The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00285

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, August 28, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 129 ISSUE 18 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com Email: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Law Enforcement . . . A2 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A15-A17 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Hall of Fame educator, A8 Eastpoint library offers computer help Carly Peary from Wilderness Coast Public Libraries will be available to help people with computer questions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, at the Eastpoint branch of the county library. Jazz concert Saturday at Riverfront Park Join us at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture, and Art, on the docks of Riverfront Park, this Saturday, Aug. 30 from 7 to 9 p.m. Enjoy live cool jazz music from the Fish Camp Cut Ups and if you want to have a lot of fun, jump in the dancing. Caller Andy Kane will be leading the fun. We will have fresh seafood to send off the Wakulla Working Waterfronts photo exhibit now on display at the center. The Great Raid Saturday at CGJ The lm The Great Raid will be shown at 10:15 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. The lm focuses on American soldiers imprisoned by the Japanese in 1944, as the Allies were closing in on the Philippines. Throughout the lm, the viewpoint switches between the POWs at Cabanatuan, the Army Rangers, the Filipino resistance and the Japanese. Admission by donation and appreciated. This lm is part of a monthly series to educate visitors of the sacri ces made by our World War II generation. Free popcorn available. Marshall wins school board; Parrish re-elected By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys primary Tuesday saw one incumbent ousted on the eastern end and another re-elected on the western end. Pamela Marshall, 56, of Carrabelle, took a clear majority of the ballots in the nonpartisan race for school board for District 2, avoiding a run-off in the Nov. 4 general election. Marshall, a former teacher who retired from the school district after 32 years in the classroom, captured more than 56 percent of vote (350), to overtake challenger Wilburn Ray Messer, 55, of Carrabelle, who drew 30.5 percent of the ballots (190), and 14-year incumbent David Hinton, 78, of Carrabelle, who received 13.5 percent (84) In the universal primary for District 4 county commissioner, incumbent Joseph Smokey Parrish, 52, of Apalachicola, easily retained his seat with 66.6 percent (381) to 33.4 percent (191) for challenger Royce S. Rolstad III, 31, of Apalachicola. Although Republican voters in District 2 might have cast votes in the race for county commissioner, the supervisor of elections of ce did not release any totals, since Mark Nobles, 57, of Lanark Village, was deemed the winner after Bill Snyder, 55, of Lanark Village, dropped out for health reasons earlier this month. Nobles now will PAM MARSHALL SMOKEY PARRISH See ELECTIONS A6 HOT ENOUGH FOR YOU? Record temperatures set for Apalachicola LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Many downtown businesses, including these situated along Avenue D, were without power for about an hour Saturday afternoon. Temperatures soar 7 degrees above average high By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Franklin County experienced record high temperatures on Friday and Saturday of last week. According to the National Weather Service of ce in Tallahassee, A heat wave began building across the Southeast on Thursday, Aug. 21. In our local area, widespread heat index values of 105 degrees or more were observed, with quite a few stations in the 108112 degree range. Some locations closer to the coast in the Florida Panhandle and Big Bend, as well as some spots closer to larger bodies of water in the interior Florida Panhandle, observed heat index values between 113 and 117 degrees, illustrating the in uence warm water can have on surface dewpoints, and therefore heat index. Multiple locations in Gulf County observed heat index values peaking in the 120 to 123 degree range. The heat index estimates the temperature perceived by persons working or playing outside. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, The heat index is a single value that takes both temperature and humidity into account. The higher the heat index, the hotter the weather feels, since sweat does not readily evaporate and cool the skin, when humidity is high. The actual temperatures observed at Apalachicola Regional Airport were nowhere near 115 degrees. See HEAT A6 Meggs: Probation of cer might have stolen $300,000 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A hearing last week in the case of a former Franklin County probation of cer who stands accused of pocketing payments from probationers by recording them as community service hours showed the case is more complicated, and more extensive, than rst thought. Jennifer Martina Brown, who worked as county probation of cer from March 2009 until she was red in August 2013, sat quietly as her lawyer, Jay GorWILLIE MEGGS JAY SHULER WILLAM GARY See STOLEN MONEY A6 Apalachicola fees could rise under new budget By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Apalachicola city commissioners got a rst look Tuesday night at details of a budget proposal for the upcoming scal year, and now must decide whether keeping the millage rate the same as this year will get the job done. The commissioners last month tentatively adopted the maximum allowable millage rate of 10 mills for next year, and so they have the leeway to raise it to that if they should so choose. The budget presented Tuesday by City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb gave gures that kept the See FEES A13 County shoots down airport lease reduction By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com County commissioners have refused to lower the monthly lease payment on Apalachicola Regional Airport for xed base operator Crystal Air of Chattanooga, Tenn. At their regular Aug. 19 meeting, Director of Administrative Services and Airport Manager Alan Pierce recommended commissioners reduce the $5,000 monthly payment to $2,500. His problem is the lease is too high, Pierce said. In an interview after the meeting, Pierce said the FBO has been late with rent more than half the time since signing the lease in October 2012. Payments are currently in arrears, he said. Pierce also suggested the county take back control of the unoccupied corporate hangar. In addition to reducing the lease payments, effective June 1, Pierce asked to modify the lease to allow the county to give Crystal Air 10 days notice in the event Franklin County has a use for it. Until Franklin County gives Crystal Air the notice, the corporate hangar will continue to be in their lease and they will continue to pay See LEASE A13 TAYLOR NEWMAN

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The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests listed were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. AUG. 18 Audra Murray, 46, Carrabelle, disorderly conduct and violation of probation (CPD) AUG. 19 Michael Lee, 45, Carrabelle, perjury in of cial proceedings (FCSO) Edward Prince, Jr., 31, Apalachicola, burglary of a dwelling with person assaulted, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, false imprisonment and withholding child support (FCSO) AUG. 20 Jacinto Negron, 49, Eastpoint, two counts of battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Donavon Crum, 20, Bristol, violation of probation (FCSO) AUG. 21 Edward Lively, 30, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Dana Aponte, 38, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (APD) By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A Carrabelle woman was killed Tuesday morning, when her car failed to negotiate a curve on U.S. Highway 98. At 7:09 a.m., Crystal Amanda Sand, 36, was traveling east in a 1995 Ford Contour, about fourtenths of a mile east of Gulf Avenue, when her vehicle left the roadway as she was traveling through a curve to the left. The Florida Highway Patrol report said Sands vehicle traveled off the south shoulder and struck a tree. The report said she was pronounced dead at the scene and transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was wearing her seatbelt at the time of the crash, the report said. FHP was assisted on scene by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, Carrabelle Police Department and Carrabelle Fire Department. We ems Memorial Rehab Car e of fers in-patient re habilitative services, designed to impr ove function and maximize potential for re tur ning to home, school, work, and the community Our team customizes each patient s car e to meet both patient and family needs. We ar e committed to re tur ning those individuals who have been impair ed by accident or disease to their highest level of independence. Re hab Re stor e, Re turn to Home Call To day (850 ) 653-8853 135 Av enue G, Apalac hicola We ems Memorial Re hab Car e Yo ur Jour ney Back Home BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0 + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 Law Enforcement A2 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 VINCE BISHOP | Special to the Times An SUV lies on the beach of Money Bayou after it rolled over Aug. 21 and killed one of its occupants. Money Bayou crash kills local man By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com An Apalachicola man was killed early Thursday when his SUV rolled over the Cape San Blas beaches near Money Bayou. Both occupants were ejected, but Chris Burke, 28, became pinned under the vehicle and died as a result of his injuries or drowning. Burke was a former member of the South Gulf County Fire Department, completing first responder classes in 2008, and occasionally worked at the Scallop Cove Market on Cape San Blas. Members of the SGCFD alerted of an auto accident with injury at 5 a.m. Eton Aug. 21 and found the SUV, which had rolled over several times, at rest on its roof in the shallows of the water. The other occupant, Keith Kelly, 28, of Panama City, suffered critical injuries and was transported to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf where he was Life Flighted to Bay Medical Center Sacred Heart Health System in Panama City and is being treated for hypothermia. According to Vince Bishop, captain of the SGCFD, its unknown what caused the SUV to roll and the accident could have occurred hours before it was discovered by vacationers and called in during the early morning hours. Bishop said that several factors likely contributed to the event including excessive speed over soft sand full of bumps, holes and logs. Neither occupant of the vehicle appeared to have been wearing a seatbelt nor was it clear which of the men had been driving. The case is being investigated by the Florida Highway Patrol. Inmates sue sheriffs of ce, Miniat By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Seven county jail inmates led suit earlier this month in federal court, alleging the sheriffs ofce and former jail physician Dr. Stephen Miniat deprived them of needed medical care. The suit was led Aug. 15 in Florida Northern District Court by attorneys from the Tallahassee law rm of Marie A. Mattox on behalf of Jason T. Wilson, Derek Strevel, Allen ONeal, Michael Quinn, Sam Revell, Anthony Sanders and James West. The suit was led in federal court because the inmates are asserting claims under the Constitutions Eighth Amendment, which bans cruel and unusual punishment, and the 14th Amendment, which guarantees citizens equal protection under the law. They also assert the damages to the plaintiffs are in excess of $75,000, the minimum threshold required to sue. The suit alleges a series of medical issues took place at the county jail between October 2010 and December 2011 and were addressed by Miniat, who was under contract to provide medical services to the sheriffs of ce, which at the time was headed by Sheriff Skip Shiver. Mock, who was elected in August 2012, is being sued since he is Shivers successor as operator of the county jail on Highway 65. According to the suit, at least one inmate has died and several others injured due to the deliberate indifference and negligence of jail staff and medical staff. None of the seven plaintiffs has died, but the suit references another case, that of Dale Bedell, who it says died while incarcerated at the jail on June 19, 2011. The suit says Bedells estate has led a separate lawsuit against the sheriffs of ce. The earliest allegation of inadequate medical care dates back to Oct. 12, 2010, when Quinn is said to have tripped over extension cords and fallen on the jails concrete oor, injuring his wrist and hip, and re-injuring his back. Quinn was unable to stand up, and no guards assisted him. He lay on the oor for approximately 45 minutes before someone helped him to his bed. He requested medical treatment for these injuries and they were all ignored and/or denied, reads the lawsuit. (He) continues to have pain due to these injuries. The next instance referenced was that of Anthony Sanders, who the suit says has HIV/AIDS, (and) suffers from seizures on a regular basis. While an inmate, (Sanders) had his medication changed by the medical staff at the jail. The change in medication caused him to have seizures. The suit says medical staff did not provide adequate medical care, and that inmates requested he be evacuated for medical care. In fact, staff was told not to call the ambulance because (Sanders) does this all the time and there is nothing that can be done. The suit alleges no one in the medical staff or in authority at the jail responded for hours, and only after a threat of a riot was Mr. Sanders evacuated to a nearby medical facility for treatment. It says the dates of these incidents include all incarcerations between Feb. 8 and Dec. 21, 2011, at the jail. Four of the plaintiffs describe incidents in July 2011. ONeal was transferred from the Leon County Jail to Franklin County around July 1, 2011. He is described in the suit as diabetic and bi-polar, and says that it took two weeks for the medical staff to provide him his medication for his bi-polar condition. The entire time that (ONeal) was in the Franklin County Jail, he did not receive his medication for diabetes and he was not furnished a diabetic/low carbohydrate diet, reads the suit, adding that as a result, he has suffered diminished sight capacity. Wilsons claim dates back to July 14, 2011, when he says he slipped and fell in the bathroom due to a leaking toilet. He says he hit his head on a sink, then landed on his right shoulder, and was seen by jail medical staff and sent to Weems Memorial Hospital for evaluation. After he was released from the hospital, Wilson says in the suit he informed Nurse Kandice Henry that his arm was turning purple, was given ibuprofen and told his xrays were ne. (Wilson) informed (Henry) that no X-rays had been taken at the hospital but no further treatment was given and (he) remained in constant pain, reads the suit. It goes on to say that one week later, Wilson slammed his middle nger in a door which caused his nger to be punctured to the bone. Dr. Miniat put glue on the wound to close it temporarily. The glue did not hold the wound properly and (Wilsons) nger began to bleed. The suit claims Henry informed Miniat of the situation, and that Wilson was told Miniat would be in later to sew up the wound. He never did and the delay in treatment resulted in severe pain to Wilson, reads the suit. On July 16, 2011, the suit claims Strevel slipped and fell in the jail bathroom due to a toilet that had been leaking for two months. It said he hit his head on a steel sink and sustained a shoulder injury, and that although he was seen by medical staff at the jail, Mr. Strevel was not administered any nonprescription pain medication to alleviate his pain despite his requests for same. In the case of West, it says that before becoming an inmate in July 2011, he had several serious medical conditions, including high blood pressure and migraine headaches, and suffered a stroke in or around 2006. The suit alleges West asked several times to see a doctor and was refused, and that he remained at the jail for about six weeks prior to receiving any medical treatment for these serious conditions which resulted in continuous pain. The last incident described took place around Aug. 29, and involved Revell, who it says suffers from kidney problems, depression, pain, and bladder infections. The medical staff at Franklin County Jail denied medications and/or treatment for Mr. Revells medical problems which caused him to suffer unnecessary mental, emotional and physical pain over an extended period of time, reads the suit. For the actions related to these seven inmates, the suit is seeking damages including, but not limited to, medical and other expenses, lost wages, lost capacity to work, loss of enjoyment of life, pain and suffering, mental anguish, and related non-economic damages. It also asks that the defendants should be made to pay the plaintiffs legal fees. Carrabelle woman killed in Tuesday morning crash Arrest REPORT Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, August 28, 2014 A Section By SARAH CAREY Special to The Times A University of Florida study of a feline trap-neuterreturn program found that a targeted approach helped effectively manage the feral cat population and reduce shelter euthanasia rates in the area. This approach has the potential to save the lives of some of the millions of animals euthanized each year in shelters across the country. Results of the twoyear study showed that sterilizing feral cats in a region of historically high animal-control impoundments led to a steep decline in the number of cats admitted to and euthanized at the local shelter. We investigated whether we ever could neuter enough cats to slow their intake into animal control, said Julie Levy, D.V.M., Ph.D., the Maddies professor of shelter medicine at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine and principal investigator on the study, published recently in The Veterinary Journal. Neutering a few cats here and there wasnt making a big impact, so we wanted to pick a focused area and throw all our resources into it, she said. The region selected for the study is in Alachua County adjacent to the UF campus and includes the downtown Gainesville business district, several residential neighborhoods, a mobile home park, two homeless shelters, industrial parks and a veterinary clinic. The zone has higher unemployment and poverty levels, as well as lower household income and rates of home ownership, than the county as a whole. The results were dramatic. During the study, 2,366 stray and feral community cats approximately 54 percent of the estimated feral cat population in the targeted area were trapped and neutered. Afterward, they were returned to their environment or adopted. Levy and her team found that in the target area, Animal Control cat intake declined 70 percent from a baseline of 13 cats per 1,000 residents to four cats per 1,000 residents at the end of the study. In the non-target area the rest of the county cat intake declined only 13 percent from a baseline of 16 cats per 1,000 residents to 14 cats per 1,000 residents. In the target area, euthanasia declined 95 percent from a baseline of eight cats per 1,000 residents to fewer than one per 1,000 residents at the end of the study. In the nontarget area, cat euthanasia declined 30 percent from a baseline of 10 cats per 1,000 residents to seven cats per 1,000 residents. The gures were incredible as were the adoptions, Levy said. Adoption wasnt part of the original plan, but it happened organically as residents offered to take in kittens and the friendlier adults. Cats werent the only ones to nd new homes. While unclaimed cats were the focus of the study, surprisingly, the shelter intake rates of dogs also declined in the targeted area. That was just an extra win, she said. As we went door-to-door, we talked to people about how to care for all their animals, including other resources available for their pets. Funded through a $250,000 grant from Maddies Fund, the study initially used direct advertising to promote the free spay/neuter surgery available through Operation Catnip, the trap-neuterreturn program based at UF. But the cats didnt arrive in large numbers like wed expected, Levy said. They were out there, but this is a community that doesnt just take stray cats to a spay-neuter clinic. So Levy hired a neighborhood resident to knock on doors. Its not enough for an agency like ours to just make services available. You must get into a community and talk to people to nd out what they need, she said. If we go in with the right resources and attitudes, we can save animals from animal control and from being euthanized. The animal welfare community as a whole has realized that we cant be solely shelter-centric, Levy said. The next step in our work is to connect with communities, nd out their needs and how we can help. However, the resources needed to complete the project were intensive. Its not realistic to provide this level of coverage throughout the community in an untargeted way. To expand what we did in the target area to the entire county would cost millions of dollars, she said. But like all daunting problems, you bite off the greatest need and start there. Sarah Carey is director of public relations at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, a job she has held since 1990. She holds a masters degree in English with a concentration in creative writing from Florida State University, where she also received her bachelors degree in political science. Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. All letters and columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Time to get on down to Florida for the game! from Comin to Your City, performed by Big and Rich As a fairweather Cubs fan who attended games at Wrigley Field quite sparingly, the extent of my sports allegiance is shallow and casual. So when I moved South 33 years ago, I was completely unprepared for the passion which accompanies college football in yall country. I never watch an entire game, though I will admit to an af nity for the song Were Comin to Your City, played at top volume on televisions throughout my neighborhood each Saturday morning. Something about a College Game Day Show? All I know is that the noise drowns out the Cooking Channel. But a recent article in The Economist piqued my interest about college athletics. The magazine estimates NCAA annual revenues at $10 billion. The argument that coffers will be depleted if student-athletes are given a living wage in addition to a scholarship seems laughable in this context. In 41 of 50 American states, a college coach is the highest-paid public employee. Urban Meyers net worth is said to be approaching $18 million. Nick Sabans net worth is estimated at $15 million; his annual salary is $5.6 million. My son, a Florida grad, says this demonstrates Meyers superior nancial acumen. At $3.7 million annually, Gator hoops coach Billy Donovan is Floridas highest paid public employee. Saban is Alabamas highest paid public employee. Bulldogs Head Coach Mark Richt is the highest paid Georgia public employee, at $3.2 million. The economic impact of college football on local communities is not insigni cant. For the players, though, it would be fascinating to analyze their participation in return on investment terms. What is the actual risk and reward for them? It certainly appears to be a one-sided affair, like buying a penny stock and hoping the company will take off. The odds that a college player will advance to the professional level, simultaneously gaining employable skill while avoiding serious injury, are stacked heavily against him. And as The Economist observes, he gets nothing nancially for his considerable efforts, except his scholarship. Most studentathletes technically live in poverty, notes the magazine, because their scholarships do not cover the cost of living beyond room and board and the NCAA bars them from signing independent endorsement or licensing deals For decades, college sports fans cheered for their alma maters without worrying that the best coaches earn millionswhile the best players live hand to mouth. One wonders about the long-term nancial prospects for collegians who dont turn pro. Some actually pursue serious academic careers, but a large number fail to graduate with marketable skills. And many major in pigskin, while the mentors around them major in money. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a fee-only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Wrigley Field, Saban and Big and Rich CORRECTION In the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times Aug. 21 story, Island divas rally round Dayle, the story offered an incorrect characterization of the composition of the group that provided the fundraising dinner. Cecilia Harris wrote to clarify that the women term themselves the Dinner Divas since they have members who live in Apalachicola and Tallahassee as well as St. George Island. The Times regrets the error. By ELINOR MOUNT-SIMMONS Reporter, Franklin County Schools Just before Seahawk students returning for the 2014-15 school year, a Meet & Greet was held in the cafetorium, Thursday evening, Aug. 14. An opportunity for parents and the community to visit the campus and meet the faculty and staff, despite a horrendous rainstorm that poured huge quantities of rain on campus just minutes before the 4:30 p.m. start time, many parents, with children in tow, did just that. A large number of students and parents mingled amongst the school employees, some excited to begin the school year, some anxious about what to expect, some downright mad because their summer was over. Greeted by the school administrators, Kris Bray and Harolyn Walker, students and parents received introductory remarks from these Seahawk leaders and after their words of welcome, the faculty and staff stood to introduce themselves, giving their names and telling all gathered what they do here on campus. This led into Robin Tenille, our school food service director, sharing words in reference to FCS award-wining food service program. One bit of new information Tenille provided pertained to our breakfast meal. This year all children must select a fruit serving when getting this meal. Initiated in previous years and continuing this year, during lunchtime students must get a fruit or vegetable with their meal. Another change involves implementation of Smart Snack rules, which refer to servings in the a la carte area. Foods served there must be 200 calories or less. An exception to that rule is that if the food item was served the previous day in the regular line (foods such as pizza, which exceeds the 200calorie limit), and there was some leftover, it can be used the next day in the a la carte section. In her comments, Tenille proudly said for the sixth year, all Seahawk students will eat free breakfast and lunch, regardless of income. No more meals at free or reduced meals, full payment for others. Students going through the regular lunch line need no money to receive the nutritious breakfasts and lunches prepared for them all 180 days of the school year. To demonstrate the type of meals offered this year, the food staff prepared samplings to give out to all attendees of the Meet & Greet. Students took great pleasure in assisting their parents in following their daily mealtime routine, and led them through the serving line, showing them how to pick up the various samples. The food service workers, led by food service manager April Dalton, eagerly explained to parents what they were eating and everyone, students, parents, faculty and staff, seemed to really enjoy the samplings. Big thanks to Tenille, Dalton and the schools food service staff for this wonderful demonstration of their vital school program. Now that school has started, students who are on campus after hours for the many extra-curricular programs will receive snacks, also prepared by the food service staff. Immediately after the school dismissal bell rings at 2:10 p.m., those many students staying for a few more hours are to head for the lunchroom, pick up their snack and then go to their various practices, meetings, etc. Again, we thank the food service employees for their attention to the nutritional health of all Seahawks through the many food servings, breakfasts, lunches, and snacks, they prepare. As students get into the school routine, our seniors have started making preparations for their nal year as Seahawks. On Monday, the Class of 2015 had their very rst meeting with their sponsors, Sonja Braswell and Dolores Croom, sharing with them important information pertaining to the many happenings of their Senior year. Morgan Martin was elected by her peers as class president during elections in May 2014 and she, along with her fellow of cers, will ably lead the Class of 2015 from start to nish. More from Martin and her seniors as the year progresses. Thats it for this week. Until next week, keep soaring. A longtime classroom teacher in the Franklin County Schools, Elinor Mount-Simmons was a regular columnist for the Times for many years. DR. JULIE LEVY UF: Targeted feral cat neutering yields bene ts Food service debuts Smart Snack rules Page 4

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The Times | A5 Thursday, August 28, 2014 Co mm un it y In vi te d Pa nh an dl e Pl ay er s An nu al Me mb er sh ip Me et ing S ep te mb er 7t h Ge ne ra l Me mb er sh ip /O pe n Hou se 3: 00 4: 30 Li gh t Re fr es hm en ts Se rv ed El ec ti on of Bo ar d Me mb er s an d Of ce rs im me di at el y fo ll ow ing Lo ca ti on : 55 So ut h Ba ys ho re Eas tp oi nt FL Ho me of Ha nk an d El ai ne Ko zl ow sk y This menu from a local school may bring back some memories. In those days, nobody worried about saturated fats. Heres the question for this week: What is a bologna cup? Does anyone remember? If so, please contact the Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star .com NEWS FROM QUINN HIGH Quinn High School will open for students Monday, August 31, 1964 at 8:30 a.m. All children will report for a full day of activities. Students who are entering the rst grade will be required to do a physical checkup before entering school. Meals will be served in the lunchroom beginning with the rst day. The menus are as follows: Menus August 31-September 4 Monday 31st Sloppy Joe /Buns Vegetable Medley Harvard Beets Butter Cake / Jell-O Milk Tuesday 1st Pot Roast Steamed Turnip Greens Buttered Rice Hot Corn Bread Cling Peaches Milk Wednesday 2nd Bologna Cups Tomato and Lettuce Salad Buttered Corn Hot Biscuits Butter Ice Cream Milk Thursday 4th Meat Loaf Sweet Potato Souf Green Beans with Onions Corn Muf ns Jellied Fruit Milk Friday 4th Oven Fried Fish Sticks Buttered Peas Glazed Carrots Cols Slaw Rolls Butter Ginger Bread / Lemon Sauce Milk OUR MOST ENJOYABLE SUMMER IN LANARK About ve years ago, I made a down payment on a home in Lanark Village. It was a great pleasure to furnish and decorate it; it was such a change from Big City life. The air, the sun, the beach, and all the beauty about was such a change from the concrete walls and pavements. Instead of tall buildings, there are tall pine trees; instead of the rumble of trucks and trains, we hear the birds singing when we arise. The Village is a boys world. There is a cat in our back yard to stroke; there is a turtle to feed; there is the bicycle to ride over unhampered roads; there are sh to catch in the lake and the gulf within walking distance; there is a beach to swim in. No longer am I in a position to live in the Village all year around. My son and I look forward to the summer season when we can return to this haven for the most enjoyable of vacations. When I mention going, my sons eyes light up like with Oh mom; thats great. When its time to leave, it is indeed a sad day to close the house and return to work and Eric, to attend school. However, there is always the next summer to look forward to when we open our beloved Florida home with all its sunshine, friends and neighbors to enjoy. Mrs. Gunda Joucken and Eric MEMBERS WANTED Members are needed to form a Civil Air Patrol Squadron in Apalachicola, Fla. Anyone between the ages of 12 to 18 are eligible to join. For information, call 6534905 or 653-6601. IMPROVED PHONE SERVICE FOR EASTPOINT The St. Joseph Telephone Company announces that the new exchange at Eastpoint, Fla. will be placed in service 2 a.m. Sunday, august 30, 1964. All of the telephone numbers at Eastpoint will be changed and a supplementary directory will be mailed by the telephone company to the Apalachicola and Eastpoint subscribers for use until the new directory is issued in October. The telephone company asks that all of the subscribers at Eastpoint inform their friends and business associates who call them that they will have new telephone numbers after August 30 and also will no longer be listed under the Apalachicola Exchange but will be under the Eastpoint, Florida Exchange. Extended Area Service will be provided between Apalachicola and Eastpoint. This means that there will be Free Calling between Eastpoint and Apalachicola when the new exchange is placed into service. Throughout its tenure, editors of the Times have had editorial columns in various formats. In the early 20th Century, there was News from the Dads, in the 1950s, the column was called Too Late to Classify, and in the 1960s, Grist and Grits was the title. The content of the front page changed over time too. Early in the 20th Century, local news shared the front page with obituaries and international stories. During both World War I and World War II, news of the war often overshadowed local news. In the 1920s and 1930s, local news took pride of place on page one. The 1950s also showed an emphasis on local news and especially economic development, but in the 1960s, the tide began to turn and there is less and less local news in the Times. Even this editorial column, is focused on the world at large. GRIST AND GRITS For over ten years, this editor has reasoned that the best way to get county economy on the move is to create jobs and payroll. Put money in the pockets of the poor man and everybody would prosper because poor folks need most everything money will buy. My campaign for the underdog got me nowhere except promotion to the head of the class. I am now topdog in the underdog organization *** A number of people say Goldwater will carry the Deep South and many (particularly Goldwater) wonder if its true what they say about Dixie. Goldwater in and Hot Water in ? Well, we put up with the City water that should prepare us to put up with Goldwater. *** There seems to be a rapidly increasing number of people who evidently think the recently enacted civil rights law authorizes them to commit civil wrongs with impunity. *** Compared to the hell-raising going on all over the country these days, the gangster era of the 20s could be looked upon now as the good old days. *** An old Army colonel in World War I was angry at the late hours his three sergeants were keeping. He warned them theyd be disciplined if they were not in their barracks by midnight. The next night, the trio were later than ever. Called on the carpet, the rst sergeant told the colonel he couldnt get a cab so he hired a hansom carriage. Trotting up the hill the horse fell dead and the sergeant had to walk. The excuse seemed reasonable, so the colonel excused the sergeant and called the next man. The second sergeant told exactly the same story as the rst. Enraged, the colonel called in the third sergeant and said: I suppose youve got some crazy excuse about missing a cab and having to hire a hansom. No, not at all, said the sergeant. I was late because my cab was delayed halfway up the hill by two dead horses blocking the road. School begins at Quinn High School FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT This past weekend, the Festival of Ice in Apalachicola had activities in Gorrie Square, where the library is located. Dr. John Gorrie died in 1855, but we are still celebrating the achievement of this statesman of Apalachicola who, for the bene t of his yellow fever patients, designed a machine that manufactured ice, which he positioned in the rooms of his patients to keep them cool. Debbe Beard has made famous in her Glance-at-the-Past radio clips the famous Bastille Day celebration, where bets were made as to whether cold champagne would be served. And it was, thanks to Gorries new invention. The library owns the title Frozen Water Trade, by Gavin Wieghtman, which tells the story of ice before Gorries famous invention. Starting in 1806, natural ice began being delivered by sailing vessels from New England. Long periods of delay between shipments often meant the residents of Apalachicola were without ice, but how did this Frozen-Water Trade, as it was called, come into being? Frederic Tudor, a young Boston entrepreneur, set out that year on a month-long voyage with a load of ice, cut from local ponds, destined for Martinique. He had plenty of detractors, but over the decades, he built a thriving business with few competitors. His deliveries spread throughout the Bahamas and Cuba. His regular routes included Charleston and New Orleans and no doubt included Apalachicola. His greatest feat was the transport, over 16,000 miles, on a four-month journey, of 100 tons of ice to Calcutta. This was in 1833. Tudor kept regular journals of his life and business, detailing the inception and growth of his empire, and the delivery of ice to the world. Ice houses are still standing in some of Tudors ports-of-call, including the one in Madras, built in 1841, a testimony to a forgotten trade. The ability to create manmade ice, for which Gorrie is commemorated, as well as the concept of air conditioning, was greeted with much skepticism and some outright scorn in many Southern locales. Men of the cloth proclaimed it unholy and possibly the work of the devil himself. But in the end, while manmade ice won the day, for many decades, arti cial ice production could not outcompete the well-established Frozen-Water Trade and its ice king Frederic Tudor. Tudor was not always a great person to do business with. Gorries biographer, Vivian Sherlock, in her book Fever Man, writes that Gorrie blamed Tudor for badmouthing his invention. The story of Frederick Tudor is just an example of books at the Apalachicola Municipal Library that will inform and entertain. Please come by and check out the collection. We are open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. When we can, were open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays; just call ahead. Caty Greene is the librarian of the Apalachicola Municipal Library. You can reach her at 653-8436. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Frederic Tudor, left, transported ice in the 1800s. At right is the Tudor Wharf in 19th century Boston. Gorrie hastened end of frozen water trade @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene

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On both Friday and Sat urday, Aug. 22 and 23, the recorded high temperature was 97 degrees Fahrenheit, seven degrees above the average high temperature for those dates, 90 degrees. Rod Gasche, who main tains a home weather sta tion in Carrabelle, said high temperatures there reached 98 degrees. Since no historical records are maintained, it is unclear whether this is a record. Temperatures on St. George Island were some what lower. Wunderground. com, which has a weather station reporting in real time on the island, mea sured a high on Friday of 94 degrees and a Saturday high of 96 degrees. On both Friday and Sat urday, the average percent age of humidity at the air port was about 70 percent. According to the National Weather Service heat index calculator, the perceived temperature at 70 percent humidity and 97 degrees Fahrenheit is about 130 degrees Fahrenheit. Fridays high tempera ture broke the existing record by one degree. The former record of 96 degrees was set in 1980. Saturdays high tied the existing re cord set in 2007. On Saturday, Aug. 23, portions of Apalachic ola from the downtown business district to the Piggly Wiggly on Tenth Street were without power for about 40 minutes. About 1:55 p.m. a large limb from a water oak about 2 to 3 feet wide broke away and fell on a power line in the alley between 13th and 14th streets on Avenue D. The incident left residents and businesses in the area of 14th Street to the Gibson Inn off U.S. Highway 98 without power for about an hour. The record low for Aug. 22 is 74 degrees set in 1997. The record low for Aug. 23 is 66 degrees set in 1959. Recorded precipitation for the month of August to date is 2.66 inches, almost three inches below normal for the month. Apalachic ola Airport has received 10.73 inches of rain since June 1, a little more than seven inches below nor mal, however, the airport has received 37.3 inches of rain since Jan. 1, a half inch above the average, so even without summer tropical storms, the county is not in drought conditions. Temperatures dropped by about nine degrees fol lowing afternoon thun dershowers on Sunday and daily highs remained in the low 90s through Wednesday. Local A6 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 No ti ce o f B oa rd V ac an cy Fr an kl in C ou n ty T our is t De ve lopm en t Co unc il Th e Fr an kl in Co un ty TD C is ac ce pt in g ap pl ic at ion s to l l a lo dg in g pr ov id er po si ti on on th e TD C bo ard In te re st ed ca nd id at es ma y ob ta in inf or ma ti on ab out th e po si ti on an d ap po in tm en t pr oc es s an d re qu ire me nt s at ww w. sa lt y or id a. co m/ ab ou t/ ad mi ni st ra ti on / pu bl ic -n oti ce s/ or by ca lli ng th e TD C o ce s at 85 0-6 53 -8 67 8. In te re st ed pe rs on s sh ou ld re pl y no la te r th an 5: 00 p. m. Se pt em be r 21 20 14 Pa nh an dl e P la ye rs Au di ti on s Pa nha nd le Pl ay er s wi ll be ho ld in g au di ti on s fo r th e 1s t pr od uc ti on of th e se as on Th e la d ie s of Ed en Fa ll s, Ge or gia ha ve ta lk ed ab ou t sh ak in g thi ng s up Th e lo ss of a de ar fr ien d br in g th em to th e re al iz at io n th at if it is go in g to hap pe n th ey ne ed to ge t st ar te d. Ke epi ng thin gs on tr ac k an d ev er yo ne mo ti va te d. An d al l th is ta ke s pl ac e in th e SP ADE EDA H a ab an don ed chu rch tu rn ed da y sp a. Th er e is su rp r is e tur n of ev en ts wh en of th e gi rl s ar ch riv al vo ws to st eal th e sp a. On th e wa y to la un chi ng th ei r ne w li ve s, ov er co mi ng ob sta cl es th ey pr ov id e yo u wi th a s ide -s pl it ti ng co me dy ma ki ng yo u LO L an d sh ou t H al le luja h Th e Ha ll el uj ah Gi rl s Th e ca st wi ll be 2 mal es an d 6 fe m al es ag e 40 60 (b ut not li mit ed to th es e ag es ) Au di ti on s wi ll be he ld : Se pt em be r 9t h at Ea stp oi nt Fi re hou se bet we en 5: 00 pm to 9: 00 pm Se pt em be r 10 th at th e Ra ne y Ca rr ia ge Ho us e in Ap al ac hi co la be tw ee n 5: 00 pm 9: 00 pm Fo r add it ion al inf orm at ion an d po ssi bl e au di t ion s pl ea se ca ll : Ed Ag ul ia r (4 07 ) 25 28888 square off in the November election against Democrat ic incumbent Cheryl Sand ers, 58, of Carrabelle. Turnout for the election was a scant 27.5 percent, not surprising given that there were no statewide pri mary races, with the Dem ocratic and Republican gubernatorial candidates both essentially decided prior to the vote. Governor Rick Scott picked up 89.7 percent of the Republican primary votes in Franklin County, while Democratic nominee Charlie Crist took 57 percent of the county votes against challenger Nan Rich. A little more than 66 per cent of the countys Demo crats preferred the eventu al winner for the nominee for Florida attorney gener al, George Sheldon, against rival Perry Thurston. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott had complete election results within about a half-hour after the polls closed at 7 p.m. She said the day went off pretty much without a hitch, with two window air conditioner units installed last week at precinct No. 8, the Ameri can Legion hall west of Apalachicola. It went ne, she said. Just long. Elliott said the countys new EVid electronic poll book system performed well, with the only bump being a delay in transmit ting the numbers from Pre cinct 8. She said state of cials told her that there had been transmission problem all over the state, and that Franklin Countys debut of its system had been ne. Yall look better than anyone in the state, a state elections ofcial told her. Turnout was particular ly lackluster in Eastpoint, where only 12.2 percent of registered voters cast bal lots. It was only a little bet ter at the National Guard Armory, where just shy of 19 percent voted; on St. George Island, where 25 percent voted, and in Car rabelle, where about 29 percent voted. It was strongest in Lanark Village, where about 40.2 percent cast ballots; at the two precincts at Ameri can Legion Hall west of Apalachicola, where 44 and 54 percent of registered voters cast ballots; and in Alligator Point, where about 42 percent of registered voters went to the polls. ELECTIONS from page A1 HEAT from page A1 HOW TO BEAT THE HEAT Slow down : reduce strenuous activity Stay hydrated : drink plenty of water or other non-alcoholic uids. Dress for summer : lightweight, lightcolored clothing reects heat and sunlight Spend more time in air-conditioned places : take breaks indoors Dont get too much sun : sunburn reduces your bodys ability to dissipate heat don Shuler, and prosecut ing attorney Willie Meggs hashed out details Aug. 21 before Circuit Judge Wil liam Gary, who is presiding over the case. Were ready to resolve this case, but we under stand Willie Meggs needs to nish the work hes do ing, said Shuler. Meggs said investigators believe the possible scale of Browns alleged wrongdo ing has grown considerably since she was charged last year with grand theft, tam pering with physical evi dence, ofcial misconduct, and racketeering. We need to know how much was taken and what damage was done, he said. We feel like we have to continue on with this case. We need to tell the public the depth of the harm done in this case. Meggs said his ofces auditors, with help from Florida Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwaters depart ment, have so far collected enough evidence from bank and court records that they say could prove at least $190,000 was taken. He said investigators must comb through 12 sep arate bank accounts, and talk with hundreds more people, as they follow the money. Meggs estimated the nal amount diverted from Browns employer, Florida Probation Ser vices, LLC, and the county and state, could be close to $300,000. Meggs said his ofce was able to recover receipt books not part of normal operations, that were shredded, and his staff is working on reconstructing them. I dont know if youve ever looked at (shredded documents), he told Gary. No, I havent, the judge replied. Its not fun, Meggs said. The prosecutor gave a denite maybe when asked by the judge wheth er three months would be enough time before the case could be scheduled for trial. I am 73 and Im not go ing to be around forever, said Gary, who used to sit on the circuit court bench in Franklin County before retiring a few years ago. Another option is to kick it back over to (Circuit) Judge (Jackie) Fulford, he said. Brown, 32, began her employment in March 2009 with Judicial Correction Services, and was retained by Florida Probation Ser vices in March 2012 when that new rm was grant ed the contract with the county. The charge of grand theft above $100,000 is a rst-degree felony that could get Brown as much as 30 years in prison. The two other charges against Brown, ofcial miscon duct and tampering with physical evidence, are each third-degree felonies, which carry a ve-year maximum sentence. The ofcial misconduct charge is connected to ling false reports as a county proba tion ofcer, and the tamper ing with physical evidence stems from the allegation she shredded receipts pri or to her ring. Browns alleged scheme enabled her to routinely take cash payments from probationers, and rather than recording them prop erly, indicate the individual had completed community service hours, which can be credited against an ac count at a rate of $10 per hour. Johnny Turner, an in vestigator with the prose cutors ofce who attended last weeks hearing, has said no probationers were denied fulllment of their obligations as a result of the scheme, and none were jailed as a result. He said only a very small percent age of probationers ever performed community ser vice hours, and that while the alleged wrongdoing might date back ve years, it mainly involved cases in 2012 and 2013. Turner has asked that any county probationers during the past four years who have questions about their case records to call the state attorneys ofce at 653-8181 for assistance. STOLEN MONEY from page A1 News BRIEFS Carrabelle tax ofce to relocate At the Aug. 19 county meeting, county commis sioners voted unanimously to move the tax collectors ofce in Carrabelle to the Carrabelle Municipal Com plex, formerly the Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked commissioners to increase the tax collec tors budget by about $20,000 to pay to move the two em ployees who are currently housed in the courthouse an nex on U.S. Highway 98 east of Carrabelle. She said Tax Collector Jimmy Harris was ame nable to the move, and de scribed the move as a safety measure. Commissioner William Massey said the two employ ees, both women, had been menaced by two guys with big knives. Jackel said this was not the rst disturbing incident. The tax collectors ofce will pay $500 monthly for two classrooms to be converted to ofce space. Massey, a Carrabelle city employee, said there would be no light or water bill. Chair Cheryl Sanders said she was not against the move. I would ask that (Parks and Recreation Director) Nikki Millender put her of ce over there, she said. She instructed Millender to put a better fence around it, possibly referring to the recent theft of a large quan tity of parks and recreation equipment in Carrabelle. She also asked that coun ty employees make sure the new ofces are handicapped accessible. Pine View Cove replatted On Aug. 19, at the unanimous recommendation of the Planning and Zoning board, county commissioners unanimously approved a request to replat the Pine View Cove development at 2016 U.S. Highway 98, Carrabelle, with three lots instead of four. The request was submitted by Thurman Roddenberry of Roddenberry and Associates, agent for Willis Timber Limited Partnership (Benjamin C. Willis Jr.).T elecommunications tower approved At the recommendation of the Planning and Zoning board, county commissioners voted unanimously to allow the installation of a 260-foot self-supporting telecommunication tower at 1250 U.S. Highway 98, Eastpoint. The request was submitted by James Johnston with Shutts and Bowen, LLP, agent for the Franklin County School Board. The tower will be leased to Verizon, and the county will have rights to free collocation on the structure.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, August 28, 2014 Coupon Expir es: 9/15/2014 CODE: AP00 Digital Account Ex ecutiv e The Ne ws Herald is seeking a Digital Account Ex ecutiv e. To ap pl y, send rsum to LGrimes@pcnh.com The quali ed candidate will need experience in: Quali cations needed: Duties will include: Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR Cat Allies head toward nonprot status By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m St. George Island Cat Allies is organizing to establish a trap, neuter and release program for feral cats on St. George Island. They are planning a fundraiser tonight, Thursday, Aug. 28 at Sometimes Its Hotter on the island from 6 to 8 p.m., featuring Dogs and Brats for the Cats, hot dogs, possibly bratwurst, a silent auction and soy candles. The group has established a board of directors. Cathy Buell of Apalachicola, president, and Beth Gammie, emergency services manager for RedRover, an animal welfare group in Tallahassee, is vice president. Helen Gore, of Apalachicola, is secretary; Mary Ann Durrer of Eastpoint treasurer. June Crawford, of Aiken South Carolina, and Will Rosenbaum, of Apalachicola, also serve on the board. Board members participate in weekly conference calls. Gore said the group has 53 potential volunteers, and needs a volunteer grant writer. Several local artists are at work preparing collection boxes to place in local businesses, she said. The group now has the money to le for tax-free status. Attorney Barbara Sanders, of St. George Island, and Apalachicola accountant Despina George, are writing bylaws to help the organization obtain nonprot status, Gore said. Veterinarian Hobson Fulmer, of the Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic, has agreed to perform four spay or neuter surgeries weekly at a discounted rate. Gore said among their fundraising activities the Cat Allies have applied for a booth at the Florida Seafood Festival. More information is at www.sgicatallies. co m The cat allies have a Facebook page and can be reached at P.O. Box 903, Apalachicola, FL 32329-0903. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Hassle-free education. That is what Gulf Coast State Col lege at its Gulf/Franklin Center will be offering next month as Education Encore returns for another year. Education Encore offers noncredit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics. We have a saying, you are never too old to learn, said Jim Barr, coor dinator of Education Encore. There are no tests, no grades, no stress, just fun. Registration for Education Encore will be held at 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, Sept. 17. Registration is rst-come, rst-served. Classes will be held on six consec utive Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 24 through Oct. 29. Classes are offered in three morn ing time periods, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, making it possible for a stu dent to take three classes during this years Encore. The fee is based on each student having access to all three classes each Wednesday. The goal of Education Encore, Barr said, is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and of fers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults explore new ideas. If you have been to college, Barr said, this is an opportunity to relive the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live the col lege experience. Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t, exercising the mind keeps one mentally t, he added. Courses offered at the Gulf/Frank lin Center include basic computer skills, drawing, writing, chair yoga, jewelry making, gardening, photog raphy and acrylic painting. Kesley Colbert will teach the histo ry of Gulf County and writing in iam bic pentameter. Gulf County Judge Fred Witten will instruct students on the Bill of Rights. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which in cludes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit the website at www. gulfcoast.edu/EducationEncore or for more information call 872-3823 or email Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.ed u Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest, Barr said. You are never too old to learn.TIM CROF T | The Star Education Encore returns to the Gulf/Franklin Center next month Education Encore returns to Gulf/ Franklin Center

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A8 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 Pe t of th e We ek PA TC HE S is a 9 we ek ol d Ja ck Ru ss el l Te rr ie r mi x. He is ve ry soci al and ha pp y bu t is ve ry lone ly as he is th e la st of th e li tt er to be adop te d. Hi s ad op ti on fe ll th ro ug h at th e la st mi nu te so he ha s be en wa it in g fo r hi s fo re ve r hom e an add it io na l we ek It is sa d fo r him bu t so me lu ck y so me one ha s th e ch an ce to ad op t th is li tt le gu y no w. Do n' t wa it Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at ely ne ed ed to so ci al iz e al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts We ar e al way s lo ok in g fo r pe ople wi lli ng to bri ng one of ou r an im al s int o th ei r ho me to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can sp ar e wo ul d be gr ea tl y ap pr ec iat ed Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Huma ne Soc iet y at 24 4 St at e Ro ad 65 in Ea st po in t. Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bs it e at www .f or go tt en pe ts or g to se e mor e of ou r ad op tab le pe ts. Special to The Times On Aug. 1, Betty Jean Croom Wright was inducted into the Oklahoma Educators Hall of Fame, at the Quail Creek Golf Club in Oklahoma City. More than 140 guests came out for her ceremony, a black tie affair. The goal of the Oklahoma Educators Hall of Fame foundation is to identify and honor persons in Oklahoma education who have exemplied the ideals of leadership, service and research in the eld of education. Each year, the board members convene to review nominations received from across the state; only educators with the highest lifetime achievement are eligible for induction. To be selected for induction is among the highest honors in Oklahoma education. Daughter of the late Granville and Lillie Mae Croom, Wright was raised with her nine siblings in Apalachicola. Her siblings are Granville Croom Jr., Cydell Wilson and Marvin Croom, all of whom reside in Apalachicola; Bertha Mae Rhodes of Austin, Texas; Evelyn Goss of Houston, Texas; Larry Croom of Miami; Lawrence Croom of Panama City; and Deborah Thompson of Fort Lauderdale. Wallace Croom is deceased. Betty also has rst cousins, John Croom and Shirley White, and a host of nieces, cousins and nephews of Apalachicola. Betty attended and graduated from Quinn High School in 1959. Her best friends were Earthine Lockley, Shirley Croom, Wesley McMillian, Vivian Tolliver and Erma Joseph. Her favorite teachers were Mr. Watson, Mr. Speed, Mrs. Tolliver, Mrs. Tampa and Mrs. Baker. Betty attended Florida A&M University with a scholarship provided by the St. Joe Paper Mill, where her father worked. She graduated from FAMU in 1963 and taught for 44 years in schools in Mainz, Germany; and Tulsa, Lawton and Oklahoma City, Okla. Betty also served as a specialist in math and science to schools across the state and nation and has trained thousands of teachers in effective teaching strategies. She has also served as a consultant to the Franklin County Schools throughout the years. Wright was the only minority teacher at the American School in Mainz, Germany, in 1964. When her husband was transferred to Fort Sill, she taught at a school for black students and later recruited to help integrate a school on Lawtons north side. In just a few short months, she felt accepted by the students, parents and community. In 1979, she was recognized by the Lawton Chamber of Commerce for the system of teaching economic principles she had developed at Crosby Elementary. She also taught in the PROMISE program for Oklahoma City Public Schools, providing gifted programs for students in kindergarten through fth grade. Betty is now retired but still continues to stay active in educational organizations. She was a leader in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) initiative. She is the administrator of the states Oklahoma Student Inventors Exposition and is a trainer of teachers in the Great Expectation foundations. Betty is serving her 22nd year on the board of regents of Rose State College, where she is the chairperson and serves on the Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence. She has been appointed by four different Oklahoma governors, each for a seven-year term. Among Bettys honors are recipient of the George Washington Medal of Honor from the Freedom Foundation of Valley Forge; recipient of the National Federation of Independent Businessmen Award; National Invent America State Educator; Black Woman of the Year by the Oklahoma state chapter of the NAACP; Oklahoma City Teacher of the Year; recipient of the Oklahoma Governor Commendation; and recipient of the Western Region Association of Community College Trustee Award. In 1993, she also received the National Donald J. Quigg Award given by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Ofce Society, of which only one is given each year, and presented in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. She is also the recipient of the Presidential Award for Math and Science Teaching, presented her in 1996 by President George H.W. Bush in the Rose Garden in Washington, D.C. Betty resides in Oklahoma City with her husband of 52 years, Robert. She has two children, Michele Towers and Robert L. Wright III; one sonin-law; one daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and one great-grandson. She has an active meeting schedule and enjoys time with her grandchildren, including vacationing with them every year. Special to the Times The Florida Small Business Development Center at Gulf Coast State College has opened an ofce at the Gulf/Franklin campus. With 40 ofces throughout Florida, the FSBDC facility offers high-end, professional business development consulting, education and research services serving the needs of micro businesses, small-medium enterprises and even new ventures. Services are at no-cost and condential. Highly trained, educated and state-certied consultants are available to provide growing businesses with assistance in accounting, strategic planning, cash ow management, nancial and capital and marketing strategies. Quen Lamb, a certied business consultant, is the local contact for this ofce and can be reached at 2279670, ext. 5519 or qlamb@gulfcoast. edu. Open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., the Gulf/ Franklin campus is at 3800 Garrison Ave. To make an appointment for consultation, visit www. northoridabiz.com and click Consultation. The Florida SBDC regional ofce is at the northeast corner entrance of the Advanced Technology Center at Gulf Coast State College, Suite 107, and has served the local business community since 1993. Visit www. northoridabiz.com or call 747-3204 for more information. Miranda Riley, Larry Davis engaged Jacob and Madalynn Riley, along with the help of their grandparents Royce and Lisa Riley, would like to happily announce the engagement of their mother/ daughter Miranda Riley to Larry (Kojack) Davis of Quincy. Larry Davis is the son of Lorraine Shiver of Carrabelle. Grandparents of Mr. Davis are John and the late Exie Gilbert, also of Carrabelle. Grandparents of the soon-to-be Mrs. Davis are Thomas Lee and Suzanne Brannan of Carrabelle and great-grandmother Merle Brannan, also of Carrabelle. Shower to celebrate Braylee birth Family and friends of Miranda Riley will be having a get-together (diaper party) to celebrate the upcoming birth of Ms. Braylee. It will be at 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at 204 Baywood Drive in Carrabelle. All friends and family are welcome. If you would like more information, please contact Alisha Woods. QUEN LAMB Engagement Gulf/Franklin opens small business center Baby SHOWER Attending Betty Wrights induction, from left, are sister-in-law Betty Truesdale and sisters Deborah Thompson, Bertha Rhodes, Wright, Cydell Wilson and Evelyn Goss. Below are Betty and her husband, Robert.PHOTO S B Y KEN BEACH L E R | Rose State College Betty Wright stands with her extended family at her induction ceremony into the Oklahoma Educators Hall of Fame. Oklahoma Educators Hall of Fame inducts Apalachicola-born educator Society

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The Times | A9 Thursday, August 28, 2014 Chillas Hall was packed full with family and friends to celebrate the life of a good friend and neighbor, Marvin Macintosh. Pastor Mark Collins ofciated and did a great job. After the service, we enjoyed lunch by the members of the Curfew Lodge. It was good to see all of them and Pastor Mark. Pray for Marvins eternal rest, and for Becky and their family for comfort and strength. Didnt make it to the brunch Sunday, but Pam said it went well for her. Pam Marshall sponsored the brunch for her friends and supporters at the Crooked River Grill. Pam is seeking a seat on the school board. School is well underway. Mrs. Johnson walked Judy to the bus stop and returned to the house to resume her daily housework. About 1 p.m., the phone rang. When Mrs. Johnson answered, the voice at the other end said, Mrs. Johnson, this is Mrs. Ferguson, Judys teacher, and I need to talk to you about her. Mrs. Johnson took a deep breath and replied, Oh no, you dont. I had her all summer, and not once did I call you. Attention board members of the Lanark Village Association, there will be a meeting of board members only on Monday, Sept. 8, at 6 p.m. in Chillas Hall. The rst Monday, as you know, is Labor Day. And the days grow short as we reach September. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Sept. 6, and come on down to the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center for the Over-50 Dance. Jim the DJ will get things spinning. Just bring a snack to share, your favorite beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze and dance the night away. Well be watching for you Thursday, Sept. 4, at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Sarge and his helpers will have a nice meal ready for us. Maybe our good friend and neighbor Ann Wilson will be there to check our blood pressure. Hip hip, hooray! Hip, hip hooray! Monday, Sept. 15, will be the season opener for the coffee hour at Chillas Hall. Door will open from 9-11 a.m. Monday through Friday. Drop by and enjoy a mug or two, and sometimes, theres something to go along with it. Coffee is still 30 cents except on Thursdays, when the men from the VA are there. That day, coffee is free. You never know whos liable to show up there. I will do coffee on Tuesdays. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound, and get a grip, tie a knot, hang on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. Ch ri st Co mm un it y Ac adem y (C CA ) Pr es cho ol an d Da yc ar e pr ov id es qu al it y ch il dc ar e an d Ch ri st ia n ed uc at io n at an af fo rd ab le pr ic e. Ou r st af f st ri ve s to pr ov id e a sa fe an d ha pp y en vi ro nm en t wh e re yo un g ch il dr en ar e ab le to gr ow in min d, bo dy an d sp ir it We ar e an Ea rl y Le ar ni ng Co al it io n (E LC ) ap pr ov ed pr ov id er as we ll a s acc re di te d by Fl or id a Co al it io n of Ch ri sti an Pr iv at e Sc ho ol s Ac cr ed it at io n, Inc We cu rr en tl y ar e ac ce pt in g lim it ed en ro llm en t fo r 20 14 -2 015 scho ol ye ar fo r in fa nt s to 4 ye ar s. Fo r mo re in fo rma ti on pl ea se co nt ac t us vi a ema il at ch ri st com mu ni ty ac ad em y1 23 @g ma il .c om by ph one at 85 065 314 16 or dr op by to vi si t us at Fi rs t Un it ed Me th od is t Ch ur ch of Ap al ac hi co la 75 5t h St re et (c or ne r of Hig hw ay 98 an d 5t h St) in Ap al ac hi co la Ou r ho ur s ar e we ek da ys 8a m 4p m. Lic en se # X 02 FR 02 00 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur ch -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P. O. Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 Cu mb aa Mo nu me nt s, In c. Se rvi ng NW Fl or id a Si nc e 1963 JA MES (J R) GR OV ER Ph : 850-674-8449 Ce ll : 850-899-0979 jrg ro v@ms n.c om Bl ou nt st ow n, FL 32424 Cu mb aa Mo nu men ts has be en at 19041 Sr 20 We st Bl ou ns to wn for 50+ Ye ar s. We ta ke p ride in hel pi ng yo u wi th se le ct in g the ri gh t mo nu men t for yo ur lo ve d on e. So co me by or gi ve us a ca ll or we wil l co me by you r ho me, gr av es it e, et c. Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Faith MIKE HOLLAND FA M ILY To all of our kind friends and neighbors who have sent owers, food, the beautiful cross, money, prayers and visits in our time of grief, thank you, and God bless you all. Linda HollandN oma community reunion Saturday The annual Noma Community reunion will be Saturday, Aug. 30, in the Noma Town Hall building. The town hall will open at 10 a.m., and lunch will be served at noon (CST). All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well-lled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us, and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. Anyone desiring additional information may call Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. Benet Saturday for Jose Pineda Special to The Times From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 30, in front of Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint, there will be a benet for Franklin County seventh-grader Jose A. Pineda. Complete mullet dinners are $7. All donations accepted. Pineda was diagnosed with scoliosis eight months ago, and it has advanced to the point where he needs surgery. It has affected his lungs, which causes breathing difculty. Without surgery, his lung could collapse. Pinedas family does not have health insurance, and the cost of the procedure is around $100,000. The family recently moved to Franklin County, and the parents do not have a stable job. The family is going to Pensacola for treatment, a vehour trip but one of only two places in the state that can address the problem. Special to the Times First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has had a feeding ministry for the community for the past 23 years and currently feeds more than 400 people per week and 1,200 per month. The ministry has grown over the years and has reached a point where it is taking space from the growing church. Seeking the Lord to show the way, the ministry received a $5,000 grant from the Baptist convention, and members decided the best route would be to build an additional building to be used for only the food ministry. This decision prompted a situation where $5,000 would be given with matching funds from the church. With more than $15,000, they began construction on a 32-by-48-foot building that will adequately handle the present ministry and give room for growth. It is probably going to need an additional $10,000 to bring the project to a usable condition. The new facility, which is run entirely by volunteers, will have a walk-in cooler; air-conditioned storage and adequate preparation space to get the boxes prepared for the people. People will be able to move through the sign-up procedure and pick-up times more rapidly, and the overall time spent picking up food will be reduced. We are asking the Lord to provide the remaining money to complete the project including a walk-in cooler. If you would like to be used of the Lord to help complete this project, call Sonny Crosby at 670-1322 or Pastor Boucher at 596-1625. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Cards of THANKS Faith BRIEF Chillas Hall coffee hour returns next month APALACHICOLA MASONIC LODGE Apalachicola Lodge No. 76 of Free and Accepted Masons wishes to recognize the contribution and remarkable dedication of the following members for their long years of service. Richard I. Bloodworth: 50 years Louis L. Roux: 60 years Elgin E. Red Sizemore: 65 years Thank you, you are appreciated. Eastpoint food pantry needs help with expansion SPECIAL T O TH E TI M E S First Baptist Church of Eastpoint is expanding to accommodate its food ministry. They are seeking an additional $10,000 in funding to complete the project.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, August 28, 2014 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer is almost gone! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TIDE TA BL ES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1:17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0:27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABEL LE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0:03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Au g. 28 88 78 20 % Fr i, Au g. 29 87 79 80 % Sa t, Au g. 30 88 79 50 % Sun, Au g. 31 88 79 40 % Mo n, Se pt 1 89 79 40 % Tu es Se pt 2 89 78 20 % We d, Se pt 3 89 78 20 % Page 10 Right now, the caterpillars of black swallowtail butter ies (Papilio polyxenes Fabricius, 1775) are abundant. This insect is also known as the American swallowtail or parsnip swallowtail. It is the state butter y of Oklahoma. The striking green worm feeds on the leaves of plants in the parsley family dill, fennel and Queen Annes lace, carrot, celery and lovage. Sometimes plants in the citrus family are also eaten. Some of its favored host plants like water hemlock and common rue are extremely poisonous to humans and can cause an allergic reaction if contacted. Like monarch butter y larvae, this caterpillar absorbs toxins from the host plants that make it unpalatable to bird predators. The black swallowtail caterpillar has an orange forked gland called the osmeterium. When in danger, the osmeterium, which looks like a snakes tongue, releases a foul smell. The beautiful black and gold adult consumes nectar from owers including red clover, milkweed and thistles. Black swallowtails overwinter as cocoons. Each year, the rst generation of adults emerges from May until late June, second brood adults will y from early July until late August, and occasionally a partial third brood will occur that will emerge in early fall. Black swallowtails are found in a variety of open habitats including elds, suburbs, marshes, deserts, and roadsides. They occur in most of the eastern U.S., north into Quebec, west into Saskatchewan, Colorado and California and south to South America. A subspecies occurs in the desert Southwest. Adults have a wingspan of up to 4 inches. These butter ies are extremely territorial and aggression between males is common. Special to the Times When someone catches sight of a panther or black bear and reports it to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the agencys biologists may use that sighting to help research and manage those species. Already, the publics willingness to report where they see panthers and black bears in Florida is having a positive impact on what is known about where these large mammals live and reproduce in the state. Based on two years of online public reporting of panther sightings and almost one year of online reports of bear sightings, biologists know more about what areas of Florida provide viable habitat for these species. A total of 1,537 Florida panther sightings were reported as of June 2014, of which 275 have been veri ed as panthers based on photos of the animal or its footprints. This includes the rst veri cation of a panther sighted near the Green Swamp north of Interstate 4 in central Florida. Primarily, the veri ed panther sightings are in southwest Florida. There also were 2,257 Florida black bear sighting reports as of June 2014, with more than 500 of those reports containing uploaded photographs. Sightings of bears were reported in 59 of the states 67 counties. The FWC continues collection of panther sightings at MyFWC. com/PantherSightings and bear sightings at MyFWC. com/BearSightings. Here, people can nd information about the animals, including how to identify them, what to do or not do if they see one, and a Google map making it easy to pinpoint the sighting location. Someones excitement about seeing a Florida panther or black bear may translate into important scienti c information if that sighting is reported to the FWC, said Carol Knox, the FWCs imperiled species management section leader. The FWC is pleased that so many people are making the effort to be citizen scientists and sharing their sightings of panthers and bears. By doing so, they are contributing to conservation of Floridas largest land mammals. Soon, cooler weather will be on the way, and more people will be resuming their outdoor pursuits. We hope people going outdoors to hunt, hike or pursue other recreational activities remember to share their bear sightings with us, particularly if it is a mother bear with cubs, said FWC bear biologist Brian Scheick. For a list of the many FWC wildlife sightings, surveys and hotlines in which citizen scientists are invited to participate, go to MyFWC.com/ get-involved/citizenscience. Learn more about panthers at FloridaPantherNet.org and more about bears at MyFWC.com/Bear. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The black swallowtail begins its life as a striking green caterpillar. BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda Black swallowtail caterpillars abundant in area Sightings of panthers, bears going strong SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Amberjack is now closed as of Aug. 25, but gag grouper is still open, and some anglers are reporting great catches over live or hard bottom due south of Cape San Blas. King sh are still very thick in our regions waters with no sign of stopping soon. Slow trolling or drift shing live baits should get you in on the action fast shing many of the buoys and channel markers close to shore. Inshore shing is slowing down still due to school activities and the hot weather. Good reports from Crooked Island and East Bay this week of nice schools of red sh in great numbers. Most inshore species are moving and feeding in our waters and looking for cooler waters. Deeper is going to be better for inshore sh right now, and rst light is the best time depending on tides. By KAREN SCHUSTER Special to the Times Catch sh, not pelicans! With just a little extra attention to your surroundings, you and your pelican friends can both have a great day out on the water. The brown pelican is now a common sight on the coasts. Pelicans eat smaller sh that are not preferred by recreational shermen and that are not commercially important. Pelicans are protected by federal and state laws. Although its wingspan is over 6 feet, a pelican weighs only 8 to 10 pounds, and your shing line test will hold it. Important: Never cut the line if you catch a pelican. Enlist a partner to help you release the bird. Extra hands and tools are useful. Put on sunglasses or other eye protection. The bird wont know you are trying to help and will try to defend itself. Pelicans do not have teeth, but they have a hook at the beaks tip, and its edges are sharp. Reel the bird in slowly and evenly. Jerking the line will increase injury. Grasp the bird rmly. Cover the birds head with a towel, shirt or your hat to calm it. Hold the beak rmly and slightly open so the pelican can breathe easily. Fold the wings gently and rmly against the birds body. Always remove the hook by cutting the barb. This reduces injury. Carefully push the barb forward to expose it, and cut the barb off with wire cutters. Back the rest of the hook out. Before you let the pelican go, carefully check it over for other hooks and shing line. Gently unfold each wing, one at a time, to examine the bird for line or hooks. If the bird is not seriously wounded, release it immediately. To release the bird, point its head toward the water, away from you, and step back. Let it y away on its own. If the bird is seriously injured, lethargic or has swallowed the hook, it should be taken to a veterinarian or wildlife rehabilitator. Call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at 888-404-3922 for a list of rehabilitators. If you hook an egret, heron or cormorant, extra care to protect yourself is needed because their sharp beaks can in ict injury. Enlist a partner to help you and put on sunglasses, goggles or other eye protection. Grasp the bird rmly, controlling the head rst. Cover the head with a towel to calm it. Hold the head behind the eyes, fold up the wings and grab the legs to control the feet and toes. What to do if you hook a pelican FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION If you hook a pelican, remove the hook by cutting the barb. Do not cut the line.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, August 28, 2014 A Page 11 Section Seahawks fall to Gators in pre-season game SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Freshman fullback Athan Dempsey (No. 6) is hit by a Gator defender to break up a pass play. The Franklin County Seahawks got their rst taste of 2014 varsity football, with a pre-season 31-0 loss at Wewahitchka Friday night. Our boys competed for a game against a good Wewa team, Coach Aaron York said. I thought our defense played well and our offense moved the ball. Turnovers are still our downfall. We turned the ball over seven times. If we hold on to the ball then it is a different ballgame. The Hawks ran the ball for 175 yards on 33 carries, led by sophomore running back Marshall Sweet, who had 18 carries for 107 yards. I thought the offensive line played well for the majority of the game, York said. Leading the defense was senior Cole Wheeler, who had four solo tackles and four assists for eight total tackles. I am eager to see how we bounce back, correct the little things and play to beat Evangelical Christian School, a Class 2A school in Fort Myers on Friday night. Evangelical will be a good test for us, a lot like Wewa, York said. Players will be leaving early Friday morning for the almost seven-hour bus trip. BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN DATE COURSE OPPONENT(S) Tuesday, Sept 2 KILLEARN CHILES, FL HIGH, JPII Wednesday, Sept 3 ST. JAMES JPII, GODBY, WAKULLA, RICKARDS Tuesday, Sept. 9 ST. JAMES WAKULLA, AUCILLA Thursday, Sept. 11 GOLDEN EAGLE CHILES, LEON, MACLAY Tuesday, Sept. 16 SEMINOLE FL HIGH, LEON, CHILES Thursday, Sept. 18 CAPITAL CITY LEON, FL HIGH Tuesday, Sept. 23 ST. JAMES LINCOLN, LEON, MACLAY Thursday, Sept. 25 GOLDEN EAGLE MACLAY, FL HIGH, WAKULLA Monday, Sept. 29 JAKE GAITHER GODBY, WAKULLA, MACLAY Wednesday, Oct. 1 ST. JAMES WAKULLA, GODBY Tuesday, Oct. 7 HILAMIN BIG BEND CHAMPIONSHIPS 8 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8 ST. JAMES WAKULLA, AUCILLA Thursday, Oct. 9 JAKE GAITHER GODBY, RICKARDS Tuesday, Oct. 14 DISTRICTS Oct. 21 or 23 PENSACOLA REGIONALS Oct. 28 and 28 STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Hawk golfers start 2014 season With a smattering of different ages, the Seahawk varsity golf team started play this week on Tuesday, against John Paul II and Leon high school at Southwood Golf Club in Tallahassee. The team is anchored by senior Calli Westbrook, and includes sophomore Megan Collins, freshman Sara Gibbs, eight graders Melanie Collins and Alexus Johnson, and sixth grader Abby Johnson. Scott Collins serves as head coach, with assistance from Spencer Tolbert and Stacy Kirvin. The schedule is as follows. All times are at 3 p.m. unless otherwise noted: Volleyball teams start this week From staff reports The three Franklin County volleyball teams started their season this week, on Wednesday, Aug. 27 at Florida A & M University High School. The middle school, junior varsity and varsity teams all played. They are coached by head coach Hilary Stanton and assistant Tara Klink. The following is the upcoming schedule: 2014 Volleyball Schedule DATE OPPONENT TIME Tuesday, Sept. 2 @ Bozeman JV / V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4 Liberty County JV / V 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9 West Gadsden V 5/6 p.m. Doubleheader Wednesday, Sept.10 North Bay Haven JV / V 5/6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11 @ Rickards JV / V 5:30/7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 15 Community Christian JV / V 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16 @ Port St. Joe JV / V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18 @ South Walton JV / V 6/7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22 @ East Gadsden JV / V 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23 FAMU MS/JV / V 5/6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25 Bozeman V 6 p.m. Varsity Only Monday, Sept. 29 Hosford MS 4 p.m. Dblheader Monday, Sept. 29 East Gadsden MS/JV/V 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30 @ Wewahitchka MS/ JV / V 5/6/7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2 @ Tolar MS 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2 @Liberty County JV / V 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7 Port St. Joe JV / V 6/7 p.m. Black Out Thursday, Oct. 9 Rickards JV / V 5:30/7 p.m. Think Pink Friday, Oct. 10 @North Bay Haven JV / V 6/7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 13 Community Christian MS/JV / V 4/5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14 South Walton JV / V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16 Wewahitchka MS/JV / V 5:30/7 p.m. Senior Night Oct. 20, 21, 23 District Tournament @ Port St. Joe District Game JV Roster No. Name Grade 3 Scout McLemore 8th 4 Allie Zingarelli 9th 5 Tanaya Harris 8th 8 Casey Riley 8th 10 Gerjie Myers 9th 13 Camille Davis 6th 14 Natasia Robinson 10th 19 Sophia Robertson 8th 26 Beyla Walker 8th Middle School roster Each of the middle school players is in sixth grade. Krystina Branch Mei-Li Chambers Leslie Escobar Kelsey Grif n Maliah Lockley Madalyn Thompson Machaela Turrell Alaina Wilson VARSITY ROSTER Name and Grade Sophia Kirvin 8th Breanna Barrack 11th Adriana Butler 10th Vanessa Simmons 10th Shameika Lake 12th Kaliegh Hardy 11th Anna Riley 11th Myranda McLeod 10th Casey Tucker 11th Emily Zingarelli 10th Scout Segree 10th Madison Newell 12th THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 Crossword PUZZLE Crossword SOLUTION Staff Report This new page has been created to feature photographs submitted to The Times by our readers. This regular addition to The Times offers an opportunity for the photographers from throughout Franklin County, residents and visitors alike, to highlight their best work capturing the excitement and energy of the people, the beauty of the landscape and the adventure of the world around them. Please send photographs to dadlerstein@ star .com For more information, call 653-8894. DOLORES QUIRK | Special to The Times A dragon y DOLORES QUIRK | Special to The Times Sunset off St. George Island LYNN SMITH | Special to The Times Payne and Ness Smith, along with cousin Chloe Smith, take the kayaks into Apalachicola Bay for an afternoon trip. TOM STOVER | Special to The Times The St. Vincent Island shuttle DOLORES QUIRK | Special to The Times A pygmy rattlesnake on North Bayshore Drive in Eastpoint. BILL WARGO | Special to The Times This rare white turtle hatchling was found dead during Mondays nest evaluation on Alligator Point, of the 46th crawl of 72 total crawls.

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, August 28, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7 654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EAR S E XPERIENCE P. O. Bo x4 39 Car ra belle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 00 66499 RG 00 65255 JOE'S LA WN CARE IF IT'S IN YO UR YA RD LET JOE TA KE CA RE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES ,T REE TRIMMING AND REMO VA LA LSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION ,P LANTING AND BEDDING AV AILABLE CA LL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO .COM Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 millage the same as this year, 9.6852 mills. Because the tax base has grown slightly, that millage rate would generate about $1.14 million, about $60,000 more than this years $1.08 million. Webb said one bright area of the budget has been a proposed switch in health insurance to Capital Health Plan from Blue Cross/ Blue Shield, which could see a drop in bene t costs throughout all departments. She said City Clerk Lee Mathes and staffer Deborah Guillotte have been reviewing CHPs proposal, and that she will have more speci cs on how the plan would work next month. Highlighting Webbs proposals for the new budget could be a possible 25 percent hike in the occupational license fee, which she said hasnt been raised since 1991. In addition, she suggested the fee for grave openings at the cemetery, which hasnt risen in several years, could rise from $250 to $500. It costs $200 a weekend, for two guys with a tractor, and the majority want to have them (funerals) on weekends, not during the week, Webb said. She also proposed adding a $25 processing fee for building permits, as well as for applications for cutting down trees. The special exception variance fee could rise from $100 to $500, if approved by the city commissioners. Right now, its costing us money, Webb said. She also indicated that water and sewer users should brace for an increase in the $6.50 per month sewer user fee that was tacked on this year in order to make payments on a wastewater treatment plant loan from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. She said that to make adequate payments in scal year 2014-14, the fee will have to rise by 65 percent. The city administrator said Greg Harris, who heads public works, has asked for two additional workers for heavy equipment, the water and sewer department needs two more certi ed people, and the library is seeking a part-time person. Neither of these, nor any other new hires, was included in the proposed budget. Susan Clementson, who heads the library board, said the part-time staff person is needed to replace the position held by Diana Kane, a federal government-funded position which has not been continued. Volunteers are wonderful, said Clementson. But volunteers take vacations; volunteers just decide they cant come to work that day. Its hard to depend on them. She said the library is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Were paying Kane on Saturday for four hours out of petty cash, Clementson said. Its a temporary thing. She said the additional person is needed for 15 to 20 hours a week, at $8 or $9 an hour, given that theres often a line when librarian Caty Greene opens the library at 11 a.m. Its dif cult to do all the things expected of me, Greene said. I hear the little bell on the desk, and have to help people print things from the computer (and other patron services). Diana was 20 hours a week, sometimes 17, and then we cut her down to 10. The thought that the millage rate could rise from the current 9.6852 mills did not nd favor in the eyes of Commissioner Brenda Ash. Its not sitting well with me right now, she said. I am not at all in favor of any tax increase anywhere. It bothers me that theres a continual increase. Due to drops in the tax base, the millage rate has climbed since 2009-10, when it stood at 7.31 mills, and yet still raised about $75,000 more ve years ago than what the proposed rate would next year. I just think we have to do better, said Ash. We cant keep putting the cost on the backs of the citizens. I know we are in need in some places. But is it absolutely positively necessary? Is there something we can do to keep it (the millage rate) down? Cant we dig a little deeper, look a little closer? Webb said she tried to propose as lean a budget as she could. If there was a way to make it work, Id be the rst to step up and say do it, she told Ash. Mayor Van Johnson stressed the budget proposal was a work in progress. This is just a workshop, he said. What were trying to do is put out numbers in the budget, and look at them and see if any additional cuts will be necessary. This is not a nal budget; this is a workshop, he said. FEES from page A1 utilities for the building. At this point, Crystal Air is not regularly utilizing the hangar. But, on occasion, does receive rent when a large plane stays there overnight. The consensus of the Airport Advisory Committee is that they would like to get the corporate hangar back. Commissioners were critical of the change to the lease. If theres a problem, Id like him (Crystal Air CEO Taylor Newman) to come and tell me theres a problem, Chairwoman Cheryl Sanders said. She asked how long Crystal Air has been FBO. Pierce said they had completed less than two years of a ve-year lease. He hasnt been in there half his lease and he wants his rent reduced, Sanders said. Commissioner Noah Lockley said Newman has not lived up to his contract, citing the fact the airport ran out of fuel over the Memorial Day holiday weekend. When you run out of gas, thats a problem, said Lockley. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked how much Crystal Air makes on the sale of a gallon of gas and how many gallons of gas are sold annually. Pierce said the FBO makes $1 per gallon and sells about 60,000 gallons a year. Jackel asked if it was customary for FBOs leasing an airport to share fuel pro ts with the owner of the property. Pierce said that had been the arrangement with the previous FBO, Bill Ruic. Jackel suggested Crystal Air give the county a portion of their fuel sales. Pierce said sale of fuel is the main source of income for the FBO. He said they also receive revenue from hangar rentals, car rentals and aircraft repair, maintenance and storage. Lockley asked how often Newman visits the airport. That was a complaint we had, Pierce said. Hes not there regularly. He has employees. What were missing is a corporate presence. There isnt a sense of a business (in operation at the airport) he said. We have some problems out there and one of them is Avcon, Jackel said, referring to the countys consulting engineer for the airport. What value do we get for that? I cant remember the last time I saw them. Sanders agreed. Avcon said they could promote our airport, she said. I say we get rid of him (Crystal Air) and Avcon, Lockley said. He moved not to accept Pierces recommendation to alter the lease. Jackel seconded and the motion passed unanimously. No luck with corporate hangar rental When Crystal Air signed its lease in 2012, Pierce said the contract will more than cover the xed costs of running the airport. The county was expected to continue to receive additional income from the rental of two commercial hangers at the airport, he said. But since becoming FBO, Crystal Air has not found a permanent tenant for one of two commercial hangers at the airport. The second, a solar-powered structure built for Garlick Environmental Services, eventually rented to Randall Terry for $1,200 monthly. In December 2013, Newman told county commissioners occupancy of the airports 34 t-hangers had increased from 65 to 80 percent. At the same meeting, he was criticized for not creating a website for the airport and not spending more time at the facility. When Crystal Air signed its lease, Newman promised to increase and upgrade airport services. For a brief time, he employed two aviation mechanics but now only John Moore, of Port St. Joe, remains employed. Crystal Air has employed a series of on-site managers, the most recent Jason Puckett, a ight instructor who resides in Quincy. Pierce said he believes the airport has at least three employees. Crystal Air keeps a small number of Hertz rental vehicles at the airport. When Newman signed the airport lease, Crystal Air had been FBO for Franklin County Airport in Sewanee, Tenn. since 2003; for Cleveland Municipal Airport, also in Tennessee, since 2007; and for Dalton Municipal Airport in Georgia since 2008. He has provided other services at airports in Sparta and Chattanooga, Tennessee. According to its website, Crystal Air no longer is FBO in Dalton, Ga. LEASE from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The corporate hangar lacks a permanent tenant. Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 Seahawk STEM scholars take Summer Challenge Special to the Times Many of the Panhandle Area Educational Consortiums FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project participants began the academic year with new skills, developed through participation in one of the projectsponsored Summer Challenges. The 2014 challenges gave gifted and talented students within the consortiums small and rural districts opportunities to explore STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) content in depth, solve problems collaboratively, and conduct investigations, enhance leadership skills and learn about STEM careers. STEM Scholars from Franklin and Gulf counties participated in a four-day STEM experience, Surviving with Water AKA the 21st Century MacGyver, at the Advanced Technology Center on the Panama City campus of Gulf Coast State College. Associate Professor Antonio Adessi, coordinator of engineering programs at GCSC, and Associate Professor of Physical Science Jamie Webb, challenged students to create, design and construct a solar desalinization device to extract freshwater from seawater, as well as a personal water purication device to remove waterborne pathogens from drinking water. This challenge heightened student awareness of the scarcity of suitable drinking water from a global perspective as they were immersed in the work of a hydrologist. Collaborating as a team, students learned how to use computer modeling tools and 3-D printers to produce prototypes of their products. This engagement in an authentic STEM research experience, under the guidance of Adessi and Webb, provided students with valuable information about potential STEM career options as they worked as a research team to creatively solve a real world problem.SPECIAL TO THE T IME S Corie Cates (Port St Joe HS), left, and Angel Henning (Franklin County HS) prepare to test the solar desalinization device they designed and sculpted from clay. Bryce Tobin (Franklin County HS), left, and Cordale Green (Wewahitchka HS) prepare to present the personal water purication device they designed and sculpted using modeling clay. Students from Franklin County show off their solar desalinization devices. LOI S SW O B O D A | The Times Making their debut at this months 5K Sizzler Race on St. George Island, straight from the Franklin County Humane Society shelter were Clementine and Wilhelmina, a pair of Rhodesian Ridgeback mixes. The pair, found running in Wakulla County, are healthy, heartworm negative, well behaved and socialized. Shelter Director Karen Martin said the sisters must stay together because they are bonded and become distraught is separated even briey. Can you nd a special place for these special girls? Call 670-8417 and ask for Willie and Clemmie. RHODESIAN RIDGEBACKS AVAILABLE Special to the Times As scammers continue to target the customers of utility service providers across the country, Duke Energy is reminding its customers not to fall victim to fraudulent activity. Unfortunately, we con tinue to receive reports across our service areas of individuals impersonating Duke Energy employees to steal money from our customers, said Gayle La nier, Duke Energys senior vice president of customer services. Our customers can protect themselves by knowing the signs of fraud ulent activity. Based on current events, here is one of the most prevalent scams reported from Duke Energys ser vice areas: P hone P ayment Scam Un der this long-running scam, a customer receives an un solicited phone call from an individual who falsely claims to be a Duke En ergy representative. The scammer warns that Duke Energy will disconnect the customers electric ser vice if the customer fails to make a payment usually within a short timeframe. Duke Energy urges customers who suspect or experience fraud, or feel threatened during contact with one of these thieves, to contact local authorities, then Duke Energy at 800700-8744 for Florida custom Duke Energy reminds customers to guard against fraud A14 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 33483T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 14-CP-000049 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL LEE YOHEM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MICHAEL LEE YOHEM, deceased, whose date of death was July 7, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 21, 2014. Personal Representative JEAN ROSENOW 2784 Highway 98 East Carrabelle, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Steve M. Watkins, III FL Bar No.: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 August 21, 28, 2014 33507T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13 CA 354 FIRST COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, f/k/a FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. BONI B. GREGORY and DAVID ALAN GREGORY, SR., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the final judgment of foreclosure entered on July 4, 2014, in Case No. 13 CA 354, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which FIRST COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, f/k/a FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION is plaintiff and BONI B. GREGORY and DAVID ALAN GREGORY, SR., are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the 2ND Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with 45.031 of the Florida Statutes, by sale beginning at 11:00 on the 10th day of September, 2014, the following described real property: Lot 37, Block B, St. James Island Park, Unit No. 3, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof as recorded in plat book 2, page 6, of the public records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on this 7th day of August, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk August 21, 28, 2014 33519T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-226-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, a division of COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT M. MALONE and wife, ETTA J. MALONE, a/k/a JEANETTE MALONE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties who may be in possession, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBERT M. MALONE, if alive, and if deceased, his unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and all other parties claiming by, through, under, or against him; and all unknown spouses, natural persons if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, and creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, or under those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees, or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in or to the lands hereinafter described, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN N. 2 DEGREES 20 MINUTES E. 1982.61 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD; THENCE S. 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES W. 332.58 FEET

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 28, 2014 The Times | A15 ALONG RIDGE ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S. 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES W. 114.36 FEET ALONG RIDGE ROAD TO A POINT; THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD, RUN N. 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES W. 381.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE N. 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES E. 114.36 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE S. 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES E. 381.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING LOT 71, NORTH RIDGE ROAD, EASTPOINT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS SHOWN ON THE UNRECORDED PLAT OF TARPON SHORES SUBDIVISION PREPARED BY TOM M. HOWARD, REGISTERED LAND SURVEYOR, DATED NOVEMBER 22, 1983. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2005 SOUTHERN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ID #DSDAL43564A and DSDAL43564B, TITLE #92392527 and 92392651. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1975 MAGN MOBILE HOME, ID #20891, TITLE #13084675. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Garth D. Bonney, Esq., whose address is Post Office Box 737, Panama City, Florida 32402, on or before September 30, 2014, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. DATED this 14th day of August, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry C. Segree Deputy Clerk August 21, 28, 2014 33535T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, W.E. Salmon, Inc., the holders of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 27 Year of Issuance: 2011 Description of Property: Lot 8 Block A, City of Carrabelle Full Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 29-07S04W-4170-000a-0080 Name in which assessed: Robert A. and Patricia Edwards All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st Monday in the month of OCTOBER 2014, which is the 6th day of OCTOBER 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 12th day of AUGUST 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33533T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, Mark Johnson and Deborah King Charitable Remainder Trust the holders of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No.1116 Year of Issuance: 2012 Description of Property: Lot 10 Pelican Beach Village Full Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 29-09506W-7334-0000-0100 Name in which assessed: RANDALL BRENT KARDOES All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st Monday in the month of OCTOBER 2014, which is the 6th day of OCTOBER 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 12th day of AUGUST 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33553T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000013 The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as successor-in-interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR1 Plaintiff, -vs.James A. Durham and Patricia J. Durham, Husband and Wife Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2010CA-000013 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York, as successor-in-interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR1, Plaintiff and James A. Durham and Patricia J. Durham, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on September 10, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN EAST 629.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0009’08” EAST 1050.00 FEET; THENCE RUN EAST 30.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0009’08” EAST 660.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1116’46” WEST 90.58 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4152’00” EAST 120.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 5224’47” EAST 365.40 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 3027’36” EAST 531.00 FEET TO THE WESTERLY EDGE OF MITCHELL CREEK; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CREEK’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 4515’38” WEST 65.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 7923’29” WEST 75.34 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CREEK’S EDGE RUN NORTH 2815’16” WEST 77.90 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK “GG”, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH 2758’12” WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK “HH”, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, A DISTANCE OF 350.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4716’23” WEST ALONG SAID PROPERTY BOUNDARY 110.94 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4143’ 09” WEST 60.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4715’44” WEST 100.05 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4143’09” EAST 60.02 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4716’46” WEST 289.05 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 2809’55” WEST 10.33 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4716’46” EAST 265.99 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4152’00” WEST 90.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 20.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. SUBJECT TO A 20.00 FOOT ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. AND ALSO: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN EAST 629.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0009’08” EAST 1050.00 FEET; THENCE RUN EAST 30.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0009’08” EAST 660.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1116’46” WEST 90.58 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4152’00” EAST 120.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 5224’47” EAST 365.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 5224’47” EAST 150.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2941’36” EAST 317.29 FEET TO THE WESTERLY EDGE OF MITCHELL CREEK; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CREEK’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 4251’46” WEST 50.39 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0511’41” WEST 45.55 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 4249’06” EAST 99.05 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0607’00” WEST 93.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 4515’38” WEST 36.32 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CREEK’S EDGE RUN NORTH 3027’36” WEST 531.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 20.00 FOOT ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Terry Segree DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 File# 09-163866 FC01 W50 August 28, September 4, 2014 33537T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, W.E. Salmon, Inc., the holders of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 1070 Year of Issuance: 2010 Description of Property: Lot 37 Lakes on the Bluff Full Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 30-08S06W-1002-0000-0370 Name in which assessed: Lois & Kim L. Davis All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st Monday in the month of OCTOBER 2014, which is the 6th day of OCTOBER 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 12th day of AUGUST 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 95752T PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2014 NOTICE OF ELECTION I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in Florida, on November 4, 2014, for the ratification or rejection of a proposed revision to the constitution of the State of Florida. No. 1 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 28 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Water and Land Conservation -Dedicates funds to acquire and restore Florida conservation and recreation lands Ballot Summary: Funds the Land Acquisition Trust Fund to acquire, restore, improve, and manage conservation lands including wetlands and forests; fish and wildlife habitat; lands protecting water resources and drinking water sources, including the Everglades, and the water quality of rivers, lakes, and streams; beaches and shores; outdoor recreational lands; working farms and ranches; and historic or geologic sites, by dedicating 33 percent of net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents for 20 years. Financial Impact Statement: This amendment does not increase or decrease state revenues. The state revenue restricted to the purposes specified in the amendment is estimated to be $648 million in Fiscal Year 2015-16 and grows to $1.268 billion by the twentieth year. Whether this results in any additional state expenditures depends upon future legislative actions and cannot be determined. Similarly, the impact on local government revenues, if any, cannot be determined. No additional local government costs are expected. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 28. Land Ac quisition T rust F und. a) Effective on July 1 of the year following pas sage of this amend ment by the voters, and for a period of 20 years after that effective date, the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall re ceive no less than 33 percent of net revenues derived from the exist ing excise tax on docu ments, as defined in the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, as amended from time to time, or any successor or replacement tax, af ter the Department of Revenue first deducts a service charge to pay the costs of the collec tion and enforcement of the excise tax on documents. b) F unds in the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall be expended only for the following pur poses: 1) As provided by law to finance or refinance: the acquisition and im provement of land, water areas, and re lated property interests, including conservation easements, and re sources for conserva tion lands including wetlands, forests, and fish and wildlife habitat; wildlife management areas; lands that pro tect water resources and drinking water sources, including lands protecting the water quality and quan tity of rivers, lakes, streams, springsheds, and lands providing re charge for groundwater and aquifer systems; lands in the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protec tion Area, as defined in Article II, Section 7(b); beaches and shores; outdoor recreation lands, including recrea tional trails, parks, and urban open space; ru ral landscapes; work ing farms and ranches; historic or geologic sites; together with management, restora tion of natural systems, and the enhancement of public access or rec reational enjoyment of conservation lands. 2) T o pay the debt service on bonds is sued pursuant to Arti cle VII, Section 11(e). c) The moneys depos ited into the Land Ac quisition T rust F und, as defined by the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, shall not be or become commingled with the General Reve nue F und of the state. No. 2 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 29 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Use of Marijuana for Certain Medical Conditions Ballot Summary: Allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. Allows caregivers to assist patients’ medical use of marijuana. The Department of Health shall register and regulate centers that produce and distribute marijuana for medical purposes and shall issue identification cards to patients and caregivers. Applies only to Florida law. Does not authorize violations of federal law or any non-medical use, possession or production of marijuana. Financial Impact Statement: Increased costs from this amendment to state and local governments cannot be determined. There will be additional regulatory and enforcement activities associated with the production and sale of medical marijuana. Fees will offset at least a portion of the regulatory costs. While sales tax may apply to purchases, changes in revenue cannot reasonably be determined since the extent to which medical marijuana will be exempt from taxation is unclear without legislative or state administrative action. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 29. Medical marijuana production, possession and use. (a) PUBLIC POLICY (1) The medical use of marijuana by a qualify ing patient or personal caregiver is not subject to criminal or civil liabil ity or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (2) A physician li censed in Florida shall not be subject to crimi nal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law for issuing a physi cian certification to a person diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition in a manner consistent with this section. (3) Actions and con duct by a medical mari juana treatment center registered with the De partment, or its em ployees, as permitted by this section and in compliance with De partment regulations, shall not be subject to criminal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (b) DEFINITIONS. F or purposes of this sec tion, the following words and terms shall have the following meanings: (1) “Debilitating Medical Condition” means can cer glaucoma, positive status for human im munodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired im mune deficiency syn drome (AIDS), hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, P arkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis or other conditions for which a physician be lieves that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the po tential health risks for a patient. (2) “Department” means the Department of Health or its succes sor agency (3) “Identification card” means a document is sued by the Depart ment that identifies a person who has a phy sician certification or a personal caregiver who is at least twenty one (21) years old and has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana. (4) “Marijuana” has the meaning given canna bis in Section 893.02(3), Florida Stat utes (2013). (5) “Medical Marijuana T reatment Center” means an entity that acquires, cultivates, possesses, processes (including development of related products such as food, tinctures, aerosols, oils, or oint ments), transfers, trans ports, sells, distributes, dispenses, or adminis ters marijuana, prod ucts containing mari juana, related supplies, or educational materi als to qualifying pa tients or their personal caregivers and is regis tered by the Depart ment. (6) “Medical use” means the acquisition, possession, use, deliv ery transfer or admin istration of marijuana or related supplies by a qualifying patient or personal caregiver for use by a qualifying pa tient for the treatment of a debilitating medi cal condition. (7) “P ersonal caregiver” means a person who is at least twenty one (21) years old who has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana and has a caregiver identification card issued by the De partment. A personal caregiver may assist no more than five (5) quali fying patients at one time. An employee of a hospice provider nurs ing, or medical facility may serve as a per sonal caregiver to more than five (5) qualifying patients as permitted by the Department. P ersonal caregivers are prohibited from con suming marijuana ob tained for the personal, medical use by the qualifying patient. (8) “Physician” means a physician who is li censed in Florida. (9) “Physician certifica tion” means a written document signed by a physician, stating that in the physician’s pro fessional opinion, the patient suffers from a debilitating medical condition, that the po tential benefits of the medical use of mari juana would likely out weigh the health risks for the patient, and for how long the physician recommends the medi cal use of marijuana for the patient. A physician certification may only be provided after the physician has con ducted a physical ex amination of the patient and a full assessment of the patient’s medical history (10) “Qualifying patient” means a person who has been diagnosed to have a debilitating medical condition, who has a physician certifi cation and a valid qual ifying patient identifica tion card. If the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards within nine (9) months after the effec tive date of this section, then a valid physician certification will serve as a patient identifica tion card in order to al low a person to be come a “qualifying pa tient” until the Depart ment begins issuing identification cards. (c) LIMIT A TIONS. (1) Nothing in this sec tion shall affect laws re lating to non medical use, possession, pro duction or sale of mari juana. (2) Nothing in this sec tion authorizes the use of medical marijuana by anyone other than a qualifying patient. (3) Nothing in this sec tion allows the opera tion of a motor vehicle, boat, or aircraft while under the influence of marijuana. (4) Nothing in this law section requires the vi olation of federal law or purports to give immu nity under federal law (5) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any accommodation of any on site medical use of marijuana in any place of education or em ployment, or of smok ing medical marijuana in any public place. (6) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any health insurance pro vider or any govern ment agency or author ity to reimburse any person for expenses re lated to the medical use of marijuana. (d) DUTIES OF THE DEP ARTMENT The Department shall issue reasonable regulations necessary for the im plementation and en forcement of this sec tion. The purpose of the regulations is to en sure the availability and safe use of medical marijuana by qualifying patients. It is the duty of the Department to promulgate regulations in a timely fashion. (1) Implementing Regu lations. In order to al low the Department sufficient time after passage of this section, the following regula tions shall be promul gated no later than six (6) months after the ef fective date of this sec tion: a. Procedures for the issuance of qualifying patient identification cards to people with physician certifications, and standards for the renewal of such identifi cation cards. b. Procedures for the issuance of personal caregiver identification cards to persons quali fied to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana, and standards for the renewal of such identification cards. c. Procedures for the registration of Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers that include procedures for the issu ance, renewal, suspen sion, and revocation of registration, and stand ards to ensure security record keeping, testing, labeling, inspection, and safety d. A regulation that de fines the amount of ma rijuana that could rea sonably be presumed to be an adequate sup ply for qualifying pa tients’ medical use, based on the best available evidence. This presumption as to quantity may be over come with evidence of a particular qualifying patient’s appropriate medical use. (2) Issuance of identifi cation cards and regis trations. The Depart ment shall begin issu ing qualifying patient and personal caregiver identification cards, as well as begin register ing Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers no later than nine months (9) after the effective date of this section. (3) If the Department does not issue regula tions, or if the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards and registering Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers within the time limits set in this section, any Florida citizen shall have standing to seek judicial relief to compel compliance with the Department’s constitu tional duties. (4) The Department shall protect the confi dentiality of all qualify ing patients. All records containing the identity of qualifying patients shall be confidential and kept from public disclosure other than for valid medical or law enforcement purposes. (e) LEGISLA TION. Nothing in this section shall limit the legisla ture from enacting laws consistent with this pro vision. (f) SEVERABILITY The provisions of this sec tion are severable and if any clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this measure, or an ap plication thereof is ad judged invalid by any court of competent ju risdiction other provi sions shall continue to be in effect to the fullest extent possible. No. 3 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 10, 11 (Legislature) Ballot Title: Prospective Appointment of Certain Judicial Vacancies Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution requiring the Governor to prospectively fill vacancies in a judicial office to which election for retention applies resulting from the justice’s or judge’s reaching the mandatory retirement age or failure to qualify for a retention election; and allowing prospective appointments if a justice or judge is not retained at an election. Currently, the Governor may not fill an expected vacancy until the current justice’s or judge’s term expires. Full Text: ARTICLE V JUDICIARY SECTION 10. Retention; election and terms.(a) Any justice or judge may qualify for retention by a vote of the electors in the general election next preceding the expiration of the justice’s or judge’s term in the manner prescribed by law. When If a justice or judge is ineligible for retention or fails to qualify for retention, a prospective va cancy is deemed to oc cur at the conclusion of the qualifying period for retention for the pur pose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. When a justice or judge so qualifies, the ballot shall read substantially as follows: “Shall Justice (or Judge) ...(name of justice or judge)... of the ...(name of the court)... be retained in office?” If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to retain, the justice or judge shall be retained for a term of six years. The term of the justice or judge retained shall commence on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January following the general election. If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to not retain, a prospective vacancy is deemed to occur im mediately following the general election for the purpose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. (b)(1) The election of circuit judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that circuit approves a local option to select circuit judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of circuit judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (2) The election of county court judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that county approves a local option to select county judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of county court judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (3)a. A vote to exercise a local option to select circuit court judges and county court judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election shall be held in each circuit and county at the general election in the year 2000. If a vote to exercise this local option fails in a vote of the electors, such option shall not again be put to a vote of the electors of that jurisdiction until the expiration of at least two years. b. After the year 2000, a circuit may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of circuit judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the custodian of state records a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the circuit in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. c. After the year 2000, a county may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of county court judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the supervisor of elections a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the county in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. The terms of circuit judges and judges of county courts shall be for six years. SECTION 11. Vacancies.(a)(1) Whenever a vacancy occurs in a judicial office to which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the vacancy by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. (2) Whenever a pro spective vacancy occurs in a judicial of fice for which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the prospective va cancy by appointing a justice or judge from among at least three persons but not more than six persons nomi nated by the appropri ate judicial nominating commission. The term of the appointment commences upon the expiration of the term of the office being va cated and ends on the first T uesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general elec tion. (b) The governor shall fill each vacancy on a circuit court or on a county court, wherein the judges are elected by a majority vote of the electors, by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next primary and general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. An election shall be held to fill that judicial office for the term of the office beginning at the end of the appointed term. (c) The nominations shall be made within thirty days from the occurrence of a vacancy or prospective vacancy unless the period is extended by the governor for a time not to exceed thirty days. The governor shall make the appointment within sixty days after the nominations have been certified to the governor. (d) There shall be a separate judicial nominating commission as provided by general law for the supreme court, each district court of appeal, and each judicial circuit for all trial courts within the circuit. Uniform rules of procedure shall be established by the judicial nominating commissions at each level of the court system. Such rules, or any part thereof, may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the legislature, or by the supreme court, five justices concurring. Except for deliberations of the judicial nominating commissions, the proceedings of the commissions and their records shall be open to the public. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 33557T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2014-CP-46 IN RE: ESTATE OF BLANCHE L. CAMERON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BLANCHE L. CAMERON, deceased, with the case number indicated above, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and of the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED 2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is: August 28, 2014. Personal Representative: JAMES F. CAMERON 73 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Attorney for Personal Representative: RONALD L. NELSON FL Bar No.: 280194 517 E. Government St. Pensacola, FL 32502 Tele: (850) 434-1700 August 28, September 4, 2014 33589T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, September 5, 2014. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #28 Deandra O’Neal Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #35 Tommy Tarantino Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #75 Joseph C. Mills Contents-Household Pub: August 28, September 4, 2014 95758T ENMIENDAS CONSTITUCIONALES PROPUESTAS SOBRE LAS QUE SE VOTAR EL 4 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2014 AVISO DE ELECCI"N Yo, Ken Detzner, Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida, por el presente notifico que se llevarn a cabo elecciones en cada condado de la Florida, el 4 de noviembre del 2014, para la aprobacin o el rechazo de una propuesta de modificacin de la constitucin del Estado de la Florida. No. 1 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 28 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Conservacin de aguas y tierras: dedicar fondos para adquirir y restaurar tierras objeto de conservacin y recreacin en el Estado de Florida Resumen de la boleta: Provee fondos para el Fondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de Tierras con el fin de adquirir, restaurar, mejorar y administrar tierras objeto de conservacin, entre ellas pantanos y bosques; el hbitat de peces y vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, incluidos los Everglades, y la calidad del agua en ros, lagos y arroyos; playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre; establecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en actividad, y emplazamientos histricos o geolgicos. Para ello se dedicar el 33% de los ingresos netos obtenidos del impuesto especial existente sobre documentos durante 20 aos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: Esta enmienda no incrementa ni reduce los ingresos estatales. El ingreso estatal limitado para los propsitos especificados en la enmienda se estima en $648 millones para el ao fiscal 2015-16 y aumenta a $1.268 mil millones hacia el vigsimo ao. Si eso traer como consecuencia gastos estatales adicionales depende de futuras acciones legislativas y no puede determinarse. De la misma manera, tampoco puede determinarse el impacto sobre los ingresos de gobiernos locales, si los hubiera. No se prevn costos de gobiernos locales. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 28. F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras. a) Con vigencia el 1 de julio del ao poste rior a la aprobacin de esta enmienda por par te de los votantes y du rante un perodo de 20 aos a partir de esa fecha de entrada en vigor el F ondo Fiduci ario de Adquisicin de T ierras recibir no me nos del 33% de los in gresos netos derivados del impuesto especial existente sobre docu mentos, tal como se define en los estatutos vigentes al 1 de enero de 2012, enmendados de tanto en tanto, o de cualquier impuesto su cesor o de reemplazo, despus de que el De

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A16| The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS partamento de Haci enda deduzca primero un cargo de servicio con el fin de pagar los costos de recopilacin y aplicacin del im puesto especial sobre documentos. b) El dinero del F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras se emp lear nicamente con los siguientes props itos: 1) Como lo establece la ley para financiar o refinanciar: la adquisi cin o mejora de tier ras, reas de agua y derechos inmobiliarios relacionados, entre el los las servidumbres de conservacin y los re cursos para tierras ob jeto de conservacin, como, por ejemplo, pa ntanos, bosques y h bitat de peces y vida silvestre; reas de ad ministracin de vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, entre ellos las tierras que protegen la calidad y cantidad del agua en ros, lagos, arroyos, manantiales, y tierras que brindan recarga de agua subterrnea y sistemas acuferos; tier ras en el rea agrcola de los Everglades y el rea de proteccin de los Everglades, como estn definidas en el Artculo II, Seccin 7(b); playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre, incluidos senderos recreativos, parques y espacios abiertos urbanos; pai sajes rurales; estab lecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en activ idad, emplazamientos histricos o geolgi cos; junto con la ad ministracin, restaura cin de sistemas natu rales y mejoramiento del acceso pblico o disfrute recreativo de las tierras objeto de conservacin. 2) P ara el pago del servicio de la deuda sobre los bonos emiti dos conforme al Art culo VII, Seccin 11(e). c) El dinero depositado en el F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de T ier ras, tal como se define en los estatutos vigen tes al 1 de enero de 2012, no estar mez clado ni se mezclar con el F ondo de In gresos Generales del Estado. No. 2 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 29 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Uso de marihuana para algunas enfermedades Resumen de la boleta: Permite el uso mdico de la marihuana a las personas con enfermedades debilitantes, segn lo determine un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Florida. Permite a los cuidadores asistir a los pacientes en el uso mdico de marihuana. El Departamento de Salud deber inscribir y regular los centros que producen y distribuyen marihuana con fines mdicos y debern extender tarjetas de identificacin a pacientes y cuidadores. Se aplica nicamente a las leyes del Estado de Florida. No autoriza infracciones de la ley federal ni ningn uso, posesin o produccin de marihuana con fines que no sean mdicos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: El aumento de costos generado por esta enmienda para el gobierno estatal y los gobiernos locales no puede determinarse. Habr actividades adicionales de regulacin y aplicacin asociadas a la produccin y venta de marihuana con fines mdicos. Las tarifas compensarn al menos en parte los costos de regulacin. Si bien el impuesto sobre la venta se aplica a las compras, los cambios fiscales no pueden determinarse de manera razonable, dado que, si no existe una accin legislativa o administrativa estatal, no est claro en qu medida la marihuana con fines mdicos estar exenta de impuestos. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 29. Pro duccin, posesin y uso de marihuana con fines mdicos. (a) POLTICA PBLICA (1) El uso mdico de marihuana por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal no est sujeto a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (2) Un mdico autori zado por el Estado de Florida no estar sujeto a responsabilidad pe nal o civil ni a san ciones, conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, por extender un certificado mdico a una persona diagnosti cada con una enferme dad debilitante de con formidad con esta sec cin. (3) Las acciones y el comportamiento de un centro de tratamiento de marihuana con fines mdicos inscrito ante el Departamento, o sus empleados, segn se contempla en esta sec cin y en cumplimiento de las reglamentacio nes del Departamento, no estarn sujetos a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (b) DEFINICIONES. A los fines de esta sec cin, las siguientes pa labras y trminos ten drn los siguientes sig nificados: (1) “Enfermedad debili tante” significa cncer glaucoma, estado posi tivo del virus de inmu nodeficiencia humana (VIH), sndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SID A), hepa titis C, esclerosis lateral amiotrfica (ELA), en fermedad de Crohn, enfermedad de P arkin son, esclerosis mltiple u otras enfermedades para las cuales, a crite rio del mdico, los ben eficios del uso mdico de la marihuana proba blemente seran superi ores a los riesgos po tenciales para la salud de un paciente. (2) “Departamento” sig nifica el Departamento de Salud o su agencia sucesora. (3) “T arjeta de identifi cacin” significa un documento emitido por el Departamento que identifica a una per sona que tiene un cer tificado mdico o a un cuidador personal de por lo menos veintin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de marihuana. (4) “Marihuana” tiene el significado otorgado al cannabis en la Seccin 893.02(3) de los Esta tutos de Florida (2013). (5) “Centro de trata miento de marihuana con fines mdicos” sig nifica una entidad que adquiere, cultiva, po see, procesa (incluido el desarrollo de prod uctos relacionados ta les como alimentos, tinturas, aerosoles, aceites o ungentos), transfiere, transporta, vende, distribuye, de spacha o administra marihuana, productos que contienen mari huana, suministros re lacionados o material educativo a pacientes calificados o a sus cui dadores personales y que est inscrito ante el Departamento. (6) “Uso mdico” signif ica la adquisicin, po sesin, uso, entrega, transferencia o admin istracin de marihuana o suministros relac ionados por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal para ser usados por un paciente calificado para el tratamiento de una enfermedad debili tante. (7) “Cuidador personal” significa una persona de por lo menos vein tin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente califi cado en el uso mdico de marihuana y tiene una tarjeta de identifi cacin de cuidador emitida por el Depar tamento. Un cuidador personal no puede asistir a ms de cinco (5) pacientes por vez. Un empleado de un proveedor de cuidados paliativos o de un cen tro mdico o de un ho gar de ancianos puede actuar como cuidador personal para ms de cinco (5) pacientes ca lificados, segn lo per mite el Departamento. Est prohibido para los cuidadores personales consumir marihuana obtenida para el uso personal y mdico del paciente calificado. (8) “Mdico” significa un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Flor ida. (9) “Certificado mdico” significa un documento por escrito firmado por un mdico, en el que se indica que, en la opinin profesional del mdico, el paciente su fre de una enfermedad debilitante, que los be neficios potenciales del uso mdico de la mari huana probablemente sean superiores a los riesgos para la salud del paciente, y se in dica durante cunto tiempo el mdico reco mienda el uso mdico de marihuana para el paciente. Un certificado mdico slo puede ex tenderse despus de que el mdico haya re alizado un examen fsico del paciente y una evaluacin com pleta del historial m dico del paciente. (10) “P aciente cali ficado” significa una persona a la que se le ha diagnosticado una enfermedad debilitante, que tiene un certificado mdico y una tarjeta de identificacin vlida de paciente calificado. Si el Departamento no comienza a emitir tar jetas de identificacin dentro de los nueve (9) meses posteriores a la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin, un certificado mdico vlido servir como tarjeta de identificacin de paciente para per mitir que una persona se convierta en “paci ente calificado” hasta tanto el Departamento comience a emitir tar jetas de identificacin. (c) LIMIT ACIONES. (1) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin afectar a las leyes referidas al uso no m dico, posesin, pro duccin o venta de ma rihuana. (2) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin autoriza el uso de mari huana con fines mdi cos a cualquier per sona que no sea un paciente calificado. (3) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin permite la operacin de un vehculo de mo tor embarcacin o aer onave mientras se est bajo la influencia de la marihuana. (4) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requiere que se in frinjan las leyes feder ales o pretende otorgar inmunidad conforme a las leyes federales. (5) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir adaptacin alguna para el uso mdico de marihuana en ningn lugar de educacin o trabajo, ni para fumar marihuana con fines mdicos en ningn sitio pblico. (6) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir que ningn proveedor de seguros de salud u organismo o autoridad del gobier no reembolse a ningu na persona por los gastos relacionados con el uso mdico de marihuana. (d) OBLIGACIONES DEL DEP ART AMENTO El Departamento debe r emitir reglamenta ciones razonables y necesarias para la im plementacin y apli cacin de esta seccin. El propsito de las reglamentaciones es garantizar la disponi bilidad y el uso seguro de marihuana con fines mdicos por parte de los pacientes califi cados. Es obligacin del Departamento promulgar reglamenta ciones de manera oportuna. (1) Implementacin de reglamentaciones. Con el objeto de otorgarle al Departamento tiem po suficiente despus de la aprobacin de esta seccin, las siguientes reglamen taciones debern pro mulgarse a ms tardar seis (6) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta sec cin: a. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de paciente calificado a las personas porta doras de certificados mdicos, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. b. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de cuidador personal a personas calificadas para asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de mari huana, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. c. Procedimientos para la inscripcin de Cen tros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos, que incluyan procedimientos para la emisin, renovacin, suspensin y revoca cin de inscripciones, y estndares para garan tizar la seguridad in formtica, el manteni miento de registros, anlisis, etiquetado, in speccin y seguridad. d. Una reglamentacin que defina la cantidad de marihuana que po dra considerarse un suministro adecuado y razonable para el uso mdico de los pa cientes calificados, so bre la base de las me jores pruebas disponi bles. Esta presuncin referida a la cantidad puede contrarrestarse con pruebas del uso mdico apropiado por parte de un paciente calificado en particular (2) Emisin de tarjetas de identificacin e in scripciones. El Depar tamento comenzar a emitir tarjetas de identi ficacin de paciente calificado y cuidador personal, y tambin ini ciar la inscripcin de Centros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos a ms tardar nueve (9) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin. (3) Si el Departamento no emite las reglamen taciones, o si el De partamento no comien za a emitir tarjetas de identificacin y a inscri bir a Centros de T rata miento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos dentro de los plazos establecidos en esta seccin, cualquier ciu dadano del Estado de Florida tendr derecho a valerse de recursos judiciales para obligar al cumplimiento de las obligaciones constituci onales del Departa mento. (4) El Departamento deber proteger la con fidencialidad de todos los pacientes califi cados. T odos los regis tros que contengan la identidad de los pacie ntes calificados debe rn ser confidenciales y estar exentos de divul gacin pblica excepto con fines mdicos o referidos al cumpli miento de la ley vli dos. (e) LEGISLACI"N. Nada de lo contenido en esta seccin limitar a la legislacin para promulgar leyes coher entes con esta dispos icin. (f) DIVISIBILID AD Las disposiciones conteni das en esta seccin son divisibles, y si cual quier tribunal compe tente declara la inval idez de cualquier clusula, oracin, pr rafo o seccin de esta medida, o su aplica cin, las dems dis posiciones continuarn vigentes en la mayor medida posible. No. 3 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO V, SECCIONES 10, 11 (Asamblea Legislativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Nombramiento Eventual para Ciertos Cargos Judiciales Vacantes Resumen de la boleta: Proponer una enmienda a la Constitucin del Estado en la que se establezca que el Gobernador debe cubrir las vacantes eventuales en los cargos judiciales que estn sujetos a elecciones de retencin cuando los jueces o magistrados se encuentren por cumplir la edad legal para jubilarse o en el supuesto de que no califiquen para la eleccin de retencin; y permitir los nombramientos eventuales si un juez o magistrado no se retiene en su cargo en una eleccin de retencin. En la actualidad, el Gobernador no puede cubrir una vacante prevista hasta que termine el mandato del juez o magistrado actual. Texto completo: ARTCULO V PODER JUDICIAL SECCI"N 10. Retencin; eleccin y mandatos.(a) Cualquier juez o magistrado puede calificar para la retencin, la cual se produce mediante el voto de los electores en la prxima eleccin general que sea anterior a la conclusin del mandato del juez o magistrado por las causas establecidas por ley. Cuando Si un juez o magistrado no est habilitado para ser retenido o no cumple con los requisitos para la retencin, se producir una vacante eventual al finalizar el periodo de calificacin de retencin a fin de nombrar un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. Cuando un juez o magistrado califique como tal para la retencin, en la boleta se deber leer claramente lo siguiente: “Deber el Magistrado (o Juez) ...(nombre del juez o magistrado)... de la...(nombre de la corte)... ser retenido en el cargo judicial?” Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen retenerlo, entonces, el juez o magistrado continuar ejerciendo sus funciones durante un periodo de seis aos. Este mandato del juez o magistrado que ha sido retenido comenzar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero siguiente a la eleccin general. Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen no retenerlo, una vacante eventual se producir inmediatamente luego de la eleccin general con la finalidad de nombrar a un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. (b)(1) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de jueces de circuito sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho circuito aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces de circuito mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces de circuito deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (2) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de los jueces de la corte del condado, sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho condado aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces del condado mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces del Condado deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (3)a. En la eleccin general del ao 2000 se deber votar en cada jurisdiccin territorial de circuito y de condado para decidir si el modo de elegir a los jueces de circuito y a los jueces del condado ser mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. Si los electores votan por no ejercer esta opcin local, esta opcin no podr someterse a votacin de los electores en esa jurisdiccin hasta que hayan transcurrido al menos dos aos. b. A partir del ao 2000, cada circuito puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o de la eleccin de jueces de circuito, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el encargado de los registros estatales. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en la jurisdiccin de ese circuito en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. c. A partir del ao 2000, cada condado puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o la eleccin de los jueces del condado, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el supervisor de las elecciones. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en el condado en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. Los mandatos de los jueces de circuito y los jueces de condado sern de seis aos. SECCI"N 11. Vacantes.(a)(1) Siempre que se produzca una vacante en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir la vacante mediante el nombramiento de una persona entre al menos tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que finalizar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a las prximas elecciones generales que se efecten al menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. (2) Siempre que se produzca una vacante eventual en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir esa vacante eventual mediante el nombramiento de un juez o un magistrado de entre al menos tres personas y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos corresponiente. El plazo del nombramiento comienza cuando finaliza el plazo del cargo que qued vacante y concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a la prxima eleccin general. (b) El gobernador deber cubrir cada vacante de una corte de circuito o de una corte de condado, en donde los jueces sean elegidos por mayora de votos de los electores, al nombrar a una persona entre no menos de tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao que sigue a eleccin primaria y general que se efecte por lo menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. Se deber realizar una eleccin para cubrir ese cargo judicial por el periodo del cargo que comienza al finalizar el periodo del cargo por nombra miento. (c) Los nombramientos se debern realizar dentro de los treinta das desde que se ha producido la vacante o vacante eventual, excepto que el gobernador extienda el perodo por un lapso que no podr exceder los treinta das. El gobernador deber realizar el nombramiento dentro de los sesenta das desde que los nombramientos hayan sido certificados ante el gobernador. (d) Tal como lo establece la legislacin general, debern existir diferentes comisiones judiciales de nombramientos para el Tribunal Supremo, para cada tribunal de apelacin de distrito, y para cada circuito judicial en todos los juzgados de primera instancia del circuito. Las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos debern establecer reglamentos de procedimiento uniformes en cada nivel del sistema judicial. Tales reglamentos, o cualquier parte de ellos, podrn ser derogados por las leyes generales promulgadas con la mayora de votos de cada cmara de la Asamblea Legislativa, o por el Tribunal Supremo de Justicia con el voto concurrente de cinco magistrados. A excepcin de las deliberaciones realizadas por las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos, los procedimientos de las comisiones y sus registros debern estar abiertos al pblico. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 95888T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 14-33-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MARGARET R. JUPPE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Margaret R. Juppe, deceased, whose date of death was March 13, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, #203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 21, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: John O. Williams Attorney FL Bar No.: 320420 Williams & Holz, P.A. 211 East Virginia Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850) 224-4510 E-Mail: jwilli7012@aol. com Personal Representative: Jacqueline J. Arentoft 1001 State Route 36 Atlantic Highlands, NJ 07716 August 21, 28, 2014 95930T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN, COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 14-37-CP IN RE: ESTATE GREGORY CARL BINKLEY NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Gregory Carl Binkley, deceased, whose date of death was May 16, 2014; is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 13-37-CP; the address of which is The Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: August 28, 2014. Petitioner Ronald Binkley 9695 S. Beechwood Rd Leavenworth, IN 47137 Attorney for Petitioner Charles A. Curran, Florida Bar No. 274380 P.O. Box 549 Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850) 697-5333 Email: cacurranlaw@ gmail.com August 28, 2014 September 4, 2014 95906T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013 CA 333 FLORIDA BANK, as successor in interest by merger to The Bank of Tallahassee, Plaintiff, vs. ANNELI NYSTRAND MAGEE and TIMOTHY D. PADGETT and ROBYN S. PADGETT, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment dated March 27, 2014, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m. on September 24, 2014, the following described property: Exhibit A Parcel 1: The West 50 feet of Lot 46, Block C, St. James Island Park, Unit No. 2., according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 30 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 2: The West 50 feet of Lot 47, Block C, Unit 2 in St. James Island Park, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 30, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: August 11, 2014 Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Aug 28, Sept 4, 2014 95932T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN, COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 14-38-CP IN RE: ESTATE FRANCES RANDOLPH BRINKLEY NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Frances Randolph Brinkley, deceased, whose date of death was January 24, 2014; is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 13-38-CP; the address of which is The Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: August 28, 2014. Personal Representative Pate L. Reynolds, Sr. 319 Burgeville Sopchoppy, FL 32358 Attorney for Personal Representative Charles A. Curran, P.O. Box 549 Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850) 697-5333 Email cacurranlaw@ gmail.com Florida Bar No: 274380 August 28, 2014 September 4, 2014 95964T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2011CA000434 AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC, Plaintiff, vs. FREDERICK BENNARR REVELL; LISA LAWRENCE REVELL; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC AS NOMINEE FOR GN MORTGAGE LLC; DEBRA L KIRKLAND; UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, and entered in 2011CA000434 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC is the Plaintiff and FREDERICK BENNARR REVELL; LISA LAWRENCE REVELL; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC AS NOMINEE FOR GN MORTGAGE LLC; DEBRA L KIRKLAND; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM, on September 18, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 28, 2014 The Times | A17 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! Coordinatorfor PreschoolHome Instruction ProgramNeeded. Formoreinformation,visit www.paec.org andclickonJobVacancies 1131900 HomeVisitors forPreschool Instruction ProgramNeeded. Formoreinformation,visit www.paec.org andclickonJobVacancies 1130299 Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans.The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout SeptemberWe seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 1131261 you canLOVE YOUR JOB! EXPAND YOUR CAREER & have the best of both worlds. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!forMulti-Media Sales Consultants Join a company that is committed to helping you succeed in your career and earn top dollars.We’re seeking Multi-Media Sales Consultants who are: ‰ Strong sales-minded individuals‰ Self-motivated and customer service driven‰ Can develop, present and close sales to new and existing customers utilizing The News Herald’s print and digital media solutions If this is you, send your resume to: LGrimes@pcnh.comAsk us about the great bene ts in sales base pay + commission, bene ts including Medical, Dental & Vision Insurance, Flexible Spending, 401(k) Plan, Vacation & Sick Leave. Sales Opportunities: P o s i t i o n s A v a i l a b l e e e e e e e e P o s i t i o n s A v a i l a b l e P r o j e c t I m p a c t t t t t P r o j e c t I m p a c t 2 0 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 1 4 1 5 5 5 5 5 1 5 P r o g r a m D i r e c t o r r P r o g r a m D i r e c t o r Degree in Education or related field, or equivalent administrative experience P r o g r a m S p e c i a l i s t t t t t P r o g r a m S p e c i a l i s t Degree in Education or related field, or equivalent administrative experience M u l t i i i i M u l t i S i t e S i t e P r e K P r e K D i r e c t o r r D i r e c t o r M U S T have DCF Certification. D a t a E n t r y y y y y D a t a E n t r y Strong computer skills and knowledge of EXCEL preferred. S i t e C o o r d i n a t o r S i t e C o o r d i n a t o r Degree in Education or related field, or equivalent administrative experience. f t e r s c h o o l A f t e r s c h o o l T e a c h e r T e a c h e r M U S T have valid FLDOE certification. Y o u t h W o r k e r Y o u t h W o r k e r M U S T have Four Year Degree in Education or related field. a r a p r o f e s s i o n a l P a r a p r o f e s s i o n a l M U S T have valid Certificate or Associate Degree S t u d e n t W o r k e r r S t u d e n t W o r k e r MUST be currently enrolled in MUST be currently enrolled in secon d ary or pos t secondary or post secondary secondary school. school. I n s t r u c t o r s n e e d e d f o r A r t M a t h S c i e n c e a n d R e a d i n g Background Check and Drug Test Required S u b m i t a p p l i c a t i o n o n l i n e a t c i t y o f a p a l a c h i c o l a c o m o r p r o j e c t t t t t p r o j e c t i m p a c t f c s o r g g g g g g i m p a c t f c s o r g F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c a l l 1129993 850-370-0145 4518802INTERESTED IN BECOMING A CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT(CNA) at no cost? Contact Marcia Dickey, RN at 850-229-8244 ext# 106 at the Bridge. Classes starting soon. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe 220 9th Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The Bridge at Bay is needing 2 full time Cooks and 3 Dietary AidesFor more information call 850-229-8244 4518808 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 42-2 Carlton 2 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities No pets. 5. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 6. 39-1 Carlton 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 650.00 mo. Includes utilities up to 200.00. No pets. 7. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 8. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets. 9. Mariner's View #9 3 bedroom 3 bath fully furnished, $850mo. No utilities. Pet friendly 10. 46-4 Carlton Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished apartment, $375mo. No utilities. Pet friendly.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518801 HOME FOR RENTNew 2000 sf brick home available for rent. 3 BR 2 full baths, large walk in ofce, gazebo, near boat ramp. Deposit $800.00 Rent $1400.00 Short term rental is negotiable. Call 720-388-9321 4518833 Lot 7, Block 10 of Lanark Village, Unit No. 1, According to the Plat thereof, as Recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 14-14A, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 13-16480 Aug. 28, Sept. 4, 2014 95982T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2013-CA-000125 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs. LORI PERKINS A/K/A LORI LYN PERKINS A/K/A LORI BURCH A/K/A LORI L. BURCH A/K/A LORI LYN BURCH A/K/A LORI L. PERKINS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LORI PERKINS A/K/A LORI LYN PERKINS A/K/A LORI BURCH A/K/A LORI L. BURCH A/K/A LORI LYN BURCH A/K/A LORI L. PERKINS; JAMES BURCH A/K/A JAMES A. BURCH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES BURCH A/K/A JAMES A. BURCH; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MARINE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 26, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13-000125CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and LORI PERKINS A/K/A LORI LYN PERKINS A/K/A LORI BURCH A/K/A LORI L. BURCH A/K/A LORI LYN BURCH A/K/A LORI L. PERKINS; JAMES BURCH A\K/A JAMES A. BURCH; MARINE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, are defendants. The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 AM, on September 10, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: EXHIBIT “A” A portion of Lot 63, SOUTHLAND, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 4, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 63 of SOUTHLAND Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 4 of the Official Records of Franklin County, Florida, said point also lying on the Southerly Right-of-Way of Apalachicola Northern Railroad; thence leaving said point run S0330’00”W 200.00 feet to a rod and cap for the Point of Beginning; thence from said Point of Beginning continue S0330’00”W 100.84 feet to a rebar; thence N8217’03”E 479.05 feet to a rod and cap lying on the Westerly Right-of-Way of Peachtree Road; thence run along said Right-of-Way N2711’ 27”W 104.99 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said Right-ofWay run S8216’32”W 424.43 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2007 Fleetwood Manufactured Home Serial Numbers GAFL635AJB92086-ER31 a/k/a. 1700 PEACHTREE ROAD, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 DATED this 27th day of June, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. Submitted By: Heller 84 Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, FL 33131, Phone (305)373-8001 Fax (305)373-8030 Designated Email Address: mail@hellerzion .com Aug. 28, Sept. 4, 2014 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternFront Desk MaintenanceWeekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34298690 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34295873 Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Night Auditor/ Front DeskMust be available holidays and weekends, Ref. Required, Applicants with prior hotel and/or bookkeeping experience will be given preference. Apply in person 51 Avenue C. HospitalityNOW HIRING Reservationist and MaintenanceTo apply visit one of our offices at 1200 Hwy 98 in Mexico Beach or 4693 Cape San Blas Rd in Cape San Blas Web Id 34297340 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL97546 to 56654 Carrabelle 2br, refurbished apartment, w/ large fenced in yard, furnished, $500mo, first/last security, Call 706-202-0639 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. GeorgeIsland $185/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola : 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. 850-643-7740 Text FL96705 to 56654 Carrabelle 3br 2ba, Call 850-766-4357 Professional CPA desires Rental for month of Sept & Oct. 1br, furnished. Pref. Inexpensive. 972-841-1014 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $1300 mo + $500 dep 850-370-6001 East Point Home for sale $85,000 159 Bear Creek Rd, approx. 1300 sq ft, Large living room, 2 bd/1 ba, Kitchen & Dining room, front & back screened porches, carport & workshop on fenced 2 acre lot w/ pond. Approx. 1 mile from the Bay, 4 miles to St. George Island bridge. For information please call 251-214-6595 or 850-370-0288 Price ReducedCarrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced, (2) storage buildings 10x20, 10x32 screened back porch, & deep well. Close to town and boat ramps. $82,500. 850-697-2176 Handyman’s Special Reduced from $25,000 to $20,000, 553 Ridge Rd, Eastpoint, close to St George Isl & correction jobs. Sale or trade lot of equal value. email mildred.marcel.spencer@gma il.com or call 850-591-0345 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds!

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Local A18 | The Times Thursday, August 28, 2014 PL ANT AT ION HOME Spacious 2B R, 2B Ah ome re plac e, ca thedr al ce iling laundr yr oom, wido ws wa lk with Gulf Vi ew ,e asy beach ac ce ss ,u pda te dw ithin the last 5y ears ,s ingle lev el home pr iv at es etting ,2 nd tier lot ,3b locks fr om Pl an ta tion Po ol and Clubhouse ,S uzie Co ur tW est ,l ist ed by John Shelb y John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com ONE AC RE CO RNER LO T Lo ca te di nS t. Ge or ge Pl an ta tion, ga te dc ommunit yo ft he Island ,a menities include 24-hr secur it y, guar dg at ee nt ry under gr ound utilities ,n ew Club House &P ool ,t ennis co ur ts ,b ic yc le pa ths ,p ri vat ea irstr ip ,b oar dw alks to beach, Gua va Tr ail ,l ist ed by Janie Bur ke Janie Burke 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com Ni ce 1a cr el ot on the Ba yw ith view so fD og Is la nd .A ll lots in this ar ea ar e1a cr es oy ou ha ve priv ac yb et we en yo ua nd yo ur neighbor Enjo ye ve ning sunsets ,g re at shing and lots of na tur e. Build yo ur family co astal re tr ea ta nd enjo yO ld Fl orida living lik et he old da ys If yo ul ik et oa dd golng to yo ur family ac tivities ,S aint Ja me sB ay Go lf Co urse is just do wn the str eet .H er et he spor tsman has it all; salt wate r, fr esh wa te r, hun ting ,w ate rspor ts ,a nd golng Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Where is it illegal to stick your tongue out at a sherman whos caught a bigger sh than you? Alaska, Maine, Utah, Hawaii 2) In the product WD40 what does WD stand for? Without drudgery, Water distilled, Without density, Water displacement 3) How many seasons were older TVs Beverly Hillbillies lmed in black and white before color? 0, 1, 2, 3 4) Which American city grew up around the colonial Sutters Fort? Oklahoma City, Sacramento, Anchorage, Richmond 5) Whose original name was Mission Dolores? San Francisco, Tina Turner, Miami Beach, Cyndi Lauper 6) What famous works rst line is, 1801I have just returned from a visit to my landlord? War and Peace, Wuthering Heights, Dracula, Walden 7) What was called No Mans Land before its areas statehood? Montana, Oklahoma Panhandle, Colorado, NW Territory 8) Vog is a Hawaiian word for a fog made up of? Car pollution, Volcanic ash, Freezing rain, Grafti 9) How many children did George Washington biologically father? 0, 2, 4, 6 10) Generally speaking what percentage larger is the average male brain over the average females? 3, 7, 9, 14 11) Whose production company was named Shamley? Susan Hayward, Richard Boone, Denver Pyle, Alfred Hitchcock 12) Which year marked the deaths of Jim Croce, J R Tolkien, Lyndon Johnson, and Pablo Picasso? 1973, 1975, 1977, 1979 13) Who was Americas rst woman to win ve Olympic gold medals? Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Bonnie Blair, Wilma Rudolph, Babe Didrikson 14) What state, according to its ofcial name, is technically a plantation? Rhode Island, Kentucky, Virginia, Illinois 15) Biblical Is the book of 3 Kings in the Old or New Testament or neither? ANSWERS: 1) Alaska 2) Water displacement 3) 3 4) Sacramento 5) San Francisco 6) Wuthering Heights 7) Oklahoma Panhandle 8) Volcanic ash 9) 0 10) 14 11) Alfred Hitchcock 12) 1973 13) Bonnie Blair 14) Rhode Island 15) Neither Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com They also are ordered to pay $4.54 million in restitution By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Lead ers of a failed Panama City Beach-based bank who lied to get more than $3.8 million of federal taxpayer money intended to keep the economy from tanking in the midst of a downward spiral have been sentenced to prison and ordered to pay the money back. Donald Terry Dubose, president and CEO of Coast al Community Investments, and Frank Baker, lawyer for the company, were sen tenced Aug. 21 to four years and Elwood Woody West, chief nancial ofcer of the company, was sentenced to three years. All three will serve their time in a minimum security prison for white-collar criminals. Jointly, the trio will repay about $4.54 million in resti tution to the Federal Depos it Insurance Corporation for a 2008 fraud scheme. Each of the men received about half the prison time normal fraudsters receive as dictated by 1984 federal sentencing guidelines. This offense was a marked deviation from an otherwise law-abiding life, said Judge Richard Smoak after each mans sentencing. Attorneys of the three Coastal Community Invest ments bankers, a holding company that owned Panama City Beach-based Coastal Community Bank and Port St. Joe-based Bayside Savings, attempted to have the case acquitted and retried after jurors found them guilty in May on several counts of de frauding an FDIC program in 2008. The program, as de scribed by prosecutors, was intended to rapidly pump U.S. taxpayer money into the banking industry to pre vent an economy in crisis from crumbling. If all the borrowers did what these borrowers did, there would have been a complete collapse, Assis tant U.S. Attorney Gayle Littleton said. Coastal itself collapsed months after accepting the loan without repayment. During the almost eighthour sentencing hearing in a lled courtroom, defense attorneys attempted to con vince Smoak the $3.8 million lost to Coastal Community actually was the FDICs fault. Duboses attorney lik ened it to a case where an oil tanker came loose from a barge and ran aground, spilling large amounts of oil an unfortunate analogy for residents along the Gulf Coast. Exxon sued the com pany hauling the tanker and won. You know what the court found? lawyer John Despri et said. The captain was an idiot. The FDIC caused its own loss because it is lazy and stupid. Smoak dis missed several enhancements to crimes to which a jury had already convicted the three, including obstruction of jus tice and abuse of trust. He agreed the men used so phisticated means and skills to attain the money. That required some con siderable nesse to pull off, Smoak said. A slip of the tongue could have caused it to scuttle off. Each of the men also was sentenced to three years probation after their prison stays. Attorneys for the men said they will be appealing the courts nd ings. Each will contribute to repaying $3.8 million for the loan and $731,565 in inter est since 2010 to the FDIC program. Despite not receiving the eight to nine years of prison sought, prosecutors said they were condent the conviction and sentencing of the bankers would send a message to others. What we had was three people who had all the ben ets this world had to offer and yet they decided to steal from the federal govern ment, Littleton said. This will resonate. Whether you are a banker or a lawyer when you lie, cheat and steal you will be punished. Special to the Times On Aug. 12, the Talla hassee Veterans Admin istration ofce brought seven veterans to visit the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum. The Department of Housing and Urban Developments VA Sup portive Housing (HUD/ VASH) program is de signed to provide case managers, and others who work with homeless veterans in the program, with a comprehensive set of resources to assist in addressing the multifac eted needs of homeless veterans. HUD-VASH is a joint effort to move veterans and their families out of homelessness and into permanent housing. HUD provides housing assistance through its Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8) that allows homeless veterans to rent privately-owned housing. VA offers eligible homeless veterans clini cal and supportive ser vices through its health care system across the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. The Camp Gordon Johnston Association hopes that visiting our museum will allow us to be a small part in sup porting the VAs efforts. Melissa Violette, a recreation therapist with the program who visited, wrote a letter of thanks to the museum staff for the warm, cheering recep tion they received. Your venerated mu seum is clearly devoted to paying homage and reverent respect to all United States veterans, she wrote. Thank you for celebrating their ef forts to preserve our free doms, and for remember ing the sacrices made my so many in the line of duty. Your establishment serves as a valuable re minder of how so many noble soldiers gave all. I commend you for your efforts to commemorate this most important part of our American history and sincerely thank you for the thoughtful kind ness and esteem you gave our veterans on our visit. Ex-bankers sentenced to prison DONALD TERR Y DUBOSE Homeless vet housing program visits museumTO NY M INIC HELLO | Special to the Times Camp Gordon Johnston museum board members Greg Kristofferson, left, and David Butler greet Melisssa Violette and James Finn of the HUD/ VASH division of the VA.