The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00289

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County seafood workers served up a kettle of bitter stew Friday evening to the man who has advocated for them during these dif cult times. The allegations were thick as gumbo or thin as a knife, depending how you look at it, against Shannon Harts eld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, at a meeting that packed the courthouse annex tighter than boats on Cat Point. Mainly the audience picked from all sides at most everything Harts eld said, and accused him of supporting talk out of Tallahassee that it will take a complete bay closure to give the oyster bars a ghting chance to recover. This man here, your president, is wanting to close it down, shouted oysterman Duane Topham, and got applause. Shouts from the audience halted Harts elds attempt to detail the upcoming $4.5 million shelling program, funded through a federal shery disaster grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The funding we have coming up right now is going to be turned loose at the end of this month, he said. A lot of peoples having problems to meet standards for the 2012 year. I only have 20 people who came in and meet eligibility for the new shelling program for new paperwork. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, September 25, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 129 ISSUE 22 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com Email: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A15-A17 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index New tness center opens, A6 Estuary Day Friday afternoon The popular Estuary Day will be from 1:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 26, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. The celebration will include free educational (and fun) activities for children of all ages, free T-shirts to the rst 600 people, scavenger hunts, animal touch tanks, games and more, plus door prizes for adults who stay until the end. Dean Grubbs, faculty at Florida State University and featured on Discovery Channels Shark Week, will talk about the endangered smalltooth saw sh, and visitors can view an exhibit created by ANERR researchers about creatures that prey on oysters in Apalachicola Bay. A Shore Thang opens Friday On Sept.26-27, the Bowery Art Gallery, 149 Commerce St., and Palmetto Sky Gallery, 147 Commerce St., will present an exhibition of more than 60 local and regional artists. The show is hosted by members of the Apalachicola Artists Association. There will be an opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 26, with light refreshments and an opportunity to meet the artists. For more information, call 653-2425 or 702-467-9705. Oyster workshop Wednesday afternoon The University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team will host public meeting from 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 1, at the Apalachicola Community Center in Battery Park to gather questions and concerns regarding the current state of the oyster industry in Apalachicola Bay. For more information about the meeting or the current oyster crisis, call Karl Havens at 352-392-5870 or email khavens@u .edu. Carrabelle to hike taxes, cut reserves By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The city of Carrabelle plans to increase its property tax rate next year by a slight amount, from 8.77 to 9 mills. City commissioners also were forced to dip into reserves to bolster sluggish ad valorem revenue. Carrabelles tax base will drop from $103.2 million to $100.5 million, a decrease of $2.7 million, or by about 2.6 percent. As result, the commissioners opted for a millage close to the rollback rate, and one which will yield income from ad valorem taxes of $904,124, about $200 less than was brought in this year. Combined with rising expenses, city of cials struggled to maintain the current level of services even with See TAXES A13 Tempers are over possible bay closure DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times A Franklin County resident gestures at a town hall meeting last Friday at the courthouse annex. Below there was standing room only at the packed building. See OYSTER MEETING A7 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times 3 FCI guards red for gassing death By DARA KAM News Service of Florida In what has become a frequent exercise, Department of Corrections Secretary Mike Crews on Friday red 32 workers accused of breaking the law, including three prison guards at Franklin Correction Institution involved in the gassing death of an inmate at the Carrabelle prison four years ago. All of the workers red were on administrative leave pending a review launched earlier this summer. The housecleaning is part of the secretarys attempt to salvage the reputation of the beleaguered agency in the wake of reports of widespread abuse and corruption, whistleblower complaints and federal investigations surrounding prisoner deaths. Among the axed workers are Rollin Austin, Randall Johnson and Kevin Hampton, three former prison guards at FCI where inmate Randall See 3 FIRED A7 No change in county jobless rate By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys unemployment rate was unchanged in August, and continues to be worse than it was one year ago. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless numbers last month stayed at 5.9 percent, as just one person left the jobless rolls, lowering them to 325 people in August in search of work. This rate of joblessness occurred as the workforce grew by only nine people, from 5,483 to 5,491. The current work force has 38 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,529 workers, and the jobless rate was lower at 5.3 percent. The August jobless picture tied the county with Clay and Nassau counties, for 12th best among Floridas 67 counties. Franklin was worse for unemployment than Seminole, Broward, Sumter, Bradford, Alachua, Jefferson, St. Johns, Wakulla, Okaloosa, Walton and Monroe County, the states best at 3.9 percent. The slight rise of unemployment continued in the two other counties, Bay and Gulf, that comprise the Gulf Coast region, which had an unemployment rate of 6.1 percent in August, an increase over 6.0 percent in July. Slight upticks at the end of summer are expected in our area, said Kim Bodine, executive director of CareerSource Gulf Coast. The monthly differences are 12TH BEST The August jobless picture tied the county with Clay and Nassau counties, for 12th best among Floridas 67 counties. See JOBLESS RATE A7 KEISHA MESSER

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From staff reports Ochlocknee River paddlewheeler talk tonight The Apalachicola Area Historical Society will present a lecture this evening, Thursday, Sept. 25 on the history of an abandoned paddlewheeler in the Ochlocknee River. The lecture by Bill McLean, starts at 5:30 p.m. and is free to the public, in the Carriage House at the Raney House, 128 Market St. in Apalachicola. McLean saw a paddlewheel boat abandoned in the Ochlockonee River when he was a young boy vacationing in Florida in the years just after the Second World War. Once he retired he became interested in researching the history of this enigmatic vessel. McLean will recount his multi-year search for the origins of this vessel, a fascinating journey that led him to talk to people from Washington state to Maine to Florida. His research revealed the boat was built in Apalachicola. The story of its early years and how it came to be abandoned is a fascinating story you are sure to enjoy. Gulf/Franklin offers law enforcement program Gulf Coast State College has announced the Gulf/Franklin Campus will offer the Law Enforcement Standards Program beginning in January 2015. We are very excited about this new opportunity for students, said Loretta Costin, director of the GulfFranklin Campus. As a result of discussions with our local Public Safety Advisory Committee, we realized that there are employment opportunities for law enforcement professionals in our area. This program will provide an excellent career pathway for students who want to pursue a career in public safety. This also benets our community by providing additional trained law enforcement professionals to serve our citizens. The 770-hour vocational program is made up of training that covers basic law enforcement and high-liability areas. The Florida Department of Law Enforcementapproved curriculum prepares students for the state certication exam. Once certied, graduates can apply for any type of law enforcement position in Florida, including those in sheriff and police departments, probation and private institutions/departments. Anyone interested in this exciting and rewarding eld is encouraged to attend the free Law Enforcement Open House at 5:30 p.m. EST Thursday, Oct. 9, at the campus in Port St. Joe. Representatives from local agencies will be in attendance to promote opportunities available through a career in public safety. For questions and additional information, email Doug Boortz at dboortz@gulfcoast.edu or call 227-9670, ext. 5511. Delegation hearing Monday in Apalachicola The Franklin County state legislative delegation will host a public hearing at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Special to the Times Four people were ar rested Friday in Carrabelle in what law enforcement ofcials say was a crack down on the making of methamphetamine. On Friday afternoon, Sept. 19, ofcers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce and Carrabelle Police Department ex ecuted two search war rants on Carlton Millender Road and on Third Street West and detained the oc cupants while a search of each residence was conducted. After the search was completed, items such as methamphetamine, pseudoephedrine hydro chloride, marijuana, digital scales, lithium batteries, Coleman fuel, acetone, propane blow torch, am monium nitrate, syringe, empty pseudo ephedrine packs, and glass smoking pipes were found, all of which are consistent with the manufacture, sale and use of methamphet amine, Sheriff Mike Mock said. A 2006 Hummer was seized from the Third Street residence as contraband in violation of the Florida Con traband Forfeiture Act, and is being kept at the sheriffs ofce. Subjects ar rested during the searches were Den nis Lake Beebe, 34, and his moth er, Lake Ann McCullar, 57, from the Carlton Millender Road residence. Justin Massey, 24, and Syl via Keith, 33, were arrested from the Third Street West residence. Charges ranging from possession of listed chemicals, manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of con trolled substance, posses sion of legend drug without prescription, cultivation of cannabis, possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. Nor th Fl or ida Med ical Cent ers Inc MEDI CAL CE NTER E astp oin t nv it es yo u to at te nd a ri bb on cu tt in g ce le br at io n an d op en ho us e of ou r ne w lo ca ti on u rs da y, Oc to be r 2, 2014, 11:30 a.m. 1:30 p. m. He av y ho rs d oe uv re s Hw y 98 158 HWY 98 Eastpoin t Me dical Ce nt er Do llar Ge ner al Se minole St or age Se llers Pl aza 158 Hw y 98, Ea st po in t, F lo ri da (850) 670-8585 De ad li ne : 09 /2 9/ 14 pr io r to 10 :0 0 AM E. S. T. Del iv er y Po in t: Ap al ac hi co la Ba y Cha rt er Sc ho ol 98 12 th St re et Ap al ac hi co la FL 32 32 0 Ty pe of Re sp onse Al lo we d: Ha rd Co py On ly Is sui ng Ag en cy : Ap al ac hi co la Ba y Cha rt er Sc ho ol Sp ec ia l No ti ce s: In su ra nc e Re quire d AC CE PT IN G VE ND OR QU EST IO NS : Due Da te : 9/ 29 /1 4 pri or to 2: 00 PM E. S. T. Pr ima ry Co nt ac t Na me : Eliz abe th Ki rv in Ass is ta nt Pr in ci pa l Em ai l: e ki rv in @a bc ea gl es .o rg SUMM AR Y OF SP EC IF IC AT IO NS : Th e Ap al ac hi co la Ba y Cha rt er Sc ho ol is a ccep ti ng se al ed pr op os al s to pr ov ide Ph ys ic al Th er ap y Se rv ic es in ac co rda nc e wi th th e sp ec i ca ti on s, te rm s an d co nd it io ns st at ed he re in Th e sc op e of wo rk wi ll in cl ud e pr ov id in g ph ys ic al th er ap y se rv ic es to sp ec ia l ed uc at io n st ud en ts as sp ec i ed by th ei r In di vi du al iz ed Ed uc at io na l Pl an s (I EP ). CD 10 73 WOW 9/ 14 Be ca us e yo ur fu tu re doe sn t ret ire 4. 15 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lu es of $1 0, 000 -$ 24 ,9 99 4. 40 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lu es of $2 5, 000 -$ 99 ,9 99 4. 60 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lue s of $1 00 ,0 00 -$ 49 9, 999 In st ea d of Ce rt i ca tes of De po si t, a sk ab ou t a Si ng le Pr em ium Def er re d An nu it y wi th a Fi rs tYe ar In te r es t Bo nu s fr om Wo od me n of th e Wo rl d. Se pt em be r in it ia l gu ar a nt ee d in te re st s ra te s ar e: Se co nd ar y gu ar an te ed in te re st ra te th ro ug h sur re nd er ch arge pe ri od is 1. 00 % Mi ni mum gu ar an te ed in te re st ra te is 1. 00 % Wo od man of th e Wo rl d Li fe In su ra nc e So cie ty Ho me Of c e, Om ah a, Ne br as ka | wo od men .o rg Coupon Expir es: 10/15/2014 CODE: AP00 Law Enforcement A2 | The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 4 arrested in meth busts DENNIS BEEBE LAKE ANN M c CULLAR JUSTIN MASSEY SYL VIA KEITH Arrest REPOR T The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.SEPT. 15 Samantha Carden, 22, Alligator Point, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked, and possession of cannabis (FCSO) Timothy R. Moran, 32, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance, possession of paraphernalia, driving while license suspended or revoked, grand theft of a motor vehicle, and eeing or attempting to elude a law enforcement ofcer (APD) Timothy J. White, 31, Sopchoppy, tampering with physical evidence, and possession of cannabis (FCSO)SEPT. 16 Bradley R. Cardin, 21, Eastpoint, giving false name or identication to a law enforcement ofcer, leaving the scene of a crash with damages, driving while license revoked habitual, and violation of probation (FCSO) James E. Cooper, 49, Apalachicola, sexual battery by a familial or custodial adult (FCSO) Jaime D. Guthrie, 46, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Anthony W. Hendrixson, 32, Havana, felony violation of probation (FCSO) Ashley C. Thompson, 25, Carrabelle, fraudulent use of a credit card, and exploitation of elderly person or disabled adult (CPD)SEPT. 17 Rhine W. Abas, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Albert L. Fincher, 51, Apalachicola, withholding child support (APD) Margaret F. Murphy, 44, Carrabelle, felony violation of probation (FCSO) Buel C. Taylor, 27, Apalachicola, lewd or lascivious battery, and violation of probation (FCSO)SEPT. 18 Ellis D. Maxwell, 30, Apalachicola, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Jeffery D. Nowling, 25, Eastpoint, trespass after warning (FCSO) Kenneth R. Rucker, 57, Eastpoint, sexual battery of victim mentally incapacitated, and violation of probation (FCSO) Joshua D. Bailey, 23, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Delana Lynn Slaughter, 33, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance, possession of cannabis, possession of paraphernalia, and violation of probation (FCSO)SEPT. 19 Russell W. Cooper, 42, Apalachicola, DUI (FHP)SEPT. 20 Baron B. Broker, 19, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked, and possession of cannabis (CPD) Jeron E. Johnson, 26, Tallahassee, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO)SEPT. 21 Mary C. Shiver, 18, Eastpoint, possession of paraphernalia, possession of a controlled substance, and possession of alcohol by a person younger than 21 (FCSO) News BRIEFS See BRIEFS A14

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, September 25, 2014

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By Elinor Mount-Simmons Special to the Times This past Friday afternoon, the Seahawk Band traveled to Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville Alabama, to participate in JSUs Annual Band Day. According to band director Karl Lester, an alumnus of JSU, more than 30 high school bands from Alabama (most of them), Georgia (a few of them) and Florida (one or two), participated in this event and he was delighted to return to his alma mater with the marching Seahawks. Lester said typically, the Seahawk band goes to Band Day at FSU; however this year, that couldnt be done, so he arranged to take his band to his alma mater for their Band Day experience. According to drum majors Morgan Martin and Samantha Marxsen, it was a great experience, adding that they really enjoyed being able to play with a college and other high schools. These two, both seniors, said the trip was unforgettable and that they were thankful for the opportunity to play and feel big. Lester said this was his rst time going to his alma mater on their band day and it was a great time for all and he is looking forward to do it again soon. Big thanks to the wonderful parents who gave up their typical weekend, and instead spent it playing chauffeur and sharing this special experience with their children, and our band, students. We salute them, Patricia Hale, Lydia Countryman and Jennifer Hale. With the huge assembly of high school bands, a combined group of 1700strong, plus the 400-strong host band, the JSU football eld was over owing with more than 2000 band members all marching, blowing, and drumming at the same time, creating an amazing performance! Im sure the music created from the thunderous and booming sounds, along with the sheer numbers of so many band colleagues all on one accord, all of that is a memory the visiting Franklin County students will have for many years to come. So, big thanks to Karl Lester, too. High school classes and clubs have been holding elections recently to select the groups leadership team. Last week, the freshman class voted for their of cers and leading the class of 2018 this year will be President Matthew Turner, VicePresident Ana Aguilar, Secretary Morgan Anderson, Treasurer Josie Kriss and Historian Leah Reeder. The Beta Honor Society also has new leaders who have taken the reins of that group, and they are President Aaliyah West, Vice-President Morgan Martin and Executive Council Member Trinity Hardy. Congratulations to all these students who will represent their groups during the 201415 school year. Students who attend Franklin County Schools come from all over the community, from all walks of life, from all socio-economic groups, from all types of families and sometimes their family structure is not as solid as it should be. Because of family issues or job situations, a students home may be disrupted and they nd themselves homeless. Sure, they may live with an aunt this night, a cousin the next and possibly a family friend another, but according to the federal McKinneyVento Homeless Assistance Act, children and youth who lack a xed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence are considered homeless. Thats the information shared with me by Sandi Hengle, the homeless liaison for Franklin County schools. According to Hengle, who has been in this position for a few years now, she works with students and their families who need housing assistance. She provides them with assessments, services and referrals. Typically, school personnel give her names of students who they feel might need her services, however if you are aware of a student who needs assistance with their housing, Hengle said you can call or email her, too. She can be reached at 3230982 or at shengle@franklin. k12. .us. Thats it for the Seahawk News this week. Until next week, keep soaring. A longtime classroom teacher in the Franklin County Schools, Elinor Mount-Simmons was a regular columnist for the Times for many years. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, September 25, 2014 A Page 4 Section Hired vs. elected superintendent: A personal view There are reasons that there are few elected superintendents left in Florida and elsewhere. It does not allow for a big enough pool of applicants, quali ed people often do not want to become politicians, and it presents a Board vs. Superintendent platform often counterproductive for meaningful change and improvements. The role of school leadership seems to get blurred in a small district because we know all the parties and typically have more access than those in a big city. The superintendent has complete control over personnel and compliance with Florida Department of Education rules. The school administration has jurisdiction over operations of schools on a daily basis. The buck stops with the superintendent, however, as it relates to school operations while the school board has jurisdiction over policy and budget. Thats why a relationship between the board and the superintendent should be respectful, with both sides being vigilant in regards to academic standards, nances, personnel, safety, plant maintenance, transportations, student co-curricular activities and much more. Currently, an individual board member has no power except when they sit together at a school board meeting. Even then, three members must agree to pass something that comes up for a vote. They cannot re or hire a teacher, and they cannot direct a teacher, a coach or a principal. That power belongs to the superintendent to initiate and for the board to consider. The board can express an opinion and can ask the superintendent to address an issue or act upon one, but they have absolutely no power to make the superintendent comply with the request. However, if the school board hires the superintended and he or she fails to follow policy or something theyve been directed to do, the board has recourse. Again, there is currently no recourse unless there is gross misconduct or other serious charges. Only voters (every four years) or the governor (in the case of incompetence or criminal act) can remove a superintendent. A hired system will require the cooperation between the superintendent and the board. Voters can hold the board responsible for who they hire, resulting in no more nger pointing between the board and superintendent and a clear view of accountability. The most important directive by a board to a new superintendent would be to do their job, and then for the board and parents to let them do it. They need time to implement new initiatives, and then progress should be assessed and outcomes measured. If the superintendent does not perform while having the support of the community, then get rid of them and hire again. Base their removal on performance, and not politics. Under a hiring system a local person still will be able to apply, and I think would have a de nite advantage if they are quali ed. Our current quali cations for superintendent are low. Fortunately, we have not had to suffer a superintendent of schools who lacks a college degree but right now the current system of electing one would allow someone without a college degree, or even a high school degree, to be elected. That is a shameful thought for 2014. No one should disagree that the head of our school system should be educated. Our schools have been challenged on many fronts for many years and are a direct re ection of our changing world, economy, community and family structure. We have all the same problems of a big school district with fewer resources. I want us to have the best leadership we can possible get for the future of Franklin County. If you can think of anyone right now with the right credentials, experience, desire to run and the ability to spend $10,000 to $15,000 to run and get elected, by all means vote to elect a superintendent. Tell them to start letting people know right now of their intentions. However, if you cannot think of such a person then I urge you to support a hired superintendent. We arent losing our voice with a hired superintendent we are saying we want the best we can nd because our kids deserve them. A resident of Eastpoint who has lived in Franklin County for 37 years, Denise Dosal Butler is a former teacher, principal, school board member and college trustee. DENISE BUTLER Seahawk band performs at Jax States band day JENNIFER EDWARDS | Special to the Times Members of the Seahawk Band who travelled to Jacksonville State University. Roosevelt, Guthrie and the color of money Editors note: This is the rst article in a series by Margaret McDowell. From the redwood forest to the Gulf Stream waters This land was made for you and me. from This Land is Your Land written by Woody Guthrie Have you watched any of the PBS documentary series by Ken Burns on the Roosevelt family? The historic, grainy lm of Theodore Roosevelt traversing the countryside on horseback, inspecting a steam shovel in the Panama Canal and gesturing emphatically in political speeches is remarkable. Yosemites towering redwoods and giant sequoias and the vistas of the Grand Canyon are accessible today because of Roosevelts desire that future generations be allowed to enjoy such natural grandeur. Inserting the federal government into the role of arbiter in the 1902 coal strike, however, was a much more controversial use of executive power. Anthracite coal miners had not enjoyed a pay raise in some 20 years, and mine owners steadfastly refused to negotiate with the miners union. With the country facing the prospect of a long winter without adequate coal supplies to heat businesses and homes, Roosevelt intervened, rst by threatening to nationalize the mining companies. Eventually a 10 percent pay increase (the miners had lobbied for 20 percent) and a nine-hour day (the miners had lobbied for an eight-hour, six-day work week) was negotiated. Roosevelts use of executive authority was historic and his actions established a precedent whose shock waves are still being felt today. How so? Six years ago markets were oundering in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. The government actively entered the crisis, saving some corporations but not others; creating a bondbuying program that in uenced markets; and holding interest rates at a sustained, low level in an attempt to rein ate the stock market and to encourage mortgage lending. Today its not just the executive branch, but other governmental bodies whose actions cause markets to react. Whether we agree or disagree with particular uses of executive authority or actions by, say, the Federal Reserve vis--vis the economy, is immaterial. Indeed, government may indeed be too much with us. But to ignore the far reaching implications of government actions designed to in uence the economy is to do so at ones own economic peril, regardless of ones politics. Its not blue states or red, as in votes. Its green, as in the color of money. When Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen attempts to establish a consensus on how best to wean ourselves from quantitative easing, markets are impacted. Analyzing these actions intelligently and applying this knowledge to investment accounts is what matters. Astute portfolio managers see Shinzo Abe in the early stages of the Japanese version of quantitative easing and consider the possibility that the Japanese Fed will drive markets in the same fashion that they have been in uenced here. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook UF: Answer to restoring lost island biodiversity found in fossils By Stephenie Livingston Special to the Times Many native species have vanished from tropical islands because of human impact, but University of Florida scientists have discovered how fossils can be used to restore lost biodiversity. The key lies in organic materials found in fossil bones, which contain evidence for how ancient ecosystems functioned, according to a new study available online and in the September issue of the Journal of Herpetology. Pre-human island ecosystems provide vital clues for saving endangered island species and re-establishing native species, said lead author Alex Hastings, who conducted work for the study as graduate student at the Florida Museum of Natural History and UF department of geological sciences. Our work is particularly relevant to endangered species that are currently living in marginal environments, said Hastings, currently a postdoctoral researcher at Martin Luther See FOSSILS A14

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Our second question this week stems from the following interesting email received last week by Lois Swoboda at the Times. My name is Robert K. Bondesen Sr. and I live in San Antonio, Texas. My girlfriends name is Stacy Sue Yent; Stacy is a descendant of Peter Alexander Yent and Nancy Mays (Maze) Humphries. They settled in Florida before 1840 and were in Leon County in the 1840 Census. I have read a lot of your articles, and you seem to know a lot about the Yent family of Franklin County. I wouldnt be at all surprised if you were a Yent descendant. Of course, they lived right on the beach at Yent Bayou where modern-day U.S. Highway 98 crosses the bayou. They were farmers and sherman, salting and barreling mullet for transport to the marketplaces of the time. During the Civil War, they provided food for the Confederate forces, and their house was even burned down by a Union naval force one day about 1862 because they were providing the Confederates with food. Most all of the Yents have died out by now because of early deaths of the male children and because most of the children were female. So, even though the Cemetery in Carrabelle has plenty of markers with the Yent name, nobody is living there with the Yent surname, to my knowledge. I have read the interesting story written by Ralph Neel Samuel Yent, son of Rufus Malancton Yent, where he describes the life and times on Yent Bayou and on East Bay long before there was a Carrabelle, Eastpoint, or a bridge from Apalachicola to Eastpoint (1936). The story is in the Apalachicola Public Library if you want a copy of it. Now, my challenge to you and your extensive knowledge. I am an amateur genealogy researcher, and I have yet to nd out exactly what happened to Peter Alexander and Nancy in December 1876. What I do know is that Peter is supposed to have died on Dec. 18, 1876, and Nancy either died two days before or two days after Peter died. I suspect that one of them died, and that the other one succumbed because of the death of the other. But, I dont know that. Lois, you detective, what do you know and what can you nd out? I will be scouring local archives for information about the Yent family but the Times only has records as far back as 1899. Are there any Yent descendants left in the area or who read the Times? Call the Times at 653-8868 or email Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star .com. The Times | A5 Thursday, September 25, 2014 Calling all Yents PHOTOS BY FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT This group portrait of men and women of Apalachicola, taken about 1917, features at least three members of the Yent family. The front row includes two unknown boys. The next row, seated from left, are Dora Menke, Mattie Yent, T.B. Gibson, Carl Mohr, Angeline Yent and Eva Maddox. Standing, from left, are Florida Harding, Mary Guir (?), Louise Wing, Helen Hoppe, May Gibson and Laura Tucker. Rufus Yent and Frederick Egbert LeGallee are standing behind the ladies. Below his photo, from an unknown year, is of Josephine Yent Pickett of Carrabelle, wife of Capt. James Reynolds Pickett. Who remembers the Pixie Chop? News of Lanark Village has always had an audience. Here is the content of the Lanark News, written by Mrs. H. B. Harts eld, in the issue of Sept. 25, 1964, 50 years ago. With Deadly Dora no longer a threat to the area, the residents are resuming normal activities. Repeated hurricane warnings did cause a few Lanarkians to evacuate to the interior cities. Some antennas were lowered. Loose objects were removed and stored. Many Automobiles and boats were moved to sheltered areas or lots. Some residents put in wakeful hours on Thursday night. No perceptible damage was evidenced in our village. Only the large windows were boarded or taped. We are thankful for the cool temperature Dora brought in her wake. With Mr. and Mrs. James Carney departure for New York, management of the Club restaurant has been taken over by Miss Eva Papadopoulos and Max of Carrabelle formerly of the White Kitchen and the Pixie Chop. Miss Eva is a well-known resident of the old timers here. She has served in that capacity when the Club rst opened. It has come to the attention of this writer that many residents are disturbed by loud television broadcasting beyond the premises. With windows open in our closely related units. It would be appreciated to consider peaceful coexistence of our neighbors during late hours. Let us abide by doing unto others, as we would be done by. Here is this weeks rst question: What was Pixie Chop? Do you remember? Please call the Times at 653-8868 or email Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@ star .com. President Lyndon Johnson surveys damage from Hurricane Dora in Jacksonville. PHOTOS BY FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT The White Kitchen is seen in this undated photo. Bay View Nursery credit to the general area The following articles are from the front page of the Times Sept. 25, 1964, 50 years ago. Things were looking up around the county. NEW PLANT, SHRUB NURSERY OPENS IN EASTPOINT Along with Eastpoints other recent signs of progress (including Municipal Park, a new elementary school, its own telephone exchange and the new bridge to St. George Island), the town can also boast of a new plant and shrub nursery which is almost completed and even now serving the public. It will be known as Bay View Nursery and is owned by Mrs. John (Vera) Fabbri. It is located a little east on the old Ferry Landing Road, which, in turn, is slightly north of Maudes Caf. The nursery came into being about a year ago when Vera Fabbri decided she would put into practical channels and use her love of plants, owers and shrubs, plus a very lucky green thumb. Mr. and Mrs. Fabbri moved to Eastpoint several years ago from Mississippi, after deciding this area had all they required in natural resources, mainly land on which to work, water, shing and good climate. Shortly after settling into their trailer home and the main clearing was accomplished, Mrs. Fabbri began beautifying the surroundings. It was not long before friends and neighbors began stopping to comment upon and admire the results. One step led to another and the present result is Bay View Nursery, which is a credit not only to Apalachicola and Eastpoint but to the general area, all of which it hopes to serve. Bay View Nursery plans to supply seeds, bulbs, plants and shrubs from the premises as well as take special orders for other requirements. Mrs. Fabbri mixes all soil and other components used for potting and planting according to speci ed formulas. The entire project of a nursery is a hit or miss idea. Mrs. Fabbri relies heavily on the service and counsel not only of the Franklin County Agent and helpful literature available through that of ce, but also numerous other nationally recognized authorities on the subject in general. After making the decision to open a nursery, she invited a state inspector from the Department of Agriculture to visit their premises, and thoroughly check the soil, plants and shrubs then in growth. During the inspectors visit, he made many suggestions as to how a nursery should be run and maintained in accordance with their regulations. The inspectors ideas have borne fruit and the result is Bay View Nursery. It is hoped that the general public will avail itself of this new facility and with this announcement of its opening go all good wishes for success. NEEDED A few civic minded citizens to form a Cemetery Association for the care of our cemeteries. A little time and a little administrative work is self-supporting. Organize and submit names to the City Of ce. DANCING CLASS Mrs. Ron Bloodworth will hold registration for her dancing classes on Wednesday, September 30 at 4 p.m. at the Community House. This year she will offer classes in ballet, tap, modern dance and a special class for preschool children in creative dance. And from the Times Nov. 2, 1914 edition, this letter to the editor serves as a follow-up to last weeks Chasing Shadows article on Oyster Day AN ECHO FROM LIBERTY CO. M. C. Herndon writes of the glorious Oyster Day On receiving the invitation to an oyster opening in Apalachicola, I accepted it with pleasure, and on Tuesday Sept. 22, took a car for Hosford station where I boarded the A.N. for Oyster City. We were welcomed at the station by Messrs. Bobbitt, Ramsey, Rice and others. The good people of the city did all they could to make our visit pleasant. Wednesday morning we accepted an invitation to take an automobile ride over the city and surrounding country followed by a boat ride on the bay. The weather was pleasant and these rides were enjoyed by all. At noon, a large assembly of people met at Lafayette Park and enjoyed an address by C. H. B. Floyd, one of Floridas most noted orators. He spoke chie y on the prospects of Apalachicola and stated that it is the best oyster city in the country. He predicted the time will come when she will extend her bounds so as to include Carrabelle and a portion of Liberty County. He predicted out the fact that the man who thought out the plan for making arti cial ice in his opinion second only to the man who discovered re and he had lived in Apalachicola and from this, he philosophized that Apalachicola may in time become the seat of government. At one oclock, dinner was announced. Fish and oysters were served in numerous ways and great abundance. The city brass band rendered some good music, and at 3:30 p.m., a ball game was called between the city team and Port Saint Joe. The game was interesting, ending with a score of six to one in favor of the home team. At 7:30 p.m., we left for home feeling the good people of Apalachicola had done all they could to make our visit pleasant, and we can truthfully say that we have never been treated better and we sincerely wish that the that the people may prosper and that the prediction of Mr. Floyd may be ful lled. In the Sept. 11 Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times, Chasing Shadows republished an article entitled Who called whom a dam fool? With that article, a photograph was included that was incorrectly identi ed as being of a man who was featured prominently in the story, Apalachicola attorney R. Don McLeod Jr., who lived from 1882 to 1961. The man who was pictured was that mans father, Roderick Donald McLeod Sr., a Confederate and Judge (R. Don McLeod) who lived from 1848-1930 and was a Wakulla County Judge 1900-1928. R. Don McLeod Jr. was a prominent Apalachicola trial lawyer, county attorney, Apalachicola city attorney, and state legislator in the 1930s. He was instrumental in getting funding for the rst John Gorrie Bridge linking Apalachicola and Eastpoint. He wrote a column for The Apalachicola Times in the late 1930s and early 1940s, rst as Don McLeods Comment, and later known as Rhyme and Reverie. The correct R. Don McLeod is pictured here. Many thanks to R. Don McLeod II for bringing this error to our attention. CORRECTION

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Fitness enthusiasts, as well as those considering the benets of getting into shape, last week celebrated Apalachicolas newest t ness center, created in part nership with the city. The afternoon-long grand opening Sept. 17 of the new Forgotten Coast Fitness and Wellness Center culminated in the snipping of a red rib bon by Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson. The center is housed in three rooms of the city complex, at the site of the former Apalachicola High School. The tness center came about after its predecessor at Fourth Street and Avenue D shut its doors. Fitness ac tivists created a not-for-prof it corporation, leased space from Franklins Promise, the citys agent, at the com plex, and set about with volunteers to refurbish and repaint the site in the space of three weeks in April. Your collaboration with the city is a prime example of how the city serves best when it partners with the community, said Johnson, for whom the entire complex is named. Its times like this that are most enjoyable when the city collaborates with the community to establish such partnerships that represent the truest form of govern ment by the people. Johnson congratulated the centers organizers for nding the perfect solution to keeping the doors of the tness center opened and operating within the Frank lin County community. Your drive and commitment to rise above the closure of the center at the old location has resulted in a public facil ity designed to meet the t ness and physical needs of the community at large. What you have accom plished through this en deavor has already greatly benetted the community, while establishing a lasting relationship with the city, he said. Ed Aguiar, a key volun teer in the effort, anked the mayor during the ribbon cutting, and later addressed the audience. This has been an in credible experience for all of us involved, he said. Working hard we all met our neighbors and formed friendships along the way. You witness this when visit ing the center and watching members as they work out together, share health tips, or just enjoy the social as pect that many mentioned they missed. The accomplishment of reaching our goal started with the volunteers who worked on our member ship drive, construction, painting, and moving the equipment, and continues with the ongoing member ship who keep our center open, Aguiar said. It ap pears friendships formed in hard work and sweat during construction have only got ten stronger as we continue hard work and sweat in the name of tness. The center is where the former BP ofces used to be, and the group pays a share of the utilities as part of their rental agreement. Aguiar and his wife Kate were in strumental in the effort to carpet the blue linoleum oor, and were later joined by volunteers who repainted the rooms. The center boats of 21 Cybex machines, three ellipticals, ve treadmills, four stationary bicycles, more than 3,000 pounds of free weights, a squat rack and incline weight benches, Smith machine, Cable cross over machine, Smith balls and aerobic equipment and even a boxing heavy bag. In the back is a water l tration system as well as a wall of plaques, each bear ing the name of a founding benefactor who prepaid their membership fees to provide the seed money for the new center to come about. Monthly fees are $35 plus tax, and hours from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekends. St. George Islands Sometimes Its Hotter donated a healthful spread of foods for the event. Per sonal trainers Eric Olson and Belinda Wharton were on hand to meet people, as was April Patriotis, who offers light and more strenu ous cardio classes, as well as kickboxing and Pilates classes at 8:15 a.m. Mon days, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Wharton teach es classes in tness classes as well, along with Pilates and full body workouts Mon day through Thursday. Yoga classes taught by Kathy Jansen soon are to be added to the schedule as well. Aguiar said the gym now boasts of 140 members, down from a high of 168 in July, but that he expects numbers to rise during fall and winter. New years resolutions should help as well, he said. Local A6 | The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 PUB LI C NO TI CE OF AT TO RNE YCLIENT SE SS IO N NO TI CE IS HEREBY GIVEN th at pu rs ua nt to Se ct io n 286.011(8), Flo ri da St at ut es, th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mmi ss io ne rs wi ll me et in Ex ec ut ive Se ss io n at 34 Fo rb es St re et, Ap al ac hico la Flo ri da on Tu es da y, Oct ob er 7, 2014, at 3:3 0 p. m., or as soo n th er ea e r as th e is su e ma y be he ar d, to re cei ve th e ad vi ce of co un se l co nc er nin g th e fol lo wi ng pe nd in g li ti ga ti on : e St Jo e Co mp an y v. Fr an kl in Co un ty Ca se No 2013-CA -435, Fr an kl in Co un ty Cir cu it Co ur t. Co un ty At to rn ey o ma s M. Sh ul er Co un ty La nd Us e At to rn ey Da vi d e ri aq ue Ch ai rm an Ch er yl Sa nd er s, Co un ty Co mm iss io ne r Pi nk i Ja ck el Co un ty Co mm iss io ne r No ah Loc kl ey Jr ., Co un ty Co mmi ss io ne r Wi ll ia m Ma ss ey an d Co un ty Co mmi ss io ne r Jo se ph S mo ke y Pa rri sh wi ll be at te nd in g th e Ex e cu ti ve Se ss io n. e en ti re Ex ec ut ive Se ss io n wi ll be tr ans cr ib ed by a cer ti e d co ur t re po rt er an d l ed wi th t he Co un ty Cl er k. e tr ans cr ip t of th e Ex ec ut ive Se ss io n wi ll be ma de a pa rt of th e pu bl ic re co rd up on co nc lu sio n of th e ab ov e-r ef er en ce d li ti ga ti on PU BL IC NO TI CE TO : CO MME RC IA L BU SI NES SE S & CO NTR AC TO RS FRO M: FO ND A DA VI S, DI RE CT OR DA TE : SEPT EM BE R 12 20 14 SUB JE CT : AM NEST Y DA Y IT IS TH E PO L IC Y OF T HE FR AN KL IN COU NT Y BO AR D OF COU NT Y CO MM IS SIO NE RS T HA T DE BR IS WHIC H IN CL UD ES C& D, WHIT E GOOD S & YA RD TR AS H, BROUG HT IN BY CO MME RI CI AL BU SI NE SS ES CO NTR AC TO RS OR BU IL DE RS WIL L NO T BE AM NE ST Y ON AM NE ST Y DA YS NO TI CE OF INTENT TO CO NS ID ER AD OP TI ON OF A CO UNT Y OR DI NA NC E No ti ce is gi ve n th at on th e 7t h da y of Oct ob er 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (E T), in th e co ur tr oo m at th e Co ur th ou se An ne x, lo ca te d at 34 Fo rb es St re et, Ap al ac hico la Flo ri da th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mm iss io ne rs sha ll co nd uc t a pu bl ic he ar in g to co ns ider ado pt in g a co un ty ord in an ce en ti tl ed : AN OR DI NA NC E OF FR ANKLIN CO UNT Y, FL OR ID A PR OH IB ITIN G THE PA RKIN G OF MO TOR VE HI CLES, CAMP ERS, WA TER VESS ELS AND TR AILERS ON PUB LI C PR OP ER TY AN D PUB LI C ST REE TS IN DE SIG NA TED N O PA RKIN G AR EA S AT AL LI GA TO R PO INT FL OR ID A; PR OV ID IN G FO R TO WIN G AT THE OW NER S EXP ENS E; PR OV ID IN G FO R AD DI TI ON AL NON -CRIMIN AL AND CRIMIN AL PE NA LT IES AND PR OV ID IN G AN EFFECTIVE DA TE. e pu bl ic is in vi te d to at te nd th e pu bl ic he ar in g. o se pe rs on s wh o desir e to sp ea k re ga rd in g th e ado pt io n of th e ord in an ce ma y ap pe ar at th e he ar in g an d sha ll be he ar d. e prop os ed ord in an ce is on l e wi th an d ma y be vi ew ed at th e o ce of th e Cl er k of Co ur t at th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Co ur th ou se wh ic h is lo ca te d at 33 Ma rk et St re et, Ap al ac hico la Flo ri da e me et in g ro om is ha nd ic ap acces si bl e; ho we ve r, th os e pe rs on s wh o ma y re qu ir e sp ec ia l as si st an ce to at te nd th e pu bl ic me et in g mu st ma ke ar ra nge me nt s in ad va nc e by ca ll in g dep ut y cl er k Mi ch ae l Mo ron at 850-653-8161, x100 at le as t tw o bu sin es s da ys in ad va nc e of th e me et in g. An y pe rs on wh o ma y desir e to ch all en ge th e ou tc om e of th e me et in g is re sp on si bl e fo r re co rd in g a ve rb at im tr ans cr ip t of th e me et in g. Health class offered at Holy Family Special to The Times Franklin County Senior Citizens and the Arthritis Foundation are offering a Walk With Ease class at the Apalachicola Senior Center, in the Holy Fam ily Senior Services build ing at 2103 Dr. Frederick Humphries St., beginning Monday, Oct. 6. This program was de veloped to help people with or without arthritis form walking groups whose goals are safety and suc cess. If you can be on your feet for 10 minutes without increased pain, you proba bly can participate success fully, and the program can be modied to meet your needs. Groups meet for six weeks, three times per week. Sessions will be on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning at 11 a.m. Each session lasts about one hour. Enrollment is limited to 12 people and is free. For more information or to enroll, call Donna Thompson at 323-0168. New tness center a true partnershipPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLER ST EIN | The Times Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, left, and Ed Aguiar, right, frame the crowd listening to the opening remarks. The new facility offers a mirrored wall to observe exercise. Shirah Patriotis arranges some of the exercise equipment in the room where her mom, April, teaches Pilates and aerobics classes. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson cuts the ribbon, accompanied by Ed Aguiar.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 Pe t of th e We ek We ha ve se ve n, 8 we ek old La b mi x pupp ie s ava il abl e fo r adop ti on Th er e ar e 5 fe ma le s an d 2 ma le s. Th re e ye ll ow an d fo ur bla ck Th ey ar e ha pp y, so ci al ro ll ypo ll y ba bi es an d al l ne ed a hom e. Th ey wi ll be re ad y to go be gin nin g ne xt we ek bu t yo u ma y ad op t no w an d ta ke hom e whe n th ey ha ve be en sp ay ed an d ne ut er ed Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at ely ne ed ed to so ci al iz e al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts. We ar e al way s lo ok in g fo r pe ople wi ll in g to bri ng on e of ou r an im al s int o th ei r ho me to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can spa re wo ul d be gr ea tl y ap pr ec iat ed Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hu ma ne Soc iet y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po int. Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bs it e at www .f or go tt en pe ts or g to se e mor e of ou r adop tab le pe ts Wedding Law and Skipper married last Thursday Matt Law and Janice Skipper were joined in holy matrimony on September 18. Capt. Gill Autrey performed the ceremony aboard the Lily below the osprey nests in the St. Marks River. The brides son, Jericho Skipper, gave Janice away. Family members and friends were along. Matt and Janice will make their home in Panama City but will visit Apalachicola often as Matt is a frequent performer at the Bowery Station. Cinnamon Smith, James Murray to wed James Murray and Cinnamon Smith to be married Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014 at 2 p.m. at their home on 2400 Highway 67 in Carrabelle. Robert Murray will conduct the ceremony. The bride to be is the daughter of Robbie Smith and the late Jesse G. Smith Sr. The future groom is son of the late Jean and Irvin Murray. A reception will follow, featuring live entertainment by High Road. Come as you are, no seating plan. All friends and family invited to attend. Wedding Special to The Times You can make the Crooked River Lighthouse legendary. Write an original song about the lighthouse. The Carrabelle Lighthouse Association is offering a $200 cash prize plus a coastal holiday package for the best song written about our local maritime heritage. The name Crooked River Lighthouse must be distinctly heard in the song. Franklin Countys colorful history of the Forgotten Coast is full of fascinating true stories that can easily spark the creation of lyrics hurricanes and fallen lighthouses, shipwrecks and survivors Guidelines are that the song is limited to no more than four minutes, and must reect our local maritime heritage of the North Florida Gulf coast (and include Crooked River Lighthouse in the lyrics). Send the $10 entry fee, along with your name, telephone number, email address, a lyrics sheet and a good quality MP3 format recording of your song on CD (No videos) to Carrabelle Lighthouse Association, Box 373, Carrabelle, FL 32322. Or bring your entry materials Thursday through Sunday, between noon to 5 p.m., to the lighthouse, 1975 U.S. 98 West, Carrabelle Beach, FL 32322. Delivery deadline is Saturday, Oct. 4. The songwriter retains all rights to the song, after giving Crooked River Lighthouse full permission to use it, always with full credit to author. Top-ranking songs will be featured, and the winner will be announced, at the lighthouses annual birthday celebration Lantern Fest, on Saturday, Oct. 25. You may even get air time on WOYS Oyster Radio. Call 697-2732 for museum information or visit www. crookedriverlighthouse. org. Tripp Braswell turns 2 Tripp Braswell celebrates his second birthday today, Thursday Sept. 25, 2014. He is the son of Scooter Braswell and Amanda Smith, of Apalachicola. His maternal grandparents are Arthur and Janice Smith, of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are Wallace and the late Betty Mae Braswell, of Apalachicola. We love you more than words could ever explain, little man, and you bring so much joy to our lives. Happy 2nd Birthday! Birthday Lily turns 3 Heather Henderson and Dakota Massey have their hands full with a beautiful, smart 3-year old. On Saturday, Sept. 6, Lily Henderson celebrated with her friends and family at a Dora the Explorer party at the park. Lily is the granddaughter of Donna and Donnie Harcus, of White City; Michael Henderson, of Apalachicola; and Nita and Rod Massey, of Carrabelle. She is the great-granddaughter of Edna and the late Bill Henderson, of Eastpoint. We love our Lily bug so much. Thank you for making our lives and hearts so full of joy. Birthday Special to The Times This is a big year for author Michael Lister, his 20th anniversary as a writer, and one that will see the publication of three new novels, one from each of his three main series characters, John Jordan, Jimmy Soldier Riley, and Merrick McKnight. The last, A Certain Retribution, featuring ex-reporter McKnight, is the rst in his 20-year career to be set in Gulf County where he lives. Im so excited to nally have a book set in the community and county where I live, Lister said. It was so much fun to write, using real places and even honoring a few close friends along the way by putting ctitious versions of them in the book. Listers new novel, A Certain Retribution, is a sequel to 2010s Thunder Beach. The mystery thriller love story is about someone killing cops with their own guns. On their way to nding out who and why, McKnight and Reggie Summers discover theres no justice quite like small-town justice and sometimes the best you can hope for is a certain kind of retribution. For his anniversary as a novelist, Lister sets the novel in his hometown. Wewahitchka, which means water eyes, because of the two nearly perfectly round lakes in the center of town, is a wild, untamed region backwoods, dirt roads, untouched, unspoiled, in some ways unwelcoming. This brutally beautiful place is home to the legendary Dead Lakes, world famous Tupelo honey, and now A Certain Retribution. In keeping with the novels 20-year theme, it opens with these words I see her for the rst time in over twenty years the night before shell be arrested. This anniversary year follows a year in which Lister won his second Florida Book Award. Listers ability to masterfully combine dark, vivid settings with tough yet fallible characters rivals that of Michael Koryta and Dennis Lehane, wrote the Florida Book Review. Michael Lister is a giant talent with a unique vision. His landmark John Jordan Mystery series is a treasure of contemporary literature suspenseful, provocative and unsettling, wrote Florida Weekly. Special to The Times At their Sept. 16 meeting, Alan Pierce, the county director of administrative services, introduced county commissioners to Jenna Harper, the recently hired manager of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. She succeeds Lee Edmiston, who has retired and now works as a consultant on special projects for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Harper, who holds a bachelors of marine biology and a masters of zoology from the University of New Hampshire, has worked at ANERR since July 2002. She began as a research assistant and in 2008 was promoted to research coordinator, a post which she holds to the rpesent day. In 2011, she became co-manager of ANERR, supervising aquatic preserve staff within the northwest region of the Florida Coastal Ofce, In May, she was promoted to ANERRs assistant manager. THE BOOKSIGNING A special signing for A Certain Retribution will take place at the No Name Cafe, (which is mentioned in the book), this Saturday, Sept. 27 from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. EDT. Everyone is invited to attend the event, at 306 Reid Ave, Port St Joe. For more about Michael Lister and his books, visit www.MichaelLister.com Lister sets new novel in Gulf County MICHAEL LISTER L OI S SW O B O D A | The Times Jenna Harper Harper to lead ANERR Calling on all singers and songwriters! Society

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The Times | A9 Thursday, September 25, 2014 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Fi rs t Ass em bl y of Go d Ap al ac hi co la Fl or id a Pa st or s, Lar ue O. (R ud y) & De bb ie Pr esc ot t A "L IF E CE NT ER FO R YO U AN D YO UR FA MI LY 26 7 Br ow ns vi ll e Ro ad Ap al ach ic ol a, FL 32 32 0 O: (8 50 ) 65 390 46 H: (8 50 ) 65 386 51 SU ND AY SCH OO L 10 :0 0A M SU ND AY SE RV IC E 11 :0 0A M & 6: 00 PM WE DN ES DA Y SE RV IC E 7: 00 PM Faith Martha Gordon Strickland went to be with the lord on Sunday, Sept. 21, 2014, at Bay Medical Center. A memorial service and visitation for her will take place Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Apalachicola, 46 9th Street. Visitation will be 10 to 10:30 a.m. Service will begin at 10:30 a.m. Martha was born on Sept. 9, 1941, at Pearl City, now known as 13-Mile to Oscar Boutilier Gordon and Lucille Reese Gordon, who preceded her in death. She was also preceded in death by her beloved infant son, and niece Charlotte Bryant Kent. Martha leaves behind to cherish her memory her sister Geneva (Fred) Bryant, and son Brad; brother Rolf (Linda) Gordon and children Rolf and Gabe; and greatnieces Diana, Christina and Whitney Kent. She also leaves behind a legacy of her love of God to her six children and 15 grandchildren, Shirley (Jimmy) Sapp and children Jody, Maranda, Erica and Colton; Barbara (Kelly) Butler and children Ciera and Brice; Marcus (Donna Kay) Strickland and children Sarah and Spencer; Jeff (Cassie) Strickland, and children Noah, Lydia and Eva; Trisha (James) Pendleton and children Allie, Tyler and Taylor; Reggie Strickland and daughter Katie; and one great grandson Justin Massey II, along with a host of other aunts, uncles and cousins. Martha G. Strickland MARTHA G. STRICKLAND Rebecca Metcalf Matson, 80, of Minneapolis, Minnesota and recently St. George Island, died of cancer Saturday, Sept. 13, 2014, at N. C. Little Hospice in Edina, Minneapolis. Rebecca was born July 3, 1934, in Primghar, Iowa. She graduated from Iowa State University in 1956 with a bachelors of science in journalism. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority and Theta Sigma Phi, a professional journalism honorary society. In 1956, she married Jim Matson, of Minneapolis. She worked as a reporter for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from 1957-59 when he served in the Army. Rebecca served on several boards, including Grace Hill Settlement House in St. Louis, Missouri. She was a member of the Junior League of Minneapolis. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, in Apalachicola, and made many close friends on St. George Island and in Apalachicola. She is survived by her husband of 58 years, Jim; and four daughters and their families: Anne (Brian) Marty, and Elizabeth and Daniel, from St. Louis, Missouri; Mary (Stuart) Latta, and Carolyn and James, from Virginia; Margaret (John) Peters, and Michael, Katherine, Thomas and Joseph, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: and Catherine (Matt) Dubbe, and Sam and Tessa, from Minneapolis. Her favorite pastime was walking the beach on St. George Island, searching for shells. She was an avid and committed member of Apalachicola Riverkeeper. Rebecca loved cooking, especially her signature recipes for pasties, inherited from her greatgrandparents who were lead miners in Yorkshire, England. Parsnips were a required ingredient. She loved to travel throughout the world, and especially enjoyed exploring food markets in foreign cities seeking out new and exotic foods. A Celebration of Life Service will be held Thursday afternoon, Sept. 25 at St. Stephens Episcopal Church in Edina, Minnesota. Graveside service will be held Friday afternoon, Nov. 28 at Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Primghar, Iowa. Memorials preferred to Pennys Worth Thrift Shop, 195 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32329.Rebecca Metcalf Matson REBECCA M. MATSON Jeanine Dykes Peterson, 55, of Apalachicola, passed away Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, in Panama City. A native and lifelong resident of Apalachicola, she worked in the seafood industry. She was a loving wife and mother, and was a member of Living Waters Assembly of God Church where she sang on the Worship Team. She was preceded in death by her dad, Willie Dykes, and her siblings, G. W. Dykes, Marvin Dykes and Glenn Dykes. She is survived by her husband, Lawrence Peterson, of Apalachicola; her son, Stephen W. Peterson, of Apalachicola; two sisters, Willie Lee Collie, of Georgia, and Dora Coulter (Arthur), of Apalachicola; her mother, Johnnie M. Dykes, of Apalachicola; sister-in-law Ruby Dykes; and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were Saturday afternoon, Sept. 20 at Living Waters Assembly of God Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. The visitation was at the church on Friday evening, Sept. 19. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Jeanine Dykes Peterson Obituaries Maybe we will see you for lunch this afternoon. Chow line forms at noon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, 201 NW Ave. F. Sarge and his helpers will have a nice meal prepared for us. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the desk. Enjoy! There was a nice turnout of about 88 people for the monthly covered dish dinner on Sunday that was hosted by District 2 County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. We pigged out on baked chicken, meatloaf, mashed potatoes and other vegetables. All the food came from Hog Wild, and some of us brought salads and desserts. The Revival Railroad played for our listening pleasure. What an afternoon. The October covered dish will be on Sunday, Oct. 19. I called Jean Barnhill Sunday. She sounded good. Jean was a good friend and neighbor. Her and her late husband, Bob, built and lived in the cream-colored house on East Pine Street for years. As a fundraiser Jean would have soup and sandwich lunches. We love you, Jean, very much. Also talked to Jim Bove Sunday,. He is getting stronger, and he and Mary Ann will be here soon. Called Dot Bless to tell her how things went at the covered dish. She is recovering slowly. We must pray for her, Jim Bove and Bob Dietz and pray that they have a full recovery. On Saturday, Sept. 27, many of us will gather at the Crooked River Grille to celebrate Gene Sewells 96th birthday. Things will get poppin at 11:30 a.m. Mark you calendars for Sunday, Oct. 5. The Railroad Revival will be at the 10:30 a.m. service at the Lanark Community Church. They will also be appearing at the pavilion in Carrabelle next to the re department, with date to be announced later. For more information, call 697-4195 or 850-556-3771. We just have three more shopping months till Christmas. Attention: Hours for hamburger and chips night on Fridays at Camp Gordon Johnston Legion Post 82 have been changed back to 5 to 7 p.m., as has pizza night on Sundays. No smoking in the lounge during these hours either night. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and have a safe and great fall season. Until next time, God bless America and our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.UMC hosts sh fry Saturday Carrabelle United Methodist Church will be having a sh fry this Saturday, Sept. 27 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street in Carrabelle, next to the re station. A donation of $7.50 per plate includes three sides; drinks and baked goods also available for sale. Dine there or carry out. Bring your family, friends and neighbors to enjoy good Christian music, shop our crafts and other items for sale, and experience the love and joy of Christian fellowship. All monies go directly to Gods Ministry for the Needy. Come and receive a blessing.Revival Railroad to perform Oct. 5 On Sunday, Oct. 5 at 10:30 a.m., Revival Railroad is coming to Lanark Village at The Community Church on Spring Street. Mark your calendar for the rst bluegrass picking and praying for revival tour. Revival Railroad will also be appearing at the pavilion next to the re department in Carrabelle. Bring a lawn chair). Watch for upcoming dates. Everyone is welcome to join us in worship. For information, contact 697-4195 or (850) 556-3771. Gene Sewells 96th to be celebrated Saturday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS Julia Thompson family The family of Julia P. Thompson would like to express our sincere gratitude to family and friends during this difcult time. We very much appreciate the cards, owers, kind words and visits that were paid to us all. Card of THANKS Gone but not forgotten Willa Bennett, the sister of the Bennett familys Oscar Bennett Jr, Katherine Bennett, Columbus Bennett, Norman Bennett, Bernice Bennett and Mary Bennett, are all gone on now, but Eula Bennett Rochelle, the Lord be good to me to let me live 74 years. Im going to trust in the Lord as I live and always pray that the Lord keep me a long time. He be good to me. Eula & Family In MEMOR Y Special to the Times As scammers continue to target the customers of util ity service providers across the country, Duke Energy is reminding its customers not to fall victim to fraudulent activity. Unfortunately, we continue to receive reports across our service areas of individuals impersonating Duke Energy employees to steal money from our customers, said Gayle La nier, Duke Energys senior vice president of customer services. Based on current events, here is a scam reported from Duke Energys service areas: Phone Payment Scam Un der this long-running scam, a customer receives an un solicited phone call from an individual who falsely claims to be a Duke Energy rep resentative. The scammer warns that Duke Energy will disconnect the customers electric service if the cus tomer fails to make a pay ment usually within a short timeframe: The thief instructs the customer to purchase a Green Dot or other branded pre-paid debit card widely available at retail stores then call him or her back to supposedly make a payment to Duke Energy. The scammer asks the customer for the prepaid debit cards receipt num ber and PIN number, which grants instant access to the cards funds. Some of these criminals also use caller ID spoong to replicate Duke Energys customer service number. They can also be come aggressive when ques tioned about the legitimacy of their calls, and some speci cally target Spanish-speak ing customers, restaurants and other small businesses. In reality, Duke En ergy never asks or requires customers who have delin quent accounts to purchase a prepaid debit card to avoid electric service disconnec tion. Customers can make payments online, by phone, automatic bank draft, mail or in person. Duke Energy customers who have delin quent accounts also receive notications from the com pany prior to electric service disconnection never just a single notication one hour before disconnection. Duke Energy reminds customers to guard against fraud

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, September 25, 2014 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TIDE TA BL ES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1:17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0:27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABEL LE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0:03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Se pt 25 85 71 20 % Fr i, Se pt 26 84 73 20 % Sa t, Se pt 27 84 74 60 % Sun, Se pt 28 83 74 60 % Mo n, Se pt .29 83 74 60 % Tu es Se pt 30 84 73 80 % We d, Oc t. 01 85 73 20 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Autumn Days are Here! Sh op wi th us fo r al l yo ur hu nt in g su ppl ie s www .shopb wo .c om SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Inshore shing is almost at a peak this week. With better weather conditions, we should see an improvement for the rest of the month. Topwater trout catches are almost the norm with good red sh in the mix. St. Joe Bay is recovering very well after a long, hot summer lled with scallop hunters. Many of our shallow water spots or ats are producing great sh such as trout, red sh and ounder. Bridge and pier shing is producing good red sh and some smaller Spanish mackerel in the early hours of the day. Special to The Times Because of reports of people taking fawn deer out of the wild, the FWC is reminding people the practice is potentially deadly for the fawn in addition to being illegal. People take the fawn, thinking they are helping, when, in fact, they are causing the deer great harm. The fawn will become imprinted with no fear of humans or dogs, which will eventually result in the death of the deer, said Jerry Shores, an FWC law enforcement investigator. I have also seen people give the fawns the wrong milk replacement. This too can result in the death of the fawn. Shores said the reason people give for taking a fawn is that they believe it was abandoned by the mother. This is rarely the case. You should never remove a fawn from the woods unless it is con rmed the mother is dead. It is common for the mother to leave the fawn hidden while she feeds a distance away. Those who are concerned about a fawn left alone have a legal option: Anyone suspecting a fawn has been orphaned should call 888-404-FWCC (3922). That number is also the one to call to report a deer in captivity or other wildlife violation concerns. It is illegal to remove a fawn from the wild plain and simple, said Shores. We investigate all these reports, and if we nd a fawn at a private dwelling, the person who seized the deer can be criminally cited. The FWC then has to move the deer to the care of a licensed wildlife rehabilitator until the animal can be released back into the wild. The rehabbers licensed by FWC have more than 1,000 hours caring for wildlife and are experts in raising animals with little or no imprinting, Shores said. Special to The Times The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has announced the Florida Forest Service is accepting applications for the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program. Invasive cogongrass spreads quickly and aggressively and can cause long-term problems if left untreated, said State Forester Jim Karels. In addition to reducing the productivity and value of forests and rangelands, it can greatly increase the risk and severity of wild re. Cogongrass is an invasive, non-native grass, which occurs in Florida and several other southeastern states. Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree regeneration, growth and survival, as well as wildlife habitat, native plant diversity, forage quality and property values. They also increase the risk of wild res and alter re behavior. The Cogongrass cost-share program is offered for non-industrial private lands in all Florida counties. It provides reimbursement of 50 percent of the cost to treat Cogongrass infestations for two consecutive years. Applicants who wish to conduct treatments in 2014 may apply from through Oct. 3.. Applicants who wish to conduct treatments in 2015 may apply from Oct. 6 through Feb. 27, 2015. To learn more about this program and obtain an application form, contact a local Florida Forest Service of ce or visit www. FloridaForestService.com All qualifying applications will be evaluated and ranked for approval. This program is supported through a grant from the U.S. Forest Service. The Florida Forest Service manages more than one million acres of public forest land while protecting 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wild re. For more information about the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www. FreshFromFlorida.com Rattlesnake master (Eryngium aquaticum) is a native species of owering plant in the carrot family, commonly called marsh rattlesnake master, corn-snakeroot, bitter snakeroot, and marsh eryngo. This plant, also known as a sea holly, is native to eastern North America including North Florida. Rattlesnake master grows up to six feet tall and branches randomly toward the top. The owers are round central globes surrounded by pointy leaves called bracts. When young they are white, but show a blue tinge as they mature. It tolerates saturated soils and periodic ooding. Native Americans used it for assorted medical purposes. The Cherokee used it for tea to treat nausea, as did many groups to treat gastrointestinal complaints. The Choctaws used it as a remedy for snakebite and gonorrhea. Other groups used it to treat worms, and some attributed magical powers to the plant. Today, rattlesnake master is cultivated as a garden ower and commercially use as a cut ower. It can be dried and used in permanent arrangements. It is also used in homeopathic medicine. The plant is robust, but shortlived, lasting only two to four years in the garden. The owers attract a wide variety of pollinators and maintain their showy appearance for several weeks. While this plant can grow in a variety of soils, it must have wet feet at all times and prefers full sun. Plants grown in soil that is too rich or in too much shade, become leggy and op. BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Rattlesnake master a spectacular sea holly Taking fawns from wild bad for young deer US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE | Special to The Times Cogongrass cost-share program available to landowners Page 10

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Running for the Bay Marathon Su nda y Oc to ber 26, 2014 In beautiful Ap alachic ola, FL Fu ll Ma ra thon, Half Ma ra thon, 10K 5K & Ul tr a50K Registration Now Open! Re gi st er online at running fo rt heba y. co m fr iends@running fo rt heba y. co m Run or Wa lk CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, September 25, 2014 A Page 11 Section SCOTT COLLINS MACKENZIE WILLIAMS Williams named hoops coach, Collins AD By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Former Apalachicola High School Shark basketball standout Mackenzie Williams will succeed Michael Sweatt as coach of the Franklin County Seahawks boys basketball team, and softball coach Scott Collins will take over Sweatts role as athletic director. At the school boards Sept. 9, the board unanimously approved the two hirings, along with several other supplemental contracts. In a letter to Superintendent Nina Marks, read before the start of the meeting, Collins offered thanks for being recommended for the AD job. I can assure all of you that the integrity, success and betterment of our student-athletes and athletic programs will be my top priority while serving in this position, he wrote. Williams, a star on former Sharks coach Joe Hayes 2007 squad, works as physical education teacher at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. He served as coaching assistant to Sweatts junior varsity team last year. I think hes respected. Hell be good, said Sweatt, who left in August after three years as Seahawks coach to return to coaching at his alma mater Wakulla High School. The school board approved all of Marks recommendations for 2014-15 supplementals, with the exception of three assistant coaching positions, for football, boys soccer and girls basketball, which were to be held by teacher Bruce Hubbs. The school board is expected to take up the matter at its October meeting. School board member George Thompson said he requested that they be pulled because of concern that the jobs might not be able to be effectively handled by a single individual. I feel like theres too much overlapping in there to do all three of them, he said. Youre still doing one when the other season is going on. Athletic supplementals approved were football coach Aaron York and assistants Mike Todd and Gerald Tate, middle school coach Jonathan Creamer and statistician Ashley Teat; volleyball coach Hilary Stanton and assistant Tara Klink; boys basketball statistician Elinor MountSimmons; girls basketball coach Jason Luquis, middle school coach Paul Bankston and statistician Angeline Stanley; soccer coach Ramon Valenzuela; girls soccer coach Joe Shields; softball coach Scott Collins, assistant Mike Todd and statistician Teresa Segree; track coach Morgan Hathcock and assistant Luquis; weightlifting coach York; girls golf coach Collins; and cheerleading sponsor Lynn Clark and junior varsity coach Leigh Smith. Golf team continues winning ways By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County High School varsity girls golf team ran its record to 17-4, with one tie, as it swept two matches last week. The team began its winning week with a defeat of Leon and Florida High on Sept. 17 on Leons home course of Capital City Country Club in Tallahassee. Franklin County scored 217 to edge Leon with 219, both well ahead of Florida High with 250. Eighth-grader Melanie Collins was the tournaments low scorer, ring a 45, just ahead of sophomore Megan Collins, who shot 48. Eighth-grader Alexus Johnson shot a career best 61, senior Calli Westbrook shot 63 and sixth-grader Abby Johnson shot 71. It was a hard-fought win and Alexus group was the last one on the course, coach Scott Collins said. We knew she had to score a career best for us to secure the win and she brought it home. The teams Sept. 16 match at Seminole was canceled because of bad weather. On Tuesday, Sept. 23, the team won another home match at St. James Bay, defeating Leon, Lincoln and Maclay. The team nished with a score of 212, ahead of Leons 229, Maclays 246 and Lincolns 260. Melanie Collins was the low scorer of the match, shooting 43. Megan Collins shot 45, Westbrook 60, Alexus Johnson 64 and Abby Johnson 65. Leons Selby Proctor was the low visiting scorer with a 46. We fell behind Leon early and I thought it was going to be a close match, but our girls nished strong to win handily coach Collins said. The team travels to Golden Eagle today, Sept. 25, to take on Wakulla, Florida High and Maclay. We are having a great year thanks to Mr. Eddy for allowing us to practice and play at St. James, as well as the fact that our players get outstanding individual coaching and care from assistants Stacy Kirvin and Spencer Tolbert, coach Collins said. Senior Calli Westbrook tees off at Capital City Country Club. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Bulldogs shut out Seahawks By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Seahawks traveled to Liberty County Friday evening and were shut out by the Bulldogs 57-0. We knew Liberty was going to be a good team, because they are ranked No. 1 on MaxPreps for Class 1A, Seahawks coach Aaron York said. Grant Grantham does a good job with his Liberty teams. We fought hard the rst quarter, but had a couple of miscues on special teams which pushed us back. Offensively, freshman tight end Landen Abel had one catch for 22 yards.; Defensively, freshman Justin Arellano and senior Cole Wheeler each had four tackles. This week will be a good game for us, York said. We are playing a good Aucilla Christian school on the road. We have been preaching hard work and doing the little things right. If we can correct the little things this week and have a hard week of practice, I feel like we can be successful against them. Looking on lm, Aucilla is a tough bunch of kids. We are going to have to play well, York said. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Junior Bryce Tobin keeps time for the Seahawk band. Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 Staff Report This page is designed to feature top-quality photographs submitted to the Times by our readers. This regular addition offers an opportunity for photographers from throughout Franklin County, residents and visitors alike, to highlight their best work capturing the excitement and energy of the people, the beauty of the landscape, and the adventure of the world around them. Please send photographs to Dadlerstein@star .com For more information, call 653-8894. Crossword PUZZLE Crossword SOLUTION ANGEL SILVA | Special to The Times While driving to Eastpoint, this photographer noticed a cloud in the shape of a heart. ROD GASCHE | Special to The Times The sun sets at Bald Point SUN ROACH | Special to The Times Sunset at the lighthouse on St. George Island DOLORES QUIRK | Special to The Times Charles Quirk kayaking in Apalachicola Bay PALMER PHILYAW | Special to The Times Sunset at Two Mile TED RUFFNER | Special to The Times The photographer used a 500mm lens with a handheld camera to get this shot of a great horned owl in his Eastpoint yard Sunday evening.

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, September 25, 2014 Se cluded 1.04 acr el ot with pr ett yb each. Be ach has sev er al shallo wa re as with sandbars and is ag re at beach fo rc hildr en or gra ndchildr en. Th el ot is 468f td eep so ther e is plen ty of ro om to build yo ur beach co ttage aw ay fr om the noise of Hw y9 8. Be ach fr on tage of 102.50f tp ro vides plen ty of unobstruc te dv iew so ft he beach and wat er PL ANT AT ION LO T 3r dt ier lot on co rn er of Le isur eL ane and Co ra lW ay acr e, Dr yl ot! Th re eb locks fr om the new Pl an ta tion Club House ,P ool and Gym. Bike and pedestr ian pa ths ,t ennis co ur ts ,a nd al anding str ip fo rs mall planes ,D og fr iendly ar ea. List ed by John Shelb y John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com 2B R, 1B A; Go od loca tion &p ri va cy ;w ra pa ro und scr een por ch; new vin yl oor ing ,w at er hea te r, in te ri or pain t, ex te ri or doors; at tached st or age building; per fe ct va ca tion geta wa yo rc omf or table full-time home; golf &b oa tl aunch near by .L ist ed by Janie Bur ke John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com the slightly higher taxes. Carrabelle was not the only taxing district in the county to see a decline of its tax base, but was the only county entity to raise millage. Carrabelle busted wide open all during the height of the market. Its going to take longer to clear out all the foreclosures on the down side, said Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper. Those looking at the budget print-out available to the public might nd the shortfall confusing since the bottom line for city receipts and revenue shows $1.36 million for the 2013-14 scal year, and $2.87 million for 2014-15. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the apparent increase reects a change in bookkeeping procedures suggested by auditors, not rising revenues. The city commissioners faced a $280,000 shortfall in revenues over expenditures, and to avoid cutting the bud get by 10 to 15 percent, they decided to make no contribu tion to the citys contingency fund, and took the balance of the shortfall, $180,000, from the balance forward from last years budget, monies not earmarked for any other purpose. Messer said eliminating the contribution to the con tingency fund was not sig nicant. We have $750,000 (25 percent of the estimated receipts and revenue) in the fund currently, and the audi tor general recommends 15 percent, so were good, she said. Last year, Carrabelle contributed $100,000 to the contingency fund. Also last year, Carrabelle city em ployees received an acrossthe-board increase in sala ries. There will be no such increase for city employees this year. City staff said there were a few increases in revenue. Water sales increased by $91,000, mostly due to the increased population at the new Franklin Correctional Institution work camp. Sewer receipts were up by $129,000, with all that money put in an account dedicated to repayment of a Florida Department of Envi ronmental Protection loan to build the citys wastewater treatment plant. The note for the loan came due in 2013. Last year, Carrabelle paid $75,000, and for the 2014-15 scal year, the payment will be $175,000, increasing to $225,000 in 2015-16. Last year, Messer re vamped the existing ordi nance governing profession al and occupational licenses and the city commission raised fees from between 50 and 100 percent. The budget showed an increase of $1,000 in these fees for the 2012-13 scal year; and in 2013-14, the fees more than doubled, from $4,500 to $9,500. Franchise fees and util ity service taxes showed a combined increase of $7,000. The city will also receive an estimated $15,000 rebate on its liability insurance. Messer said increases to this years budget were mostly the result of xed items like retirement, insur ance and fuel costs. One line item that was bumped up a bit was com munity celebrations. For the 2013-14 scal year, $1,500 was budgeted for communi ty festivals. In the rst 201415 budget, that gure was increased to $10,000, and af ter debate, the commission compromised and allocated $8,000. Commissioner Brenda La Paz said much of the money would go to purchas ing new Christmas orna ments and American ags for public areas. The com missioners said they plan to allow private vendors and not-for-prots to sell food during future celebrations, rather than providing free food purchased by the city and downtown businesses. In addition to reducing the cost of food, this will reduce overtime paid to city em ployees, Messer said. The only department head present at the pre liminary budget hearing on Sept. 9 was Police Chief Craig Kincaid. He requested the city pro mote Ofcer Amber Holton to sergeant and raise her salary $2,000 annually. He said money was available for the raise without increasing the budget because his own salary is less than the for mer police chiefs. (Holton) should be en couraged to stay, Kincaid said. She will be one of your most valuable employees in the future. She already is to me. The commissioners took no action, and Messer said a decision on the promotion would be discussed again at a later time. Kincaid asked for a new police vehicle, saying that one of the cars in use has been driven more than 187,000 miles. The $29,000 for the car was budgeted out of capital projects. The police department also purchased a car last year. This year the budget for Parks and Recreation was combined with the budget for Streets and Roads. Messer said the same workers and equipment are shared by both departments. The com bined budget for the 2014-15 scal year is $279,900, com pared to a combined budget of $269, 650, for an increase of $10,250. TAXES from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | the Times Funding for community celebrations increased but most of the funds will be spent on purchasing new American ags and Christmas decorations for public areas. A report on Carrabelle Police Department By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Chief Craig Kincaid is a stickler for transparency. The Carrabelles Police Departments budget in creased by $21,650 because of xed costs. Budgeted fuel costs increased from$15,000 to $17,500. Budgeted funds for retirement took the big gest leap, $27,000 to $45,000. The Carrabelle police was the only department represented at both budget hearings. At the second hearing, Kincaid provided commis sioners with a detailed ac count of police services from Jan. 1 to Aug. 31, 2014. So far this year, the de partment has responded to 36 alarm calls. They have elded 25 animal control cases, including nine stray animal complaints, two missing dogs, one dog on dog fatality, two cases of ani mal cruelty, two bear calls and four other wildlife calls. They have also responded to three trafc crashes involv ing animals, two bears and one deer. Carrabelle Police have responded to 184 calls to as sist other agencies: Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, 136; Florida Highway Patrol, 26; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 26; Florida Department of Children and Families, six; Department of Corrections, three and one from the State Fire Marshal. They have enforced ve Baker Act cases, two peti tions led by a hospital and three led by individuals. In addition, to six reports of emotionally disturbed per sons where no Baker Act petition was led and three calls about homeless peo ple. They investigated four missing persons cases and located three juveniles and one adult. This year, Carrabelle has seen six cases of misde meanor battery. There have been 14 bur glaries, six were residential, four commercial, and one was a utility building. Three attempted burglaries failed, there were also four prowler calls. There were 31 calls about suspicious persons or circumstances. The police responded to 131 citizen assist calls, 27 to check on an individuals well-being and eight escort calls. They went to the aid of one fallen senior citizen and checked on 16 intoxicated pedestrians. They provided aid to 16 distressed vehicles and 67 lockouts, including one case where a child was locked in a car and one case where a pet was locked in a car. They made 102 service calls to re move road blockage or check open doors, etc. They also provided crowd and trafc control at nine community events, including Camp Gor don Johnston Days, the Riv er Walk Art Festival and the Special Olympic Torch Run. They responded to 18 lost and found calls and were able to recover lost items in four cases. Happily, it has not been a bad year for natural disas ters but Carrabelles police force responded to two se vere storms and a tornado in St. Theresa and Chief Kin caid responded to a plane crash west of Apalachicola. The police responded to 46 quality of life complaints including complaints about noise, abandoned vehicles and garbage complaints In spite of the fact that revenue from trafc cita tions dropped $1,000 from the previous scal year, the Carrabelle police made 244 trafc stops and issued 69 tickets. They responded to 51 misdemeanor trafc calls, and of these 46 were reckless driving or DUI. They ticketed seven DUIs including one felony DUI. They investigated 31 trafc crashes. Carrabelle Police helped with 36 civil cases including landlord-tenant disputes and property disputes. They received reports of 24 crimi nal mischief cases including two felonies with damages of over $1,000. They investi gated two unattended death incidents. In the rst eight months of 2014, they looked into 91 domestic disturbances or problems, made two drug arrests, and responded to 23 calls about ghts. There were four cases of aggravated battery. They probed three cases of fraud. They investigated three cases of shots red. Carrabelles police investi gated 13 cases of grand theft including two stolen boats or vehicles. There were 11 reported cases of witness harassment or tampering. They responded to six contraband or stolen prop erty recovery calls. In three cases, stolen property was recovered. They investigat ed 27 cases of petit theft. Carrabelle police ofcers used force only eight times in eight months. On three occasions, a subject was subdued using empty hand control. On one occasion, a beanbag weapon was dis played. On two occasions, a gun was displayed but not pointed and on two more oc casions, the gun was point ed in the direction of the subject.

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Buil ding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Deli ve rA ny where Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontrager ,D MD L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EAR S E XPERIENCE P. O. Bo x4 39 Car ra belle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 00 66499 RG 00 65255 NO TI CE OF PR OP OSE D ORD IN AN CE RE PE AL IN G CI TY OF CA RR AB EL LE ORD IN AN CE 42 7 AN D DI SS OL VI NG TH E SE AS ID E VI LL AG E CO MM UNI TY DE VE LO PM EN T DI STRI CT Pl ea se ta ke no ti ce th at th e Cit y o f Ca r ra be ll e wi ll co ns ider th e adop ti on of an Or dina nc e en ti tl ed : OR DI NAN CE NU MBE R 46 0 AN ORDI NA NC E OF THE CI TY OF CA RR AB EL LE FL OR ID A RE PE AL IN G ORDI NA NC E 42 7 AN D DI SS OL VI NG TH E SE AS ID E VI LL AG E CO MM UNI TY DE VE LO PM EN T DI STRI CT AN D PR OV ID IN G AN EF FE CT IV E DA TE Th e pu rp os e of t he Or dina nc e is to di ss ol ve th e Se asi de Vi lla ge Co mm un it y De ve lopm en t Di st ri ct pu rs uan t to th e pr ov is io ns of se ct ion 19 0. 046 (9 ), Fl ori da St at ut es Pu bl ic he ar in gs on th e pr op os al Or dina nc e wi ll be hel d on Th ur sd ay Oc to be r 2, 20 14 an d No ve mb er 7, 20 14 at 6: 00 p. m. or as so on as ca n be he ard in th e Cit y Ha ll Me et in g Ro om 10 01 Gr ay Av en ue Ca rra be ll e, FL A co py of t he Or di na nc e ma y be ob ta in ed an d pe rs on s wi shi ng to co mm en t ma y do so in pe rs on at th e pu bl ic he ar in g or by wr it in g to th e Ci ty of Ca rra be ll e, 10 01 Gr ay Av en ue Ca rra be ll e, Fl ori da 32 32 2. If an in di vi du a l de ci de s to ap pe al an y de ci si on ma de by th e co mmi ssi on wi th re sp ec t to thi s me et in g, a ve rb at im tr an sc ri pt ma y be re qu ir ed If so th e in di vi du al sh ou ld ma ke pr ov is io n for a tr an sc ri p t to be ma de at th e me et in g, (R E: Fl ori da St at ut e 28 6. 01 05 ). Pu rs ua nt to th e pr ov is io ns of t he Am eri ca ns wi th Di sa bi li ti es Ac t, an y pe rs on re quir in g sp ec ia l ac co mm od at io n to pa rt ic ip ate in th is me et in g is ask ed to adv is e th e ci ty at le as t 48 hou rs be for e th e me et in g by co nt ac ti ng Ke is ha Me ss er at th e ab ov e add re ss or by ph one at 85 069 727 27 37 Forbes St., in Apalachicola. All residents and elected ofcials are invited to attend. This hearing will allow residents the opportunity to meet their state legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments for the upcoming 2015 legislative session. For more information, call Marcia Mathis at 487-5003 or send an email to mathis.marcia@senate.gov. Beshears staffer on hand Monday A staff member from the ofce of State Representative Halsey Beshears (RMonticello) will be available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, at Beshears ofces at 78 11th St., Suite 5, Apalachicola. The staffer will be able to assist citizens with any issues that may be of concern or those involving state agencies. If you have any questions, call the Capitol ofce at 717-5007. World War II vet visits Camp Gordon Johnston On Sept. 23, 95-year-old John Easley visited the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. Easley was stationed as a pharmacist at the camp hospital and was the subject of an article in the Times earlier this year. Easley served for two years at the hospital before being shipped off to France. This was his rst return visit since World War II. Joining Easley were his children and their spouses. Museum Director Linda Minichiello interviewed Easley and staff videoed the session. CERT seeks new members Franklin Countys Community Emergency Response Team team is very new and wants to increase membership. Members of CERT, which is part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency are trained in how emergency responses are organized, and are activated by Franklin County Emergency Management and under their jurisdiction. CERT organizers want all the communities in Franklin County to be represented. Franklin County CERT helps in the emergency operations center before, during and after a hurricane, and can respond immediately after a storm to help render aid, assess damage, and assist in the distribution of resources. Currently the CERT team is helping issue hurricane evacuation re-entry passes to residents, educating people about hurricane safety and evacuation, helping with benet events and raising interest in CERT in Franklin County. The next CERT training course, which is free, will begin Tuesday, Oct. 7, will run for six sessions, from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the EOC in Apalachicola. Those who complete the class will be eligible to apply for membership to the CERT team. The class covers basic CERT organization, safety in a disaster setting, re extinguisher use, medical evaluation and rst aid, search and elementary aspects of rescue, and the psychological impact of disaster. People who complete this course are able to help protect themselves, their families and their neighbors in the event of a disaster. Those interested in enrolling in the course or needing more information are invited to call Lisa Keith-Lucas at 931-6362145 or lkeithlucas@gmail.com. To learn more about CERT, visit www.fema.gov. Camp Gordon Johnston to mark Museum Day This Saturday, Sept. 27, will be the eighth consecutive year the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum has been asked to participate in Smithsonian Magazines National Museum Day. The museum will be open from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.. with refreshments, live music playing popular songs from World War II, video interviews of World War II veterans, and some local, training lms from the camp. The series America in the 40s will be running through-out the day. Displays, artifacts, photographs, gift shop all await, and as always, admission is by donation and appreciated. The museum is supported, in part, by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. BRIEFS from page A2 University Halle-Wittenberg. A better understanding of species natural roles in ecosystems untouched by people might improve their prospects for survival. Thousands of years ago, the largest carnivore and herbivore on the Bahamian island of Abaco disappeared. The study reconstructs the ancient food web of Abaco where these two mega-reptiles, the endangered Cuban Crocodile (Crocodylus rhombifer) and the nowextinct Alburys Tortoise (Chelonoidis alburyorum), once ourished. Today, there is no modern terrestrial ecosystem like that of ancient Abaco, with reptiles lling the roles of largest herbivore and carnivore. In the study, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and National Geographic Society, researchers embarked on the difcult task of reconstructing an ecosystem where few of the components still exist. To understand these missing pieces, scientists analyzed the types of carbon and nitrogen in well-preserved fossil bones from the Cuban Crocodile and Alburys Tortoise, which was unknown to scientists before its 2004 discovery in the Bahamas. The data reveal the crocodile and tortoise were both terrestrial, showing that reptiles called the shots on the island, Hastings said. The terrestrial nature of these creatures is a great indicator of how biodiversity has changed in the Bahamas and what the ideal circumstances would be for these or similar species to return, said Florida Museum ornithology curator and study co-author David Steadman. On islands like Abaco that have always been dominated by reptiles, the ora and fauna are more vulnerable because they have evolved to lead a more laid back, island existence, Steadman said. Understanding this is important to designing better approaches to conservation on the island. Early paleontological sites in the Bahamas have yielded bones from numerous species of reptiles, birds and mammals that no longer exist on the islands. James Mead, a vertebrate paleontologist with East Tennessee State University, said more research into the evolutionary history of native plants and animals on Abaco is needed as well as conservation programs based on paleontological research that aims to restore these species. The Cuban crocodile is living today in small numbers in Cuba, but this new research shows that it is not living to its fullest potential, Mead said. The crocodile could live more abundantly in a much wider habitat if we allowed it. Other study co-authors are Nancy Albury with the National Museum of the Bahamas and John Krigbaum with UFs department of anthropology. FOSSILS from page A4 KIRSTEN GRACE | Florida Museum of Natural History Co-authored by Florida Museum of Natural History ornithology curator David Steadman, a new study reconstructs the ancient food web of the Bahamian island of Abaco where mega-reptiles, including the Cuban Crocodile, once ourished.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 25, 2014 The Times | A15 33613T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA PANAMA CITY DIVISION CASE NO.: 5:13-cv-00162 CADENCE BANK, NA., as successor-in-interest by merger to Superior Bank, N.A., as successor-in-interest to Superior Bank, FSB, by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Superior Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. APEX DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a limited liability company, GEORGE STEPHENS NEWMAN, JR., an individual, JOSEPH PATRICK FERRELL, an individual, JOHN Z. FERRELL, an individual CARRAWAY BAY PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, a Florida non-profit corporation, OCEAN PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, HIDE-A-WAY AT LAKE POWELL HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., A Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHAL’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Amended Final Default and Summary Judgment directed to me by the U.S. District Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned United States Marshal or any of his duly authorized deputies, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Section 2001, et seq., will sell the property having the legal description of: EXHIBIT “A” First Newman Mortgaged Property: Lot 9, Carraway Bay, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 37, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AND Lot 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, Coastal Village of Carrabelle, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in PIat Book 10, Page 19, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Second Newman Mortgaged Property (P arcel 2): Lot 4, Carraway Bay, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 37, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. together with all appurtenances thereto and all improvements thereon, at public auction at the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola Office, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on the 15th day of October, 2014, at 2:00 p.m. EST. The terms of the sale shall be certified funds, with ten percent (10%) of the successful bid to be deposited with the undersigned by the successful bidder upon the property being struck off to him; the balance of the successful bid shall be due and payable in the office of the undersigned at 111 N. Adams Street, Suite 277, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within forty-eight (48) hours following conclusion of the sale. The plaintiff reserves the right to bid on the above property and apply the indebtedness of the defendant to any bid so made. Any questions should be directed to Allison C. Doucette, Esquire at (813) 273-5616. Ed Spooner United States Marshal September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33645T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:13-cv-304-RS-CJK CADENCE BANK, N.A., as successor-in-interest by merger to Superior Bank, N.A., as successor-in-interest to Superior Bank, FSB, by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Superior Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. CELTAE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, OLIVER H. DUCIMETIERE-MONOD, individually, 101 EAST GULF BEACH DR., LLC, an inactive Florida limited liability company, ANCHOR REALTY AND MORTGAGE COMPANY OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC., a Florida corporation, PEREMANS, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, ANCHOR VACATION PROPERTIES REAL ESTATE REFERRALS f/k/a ANCHOR VACATION PROPERTIES, INC., a Florida corporation, and 101 FRANKLIN BOULEVARD, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, STATES RESOURCES CORP., as assignee from Wachovia Bank, N.A., an Iowa corporation, DURDEN ENTERPRISES, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, COASTLINE PUBLICATIONS, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHAL’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Agreed Foreclosure Judgment directed to me by the U.S. District Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned United States Marshal or any of his duly authorized deputies, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Section 2001, et seq., will sell the property having the legal description of: EXHIBIT “A” FIRST 101 FRANKLIN BOULEVARD PROPERTY Lots 8 and 9, Block 6, St. George Island Gulf Beaches East, Unit No. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lots 13, 14 and 15, Block 6 East, St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit NO. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 7, Block 6 East, St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit NO. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lots 17 and 20, Block 5-E, ST. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. CELTAE PROPERTY Lots 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24, Block 6 East, St. George Island Beaches, Unit 1, according to the map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, also included is the alley located between lots 16-21 and lot 22 being a parcel 34’ wide running the length of said Lot 22 (135’). Being the same property conveyed to Dragon SAF, LLC by deed filed and recorded April 4, 2000, in O.R. Book 637, Page 603, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. SECOND 101 FRANKLIN PROPERTY LOTS 10, 11, and 12, Block 6 East, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 7 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; Lots 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, Block 6 East; St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit No. 1, a Subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded In Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. together with all appurtenances thereto and all improvements thereon, at public auction at the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola Office, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on the 20th day of October, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. EST. The terms of the sale shall be certified funds, with ten percent (10%) of the successful bid to be deposited with the undersigned by the successful bidder upon the property being struck off to him; the balance of the successful bid shall be due and payable in the office of the undersigned at 111 N. Adams Street, Suite 277, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within forty-eight (48) hours following conclusion of the sale. The plaintiff reserves the right to bid on the above property and apply the indebtedness of the defendant to any bid so made. Any questions should be directed to Allison C. Doucette, Esquire at (813) 273-5616. Ed Spooner United States Marshal September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33705T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 19, 2014, and entered in Case No. 09-000342-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 13th day of November, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 20th day of August, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Tele: (954) 382-3486 Tele: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File# 09-16447 OWB Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33855T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000313 U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2 Plaintiff, -vs.William Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a W. Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a William Proctor, Individually and as Trustee of the W. Stanley Proctor Sr. Revocable Real Estate Trust Agreement Dated July 22, 2004; Melinda Lippe Proctor; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000313 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2, Plaintiff and William Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a W. Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a William Proctor, Individually and as Trustee of the W. Stanley Proctor Sr. Revocable Real Estate Trust Agreement Dated July 22, 2004 are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on October 16, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: UNIT 8, BUILDING B, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSES: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A, ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY, THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5704.64 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 35 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 113.81 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, 113.81 FEET), THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST, 92.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST, 244.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST, 27.09 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 22.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 61.50 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST, 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST, 61.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THE 30 FOOT NON-EXCLUSIVE INGRESS/ EGRESS, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT DESCRIBED ON EXHIBIT “A” TO THAT CERTAIN INSTRUMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 709, PAGES 547 THROUGH 549, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Terry Segree DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Tele: (561) 998-6700 Fax: (561) 998-6707 13-260666 FC02 WNI Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33827T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: October 4, 2014 at: 10:00 a.m. at SEMINOLE SAFE N SECURE, 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: APRIL THOMPSON SHAMI BIGALOW Before the sale date of October 4, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33835T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: October 4, 2014 at 11:30 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: JUDT TERRY & CO/ OWNER FAITH HERRING Before the sale date of October 4, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33849T PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: On 16 housing units, a total of approximately 25,000 square feet, located on 11th and 12th Street in Apalachicola, FL, install (color silver) 24 gauge galvalume metal roofing with 6 inch eave drip edge to match roof color, installation of one layer of #30 lb felt underlayment on existing roof surface, replace all existing gutters and add or replace vent pipes as necessary. Metal roofing will go over existing shingle roofs. All grounds to be cleaned up on a daily basis as homes are occupied by tenants. All bushes, shrubs and flowers to be protected. Bids will be received until October 14, 2014. Please send bids to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 For questions, please email apalhousing@ gmail.com or call 850-653-9304 Sept. 18, 25, 2014 95752T PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2014 NOTICE OF ELECTION I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in Florida, on November 4, 2014, for the ratification or rejection of a proposed revision to the constitution of the State of Florida. No. 1 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 28 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Water and Land Conservation -Dedicates funds to acquire and restore Florida conservation and recreation lands Ballot Summary: Funds the Land Acquisition Trust Fund to acquire, restore, improve, and manage conservation lands including wetlands and forests; fish and wildlife habitat; lands protecting water resources and drinking water sources, including the Everglades, and the water quality of rivers, lakes, and streams; beaches and shores; outdoor recreational lands; working farms and ranches; and historic or geologic sites, by dedicating 33 percent of net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents for 20 years. Financial Impact Statement: This amendment does not increase or decrease state revenues. The state revenue restricted to the purposes specified in the amendment is estimated to be $648 million in Fiscal Year 2015-16 and grows to $1.268 billion by the twentieth year. Whether this results in any additional state expenditures depends upon future legislative actions and cannot be determined. Similarly, the impact on local government revenues, if any, cannot be determined. No additional local government costs are expected. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 28. Land Ac quisition T rust F und. a) Effective on July 1 of the year following pas sage of this amend ment by the voters, and for a period of 20 years after that effective date, the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall re ceive no less than 33 percent of net revenues derived from the exist ing excise tax on docu ments, as defined in the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, as amended from time to time, or any successor or replacement tax, af ter the Department of Revenue first deducts a service charge to pay the costs of the collec tion and enforcement of the excise tax on documents. b) F unds in the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall be expended only for the following pur poses: 1) As provided by law to finance or refinance: the acquisition and im provement of land, water areas, and re lated property interests, including conservation easements, and re sources for conserva tion lands including wetlands, forests, and fish and wildlife habitat; wildlife management areas; lands that pro tect water resources and drinking water sources, including lands protecting the water quality and quan tity of rivers, lakes, streams, springsheds, and lands providing re charge for groundwater and aquifer systems; lands in the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protec tion Area, as defined in Article II, Section 7(b); beaches and shores; outdoor recreation lands, including recrea tional trails, parks, and urban open space; ru ral landscapes; work ing farms and ranches; historic or geologic sites; together with management, restora tion of natural systems, and the enhancement of public access or rec reational enjoyment of conservation lands. 2) T o pay the debt service on bonds is sued pursuant to Arti cle VII, Section 11(e). c) The moneys depos ited into the Land Ac quisition T rust F und, as defined by the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, shall not be or become commingled with the General Reve nue F und of the state. No. 2 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 29 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Use of Marijuana for Certain Medical Conditions Ballot Summary: Allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. Allows caregivers to assist patients’ medical use of marijuana. The Department of Health shall register and regulate centers that produce and distribute marijuana for medical purposes and shall issue identification cards to patients and caregivers. Applies only to Florida law. Does not authorize violations of federal law or any non-medical use, possession or production of marijuana. Financial Impact Statement: Increased costs from this amendment to state and local governments cannot be determined. There will be additional regulatory and enforcement activities associated with the production and sale of medical marijuana. Fees will offset at least a portion of the regulatory costs. While sales tax may apply to purchases, changes in revenue cannot reasonably be determined since the extent to which medical marijuana will be exempt from taxation is unclear without legislative or state administrative action. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 29. Medical marijuana production, possession and use. (a) PUBLIC POLICY (1) The medical use of marijuana by a qualify ing patient or personal caregiver is not subject to criminal or civil liabil ity or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (2) A physician li censed in Florida shall not be subject to crimi nal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law for issuing a physi cian certification to a person diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition in a manner consistent with this section. (3) Actions and con duct by a medical mari juana treatment center registered with the De partment, or its em ployees, as permitted by this section and in compliance with De partment regulations, shall not be subject to criminal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (b) DEFINITIONS. F or purposes of this sec tion, the following words and terms shall have the following meanings: (1) “Debilitating Medical Condition” means can cer glaucoma, positive status for human im munodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired im mune deficiency syn 33873T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice that the Governing Board of George E. Weems Memorial Hospital will hold a public meeting for comments to review the plan to file an application for Federal assistance for construction with the USDA Rural Development Community Facilities Direct and Guaranteed Loans program. The public meeting will be held at 5pm on Tuesday, October 7, 2014 in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola. One or more Franklin County Commissioners may be present at the meeting. Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014

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A16| The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS drome (AIDS), hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, P arkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis or other conditions for which a physician be lieves that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the po tential health risks for a patient. (2) “Department” means the Department of Health or its succes sor agency (3) “Identification card” means a document is sued by the Depart ment that identifies a person who has a phy sician certification or a personal caregiver who is at least twenty one (21) years old and has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana. (4) “Marijuana” has the meaning given canna bis in Section 893.02(3), Florida Stat utes (2013). (5) “Medical Marijuana T reatment Center” means an entity that acquires, cultivates, possesses, processes (including development of related products such as food, tinctures, aerosols, oils, or oint ments), transfers, trans ports, sells, distributes, dispenses, or adminis ters marijuana, prod ucts containing mari juana, related supplies, or educational materi als to qualifying pa tients or their personal caregivers and is regis tered by the Depart ment. (6) “Medical use” means the acquisition, possession, use, deliv ery transfer or admin istration of marijuana or related supplies by a qualifying patient or personal caregiver for use by a qualifying pa tient for the treatment of a debilitating medi cal condition. (7) “P ersonal caregiver” means a person who is at least twenty one (21) years old who has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana and has a caregiver identification card issued by the De partment. A personal caregiver may assist no more than five (5) quali fying patients at one time. An employee of a hospice provider nurs ing, or medical facility may serve as a per sonal caregiver to more than five (5) qualifying patients as permitted by the Department. P ersonal caregivers are prohibited from con suming marijuana ob tained for the personal, medical use by the qualifying patient. (8) “Physician” means a physician who is li censed in Florida. (9) “Physician certifica tion” means a written document signed by a physician, stating that in the physician’s pro fessional opinion, the patient suffers from a debilitating medical condition, that the po tential benefits of the medical use of mari juana would likely out weigh the health risks for the patient, and for how long the physician recommends the medi cal use of marijuana for the patient. A physician certification may only be provided after the physician has con ducted a physical ex amination of the patient and a full assessment of the patient’s medical history (10) “Qualifying patient” means a person who has been diagnosed to have a debilitating medical condition, who has a physician certifi cation and a valid qual ifying patient identifica tion card. If the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards within nine (9) months after the effec tive date of this section, then a valid physician certification will serve as a patient identifica tion card in order to al low a person to be come a “qualifying pa tient” until the Depart ment begins issuing identification cards. (c) LIMIT A TIONS. (1) Nothing in this sec tion shall affect laws re lating to non medical use, possession, pro duction or sale of mari juana. (2) Nothing in this sec tion authorizes the use of medical marijuana by anyone other than a qualifying patient. (3) Nothing in this sec tion allows the opera tion of a motor vehicle, boat, or aircraft while under the influence of marijuana. (4) Nothing in this law section requires the vi olation of federal law or purports to give immu nity under federal law (5) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any accommodation of any on site medical use of marijuana in any place of education or em ployment, or of smok ing medical marijuana in any public place. (6) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any health insurance pro vider or any govern ment agency or author ity to reimburse any person for expenses re lated to the medical use of marijuana. (d) DUTIES OF THE DEP ARTMENT The Department shall issue reasonable regulations necessary for the im plementation and en forcement of this sec tion. The purpose of the regulations is to en sure the availability and safe use of medical marijuana by qualifying patients. It is the duty of the Department to promulgate regulations in a timely fashion. (1) Implementing Regu lations. In order to al low the Department sufficient time after passage of this section, the following regula tions shall be promul gated no later than six (6) months after the ef fective date of this sec tion: a. Procedures for the issuance of qualifying patient identification cards to people with physician certifications, and standards for the renewal of such identifi cation cards. b. Procedures for the issuance of personal caregiver identification cards to persons quali fied to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana, and standards for the renewal of such identification cards. c. Procedures for the registration of Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers that include procedures for the issu ance, renewal, suspen sion, and revocation of registration, and stand ards to ensure security record keeping, testing, labeling, inspection, and safety d. A regulation that de fines the amount of ma rijuana that could rea sonably be presumed to be an adequate sup ply for qualifying pa tients’ medical use, based on the best available evidence. This presumption as to quantity may be over come with evidence of a particular qualifying patient’s appropriate medical use. (2) Issuance of identifi cation cards and regis trations. The Depart ment shall begin issu ing qualifying patient and personal caregiver identification cards, as well as begin register ing Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers no later than nine months (9) after the effective date of this section. (3) If the Department does not issue regula tions, or if the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards and registering Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers within the time limits set in this section, any Florida citizen shall have standing to seek judicial relief to compel compliance with the Department’s constitu tional duties. (4) The Department shall protect the confi dentiality of all qualify ing patients. All records containing the identity of qualifying patients shall be confidential and kept from public disclosure other than for valid medical or law enforcement purposes. (e) LEGISLA TION. Nothing in this section shall limit the legisla ture from enacting laws consistent with this pro vision. (f) SEVERABILITY The provisions of this sec tion are severable and if any clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this measure, or an ap plication thereof is ad judged invalid by any court of competent ju risdiction other provi sions shall continue to be in effect to the fullest extent possible. No. 3 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 10, 11 (Legislature) Ballot Title: Prospective Appointment of Certain Judicial Vacancies Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution requiring the Governor to prospectively fill vacancies in a judicial office to which election for retention applies resulting from the justice’s or judge’s reaching the mandatory retirement age or failure to qualify for a retention election; and allowing prospective appointments if a justice or judge is not retained at an election. Currently, the Governor may not fill an expected vacancy until the current justice’s or judge’s term expires. Full Text: ARTICLE V JUDICIARY SECTION 10. Retention; election and terms.(a) Any justice or judge may qualify for retention by a vote of the electors in the general election next preceding the expiration of the justice’s or judge’s term in the manner prescribed by law. When If a justice or judge is ineligible for retention or fails to qualify for retention, a prospective va cancy is deemed to oc cur at the conclusion of the qualifying period for retention for the pur pose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. When a justice or judge so qualifies, the ballot shall read substantially as follows: “Shall Justice (or Judge) ...(name of justice or judge)... of the ...(name of the court)... be retained in office?” If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to retain, the justice or judge shall be retained for a term of six years. The term of the justice or judge retained shall commence on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January following the general election. If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to not retain, a prospective vacancy is deemed to occur im mediately following the general election for the purpose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. (b)(1) The election of circuit judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that circuit approves a local option to select circuit judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of circuit judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (2) The election of county court judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that county approves a local option to select county judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of county court judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (3)a. A vote to exercise a local option to select circuit court judges and county court judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election shall be held in each circuit and county at the general election in the year 2000. If a vote to exercise this local option fails in a vote of the electors, such option shall not again be put to a vote of the electors of that jurisdiction until the expiration of at least two years. b. After the year 2000, a circuit may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of circuit judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the custodian of state records a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the circuit in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. c. After the year 2000, a county may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of county court judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the supervisor of elections a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the county in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. The terms of circuit judges and judges of county courts shall be for six years. SECTION 11. Vacancies.(a)(1) Whenever a vacancy occurs in a judicial office to which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the vacancy by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. (2) Whenever a pro spective vacancy occurs in a judicial of fice for which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the prospective va cancy by appointing a justice or judge from among at least three persons but not more than six persons nomi nated by the appropri ate judicial nominating commission. The term of the appointment commences upon the expiration of the term of the office being va cated and ends on the first T uesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general elec tion. (b) The governor shall fill each vacancy on a circuit court or on a county court, wherein the judges are elected by a majority vote of the electors, by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next primary and general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. An election shall be held to fill that judicial office for the term of the office beginning at the end of the appointed term. (c) The nominations shall be made within thirty days from the occurrence of a vacancy or prospective vacancy unless the period is extended by the governor for a time not to exceed thirty days. The governor shall make the appointment within sixty days after the nominations have been certified to the governor. (d) There shall be a separate judicial nominating commission as provided by general law for the supreme court, each district court of appeal, and each judicial circuit for all trial courts within the circuit. Uniform rules of procedure shall be established by the judicial nominating commissions at each level of the court system. Such rules, or any part thereof, may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the legislature, or by the supreme court, five justices concurring. Except for deliberations of the judicial nominating commissions, the proceedings of the commissions and their records shall be open to the public. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 95758T ENMIENDAS CONSTITUCIONALES PROPUESTAS SOBRE LAS QUE SE VOTAR EL 4 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2014 AVISO DE ELECCI"N Yo, Ken Detzner, Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida, por el presente notifico que se llevarn a cabo elecciones en cada condado de la Florida, el 4 de noviembre del 2014, para la aprobacin o el rechazo de una propuesta de modificacin de la constitucin del Estado de la Florida. No. 1 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 28 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Conservacin de aguas y tierras: dedicar fondos para adquirir y restaurar tierras objeto de conservacin y recreacin en el Estado de Florida Resumen de la boleta: Provee fondos para el Fondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de Tierras con el fin de adquirir, restaurar, mejorar y administrar tierras objeto de conservacin, entre ellas pantanos y bosques; el hbitat de peces y vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, incluidos los Everglades, y la calidad del agua en ros, lagos y arroyos; playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre; establecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en actividad, y emplazamientos histricos o geolgicos. Para ello se dedicar el 33% de los ingresos netos obtenidos del impuesto especial existente sobre documentos durante 20 aos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: Esta enmienda no incrementa ni reduce los ingresos estatales. El ingreso estatal limitado para los propsitos especificados en la enmienda se estima en $648 millones para el ao fiscal 2015-16 y aumenta a $1.268 mil millones hacia el vigsimo ao. Si eso traer como consecuencia gastos estatales adicionales depende de futuras acciones legislativas y no puede determinarse. De la misma manera, tampoco puede determinarse el impacto sobre los ingresos de gobiernos locales, si los hubiera. No se prevn costos de gobiernos locales. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 28. F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras. a) Con vigencia el 1 de julio del ao poste rior a la aprobacin de esta enmienda por par te de los votantes y du rante un perodo de 20 aos a partir de esa fecha de entrada en vigor el F ondo Fiduci ario de Adquisicin de T ierras recibir no me nos del 33% de los in gresos netos derivados del impuesto especial existente sobre docu mentos, tal como se define en los estatutos vigentes al 1 de enero de 2012, enmendados de tanto en tanto, o de cualquier impuesto su cesor o de reemplazo, despus de que el De partamento de Haci enda deduzca primero un cargo de servicio con el fin de pagar los costos de recopilacin y aplicacin del im puesto especial sobre documentos. b) El dinero del F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras se emp lear nicamente con los siguientes props itos: 1) Como lo establece la ley para financiar o refinanciar: la adquisi cin o mejora de tier ras, reas de agua y derechos inmobiliarios relacionados, entre el los las servidumbres de conservacin y los re cursos para tierras ob jeto de conservacin, como, por ejemplo, pa ntanos, bosques y h bitat de peces y vida silvestre; reas de ad ministracin de vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, entre ellos las tierras que protegen la calidad y cantidad del agua en ros, lagos, arroyos, manantiales, y tierras que brindan recarga de agua subterrnea y sistemas acuferos; tier ras en el rea agrcola de los Everglades y el rea de proteccin de los Everglades, como estn definidas en el Artculo II, Seccin 7(b); playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre, incluidos senderos recreativos, parques y espacios abiertos urbanos; pai sajes rurales; estab lecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en activ idad, emplazamientos histricos o geolgi cos; junto con la ad ministracin, restaura cin de sistemas natu rales y mejoramiento del acceso pblico o disfrute recreativo de las tierras objeto de conservacin. 2) P ara el pago del servicio de la deuda sobre los bonos emiti dos conforme al Art culo VII, Seccin 11(e). c) El dinero depositado en el F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de T ier ras, tal como se define en los estatutos vigen tes al 1 de enero de 2012, no estar mez clado ni se mezclar con el F ondo de In gresos Generales del Estado. No. 2 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 29 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Uso de marihuana para algunas enfermedades Resumen de la boleta: Permite el uso mdico de la marihuana a las personas con enfermedades debilitantes, segn lo determine un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Florida. Permite a los cuidadores asistir a los pacientes en el uso mdico de marihuana. El Departamento de Salud deber inscribir y regular los centros que producen y distribuyen marihuana con fines mdicos y debern extender tarjetas de identificacin a pacientes y cuidadores. Se aplica nicamente a las leyes del Estado de Florida. No autoriza infracciones de la ley federal ni ningn uso, posesin o produccin de marihuana con fines que no sean mdicos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: El aumento de costos generado por esta enmienda para el gobierno estatal y los gobiernos locales no puede determinarse. Habr actividades adicionales de regulacin y aplicacin asociadas a la produccin y venta de marihuana con fines mdicos. Las tarifas compensarn al menos en parte los costos de regulacin. Si bien el impuesto sobre la venta se aplica a las compras, los cambios fiscales no pueden determinarse de manera razonable, dado que, si no existe una accin legislativa o administrativa estatal, no est claro en qu medida la marihuana con fines mdicos estar exenta de impuestos. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 29. Pro duccin, posesin y uso de marihuana con fines mdicos. (a) POLTICA PBLICA (1) El uso mdico de marihuana por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal no est sujeto a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (2) Un mdico autori zado por el Estado de Florida no estar sujeto a responsabilidad pe nal o civil ni a san ciones, conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, por extender un certificado mdico a una persona diagnosti cada con una enferme dad debilitante de con formidad con esta sec cin. (3) Las acciones y el comportamiento de un centro de tratamiento de marihuana con fines mdicos inscrito ante el Departamento, o sus empleados, segn se contempla en esta sec cin y en cumplimiento de las reglamentacio nes del Departamento, no estarn sujetos a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (b) DEFINICIONES. A los fines de esta sec cin, las siguientes pa labras y trminos ten drn los siguientes sig nificados: (1) “Enfermedad debili tante” significa cncer glaucoma, estado posi tivo del virus de inmu nodeficiencia humana (VIH), sndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SID A), hepa titis C, esclerosis lateral amiotrfica (ELA), en fermedad de Crohn, enfermedad de P arkin son, esclerosis mltiple u otras enfermedades para las cuales, a crite rio del mdico, los ben eficios del uso mdico de la marihuana proba blemente seran superi ores a los riesgos po tenciales para la salud de un paciente. (2) “Departamento” sig nifica el Departamento de Salud o su agencia sucesora. (3) “T arjeta de identifi cacin” significa un documento emitido por el Departamento que identifica a una per sona que tiene un cer tificado mdico o a un cuidador personal de por lo menos veintin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de marihuana. (4) “Marihuana” tiene el significado otorgado al cannabis en la Seccin 893.02(3) de los Esta tutos de Florida (2013). (5) “Centro de trata miento de marihuana con fines mdicos” sig nifica una entidad que adquiere, cultiva, po see, procesa (incluido el desarrollo de prod uctos relacionados ta les como alimentos, tinturas, aerosoles, aceites o ungentos), transfiere, transporta, vende, distribuye, de spacha o administra marihuana, productos que contienen mari huana, suministros re lacionados o material educativo a pacientes calificados o a sus cui dadores personales y que est inscrito ante el Departamento. (6) “Uso mdico” signif ica la adquisicin, po sesin, uso, entrega, transferencia o admin istracin de marihuana o suministros relac ionados por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal para ser usados por un paciente calificado para el tratamiento de una enfermedad debili tante. (7) “Cuidador personal” significa una persona de por lo menos vein tin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente califi cado en el uso mdico de marihuana y tiene una tarjeta de identifi cacin de cuidador emitida por el Depar tamento. Un cuidador personal no puede asistir a ms de cinco (5) pacientes por vez. Un empleado de un proveedor de cuidados paliativos o de un cen tro mdico o de un ho gar de ancianos puede actuar como cuidador personal para ms de cinco (5) pacientes ca lificados, segn lo per mite el Departamento. Est prohibido para los cuidadores personales consumir marihuana obtenida para el uso personal y mdico del paciente calificado. (8) “Mdico” significa un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Flor ida. (9) “Certificado mdico” significa un documento por escrito firmado por un mdico, en el que se indica que, en la opinin profesional del mdico, el paciente su fre de una enfermedad debilitante, que los be neficios potenciales del uso mdico de la mari huana probablemente sean superiores a los riesgos para la salud del paciente, y se in dica durante cunto tiempo el mdico reco mienda el uso mdico de marihuana para el paciente. Un certificado mdico slo puede ex tenderse despus de que el mdico haya re alizado un examen fsico del paciente y una evaluacin com pleta del historial m dico del paciente. (10) “P aciente cali ficado” significa una persona a la que se le ha diagnosticado una enfermedad debilitante, que tiene un certificado mdico y una tarjeta de identificacin vlida de paciente calificado. Si el Departamento no comienza a emitir tar jetas de identificacin dentro de los nueve (9) meses posteriores a la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin, un certificado mdico vlido servir como tarjeta de identificacin de paciente para per mitir que una persona se convierta en “paci ente calificado” hasta tanto el Departamento comience a emitir tar jetas de identificacin. (c) LIMIT ACIONES. (1) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin afectar a las leyes referidas al uso no m dico, posesin, pro duccin o venta de ma rihuana. (2) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin autoriza el uso de mari huana con fines mdi cos a cualquier per sona que no sea un paciente calificado. (3) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin permite la operacin de un vehculo de mo tor embarcacin o aer onave mientras se est bajo la influencia de la marihuana. (4) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requiere que se in frinjan las leyes feder ales o pretende otorgar inmunidad conforme a las leyes federales. (5) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir adaptacin alguna para el uso mdico de marihuana en ningn lugar de educacin o trabajo, ni para fumar marihuana con fines mdicos en ningn sitio pblico. (6) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir que ningn proveedor de seguros de salud u organismo o autoridad del gobier no reembolse a ningu na persona por los gastos relacionados con el uso mdico de marihuana. (d) OBLIGACIONES DEL DEP ART AMENTO El Departamento debe r emitir reglamenta ciones razonables y necesarias para la im plementacin y apli cacin de esta seccin. El propsito de las reglamentaciones es garantizar la disponi bilidad y el uso seguro de marihuana con fines mdicos por parte de los pacientes califi cados. Es obligacin del Departamento promulgar reglamenta ciones de manera oportuna. (1) Implementacin de reglamentaciones. Con el objeto de otorgarle al Departamento tiem po suficiente despus de la aprobacin de esta seccin, las siguientes reglamen taciones debern pro mulgarse a ms tardar seis (6) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta sec cin: a. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de paciente calificado a las personas porta doras de certificados mdicos, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. b. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de cuidador personal a personas calificadas para asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de mari huana, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. c. Procedimientos para la inscripcin de Cen tros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos, que incluyan procedimientos para la emisin, renovacin, suspensin y revoca cin de inscripciones, y estndares para garan tizar la seguridad in formtica, el manteni miento de registros, anlisis, etiquetado, in speccin y seguridad. d. Una reglamentacin que defina la cantidad de marihuana que po dra considerarse un suministro adecuado y razonable para el uso mdico de los pa cientes calificados, so bre la base de las me jores pruebas disponi bles. Esta presuncin referida a la cantidad puede contrarrestarse con pruebas del uso mdico apropiado por parte de un paciente calificado en particular (2) Emisin de tarjetas de identificacin e in scripciones. El Depar tamento comenzar a emitir tarjetas de identi ficacin de paciente calificado y cuidador personal, y tambin ini ciar la inscripcin de Centros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos a ms tardar nueve (9) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin. (3) Si el Departamento no emite las reglamen taciones, o si el De partamento no comien za a emitir tarjetas de identificacin y a inscri bir a Centros de T rata miento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos dentro de los plazos establecidos en esta seccin, cualquier ciu dadano del Estado de Florida tendr derecho a valerse de recursos judiciales para obligar al cumplimiento de las obligaciones constituci onales del Departa mento. (4) El Departamento deber proteger la con fidencialidad de todos los pacientes califi cados. T odos los regis tros que contengan la identidad de los pacie ntes calificados debe rn ser confidenciales y estar exentos de divul gacin pblica excepto con fines mdicos o referidos al cumpli miento de la ley vli dos. (e) LEGISLACI"N. Nada de lo contenido en esta seccin limitar a la legislacin para promulgar leyes coher entes con esta dispos icin. (f) DIVISIBILID AD Las disposiciones conteni das en esta seccin son divisibles, y si cual quier tribunal compe tente declara la inval idez de cualquier clusula, oracin, pr rafo o seccin de esta medida, o su aplica cin, las dems dis posiciones continuarn vigentes en la mayor medida posible. No. 3 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO V, SECCIONES 10, 11 (Asamblea Legislativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Nombramiento Eventual para Ciertos Cargos Judiciales Vacantes Resumen de la boleta: Proponer una enmienda a la Constitucin del Estado en la que se establezca que el Gobernador debe cubrir las vacantes eventuales en los cargos judiciales que estn sujetos a elecciones de retencin cuando los jueces o magistrados se encuentren por cumplir la edad legal para jubilarse o en el supuesto de que no califiquen para la eleccin de retencin; y permitir los nombramientos eventuales si un juez o magistrado no se retiene en su cargo en una eleccin de retencin. En la actualidad, el Gobernador no puede cubrir una vacante prevista hasta que termine el mandato del juez o magistrado actual. Texto completo: ARTCULO V PODER JUDICIAL SECCI"N 10. Retencin; eleccin y mandatos.(a) Cualquier juez o magistrado puede calificar para la retencin, la cual se produce mediante el voto de los electores en la prxima eleccin general que sea anterior a la conclusin del mandato del juez o magistrado por las causas establecidas por ley. Cuando Si un juez o magistrado no est habilitado para ser retenido o no cumple con los requisitos para la retencin, se producir una vacante eventual al finalizar el periodo de calificacin de retencin a fin de nombrar un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. Cuando un juez o magistrado califique como tal para la retencin, en la boleta se deber leer claramente lo siguiente: “Deber el Magistrado (o Juez) ...(nombre del juez o magistrado)... de la...(nombre de la corte)... ser retenido en el cargo judicial?” Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen retenerlo, entonces, el juez o magistrado continuar ejerciendo sus funciones durante un periodo de seis aos. Este mandato del juez o magistrado que ha sido retenido comenzar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero siguiente a la eleccin general. Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen no retenerlo, una vacante eventual se producir inmediatamente luego de la eleccin general con la finalidad de nombrar a un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. (b)(1) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de jueces de circuito sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho circuito aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces de circuito mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces de circuito deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (2) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de los jueces de la corte del condado, sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho condado aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces del condado mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces del Condado deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (3)a. En la eleccin general del ao 2000 se deber votar en cada jurisdiccin territorial de circuito y de condado para decidir si el modo de elegir a los jueces de circuito y a los jueces del condado ser mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. Si los electores votan por no ejercer esta opcin local, esta opcin no podr someterse a votacin de los electores en esa jurisdiccin hasta que hayan transcurrido al menos dos aos. b. A partir del ao 2000, cada circuito puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o de la eleccin de jueces de circuito, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el encargado de los registros estatales. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en la jurisdiccin de ese circuito en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. c. A partir del ao 2000, cada condado puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o la eleccin de los jueces del condado, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el supervisor de las elecciones. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en el condado en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. Los mandatos de los jueces de circuito y los jueces de condado sern de seis aos. SECCI"N 11. Vacantes.(a)(1) Siempre que se produzca una vacante en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir la vacante mediante el nombramiento de una persona entre al menos tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que finalizar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a las prximas elecciones generales que se efecten al menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. (2) Siempre que se produzca una vacante eventual en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir esa vacante eventual mediante el nombramiento de un juez o un magistrado de entre al menos tres personas y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos corresponiente. El plazo del nombramiento comienza cuando finaliza el plazo del cargo que qued vacante y concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a la prxima eleccin general. (b) El gobernador deber cubrir cada vacante de una corte de circuito o de una corte de condado, en donde los jueces sean elegidos por mayora de votos de los electores, al nombrar a una persona entre no menos de tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao que sigue a eleccin primaria y general que se efecte por lo menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. Se deber realizar una eleccin para cubrir ese cargo judicial por el periodo del cargo que comienza al finalizar el periodo del cargo por nombra miento. (c) Los nombramientos se debern realizar dentro de los treinta das desde que se ha producido la vacante o vacante eventual, excepto que el gobernador extienda el perodo por un lapso que no podr exceder los treinta das. El gobernador deber realizar el nombramiento dentro de los sesenta das desde que los nombramientos hayan sido certificados ante el gobernador. (d) Tal como lo establece la legislacin general, debern existir diferentes comisiones judiciales de nombramientos para el Tribunal Supremo, para cada tribunal de apelacin de distrito, y para cada circuito judicial en todos los juzgados de primera instancia del circuito. Las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos debern establecer reglamentos de procedimiento uniformes en cada nivel del sistema judicial. Tales reglamentos, o cualquier parte de ellos, podrn ser derogados por las leyes generales promulgadas con la mayora de votos de cada cmara de la Asamblea Legislativa, o por el Tribunal Supremo de Justicia con el voto concurrente de cinco magistrados. A excepcin de las deliberaciones realizadas por las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos, los procedimientos de las comisiones y sus registros debern estar abiertos al pblico. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 96166T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-173 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KURT M. ELDRIDGE and VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA, PHASE 1 PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 27th day of August, 2014. in Case Number 13-173 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A., is Plaintiff, and KURT M. ELDRIDGE and VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA, PHASE 1 PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the 2nd floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola at 11:00 a.m. (Central Time) on October 23, 2014, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Forec osure: Lot 25 of Village Green By the Sea, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 10-11, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 25, 2014 The Times | A17 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 5. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 6. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets. 7. Mariner's View #9 3 bedroom 3 bath fully furnished, $850mo. No utilities. Pet friendly 8. 46-4 Carlton Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished apartment, $375mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 9. 33-2 Holland Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished, $525mo. No utilities. 10. 51-4 Pine Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath, unfurnished. $525mo. No Utilities.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519267 Franklin CountyLiquor License$ 155,000.00 Seriousinquires/offersonly at:anitalln242@aol.com 4518844 4518882CASE MANAGEMENT POSITION Bachelor's Degree in Social Services (social work, sociology, psychology, or related eld) or an LPN/RN license and 2+ years of professional case management experience REQUIRED. No one without these minimum quali cations will be considered. Excellent written communication skills and basic computer skills also required. Please send resume to Mary Clayton, Gulf County Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 or email to psjseniorscfo@fairpoint.net 4518535 AdministrativeFacilities SpecialistLooking for a self-motivated multi-tasker to report to the Facilities Manager for the St. George Plantation Owners’ Association. You will need extensive software skills, as well as computer research and graphic abilities. Responsibilities include controlling the incoming and outgoing documentation process for multiple functions plus maintaining computer files; creating spreadsheets and meeting presentations; tracking project progress and results; filing and copying. Strong communications, interpersonal and organizational skills required. You will be expected to maintain solid customer relations with all internal groups interfacing with this position, especially in fielding and resolving questions and concerns with speed and efficiency. Full-time position with full benefits plus a starting salary in the low to mid $30,000 range based on experience and qualifications. References required. Please submit your resume or inquiry to Karen Rudder, General Manager, St. George Plantation Owners’ Association, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328; Fax 850-937-3039; email gmanager@sgpoa.com EEO Employer Web ID#: 34301145 SalesWashington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Advertising Sales ExecutiveHalifax Media Group is looking for an experienced sales executive to provide online and print advertising solutions to advertisers in Washington/Holmes Counties in beautiful northwest Florida, to maximize the benefits of advertising for our customers while maximizing revenues for our company. This position will focus on soliciting print and online advertising on behalf of the businesses and brands of Halifax Media Group, Northwest Florida. Prior sales experience a must. Washington and Holmes counties are just a short drive to the World’s Most Beautiful Beaches and have plenty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Halifax Media Group offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Hire is made pending a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background check. No phone calls, please Web ID#: 34300963 THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICY OF THE CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale. you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 27th day of August, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Sept. 18, 25, 2014 96194T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2009-CA-000469CAAX-MX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE RELATING TO CHEVY CHASE FUNDING LLC MORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. LUCIA ANN GLEATON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUCIA ANN GLEATON; JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 50, TURTLE BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 36, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on December, 10, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 28th day of August, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff 47278-T/jml If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 96264T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FileNo.14-000048-CP Division IN RE: ESTATE OF KENNETH FOYD SPIVEY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Kenneth Foyd Spivey, deceased, whose date of death was July 1, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203 Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 25th, 2014. Personal Representative: Vanessa Ball 170 Erika Lane Douglasville, FL 30134 SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representative 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8976 Florida Bar No. 442178 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.net Sept. 25, Oct 2, 2014 96272T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 12-165CA ONE WEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF EUGENE HOBBS A/K/A OLEN EUGENE HOBBS, DECEASED. et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: LARRY EUGENE HOBBS A/K/A LARRY HOBBS and UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF EUGENE HOBBS A/K/A OLEN EUGENE HOBBS, DECEASED whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO-WIT: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST; THENCE RUN NORTH 2 20’ EAST ALONG THE EAST SECTION LINE OF SAID SECTION 20, A DISTANCE OF 291.23 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF WILDERNESS ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 44’ 00” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 513.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 26 16’ 00” WEST 420.0 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 44’ 00” WEST 103.71 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 16’ 00” WEST 420.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 63 44’ 00” EAST 103.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PROPERTY LYING IN AND BEING A PART OF SAID SECTION 20, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 1989 EAGLE DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #’S GAFLIC35A01722ET AND GAFLIC35B01722ET COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH EAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST; THENCE RUN NORTH 2 20’ EAST ALONG THE EAST SECTION LINE OF SAID SECTION 20, A DISTANCE OF 291.23 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF WILDERNESS ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 44’ 00” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 513.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 26 16’ 00” WEST 420.0 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 44’ 00” WEST 103.71 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 16’ 00” WEST 420.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 63 44’ 00” EAST 103.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PROPERTY LYING IN AND BEING A PART OF SAID SECTION 20, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 1989 EAGLE DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #’S GAFLIC35A01722ET AND GAFLIC35B01722ET has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before 30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Franklin County, Florida, this 11th day of September, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, & SCHNEID, PL 6409 CONGRESS AVE. SUITE 100 BOCA RATON, FL 33487 PRIMARY EMAIL: MAIL@RASFLAW.COM 13-22514 -SuY Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 ADOPTION: Jewelry Designer & TV Journalist yearn for 1st baby to LOVEMeryl & David 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com GUN SHOWSeptember 27th &28th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 txt FL00161 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 11th & 12th9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Conceal weapon classes offered daily. Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternFront Desk MaintenanceWeekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34301150 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at The Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island, FL. Experience is helpful. Must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at The Buccaneer Inn located at160 W. Gorrie Dr., St. George Island or call 850-927-2585 for more information. Web ID#: 34300743 Medical/HealthLPN / MA Wanted/ PRNOutpatient practice seeks an LPN or Certified MA for a specialty practice to work on a PRN basis. The ideal candidate will have three to five years of nursing experience. Previous medical office experience is preferred. The nurse will provide support for providers at outlying clinics. The optimum candidate will have an impeccable attention to detail. Apply by email to: pesher@seuc.com Web ID 34299015 OtherExecutive Director of the Chamber of CommercePosition open in November. For inquiries, call 850-697-2585 or email: chamber@nettally .com Web ID#: 34300272 OtherMaintenance TechTransfield Services Carrabelle, FL Roadway, Signs, Bridges, Vegetation, etc. HS or GED -Valid DL CDL Highly Desirable. Call 850-544-4023 Web ID#: 34299681 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL97546 to 56654 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-247-8470 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. GeorgeIsland $185/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola -Beautiful 4br, 3.5ba, located in the heart of Apalachicola Historic Southside. Garage & Fenced yard. $2000mo + $1000 dep. First & Last month req. 6-12mo lease. Call 850-370-6001 Apalachicola : 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. 850-643-7740 Text FL96705 to 56654 St. George Island 2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $1150 mo + $500 dep 850-370-6001 East Point Home for sale $85,000 159 Bear Creek Rd, approx. 1300 sq ft, Large living room, 2 bd/1 ba, Kitchen & Dining room, front & back screened porches, carport & workshop on fenced 2 acre lot w/ pond. Approx. 1 mile from the Bay, 4 miles to St. George Island bridge. For information please call 251-214-6595 or 850-370-0288 Price ReducedCarrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced, (2) storage buildings 10x20, 10x32 screened back porch, & deep well. Close to town and boat ramps. $82,500. 850-697-2176 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

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Local A18 | The Times Thursday, September 25, 2014 Special to the Times Through the FloridaLe arns STEM Scholars Proj ect, talented and gifted high school students from small and rural districts across Florida participat ed in the 2014 STEM Im mersion experience. This opportunity was made possible through a partnership with the Uni versity of Floridas Center for Precollegiate Educa tion and Training. In the PAEC-served area, 29 STEM Scholars and ve teachers partici pated in a variety of ex periences at the Univer sity of Florida and STEM Scholars were exposed to a variety of STEM career preparatory programs available at the university. For a realistic college ex perience, University of cials assigned students to dorm rooms as well as their work groups for the week. One of the STEM Schol ars rst experiences in cluded a STEM Health Science Professions forum. This took place in the Health Science Cen ter where STEM Scholars interacted with univer sity faculty and students from the colleges of medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, occu pational therapy, physi cal therapy, and phar macy, and the biology department. The stu dents then visited vari ous biomedical research laboratories housed in the center. The chemistry depart ment shared information about career options in their specic eld and provided students handson activities working with nanotechnology. The students also visited the computer science depart ment where they con structed a Virtual Pa tient and practiced with diagnosing that patients illness. The STEM Scholars experiences included ex tracting DNA from plants, running a PCR ( polymerase chain reaction) and com pleting gel electrophore sis in the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research. Data was used to construct morpho logical and molecular phylogenies. STEM Scholars also completed a scientic research activity at the Entomology and Nematol ogy Department by col lecting data on fruit ies (Drosophila) that were in a cold-induced coma. Students took advan tage of this departments outside classroom as they waded through the Stormwater Ecologi cal Enhancement Proj ect Wetlands teaching laboratory and worked with university faculty and graduate students to explore this Florida ecosystem. XNS P112049 Parkway Motors Parkway Motors CHEVROLET AVA LANCHE $ 315 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 4x4 HOND AA CCORD $ 235 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn EX-6, Leather ,R oof ,L ow Miles! MINICOOPER $ 235 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 26K Miles DODGE RAM $ 315 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn 2t oc hoose fr om! 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HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HO ND A CR-V Under $ 10,000 850-481-0148 4136 E. 15th St. |P an ama City www .pkwymot ors.com STEM Scholars explore careers through UF immersionPHOTOS ARE COURTESY OF P ANHANDLE A REA E DUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM Dallas Bird (Port St Joe) watches as Chase Taranto (Franklin County) and Maura Mahan (Port St. Joe) work with micropipettes as they prepare the groups sample for DNA replication. At top right Chase Taranto (Franklin County) learns about Floridas geology and hydrology as she explores a bat cave at the Harvey Sharron Bat Cave Field Laboratory. 1) What happened to Mt. Vernon, Washingtons home, during the U.S. Civil War? Confederate hospital, Left alone, Union stockade, Southern storage depot 2) What was the rst animal successfully cloned? Rabbit, Mouse, Sheep, Guinea pig 3) The late Minnie Pearls hat had a hanging tag with what dollar amount? $.02, $.98, $1.98, $1.99 4) What was the original name for TV Guide? TV Time, Television Night, TV Digest, Channel Select 5) Which famed persons middle name was Sydenstricker? Ulysses Grant, Pearl Buck, Harry Truman, Malcolm Forbes 6) Where in Germany is the MercedesBenz museum? Hamburg, Munich, Stuttgart, Potsdam 7) Which Porsche model became its rst with a water-cooled engine? 911, 924, 944, 959 8) What famed writer lled her pockets with rocks and drowned herself? George Eliot, Ayn Rand, Virginia Woolf, Mary Wollstonecraft 9) From the comics, whose dog foe is named T ackhammer? Woody Woodpecker, Popeye, Judge Parker, Gareld 10) What country provided the main setting for the classic movie Casablanca? France, Egypt, Morocco, Italy 11) A T eenagers Romance and Im Walkin were whose earliest records? Ricky Nelson, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Perry Como 12) What does the British English word buffer mean in American English? Bumper, Skater, Thinker, Student 13) On older TVs Bonanza what were Buck, Cochise, Chub, and Sport? Beers, Horses, Bartenders, 6-guns 14) Experts on ants claim the insects hate what the most? Salt, Vinegar, Mayonnaise, Baking soda ANSWERS 1) Left alone. 2) Sheep. 3) $1.98. 4) TV Digest. 5) Pearl Buck. 6) Stuttgart. 7) 924. 8) Virginia Woolf. 9) Woody Woodpecker. 10) Morocco. 11) Ricky Nelson. 12) Bumper. 13) Horses. 14) Vinegar. T rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com TRIVIA FUN Aaliyah West (Franklin County) works to prepare her groups sample for DNA replication.