The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00281

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, July 3, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM P hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8893 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Island residents are research ing the feasibility of incorporating to form the countys third city. On Wednesday, June 25, a group of concerned island citi zens led by Newt Colston made a public presentation on what they have learned to date about the possibility of incorporating St. George Island. More than 50 people attend ed the meeting and 42 said they were registered voters who live on the island. In a show of hands taken after the presentation, 30 said they would like to investigate further the possibility of incorpo ration. Only seven said they dont believe pursuing more informa tion is advisable. A petition circulated at the meeting stating, We the resi dents of St. George Island, peti tion Franklin County Commis sioners and the Franklin County Legislative Delegation to autho rize and support the St. George Island Incorporation effort, so that the voters of St. George Is land are able to vote in favor of or opposed to incorporating the island as a municipality, was signed by 25 people, two of whom were not registered voters and island residents. Colston said the idea of in corporation started following a meeting of the island civic club, but is not directly afliated with the club. He told the audience Carol Talley, Chris Jensen, Don Murry Residents mull incorporation ST. GEORGE ISLAND By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com At about 5 p.m. on Monday, a small but pow erful storm swept in from the north and subjected Apalachicola, Eastpoint and St. George Island to torrential rain and strong winds. Visibility was almost zero on the Patton and Gorrie bridges as the storm dropped buckets of water for about ten minutes. A transformer on Avenue F took a direct hit by lightning and exploded in a shower of sparks. On Water Street next to the Honey Hole, a power pole was ripped from the ground on the west side of the street, and jerked around to wind up pointing north in the streets center. Much of the town experienced a complete or partial power failure. Police blockaded the scene of destruction to protect curious onlook ers. Duke Energy crews worked frantically to re pair the damage and at about 10 p.m. power was restored. Several business own ers said, because of the prolonged outage, they were fearful that perish ables had been ruined. Tim Barry, a National Weather Service fore caster in Tallahassee said he was monitoring radar at the time of the storm and saw no cyclonic ac tivity. Thunderstorms can generate very strong winds and that is prob ably what happened, he said. See SGI A6 By TOM McLAUGHLIN 315-4435 | @TomMnwfdn tmclaughlin@nwfdailynews.com Three years ago last week, a be loved St. George islander, a former wildlife biologist at St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge perished in the crash of a small plane during a training ight at Eglin Air Force Base The National Transportation Safe ty Board has determined pilot error caused the June 23, 2011, airplane crash at Eglin that killed Shalimar resident David Miles and Thomas Lewis of St George Island. Miles, 65, and Lewis, 50, both li censed pilots, died when their plane went down during an early-morning training ight. The Beech C24R Sier ra they had rented from Eglins Aero Club crashed in a grassy area just off the bases runway. The probable cause of this ac cident was the pilots failure to maintain airspeed, according to the NTSBs probable cause report re leased earlier this spring. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com It was not lack of strength and agility that stopped Austin Carter from playing football or soccer or any of the other traditional male sports featured at Franklin County High School. At 6 feet, 2 inches, 190 pounds, his athletic talents and academic skills afforded him plen ty of choices. So he chose the one that best served his passion, cheerleading. The girls who are his teammates, his many other close friends, nieces and nephews, all were in abundance Saturday evening at a go ing-away party in his honor at his stepmothers church, the Living Waters Assembly of God. Amidst the cake and sandwiches and picture taking, their affection for Carter populated the air as they said goodbye. The 17-year-old stu dent athlete is swapping the Seahawk Life of the Forgotten Coast for the Seahawk life of the Pacic Northwest, to nish up his last year of high school living with an uncle in Bellingham, S PECIAL TO T HE T IMES Tom Lewis NTSB cites pilot error in 2011 crash at Eglin Rough and tumble D A V I D A D LE R STEI N | The Times Austin Carter leaps high at spring 2013 jamboree in Port St. Joe Carter nds path as Seahawk cheerleader LOIS SWO B O D A | The Times Strong storm fells power pole F CHS YEA RB OO K| Special to The Times Austins cheerleading photograph See CHEERLEADER A6 See CRASH A6 Opinion ............ A4 Society ............ A8 Faith .............. A9 Outdoors .......... A10 Tide Chart ......... A10 Sports ............ A11 Classieds ...... A14-A15 VOL 129 I SSUE 10 Apalach marks July 3 Fourth The third annual Independence Day celebration in Apalachicola will be on Thursday, July 3. Food and fun get started at noon at Riverfront Park with popcorn shrimp, freedom fries, low country boil, hot dogs for the kids for $1, and wine and beer, including Apalachicolas new Oyster City beer. Project Impacts childrens art event runs all afternoon. Silent auction items on display all day, with live auction at 7:30 p.m. led by Harry Arnold and Chuck Spicer The Red, White and Blue parade from Lafayette Park gets going at 6 p.m., and steps off at 6:30 p.m. Bicycles, baby carriages, golf carts, convertibles, motorcycles, all decorated, are welcome to join in. Parade ends at Riverfront Park with a complimentary ice cream social. Music entertainment by several groups runs all day, highlighted by Tobacco Road beginning at 6:30 p.m. Please bring your favorite lawn chair. There will be a Salute to Veterans with the Hillside Chorus at 8:30 p.m. followed by one of the largest reworks display in city history over the Apalachicola River. Carrabelle reworks July 4 Carrabelles annual reworks extravaganza will begin at dark-thirty, somewhere around 9 p.m. on Friday, July 4. Come downtown and enjoy local business and a spectacular show. Island Blast on July 4 St. George Island will kick off its annual Island Blast on Friday, July 4 at 11 a.m. with Eddy Teachs Wettest and Wildest 4th of July parade. Dress up your golf cart, bring your water guns and meet at the corner of Third Street and West Pine, beginning at 10:30 a.m. Fireworks will be on the beach behind the Blue Parrot restaurant at dark-thirty, about 9 p.m. Have a safe and happy 4th of July

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A2 | The Times Thursday, July 3, 2014 The Jou rn ey Back Home With We ems Memorial Rehab Car e When you or a loved on e need a little mor e time to ge t back on your feet, We ems Memorial Re hab Car e is her e Right in your own ne ighborhood Give us a call today and let us help you make that jour ney back hom e. We ems Mem orial Rehab Ca re 135 Av enue G, Apalach icola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 4518470 FRANKLIN COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE CHANGE 2013-14 FY SOME OF THE THE FOLLOWING MEETINGS HA VE BEEN CANCELED OR RESCHEDULED We dnesday JUL Y 2, 2014 3:00 PM Boar d Meeting CANCELED We dnesday JUL Y 16, 1:30 p.m. Committee Meeting, RESER VE, Eastpoint We dnesday AUGUST 6, 3:00 PM, Boar d Meeting CANCELED and DA TE AND LOCA TION RESCHEDULED TO: MONDA Y, AUGUST 4, 3:00 PM Boar d Meeting, City of Apalachicola Community Meeting Room, Bay Av e We dnesday AUGUST 20, 1:30 p.m. Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Community Meeting Room, Bay Av e We dnesday SEPTEMBER 3, 3:00 pm, Boar d Meeting, Carrabelle City Of ces We dnesday SEPTEMBER 17, 1:30 pm, Committee Meeting, Carrabelle City Of ces These ar e OPEN public meetings and two or mor e County Commissioners may attend. Franklin County Administrative Of ce, 192 Coach Wa goner Blvd (14th Str eet), Apalachicola Te lephone 850-653-8678 Coupon Expir es: 7-15-14 CODE: AP00 Law Enforcement Special to the Times Over the course of two days last week, the Frank lin County Sheriffs Ofce executed 14 warrants in a countywide drug round up. On June 26, deputies executed 12 warrants for 22 different charges, in cluding sale of a controlled substance within 1000 feet of parks, schools and churches. Two vehicles were seized, as well as 11.1 grams of crack cocaine and $1,279 in cash. On June 29, two suspects were arrest ed, on two other charges. The Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce is making every effort to clean up our county to build a bet ter community for all, said Sheriff Mike Mock. Arrested were the fol lowing individuals, age and city, and their charges: Marvin B. Camp bell, 54, Apalachicola, two counts of sale of a con trolled substance Jennifer C. Golden, 41, Apalachicola, sale of a con trolled substance Donald P. Taylor, 58, Eastpoint, sale of a pre scription drug Joyce M. Hendels, 52, Apalachicola, sale or pos session of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell Shelly L. James, 44, Apalachicola, two counts sale of a controlled substance Billie J. Byrd, 46, Apalachicola, sale of a con trolled substance Kendra W. Hurd, 28, Apalachicola, two counts of delivery of a controlled sub stance, possession of can nabis, sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell within 10000 feet of a church, and pos session of paraphernalia Paula B. Medley, 34, Apalachicola, sale of a con trolled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing Walter D. Gallion, 54, Eastpoint, sale of a con trolled substance Gerald G. Kent, 20, Apalachicola sale of a con trolled substance Gerald H. Kent Jr., 41, Apalachicola, delivery of a controlled substance Shelton D. Hutchins, 31, Port St. Joe, possession of cannabis, sale or posses sion of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell, possession of a parapher nalia, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing and two counts of sale of a con trolled substance within 1,000 feet of a church Allen D. ONeal, II, 30, Apalachicola, delivery of a controlled substance and sale of a controlled sub stance (FCSO) Rhine W. Abas, 33, Eastpoint, sale or posses sion of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell. 14 arrested in drug sweep MARVIN B. CAMPBELL KENDRA W. HURD JENNIFER C. GOLDEN DONALD P TAYLOR JOYCE M. HENDELS SHELLY L. JAMES BILLIE J. BYRD P AULA B. MEDLEY RHINE W. ABAS WAL TER D. GALLION GERALD G. KENT GERALD H. KENT JR. SHEL TON D. HUTCHIN ALLEN D. ONEAL, II Special to the Times The Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce conducted an Active Shooter train ing exercise Friday for lo cal law enforcement per sonnel at the ABC Charter School, at 98 12th Street in Apalachicola. An Active Shooter is an individual engaged in kill ing or attempting to kill people in a conned and populated area. In most cases an active shooter uses one or more rearms and theres no pattern or method to their selection of victims. Ofcers taking part in the mock exercise were carrying AK-47s loaded with rubber bullets and dressed from head to toe in tactical gear reminiscent of a Rambo movie. They were in search of a lone gunman who was shooting and run ning rampant inside the school. The exercise was overseen by Instructors Gary Martina and Jona than Riley, both lieutenants with the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. According to Lt. Carl Whaley, also with the sher iffs ofce, the training was part of the Multi-Assault Counter Terrorism Action Capabilities (MACTAC) training program, whose purpose is to ready law enforcement personnel for rapid deployment to stop violent, aggressive, deadly behavior. Staff and teachers at the school took part in the exercise to learn rst-hand what steps to take with students in the event a situation involving a school shooting occurs. In a rapidly chang ing world with a propen sity towards violence, the training is another means which Sheriff Mike Mock has employed to keep the most vulnerable in our community safe. A similar exercise is in the planning stages for the Franklin County Court house. said Whaley. Law enforcement personnel from both the Apalachicola and Carra belle police departments participated in the train ing, which lasted almost six hours, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ABC School stage for Active Shooter training BRENDA BEN J A M IN | Special to the Times Carrabelle Chief of Police Craig Kincaid taking a break during the exercise

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The Times | A3 Thursday, July 3, 2014 Law Enforcement Sp en d y ou r 4t h o f J ul y w it h u s a t FI RE WOR KS ST AR T AT DA RK ON THE BE AC H! LI VE BA ND 8: 00 TO MI DN IG HT TR OP IC AL 4T H OF JU LY By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star Tcroft@star.com A Port St. Joe man was for mally charged last month with second-degree murder in the slaying of his mother in their Cape San Blas home. Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, is al ready in jail without bond in the May 18 killing of his mother, Re nee Gail Coffey, 58. In an information ling from the Gulf County State Attorneys Ofce in Port St. Joe, new details of the crime were also released. According to the ling, Slick killed Coffey by striking her over the head with a blue curling weight and slicing her neck with a corkscrew. Those acts were im minently dangerous to another and evincing a depraved mind regard less of human life. The ling details that the State Attorneys Of ce did not believe the crime premeditated, resulting in the second-degree murder charge. Slick faces up to 30 years in prison. Investigators responding to a 9-1-1 call from Slick found Coffey unconscious and unresponsive in her home at 7525 Cape San Blas Road. Slick told dispatchers in the emergency call that his mother had been as saulted, according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Coffey was ruled dead at the scene. Slick, after question ing by investigators was quickly developed as a suspect. A suspect in arsons of the Masonic Lodge in Port St. Joe in 2012, Slick was out on bond secured by Coffey. A home security system indi cated Slick and Coffey were the lone occupants of the Cape San Blas home at the time of the inci dent, investigators learned. The system also revealed no indication of a breach of the house or any other person in or around the house during the timeframe of the incident. Slick told investigators he and his mother left the residence ear lier in the day and made several stops in Callaway before return ing home, which were conrmed through receipts and in-store video. Upon returning home, Slick told investigators, he went into the backyard to tend the family dog, remaining there for 30 min utes before going inside. He said he found his mother with her throat slit and her head bashed in, but I didnt know she was going to die, according to the arresting afdavit. The home security system, however, showed Slick going in side the residence upon return ing home and Coffey following roughly one minute later, accord ing to investigators. Slick sent a text message to his brother about bringing home a grocery item a few minutes later and was seen leaving the residence, phone in hand appear ing to be in conversation, roughly three minutes prior to the 9-1-1 call. The system showed no other individual present. Investigators found what ap peared to be blood spatters on Slicks shoes. Slick charged with murdering mother JARROD SLICK This report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 25 Melissa R. Johnson, 47, Eastpoint, possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) James C. Yon, 47, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) JUNE 26 Angela L. Sheridan, 45, Carrabelle, resisting ofcer without violence, three counts possession of a controlled substance, and DUI with property damage (CPD) Curtis W. Nowling, 22, Sopchoppy, Gulf County violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 28 Paul C. Aughtry, 38, Greenville, South Carolina, domestic battery (APD) Timothy C. Register, 22, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) JUNE 29 Joshua A. Harris, 25, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence (FWC) Antoinido R. Joseph, 21, Tallahassee, Leon County warrant (FCSO) Arrest REPORT James retires from Apalachicola police Special to the Times Apalachicola Police Department Capt. Steve James enjoyed a retirement luncheon June 18 at the Battery Park Community Center surrounded by family, friends, city staff and former fellow law enforcement ofcers. James, an 18-year veteran of the department, started his career in law enforcement in 1987 as a correctional ofcer with the Florida Department of Corrections. Nine years later, former Apalachicola Police Chief Warren Faircloth brought James on board as a young ofcer with the citys police department, where he was later promoted to captain by former Chief Anderson Williams. James said he is looking forward to owning and operating his own business, the Liberty Gas Station, also known as Reds Family Store west of town on U.S. 98. I bought Reds station and will be opening it around Oct.1, said James. He (Red) made me an offer I couldnt refuse. In honor of James years of law enforcement service to the Apalachicola community, Police Chief Bobby Varnes presented him with his service patch, name plate, his captain insignias and his badge all enclosed in a small wooden case with a glass front, along with another badge inscribed Retired Police Ofcer. James was also presented a plaque by Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson in appreciation for his 18-years of service. STEVE JAMES Special to the Times A $1,000 reward has been offered for help in solving an April 15 burglary at Leavins Seafood in Apalachicola. Bob Eddy said thieves broke in af ter hours to the Leavins repair shop he oversees, and made off with thou sands of dollars of equipment, includ ing a desktop computer. Eddy said he thinks thieves loaded the stuff on his custom golf cart, which was recovered a few days later in the woods adjacent to the former Apala chicola Bay Charter School. He said the $1000 reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons involved in this burglary, and the recovery of the stolen items. A list of stolen items is as follows: HP Pavilion desktop computer (Serial #2MD206056M) and 22 com puter monitor with wall bracket Bosch 1125VSR Bulldog Extreme hammer drill in case, with assorted SDS bits Dewalt machinery, including an 18-volt reciprocating saw (model #DC385K); Sept. 2013 half-inch VSR drill (model #DW130V); Nov. 2013 14-inch multi cutter chop saw (model #DW872): 4 angle grinder with sanding disc; 4 1/2 angle grinder with stainless cup brush; Skill saw (Model #DW364K) and angle variable speed polisher 7/9 with 9 polishing pad. Black & Decker wildcat side grind er 7/9 with grinding stone; Kimbell Midwest heat gun; Metabo 6 grinder with cutoff wheel (model #WE 14-150 Quick); new in box Klipsch Promedia 2.1 computer speaker system; Marks man TP9370 Ultrasonic Diagnostic Kit; 1/2 green hammer drill; new in box Barska spotting scope; MTM brand Range box with gunsmith tools and ammo; AB Biller Mahogany 54 special wood spear gun with tip; Snap On 3/8 air ratchet and 3/8 ratchet; and Club Car golf cart 10 Champion aluminum mag wheels with new tires. Reward offered in Leavins theft case

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINI O N www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 3, 2014 A Section By MARY WESTBERG Special to The Times As we celebrate Independence Day, July 4, 2014, let us remember with gratitude our forefathers, the courageous patriots who fought and died in the American Revolution for freedom. On July 4, 1776, 238 years ago, the Declaration of Independence was signed, freeing the early colonies from aggressive rule of England, the mother country, and granted with rights of freedom to us and all generations to come. Legacy of freedom When our freedom is threatened, well take a stand; To keep Old Glory waving oer our beloved land. The annals of history proclaim the valor of our fathers who rallied round; The ag that bears the stars and stripes And held it from the ground. When the fate of our nation was at stake they never cut and run; For love of country, they hammered their guns till the battle was won. Now again were called to defend freedoms ame Against the satanic forces of terrorists evil regime. We long for the day when love will convert the wicked power of hate And bring living peace on earth to every race and faith. We shall continue to raise our ag over the land of the free As a symbol of freedom, our fathers legacy. God bless America and happy Independence Day. CORRECTION In the June 26 story headlined Scary weather sweeps across the county, it was reported that inmates from the Franklin Correctional Institution removed remove limbs from the yard of Shawn Bunnell. This is incorrect. The inmates removed fallen limbs and cut-up trees from the right-of-way adjacent to his yard. The Times regrets the error. Cant take it with you when youre goneBut I want enough to get there on. from Rolling With the Flow written by Jerry Hayes and recorded by Charlie R ich Todays markets are, as Kevin Costner said in the 1991 lm JFK, through the looking glass. What do we mean? Well, bonds (xed income) have traditionally been considered a less risky investment than equities (stocks). But, currently, this is not necessarily true. Its an upside-down investing world. Alice, its your move in the Wonderland of Capital Markets. Historically, bonds are popular for many reasons. Bondholders are high on the default ladder and are paid before stockholders should a default occur. Secondly, when a bond matures, you get your original investment back, in addition to the yield youve been paid throughout the life of the bond. Bonds have also been known traditionally for their stability; in good times and bad, bondholders of credit worthy institutions are paid on time and their money is considered reasonably safe. Payments were made to owners of U.S. treasuries even while the Civil War raged. Municipal bonds remain one of the few ways that high-wage earners can catch a tax break, since interest earned from muni bonds is not subject to federal tax. In years past, some investors even went so far as to create all-bond portfolios. Currently, though, most investors are leaning to equities. Why? While equities certainly are more expensive than they were even 18 months ago, many dividend-paying stocks are paying more than bonds when considered on an apples-to-apples basis, a comparison known as the equity risk premium. And some equities, like utilities (referred to as widow and orphan stocks), for instance, represent investments whose dividends are seen as sound as the yields offered by some types of bonds. Another bond concern is that the face value of longer-dated debt will likely decline when the Federal Reserve raises interest rates, perhaps as early as next year. Naturally, an investors nancial objectives and risk tolerance should always be considered. Certain bond purchases may indeed successfully ll a xed income need in a portfolio, even in an economy in recovery amidst a rising interest rate environment. Convertible bonds, highyield bonds, senior loans, and bank loans are a few to consider. But the traditional 60 percent equities / 40 percent bonds investment ratio that so many investors have utilized for years wasnt designed for this type of environment. Even Bond King Bill Gross of PIMCO declared an end to the 30-year bond bull market last year. Equities are no longer cheap, but they arent extremely overvalued when compared to what bonds are offering these days. There are always underappreciated companies whose prices havent risen with the rest of the market. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a fee-nly and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. Stocks, bonds, Kevin Costner and Charlie Rich MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Page 4 S pecial to T he T imes EUF AULA, Ala. ACF Stakeholders, Inc. (ACFS) last month took a step closer to completing its Sustainable Water Management Plan, agreeing to spend the funds necessary to complete the technical modeling and continue drafting the nal plan. The 56-member governing board directed its technical contractors Black & Veatch, Atkins Global and the Georgia Water Resources Institute at Georgia Tech to nish its work this summer with the goal of nalizing the plan by late fall. The Sustainable Water Management Plan has been the organizations goal since its creation nearly ve years ago. Governing board members also received their rst look at the opening chapters of the plan during their twoday meeting on June 24 and 25 at the Lakepoint Resort State Park in Eufaula, Alabama. The Technical Oversight and Coordination Work Group, which is responsible for working most closely with the technical contractors in developing the draft, met in a closed session on June 25 and 26. I am looking forward to unveiling this year a Sustainable Water Management Plan that balances the needs of all the interests and stakeholders that rely on the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint river basin, Board Chairman Jim McClatchey said. Though much has been accomplished, there is still a lot of work that must be done. I am condent that we will get there. Since 2009, ACFS, a grassroots organization that represents the spectrum of water interests throughout the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint (ACF) river basin, has been working toward a Sustainable Water Management Plan based on science, good data and consensus. The group has raised more than $1.6 million to accumulate and model the data necessary to develop a consensusdriven plan. ACF Stakeholders, Inc. is a group of water users in the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint (ACF) river basin of Alabama, Florida and Georgia who are working together for sustainable water management. The Governing Board is comprised of 56 individuals representing all aspects of the river basins economic, agricultural, aquacultural, recreational and environmental concerns. Membership on the board is divided equally among the four ACF sub-basins and includes membership from Alabama, Florida and Georgia. Tri-state group to complete water management plan By KIM SALERNO Special to The Times The Fourth of July is one of the most stressful and potentially dangerous times of the year for pets. While you and your family, friends, and neighbors are celebrating the holiday with reworks, pets are nding these festive activities anything but celebratory. Many pet parents assume that if their pet is not afraid of thunder or other loud noises, they will not be bothered by reworks. This is not necessarily true. Even pets who normally are not bothered by these are often frightened and panicked by the cumulative effects of the reworks, the excited voices outside, and being left alone inside the house. If pets are left outside and unattended, the noise and raucous often drives them to run away. In fact, the July 4th holiday is a very busy time for animal shelters across the U.S. They report taking in a higher number dogs that run off during rework festivities. In addition, many police stations log higher volumes of stray dog calls and barking complaints on July 4th compared to any other day of the year. By planning ahead and taking some common sense precautions, you can help ensure your pet is happy and safe this Fourth of July. Do not take your pet to reworks displays. Do not leave your pet alone in the car. With only hot air to breathe inside a car, your pet can suffer serious health effects even death in a few short minutes. Partially opened windows do not provide sufcient air, but they do provide an opportunity for your pet to be stolen. However, if your pet is most comfortable in the car, some pet parents nd that driving around with their pet in the car helps to calm their pet. Keep your pets in your home in a comfortable and quiet area with the shades drawn. If your pet is crate trained, then their crate is a great choice. Some animals can become destructive when frightened, so be sure that youve removed any items that your pet could destroy or that would be harmful to your pet if chewed. Leave a television or radio playing at normal volume to keep your pet company while youre attending Fourth of July picnics, parades, and other celebrations. If your pet seeks comfort in a bathtub, under a bed or other small space...let them. Do not try to lure them out. If the space is safe and it makes them feel more secure, let them be. Never leave pets outside unattended, even in a fenced yard or on a chain. In their fear, pets who normally wouldnt leave the yard may escape and become lost, or entangled in their chain, risking injury or death. Make sure pets are wearing identication tags so that if they do become lost, they can be returned promptly. Animals found running at-large should be taken to the local animal shelter, where they will have the best chance of being reunited with their owners. Heres to you and your pet having a happy and safe Independence Day! TripsWithPets.com is an online resource for pet travel whose mission it is to offer resources that ensure pets are welcome, happy, and safe while traveling. Kim Salerno is president of TripsWithPets.com, which she founded in 2003. Keep pets t on the Fourth The Poets Voice Let us remember with gratitude

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The Times | A5 Thursday, July 3, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Seventy years ago this week, Independence Day had been an ofcial national holiday for three years. The Times came out a day late on Thursday, July 5, because the editor decided everybody needed a day off. The day was quietly spent with a large number going to the beaches, many going shing and others visiting friends and relatives. Practically all the stores in the city were closed, including two downtown cafes and both drug stores. No accidents were reported during the day in this section. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sawyer, Sr. had been honored the previous week with a surprise party at their home to celebrate their Golden Wedding Anniversary. Friends and neighbors decorated for the party while the happy couple took in a movie. When they returned, The living room was ablaze with yellow owers. The golden decorations of the many beautiful gifts added to the lovely setting for the center table on which stood a silver candelabra with seven candles decorated in gold and white frosting surrounded by crystal baskets lled with mints. The Lookout Mountain Hotel in Chattanooga, Tennessee advertised for experienced maids and waitresses. The jobs paid $75 monthly plus meals, a room and private bath. Prefer middle-aged schoolteachers who have previous experience. Things were lively in Carrabelle that week. On Sunday, July 1, a ght broke out at McKissack Beach. Trouble erupted between Camp Gordon Johnston Soldiers and local men when some money went missing from the bathhouse. One soldier was cut with a beer bottle and several Franklin County residents spent the rest of the weekend locked up in Bragdons Boarding House. (The Carrabelle jail) Samuel Whatley came home on furlough and married Miss Robbie Sue Cain. Wilton Cook fell from a ladder while painting at the school and had to be sent to Mobile, AL for treatment. Dr. McKissack was remodeling his building next to the drug store as a bus station with drinks, sandwiches, a nice line of confectionaries and separate waiting rooms for white and colored with up to date restrooms for both. On the front page of the Times, the following story ran in the rst column. Our boys and girls in the service By C A PT AI N J. F. W A RREN They were two hardghting Marines from the same time and had gone through boot training together and then separated. One had been through the hell of Iwo Jima. The other on Okinawa where it was the same. Sammy Teague ghting thru the mud, rain and Jap snipers saw someone that had a familiar face look to him, and upon getting closer, it was none other than his buddy and best friend Frank Whiteside. They hunted for a safe place, if there was such a thing on this island, and talked about home. What they wanted most was to eat a mess of turnip greens and a piece of cornbread. May their feet be under their folks table real soon and all the good things come to them. Junior Montgomery, who has been in the navy from North Africa to the South Pacic, recently wrote home for some snapper shing tackle. His folks secured the necessary outt and he writes that he had been back to Honolulu and out shing with good luck. Keep em biting along with the ghting. Casper Allgood of Carrabelle, the boy who helped take Attu and was also quoted in the Saturday Evening Post, is home on furlough and we very much enjoyed a short visit from him. Casper, after xing up the job there, has been down on Petieu Island and certainly needs a good long rest back home. We suggest an assignment to Miami for the next six months. Norton Kilbourn who has been with the Seabees is now stationed on Tinian Island where they have been building airbases for those mighty B-29s that have been doing so much to destroy plenty of little brown devils. Its about time for Norton to be getting a furlough here. Points, points and points to the hungry. Its red and blue to the boy in the service; its how many have you. Were happy to report that during the last month approximately a dozen have been discharged as having completed their service to our country. They are back home and have jobs. Its hoped that there will be a place for everyone as they return and that most of them may be able to stay with us. We have been advised that those members of Co. E. 106th Engineers, who are receiving their discharges, are not discharged from membership in the National Guards. Sgt. Kenneth Tucker of Eastpoint was in to see us the past week and having done 35 missions as a tail gunner in the Italian area, reports that its good to be back home on furlough and it is hoped rotation to an easier job in the States. Kenneth has a number of decorations and battle stars. Nice going for a good gunner. Reports from abroad, we have letters from Friedburg, from Mannheim both about 30 miles from Frankfurt on Main, the American headquarters. Another Bad Nauheim, which our map doesnt show and we wonder where this is. The Bad part could be any part or all of German to our way of thinking. And news comes that S-Sgt Lawrence A. Scott, has received a Citation and awarded the Bronze Star Medal. Lawrence entered military service from this city and everyone of Audies friends congratulate him on this deserved recognition of what we all know he has in the way of courage and ability. Late reports received are that he expects to leave for home or has already left. We have word this week from Lt. TE Warren that her organization, the 41st Evacuation hospital will denitely go to the Pacic area. TE does not know if she will come via the States with a short furlough or direct thru the Suez Canal route. Friends and relatives of Douglas Calloway, who has been at Annapolis for the past two years, were glad to see him on his visit here. He left Monday night to resume his studies, and we are glad to know that Douglas is making a ne record there. We learn this week that Percy Oliver Mock, 18, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jessie Mock of Carrabelle is receiving his initial naval indoctrination or boot training at Great Lakes, Ill. We know this young man is familiar with the water and will make an excellent seaman. And Jimmie Nichols, who spent a 30-day furlough at home after spending many months overseas in the African, Italian and Normandy campaigns, is now in the Redistribution station in Miami Beach for reassignment processing. It is not known just what will be done, but Jimmy has a good chance to be assigned to a base close to home, due to his long service overseas. Best of luck, boy. And news comes that Thomas E. Dyar of Carrabelle has been promoted to the rank of second Lieutenant upon graduation from Infantry OCS in the European theatre of operations. He was a member of the fourth class to complete the course, and was assigned immediately after graduation as an infantry platoon leader. His many friends will rejoice with him in his promotion. Pfc Wilton E. Brackin, USMCR, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mancil Brackin of Campbleton, Fla. was wounded in action on March 24 on Okinawa, according to information received by his parents. He sustained a shrapnel wound of the head and was admitted to a hospital. At the same time, his parents received a news story from Marine headquarters of a narrow escape he had several days before. It read: While driving along a road near Naha, a Jap artillery shell landed near Brackin with all four tires of his machine punctured by fragments. The Marine sought cover in a ditch and another Jap shell scored a direct hit and demolished the jeep. Next day, Brackin was given another jeep and an hour later enemy machine gun bullets riddled the vehicles windshield, top and body. That afternoon, another artillery shell scored a direct hit and completely demolished the second jeep. Im trying to get in a rie company, said Brackin. Im getting a little tired of driving. Overseas 20 months, he is a veteran of Guam and the Marshall operations. Brackin is a nephew of Mrs. J. G. Bruce of this city and has visited Apalachicola several times and is well-known. PU BL IC NO TI CE Al l sp eed bu mp s on ro adw ay s lo ca te d wi th in th e Ci ty of Ap al ac hi co la wi ll be re mo ve d du ri ng th e we ek of Ju ly 14 20 14 Po li ce pa tr ol wi ll be in cr ea se d an d si gn ag e wi ll be in st all ed to war n dr iv er s to SL OW DO WN in th es e ar ea s. We en co ur ag e eve ry on e to dr iv e sa fe an d be al er t on th e ro adw ay BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0 + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Many thanks to local historian Mark Curenton for providing us with many of the answers to last weeks questions about the old Chapman School and public water system in Apalachicola. The former president of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society president wrote the following account after researching the school in back issues of the Times. The wooden Chapman school was torn down in 1915 and the threestory brick school was built in its place. M. V. Henry of Jacksonville was awarded the contract for construction of the new school building in Apalachicola in the amount of $20,800. The plumbing, re escapes and heating system were each separate bids. (Apalachicola Times, May 8, 1915) George H. Marshall moved the old wooden school building to the front of the lot so the new building could be built. (Apalachicola Times, May 22, 1915) The contractor exceeded the time allowed in the contract to complete the building and the School Board took possession of the work site. (Apalachicola Times, Oct. 30, 1915) George H. Marshall was in charge of completing the building. The opening of school was delayed due to the building not being completed, but the rst day of class was set for Monday, Nov. 8, 1915. (Apalachicola Times, November 6, 1915) On May 29, 1915, the Times published the ofcial school board minutes for May 1. Opening bids and awarding contracts for the new school was postponed until Monday, May 3. There were four bids for plumbing. Coons and Golder were awarded the plumbing contract for $1,508. There were ve bids for the general construction. W. V. Henry was awarded the general construction contract for $20,800. There were two bids for the four re escapes. The board eliminated two of the re escapes and awarded the bid to the Ford Roong Co. if they would build the two re escapes for $200 each. Three bids for the heating and ventilation were received. The low bid was $3,892, by Coons and Golder, but all bids were rejected and the contract was readvertised. When the school board met again on May 3, six proposals for heating and ventilation were received. W. F. Martin, of Dothan, Ala., was awarded the contract for $3,586.00. On June 12, the Times reported that four carloads of Jacksonville bricks sent to Apalachicola for the new school building are condemned as worthless. In September, a hurricane struck Apalachicola. The Times reported that, The new school building in course of construction received some damages to the roof and windows, although the damages will not amount to a great deal in money. In the Oct. 23, 1915, issue of The Apalachicola Times there was a brief mention about the old school being converted into cottages under News Chips that said: Thursday, Mr. Rudolph Marshall was busy placing in position a cottage for Mr. W. A. Roberts on the vacant lot adjoining Mr. Chas. (Chicken) Robinsons residence. A second cottage will be placed adjoining the Roberts cottage for Mr. Geo. H. Marshall who will offer it for rent. These cottages are part of the old Chapman School. Frank and Frances Cook said the Robinson residence was on Seventh Street between Avenues C and D. The cottage erected there doesnt appear to have survived but the Cooks said the second cottage is on 15th Street and still standing. It is currently owned by Amy Friedman. In answer to the question of when the city rst installed public water, Curenton wrote, The city waterworks did not begin until after the re of 1906. There was a notice in the newspaper on April 7, 1906 that Mr. W. C. VanFleet, the contractor to bore the well of the waterworks, would arrive within the next 10 days with his well boring rig. In the Sept. 18, 1906 newspaper, there was an article about the water system. The well was producing 110 gallons per minute, there was a 100,000-gallon brick reservoir at the well, a 100,000 gallon steel water tower at Avenue D and 6th Street, and three miles of pipe in the city. That water tower was later destroyed in a storm. It was empty at the time. FL O RIDA ME MO RY PR O JECT The old wooden Chapman School has a similar roof to the Friedman house. Solved, the Chapman outhouse 70 years ago this week: Local soldiers home on furlough P H O T O S CO URTESY OF CO URTESY OF C A MP G O RD O N JO HNST O N MUSEU M NORTON KILBOURN KENNETH TUCKER PERCY MOCK

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, July 3, 2014 Wash., a city as far north and west to the Canadian border you can go without stepping on a maple leaf. His father, Ronald Carter, is happy his older brother, a retired Marine colonel with plenty of re sources to do as he wishes, is ex cited about taking his son in. All of Ronald Carters siblings spent time in the military, children of an Air Force master sergeant who introduced his family to the area while stationed at Tyndall. Ronald Carter is now retired from the service, working in mainte nance for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection in Eastpoint. In his toast to his son, he re minded him that a cellphone is a useful tool these days. He said this with a tear of joy in his eye, as he thinks about what his son has accomplished, and the opportuni ties that lie ahead. Hes a great kid, said his cheerleading coach, Lynn Clark. Carters gal pals couldnt agree more. I cant even start to explain about how genuine he is, Eve Bond said. Hes very real about anything and everything. Hell let you know the truth but hes never mean about it. Following his freshman year, Carter was encouraged by Cyn thia Duncan to act on his interest in cheerleading. He tried out and made the team. Ever since then, Ive been in love with it, he said. Im enjoy ing being in front of people. Most of what he learned he picked up on his own, as the pre vious coach had little if any expe rience with how to incorporate a boy into an all-female squad. She didnt know what kind of uniform to order, Carter said. The internet helped a lot. Of course, the girl cheerlead ers had an ulterior motive for wanting a boy on the team, espe cially a strong one, with patience and an outgoing personality. The reason is they can do more stunts. Theyve got the strength; they can throw their y ers higher, said Jamie Rohrer, an assistant director at the Florida High School Athletic Association who has overseen the implemen tation of competitive cheerleading in the state ever since it started a decade ago. The FHSAA doesnt govern sideline cheerleading, such as Franklin County has, which is considered an extracurricular activity. But the sport that it does govern, the competitive variety, now boasts of anywhere from 300 to 500 male cheerleaders from about 250 schools, about three times as many as took part in the rst state championship in 2007. Its grown pretty quickly, Rohrer said. Were the largest state in the nation for competitive cheerleading. She said the coed division is one of the largest divisions at the state level, with 40-50 teams. Youre looking at half the teams in Florida have male cheerlead ers, she said. While male cheerleaders are uncommon in rural North Flori da, there are plenty of boys taking part at high schools in central and south Florida. Some recruit football play ers and wrestlers just to enhance their stunts. A lot of males are tumblers too, Rohrer said. They (fellow cheerleaders) loved that we had a male, said Carter. He exercised extensively to maintain his stature as the teams physical anchor. Muscle exercises, pushups, pull-ups, a lot of stretch ing, all gured into his regimen. Its a good workout, starting with gymnastics, Carter said. Ive gained a lot of really good friends, that you knew you could trust. The emotions that emerged in pioneering a new role for boys at the school shaped the young mans perspective. I never knew what theyd see or how they were going to react to it, he said. Carter also experienced the stress of how some others would comprehend his homosexuality. Some bullying, some nasty com ments, are a remnant of the past, and they dont seem to bother the soft-spoken honor student.. Everybodys entitled to their own opinion, he said. Its always an awkward topic. You can tell if people bring it up. Bond said her best friend set an example for grace under pres sure. Hes the most condent person I know, she said. He believes that everyone should be proud of themselves and be who they are. Once he settles into a room added on to his uncles house, Carter will start at Bellingham High School in the fall. They al ready have a roster for the cheer leading squad, but school ofcials say they may be able to work in a tryout for the transfer student. After graduation, he plans to major in math and minor in phi losophy at college. Carter also plans to take advantage of the many opportunities the area has to offer, and step through any doors that his illustrious uncle, who served in counterintelligence during his career, may be able to open for him. Hes smart inside and outside of school, one girl said. Which is very rare to nd around here. and Tom Wood have all tak en leadership roles on the incorporation committee. He said incorporation would benet island resi dents by increasing their control of their communi tys destiny, putting island ers in control of planning and zoning and allowing island residents to better protect the islands fragile habitats. Colston said is landers would enjoy an im proved quality of life under self-governance. The area proposed for incorporation would extend from the western border of Dr. Julian Bruce State Park to Bob Sikes Cut. Colston said the island has only one representative on the ve-person county commission but provides the county with more than 40 percent of its income from ad valorem taxes. If the island incorpo rates, law enforcement, maintenance of parks and recreation areas, road maintenance, tax collec tion, elections, building permits and inspection and animal control would all re main under county control. Colston said if the island determined it wanted ad ditional law enforcement ofcers, the island govern ment would have to provide funding for salaries. The county would also continue to provide a land ll, health department, mosquito control and emer gency management but the island would develop its own comprehensive land use plan. If the decision makes it onto a ballot, only registered voters who re side on the island would vote on incorporation. The matter could be brought before voters as early as fall of 2016. Colston said the rst step toward incorporation is developing a detailed plan and gathering signa tures on a petition to be presented to the county commission. Although the state leg islature approves requests to put incorporation bids on the ballot, Colston said a letter of support from the county is needed for the request to be considered on the state level. He said Commissioner Pinki Jackel advised the committee that 200-300 signatures would be sufcient to show county commissioners that incor poration has widespread support on the island. He said the ofcial re quest to have incorpora tion placed on a ballot in 2016 must be presented to the legislature on or before Sept. 1, 2015. Before the incorpora tion, committee can peti tion the state for a ballot, they must create a compre hensive development plan, have a system for records management in place, have legal representation and an elected council. He said roughly half of the incorpo ration requests sent to the state are denied. Colston estimates that preparing for submission to the state could cost as much as $50,000 but at the Wednesday meeting, he said, With all the talented people on this island, I dont think it will cost that much. An estimate of the costs The committee has al ready consulted both Coun ty Planner Alan Pierce and Jackel about incorporation and has reviewed the city budgets of Apalachicola and Carrabelle to estimate the cost of operating a mu nicipal government. As a municipality, the island would need an ad ministrative staff, an at torney, ofce space, insur ance including utilities and furnishings, and associated costs including a reserve fund. Colston said he believes the cost of running the city would be between $200,000 and $300,000 annually. If the island incorporates, it must develop a municipal income stream to cover costs. He said the island couldnt depend on sup port from state funding al though, as a municipality, it would become eligible for state and possible federal grants that are not avail able now. For a fee, the municipality could use the countys grant writer to prepare proposals. The island could raise funding by increasing prop erty tax for landowners on the island. With an estimat ed $771 million in taxable value, increasing the tax rate by a quarter mil would produce $192,000 in income. This would add $25 of taxes annually per $100,000 of property value. As a municipality, the island could also impose utility taxes on providers of electricity and water and communication taxes on providers of phone service, internet or cable television. Colston said the munici pality could also generate income through a sales or business tax. He said tour ists would pay for the ma jority of such an increase. Colston said there are cur rently 830 rental properties on the island. He said the new municipality could not impose a bed tax without a special exception from the state. He said the island meets a number of the criteria that legislators will consider in weighing the request for incorporation. It is a com pact and contiguous area, and is two miles from an ex isting city. However, it falls short of the required population size, 1,500. The island cur rently has 826 registered voters. The island also falls short of the mandated pop ulation density of 1.5 resi dents per acre. Colston said the legis lature has waived these guidelines for other municipalities. While this is not the rst time incorporation for the island has been discussed, attendees at the meeting said the current incorpora tion committee has done more research into the matter than previous pro ponents of incorporation. Some attendees did raise objections to the scheme. One woman said she lived in Destin when it incorporated. There, the push to in corporate was to prevent overdevelopment but once (Destin incorporated) the membership of the coun cil changed and everyone rushed to sell their property to the developers, she said. Is there anything we can do to ensure this doesnt streamline development? Colston said that issue could be addressed in the municipal charter. Two realtors told me to make sure that realtors dont rule the board, he said. There should be no more than one at a time. A huge amount of issues are on the table. (Nobody here tonight) represents a business. Nobody repre sents (commercial) sher men. If theres an emergen cy and you become a city, you own it. (There should be a) huge cost benet study. I would hate to see you go down this path and not have enough information. Im willing to help but I want to see it done for the benet of the island, another island resident said. Colston stressed we dont have all the answers and were not pretending we do. There will have an other couple of meetings this fall. The incorporation com mittee is requesting help from volunteers and seek ing signatures on a petition to take before the county commission. In particular, they are looking for help with the nancial plan and with the geographic aspects of incorporation. Anyone who would like to sign the petition or to volunteer can contact Carol Tally at Carol_Talley@ya hoo.com or Newt Colston at newtcol@gmail.com or call 927-3001. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Newt Colston makes his presentation SGI from page A1 CHEERLEADER from page A1 CRASH from page A1 Evidence from the scene indicated the likelihood that neither pilot adequate ly monitored the airplanes airspeed, which resulted in a right-turning aerodynam ic stall, the report said. Miles, a retired Air Force colonel, was a certi ed ying instructor. He was training Lewis at the time of the accident. Both men were members of the Aero Club. NTSB investi gators used radar data to determine Miles and Lewis were attempting a -de gree power off approach, just before the accident. The maneuver, sometimes used to simulate engine failure, involves a 360-de gree change of direction to a preselected landing spot, the report said. The pilots tried the ap proach twice. During the second attempt, witnesses heard the engine sputter, then power back up, the re port said. They then saw the air plane descend at a steep angle and impact an air craft parking apron, it said. The report said the Beech C24Rs engine had not been overhauled re cently and another pilot reported that he had engine failure about 12 months earlier. That pilot made a suc cessful forced landing and could not restart the air craft, the report said. Main tenance personnel were able to start it the next day. Lewis worked for sev eral years as a biologist at St. Vincent, but most re cently worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Maryland. The four-passenger plane was owned by Eglin and rented to the civilian pilot through the bases Aero Club. Use of the clubs planes is open to the gen eral public, provided the pi lot has the proper creden tials. Both Miles and Lewis were members of the Aero Club. The club has just one Beechcraft C24R Sierra, base ofcials conrmed. It was graded airworthy in 190. The NTSB ID on this in vestigation is ERA11FA354 on a Beech C24R plane reg istration number N38029. PH O T OS B Y DAVID ADLERS T EIN | The Times At left Austin Carter poses with his dad, Ronnie Carter. At right Austin Carter cheers on the crowd at a football game. Hes the most condent person I know. He believes that everyone should be proud of themselves and be who they are. Eve Bond

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, July 3, 2014 The Nest has summer openings The Nests Afterschool and Summer Program is looking for children who want to do fun things with their friends this summer. There are still openings at both the Carrabelle and Eastpoint site. Summer Camp is Monday through Thursday (closed on Fridays) until July 31. Hours are 8 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. We have fun activities planned throughout the summer. We are working on a Courtyard Garden and will be writing, illustrating and publishing books this summer. In addition the children can participate in other activities such as art, checkers/chess, character ed. technology, health and nutrition, computer, dance and drama. Free breakfast and lunch will be served. You will need to provide a snack for your child for the afternoon snack time. There will be limited snacks for those who do not have one; however, they may not be available every day. The Carrabelle site is at 1001 Gray Ave. and the Eastpoint site is at 85 School Rd. Is your child ready for kindergarten? Parents, is your child ready for kindergarten? Early Education and Care is currently accepting applications for Early Head Start for the 2014-15 school year. Early Head Start is a federally funded program for young children from lowincome families promoting socialization and school readiness. To be eligible, the family must meet federal income guidelines, reside in Franklin County and children must be between newborn and age 2. Services are offered at no cost. Pregnant mothers and parents of children with disabilities are encouraged to apply. For more information, call 653-3366 or stop by Franklin County Early Head Start, 162 Avenue E in Apalachicola between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Lanark church hosts July 12 fundraiser The Community Church in Lanark Village will hold a fundraiser on Saturday, July 12 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Community Church on 171 Spring Street in Lanark Village. All proceeds will be used for repairs and restoration of the Community Church and parsonage. There will be a silent auction, sh fry and yard sale with lots of live entertainment, featuring Cary Moon, H.J. Kuntry and more. Some auction items are two Trane HVAC systems, refrigerator, two ranges, dining room set, jewelry, art, Crooked River Grill dinner tickets, Hog Wild dinner tickets plus more. Bring a lawn chair and umbrella. It might get hot that weekend! For more information, call Shirley Cox at 697-4195. Call for grant applications Floridas Wildlife Legacy Initiative is seeking applications for research projects on communitybased oyster restoration and living shoreline These projects are being developed to address the goals of Floridas State Wildlife Action Plan. Floridas Wildlife Legacy Initiative has identied the project need and objectives. Applicants are asked to submit project proposals that detail the approach best suited to meet the stated objectives. To be considered, applicants must submit a completed State Wildlife Grant application, fully developed scope of work, budget and match commitment letter that specically relate to the needs and objectives of these projects. Please contact Andrea Alden, the State Wildlife Grants Coordinator, at Andrea.Alden@MyFWC. com or Robyn McDole, the Assistant State Wildlife Grants Coordinator, at Robyn.McDole@MyFWC. com. WA TER SA FE TY IN VE ST IG AT IO N AT TE NTI ON : Ap al ac hic ol a Wa te r Cu st om er s In Ma y 20 13 th e Ci ty of Ap al achi co la Wat er Sy st em no ti ed re sid en ts th at th eir wa te r fa il ed to me et st an d ar ds se t by th e Fl or ida De pa rt me nt o f En vi ro nm en ta l Pro te ct io n an d th e EP A. Du ri ng rou t in e sa fet y te st in g, th e Ci ty of Ap al ach ic ol a fo un d le ve ls of t ri halome tha ne s (T HM s) mor e tha n 50% higher tha n esta bl is he d ma xi mu m co nt ami na nt le ve ls fo r dr in ki ng wa te r. TH Ms ca n al so be in ha le d an d ab so rb ed th ro ug h th e sk in Re se ar che rs di sc ove re d th at bloo d co nc en tr ati on s of TH Ms ro se 5to 15 -f ol d fol lo wi ng su ch ro ut in e ac ti vi ti es as sh ow er in g, ba thi ng an d ha nd wa sh in g. Of te n fo un d in in du st ri al so lv en ts an d re fr iger an ts TH Ms ar e co ns id er ed ca rc in og enic an d ha ve bee n li nk ed to nu me rou s li fe th re at eni ng he al th ef fec ts : Li ve r or Ki dn ey Fa il ur e Li ve r or Ki dn ey Ca nc er Co lo n or Re ct al Ca nc er Bl ad de r Ca nc er Ad ve rs e Pr eg na nc y Ou tc ome s Se ri ou s Ce nt ra l Ner vo us Sy st em Da mage If yo u or a lo ve d one ha s re ce iv ed su ch a di ag nos is or a fa mil y me mb er ha s die d fr om one of the se co nd it io ns an d if yo ur wa te r is pr ov id ed by the Ci ty of Ap al ac h ic ol a, pl eas e co nt ac t ou r r m fo r a fr ee co ns ul ta tion PA NAMA CI TY 180 080 085 39 wa lb or sk y. co m So ur ce s: U. S. En viro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on Ag en cy Sa fe Dr ink in g Wa te r Inf or mat ion Sy st em (S DW IS ) Vi olat io n Re por t, Ci ty of Ap alachic ola re por t cr ea te d 4/2 2/ 20 14 ba se d on data ex tr ac te d on 2/ 10 /2 01 4; Na ti ona l In st it ut es of He alt h, T ap Wa te r an d Tr ih al omet ha ne s: Fl ow of Conce rn s Con tin ue s, En viro nm en ta l He al th Pe rs pe ct iv es July 20 05 11 3( 7) : A4 74 ; T ri ha lomet ha ne s in Dr ink in gwa te r, WH O Gu ide lin es fo r Dr ink in gwa te r Qu al it y, WH O/ SD E/ WS H/ 03 .0 4/ 64 Nor th Florida Medical Centers In c. MEDIC AL CE NTE R E as tpo int as tp oi nt Me dic al Ce nt er is pro ud to an no un ce An n Ru bi n, PA an d An ge l Co rt es, MD wi ll be pro vi din g he al th ca re se rv ices in cl udin g we ll wo me n s se rv ices at Ea st po in t Me dic al Ce nt er be gi nnin g Ju ne 30t h. To sc he du le an ap po in tm en t, pl ea se ca ll 850-670-8585. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star Tcroft@star.com If a majority of Gulf County commissioners wish to move to countywide voting in the future, they have some corrections to make in the present. Michael Spellman, an attorney consulting with the Gulf County commissioners on redistricting and voting issues, said if commis sioners aim to overturn or amend a federal decree that implemented single-member district voting in the county, xes had to be made through redistricting. Spellman said to walk into a federal court with clean hands and make the case for either lift ing or amending the decree ap proved by a federal judge in 1986, the county would have to get its house in order. We need to get our house in order before we stand in front of a federal judge, Spellman said. Most prominently, the Gulf County commissioners must re district counting inmates housed in state prisons as part of the pop ulation. The county commission ers did not do so during the most recent redistricting in 2011, and had not in previous redistricting. Sometimes the law doesnt make sense and this is one of those cases, Spellman said, add ing that inmates are felons who cannot vote, are not likely from Gulf County and are not free to en joy the county-provided services. However, he said there is no exemption from the provision in federal or state law, though he said some other jurisdictions such as Texas have considered testing the provision in court. To date, the only x would be legislative, not in the courts, Spell man said. While there is some movement among counties in several states to ignore the mandate on count ing prisoners, the difference for Gulf County was going into federal court and adhering to all dictates of state and federal law. You must count prisoners, Spellman said. Given the inmate population in the county, roughly 3,000, that would signicantly impact district lines, Commissioner Ward Mc Daniel said. We need to work with our leg islative delegation to change the law, said Commissioner Warren Yeager. This affects small coun ties. Most of your prisons are in small counties. Secondly, is the federal decree as it pertains to race. Normally, Spellman said, a re districting cannot consider race but he said under the decree the county must consider race and draw a district that was geo graphically compact and could be considered a minority major ity district, meaning the majority of voters are minorities. Given the events over the years since the decree, Spellman said, his research and demographic data indicate that such a district may no longer be District 4 in Port St. Joe, which was the majority minority district established un der the decree. He said there were pockets of minority voters in the south end of the county, and pockets in the central area, but given current trends a majority minority dis trict would likely be on the north end of the county. The numbers support the majority minority district will be in the north end of the county, Spellman said. In sum, Spellmans recom mendation is that commission ers prepare for any redistricting in 2015 it must occur by law in odd-numbered years by hiring a consultant versed in GIS and re districting work. That the county include the prison population and identify what would currently be a suf ciently large, geographically compact minority population to honor the decree. Early is better and I would stress that, Spellman said. You should do the work as early as possible. Only then, he said, would he feel comfortable going before a federal judge to alter or eliminate the decree. Commissioner Tan Smiley said commissioners shouldnt be working to x something that was not broken. He said he saw no problem with single-member districts and noted that taking the action Spellman outlined would push me off the table. We dont have the money, Smiley said. There is so much we can focus on but here we are fo cusing on something that doesnt amount to a hill of beans. We need to worry about jobs. Lets focus on jobs. Redrawing lines dont put food on the table. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said three commissioners ran on a platform that included county wide voting and said redistricting and moving to countywide would not only leave a commissioner in each citizens district but also al low for all voters to cast ballots for all ve commissioners. I think that is the important point, Bryan said. Tom Graney of St. Joe Beach said the federal decree was the epitome of federal intervention and that he was personally offend ed to be considered a racist and ignorant due to a federal judge. He said only in Gulf County can citizens not exercise their full con stitutional rights due to a federal judge preventing all from voting on how they are governed. I want this xed from the top down not the bottom up, Graney said. Lets get this straightened out and it is your jobs to do it. It limits me as a citizen and it limits you as a citizen. It insults me for some judge to tell me Im too racist or too ignorant to gov ern myself. Gulf County faces hurdles to countywide voting News BRIEFS

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A8 | The Times Thursday, July 3, 2014 Pe t of th e We ek CH AR MIN G CH AD He is a 6 mon th old ye ll ow la b/ hound mi x. He is ex tre me ly me ll ow an d ge nt le an d lo ve s no th in g mor e th an to li e on th e co uch ne xt to yo u an d be pe tt ed He is he ar tw or m ne gat iv e an d can be re le as ed as soon as he is ne ut er ed Ad op ti ng an olde r pu pp y mak es a lo t of se nse fo r pe opl e no t wa nt ing to go th ro ugh th e ve ry yo ung pu pp y sta ge bu t st il l wa nt to rai se a do g fr om a pu p Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to soc ia liz e al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts We ar e al way s lo ok in g fo r pe ople wi lli ng to bri ng one of ou r an im al s in to th ei r hom e to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can spa re wo ul d be gr ea tl y appr ec iat e Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hum an e Soc iet y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po int Yo u ma y lo go n to th e we bs it e at www fo rg ot te np ets .o rg to se e mor e of ou r adop tab le pe ts. Society Special to The Times The Florida Seafood Festival is beginning its search for this years queen. The festival will hold this years festival pageant on Saturday, Aug. 2 at the Franklin County School. Pageant organizers are now looking for contestants. Girls who would like to participate have to be between ages 16-18, and either a junior or senior in high school. The girls must live in Franklin County. The festival also requires contestants have never been married, have not had a child, and are not pregnant. Miss Florida Seafood wins a $1,000 scholarship from the seafood festival committee and attends several parades in surrounding counties to help promote Franklin County seafood and the Florida Seafood Festival. She also makes several personal appearances on TV and radio. Young ladies interested in participating in the event should email the Florida Seafood Festival by at food@ oridaseafoodfestival. com or message them at the Florida Seafood festival Facebook page. Wedding LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Several events were held over the last week to benet popular St. George Island tour guide Dayle Flint, who was set to undergo surgery on Tuesday, July 1. In photo above, Gail Riegelmayer, who helped organize a benet held at Eddy Teachs Raw Bar June 26, examines a basket donated by island artist Dee Grinenko who created the piece. Sometimes Its Hotter, and Danny Itzkovitz, owner of the Tapas Bar and Caf Floridita, also held benets to help defer Flints medical bills. HELPING A FRIEND Special to The Times Leaders of Van Buren County Hospital and University of Iowa Health Care have announced that Ray Brownsworth will begin serving as chief executive ofcer (CEO) at the hospital in Keosauqua, Iowa, on July 28. Brownsworth, CEO of the George E. Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola, previously served as CEO of the Keokuk County Health Center in Sigourney, Iowa, and as vice president of general services at the Ottumwa Regional Health Center in Ottumwa, Iowa. We are very pleased that Ray Brownsworth will bring his experience, leadership and skills back to Iowa, said Lloyd Foster, chair of the board of trustees of Van Buren County Hospital. We feel strongly that he is a very good t for our hospital, and that we are in a very good position to provide outstanding health care in southeast Iowa. Brownsworth will report jointly to the Van Buren County Hospital Board of Trustees and Ken Kates, CEO of University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa. I am delighted at the opportunity to work again with Ray, and I am looking forward to building on the strong relationship that already exists between these two excellent hospitals, said Kates. Brownsworth previously served on the Iowa Task Force on Disaster Surge Capacity, Iowas Early Access Council for Children and the Iowa Hospital Association, District F Chairperson. He has also served as board president for Keokuk County Assisted Living, president and secretary of the Sigourney Area Development Corporation, and the Iowa Regional Alliance Sustainability Committee. I rmly believe that it is vitally important to be active in the community where I live and work, and I am eager to get to know not only my new colleagues at Van Buren County Hospital, but the people we serve across southeast Iowa, said Brownsworth. Brownsworth completed his undergraduate education at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Oklahoma, and earned his master of business administration in health services administration from the University of Dallas in Dallas, Texas. Van Buren County Hospital, opened in 1951 with the ability to care for 20 acute care patients and seven newborns, in 1962 expanded to 40 beds. In 1984, the hospital board contracted with Sisters of Mary of the Presentation Health Corporation of Fargo, North Dakota to manage the facility. In the 1990s, the hospital established an afliation with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and through this afliation and arrangements with area hospitals, over 20 specialty clinics were established. In 1997, the hospital completed a major expansion project, thanks to a generous donation from a local estate as well as a capital campaign that raised $1.1 million. The $4.4 million expansion included space for active medical staff; visiting specialists, emergency room, physical therapy, cardio pulmonary rehabilitation, respiratory therapy, laboratory services, radiology, and occupational therapy departments. In 2004, the hospital opened Village Terrace, a 10-unit apartment complex for senior assisted living, attached to the hospital, as well as a new operating room/ recovery suite and acute care wing with all private beds. Sticks and Stones, the rst book by Eastpoint businessman and resident Jarrett Woolever, is an imaginative and beautifully illustrated parable about environmental stewardship. Woolever both wrote and illustrated the story and his watercolor paintings are a perfect t for this tale of how science can serve the world by solving environmental problems. When the residents of Apple Island allow industry to foul their home and litter it with stacks of rubbish, good King Oak, under direction of Queen Elma, travels across the water by air to lend a hand. He and Twiggy, his chief of staff, are sidetracked by a junkyard dog named Isis. It appears that the rescue mission has failed until Isis introduces the royal visitor to two children who explain the problems of Apple Island perfectly. Inspired by the youngsters dilemma, King Oak mobilizes the scientic resources of his Twigville Kingdom to bring about a green revolution on Apple Island and save the day. Targeting kids age 8 and younger, this is a story with an important lesson even a 5-year old can understand with fetching, lively characters that even an 85-year-old can enjoy. By LOIS SWOBODA Laura ONeal, Michael Toole to be married Shaun, Lonnie and Kendra want you to know that their mom is Happy Happy Happy! Michael Toole and Laura ONeal will become one in the eyes of God on Saturday, July 12, 2014. The ceremony will take place at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Center, at 142 River Road. Servant of the Lord, Don Carroll, will preside over the service, and a reception will follow. All close friends of the couple are welcomed to attend. Would you like to be Miss Florida Seafood? RA Y BROWNSWOR TH Brownsworth headed to Van Buren County, Iowa Sticks and Stones a recycling parable

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The Times | A9 Thursday, July 3, 2014 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Well, here we are starting the seventh month of the year, already. Hope you have a safe and happy Independence Day and weekend. Friday, July 4 will nd us at the Lanark Village Boat Club. We will have our annual picnic starting at 1 p.m. Just bring a covered dish to share. We will have a great time. I just know it. Jim the DJ will be on hand at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, Saturday, July 5, to provide the music for the Over 50 Dance. Be sure to bring a snack to share, your beverage of choice, your dancing shoes and, oh yes, your main squeeze. Cha, cha, cha On Sunday, July 6, you can enjoy pizza at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Yum, yum! Orders are taken after 5 p.m. Pizza by the slice requires a donation of $1. Bet you cant eat just one! Whole pizzas enjoyed in the lounge are an $8 donation, and pizza on the run requires a donation of $10. Call 697-9998 to place your order. Dont forget about the yard sale, auction and sh fry next Saturday, July 12, starting at 9 a.m. at the Lanark Community Church. Lunch will feature mullet and other sh, cole slaw, baked beans and grits and hushpuppy bread. All that for a donation of $6. See you there. Donations for the sale are needed. Bring them to the community church in Lanark Village at the corner of Oaks and Spring streets. If you cant bring your sale donations to the church, just call 697-4195 and tell Shirley Cox you have some stuff to be picked up. Have a great day and help repair and restore the community church and the parsonage. We need to keep Carlton Wathen in our prayers and pray for strength and peace for Grace and their family. Carlton or Admiral, as I called him, was a good friend and a fellow member of many clubs and organizations. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and dont complain about old age, many people dont get the chance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. Bette Kay Becky (Porter) Holtom went to her Heavenly Home on Monday, June 23, 2014. She was born Aug. 26, 1935 in St. Louis, Missouri to Clark Gardner Porter, MD and Jayne Elizabeth (Newton) Porter. She was raised in Three Rivers, Michigan, and then the Porter family relocated to Apalachicola where she graduated from Chapman High School in 1953. After graduation, she attended Kalamazoo College majoring in music which included playing piano, pipe organ, ute and viola plus choral conducting and voice. Upon her return home to Three Rivers from college, she became reacquainted with Frank Holtom, who was home from two-and-a-half years of service in the Army, stationed in Germany. They were married April 26, 1957 after a short courtship and remained together for 57 years. The Holtoms moved south in 1979 to live on St. George Island until 2006, when they built their current home in Apalachicola. Becky was the organist and pianist at the First Baptist Church of St. George Island for many years and helped to organize the Bay Area Choral Society, which became part of the Ilse Newell Concert Series. Becky is survived by her husband, Frank Erwin Holtom, their three children Kathryn (Tommy Robinson), Charles (Sherry) and Jonathan; grandchildren Clark, Frank, Casey, Alexandria, Elliot and Eliza Holtom and Hannah Wintker; and great-grandchildren Hayden, Lilly, Elaine, Chance and Isaiah Holtom. She was the oldest of her siblings Clark Porter, Judyth Porter (Amy Jo AND Loren), Debra Porter Byers (Julie, Pete, Chris and Bobby), Sharon Nolan and Glory Hanson. She was preceded in death by her parents and her Mom Betty O. (Klapp) Porter and brothers Mickey Maher and Michael Porter. She also wanted to acknowledge greatly-loved family friend Tom Woods and close to her heart caregiver Jennifer Harris Finch. Becky was a loving and generous wife, mother, grandmother, aunt, sister and friend. She will be missed greatly by all who knew her, but most especially by her children who are proud to have been raised by the unique person we were fortunate enough to call mom. A celebration of her life for family and friends will be held later this summer. In lieu of owers, please make a donation in her name to The Ilse Newell Fund for Performing Arts; c/o Fran Edwards, PO Box 405, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Becky Holtom BECKY HOLTOM Mrs. Emogene Norton Gander, 89, of Apalachicola, passed away Sunday, June 29, 2014 in a local hospital. Born in Clio, Alabama, she has been a longtime resident of Apalachicola. Mrs. Gander was a retired school teacher from Franklin County School District. She was also a member of the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. Mrs. Gander is preceded in death by her parents, Clarence and Bertie Lee Norton; brothers; Clyde Norton and Clarence Norton Jr., and sister; Catherine Cox Steinaker. She is survived by her husband; J.V. Gander Sr.; son; Jimmy Gander and wife, Charlotte; grandsons; Jim Gander and Joe Gander; granddaughter Donna Duncan; and great-grandson; Kristopher Duncan. Funeral services for Mrs. Gander were conducted on Wednesday, July 2 at 11 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola with Rev. Themo Patriotis ofciating. Interment followed in Magnolia Cemetery. The following gentlemen served as active pallbearers, Rex Buzzett, F.G. Lovett Jr., Wayne Hicks, Kristopher Duncan, Al Steinaker and A.J. Smith. Honorary pallbearers were Tink Hose, DeWitt Galloway, Fred Fitzgerald and Aaron Taylor. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted and viewed at www. southerlandfamily.com. Emogene Norton Gander EMOGENE NORTON GANDER In celebration of her 108th birthday on June 10, 2014, Mildred Phillips Leaver enjoyed many cards and letters and her usual birthday cheesecake. On Monday, June 23, she passed away peacefully in her sleep. Often celebrated as a dedicated and exceptional Missouri educator, she spent more than 60 years focused on the needs of children and teachers. Mildred was both an elementary teacher and principal and, after retirement, was a substitute teacher into her 90s. She then began what she said may have been her most valuable contribution, volunteering three afternoons a week to teach reading to at-risk third graders. Active as a professional educator, she became president of both Missouri Classroom Teachers and the Missouri State Teachers Association. She was state director, National Education Association. After her retirement in 1971, Mildred gave hundreds of inspirational speeches to retired groups. She became president of Missouri Retired Teachers Association and was state director, National Retired Teachers Association during which she organized 52 MRTA chapters. She was Missouris delegate to the White House Conferences on Aging in 1979 and again in 1991, senator and president pro tem, Silver Haired Legislature, and chairman, Governors Council on Aging. She successfully urged her many legislative friends to pass many bills aiding retired citizens. Mildred often cited her father, a boy at the Wilson Creek Battle of the Civil War who was active into his 90s, whose motto was always stand for what you believe. Born in 1906, Mildred was the youngest of seven born to Clara and Marion Phillips. She and her twin, Marian, grew up on a prosperous farm near Springeld, Missouri and drove their pony and buggy to the country school. For months in 1919, they and their mother drove a horse and buggy on the dirt roads of Greene County, urging neighbors to approve womens right to vote. When the 19th amendment passed in 1920, Mildred was a freshman at Willard High School and very proud that her mother was the rst woman to vote in their precinct. The twins attended Springeld Teachers College, a onebuilding school that is now Southwest Missouri State University. After college, Mildred was a home economist for May Kelly Kitchens demonstrating the new electric stove in department stores in Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Missouri. As the Depression deepened, such advertisement ended. Mildreds twin taught in Pacic, Missouri and, when one of the teachers married, Mildred was hired. At the time, married woman were generally not allowed to teach children. In 1934, she became a home economist for Union Electric in St. Louis, and in 1936, she married Lawrence Larry Leaver, head of science in the St. Louis Public Schools. In 1940, after graduate school at the University of Illinois, they moved to Rolla, Missouri where Larry was a professor of physics at what was then the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. In 1948, Mildred returned to teaching and continued as teacher, principal, substitute teacher, story teller and volunteer until she moved to be with family in Atlanta in 2008. She is survived by daughter, Lari Murry and husband Don, of St. George Island; granddaughters, Alison Murry, and Karen Murry Flynn and husband Dennis; and greatgrandchildren Caroline and Sam Flynn. Mildred asked for a simple family graveside gathering as did Larry. She wished gifts in her memory to be for the donors favorite organization that focuses on children. She noted that family and friends often join in a celebration of life for the deceased. She asked that her friends and family remember her joyful 100th birthday festivities as well as their participation together in many activities and events. Mildred will rest next to Larry in the family plot in Springeld. Mildred Phillips Leaver MILDRED PHILLIPS LEAVER LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Donations sought for churchs July 12 yard sale Faith Card of THANKS Lois W atkins family Many thanks to each who visited Lois C. Watkins during her bout with cancer, and for your phone calls, prayers, cards owers and food. May God bless each and every one who helped in any way. R.C. Collie Watkins and family The Cobb and Johnson families CLERGY OFFER COASTAL BLESSING AT LIGHTHOUSE On Sunday, June 1 at the Crooked River Lighthouse, four local clergy participated in the annual Coastal Blessing service, offering prayers for the safety of the community during the present hurricane season. Pastor Ron Barks of the Assembly of God church, Mother Phoebe McFarlin of the Episcopal Church of the Ascension, Pastor Mark Collins, from the Carrabelle Christian Center, and Pastor Byron Sherman, from the First Baptist Church, raised their various voices in praise and prayer for another year of leniency during the stormy time of the year. Following the clergy, volunteer Dan Cox read a traditional Native American blessing, acknowledging the humility of man before the power of nature. Afterwards, while all were gathered in the meeting room for refreshments, a new neighbor, Jeanne Van Pelt, arrived to tell how much she enjoyed hearing the prayers and blessings, along with the music. She and her husband have rented the Rocha house directly behind the property, and she had a great view of the proceedings from the upstairs balcony. Another hurricane season has begun; may the calm prevail. YOUTH PLAN JULY 4 BREAKFAST ON ISLAND The Re:Action youth group of the ApalachicolaSt. George Island Cooperative Parish will have a Fourth of July pancake breakfast at the St. George Island United Methodist Church. Join us for all-you-caneat pancakes, sausage, juice and coffee for only $6. The time is 7:30 to 10 a.m. this Friday. All proceeds go toward their trip to the Jesus Culture Conference. Faith BRIEFS Obituaries SUBMISSIONS: Send obituaries to dadlerstein@star.com On Sunday, July 6, you can enjoy pizza at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Yum, yum! Orders are taken after 5 p.m. Call 697-9998 to place your order

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By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star Tcroft@star.com Surveys indicate scal lop numbers should con tinue to improve in St. Joseph Bay as the season opened last weekend. Bay scallop harvest season began Saturday and researchers studying St. Joseph Bay indicate that after a lean year in 2012, followed by a re bound in 2013, the adult scallop population should continue an upward climb. The recreational sea son opened June 28, after Gov. Rick Scott requested an early open to the sea son last month, for state waters from the PascoHernando county line to the west bank of the Mex ico Beach Canal in Bay County. The season has opened early every year since the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The season will continue through Sept. 24. Scallops may be col lected by hand or with a landing or dip net. Scal lops cannot be taken ashore outside of an open area for harvesting. There is no commercial harvest for bay scallops in Florida state or federal waters. The average number, or density, of scallops ob served in St. Joseph Bay doubled last year as re searchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg conducted their surveys, though the distribution of scallops around the bay was spotty. Given research early this spring into juvenile recruitment, researchers are predicting that, St. Joseph Bay abundance will increase, accord ing to a report from the Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commission. In fact, according to researchers, St. Joseph Bay is one of just three of the major bay scallop harvest areas where the abundance is projected to increase. Each year, research ers place 20 transect lines of 300 meters in length at 12 stations around St. Jo seph Bay. The configuration works like this: the first station is just off the boat ramp at Frank Pate Park and researchers work in a horseshoe around the south end of the bay and up to T. H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. In all, about 12,000 square meters of the bay are surveyed, a diver dip ping underwater at one end of each transect and counting scallops along the length of the line. In 2012, after two banner years, the average number of scallops per transect line in St. Joseph Bay fell to 10.9. Last year, researchers found 23 scal lops per transect line, in dicating a successful year for juvenile growth. That juvenile growth continued through the fall and winter and research ers projected that adult numbers would be very similar, if not up, com pared to what was seen in 2013. In 2010, the average per transect was 138; in 2011 it was 154. Homosas sa and Steinhatchee also are expecting an increase in density, according to re searchers. The average at St. Marks continues to de crease, a trend that began in 2012. Once again this year, the FWC is asking for the publics help in assessing the bay scallop popula tion as well as how long it took folks to find and har vest scallops. The FWC is asking those seeking scallops to fill out an on line survey at http://svy. mk/bayscallops. For questions or seek additional information about scallop season email BayScallops@My FWC.com. Learn more by visiting MyFWC.com/Fishing and clicking on Saltwater, Recreational and Bay Scallops. Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TID E TA BLES MONT HL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, July 3 90 80 30 % Fr i, July 4 88 80 30 % Sa t, July 5 88 79 30 % Sun, July 6 86 78 30 % Mo n, July 7 86 78 60 % Tu es July 8 86 78 10 % We d, July 9 87 79 10 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 10 Thursday, July 3, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom SPONSORED BY King sh still occupy the inshore wrecks. Gag grouper season is nally here, time to soak a pinsh. Reports say they are plentiful. Trout continue to bite in St Joe Bay and East Bay. Top water baits are great for the morning bite.. Red sh and ounder are there as well, you will just have to nd them because they are on the move constantly. Mexico Beach Pier continues to be a good loca tion for shark shing, as well as Indian Pass. Whiting and pompano continue to be caught off the beach. Scallops on the rebound as season opens SCALLOPING RULES There is a daily limit of 2 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person. No more than 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell, or one-half gallon of bay scallop meat, may be possessed aboard any vessel at any time. Folks are allowed to harvest bay scallops only by hand or with a landing or dip net. Bay scallops may not be harvested for commercial purposes. Bag limits are daily limits; it is illegal to take a limit of scallops in the morning and return later in the day and collect another limit of scallops. Unless otherwise exempt, a regular Florida saltwater shing license is required when using a boat to harvest scallops. If folks wade from shore, a regular Florida saltwater shing license or a free resident shore-based license is needed. Divers and snorkelers are required to display a divers-down ag (red with a white diagonal stripe) while in the water. Boaters must stay at least 100 feet away from a divers-down ag in a river, inlet or channel. In open waters, boaters must stay 300 feet away from a divers-down ag. PH O T O CO URTE S Y O F T HE STAR In 2012, after two banner years, the average number of scallops per transect line in St. Joseph Bay fell to 10.9. Last year, researchers found 23 scallops per transect line, indicating a successful year for juvenile growth. Working to reduce wildre risk By Todd Schroeder Special to the Times Fire season has become a year-round reality in Florida, requiring reght ers and residents to be on heightened alert for the threat of wildre through out the year. As Floridas population has increased through the years so has the number of homes built on the edge of forests or wildlands. This area, commonly referred to as the Wildland/Urban In terface, presents real chal lenges for the homeowner in managing wildre risk. Each year, nationally, wildres consume hundreds of homes in these areas. Each year the Florida Forest Service implements fuel reduction projects de signed to reduce or miti gate the buildup of natural fuels from around homes and communities. These projects target high wild re-risk areas and the work is primarily performed us ing prescribed re. Studies have shown that as many as 80 percent of the homes lost to wildres could have been saved if their owners followed a few simple re-safe prac tices. The reality today is that there are simply not enough re engines or re ghters available to defend and save every home in a major wildre. Todays homeowner in the Wild land/Urban Interface must take personal responsibil ity for himself, family and home by being proactive in reducing his wildre risk. However, many residents still dont have a full under standing of the impact that wildre could have on their homes and properties. The FFS has been work ing to solve this problem through community out reach programs that teach homeowners and commu nities simple re-safe con cepts that will help them to manage their wildre risk. The National Firewise pro gram and the Ready, Set, Go program are both be ing currently implemented by the FFS throughout the state. Both programs highlight homeowner responsibility in protect ing their homes from the threat of wildre. During the past two years, the FFS has been working with residents of The Plantation community on St. George Island to as sist them in managing the wildre risk to their com munity using Firewise pre sentations and principles. Community volunteers thinned out forest fuels by hand in an area that is planned for a prescribed burn the rst part of 2015. This burn will help reduce the chances for a wildre to occur in this area. FFS personnel continue to en courage residents to pro vide for defensible space around their homes by clearing back brush and dead material next to the home. The goal is to get the residents to work together as a community to man age their wildre risk and certify them as a National Firewise Community. Recently, the FFS made a Firewise presentation to the residents of Hickory Hammock at their annual meeting in Carrabelle. Several of these residents have properties that bor der Tates Hell State For est. The FFS plans to work cooperatively with these homeowners to mitigate the fuel load on their prop erty and along the bound ary lines of the state forest. Working together to help them to reduce and man age their wildre risk and certify them as a Firewise Community is the goal for this community as well. It is everyones responsi bility to be proactive about reducing wildre risk. For more information about these educational programs and fuel re duction (mitigation), log on to www.Firewise.org, www.Wildlandrersg.org, www.Fireadapted.org and www.FloridaForestSer vice.com. Todd Schroeder is wild re mitigation specialist at the Tallahassee Forestry Center. He can be reached at 850-681-5960 or Todd. Schroeder@FreshFrom Florida.com. FIREWISE, DONT BE FOOLISH Provide for at least 30 feet of defensible space in all directions around your home. Nothing combustible Keep rooftops and gutters clean to avoid re from ember collection Remove ladder fuels (shrubs that enable a re to climb into the treetops) Keep yard free of dead vegetation Dont store or locate combustible materials near home Use re resistant building materials Plant re-resistant vegetation

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Their sweep of the Dis trict 4 All-Star Tournament at D. W. Wilson Field in Apalachicola behind them, the Franklin County AAA All-Stars are headed to Ar cadia on July 11. After a week layoff fol lowing their dominance of Port St Joe and Wewa hitchka in the districts, Coach Steven Cook and assistants Tony Brannan and Duane Topham have been putting the team through three practices a week as they prepare for the 16-team double elimi nation state championship tourney. bringing together the nest in Dixie Youth League 9 and 10-year-olds from throughout the state. Theyre a great group of kids Cook said. They love baseball. They get along well and they have a good time. They have a good atti tude, he said. They play the game right. The team expects to face tougher opponents than they encountered at the districts, where they breezed through. Caleb Abel led the team in hit ting, going 7-for-10 at the plate and scoring seven runs. Jabara Pearson was 6-for-9 in the batters box and scored six runs. The hard-throwing Ash ton Topham hurled the maximum number of 13 in nings in the tourney, and did so with complete games. The team features all right-handers, comprised of the nest prospects plucked from the regular season teams from Apala chicola and Eastpoint. April Rester, secretary for the Dixie Youth League, said the county traditional ly gives at least $2,500 to ev ery team that goes to state, and both cities usually kick in a donation as well. She said since the league has all its All-Star teams going to state tourneys, the league has been working to coordinate donations that a business can give in one sum, and then have it div vied up as needed by the league. Its better than hit ting up one business ve times, she said. The players and parents will be soliciting donations up until tourney time from residents and visitors. This Saturday, July 5, they will be bagging for bucks at the Carrabelle IGA, selling sno-cones and hot dogs at Carrabelle Beach and tak ing donations on St. George Island. They also plan to bag for bucks at the Apala chicola IGA and Piggly Wiggly stores. CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SPORT S www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 3, 2014 A Page 11 Section THE LINEUP No. 1 Will Varnes, 1B No. 3 Ashton Topham, P/C/3B No. 5 Caleb Abel, SS No. 6 Evan Stanley, OF No. 8 Colin Amison, 3B No. 10 Gage Boone, P/C No. 12 Garrison Cook, RF No. 15 Kyler Custer, LF No. 20 Wyatt Abercrombie, CF No. 21 Owen Poloronis, 2B/OF No. 23 Jabara Pearson, 2B AAA All Stars heading to Arcadia Ashton Topham threw strikes at the district tourney. P HO T OS BY DAV I D AD LE R S T EIN | The Times Third baseman Colin Amison tags out a Wewa runner. Bottom right shortstop Caleb Abel gets back into position during game play. Franklin County ready for 16-team double elimination round at state tourney Ozoners punch ticket to state tournament By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com On July 11, the Franklin County Ozone All-Stars will begin state tournament play at Spring Hill as they compete in the B-Division for the Florida title. The team, under the coaching of Justin Odom and assistants Lanny Rester and Donny Gay, swept the District 4 All-Star Tournament at D. W. Wilson Field in Apalachicola last month. After defeating Wewahitchka 10-3, the boys went on to blank Port St. Joe, 21-0, and then tri umphed 11-1 over Wewa. This group of players is dedicated to the game and will ing to put in the time to grow and learn, coach Odom said. Im very proud of their win at districts and look forward to the opportunity to bring a state title home to Franklin County. The team loves a quote by Babe Ruth that says the way a team plays as a whole de termines its success. You may have the greatest bunch of indi vidual stars in the world, but if they dont play together, the club wont be worth a dime. Coach Odom said he is confident. They have been hitting the ball well and play good de fense, he said. For a lot of them its their first year playing Ozone. Only three 12-year-olds played in the division before. They really have been working hard this year. Ozone is a brand of ball the league went with last year, and it tries to capitalize on speed. It al lows players to leadoff bases, cites pitchers for balks and has a longer distance to first base and the pitchers mound. Dona tions to help with the trip to state are being accept ed at any Frank lin County Centennial Bank. You can show your sup port by making a do nation and a display of donors will be put around the drive-through window. On July 3, there will be a lemonade stand next to Tin Shed in Apala chicola and on July 4 the boys will be in front of Eddy Teachs on St. George Island selling wa ters and doing a helmet drive. Any business or per son wanting to donate to the teams may do so by making checks payable to FCDYL. We have five teams going to state this season and our youth needs this com munitys support to get there, said parent Chala Parish. THE LINEUP No. 3 Jarvis Turrell No. 5 Schuyler Donahoe No. 8 Devin Daniels No. 9 Clint Rester No. 13 Lamarius Martin No. 14 Kyron Wheeler No. 17 Caden Turrell No. 20 Matthew Gay No. 21 Josh Odom No. 42 Joshua Farmer No. 79 Zander McAlpin PHO T OS BY DAV I D AD LE R S T EIN | The Times Caden Turrell protects rst base during district tournament play. Kyron Wheeler prepares to hit at districts. Matthew Gay takes his stance at the plate. Joshua Farmer swings away. Devin Daniels res his fast ball at a batter.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, July 3, 2014 This new page has been created to feature photographs submitted to The Times by our readers. We would like to make this page a regular addition to The Times, an opportunity for the photographers from throughout Franklin County, both residents and visitors alike, to highlight their best work capturing the beauty of the landscape, the excitement and energy of the people, and the adventure of the world around them. Please send photographs to Dadlerstein@star.com. For more information, call 653-8894. f-stop Franklin DRAGONFLY PHOTOGRAPHY | Special to The Times A seafood house in Eastpoint CHARLIE SAWYER | Special to The Times Shrimp boats at the dock MELISSA LUCY | Special to The Times Karl Lucy shes at the end of summer 2013. DOUG JIMERSON | Special to The Times Eastpoint at sunrise along US 98 in April 2014. SUE ROACH | Special to The Times A pelican soars above the St. Vincent Island boat launch. Crossword SOLUTION Crossword PUZZLE

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, July 3, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces AD VERTISE HERE TO DA Y 227-7847 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD Both branches of Franklin County Public Library are in full swing with our summer library programs! This is an exciting time to visit your local libraries, not just because of the books, but because of the services and programs that we offer. If you havent been to the Eastpoint or Carrabelle branch, you might miss out. You might think that the library focuses on the young during the summer months because of the typical summer slide of losing an interest in reading while not in school. We are working extremely hard to keep them focused on learning and reading with the programming both in the library and in our Outreach to The Nest. Children are busily working on their summer projects in the Fizz, Boom, READ! Programs that are running until July 24. The teens and tweens are also involved in kitchen science, forensic science, and experiments this summer. What about the adults? You are not forgotten as we are always offering programs that might interest you. Our Literary Elements Programs is also science-based, with some interesting events. On Tuesday, July 15 in Carrabelle from 1 to 2 p.m., and Thursday, July 17 in Eastpoint from 11 a.m. to noon, Les Harrison, from the Wakulla County Extension Agency will be presenting a workshop on fall gardening. There will be Gardening door prizes for participants and light refreshments. On Tuesday, July 22 at 11 a.m. in Eastpoint, and Thursday, July 24 at 11 a.m. in Carrabelle, Lt. Carl Whaley from the Franklin County Sheriffs Department will give us an inside look at the investigation process. There will be door prizes and refreshments at both programs. We recently had a recycling workshop presented by Fonda Davis from the Franklin County Solid Waste Department at both branches. You might consider the Book Chat held in Eastpoint, on the rst Tuesday of every month at 1:30 p.m., where you can share your thoughts about what you have been reading. There is also a Book Social in Carrabelle, the second Thursday of each month at 5:30 p.m. Its great to hear about new books that others are reading. If you are a writer, we have a Writers Group at the Carrabelle Branch on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 10 am. In Eastpoint, Dawn Radford will be starting up another Writers Forum starting Wednesday, August 13 until September 17. These Wednesday groups include lively discussions and tips for those who might have started to write and are seeking professional advice. Radford is a local author with splendid ideas for aspiring authors. Are you afraid of a computer mouse? The county library has computer lessons available at no cost to you. Carly Peary from Wilderness Coast Public Library Consortium, will work with you one-on-one in basic computer skills, MS Word, or whatever computer questions you might have. You will need to schedule an appointment with her for the days she visits both branches. You can also call to request an appointment. She will be at the Carrabelle Branch on Thursday, July 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and at the Eastpoint Branch on July 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. If you have not visited the library, we have a LIBRARY BINGO game! Complete one line on your BINGO card and enter to win one of our great prizes. For the adults we have an RCA 9 Tablet, a Coleman Cooler, and a Polaroid Camera. We want to encourage you to participate in any or all of the summer programs! For any questions on services, or programs at either library, call the Carrabelle Branch at 697-2366 or the Eastpoint Branch at 670-8151. Anne Birchwell is the director of the Franklin County Public Library. The following is the honor roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at Franklin County Middle School. Sixth grade All As: Kt Nessly A/B: Michael Taylor, Chasity Ard, Jacob Shirley, Mikel Register, Jacob Shirley, Shyne Faircloth Seventh grade All As: Jessica Rudd, Preston Edwards, Kirsten Robinson A/B: Carlton Whaley, Tonnor Segree, Makenzie Shuman, Hannah Hogan, Matthew Kelly, Casey Riley, Colby Boatwright, Beyla Walker, Tanaya Harris, Peyton Millender, Kiana Foley, Melanie Collins Eighth grade All As: Josie Kriss A/B: Jesse Page, Evangelina Ducker, Tiffany Glass, Leah Reeder, Conner Mathes, Tylyn Gillikin, Jake Paterson Franklin County HONOR ROLL MIDDLE SCHOOL The following is the Honor Roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at Franklin County High School Freshmen All As:, Jayla Alley, Tessa Carlisle, Emily Crosby, Jaylon Gainer, Bianca Huber, Holly Chambers, Logan Crosby, Allie Kirvin, Astrid Ramirez, Ann Reeder, Scout Segree, Mallorie Shiver, Tyanna Townsend A/B: Adriana Butler, Chelsea Register, Alexis Segree, Megan Collins, Christopher Creamer, Tia Cummings, Maxwell Davis, Kacey Howard, Melody Hateld, Tea Kelly, Zachary May, Myranda McLeod, Natasia Robinson, Jackson Subbarao, Thomas Subbarao Sophomores All As: Amelia Newman, John White A/B: Ricky Smith, Jessica Schmidt, Jaylynn Lyston, Haley Edgecomb, Hollie Shiver, Kendrick Hunter, Nathan Wanders Juniors All As: Aaliyah West, Payton Smith, Whitney Frye-Amison A/B: Amanda Anthony, Julie Diestelhorst, Myesha Campbell, Zoie Lance, Morgan Martin, Samantha Marxsen, Chance McLead, Austin Carter, Chaseon Taranto Seniors All As: Amber Adkins, Bria Walker, Josie Turner A/B: Marlyn Lee, Logan McLeod, Austin Martina, Cameron White, Alviauna Cummings, Cynthia Duncan, Malachi Parker, Thadaeisha Carr, Tevis Page. HIGH SCHOOL Calling all Franklin County adults! LIBRAR Y CORNER Anne Birchwell CO U R T ES Y OF F R A N K L I N CO U N TY PUB L IC LIB R A R Y Children enjoy the Summer Reading Program

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A14| The Times Thursday, July 3, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95324T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000438 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. JANE B. PALMIER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order Cancelling and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated 9th day of June, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 19-2012-CA-000438 in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST the Plaintiff, and JANE B. PALMIER, et al, are the Defendants. Franklin County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 2, BLOCK “B”, BALD POINT ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES 43, 44 AND 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on 13th day of August, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 9, 2014 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provsion of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 W. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith, He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. June 26, July 3, 2014 99321T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TIM OR CHRISTINA SAUNDERS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 313 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: Lot 14 ANGLERS HARBOR Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 19-07S-04W-1001-0000-01 40 Name is which assessed: BRYAN L. SANFORD & MICHAEL FORLUND All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST 2014, which is the 4th day of AUGUST 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th day of JUNE, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 10, 17, 2014 95386T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN, COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 14-31-CP IN RE: ESTATE KAREN LEE HILDEBRANDT NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Karen Lee Hildebrandt, deceased, whose date of death was May 10, 2014; is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 14-31-14; the address of which is The Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: June 26. Personal Representative Loretta Westbrook 1949 Cape Street Carrabelle, Florida 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Charles A. Curran, FL Bar No. 274380 P.O. Box 549 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Phone (850) 697-5333 Email: cacurranlaw@ gmail.com June 26, July 3, 2014 99329T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000375 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 3811 Frederica Road St. Simons Island, GA 31522, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM PARKER III, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff’s Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 2459.17 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 2175.67 FEET TO RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONINTUE NORTH 80 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 362.72 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 263.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 363.08 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 289.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1704 HWY 67A, CARABELLE, FL 32322, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on July 16, 2014, at 11:00a.m EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons with Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office no later than seven days prior to the proceeding. BILL KINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 2014 99339T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-417-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN REYNOLDS, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated, entered in Case No. 13-417-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Marilyn Reynolds, a single woman; Tress Anderson a/k/a Tress Mara Anderson a/k/a Tress M. Dameron, a married woman; Lighthouse Ridge Estates Unit III Homeowners’ Association, Inc.; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Inside 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11: 00 o’clock a.m. on August 13, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit “A”. EXHIBIT “A” LOT 65, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to, the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet, thence run South 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence run North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 657.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41-seconds for an arc distance of 234.42 feel, thence run North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 111.58 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 128.81 feet, thence run, South 59 degrees 44 minutes 15 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 128.81 feet, thence run North 59 degrees 44 minutes 15 minutes seconds West 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 66, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet, thence run South 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence run North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 East along said right-of-way boundary 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and aIong said curve with a radius of 657.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an are distance of 234.42 feet, thence run North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 240.39 feet to a point of curve to the right for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arch distance of 137.00 feet, thence run South 57 degrees 23 minutes 40 seconds East 350.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 3000.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arc distance of 122.68 feet, the chord of said arc being South 21 degrees 26 minutes 03 seconds West 122.67 feet, thence run North 59 degrees 44 minutes 15 seconds West 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 13th day of June, 2014. Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Court By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 2014 99359T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000252 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Jeffrey W. Little a/k/a Jeffrey Little; Alecia McCallister; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000252 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Jeffrey W. Little a/k/a Jeffrey Little are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on July 16, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 5, SUN ‘N SAND BEACHES, UNIT NO. 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 N. Federal Hwy, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-243341 FC02 CHE June 26, July 3, 2014 99351T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: July 12, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Jasmen Yon Bradley Charlton Judy Terry Before the sale date of July 12, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. June 26, July 3, 2014 99403T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000040 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., PLAINTIFF vs. SABRINA N. EVANS, ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 13, 2014, and entered in Case No. 19-2013-CA-000040 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Sabrina N. Evans, et al., are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 A.M. ET, Franklin County, Florida at on the 21st day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 4, BLOCK 212 (OLD BLOCK 49), KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1008 TALLAHASSEE ST. CARRABELLE, FL 32322-3209 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 17th day of June, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC-002819F01 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 26, July 3, 2014 99455T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-0428CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PETE MANGHAM and JOSEPH HAWKINS, individually and as sole heirs of Sharon E. Hawkins, and UNKNOWN HEIRS OR DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF SHARON E. HAWKINS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 30th day of April, 2014, entered in Case No.: 13-0428-CA in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is Plaintiff, and PETE MANGHAM (“Mangham”) and JOSEPH HAWKINS (“Hawkins”), individually and as sole heirs of Sharon E. Hawkins, and UNKNOWN HEIRS OR DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF SHARON E. HAWKINS (“Estate”), are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 2nd Floor Lobby at the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), on August 27, 2014, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said final judgment, to-wit: A parcel of land in Fractional Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point marked by an old concrete monument, said monument being the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 27 and run thence North 00 degrees 25 minutes 53 seconds West (bearing base) 1774.24 feet to an old concrete monument, thence North 89 degrees 57 minutes 31 seconds East 215.68 feet to an old concrete monument on the Northeast right of way of a 66 foot roadway; thence South 00 degrees 25 minutes 53 seconds East 72.49 feet to a point on the Southwestern right of way of said road; thence South 66 degrees 00 minutes East 388.21 feet along said Southwest right of way to a point of curve to the right; thence along said curve with a radius of 279.0 feet thru a central angle of 37 degrees 41 minutes 30 seconds for an arc distance of 182.74 feet; thence continue along said right of way South 28 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 479.19 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 28 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 264.31 feet to a concrete monument located at the intersection of said right of way and the West right of way of State Road S-384-A, also being on a curve concave to the Southeast; thence Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 527.46 feet thru a central angle of 18 degrees 33 minutes 06 seconds for an arch length of 170.78 feet (chord of said arc being South 52 degrees 27 minutes 12 seconds West 170.04 feet); thence leaving said right of way North 28 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds West 264.31 feet; thence North 52 degrees 27 minutes 12 seconds East 170.04 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 25th day of June, 2014. In accordance with the Americans With Disabinties Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850653-8861. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk if Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99447T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-55-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KATHY LEE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KATHY LEE; CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), N.A., n/k/a CITIBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 17, 2014, in Case No.: 14-55-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST on July 16, 2014 the following described property: Lots 10 and 11, Block B of LANARK BEACH UNIT NO.1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with that certain 1992 Singlewide Mobile Home, ID #HMST6505GA, Title #63190654. DATED: June 18, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99467T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 3, 2014 The Times | A15 1130260FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENTPosition: Entry Level Closing Date: 7/10/2014 Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Fonda D. Davis, Director Solid Waste & Recycling Department 210 State Road 65, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 Phone (850) 670-8167e Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/ Armative Action/ Drug Free Workplace EmployerKnowledge, Skills and Abilities: AN EMPLOYEE IN THIS POSITION WILL OPERATE VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAVY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS ASSOCIATED WITH LANDFILL OPERATIONS, RIGHT OF-WAY DEBRIS REMOVAL AND RECYCLING ACTITITIES. OPERATE TRASH COMPACTOR TO COMPACT CLASS III WASTE AT THE COUNTY LANDFILL. OPERATE AIR CURTAIN INCINERATOR TO BURN YARD DEBRIS. OPERATE KNUCKLEBOOM TRUCK FOR RIGHT OF WAY DEBRIS REMOVAL. OPERATE TRACTORS, AND DRIVE DUMP TRUCKS TO HAUL EQUIPMENT. OPERATE EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS, AND PUSH MOWERS ETC. MUST HAVE THE ABILITY TO WASH, CLEAN AND PERFORM MINOR PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE ON ASSIGNED EQUIPMENT. ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE USING SPEECH, VISION AND HEARING; LIFT HEAVY OBJECTS (OVER 50 POUNDS); PUSH, PULL, WALK, STAND, KNEEL, BEND, STOOP, AND CLIMB; SIT IN A RESTRICTIVE POSITION FOR LONG PERIODS OF TIME. WORK OUTSIDE IN VARYING WEATHER CONDITIONS; WORK IS SUBJECT TO EXCESSIVE DIRT, GRIME, DUST, SOILING OF CLOTHING, EQUIPMENT NOISE AND VIBRATION, AND AT TIMES EXTREME TEMPERATURES AND HUMIDITY. ANIMAL CONTROL DUTIES MAYBE REQUIRED. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT.Minimum Qualication: Graduation from an accredited High School; or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma; and at least one (1) year prior experience in operating or driving the above mentioned equipment or any combination of training and experience which provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities to perform the job. Require knowledge of Florida trac laws with basic understanding of safety procedures. You must possess a Florida Drivers License with a favorable driving record. Must obtain a Class A Commercial Driving License (CDL) within the 6 months probation period. Supervising State Inmates may be required. 4518422The MainStay Suites is NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Guest Service Agent Full Time Position Thursday to Sunday 3:00 PM to 11:00PMCandidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. MainStay Suites 3951 E. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished $550.00 mo. 2. 39-5 Holland, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, w/d, fenced yard $525.00 mo. 3. 24-3 Pine St, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, unfurnished $450.00 mo. 4. 39-1 Carlton, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, carport $650.00 mo. incl. utilities 5. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle, 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach $1400.00 mo. 6. 202 1st St NE, Carrabelle, 5 bedroom, 2 baths, unfurnished $1000.00 mo. 7. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished $550.00 mo.8. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths $1000.00 mo. 9. 811 Three Rivers Rd. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on water, deep water dock, garage, fenced yard, parking $1000.00 mo. 10. 39-2 Carlton, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, Lanark Village $750.00 mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518442 August 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 6, Township 8 South, Range 3 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run North 6926’36” East, 1290.64 feet to an old concrete monument marking the Intersection of the Easterly boundary of the 100.00 foot right-of-way of a State Road with the Southerly boundary of the 66.00 foot right-ofway of the Gulf Shore Drive: thence run South 2315’00” East along the Easterly boundary of said State Road a distance of 170.00 feet, more or less, to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run North 2315’00” West along said Easterly right-of-way boundary, 170.00 feet, more or less, to an old concrete monument marking the intersection of said Easterly right-of-way boundary with the Southerly boundary of the 66.00 foot right-ofway of Gulf Shore Drive; thence run North 6650’00” East along said Southerly right-ofway boundary, 300.00 feet to a concrete monument, said concrete monument being located South 6650’00” West, 100.00 feet from the Northwest corner of Lot 1, Block “1”, of the Corrective Replat of Dog Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 2, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 34, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, leaving said southerly right-of-way boundary run South 2310’00” East, 194.00 feet, more or less, to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico, thence run South 7124’40” West along said mean high water line 300.71 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Being the same lands as described in Official Records Book 350, Page 175, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH all the buildings and other structures and plants, shrubs, trees and sod now or hereafter on said land, and all fixtures, chattels, and articles of personal property now or hereafter affixed to or used in connection with said premises, including but not limited to plumbing and bathroom fixtures, air conditioning and sprinkler systems, furnaces, elevators, swimming pool, carpeting, window awnings, shades and blinds; and also encumbering any and all materials and supplies (including but not limited to bricks, lumber, concrete products, roofing materials, electrical equipment such as air conditioning, refrigeration, heating apparatuses), now or hereafter placed upon the mortgaged premises or utilized in the construction of any improvements on the mortgaged premises; and as to any property which does not form a part or parcel of the real estate, or does not constitute a fixture, this instrument is also deemed to be a security agreement under the Uniform Commercial Code for the purpose of creating a security interest in such property, which Mortgagor hereby grants to Mortgagee as a secured party under the Uniform Commercial Code. TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the same, together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in anywise appertaining, including all permits and/or land use authorizations issue by governmental agency or authority in connection with the mortgaged premises, and all easements in any way pertaining to the mortgaged premises, all rights-of-way and/or water rights used or available in connection with the mortgaged premises, and the rents, issues and profits thereof unto the Mortgagee in fee simple. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count I entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JANE A. DOERFER, Defendant, and the docket number of which is 2014-CA000010. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL, 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of June 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99469T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property Parcel 1: Lot 3, WILLOW ACRES ESTATES, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 4, WILLOW ACRES ESTATES, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lot 14-B, (unrecorded) Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 17, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run North 89 degrees 09 minutes 39 seconds West 123.39 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue North 89 degrees 09 minutes 39 seconds West 429.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds East 347.32 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the Southeasterly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot wide dirt roadway, thence run South 79 degrees 48 minutes 19 seconds East, along said right-of-way boundary 135.77 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), lying on a curve concave to the Northwesterly, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and said curve with a radius of 145.32 feet, through a central angle of 37 degrees 57 minutes 56 seconds for an arc distance of 96.29 feet, chord being North 81 degrees 23 minutes 49 seconds East 94.54 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 29 degrees 54 minutes 09 seconds East 396.48 feet to the Point of Beginning. P ersonal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however, established. pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK by asset acquisition from the FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION as receiver for COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JOHNNY C. MILLENDER and SHEILA L. MILLENDER, Defendants. and the docket number of which is: 2013 CA 000440. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Judson C. Brandt, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99471T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000421-CA BANK OF EASTMAN, Plaintiff, vs. MARK GRIFFIS, THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida Nonprofit Corporation, and RONDA HOBBY f/k/a RONDA HOBBY WALKER, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: Lot 1, Block B, 300 Ocean Mile Phase 1, subdivision as per plat or map thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, at page 26, of the public records of Franklin County, Florida. Also known as 1760 East Gulf Beach Drive, B-1, St. George Island, Florida 32328. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, in the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 27, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of June, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99519T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2012-CA-000298 PHH Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs. Palmer H. Philyaw; Unknown Spouse of Palmer H. Philyaw; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2012CA-000298 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff and Palmer H. Philyaw are defendant (s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on July 31, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 11, 12, 13, 14 AND 15, BLOCK 261, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK M, PAGE 436 IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOW IN GENERAL USE, SAID LAND BEING SITUATE IN AT PORTION OF THE AFORESAID CITY DESCRIBED AS “GREATER APALACHICOLA”. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 N Federal Hwy, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-245101 FC01 PHH July 3, 10, 2014 99483T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USE PERMIT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for a water use permit has been received by the Northwest Florida Water Management District: Application number I 07481 filed 06/24/2014 Carrabelle Properties, Ltd., 8340 Meadow Road, Suite 226, Dallas, TX 75231 Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal of 315,000 gallons per day from Lake #2 for Landscape Irrigation use by an existing facility. General withdrawal location(s) in Franklin County: T07S, R03W, Sec. 5 Interested persons may submit written comments/ objection or submit a written request for the notice of proposed agency action (NOPAA) regarding the application by writing to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Havana, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only to persons who have filed such requests. A NOPAA must be requested in order to be advised of further proceedings and any public hearing date. Written comments/ objection or NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00 p.m. eastern time on July 17, 2014. No further public notice will be provided regarding this application. Publication of this notice constitutes constructive notice of the permit application to all substantially affected persons. Pub: July 3, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 GUN SHOWJuly 5 & 6 Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL92777 to 56654 EducationEarly Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and organizational skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34293147 Text FL93147 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler CaregiversThis position provide quality early care and education to children age 0-3 years. CDA plus training and experience in working with young children accepted along with the willingness to receive additional training. Pay scale: $10.10-$12.70, plus excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34293148 Text FL93148 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34293190 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291812 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291811 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103Text FL86476 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. Available August 1 850-653-3838 Text FL92303 to 56654 Apalachicola : 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft, Open Plan, 1Br, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Secluded in Trees, 1/2 mile from Beach. $400 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL92051 to 56654 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat, AWD Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. Ultimate Off Road SUV $21,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Spot Advertising works!

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, July 3, 2014 Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact Th e Times To day (850) 653 -8 868 YO UR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE TH AN 120 YEARS YO UR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 Y EARS TH E T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicol a Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks Be autifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular Ba ya nd Br idge views with man yn ew upda te s. Re modeled ki tc hen (new ca binets ,c oun te rt ops ,s ink ,d isposal ,s tov e, dish wa sher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea tr ee ct iv ew indo w lm; 3l gB Rs with new mast er BA; priv ate oc ej ust o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2w alk -i nc losets .T his house is per fe ct fo re nt er taining with ah uge fr on tp or ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and wo od burning r eplac e. La ndsc ape has irriga tion we ll and na tiv ep lan ts .H igh ecienc yh ea t pump ,n ew ro of ,6a dditional in ro of insula tion. Sh immering Sa nds Re alt y STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-8 90-19 71 st ev e@st ev esislan d. com ww w. st ev esislan d. com ww w. 332C ookS tr eet .com Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. Su nr oom, scr eened &o pen por ches ,h ot tub o MBR suit e, lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho we ra nd gar den tub detached gar age ,g as r eplac e, gr anit ec oun te rt ops ,s tainless ki tc hen, wine co oler ,b uilt-in co rner ca binets .A menities include co mmunit y dock ,p ool ,t ennis co ur ts .M ain living ar ea &m ast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs fo rp riv ac yw /p riv ate por ch. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-1971 st ev e@st ev esisla nd .com ww w. 288m agnoliaba yd r. com www .st ev esis land .com MLS# 252123 $369,000 St. George Island FI RS TT IE RC OR NE RL OT Un ob st uct ab le vi ew ov er th e1 00 fo ot wi de co un ty be ac h eas em en tm ak es th is on eo ft he mo st so ug ht af te rb ui ld in g si te so nS t. Ge or ge Is la nd ," St re et To St re et "l ot ,h ig h&d ry el ev at ion ,b ik ep at ho nt he no rt hs id e, lo ca te da tt he co rn er of 4t ha nd Ea st Go rri eD ri ve 800-344-757 0 850-927-477 7 www .sgirealty .com Joh nS he lb y 850-899-5104 |8 50-545-5852 www .coasta lr eal tyi nfo.co m Se cl ud ed 1. 04 ac re lo tw it hp ret ty be ach .B ea ch ha ss ev er al sh al lo wa re as wi th sa nd ba rs an di sa gr ea tb ea ch fo rc hi ld re no r gr an dch il dre n. Th el ot is 46 8f td ee ps ot he re is pl en ty of ro om to bu il dy our be ac hc ot ta ge awa yf ro mt he noi se of Hw y9 8. Be ach fr on tag eo f1 02 .5 0f tp ro vi de sp le nt yo fu no bs tr uc te dv ie ws of th eb each and wa te r. 4518463 RAR EO PPOR TUNIT Y SHA UN S. DONAHOE To ow nb ay view 1907 Vic torian hom eo nl arg ec orner lot in south si de hi st or ic di st rict. Ta ll ceilings, four replace s, impressive fo yer and staircase, wido w sw alk, original woodwork reec ts period style and design through out. Priced to sel lq uic kly a t$ 450,00 0. Licensed Florid aR eal Esta te Broke r 86 Market St. Ap alachic ola, FL 850 .653 .83 30 MLS# 249989 $499,000 St. George Island LA RG EG UL FV IE WH OM E 5B Rp lu so f ce ,4B A, 2nd LR wi th we tb ar EL EV AT OR ,H uge Ki tc he n, La un dr y, Ne wS Sa pp li an ce s, fr es hl yp ai nt ed ,S cr ee ne dS pa Tu b, la nd sc ap ed on 2l ot s wi th pa lm tr ee s, un de rh ou se wo rk ar ea wi th si nk & st or ag e, St or mS hu tt er s, Ea st Pi ne Av en ue John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Up until Henry Fords cars came along July 4th was a miserable day for what animals as recrackers were commonly thrown at them? Chickens, Horses, Cows, Cats 2) Surveys say Roman candles are the most favorite type of reworks for the 4th with what the least favorite? Firecrackers, Smokeballs, Pinwheels, Snaps 3) Where is Rebildfest billed as the largest celebration of American independence held outside the U.S.? Germany, Denmark, Mexico, Australia 4) On July 4, 1848, President Polk laid the cornerstone of what famous structure? Lincoln Memorial, Library of Congress, Capitol building, Washington Monument 5) Thomas Jefferson and which other former president died July 4, 1826? George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson 6) On that same date of July 4, 1826, what noted American was born? Robert E. Lee, Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau 7) There are how many original copies of the Declaration of Independence still in existence today, not counting subsets? 7, 14, 19, 26 8) What famous American patriot was hung as a spy in 1776 by the British? Paul Revere, Nathan Hale, Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne 9) Whos been the only future President of the United States to be born on a July 4th? Jackson, Van Buren, Taft, Coolidge 10) Where did the Continental Congress sign the Declaration of Independence? Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Mount Vernon 11) Who was the rst President of the Continental Congress? Peyton Randolph, Roger Sherman, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin 12) At signing time the colonies were under which English King? George I, George III, Charles I, Charles III 13) Which colony had the most signers at 9? Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts 14) Which former president died July 4, 1831? Madison, Monroe, Tyler, Polk 15) Biblical Is the book of Freedomia in the Old or New Testament or neither? 16) In Galatians 5:1, Stand fast therefore in the what wherewith Christ hath made us free? Light, Liberty, Redemption, Resurrection 17) From John 8:32, And ye shall know the what, and it shall make you free? Word, Truth, Love, Forgiveness 18) How many times is the word independence mentioned in the King James version of the Bible? 0, 2, 11, 17 19) From what books 6:7 does it say, For he that is dead is freed from sin? Isaiah, Daniel, Mark, Romans 20) In Acts 22:28 who said, But I was free born? Paul, Bernice, Nicodemus, Phoebe ANSWERS: 1) Horses 2) Smokeballs 3) Denmark 4) Washington Monument 5) John Adams 6) Stephen Foster 7) 26 8) Nathan Hale 9) Coolidge 10) Philadelphia 11) Peyton Randolph 12) George III 13) Pennsylvania 14) Monroe 15) Neither 16) Liberty 17) Truth 18) 0 19) Romans 20) Paul Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com