The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00288

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, September 18, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com Email: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index VOL. 129 ISSUE 21 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Apalachicola physician and inventor John Gorrie, M.D. may have lived nearly two centuries ago, but he’s still the “class” of 2014. Three Franklin County representatives — Joshua Hodson, park manager at the John Gorrie Museum State Park, and Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson and City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb — joined in an elegant gala Sept. 10 in Tampa to celebrate Gorrie’s induction, as part of the inaugural class of six Florida inventors, into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. In addition to Gorrie, considered the father of modernday refrigeration and air conditioning, the ceremony at the Palma Ceia Golf and Country Club in South Tampa honored Thomas Edison, Gatorade inventor Dr. Robert Cade, Eyewitnesses scarce in Williams murder case By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The 46-year-old Eastpoint man charged in the bludgeoning death May 10 of a known sexual predator has said he doesn’t recall striking the victim with an ax handle, and so far there are few individuals at the scene that night willing to come forward to say he did. Bobby J. Bullock Jr. faces second-degree murder charges in the death of Norman Bill Williams, 59, which police say took place sometime before 8:30 p.m. at a house on Washington Street. An autopsy report from Dr. Lisa M. Flannagan, with the medical examiner’s of ce, said she found “blunt force trauma and hemorrhage. It appears that (Williams) was struck by a very signi cant impact near the base of the skull near left ear. The source of hemorrhage in this area is often dif cult to locate.” Bullock was in court last week on an unrelated felony charge of child abuse dating back to September 2013. Nan Weaver, spokeswoman for the Of ce of Criminal Con ict & Civil Regional Counsel for the First District Court of Appeals Region, said Bullock’s attorney, Thomas Cassidy from Port St. Joe, had sought a plea agreement to reduce the charge to misdemeanor domestic battery, with the punishment time served of about nine months. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford at rst refused to accept it, but Assistant State Attorney Jared Patterson plans to le the lesser charge for consideration by the judge in November, Weaver said. At that time, proceedings are expected to begin in the murder case, although a possible trial is still months away. “We plan to perform Town’s CRA has $1.27 million at its disposal By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The numbers are in place for Carrabelle’s rst ever Community Redevelopment Agency budget. During the upcoming scal year, Carrabelle will have an unprecedented $1.27 million to spend on projects within the CRA district, which covers much of the business district, stretching from the riverside pavilion to Tillie Miller Bridge. Additional income is available because the city repaid a loan of more than $800,000 borrowed from the CRA fund to make repairs to the water and sewer system in 2007. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s elected ofcials will be getting a small increase, just over one-quarter of 1 percent, in their annual pay next year. The Florida Legislature’s Of ce of Economic and Demographic Research this month released the annual calculations, which apply to the upcoming scal year beginning Oct. 1. While the practice of having state law set the pay for Florida county ofcials started with the Constitution of 1885, Florida lawmakers ended the need for frequent legislative action in 1973, when they authorized the salary compensation formula that was the precursor to its present form. The formula is based in large part on a county’s population and Franklin County, with 11,530 people, nds itself in the smallest of the population groupings. Only Liberty and Lafayette counties are smaller, each with about 3,000 fewer people. The formula begins with a base salary, and then multiplies it by a series of modi ers, to get the eventual pay. Assistant Finance Director Erin Grif th told county commissioners Monday the increases will cost the county an additional $2,277. In the case of the sheriff, highest paid of the county’s ve constitutional of cers, Mike Mock will make $103,276 next year, $290 more than the $102,986 paid him this scal year. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 Carrabelle to upgrade downtown Welcome Park in Carrabelle will get a $5,000 facelift, with the little lighthouse eventually replaced with a Big Bend Scenic Byway kiosk. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times See CARRABELLE A13 CLASS OF 2014 DR. JOHN GORRIE Of ceholders to get small salary increase GORRIE INDUCTED INTO FLORIDA INVENTORS HALL OF FAME See MURDER CASE A3 See SALARY A3 THE OTHER 2014 INDUCTEES DR. ROBERT CADE Gatorade inventor DR. WILLIAM GLENN high-de nition imaging expert THOMAS EDISON inventor of the phonograph and light bulb DR. SHIN-TSON WU liquid crystal researcher DR. SHYAM MOHAPATRA nanotechnology scientist AIMEE BLODGETT | USF News Dr. John Gorrie was inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame’s inaugural class on Sept. 10 in Tampa. Above Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, chairman of the Hall of Fame’s advisory board, left, and Margaret A. Focarino of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Of ce stand with Joshua Hodson, park manager at the John Gorrie Museum State Park. See GORRIE A13 Seahawk ups and downs, A11 Coastal Cleanup this Saturday The annual Coastal Cleanup will be 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 20, throughout the county. Volunteers should wear or bring sunscreen, bug spray, protective clothing (hats, long pants, longsleeved shirts) and work or closed-toed water shoes. Volunteers will be provided trash bags, gloves, data cards, snacks, water and T-shirts. For more info, call Ada Long at 927-2776 or email adalong@uab.edu. Gulf-Franklin hosts roundtable Monday Gulf Coast State College’s Gulf/Franklin Campus will host a Business Roundtable Forum from 7:45-9:30 a.m. Monday, Sept. 22, for the local business community. The free forum is open to business people, and a breakfast will be buffet provided. RSVP no later than Sept. 19 by visiting www.gulfcoast. edu/smallbusinessforum, emailing mdarko@ gulfcoast.edu or calling 850-227-9670, ext. 5503. Estuary Day Sept. 26 Estuary Day will be 1:306 p.m. Friday, Sept. 26, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. The celebration will include free educational and fun activities for kids, free T-shirts to the rst 600 people, scavenger hunts, animal touch tanks, games and door prizes for adults who stay until the end. Dr. Dean Grubbs, faculty at Florida State University and featured on Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week,” will talk about the endangered smalltooth saw sh, and visitors can view an exhibit created by ANERR researchers about creatures that prey on oysters in Apalachicola Bay.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, September 18, 2014 ‘To End All Wars’ screened Saturday The Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, 1001 Gray Avenue in Carrabelle will present the lm “To End All Wars” this Saturday, Sept. 20 at 10:15 a.m. Based on the true story of Ernest Gordon, the lm tells of four Allied POWs who endure harsh treatment from their Japanese captors during World War II while being forced to build a railroad through the Burmese jungle. Ultimately, they nd true freedom by forgiving their enemies. Admission is by donation. This lm is one in a series shown monthly to educate visitors on the sacrices made by our World War II generation. Free popcorn will be served. For more information call 697-8575. Gulf-Franklin hosts business roundtable Monday Gulf Coast State College’s Gulf/Franklin Campus will host a Business Roundtable Forum Monday, Sept. 22 for the local business community, its goal to provide a viable means to drive conversation to identify local economic topics of real concern. “Safeguarding the economic well-being of our local communities is a core focus of Gulf Coast State College. This breakfast is designed as a tool to learn, share, and engage in meaningful dialogue, “said Loretta Costin, Gulf/ Franklin Campus director, The forum is sponsored by the college’s Florida Small Business Development Center in partnership with the Gulf County and the Apalachicola Bay chambers of commerce. It will be from 7:45 to 9:30 a.m. EDT at the Gulf/Franklin Campus, 3800 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe. The forum is open to the business community at no cost and a breakfast buffet will be provided. Please RSVP no later than Sept. 19. For event details and to RSVP, visit www.gulfcoast.edu/ smallbusinessforu m or email mdarko@gulfcoast. ed u All inquiries should be directed to the Gulf/ Franklin Campus at 850227-9670 ext. 5503. Legislative delegation to meet Sept. 29 Franklin County’s Legislative Delegation will meet in the county commission meeting room on Monday, Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. The public hearing in Apalachicola will be at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 37 Forbes Street. All residents and elected ofcials are invited to attend. This hearing will allow citizens the opportunity to meet their state legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments for the upcoming 2015 legislative session. For more information please telephone Marcia Mathis at (850) 487-5003   or send email to mathis. marcia@flsenate.go v ),& &&&**& *& -& !+'!% -& -* & & , *& )& &*) & + ( ( %%( % +( % & -, -&, & & ( ( % ( ( % & %! & &, &!!( % !!( % & &( ( *$ !( % !( % *&*! (! !( $ ( ( -%+( %+( & $ -( %+ %( ( %+ %( )& -! 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Se pt em be r in it ia l gu ar a nt ee d in te re st s ra te s ar e: # # / %' %# '& ' 0$ "+ .. #/ ' # ) + ,# # ''& ) %' %# ' # # & %/ &' # # / ' $ ) .. #/ # # # $/' # %' %# # # / ) + ((( .. #/ ' # ) + + ,# # '' & ) %' % #' # # & %/ &' # # / ' $ ) .. #/ # # # $/' # %' %# # # / ) (( .. #/ ' # ) + # # '& ) %' %# ' # # & %/ &' # # / $ ) .. #/ # # # $/ # %' %# # # / ) +( ( ((( ) ' %' %# ' # # '% &# ' # ) ,# # ''& / '& ) '&' %#, ' & # & # 0. .0 0 ' # ) # # '& '#) ' # / ' # # ' 0 / $ & 0' ) / & # & // ' $' / # # #' '& # // ) % # %' %# -. ,-' # # / & % 0# $' # #. /# $/ #/ / #' #% # & 0' '/& '' # & .) & % . ,) 0$ . # ) '/ ., .$./ %# ( Se co nd ar y gu ar an te ed in te re st ra te th ro ug h sur re nd er ch arge pe ri od is 1. 00 % Mi ni mum gu ar an te ed in te re st ra te is 1. 00 % Wo od man of th e Wo rl d Li fe In su ra nc e So cie ty Ho me Of c e, Om ah a, Ne br as ka | wo od men .o rg By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@starfl.co m Gwen Graham is far from conceding Franklin County in her race to represent the 2nd Congressional District in Washington. She, accompanied by her par ents, former Democratic gover nor Bob Graham, and his wife of 55 years Adele, and a sizeable con tingent of campaign volunteers, on Saturday afternoon christened a new campaign headquarters in Eastpoint, at the former Gulf State Community Bank building, now headquarters of FCTV. Volunteers, choreographed by a couple of eld operatives from there, intend to launch a vigor ous telephone call and personal visit effort, to convince voters the edge should go to Gwen Graham in her campaign to unseat Steve Southerland, a two-term Repub lican incumbent. Any notion that Bob Graham would serve his daughter’s cam paign mainly as a cigar store Indian, lending authenticity but silent and unmoving, was quickly dispelled after a warm introduc tion of the Grahams to the gath ering, by Curt Blair, past chair man of the county’s Democratic Executive Committee. “Every election says this is the most important election in the history of the world,” said Bob Graham, summoning the electioneering spirit that led to two terms as governor and three as U.S. senator. “This one is es pecially important.” He spoke of a government and Congress that “has become dysfunctional,” presumably dat ing back a decade, when he com pleted his career as an elected ofcial. Graham said this has led to the needs of constituents not be ing attended to, and a greater focus being paid to contentious and divisive national issues. The implication was clear when he spoke of 50 or 60 Tea Party con gressmen “a signicant number but nowhere close to a majority” who he said “has been able to vir tually bring Congress to a halt. “We can’t elect 60 members of Congress, we can only elect one,” he said. “Maybe voters feel intimidated, or maybe they just feel there’s not the possibility of change. They need to feel embold ened, that we’re not consigned to the last 10 years forever. “We can replace one of those,” Bob Graham said. “With someone’s who’s going to be reasonable.” He then voiced an observa tion that Gwen Graham would later underscore, although less stridently. “Mr. Southerland said he did not go to Washington to make friends,” he said. “Well, how the hell do you get anything accom plished when there aren’t people there to work with you?” Before introducing his wife, and later his daughter, Bob Gra ham closed with enthusiasm for the challenge ahead. “There has never been a woman elected to Congress from the Florida Pan handle,” he said. “You’re going to have a chance to change that piece of history.” Adele Graham’s remarks were a soft contrast to her husband’s. “You can’t imagine how a mother feels,” she said. “Watching your daughter doing everything with such ease, and loving it.” After the requisite thank-yous to the Democratic loyalists, who were able to munch on fruits, vegetables and sh dip, Gwen Graham voiced her brand of po litical promise-making. She referred to Southerland’s recent remarks to the county commission about the Water Re sources Reform and Development Act of 2014, and suggested he was overstating the signicance of his amendment to the act. “I was very, very disappointed in Congressman Southerland,” she said. “He is misleading the people of Franklin County about his actions. We lost a great opportunity.” Graham was referring to a pro posal that was suggested, but not turned into law, that would have granted legal rights to downstream users such as the oystermen of Apalachicola Bay. “He could have offered an amendment,” she said. “He missed that chance. “I can’t wait to show him. I will be doing that,” she said. “If I had that opportunity, there would have been nothing that kept that amendment from being in that bill.” Graham said the task lies in “building relationships, instead of alienating the Army Corps of Engineers. That’s the way we’re going to break though and have some real dialogue.” She said the new ofce marks the sixth such headquarters in the sprawling district that in cludes all or some of 14 counties, from Bay County to the west, Jackson and portions of Holmes to the north, to Taylor and por tions of Madison to the east. Fur thermore, Graham said, this was part of the largest eld campaign of any congressional race in the country. “We’re doing everything right to win this race,” she said. Graham opens campaign headquarters in Eastpoint DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Gwen Graham addresses the gathering at her new headquarters. FCO B riefsRIEFS 2014

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, September 18, 2014 Wh y di d we go sm ok efr ee ? Ja ni e's Ga rden 23 50 Ce nt ral Av e Sa ra so ta FL Bo na ir To we r 19 15 Ha lg ri m Av e Fo rt My er s, FL "G oi ng sm ok efr ee wa s th e RI GH T po li cy fo r he alt h, sa fe ty an d co st re as on s fo r AL L of ou r re si den ts ." Bi ll R us se ll Sa ra sot a Ho us in g Au th or it y, Pr es ide nt & CE O "W e ad o pt ed a sm ok efr ee po li cy in Jan uar y 20 13 for al l of ou r Pu bl ic Ho us in g an d Ne ig hb orho od St ab il iz at io n pr op er ti es Ou r fo cu s an d de ci si on wa s qu it e si mp le : 1. Pr om ot e a he alt hi er li fe st yl e 2. Cr ea te a he alt hi er li vi ng en vi ro nm en t 3. Cu t th e co st as so ci at ed wi th sm ok in g da ma ge to un it s" Sh er ri Ca mp an al e, Ho us ing Au th or it y of th e Ci ty of Fo rt My er s Di re ct or of Ho us ing & Ma in te nan ce Op er at io ns Fo r mo re in fo rm at io n pl ea se co nt ac t: www .t ob ac co fr ee or id a. co m/ sm ok ef re eh ou si ng a rigorous defense at trial on the behalf of Mr. Bullock,” Cassidy said. Deputy Jamie Shiver, rst to arrive at the scene about 8:23 p.m., found emergency medical technicians administering CPR to Williams, who was later pro nounced dead at Weems Memo rial Hospital. While Shiver’s report indicates several individuals at the home that night believe Bullock struck Williams with an ax handle, only one 14-year-old has come forward to say he actually witnessed the apparent slaying. The boy said he saw Williams arguing with David Holstein, hus band of his grandmother Sarah Vinson, who they call Nupi, The boy said Holstein was ordering Williams to leave because he had groped Angela Law, known as “Shortly.” The boy told police Bullock walked up behind Williams and struck him with an ax handle. He then “staggered a short dis tance and fell over a grill onto the ground,” the boy said. A half hour later, the boy told the deputy he checked Williams for a pulse and could not detect one. The deputy said permission for the interview was granted by the boy’s mother. Holstein told police that in ad dition to groping Law, Williams had “become aggressive towards people at the home.” He said he ordered Williams to leave, but he refused. Holstein said he went inside the house, and when he returned a little later, he found Williams collapsed on the ground near an overturned grill. He told the deputy he did not know what had happened. Law told police Williams had grabbed her “butt, breast and vagina … on top of her clothing.” She said Holstein and Williams began arguing, and she went in side to tell Sarah Vinson “that Bill needs to be made to leave.” Law said that when she walked back outside, she saw Williams on the ground. “She knows Bullock hit Bill in the head,” Shiver wrote. “But did not see it happen.” Philip Vinson told police he was inside Sarah Vinson’s home when the incident occurred, and that “he is not going to lie like everyone else is coaching each other to do. He is going to tell the truth because someone died.” Vinson said that while he did not witness Bullock hitting Wil liams, “he is basing his account of events on what he could hear tak ing place, and what others have said while coaching each other to lie. Witnesses have said they are lying because (Law) is on proba tion and is afraid she will be vio lated for being around alcohol.” Sarah Vinson said she watched from a window “but is not going to make a truthful statement be cause she is afraid press coverage will affect her rental income.” Bullock’s sister, Sheila Mon roe, told police said she was at home on Shuler Street when her brother came by around 9 p.m. and said he was in a ght with Williams. Monroe said people told her Bullock had hit Williams in the head with an ax handle, but “she does not believe her brother would kill someone intentionally,” according to the police report. “She has also been made aware that Williams had been tormenting Bullock for the past two days. Williams was telling Bullock that he raped his mother and grandmother years ago and Bullock was powerless to stop it,” Shiver wrote. “Monroe feels this may have played a part in the incident, however she does not know if it did.” Charlie Goodwin said he did not see the incident but was told Bullock struck Williams with an ax. Goodwin led Shiver to an area where he has an ax stored and identied it as having been used by Bullock to strike Williams. Goodwin also provided a second ax that he said “had nothing to do with the killing.” Goodwin re fused to explain how he was able to identify the ax used, wrote the deputy. Ruby Rutherford said she was at Sarah Vinson’s home with oth er witnesses, when she saw Wil liams playing cards and sitting along with everyone. Williams was eating a plate of spaghetti at about 7:50 p.m. when Rutherford went to the store, she told the deputy, and when she returned about 20 to 30 minutes later, she found Williams dead on the front lawn. Both Law and Holstein said Bullock had hit Williams and ed. She was also told by witnesses that Williams had fell over a grill. Bullock said after Williams re fused to leave, and began cussing at Holstein, he walked up and hit him, “but does not remember hit ting him with an ax handle. (He) said he believes he only hit him with a closed st, due to his wrist being swollen now.” Bullock told the deputy he thought he had knocked Williams unconscious and had no idea he was dead. He said he then went to Monroe’s house, where he re mained until deputies came to question him. Williams attracted widespread media attention in September 2011, when he ed the woods outside Eastpoint after being re leased there from a stint in state prison. Because he was a sexual predator who was shunned by his family, Williams had no place else he could legally stay, so probation ofcials placed a tracker on Wil liams’ leg and told him to remain in the woods. He shed the device and ed. Two weeks later, he was ap prehended in Lafourche Parish, a shing village in southwest Louisiana. At that time, Wil liams had an extensive criminal history, with numerous arrests stretching over several counties in Florida, Alabama, Texas and Louisiana. Prior arrests were for such crimes as armed robbery, kidnapping, aggravated assault, larceny, burglary, grand theft auto and drug possession. After serving more than two years for failure to register as a sexual offender, Williams was released earlier this year to a residence in Tallahassee. He re turned to Franklin County the week before his murder and reg istered May 10 as a sexual preda tor here, with an address of 407 U.S 98 in Eastpoint. MURDER CASE from page A1 Clerk of Courts Marcia John son, Tax Collector Jimmy Harris and Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper each will earn $94,337, $266 more than their $94,071 sala ries in place this year. Supervi sor of Elections Ida Elliott will make $77,031, $219 more than the $76,812 paid her this year. The ve county commission ers will each make $26,041 next year, $81 than the $25,960 the job paid this year, for a slightly high er raise of about one-third of 1 percent. Superintendent Nina Marks will see a salary of $94,337 in the coming year, $266 more than the $94,071 she made this year. The ve school board members each will make $24,969, $70 more than the $24,899 in their pay envelopes this year. While the new county salaries commence Oct. 1, school district salaries began July 1, with the start of the school district’s scal year. Each elected county consti tutional ofcer, county commis sioner and school board member is allowed under Florida law to reduce his or her salary rate on a voluntary basis. Select county constitutional ofcers are eligible to receive a special qualication salary of up to $2,000 added to their formulabased salary, if the ofcer com pletes the required certication program. Certication programs are offered to clerks of court, sher iffs, supervisors of elections, prop erty appraisers, tax collectors, and elected school superintendents. Salaries of Florida’s elected state ofcials and full-time mem bers of commissions are not set by a statutory salary formula, but are set annually in the General Appropriations Act. Circuit Court Judge Tracy Fulford will be paid $146,080 per year, and County Court Judge Van Russell $138,020 annually. State Attorney Willie Meggs will make $154,140, the same rate as Public Defender Nancy Daniels. Salaries for all members of the Florida Senate and House mem bers are $29,697 each. DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The Times Bobby Bullock Jr. stands in court last week. SALARY from page A1

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINIo O N www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 A Section Page 4 Q. I received a notice from Local Records Ofce stating I could send them $89 for a complete property prole and copy of the only document that identies me as a property owner. What is this? A. To my knowledge, these “notices” sent by “Local Records Ofce” have been going around for a few years and have become more prevalent lately. There is no afliation between “Local Records Ofce” and the Clerk of the Court, who is responsible for keeping the ofcial records. The notice tells recipients that they can receive a copy of their property deed and a “complete property prole” by sending $89 or $96 to an address in Tallahassee. These notices include a coupon people can detach and mail back with their checks, noting the $89 or $96 “service fee.” This may not be against the law, but I believe it is certainly misleading because there is no need to pay such a high price to get a public record. Nobody needs to pay $89 or any other large amount to receive a copy of their deed. Deeds and other ofcial records are now easily obtained online or at our courthouse from my ofce. Hard copies cost $1 per page, and certied documents cost an additional $2. Uncertied copies can be downloaded and printed free in Franklin County by using the Public Records Search under Quick Links at www.franklinclerk.com. Send questions or comments about this column to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, email mmjohnson@franklin.clerk. com or visit www.franklinclerk.com. M aA RCI aA JOHNSON Your Public Trustee “Oh the days dwindle down … to a precious few … September … November …” — from “September Song” as recorded by Willie Nelson Pennsylvania has Punxsutawney Phil; Florida has singing katydids. Last week a wonderfully entertaining article in the Sebring News (central Florida) described a variety of signs that we are facing an early, cold and wet winter. A primary source is the Farmer’s Almanac. Mainly, though, folks around Sebring are observing nature’s pre-winter activities. One Sebring native says that katydids are singing, and this traditionally means that winter’s rst frost is only six weeks away. “Thick tails and bright bands” on raccoons and thick hair on the nape of cows’ necks represent more signs that cold weather is coming. Crickets populating the replace hearth earlier than usual are another harbinger. Some Sebring natives say that considerably cooler weather is imminent when spiders spin webs that are larger than normal and nd their way inside peoples’ homes. Finally, squirrels are already burying acorns for the winter. Pretty unscientic, huh? But I’ll be shocked if our central Florida friends are incorrect. Animals, insects and birds can “sense” the earth’s changing seasons. Anyone who has witnessed the movements of nature’s creatures just before a hurricane arrives has likely marveled at their prescient qualities. By the way, January is likely to be our coldest month this winter. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if certain events tipped us off to similar coming market changes? As my father used to say, “Would that it were.” Lagging and coincident indicators only provide backward and sideward glances. For instance, a look at current corporate prots (a lagging indicator) tells us nothing about the future, because these numbers represent past performance. Leading economic indicators may provide some front windshield views, but economists differ on how these factors should be interpreted. Many items are considered leading economic indicators by the Conference Board, including 10 that comprise the Composite Index: Average weekly hours (manufacturing); average weekly jobless claims for unemployment insurance; manufacturers’ new orders for consumer goods; vendor performance; manufacturers’ new orders for non-defense capital goods; building permits for new private housing units; the S&P stock index; money supply; the interest rate spread and the index of consumer expectations. Synthesizing and applying this information, once it’s assembled, is a neat trick, especially when individual leading economic indicators provide conicting data. What’s an investor or advisor to discern, for instance, when manufacturer’s new orders for consumer goods and capital goods are up, but when consumer expectations and vendor performance are down? Various aspects of the economy may be performing at different levels. Which is why all the securities and sectors of a well-designed portfolio do not rise or fall in concert simultaneously. In other words, “the Bronx is up, but the Battery’s down.” Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850608-6121, www.arborwealth. net), a “fee-only” and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. Groundhogs, katydids and leading indicators M aA RG aA RET RR M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook By JEAn N FEIn N GOLD Special to the Times Oil residue remained in the Gulf of Mexico two years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to a study headed by a University of Florida professor. A team led by professor Thomas S. Bianchi, who holds the Jon and Beverly Thompson Endowed Chair of Geological Sciences, analyzed water samples taken from Gulf waters in 2012 and concluded that dispersants intended to speed the breakup of the oil and hasten its decomposition appear to have enhanced the oil’s solubility in water, resulting in a shift in the optical properties of the oil and its degradation into smaller hydrocarbon molecules. Bianchi and researchers from three other universities examined samples collected from the deep Gulf region around the 2010 spill, looking for evidence of a chemical signature. While other researchers have concluded that hydrocarbons in deep Gulf waters resulting from the explosion no longer are detectible by standard chemical analyses, the UF team found evidence some of the oil had been converted into a different pool of molecules that also were part of the natural ecosystem. Research ndings were published Aug. 19 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. “This nding was quite interesting since all other studies to date continue to nd no evidence of any oil at these depths in the Gulf,” Bianchi said. “What has happened here is that while there are no longer any oil molecules present, they are now disguised in the seawater’s natural carbon pool as degraded uorescent components.” Bianchi likens the formation of these naturally occurring dissolved organic molecules, known as colored dissolved organic matter, or CDOM, to how one makes tea, a process in which colored organic molecules are leached into water from a source of organic matter more commonly known as tea leaves. “All of the plants and animals living in the Gulf are potential sources of these molecules,” Bianchi said. “The reason the Gulf is clear and not colored is because there are many more molecules that do not have a uorescent signature than those that do.” Further work is needed to determine what long-term effects the molecules will have on the Gulf’s ecology, Bianchi said. The next step for Bianchi and his team is to use high resolution mass spectrometry to better identify the molecules associated with these uorescent signatures in the CDOM. “This is information that did not exist previously, and it will prove invaluable if and when another deep water oil catastrophe occurs,” Bianchi said. The research was funded by a grant from BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. Bianchi is part of a larger research consortium, the Gulf Integrated Spill Responsive, led by Piers Chapman of Texas A&M University. Jean Feingold is a writer for the University of Florida. She can be reached at buscomm@ bellsouth.net. Property proles easily, cheaply obtainable UF: OO il residue in G G ulf 2 years after BP spill TT HO maMA S BI aA NCHI UF professor By EE LIn N OR MOun UN T-SImm MM O ns NS Special to the Times The rst PTO meeting for the 201415 year was last week, and according to elementary teacher Natasha Pennycuff, the organization’s treasurer, there are “high hopes that the PTO will continue to grow throughout this year!” PTO, a parent-teacher organization, is an important component of any successful school, contributing much to the school in a variety of ways. This year, Pennycuff said, the Seahawk PTO has “a lot of exciting and rewarding ideas for our school and students,” and of course, they seek the community’s support. One such idea that’s already started, and will be ongoing the entire school year, is Box Tops for Education, a nationwide school earnings loyalty program. Around since 1996, with more than 250 products participating, Pennycuff said this “an easy way for us to earn cash for our school.” All you do is buy a participating product, clip the Box Tops coupon from the item, and send it to FCS. For every coupon we collect, the organization sends us 10 cents. Those dimes can really add up, so we urge you to support this fundraising effort. Products with Box Tops coupons are not limited to food, either. There are so many other companies that participate in this worthwhile program, such as Hanes socks and underwear; Scott paper towels; Kleenex tissue; Hefty trash bags, plates, cups and napkins; and Ziploc baggies. There’s lots more, and to nd out who and what they are, go online to the Box Tops for Education website at www.boxtopsforeducation. com. There you can print out a list of all eligible products, plus read other information about this valuable program. If you are unable to print out this list but want to lend the Seahawks your support for this special project, just contact your child’s teacher. I am sure they will be willing to help you by printing out a list and sending it home by your child. Also, you don’t have to have a child attending FCS to support this Seahawk fundraiser. The entire community is encouraged to help out, so those without a Seahawk student can just bring or send their box tops to the front ofce, and we’ll take it from there. Pennycuff added the PTO has established a goal for this year, and “if the goal is met, we have something fun planned for the students to take part in!” The rst goal is 3,000 Box Tops by the end of October, and a personal incentive to help students bring in those coupons is their earning a Homework Pass or some other reward if they bring in at least two sheets of Box Top coupons. (These sheets were distributed to students last week, but if yours didn’t bring one home, just have your child ask their teacher.) So come on everyone, get to clipping those Box Tops coupons and send them to school, and know the PTO and the entire Seahawk family will be most appreciative of your support with this year-long project. The Class of 2015 held their rst (of many to come) Parent Meeting on Thursday evening, Sept. 4. Quite a few parents came out to be briefed on the expectations for their child’s nal year of high school with veteran Senior Class sponsor Dolores Croom welcoming them all. She got right down to business, informing the parents and students, that although it’s month’s away, she wanted them to have information about graduation. As FCS graduation coordinator, I was asked to attend and share news of this. As an information sheet was being distributed, I informed the parents the Seahawk graduation committee, which consists of Croom, Carla Bankston, Karyl Gavigan, Leigh Smith and myself, looks forward to creating a memorable time for their children, as we have done in the years since the committee’s inception. Dates for the two special occasions FCS is responsible for were also announced: Senior Recognition Night will be Friday, May 22, 2015, with the graduation ceremony Thursday, May 28. The baccalaureate, although also a traditional graduation activity, is planned by parents, so I encouraged those in attendance to step up to the plate and get to working on this, too, with the understanding the senior advisors and the school are here to support them with this special event. Fundraising is a big task for any senior class, primarily to nance their annual senior class trip, and the ofcers and advisors typically plan many opportunities for the students to raise money to help with this endof-the-year excursion. Being sold now are Yankee candles. Coming up soon, they’ll be selling Seahawk T-shirts and hoodies and barbecue dinners, as well as having a 10-10-10 drive. Hopefully one of the members of this class will seek your support for their fundraising efforts, and we urge you to please support them with their many efforts and buy a candle or a shirt or a dinner. The Class of 2015 meets every second Monday during lunch. The schedule for the parents meeting is every other month, so the next gathering for them will be at 6 p.m. Nov. 6 in the media center. Assisting Croom as advisor is Sonja Buffkin, so if there are ever questions and concerns that pertain to the senior class, please contact them. A longtime classroom teacher in the Franklin County Schools, Elinor Mount-Simmons was a regular columnist for the Times for many years. Clip a box top, help a student

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The Times | A5 Thursday, September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h e Ci ty of Ca rr ab el le ha s te nt at iv el y adop te d a bud ge t fo r 20 14 -2 01 5. A pu bl ic he ar in g to ma ke a FI NA L DE CI SI ON on th e bu dg et AN D TA XE S wi ll be hel d on : SE PT EM BE R 22, 20 14 5: 01 P. M. at Ca r ra be ll e Mu ni ci pa l Co mp le x 10 01 Gr ay Av e. Franklin County has been a tourist destination for over 1,000 years. It was a sacred site for Native Americans, a haven for hunters and shermen and a beachgoer’s dream. Tourists were already visiting via steamboat at the turn of the century. In 1907, the rst Apalachicola Northern Railroad train arrived in the county seat, making it even easier for visitors to come to Apalachicola. The city “Dads” aggressively promoted the town. Today we have Florida Seafood Festival. Before that, there was Harbor Day, the Catholic Fair and for a few brief years, Mardi Gras. Perhaps the rst big festival was Oyster Day, celebrated in 1914 the year before the rst Mardi Gras. Oyster Opening Fete Mayor turns over the keys of the city to visitors and they make themselves at home. The delicious shellsh in his native habitat – a visit made to the bars Tuesday On Tuesday morning several boats as per program set sail from the river docks to the oyster bars lying several miles eastward of Apalachicola. Each boat was tted with tongs for grabbing the oyster, while oyster knives, hot sauce and crackers were on board each vessel for use of the visitors. Shellsh Commissioner T. R. Hodges was in the city with his beautiful yacht. The Sea Foam, and the writer and family with several others notably, Mr. A. F. Whiteside, Mr. John Cook and Miss Martha Stovall, accompanied Mr. Hodges as his guests. Mr. Hodges made a splendid host. Arriving at the bar, Mr. Hodges, Mr. Cook, Mr. Whiteside, Miss Stovall and Miss Johnston accompanied him to the bar and witnessed the gathering of the oysters from the bottom of the bay. Later these oysters were served on the Sea Foam raw and fried. A delicious sh chowder was also on the menu. The schooners on the bar also gathered oysters to appease the appetite of their passengers. Fresh from the briny, they were delicious. The land lubbers said it was the trip of their lives. It certainly was a novelty to those who had never visited the great “beds” of the Apalachicola Bay. The return trip was made to Apalachicola by 3:30 o’clock. All trains and steamers met by reception committee Commencing Tuesday night all trains and all passenger steamers were met by members of the reception committee in automobiles and conveyed to the hotels and boarding houses in the city. Dinner at Lafayette Park Wednesday morning commencing at 9 o’clock on Market Street opposite Buzzett’s drugstore, the tour of the city in automobiles began. There were many in automobiles in the parade. Each machine was decorated with ags and bunting and visitors were taken in the machines and shown many points of interest in the city. One of the visitors was heard to remark that while he had often heard of Apalachicola this was his rst visit, and he was surprised to nd such a lovely town and such hospitable citizens. At noon there were several hundred people at Lafayette Park. The city band was located in the pavilion and made excellent music, while many res indicated that sh straight from the briny and oysters said to be the nest in the world were being prepared for every person who cared to partake. Messers. John Austin and Robert Crowson presided at the oyster pots and they served the nest oyster stew ever eaten. Mr. John Flowers was chef at the res where Apalachicola sh were being prepared, and old connissiers claim they never ate a ner sh. Many of the Apalachicola ladies were observed dressing the long tables, and doing other things that contributed largely to the success of the occasion. At 12 o’clock H. W, Johnston called for order, then he introduced Col. C. H. B. Floyd to the large audience. Mr. Floyd was at FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT The pier at Lafayette Park circa 1906 was a popular spot for swimming and Sunday strolls. See SH adoADO WS A6 Oyster Day served ‘fresh from the briny’

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, September 18, 2014 his best, and that means something. Mr. Floyd predicted that Apalachicola one day would be one of the big cities of the Southland. “I may not live to see it,” he said, “but that day is coming, and I think it is near at hand.” During the course of his remarks he referred to the fact that of the two greatest inventions one was re and the other was ice, and it was an Apalachicolan who gave the world the latter. Col. Floyd’s speech was frequently interrupted by loud applause. The speeches over, H. W. Johnston invited those present to the tables to partake of the good thing provided for their comfort. The invitation was accepted by all present. Fine exhibits by citizens to entertain visitors The Cook building on Market Street displayed a most excellent exhibit of products of Franklin County and visitors visiting the building commented favorably on what they saw. Among the exhibits were a hive of bees at work from the A. B. Marchant Apiary. There were samples of the famous Tupelo honey, a brand that commands a fancy price on account of rarity and alround excellence. The exhibit was creditable indeed. The Cypress Lumber Co. – the old stable – was there with the goods. Their display of mantles, shingles, cypress boards etc. the product of their mill in this city, attracted much attention. An exhibit of cypress shingles that have been in use for over thirty years, brought fourth much favorable comment for the excellence of this wood. Hon. R. M. Yent’s exhibit of sweet potatoes grown on Franklin County dirt was excellent. Among the lot was a tuber that tipped the beam at six pounds and thirteen ounces. Those who saw it say the young man has an article of merit. Byron D. Morris, S. Lucido and Charles Schoen, wholesale oyster dealers, exhibited a quantity of the oyster carriers used by them in shipping oysters. The experimental farm exhibited some vigorous stalks of short staple cotton lled with many bolls of the eecy staple. Creel Bros. and Mr. Morris had several immense stalks of green sugar cane, ranging from ten to twelve feet in height. O! You Franklin County land; you are great for producing big things. The Apalachee Packing Co’s., exhibit of the cove oyster in the hull to tempt the epicure attracted much attention. A full rigged ship on the large table was especially interesting. The Bay City Packing Company had a ne exhibit consisting of cove oysters and canned sweet potatoes. In this exhibit were a number of large oyster shells measuring over ten inches. The cluster of seven oyster shells of extremely large size attracted much attention. The window displays were the rst things the visitors saw and it took them some time to see the many articles. There was a shark’s head, snake skins, sturgeon backbone, Indian pottery, sponge, the vertebrae of a whale coral exhibited by Mr. H. L. Grady. The second window contained the vertabra of a 45-foot whale stranded on St. George Island near this city last summer. There were also in this window curios of Indian pottery, pipes, tomahawks, sawsh saws, sponges, sea grass, and other products of the Gulf. Near the front doorway was a handsome sugi nished cypress table built by Mr. Fred Sawyer of this city. It was admired by all who saw it. A nice display of Apalachicola made cigars by the manufacturer, Mr. J. Kaufman. A large home grown pumpkin by Capt. Wm. Floyd. Deerhide and horns of Franklin County deer by Eddie Markham col. Bearhide – a real Franklin County bruin – by Mr. James Silvey. Tira or chittum wood, the rarest in the world grown on the Apalachicola River by Mr. H. P. Snelgrove. At the Dixie Theatre There was a large audience at the Dixie theatre Thursday evening. At the conclusion of the rst run of moving pictures, Mayor S. E. Teague made a stirring address of welcome to the visitors. At the conclusion of Mr. Teague’s address, H. W. Johnston introduced the State shell Fish Commissioner, Mr. T. R. Hodges, who gave an interesting talk on the oyster. He had a number of diagrams depicting the oyster in its many stages – from the “spat” to full grown. Mr. Hodges also spoke on the great work undertaken by the state of Florida in encouraging the planting of oysters in the bays bordering the Gulf and Atlantic seaboard. Mr. Hodges heart is in his oyster planting business and the Times predicts that within a few years there will be thousands of acres of the submerged lands bearing commercial oysters. At Battery Park Wednesday evening The seats at the park Wednesday evening were lled with adults while many children romped and played on the park grounds. The band was out and furnished delightful music. At the hour of 8 o’clock H. W. Johnston called for order and introduced Dr. W. T. Marler who spoke for about twenty minutes on the great possibilities of this favored land – a land made rich by mighty rivers that fed an outlet to the Gulf of Mexico at our doors. The doctor said what this country needed was manufacturing plants to utilize the vast quantities of woods contiguous to Apalachicola and farmers who knew how to till the soil intelligently. He believed there was a great day coming for Apalachicola and thought that the turning point was in sight. Other local speakers were appointed to make short talks but they were unavoidably detained from attending. $ + + "& ) ! 3 ($ '$ $ ( + $* "& ")& ,&" ,/ + $ +* + + + #' 3 + 4 + ," / ," / / 2 33' 0+ + & $' + 3+ &" &" 2 2 ) ) 1' 0 + " 2 ) +3 3' + + + + &" &" $ + + + $* + ( + "!!& "!#& ) /&" $ + $ +* + + + $* "!!& ) "& & )# &" ,," '$ $ ( + + + + + + + $' + + 2 + + " 2 3 4 + 4+ / / + ( + 2) + &" &" $ + + + $* + + + "##& # !& ) &" / % % % !& #! ")#& # $ $ $ +* + + + # ,"/ &"&"/ &" ,," + $ $ $ $ + + (+ ( ( $ + $ ) # N OT IC E O F B UDG ET H EA RI NG Th e A lli ga to r P oi nt W at er R es ou rc es D is tr ic t h as t en ta ti ve ly adop te d a b ud get f or F is ca l Y ea r 2 01 420 15 A p ub li c he ar in g to ma ke a FI NA L DE CI SI ON on th e bu dg et AN D TA XE S wi ll be he ld on : Sa tu rda y, Se pt em be r 20, 20 14 9: 00 A. M at Al lig at or Po in t Wa te r Re sou rc es Di st ri ct O ce 13 78 Al li ga to r Dr iv e Al lig at or Po in t, Fl or id a 32 34 6 Coupon Expir es: 9/30/2014 CODE: AP00 ‡+ OO G G BG ‹ ‡+ OO G OQ ‰„‹u „ zS” —u’ |… w‰ ’ „” ‰—~S” —u’ |… w‰ SHADOWS from page A5 FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT The Apalachicola oyster eet on oyster opening day 1916. FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT Buzzett’s Drug Store circa 1914

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The Times | A7 Thursday, September 18, 2014 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Sept. 8 Larry W. Alligood, 69, Carrabelle, DUI (CPD) Sept. 9 Angela M. Parks, 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Sept. 11 Cole H. Nichols, 31, Eastpoint, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Kayla N. Rogers, 32, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Sept. 12 James C. Yon, 48, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Robert J., Register, 28, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Sept. 13 Oscar H. Linares, 28, Carrabelle, DUI (CPD) Sept. 14 Cora B. Bass, 27, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Tonya C. Seamon, 41, Lanark Village, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, and felony criminal mischief over $1,000 (FCSO) BU DG ET SU MM AR Y EA STP OI NT WA TE R AN D SE WE R DI ST RI CT FI SC AL YE AR 20 14 -2 01 5 ES TI MA TE D RE VE NUE Us er Fe es -W ate r $2 72 ,0 00 .0 0 Us er Fe es -S ew er $2 21 ,0 00 .0 0 Su rc har ge s $3 6,0 00 .0 0 Pe nalt ie s & Fe es $5 8, 000 .0 0 Ba se Fa ci l it y Ch arg e $8 2, 000 .0 0 Ad Va lor em Ta x In co me (2 .0 Mi ll ag e pe r $1 ,0 00 ) $1 26 ,0 00 .0 0 In te re st Ea rne d $1 ,0 00 .0 0 Ca sh Ca rr y Fo rw ard $4 3, 000 .0 0 Re se rv es $1 ,0 00 .0 0 TO TA L ES T. RE VE NUE S: $8 40 ,0 00 .0 0 EX PE ND ITU RE S Sa lar ie sAd m. $9 5, 680 .0 0 Sa lar ie sOp er at ion $1 73, 680 .0 0 Sa lar ie sOv er tim e $1 2, 000 .0 0 Pa yr ol l Ta xe s $2 0, 61 0. 00 Ret ir em en t $1 8, 59 0. 00 Gr ou p In su ra nc e $6 6, 50 0. 00 Li ab il i ty /W C/ Pr op er ty In su ra nc e $3 9, 29 0. 00 Ut il it ie s $6 6, 50 0. 00 En gi ne eri ng /L eg al /A cco un tin g/ Co ns ult an t $6 1, 000 .0 0 La bo ra to ry Se rv ic e s $4 ,3 00 .0 0 O ce Ex pe ns es $1 2, 75 0. 00 O & M Wa st ew at er $2 0, 20 0. 00 O & M Wa te r $1 7, 880 .0 0 Tr an sp or ta ti on $1 5, 60 0. 00 Co mmun i ca ti on s $6 ,7 00 .0 0 Lo ng te rm De bt $2 07 ,7 20 .0 0 TO TA L ES TI MA TE D EX PE ND ITU RE S $83 9, 000 .0 0 Re se rv es $1 ,0 00 .0 0 TO TA L EX PE ND ITU RE S WI TH RE SER VE S: $8 40 ,0 00 .0 0 TH E TE N TA TI VE AD OP TE D, AN D/ OR FI NA L BU DG ETS AR E ON FI LE IN TH E OF FI CE OF TH E AB OV E ME NT IO NE D TA XI NG AU TH OR IT Y AS A PU BL IC RE CO RD NO TI CE OF BU DG ET HE AR IN G Th e Ea st po in t Wa te r an d Se we r Di st ri ct ha s te nt at iv ely Ad op te d a bud g et fo r 20 14 -2 01 5. A pu b li c he ar i ng to ma ke a FI NA L DE CI SI ON on th e bud ge t AN D TA XE S wi ll be he ld on Mo nd ay Se pt em be r 22 20 14 5: 05 P. M. At Ea st po in t Wa te r an d Se we r Di st ri ct O ce 40 Isla nd Dr iv e Ea st po in t, Fl or ida BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0’ + CO MM U. 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FR IE ND S OF ST JO SE PH BA Y PR ES ER VE S Pr es en ts SA TU RD AY OC TO BE R 4, 20 14 RA IN DA TE : SA TU RD AY OC TO BE R 11 20 14 LI VE MU SI C Between Sept. 5 and 111, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Division of Law Enforcement handles several matter involving unlawful oystering. Ofcer Allen received information about individuals harvesting oysters at night in closed waters in Apalachicola Bay. He set up surveillance in the area the information was given and observed two boats and occupants actively harvesting oysters. The ofcer attempted to stop the vessels and was able to get one stopped. He found the individuals on board had a full deck of oysters and were harvesting them in closed waters. Two individuals on board were issued citations for harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise and harvesting oysters in a closed area. Also, several boating safety warnings were issued. Ofcers conducted oyster size tolerance inspections to coincide with the opening of the winter harvest areas in Apalachicola Bay this week. During the inspections, Ofcer Allen and Investigator Cook issued four misdemeanor citations for possession of undersized oysters. While fueling his vessel at a local marina, Cook noticed a vessel operating in the idle speed zone of the Carrabelle River at what appeared to be full speed. After refueling, Cook located the vessel and performed a vessel stop and vessel safety inspection. During the inspection, it became quite clear to the ofcer the vessel operator was under the inuence of some type of alcoholic beverage. After attempting several eld sobriety tasks, the operator of the vessel admitted to consuming alcohol pretty much the entire day and a breath sample of the operator revealed that he was almost twice the legal limit (.159 ml). The vessel operator was cited and jailed for the violation. Arrest REPORT FWC REPORT Like us on THE APAlL ACHICO lL A TIMES Law Enforcement

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A8 | The Times Thursday, September 18, 2014 Al-Anon Family Groups Al-Anon Family Group has but one purpose, to help families and friends of alcoholics. If you are concerned with someone else’s drinking, the AlAnon program can help you. TUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, Benedict Hall, 79 Sixth St. 6-7 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. 6-7 p.m. Open Discussion. AA meeting schedule The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion. TUESDAY • Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church. Noon to 1 p.m. Open Discussion. • Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open. WEDNESDAY • Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church. 6-7 p.m. Women’s AA, Closed. 7:308:30 p.m. Men’s AA, Closed. THURSDAY • Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church. Noon to 1 p.m. Open Discussion • St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Drive. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY • Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church. 5:306:30 p.m. Open Discussion • Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. SATURDAY • Alligator Point Mission By The Sea. 5:306:30 p.m. Discussion Group •Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open. SUNDAY • Eastpoint First United Methodist Church. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open. “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference.” Pe t of th e We ek SI SS Y is a wi re -h ai r Te rr ie r/ Ch ihu ah ua cr os s. Sh e is 3 mo nt hs ol d an d wi th he r wi re ha ir whis ke rs an d sh or t li tt le ta il sh e co ul d no t be an y cu te r. Sh e is a ve ry soc ia l an d ha pp y pup who lo ve s at te nt io n an d af fe ct io n. Sh e wi ll do we ll in a hom e wi th ou t sm al l ch il dr en whe re sh e ca n co nt inu e to gr ow an d th ri ve int o a pe rf ec tl y wo nde rf ul smal l do g. Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to so ci al iz e al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts We ar e al way s lo ok in g fo r pe ople wi lli ng to br in g one of ou r an im al s int o th ei r ho me to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can sp ar e wo ul d be gr ea tl y app re ci at ed Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Huma ne So ci et y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po int. Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bs it e at www .f or go tt en pe ts or g to se e mor e of ou r ad op tab le pe ts. _ƒ ƒ z ƒ |£ ‹¦ ƒ †™ Ÿ ™ Ÿ | £‹ –ƒ ££ F™ –5 ¦ Šz ƒ ¦‹ ’ƒ ¦™ | ‹‘  ‹¦ E ™Ÿ ¦Š ƒ – ™ ‘ƒ ˆ ƒ ¦™ | ‹‘  ‹¦ W z – Šƒ ‘› W† ™ ™ ‘  ‘‹ ƒ z £¦™ ’ | ‹‘ ¦ ƒ |£ ‹¦ ƒ ‹ ¦Š z ‘™ ™– ƒ ¦‹ ’ƒ £ƒ ¦ › †ƒ ƒ z–  ‘™ ’™ –¦ Š‘ ™ £¦ E ƒ Šz ƒ ¦Š ƒ £™ ‘ ¦‹ ™– †™ Ÿ ™ I =›t{› Ot ›…‹ \Œ†›… Ž—D }. + + 1 0 *)0' 2 ,10 1 +'+ )'11 && 2102+' 1'0 '( + '1/+ $ )2+ '* / '+.0+ + (+ 0+* 0 + 0/ # 2 + 0 +'(1+ '+ $ " Serving all of Gulf and Fr anklin Counties Pr ev entati ve Maintenance Email us at inf o@portstjoeac.com www .portstjoeac.com Society Carla Dean, Jake Jetton to wed Carla Dean and Jake Jetton will be married at 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, at the borrow pits in Tate’s Hell State Forest. Mr. Jackie Jetton will conduct the service. A reception will follow. Carla is the daughter of Jimmy and Lois Dean of Carrabelle. She is the granddaughter of Frankie Gray of Carrabelle and Lovie Baker of Wewahitchka. Jake is the son of Mandy and the late Fred Jetton, Jr. of Carrabelle. He is the grandson of Tina and Fred Jetton of Carrabelle; and Joyce and Joe Howard Massey of Carrabelle. Family and friends are invited to join in the wedding festivities. Granger sisters celebrate birthdays Summer Granger turned 13 on Thursday, Sept. 4, and Tina Granger turned 12 on Friday, Sept. 5. They are the daughters of Tonia Chisholm of Carrabelle. Grandparents are Charlie and Lena Ellis and the late Martin Chisholm. Greatgrandparents are the late Braxton “Bum” and Lena Millender. The sisters celebrated their birthdays together with a luau theme at Carrabelle Beach along with family and friends. Happy Sweet 16! Happy 16th birthday today, Landa Ann Maria Reeder. I love you bigger than the sky, deeper than the ocean and wider than the world. Love, Mom AA M eetingsEETINGS Wedding Happy B irthdayIRTHDAY

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The Times | A9 Thursday, September 18, 2014 Ch ri st Co mm un it y Ac adem y (C CA ) Pr es cho ol an d Da yc ar e Pr ov id es qu a li ty ch il dc ar e an d Ch ri st ia n ed uc at io n at an af fo rd ab le pr ic e. We sp ec ia li ze in Sma ll Cl as sr oo m si ze s Ind ivi du al iz ed in st ruc ti on an d As se ss men ts Ch ri st ia n Cu rr ic ulu m We e Le ar n fr om Li fe Wa y Ch ri st ia n Re so ur ces Ex pe ri enc ed St af f Sc ho ol Re ad in ess Pr og ra m Sub si di ze d Tu it io n th ro ug h Ea rl y Le ar ni ng Co al it io n (E LC ) Ac cr ed it ed by FC CP SA Fo r mo re in fo rma ti on pl ea se co nt ac t us vi a ema il at c hr is tc om mu ni ty ac ad em y1 23 @g ma il .c om by ph one at 85 065 314 16 or dr op by to vi si t us at Fi rs t Un it ed Me th od is t Ch ur ch of Ap al ac hi co la (c or ne r of 5t h St re et an d Hw y 98 ) Lic en se# X0 2F R02 00 Li mi ted Op en in gs fo r In fa nt s, To dd le rs an d Ag e 2 _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{ ~” …—” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 Fi rs t Ass em bl y of Go d Ap al ac hi co la Fl or id a Pa st or s, Lar ue O. (R ud y) & De bb ie Pr esc ot t A "L IF E CE NT ER FO R YO U AN D YO UR FA MI LY 26 7 Br ow ns vi ll e Ro ad Ap al ach ic ol a, FL 32 32 0 O: (8 50 ) 65 390 46 H: (8 50 ) 65 386 51 SU ND AY SCH OO L 10 :0 0A M SU ND AY SE RV IC E 11 :0 0A M & 6: 00 PM WE DN ES DA Y SE RV IC E 7: 00 PM >{‹Œ Xt„tq †Œo A†{„tŒŒ 8y’‹qy $" !& et‹t t—q{t r op†’ –yo ?†rŒ r†{„x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '=m o‚ '"% "" # & " # %"# " & R’‹Œt‹ X‹†•{rtr r’‹{„x ‹tx’o‹ qy’‹qy Œt‹•{qtŒ Faith Pauline Jones Family We, the family of the late Pauline Jones Farmer, extend our heartfelt gratitude to you. We truly thank God for each and every one of you. Your outpouring of love, prayers, kindness and support has helped sustain us through this season of mourning. Our Mom lived her funeral and your outpouring showed us that. Please continue to keep a vigil, watch over us in prayer as we move forward in our tomorrows. Psalm 91:2 “I will say of the Lord he is my refuge and my fortress, my God. In him will I trust.” She lives on in all of us, Juan, Steve, and Natasha Jones, Greg, Direek, Tyler, Jazmyne and Joshua Farmer Special to The Times High Calling marks ‘Back to Church Sunday’ Back to Church Sunday, part of a national movement of churches across America, will be celebrated at High Calling Church, 21 Island Drive in Eastpoint, at 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 21. Everyone is welcome to attend. This initiative “Inviting America Back to Church” seeks to reach the “unchurched” and “dechurched,” people who have never attended church or who once attended church but don’t anymore, and invite them to return on a special Sunday. In 2013, a Gallup survey stated that 87 percent of people believe in God; however, only 27 percent of those surveyed attended church in the last seven days. Additionally, 82 percent of people who don’t attend church say they would attend if invited by a friend, yet only 2 percent of Christians ever invite someone to church. For Back to Church Sunday, High Calling Church will have a special service that features uplifting music, an encouraging message from the pastor and lunch provided for all after the service. “We simply want to invite as many people as possible to know Jesus,” said Ron Crum Jr., lead pastor. For more information, visit www.backtochurch. com or www. highcalling church.org, or call 850-320-0409. Please accept my apology for the date misprint for the pancake breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club. This Saturday morning, Sept. 20, your monthly sugar x will be ready the boat club from 9-11 a.m. Your order will be taken, prepared and served by our faithful volunteers. Your donation of $5 will be collected inside the door. See ya there! Hope to see you for lunch this afternoon at the FC Senior Center. I’m sure Sarge and his crew will have a nice meal for us. Chow line at noon; be looking for you. I hope you are enjoying the coffee hour at Chillas Hall; the season opening was Monday, Sept. 15. We will have coffee Monday to Friday 9-11 a.m. On Thursdays coffee is free; all other days 30 cents. Friday Night is hamburger night at Camp Gordon Johnston Post 82. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. No smoking until after 8 p.m. Orders taken for your hamburger and chips from 6-8 p.m. Take out, call 6979998 Enjoy! After church on Sunday, Sept. 21, come over to Chillas Hall for the monthly covered dish. No dish required as County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders is providing the food. However, a dessert to share will be appreciated. Be looking for you. Later on Sunday, pizza is served at Camp Gordon Johnston Post 82. Come and enjoy a slice or two for a $1 donation each. Eat-in whole pizza $8. Pizza on the run requires a donation of $10. Orders taken after 5 p.m. Again, no smoking until after 7 p.m. on Sundays. Drop by our thrift shop at the Lanark Village Plaza and look around, and visit with Betty Baker or Mary Staff. Hours of operation are Tuesday to Saturday 9 a.m. until noon. Proceeds, after rent and electricity, are divided between organizations in the village. Your donation of clean and resalable items are greatly appreciated, but please bring them in during business hours. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound, and remember our little prayer — God grant me patience, and I want it right now. Until next time, God Bless America and our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Pauline Denise Jones was born on Oct. 23, 1971, in Apalachicola to Mrs. Clifford Eugene Jones, Sr. and the late Mrs. Pearlie Mae Rochelle. Pauline was educated at Apalachicola High School. During her early, married, adult years, Pauline was able to experience the world abroad while living in Germany. Years later, she returned home, where she met the late Gregory Farmer, whom she later married in holy matrimony. Although a member of Free Will Holiness Church in Orlando, she shared her passion for Christ by visiting and fellowshipping with other members within the body of Christ. Pauline always had an encouraging word to share with others and made it one of her points in life to make sure others were lifted up beyond life’s despairs. She departed this life for the eternal on Sunday, Aug. 31, 2014. Pauline was a devoted mother and she cherished her children. To continue her legacy of love she leaves behind her most beloved earthly possession, her eight beautiful children; Juan Jones, Natasha Jones, Steve Jones (Jody), Gregory Farmer Jr., Direek Farmer, Tyler Farmer, Jazmyne Farmer and Joshua Farmer. Her little bundles of joy, her grandchildren, one to precede her in death: Baby Emanuel Critton, William Chastine, Gregreyuna Grifn, Janayla Gibbs, Nevaeh Sims, Michaela Jones and Carter Jones. To stand in her stead, she leaves behind four sisters and ve brothers: Brenda Bareld, of Orlando; Patricia Jones (Robert), of Apalachicola; Carol Bareld, of Apalachicola; Charles Bareld Esq. (Wendy), of Orlando; Gerald Dawson (Susie), of Panama City; Bruce Jones (Stacy), of Panama City; Alocyndor Underwood (Mandricka) of Lakeland; Cornelius (C.J.) Jones, of Port St. Joe; and Prince Jones, of Port St. Joe. She leaves to cherish her memory her devoted companion Johnny Arnez Williams, Sr.; her faithful mother-in-law, Ruby Farmer, of Port St. Joe; her devoted stepmother Sandra Jones; Samuel Critton, the one she looked upon as her son-in-law; along with close friends, Madolyn Floyd, Cheryl Dennison, and Leatha Mae Knight; and a host of loved aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Pauline was truly loved by many and will be missed. Service was held at New Life Tabernacle Church under the guidance and leadership of Bishop Horace and Sarah Solomon. The eulogy was delivered by Bishop C.M. Lockhart, Anointed Word Ministries, Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Obituary created by Brenda Bareld. Funeral arrangements by Richardson’s Family Funeral Care. Pauline Jones PAULINE JONE sS Bobby Ray McClendon, 68, of Apalachicola died Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, at home, after a lengthy illness. He was born in Jasper, Ala., to Pete and Bess McClendon, and grew up on Cold Springs Mountain in Cullman County, Ala. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was a disabled Vietnam veteran. He was an alumnus of the University of Arkansas and worked at the University of Arkansas Medical Center for 26 years following graduation. He is survived by his wife of 44 years, Tanya Money McClendon; his son Bobby Ray McClendon, Jr. (Jamie) of Allen, Texas; and two grandchildren, Grifn and Ralee McClendon, also of Allen, Texas. He is also survived by three brothers-in-law, Butch Money (Julie), Wandal Money (Glenda) and Eddie Money (Lanay); and one sister-in-law, Karen Money Caldwell (Donald). Special thanks to “Aunt Bobbie” Hudspeth for staying with us and keeping our home running, to Big Bend Hospice and to family and friends that supported us and held us up in prayer. Memorization by cremation. Family memorial services held in Cold Spring Cemetery in Cold Springs, Ala. Bobby Ray McClendon BO bbBB Y RAY M cC CLENDON LL ANA rR K NEW sS Jim Welsh Enjoy a ‘sugar x’ at boat club Saturday Faith brBR IE fF Obituaries Card of T hH ANK sS Like us on THE APAlL ACHICO lL A TIMES

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 O UTDoo OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TIDE TA BL ES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1:17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0:27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABEL LE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0:03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Se pt 18 89 75 0 % Fr i, Se pt 19 86 73 40 % Sa t, Se pt 20 85 74 20 % Sun, Se pt 21 86 74 10 % Mo n, Se pt 22 85 74 10 % Tu es Se pt 23 85 74 80 % We d, Se pt 24 84 74 20 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Autumn Days are Here! Sh op wi th us fo r al l yo ur hu nt in g su ppl ie s www .shopb wo .c om SPON sS ORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Redsh are running in good numbers along the beaches in our waters and as far as Apalachicola right now. Live bait is a good choice for the bigger ones; however, grubs and jigs are producing good slot-sized sh also. Flounder are starting to show up in fair numbers on the ats and in shallow water. Live bull minnows are plentiful and a must for any serious ounder anglers! Our waters are coming alive again this week as the cooling water and air temperatures are falling a little. Good trout catches are being reported in St. Joe Bay, Crooked Island and East Bay. Most anglers are seeing large numbers of sh and catching them as well. Smaller trout seem to be the norm with a limit not hard to ll. Most trout are aggressively eating live shrimp, and even soft plastic baits are producing nice sh. Page 10 Special to the Times The Northwest Florida Water Management District’s Governing Board last week approved a joint funding agreement with the United States Geological Survey for stage and discharge monitoring at 10 stations. This agreement includes the continuation of ve existing stations, as well as the initiation of ve new sites in support of the district’s development of minimum ows and levels (MFLs) for Wakulla Springs and St. Marks River Rise. “Data collection plays an essential role in the district’s efforts to protect our water and natural resources,” said Director of Resource Management Guy Gowens. “By expanding and enhancing our monitoring network, we’re ensuring that we develop MFLs and implement other activities based on sound science and the best information available.” Monitoring stations provide valuable water resource data the district can use for a variety of purposes, including MFL development, consumptive use regulation, ood warning and other water resource management functions. The joint funding agreement includes $170,900 in district funding for Fiscal Year 2014-2015. The USGS is providing matching funds of $92,500 to cover the total operational cost of the network of $263,400. The cost of gauge along Spring Creek is being split evenly between the district, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the city of Tallahassee. “The foundation of all protective environmental rules and policies is science,” said DEP Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration Drew Bartlett. “The development of sound science begins with a robust dataset. I applaud the district’s commitment to gathering this data now so additional environmental protections can be set for these extremely valuable water resources.” Under the agreement, ve new stations will be installed at Fisher Creek, Black Creek, St. Marks River Sink and two sites along Lost Creek to collect data that is vital to the development of effective and protective MFLs. The agreement also includes continued monitoring at Telogia Creek, Yellow River, Spring Creek and two sites along the Apalachicola River. The USGS will operate all 10 stations for continuous discharge and stage monitoring. The data will be updated in real time and available on the USGS website. The district continues to expand and enhance its data monitoring network to more effectively manage and protect the water resources of Northwest Florida. Data from the district’s network of rainfall, state and other stations is available at www.nwfwater.com/datapublications/hydrologic-data/. Special to the Times Fall is a great time to be outside in our landscapes and gardens. We take stock of which plants are looking good and which plants seem to need a little help. It is natural to want to “do” something to help a tree — prune it, fertilize it, polish it — we can’t help wanting to touch it in some way. Pruning is an oftneeded maintenance treatment for good tree health, and to keep your tree and yard safe and looking good, but pruning without a good reason is not good tree care practice. Pruning just because your neighbor is doing it may not be benecial for the tree and could result in too much live tree tissue being removed. This can cause the tree to become stressed and perhaps decline. In fact, industry tree pruning standards (ANSI A300) say no more than 25 percent of a tree’s foliage should be removed in a single season, and if the tree cannot tolerate a lot of pruning, even less should be removed. When determining how much pruning your tree can tolerate, an arborist may consider if the tree: • is healthy • is still growing rapidly or has matured and slowed its growth • had its roots severed or damaged recently or in the past • suffers from disease • is a species tolerant of heavy pruning “All that said, fall is a good time to prune to meet certain tree growth goals,” said Tchukki Andersen, BCMA, CTSP and staff arborist with the Tree Care Industry Association. A good arborist will work with you to set an objective for the pruning job (i.e., what you want accomplished when the work is done). Pruning objectives usually include one or more of the following: • reduce risk of damage to people or property • manage tree health and direction of growth • provide clearance for vehicles or roadways • improve tree structure • increase or improve aesthetics • restore shape “Once tree pruning objectives are established, the arborist can provide specic details on how your trees could be pruned to get the desired result,” Andersen said. The pruning process can be overwhelming to those not familiar with shade and ornamental tree pruning. A qualied tree care expert trained in tree and woody plant health care can answer your questions, as well as help you with your tree pruning goals. Make sure to ask for tree pruning to be done according to ANSI A300 standards, the generally accepted industry standards for tree care practices. Now appearing in ditches and bogs around the county is enchanting blue skyower (Hydrolea corymbosa), also known as corymb ddleaf, bladderpod or bagpod. The clear blue color of these owers is eyecatching, and once your eye is caught, you won’t be able to look away. Occasionally a lavender form also occurs. Although many sources say the environmental status of this plant is unknown and it is not classied as endangered, the Institute for Regional Conservation calls it rare. It is a wetland plant found only in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Pretty as it is, don’t try to dig up a sample for your garden, please. In areas with shallow standing water for part of the year, it may be quite abundant, but it often goes largely unnoticed except when it is in bloom. Its weak foliage stays low to the ground. It is a perennial, meaning it dies back to roots in the ground each winter. The leaves are small and rounded, becoming more elliptical near the owers. Each plant bears only a few owers at a time, but may bloom over several months. It can bloom anytime from May through October. Blooms are about an inch across and somewhat cup-shaped. They tend to be held skyward. Each ower lasts only a day, and they tend to fade in the heat. This beautiful plant is not widely available in the native plant nursery trade because it is sensitive and requires wet feet, but it could be a beautiful addition to a garden if you have the right conditions. It will slowly spread by underground suckering and will never become a nuisance. Skyower is largely pollinated by bees and is somewhat attractive to butteries. NWFWMD continues to enhance monitoring network Tree pruning with a purpose Blue skyower grows only in Southeast LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Blue skyower is a wetland plant found only in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. BUds DS ‘N’ BUGs S Lois Swoboda

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On Sept. 9, the Lady Seahawk varsity volleyball team swept a doubleheader at home against West Gadsden. In the rst game, the Hawks won the rst three out of ve sets, triumphing 25-12, 25-15 and 25-21. In the second game the teams were set to play just three sets, and the Lady Seahawks won the rst two, 25-8 and 25-12. On Sept. 10 at home, the junior varsity and varsity squads hosted North Bay Haven. “We have never played this school so we were going into this game pretty nervous, not knowing what to expect,” coach Hilary Stanton said. “Although we lost both JV and varsity games it was one of our best games we have played for both teams.” The JV squad fell 25-23 and 25-9. The varsity team lost in three sets, 25-15, 25-17 and 25-23. On Sept. 11, the teams traveled to Rickards, and the varsity battled it out with the Lady Raiders before coming away with a slim victory. Both team travel tonight, Sept. 18, for a district matchup against South Walton, and again on Monday, for competition against East Gadsden. — By DAVID ADLERSTEIN By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Sneads Coach Bill Thomas came home Friday night and found Franklin County not entirely what he expected. Thomas’ Pirates fell behind early, pulled ahead 14-6 right before the break and then were battled stride for stride in the second half before claiming a 33-20 win. “We got a win, and that’s good anytime you’re on the road,” said Thomas, who played for the Apalachicola Sharks and then went on to coach them for three seasons, in 1997, ‘98, and ‘99. “I thought the Seahawks played hard,” he said. “Every time I see them they’re getting better. I think he (coach Aaron York) has got it going in the right direction.” York’s Seahawks struck rst, with four minutes left in the rst quarter, when junior quarterback Josue Barahona lofted a 25-yard pass to freshman wide receiver Landen Abel wide open in the end zone. Barahona’s extra point try was blocked, The Seahawks got the ball right back, after freshman Athan Dempsey recovered a fumble, but the Pirate defense held. Midway through the second quarter, a fumbled punt return by Seahawk freshman O’Shea Williams put Sneads deep in Seahawk territory. Two plays later, senior quarterback Alphonso Brown ran in from the 5, but a blocked extra point kept the game knotted at 6-6. After a long Pirate pass completion that seemed to be aided by the absence of an offensive pass interference call that had Hawk fans yelling in anger, the Pirates pulled ahead. With three minutes left before halftime, Sneads senior fullback Bacarius Boykin ran 12 yards off tackle to score the rst of his two touchdowns. He added a successful pair of extra points, and a 14-6 lead. During halftime, fans were treated to the coronation of Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School — Kelsey Jones and Zoie Lance — by last year’s recipients, Logan McLeod and Brook Pittman. Three minutes into the third quarter, the Pirates recovered a fumble on the Franklin County 10. Brown nished the brief drive by punching in from the 2, for a 20-6 lead. The Seahawks came right back, and two minutes later, Barahona tossed a 15-yarder to sophomore Marshall Sweet for a 20-12 margin. The Pirates came right back to clip the Seahawks wings, as junior Stavae Raines returned the kickoff 80 yards for a 27-12 margin. With two minutes left, Boykin scored for a second time, from 12 yards out, for a 33-12 lead. An 11-yard gallop by Barahona on the next drive, and a pair of extra points by Sweet, cut the margin to 33-20. “Physically we matched up very well against them,” York said. “The kids were still ghting all the way. We’re closing the gap. That’s what we’re building on.” York said offensive player of the game honors went to Barahona, who carried the ball six times for 9 yards, and one touchdown, and he completed 14 of 27 passes for 190 yards and two touchdowns. “He’s playing well,” York said. “We’re not catching the ball.” For the season, Barahona has rushed 11 times for 42 yards, and completed 34 of 71 pass attempts for 371 yards, with four touchdown passes and ve interceptions. Defensive player of the game honors went to freshman Athen Dempsey, who tallied ve tackles, two for a loss, and had one sack. On the season, the Hawks’ leading ground gainer for the rst three games is sophomore Marshall Sweet, who has carried the ball 36 times for 153 yards, for a 4.25-yard average. Senior Cole Wheeler has rushed 18 times for 78 yards. The most successful receiver has been sophomore O’shea Williams, who has caught 12 passes for 157 yards. Wheeler has snared seven passes for 65 yards, freshman Tyler Farmer six for 50 yards, Sweet ve for 53 yards, and Abel two for 46 yards. On the defensive side of the ball, Wheeler is the top tackler, with 17 solos and 12 assisted tackles, three for a loss, followed by eighthgrader Rufus Townsend, with nine solos and nine assists, freshman Justin Arellano, with ve solos and 12 assists, Farmer, with ve solos and 12 assists, Dempsey with four solos and eight assists, three for a loss; and senior Trenton Lee, with seven solos and four assists. This Friday night, the Hawks travel to Liberty County to take on the Bulldogs, in a tough district outing. Running for the Bay Marathon Su nda y Oc to ber 26, 2014 In beautiful Ap alachic ola, FL Fu ll Ma ra thon, Half Ma ra thon, 10K 5K & Ul tr a50K Registration Now Open! Re gi st er online at running fo rt heba y. co m fr iends@running fo rt heba y. co m Run or Wa lk ‡+ OO GG B G ‹  ‡+ OO G OQ ‰„‹u„ zS” —u ’| …w‰ ’ „” ‰—~S” —u’ |… w‰ We |g ge‚ ƒl|‚ † †e‚ v Nel_a _yc t|yh †e‚v b_‚e ƒe‚Šnbeƒ Bl ountsto wn He alth and Re habilitation Center !! !# " CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 A Page 11 Section PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Newly crowned Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, Kelsey Jones and Zoie Lance, stand with last year’s recipients, Logan McLeod, left, and Brook Pittman, right. Sneads downs Franklin Co. 33-20 Sophomore Marshall Sweet makes his cut against Sneads. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Seahawk golfers, from left, are Calli Westbrook, Megan Collins, Abby Johnson, Melanie Collins and Alexus Johnson. Seahawk golfers post 5-1 week The girls’ golf team posted a 5-1 record on the week as they topped Wakulla, Aucilla, Branford, Leon and Maclay high schools. The team’s only loss came at the hands of Chiles by three strokes. On Sept. 9, the Lady Seahawks hosted a match at St. James Bay and handily defeated district foe Branford by 18 strokes, and Wakulla, who came in third, 30 strokes behind. Senior Calli Westbrook shot her best round ever at St. James, ring a 57 to pace the Seahawks. On Sept. 11, the team traveled to Golden Eagle Country Club in Tallahassee and defeated Leon and Maclay before falling to Chiles. Sophomore Megan Collins shot a 49, eighth-grader Melanie Collins shot 50, sixth-grader Abby Johnson 64, eighthgrader Alexus Johnson 64 and Westbrook 69. “Our rst year players (Alexus and Abby) showed great effort and improvement the whole week, and our second year players (Calli, Megan and Melanie) played well at times, but struggled with consistency,” coach Scott Collins said. “We have about a month left before districts and our players and coaches are dedicated to trying to make the playoffs.” Lady Seahawks sweep West Gadsden in doubleheader

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, September 18, 2014 Crossword PUZZLE Crossword SO LULU TION Staff Report This page is designed to feature top-quality photographs submitted to the Times by our readers. This regular addition offers an opportunity for photographers from throughout Franklin County, residents and visitors alike, to highlight their best work capturing the excitement and energy of the people, the beauty of the landscape, and the adventure of the world around them. Please send photographs to Dadlerstein@star.com For more information, call 653-8894. ROD GASCHE E | Special to The Times Pond life PAL L M E E R PHIL L YAW | Special to The Times Shrimpboats docked in Apalachicola PAL L M E E R PHIL L YAW | Special to The Times Birds explore Two Mile as the sun sets ROD GASCHE E | Special to The Times The former Georgia, Florida and Alabama Railway bridge on C-30 outside Carrabelle JOHN INZE ZE TTA | Special to The Times Low tide on an Eastpoint morning

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, September 18, 2014 All funds must be allo cated by Sept. 30, and the money becomes available Oct. 1. The CRA was created in 1993, and the city has used funds generated by the dis trict before, mostly for land scaping, but there has never been a formal budget. Next year, depending on property values, revenue for the CRA will fall back to around $200,000. Revenue is derived from tax increment nancing, which comprises all property tax increases in the CRA, beyond a base year, which are then spent to on improvements to the CRA. In June, the CRA board, composed of Bo May, Rob Powis and all ve city com missioners, announced that $200,000 had been earmarked for grants to improve the appearance of buildings in the district. That money may be used to improve either businesses or residences. At the last Carrabelle city meeting Sept. 4, City Admin istrator Courtney Millender said while most businesses picked up a form to apply for the grants, none have been returned. Board members brought additional sugges tions for spending the mon ey to workshops held Aug. 19 and 25. During meetings regard ing the CRA budget, proj ects discussed ranged from changing the landscaping at the library to moving, or dis mantling altogether, the sh cleaning station on Marine Street constructed in 2008. At a public workshop Sept. 4, Commissioner Charlotte Schneider ob served, “We have to go with the demographics of the time. The visitor is where it’s at.” In the end, three projects got the lion’s share of fund ing. Avenue B, which runs adjacent to Welcome Park and the Carrabelle History Museum, will be resurfaced at a cost of $60,000. The Fourth Street boat ramp will get a makeover for an estimated $100,000. That is just a part of a larg er upgrade involving an ad ditional $5,000 to improve Veteran’s Park across the street from the ramp. If the Florida Department of Transportation will allow it, the CRA board also hopes to install a crosswalk between the ramp and the park at a cost of $30,000. DOT has nixed a proposal to place a trafc light in Carrabelle. CRA money would be used to resurface the boat ramp, plus install a sign for the Big Bend Scenic Byway and build a kiosk with infor mation about local shing. In the park, the statues of servicemen would be raised and placed in a straight line, the brick wall repaired and the fountain converted into a ower bed. May, who advocated strongly for the Fourth Street project, said it will ul timately cost about $300,000. He said the city can attack the changes in phases and that the improvements would create a “tour ist event” in Carrabelle’s downtown. The CRA has also ear marked an additional $150,000 as a match for a grant from the Northwest Florida Water Management District to correct storm water drainage on Marine Street. A block of $10,000 is ear marked to purchase eight benches and eight waste baskets for the downtown area. The “world’s small est police station” gets a $300 facelift, plus $35,000 will repair the boardwalk along Marine Street using composite material with a 15-year guarantee. The Welcome Park, at U.S. 98 and Avenue B, gets a $5,000 upgrade, in addition to one of the eight waste baskets and two of the new benches. Another $5,000 is set aside for not-for-prots, and $38,000 is earmarked for holiday celebrations, concerts and other special events. Part of that will pur chase new Christmas orna ments and replace tattered American ags in the CRA district. Most of the remaining funds are earmarked for land acquisition, although no particular property has been identied. The ask ing price of several pieces of property discussed was higher than the appraised value. All the board members agreed that increased park ing in the CRA district is a priority. The board is also con cerned about maintaining the new improvements and is looking for an inde pendent contractor to keep things clean. They allocated about $20,000 of CRA funds to pay for a city employee with an inmate work crew to dedicate time to the CRA district. One early suggestion was shot down in negotia tion. Both Commissioner Brenda La Paz and May wanted to dismantle the Marine Street sh clean ing station, but they butted heads with Commissioner Olivia Massey and she prevailed. “Local people use that station every day,” Massey said. Tr ades & Ser vi ces Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7 654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD &! $+& !$ () $! -# (#* ,%) !& ,! &"& &! !$ && $''% % '% ' ''$' & $ ##! # $ & JOE'S LA WN CARE IF IT'S IN YO UR YA RD LET JOE TA KE CA RE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES ,T REE TRIMMING AND REMO VA LA LSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION ,P LANTING AND BEDDING AV AILABLE CA LL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO .COM Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 W¦ ™ £¦ ‘ƒ ££ ¦Š ƒ– ™ ¦Š ‹–  I I I D™ –¦ z ¦ £ ¦™ z ‡+ OO GG B G Œ‡Žw’‡ }]—š w• ˆ yŒ Y’ ‡+ OO G OQ ‡—Œ„š ] —š w• ˆ yŒ Gorrie was granted the rst patent issued for mechanical refrigeration in 1851, which he developed to help cool his patients suffering from yellow fever. high-denition imaging expert Dr. William Glenn, liquid crystal researcher Dr. Shin-Tson Wu and nanotechnology scientist Dr. Shyam Mohapatra. Each was inducted into the Hall by Commissioner for Patents Margaret A. Focarino of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Ofce. “These six Floridians have been granted more than 1,300 patents,” Fo carino said. “Since 1976, more than 100,000 patents have been issued to inven tors in the state of Florida, and those numbers con tinue to go up every day.” Focarino and Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, chairman of the Hall’s advisory board and senior vice president for research and innova tion at the University of South Florida, presented a custom-designed Florida Inventors Hall of Fame medal to each inductee or representative. Hodson accepted the framed, embossed induc tion medallion on behalf of Gorrie, who lived from 1803 to 1855, during which time he also served as mayor and postmaster. Gorrie was granted the rst pat ent issued for mechanical refrigeration in 1851, which he developed to help cool his patients suffering from yellow fever. Gorrie, the only 19th century recipient of the honor, was joined by other inductees who included three others who passed on: Cade, a University of Florida professor who developed the hydrating sports drink Gatorade; Edison, the most prolic inventor in U.S. history and longtime Fort My ers resident; and Glenn, a Florida Atlantic University professor who developed high-denition digital im aging for NASA. The two living induct ees are Mohapatra, a USF professor and pioneer of applied biomedical nano technology; and Wu, a University of Central Flor ida professor whose liquid crystal research has im pacted display technology. The Hall’s advisory board comprises leaders and inventors from public corporations, private busi nesses, research universi ties, nonprot institutes, governmental agencies and other areas. Honor ees are selected annually through a nomination pro cess open to all inventors in the state of Florida. The nominations are reviewed by a selection committee, which this year included Wendy Abberger, presi dent of Leadership Flori da; Sharon Heise, associ ate director of the Insti tute for Human & Machine Cognition; David Makufka, manager, Technology Transfer, Kennedy Space Center; David Norton, vice president for research, University of Florida; Gary Ostrander, vice president for research, Florida State University; Paul Sanberg, senior vice president for research and innovation at USF; M.J. Soileau, vice president for research and commercialization at UCF; and Jack Sullivan Jr., CEO of Florida Research Consortium. “By celebrating inven tors, we encourage a new generation of innovators to pursue their ideas and believe in themselves,” said Dr. Judy Genshaft, president of the University of South Florida, which founded and hosts the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. Sanberg announced a new Florida Inventors Hall of Fame Walkway, to be installed on the USF campus, featuring bronze plaques honoring the in ductees. “The ‘walk of fame’ will be part of what we hope to develop into an ‘Inventors’ Commons,’ an outdoor space for events and gatherings,” Sanberg said. For more information on the Hall of Fame, visit www.FloridaInvents.org. FAR LEFT: With a crosswalk, new sign and a kiosk, the CRA board hopes to make the Fourth Street boat ramp part of a downtown “tourist event” to slow visitors passing through Carrabelle. LEFT: Few grant applications have been returned for the $200,000 available in facade grants for rundown or blighted buildings. PHOTOS BY LO O I S S S S W OBO OBO DA | The Times CARRABELLE from page A1 GORRIE from page A1

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A14 | The Times Thursday, September 18, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 33535T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, W.E. Salmon, Inc., the holders of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 27 Year of Issuance: 2011 Description of Property: Lot 8 Block A, City of Carrabelle Full Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 29-07S04W-4170-000a-0080 Name in which assessed: Robert A. and Patricia Edwards All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st Monday in the month of OCTOBER 2014, which is the 6th day of OCTOBER 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 12th day of AUGUST 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33533T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, Mark Johnson and Deborah King Charitable Remainder Trust the holders of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.1116 Year of Issuance: 2012 Description of Property: Lot 10 Pelican Beach Village Full Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 29-09506W-7334-0000-0100 Name in which assessed: RANDALL BRENT KARDOES All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st Monday in the month of OCTOBER 2014, which is the 6th day of OCTOBER 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 12th day of AUGUST 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33613T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA PANAMA CITY DIVISION CASE NO.: 5:13-cv-00162 CADENCE BANK, NA., as successor-in-interest by merger to Superior Bank, N.A., as successor-in-interest to Superior Bank, FSB, by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Superior Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. APEX DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a limited liability company, GEORGE STEPHENS NEWMAN, JR., an individual, JOSEPH PATRICK FERRELL, an individual, JOHN Z. FERRELL, an individual CARRAWAY BAY PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, a Florida non-profit corporation, OCEAN PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, HIDE-A-WAY AT LAKE POWELL HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., A Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHAL’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Amended Final Default and Summary Judgment directed to me by the U.S. District Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned United States Marshal or any of his duly authorized deputies, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Section 2001, et seq., will sell the property having the legal description of: EXHIBIT “A” First Newman Mortgaged Property: Lot 9, Carraway Bay, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 37, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AND Lot 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, Coastal Village of Carrabelle, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in PIat Book 10, Page 19, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Second Newman Mortgaged Property (P arcel 2): Lot 4, Carraway Bay, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 37, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. together with all appurtenances thereto and all improvements thereon, at public auction at the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola Office, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on the 15th day of October, 2014, at 2:00 p.m. EST. The terms of the sale shall be certified funds, with ten percent (10%) of the successful bid to be deposited with the undersigned by the successful bidder upon the property being struck off to him; the balance of the successful bid shall be due and payable in the office of the undersigned at 111 N. Adams Street, Suite 277, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within forty-eight (48) hours following conclusion of the sale. The plaintiff reserves the right to bid on the above property and apply the indebtedness of the defendant to any bid so made. Any questions should be directed to Allison C. Doucette, Esquire at (813) 273-5616. Ed Spooner United States Marshal September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33537T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, W.E. Salmon, Inc., the holders of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1070 Year of Issuance: 2010 Description of Property: Lot 37 Lakes on the Bluff Full Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 30-08S06W-1002-0000-0370 Name in which assessed: Lois & Kim L. Davis All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st Monday in the month of OCTOBER 2014, which is the 6th day of OCTOBER 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 12th day of AUGUST 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33645T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:13-cv-304-RS-CJK CADENCE BANK, N.A., as successor-in-interest by merger to Superior Bank, N.A., as successor-in-interest to Superior Bank, FSB, by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Superior Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. CELTAE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, OLIVER H. DUCIMETIERE-MONOD, individually, 101 EAST GULF BEACH DR., LLC, an inactive Florida limited liability company, ANCHOR REALTY AND MORTGAGE COMPANY OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC., a Florida corporation, PEREMANS, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, ANCHOR VACATION PROPERTIES REAL ESTATE REFERRALS f/k/a ANCHOR VACATION PROPERTIES, INC., a Florida corporation, and 101 FRANKLIN BOULEVARD, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, STATES RESOURCES CORP., as assignee from Wachovia Bank, N.A., an Iowa corporation, DURDEN ENTERPRISES, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, COASTLINE PUBLICATIONS, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHAL’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Agreed Foreclosure Judgment directed to me by the U.S. District Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned United States Marshal or any of his duly authorized deputies, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Section 2001, et seq., will sell the property having the legal description of: EXHIBIT “A” FIRST 101 FRANKLIN BOULEVARD PROPERTY Lots 8 and 9, Block 6, St. George Island Gulf Beaches East, Unit No. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lots 13, 14 and 15, Block 6 East, St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit NO. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 7, Block 6 East, St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit NO. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lots 17 and 20, Block 5-E, ST. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. CELTAE PROPERTY Lots 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24, Block 6 East, St. George Island Beaches, Unit 1, according to the map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, also included is the alley located between lots 16-21 and lot 22 being a parcel 34’ wide running the length of said Lot 22 (135’). Being the same property conveyed to Dragon SAF, LLC by deed filed and recorded April 4, 2000, in O.R. Book 637, Page 603, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. SECOND 101 FRANKLIN PROPERTY LOTS 10, 11, and 12, Block 6 East, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 7 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; Lots 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, Block 6 East; St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit No. 1, a Subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded In Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. together with all appurtenances thereto and all improvements thereon, at public auction at the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola Office, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on the 20th day of October, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. EST. The terms of the sale shall be certified funds, with ten percent (10%) of the successful bid to be deposited with the undersigned by the successful bidder upon the property being struck off to him; the balance of the successful bid shall be due and payable in the office of the undersigned at 111 N. Adams Street, Suite 277, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within forty-eight (48) hours following conclusion of the sale. The plaintiff reserves the right to bid on the above property and apply the indebtedness of the defendant to any bid so made. Any questions should be directed to Allison C. Doucette, Esquire at (813) 273-5616. Ed Spooner United States Marshal September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33705T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 19, 2014, and entered in Case No. 09-000342-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 13th day of November, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 20th day of August, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Tele: (954) 382-3486 Tele: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File# 09-16447 OWB Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33693T PUBLIC NOTICE You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. James, Jeremy J 303 11th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Sheridan, Angela L 802 Gray Ave Apt 19 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Walden, Robert B 802 Gray Ave Apt 19 Carrabelle, FL 32322 You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Apalachicola, Florida no later than (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. September 18, 2014 33719T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19 2011 CA 000204CAX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSMC MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-4, Plaintiff, vs. DELL SCHNEIDER, et al, Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 19, 2013, and entered in 19 2011 CA 000204CAX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSMC MORTGAGE-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-4 is the Plaintiff and DELL SCHNEIDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DELL SCHNEIDER N.K.A CHARLOTTE SCHNEIDER; CITIBANK, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N.K.A SIERRA RUSSELL; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N.K.A PATRICIA C. SCHNEIDER are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM, on September 24, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 17, BAYOU HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 35, THEREAFTER, SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED AS A REPLAT OF BAYOU HARBOR, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 38, BOTH IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 2nd day of September, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 Tele: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33731T PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS TO PROVIDE LABOR AND MATERIALS FOR INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS NEEDED TO FACILITATE THE CONSTRUCTION UPGRADES FOR THE CARRABELLE HIGHWAY 98 R.O.W BEAUTIFICATION AND REUSE LINE PROJECT FPID NO.: 416533-8-58-33 City of Carrabelle, (herein referred to as the “City”) Sealed bids marked “Sealed Bid” City of Carrabelle Project, to be financed by the State of Florida Department of Transportation, will be received by the City for the construction of the Project described above. Proposals shall be addressed to the Purchasing Agent, City of Carrabelle, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida 32322. All proposals must be received by the City of Carrabelle Purchasing Department prior to the bid deadline date and time to be considered. The bid deadline date for receipt of proposal for this project is 2:30 pm on October 8, 2014. Proposals shall be designated as “Sealed Bid” City of Carrabelle, Carrabelle Highway 98 R.O.W Beautification and Reuse Line Project. All bids must be submitted in triplicate. Any bids received after the specified time and date will not be considered. The sealed bids received will be publicly opened and read aloud at the City of Carrabelle Purchasing Department on October 8, 2014 at 2:30 pm. The information for Bidders, Forms of Proposal, Form of Contract, Plans, Specifications, and Forms of Bid Bond, Performance and Payment Bond, and other contract documents may be examined at the of Inovia Consulting Group c/o Russell Large, PE, located at 1983 Centre Pointe Boulevard, Suite 103, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, phone 850-298-4213. Copies may be obtained at this office upon payment of $100 which amount constitutes the cost of reproduction and handling. This payment will not be refunded. Each Bidder must deposit with his/her security in the amount, form and subject to the conditions provided in the Information for Bidders. Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear as acceptable according to the Department of Treasury Circular 570. The contractor shall begin mobilization and procurement of materials within ten working days after the receipt of the “Notice to Proceed”. The City of Carrabelle is an Equal Opportunity Employer and reserves the right waive any informalities or to reject any or all bids. Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33849T PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: On 16 housing units, a total of approximately 25,000 square feet, located on 11th and 12th Street in Apalachicola, FL, install (color silver) 24 gauge galvalume metal roofing with 6 inch eave drip edge to match roof color, installation of one layer of #30 lb felt underlayment on existing roof surface, replace all existing gutters and add or replace vent pipes as necessary. Metal roofing will go over existing shingle roofs. All grounds to be cleaned up on a daily basis as homes are occupied by tenants. All bushes, shrubs and flowers to be protected. Bids will be received until October 14, 2014. Please send bids to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 For questions, please email apalhousing@ gmail.com or call 850-653-9304 Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33827T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: October 4, 2014 at: 10:00 a.m. at SEMINOLE SAFE N SECURE, 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: APRIL THOMPSON SHAMI BIGALOW Before the sale date of October 4, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33835T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: October 4, 2014 at 11:30 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: JUDT TERRY & CO/ OWNER FAITH HERRING Before the sale date of October 4, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33855T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000313 U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2 Plaintiff, -vs.William Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a W. Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a William Proctor, Individually and as Trustee of the W. Stanley Proctor Sr. Revocable Real Estate Trust Agreement Dated July 22, 2004; Melinda Lippe Proctor; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000313 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2, Plaintiff and William Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a W. Stanley Proctor Sr. a/k/a William Proctor, Individually and as Trustee of the W. Stanley Proctor Sr. Revocable Real Estate Trust Agreement Dated July 22, 2004 are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on October 16, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: UNIT 8, BUILDING B, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSES: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A, ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY, THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5704.64 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 35 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 113.81 FEET (CHORD BEARS SOUTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, 113.81 FEET), THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST, 92.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST, 244.65 FEET,

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, September 18, 2014 The Times | A15 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 5. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 6. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets. 7. Mariner's View #9 3 bedroom 3 bath fully furnished, $850mo. No utilities. Pet friendly 8. 46-4 Carlton Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished apartment, $375mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 9. 33-2 Holland Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished, $525mo. No utilities. 10. 51-4 Pine Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath, unfurnished. $525mo. No Utilities.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518856 Franklin CountyLiquor License$ 155,000.00 Seriousinquires/offersonly at:anitalln242@aol.com 4518844 4518883 Help WantedFull Time Receptionist Needed For Busy Veterinary Clinic in Eastpoint. Must be skilled with customer service, be a team player, have good telephone skills, be able to handle a busy workload, have good computer skills, be able to deal with difcult situations, love pets and their people, and be a quick learner. Only candidates seeking long term employment need apply. Competitive salary and benets.Please send resume to: P.O. Box 685, Eastpoint,FL 32328 or email to: drhffulmer@yahoo.com 4518882CASE MANAGEMENT POSITION Bachelor's Degree in Social Services (social work, sociology, psychology, or related eld) or an LPN/RN license and 2+ years of professional case management experience REQUIRED. No one without these minimum quali cations will be considered. Excellent written communication skills and basic computer skills also required. Please send resume to Mary Clayton, Gulf County Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 or email to psjseniorscfo@fairpoint.net Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans. The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout September We seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 1130494 NOTICEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will consider applications for the following position:COUNTY COORDINATORThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is seeking a proven, dedicated innovative and experienced individual for the new County Coordinator position. The Board prefers an individual who has familiarity with the county administration. The successful individual will possess a four year college degree or have equivalent work experience of at least 7 years of progressively responsible experience in management. The Coordinator position directly supervises and is responsible for the function of the Building Department employees, Planning Department employees, Administrative Services staff, Courthou se Maintenance staff, and is the Airport Manager. The Coordinator reports dire ctly to the Board, and represents the Board at meetings and functions when authorized. The Coordinator is the Board’s contact for economic developmen ts and is the chief administrative ofcial for the Board. The Coordinator develops Board Agenda’s for Board meetings and workshops through coordin ation with the Board chairman, and submits agenda to Clerk for distribution. The Coordinator attends and reports at Board meetings and workshops, and listens and responds to citizen requests and comments regarding county services and advises the Board as needed. STARTING SALARY: $45,000-$50,000 Depending on Qualications Special areas of concern include:€ General knowledge of county government structure and function € General knowledge of government budgeting and nance € General knowledge of human resources and personnel guidelines € Experience in grant writing and grant administration € Experience in public speaki ng and public presentations € Experience in organizing meetings € Experience in disaster response € Experience in building maintenance € Ability to interpret an d explain complex problems € Ability to express in writing and orally, decisions or directives of the Board € Other duties may be assigned by the BoardFranklin County employment applications may be picked up in the Clerk’s Ofce in the Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida. For assistance in obtaining an application please contact Michael Moron in the Clerks Ofce at 850-653-8861, Ext. 100. Completed applications and resumes must be received in the Clerks Ofce by 4:00 p.m. EST, Friday, October 10, 2014, attention Michael Moron, Board Secretary. The mailing address for the Cle rks Ofce is: 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.FRANKLIN COUNTY IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 4518535 THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST, 27.09 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 22.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 61.50 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST, 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST, 61.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THE 30 FOOT NON-EXCLUSIVE INGRESS/ EGRESS, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT DESCRIBED ON EXHIBIT “A” TO THAT CERTAIN INSTRUMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 709, PAGES 547 THROUGH 549, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Terry Segree DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Tele: (561) 998-6700 Fax: (561) 998-6707 13-260666 FC02 WNI Sept. 18, 25, 2014 96166T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-173 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KURT M. ELDRIDGE and VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA, PHASE 1 PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 27th day of August, 2014. in Case Number 13-173 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A., is Plaintiff, and KURT M. ELDRIDGE and VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA, PHASE 1 PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the 2nd floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola at 11:00 a.m. (Central Time) on October 23, 2014, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Forec osure: Lot 25 of Village Green By the Sea, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 10-11, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICY OF THE CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale. you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 27th day of August, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Sept. 18, 25, 2014 96194T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2009-CA-000469CAAX-MX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE RELATING TO CHEVY CHASE FUNDING LLC MORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. LUCIA ANN GLEATON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUCIA ANN GLEATON; JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 50, TURTLE BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 36, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on December, 10, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 28th day of August, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff 47278-T/jml If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com GUN SHOW September 27th &28th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 txt FL00161 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternFront Desk Maintenance Weekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34298690 Install/Maint/Repair Maintenance Full time maintenance person needed at The Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island, FL. Experience is helpful. Must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at The Buccaneer Inn located at160 W. Gorrie Dr., St. George Island or call 850-927-2585 for more information. Web ID#: 34300743 Medical/Health LPN / MA Wanted/ PRNOutpatient practice seeks an LPN or Certified MA for a specialty practice to work on a PRN basis. The ideal candidate will have three to five years of nursing experience. Previous medical office experience is preferred. The nurse will provide support for providers at outlying clinics. The optimum candidate will have an impeccable attention to detail. Apply by email to: pesher@seuc.com Web ID 34299015 Other Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce Position open in November. For inquiries, call 850-697-2585 or email: chamber@nettally .com Web ID#: 34300272 Other Maintenance TechTransfield Services Carrabelle, FL Roadway, Signs, Bridges, Vegetation, etc. HS or GED -Valid DL CDL Highly Desirable. Call 850-544-4023 Web ID#: 34299681 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL97546 to 56654 Carrabelle 2br, refurbished apartment, w/ large fenced in yard, furnished, $500mo, first/last security, Call 706-202-0639 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-247-8470 Publisher’s Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. GeorgeIsland $185/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola -Beautiful 4br, 3.5ba, located in the heart of Apalachicola Historic Southside. Garage & Fenced yard. $2000mo + $1000 dep. First & Last month req. 6-12mo lease. Call 850-370-6001 Apalachicola : 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. 850-643-7740 Text FL96705 to 56654 St. George Island 2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $1150 mo + $500 dep 850-370-6001 East Point Home for sale $85,000 159 Bear Creek Rd, approx. 1300 sq ft, Large living room, 2 bd/1 ba, Kitchen & Dining room, front & back screened porches, carport & workshop on fenced 2 acre lot w/ pond. Approx. 1 mile from the Bay, 4 miles to St. George Island bridge. For information please call 251-214-6595 or 850-370-0288 Price Reduced Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced, (2) storage buildings 10x20, 10x32 screened back porch, & deep well. Close to town and boat ramps. $82,500. 850-697-2176 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds!

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, September 18, 2014 Lo ca te do n4c it yl ots ,t his is ab eautiful we ll ke pt pr oper ty in aq uiet neighbor hood .M ast er bedr oom has ag re at wa lk -in closet .P len ty of ro om to par kab oa ti nt he back ya rd. Pa rt ially fe nc ed with tw oo utbuildings and ag ar age Fr uit tr ees and gra pe vines in the back ya rd and easy to main tain landscaping .E asy to sho ww ith one hour notic e. BEA CH FR ONT LO T Landmar kl oca tion! Th eO NL Y1 00’ wide beachfr on tl ot in the Gulf Be aches fo rs ale! Lo ca te dn ex tt oa1 00' wide beach easemen tw ith ad une wa lko ve r, the east er nmost beachfr on tl ot in the Gulf Be aches pr ov iding open view s to the East End .Ar ar eo e r. John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com Fi rst tier ,6 BR 5B A, Upscale nish with har dw ood ,t ile ,& gra nit ec oun te rt ops ,E LE VA TO R, open ki tc hen/ dining/ living ar ea, stainless applianc es ,w et bar in MBR, fur nished 3c ov er ed por ches ,p ri vat eP OOL, gr ea tr en tal inc ome Pa lmett oW ay John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com " # "! % $% !" + " !!!" !" #" %" # $ # "' " # # % 1 # 0 /0 ,( )* # "' # #! & " .* "0 De ad li ne : 09 /2 9/ 14 pr io r to 10 :0 0 AM E. S. T. Del iv er y Po in t: Ap al ac hi co la Ba y Cha rt er Sc ho ol 98 12 th St re et Ap al ac hi co la FL 32 32 0 Ty pe of Re sp onse Al lo we d: Ha rd Co py On ly Is sui ng Ag en cy : Ap al ac hi co la Ba y Cha rt er Sc ho ol Sp ec ia l No ti ce s: In su ra nc e Re quire d AC CE PT IN G VE ND OR QU EST IO NS : Due Da te : 9/ 29 /1 4 pri or to 2: 00 PM E. S. T. Pr ima ry Co nt ac t Na me : Eliz abe th Ki rv in Ass is ta nt Pr in ci pa l Em ai l: e ki rv in @a bc ea gl es .o rg SUMM AR Y OF SP EC IF IC AT IO NS : Th e Ap al ac hi co la Ba y Cha rt er Sc ho ol is a ccep ti ng se al ed pr op os al s to pr ov ide Ph ys ic al Th er ap y Se rv ic es in ac co rda nc e wi th th e sp ec i ca ti on s, te rm s an d co nd it io ns st at ed he re in Th e sc op e of wo rk wi ll in cl ud e pr ov id in g ph ys ic al th er ap y se rv ic es to sp ec ia l ed uc at io n st ud en ts as sp ec i ed by th ei r In di vi du al iz ed Ed uc at io na l Pl an s (I EP ). “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) This trivia column (begun in Spartanburg, SC H-J and now nationally widespread) is celebrating what number anniversary this week? 6, 8, 10, 14 2) What’s considered the most difcult of all woodwind instruments to play correctly? Clarinet, Oboe, Flute, Saxophone 3) Of these which has remained virtually unchanged since 1890? Vicks VapoRub, Vaseline, Band-Aids, Dixie Cups 4) What did Charles Stilwell invent in 1883 that is around today? Grocery bag, Shopping cart, Cash register, Ear muffs 5) How many years did Noah Webster spend writing his famed dictionary? 26, 36, 46, 56 6) During which century was Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick” rst published? 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th 7) Where did cattle branding in the U.S. originate? Connecticut, South Carolina, Texas, Ohio 8) When was the rst-ever Social Security check #00000-001 issued by the U.S. Government? 1920, 1930, 1940, 1950 9) General Manuel Noriega was at one time military leader of what country? Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, Panama 10) What’s the number of steps leading to the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa? 296, 412, 602, 856 11) When was Mexico’s current constitution adopted? 1617, 1717, 1817, 1917 12) What was patented by Frank Baldwin in 1850? Hand saw, Adding machine, Fish hook, Paint brush 13) Karachi and Rawalpindi have both been capitals of what country? Pakistan, Nepal, Saudi Arabia, Egypt 14) When a recipe calls for a dash of something, that’s about how much of a teaspoonful? 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2 ANSWERS 1) 14. 2) Oboe. 3) Vicks VapoRub. 4) Grocery bag. 5) 36. 6) 19th. 7) Connecticut. 8) 1940. 9) Panama. 10) 296. 11) 1917. 12) Adding machine. 13) Pakistan. 14) 1/16. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com WWW.APALACHtT IMES.COM From Staff ReportsCC ounty bonuses slated for November At Tuesday morning’s county commission meeting, Commissioner Pinki Jackel moved that the one-time $500 bonuses promised to county workers be presented with their second October check. “I want to see them get it as soon as possible,” she said. The motion died for lack of a second. Commissioner William Massey then moved the bonus be awarded with the second November check. The motion passed 4-1, with Jackel opposed.AA quarter-million for C C amp Gordon Johnston? At Tuesday’s county commission meeting, Commissioner William Massey moved that the Tourist Development Commission budget $250,000 for the next scal year to help provide a new building for the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. Commissioner Smokey Parrish was opposed, saying, “I can’t support that because we will have to cut out other programs.” Commissioner Noah Lockley said he believed veterans should receive support beyond a museum. “People come back all messed up, and we aren’t even giving them jobs,” he said. The motion passed 3-2, with Lockley and Parrish opposed.PP roposal to limit some roofs on A A lligator P P oint On Tuesday morning, County Planner Alan Pierce presented county commissioners with a draft ordinance prohibiting roofs on detached structures seaward of the Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) on the west end of Alligator Point. The need for this ordinance arose from a decision the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) made in allowing beach viewing platforms on Alligator Point seaward of previous structures. Residents are concerned that if DEP were to allow roofs over any future structures that it permits seaward of the CCCL, that it will have a greater chance of becoming airborne during a storm and causing damage. This part of Alligator Point has an extremely at beach and is vulnerable to storm events. News BRIE fF S