The Apalachicola times

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00280

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, June 26, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM P hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8893 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The Franklin County School Board last week hired a veteran teacher and reading coach as the new principal of the Franklin County School. By unanimous consent, the board June 19 accepted the recommendation of Super intendent Nina Marks to hire Yvette Lern er, a former teacher in the district who now lives in Chipley. Marks said there had been about two dozen applicants to succeed Eric Bidwell as principal, and that a committee of the Panhandle Area Education Consortium, including Franklin Countys Nick OGrady, had whittled it down to ve applicants. Four of these were interviewed, and Marks selected Lerner. I would like to express my support for the incoming principal of Franklin County Schools, Marks said. Mrs. Yvette Le rner has been a friend of Franklin County for many years, conducting professional development workshops to improve our mastery of curriculum. Faculty and staff are very familiar with her. Mrs. Lerner has the talent for enhancing programs and us ing her leadership skills to make learning more exciting for the faculty and the stu dents they instruct. Bringing in Mrs. Le rner is a gain for Franklin County. Support staff offered 3-percent raise By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Teachers and support staff are expected to review a contract Monday that, if ratied, would give support staff a 3 percent raise, and teachers 1 percent, beginning July 1. The possible early summer ratication is a rarity with annual contracts between Board OKs new principal FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOLS See RAISE A5 See PRINCIPAL A5 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A construction crew last week expanded Carrabelles 10 Mile Reef system, further en hancing shing and diving opportunities in and around Dog Island. Alan Richardson, who chairs the Tallahas see-based non-prot Organization of Articial Reefs group, said the deployment took place June 17 and 18, funded by a mix of state grants, matching funds and private donations. The new reef components, named in mem ory of young men whose life were tragically cut short, expand to the south the 10 Mile Reef complex, about three miles offshore of Dog Island. Origins of the reef date back to 1999 when a group of divers from Thomasville, Georgia created the Rose City Reef, the rst in a com plex series of smaller patch reefs that have grown over the years with additional portions, each named in the memory of a shing or div ing enthusiast who loved the Gulf waters. The most recent of these, the popular Robbys Reef was christened in May, 2011, and includes a 12-ton metal sculpture. Costs are defrayed each year by supporters of the Robby Redding family, through a fundraising event on Robbys traditional birthday after Christmas. Last weeks deployment included an en hancement of Robbys Reef, which added another eight articial reef units to the patch Where the reefs are The following are deployment coordinates for the new reefs. Camp 1 Latitude North 29 39.169 Longitude West 084 30.000 Camp 2 Latitude North 29 39.229 Longitude West 084 30.000 Camp 3 Latitude North 29 39.390 Longitude West 084 30.000 S PECIAL TO T HE T IMES These 15-foot tall reefs are now public coordinates in the Carrabelle 10 Mile Reef project, named after Dixon Camp. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The National Weather Service said there is no evidence that a tor nado touched down in Carrabelle on Sunday. When strong winds swept across his property downing limbs and trees on Sunday, Shawn Bunnell grabbed his 6-year old daughter and sheltered in a central bathroom. Jeff Fournier, a forecaster for the National Weath er Service said Bunnell did the wise thing. Bunnell said he did not see a twist er but believed the pattern of damage in his Avenue J neighborhood indi cated a small tornado had touched down. The forecaster said his ofce didnt receive any reports of torna does in Franklin County over the weekend and there was no evidence of cyclonic activity on radar. He said the National Weather Service issued a warning of possible strong winds and thunderstorms. What we did receive were re ports of trees and limbs downed by strong straight-line gusts all across the warning area, said Fournier. While no gusts stronger than 40 mph were recorded, Fournier said small severe disturbances known as microbursts are difcult to record be cause they are short and often on a very small scale. Bunnell said falling limbs damaged a childs plastic playhouse, dented his truck, scratched his car and ipped a carport in his yard. Fournier said his agency received an unusual number of reports of dam age to light structures like carports on Sunday. On Monday, as rain continued to pour down, Bunnell said a crew from the Franklin Correctional Institution removed fallen limbs from his yard and cut up trees in the public right of way. In the summer you get micro bursts you cant predict, Fournier said. There are some days you can say they are more likely than normal. He said trees are more likely to fall when they are rooted in water-satu rated soil. Lightning reportedly damaged several television sets in the county and businesses in both Carrabelle and Apalachicola reported damage to Scary weather sweeps across county See WEATHER A5 Reef renewal OAR expands Dog Islands underwater structure Super Reef prior to deployment See REEFS A5 VOL 129 I SS U E 9 Opinion ............ A4 Society ........... A10 Faith ............. A11 Outdoors .......... A12 Tide Chart ......... A12 Sports ............ A13 Classieds ...... A17-A19 ANERR to host July 1 meeting The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is hosting a public meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 1, at the reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Local and regional stakeholders are invited to provide input to state and federal entities about what the reserve does and what stakeholders think the reserve should do that it doesnt. Written comments on reserve programs are encouraged, and participation at the public meeting is not required for submission. Written comments should be sent to Carrie Hall NOAA/ NOS/OCRM, via e-mail to Carrie.Hall@noaa.gov no later than July 12. Paddle Out on July 3 Kickoff the Independence Day Celebration at Riverfront Park with a patriotic paddle event on Thursday, July 3 from 9 a.m. to noon. Join the Forgotten Coast Paddle Club as they paddle down the Apalachicola River in a three mile easy paddle. Interested paddlers will meet at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum and be shuttled upriver where they will launch and paddle down to Riverfront Park to join the celebration beginning at the park at noon. Paddlers are encouraged to y redm white and blue colors so bring your ags! Need a kayak? Apalachicola Maritime Museum (653-2500) or Journeys of St. George Island (927-3259) will provide a kayak, paddle and personal otation device for $20. Plan for a two to three-hour trip depending on your paddling level. Bring sunscreen, water and snack. Headed to state, A13

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The slate of candidates for the upcoming primary and general elections is now set, with one election already decided. Because he was unopposed in his bid to succeed the retiring Jimmy Gander as school board member for District 4, Stacy Kirvin, 52, of 142 Deer Patch Rd., Apalachicola will assume that ofce following the general election in November. Kirvin spent a mere $16.50 in his bid to qualify last week for the ofce. He invested $15 in a voter registration list for the district, and $1.50, or 10 cents each, to have the 15 names on his petition certied for the nonpartisan election. The other race in District 4, for county commissioner, promises to be an exciting one, as incumbent Joseph Smokey Parrish, 52, 108 Long Rd. Apalachicola, is facing a challenge from Royce S. Rolstad III, 31, 119 Hicks Lane, Apalachicola. The two are squaring off in the Aug. 26 Democratic primary, where winner takes all. Because there are no declared Republican candidates for the ofce, the primary will be a universal one, meaning members of either party, or those without party afliation, or those afliated with a small party, all are eligible to vote. As of Monday, the total number of registered voters, 1,213, in this district comprised 899 Democrats, 211 Republicans, and 103 either from other parties or without afliation. CONTESTED ELECTIONS ON THE EASTERN END Both the county commission and school board races are being contested on the eastern end of the county, in District 2 encompassing portions of Carrabelle, Lanark Village and Alligator Point. County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, 58, 4901 Jeff Sanders Road, Carrabelle, is not facing an opponent in the Democratic primary, so she goes directly to the Nov. 4 general election. There, she will face the winner from the two Republican candidates, Mark Nobles, 57, 10-5 W Pine St., Lanark Village, and William Snyder, 55, 2332 Enabob Street, Carrabelle, who are vying to unseat her. The Aug. 26 Republican primary in District 2 will be decided only by those who are registered with the GOP. Registration for the primary ends July 28. Nobles and Snyder will be seeking to gain a majority of the districts Republicans, who numbered 513 as of June 16. The district also contains 813 Democrats, 198 without party afliation and 45 registered with small parties, but none of these will be eligible to vote in the GOP primary for county commissioner. All these 1,569 voters, however, will have a say in which of the three declared candidates for the nonpartisan school board seat in District 2 emerges as the victor. At the primary, the voters will decide among incumbent David Hinton, 78, 112 Hinton Street, Carrabelle, challenger Wilburn Ray Messer, 55, 166 Sanborn Road, Carrabelle; and challenger Pamela Marshall, 56, 1989 River Bend Plantation Road, Carrabelle. If one of the three earns a majority of the votes cast, 50 percent plus one, then they will be declared the winner. Otherwise the top two candidates will then square off at the general election. While there are no local candidate elections in the three other districts, there will be plenty to decide on a state level at both the primary and general elections, including a school referendum in November that will decide whether the superintendent will remain as an elected ofce, or will change in 2016 to a manner in which the head of the schools is appointed by the school board. A countywide majority vote is necessary to change the way that ofce is lled. Registration in the other three districts, as of Monday, were as follows. District 1, including Eastpoint and St. George Island: 1051 Democrats, 542 Republicans and 172 other, for a total of 1,765 registered voters. District 3, including the Hill area north of U.S. 98, 959 Democrats, 144 Republicans, and 102 other, for a total of 1,205 registered voters. District 5, which includes portions of Carrabelle and Eastpoint, 939 Democrats, 324 Republicans and 171 other, for a total of 1,435 registered voters. All told, there are 7,187 registered voters in the county, including 4,661 Democrats, 1,734 Republicans, 649 with no party afliation and 143 others. Early voting in the primary opens Aug. 11 and runs through Aug. 23. Nor th Fl or id a Me di ca l Cente rs In c. MEDICAL CENTE R E ast poi nt as tp oi nt Me di cal Ce nt er is pr ou d to an no un ce An n Ru bi n, PA an d An ge l Co rt es, MD will be pr ov idin g he al th ca re se rv ices in cl udin g we ll wo me n s se rv ice s at Ea st po in t Me di cal Ce nt er be gi nni ng Ju ne 30t h. To sc he du le an ap po in tm en t, pl ea se ca ll 850-670-8 585. PU BL IC NO TI CE TH E FR ANKL IN CO UN TY AD VIS OR Y BO AR D OF AD JU ST ME NT WIL L HOL D A PU BL IC HE AR ING ON WE DNE SD AY JUL Y 2, 20 14 AT 10 :0 0 A. M. IN TH E CO UN TY CO MMIS SI ON ME ET ING RO OM OF TH E FR AN KL IN CO UN TY CO UR TH OU SE ANN EX TO CO NS ID ER TH E FO LL OW IN G VA RI AN CE S, AP PE AL S AND SP EC IAL EX CE PT ION S: 1 -C ONS ID ER AT IO N OF A RE QU ES T FO R A VA RI AN CE TO CO NS TR UC T A SE AW AL L AN D RI P RA P RE VE TM EN T WI TH IN THE CR IT I CA L HAB IT AT ZO NE ON PR OP ER TY DE SC RI BE D AS 15 27 EA ST GULF BE AC H DR IV E, LO T 6, TR AC T 50 EA ST EN D, ST GE OR GE IS LA ND FR AN KL IN CO UN TY FL OR ID A. RE QU ES T SU BMI TT ED BY GA RL ICK EN VI RO NME NT AL AS SO CI AT ES IN C. AG EN T FO R BR UC E GR AD Y, OW NE R. 2 -C ONS ID ER AT IO N OF AN AP PE AL TO AN AD MI NIS TR AT IV E DE CI SIO N TO DE NY A BU IL DI NG PE RM IT FO R CO NS TR UC TIO N OF A SI NG LE FA MIL Y DW EL LIN G AN D TO DI SC ON NE CT EL EC TRI C SE RV IC E TO TH IS LO T. TH IS PR OP ER TY IS DE SCR IB ED AS 69 6 EA ST BA YS HOR E DR IV E, LO T 13 BL OC K 35 UN IT 4, ST GE OR GE IS LA ND FR AN KL IN CO UN TY FL OR ID A. AP PE AL SUB MI TT ED BY JOHN CL ARK AN D DI AN E WY AT T, OW NE RS TH E BO AR D OF CO UN TY CO MMI SS ION ER S AC TI NG AS TH E BO AR D OF AD JU ST ME NT WI LL AD DRE SS TH ES E RE QU EST S AT TH EI R ME ET ING ON JU LY 16 20 14 *P er so ns wi sh in g to co mme nt ma y do so in pe rs on or in wr it in g to th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Pl an nin g & Zo nin g Dep ar tm en t, 34 Fo rbes St re et Su it e 1, Ap al ac hi co la FL 32 32 0. Tr ans ac ti ons of th is he ari ng wi ll no t be re co rde d, pe rs ons wi sh in g to re co rd th e pr oc ee di ng s mu st mak e th e ne ces sar y ar ra nge me nt s fo r re co rd in g. Banks joins Scotts Small Business Coalition Eastpoint attorney Kristy Branch Banks is among the rst round of small business owners across the state who will make up the Small Business for Scott Coalition for Gov. Rick Scotts bid for reelection. Earlier this month, the campaign announced the formation of the coalition as the National Federation of Independent Businesses publicly announced their endorsement of Scotts reelection. Jerry Pierce, chairman of the NFIB Leadership Council is serving as statewide chair of the coalition. Ive seen rst-hand Governor Scotts strong commitment to free enterprise and getting our economy back on track, said Pierce. Having such a vocal advocate of the small business community in the Governors Ofce has no doubt improved the business climate for Floridas job creators. The coalition membership includes 105 businesses from all over Florida. The coalition is represented in every county of the state. Election BRIEF Candidates qualify for upcoming elections 2014 HEATHER RILE Y | Special to The Times Stacey Kirvin, right, who is unopposed for election to the District 4 school board seat, lls out paperwork with Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott. CHER YL SANDERS MARK NOBLES BILL SNYDER DAVID HINTON PAM MARSHALL RA Y MESSER SMOKEY PARRISH ROYCE ROLSTAD

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The Times | A3 Thursday, June 26, 2014 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Spindles and railing damaged by a vandal at the Lafayette Park gazebo. Apalachicola police have identied the person who broke spindles and part of the railing on the Lafayette Park gazebo. On Monday, Chief Bobby Varnes said he knows who damaged the ornamental structure and is considering what charges to bring. Varnes said contrary to rumor, the spindles were not damaged by skateboarders. He said the vandal is a male, a minor, and the damage was done over a period of two weeks. He said the boy is not yet in custody but police have spoken to him and his family about the crime. WA TER SA FE TY IN VE ST IG AT IO N AT TE NTI ON : Ap al ac hic ol a Wa te r Cu st om er s In Ma y 20 13 th e Ci ty of Ap al achi co la Wat er Sy st em no ti ed re sid en ts th at th eir wa te r fa il ed to me et st an d ar ds se t by th e Fl or ida De pa rt me nt o f En vi ro nm en ta l Pro te ct io n an d th e EP A. Du ri ng rou t in e sa fet y te st in g, th e Ci ty of Ap al ach ic ol a fo un d le ve ls of t ri halome tha ne s (T HM s) mor e tha n 50% higher tha n esta bl is he d ma xi mu m co nt ami na nt le ve ls fo r dr in ki ng wa te r. TH Ms ca n al so be in ha le d an d ab so rb ed th ro ug h th e sk in Re se ar che rs di sc ove re d th at bloo d co nc en tr ati on s of TH Ms ro se 5to 15 -f ol d fol lo wi ng su ch ro ut in e ac ti vi ti es as sh ow er in g, ba thi ng an d ha nd wa sh in g. Of te n fo un d in in du st ri al so lv en ts an d re fr iger an ts TH Ms ar e co ns id er ed ca rc in og enic an d ha ve bee n li nk ed to nu me rou s li fe th re at eni ng he al th ef fec ts : Li ve r or Ki dn ey Fa il ur e Li ve r or Ki dn ey Ca nc er Co lo n or Re ct al Ca nc er Bl ad de r Ca nc er Ad ve rs e Pr eg na nc y Ou tc ome s Se ri ou s Ce nt ra l Ner vo us Sy st em Da mage If yo u or a lo ve d one ha s re ce iv ed su ch a di ag nos is or a fa mil y me mb er ha s die d fr om one of the se co nd it io ns an d if yo ur wa te r is pr ov id ed by the Ci ty of Ap al ac h ic ol a, pl eas e co nt ac t ou r r m fo r a fr ee co ns ul ta tion PA NAMA CI TY 180 080 085 39 wa lb or sk y. co m So ur ce s: U. S. En viro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on Ag en cy Sa fe Dr ink in g Wa te r Inf or mat ion Sy st em (S DW IS ) Vi olat io n Re por t, Ci ty of Ap alachic ola re por t cr ea te d 4/2 2/ 20 14 ba se d on data ex tr ac te d on 2/ 10 /2 01 4; Na ti ona l In st it ut es of He alt h, T ap Wa te r an d Tr ih al omet ha ne s: Fl ow of Conce rn s Con tin ue s, En viro nm en ta l He al th Pe rs pe ct iv es July 20 05 11 3( 7) : A4 74 ; T ri ha lomet ha ne s in Dr ink in gwa te r, WH O Gu ide lin es fo r Dr ink in gwa te r Qu al it y, WH O/ SD E/ WS H/ 03 .0 4/ 64 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 16 Lacey J. Amerson, 18, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked, and eeing or attempting to elude a law enforcement ofcer (CPD) JUNE 19 Charles M. Glass, 31, Carrabelle, possession of a controlled substance and violation of probation (FCSO) Reginald D. Giddens, 35, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Timothy J. Marshall, 24, Apalachicola, two counts of sale or possession of a controlled substance (APD) JUNE 20 Jonathan G. Carmichael, 27, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 21 David D. Hartman, 35, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) JUNE 22 Kevin M. Schoelles, 29, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked, and leaving the scene of an accident with property damage (APD) Roland M. Schoelles, 49, Apalachicola, driving while license revoked habitual (APD) JUNE 23 Misty L. Morales, 40, Carrabelle, possession of cannabis and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Several people were injured when a set of exterior stairs collapsed Saturday at a Gulf front home in the St. George Island Plantation. At around 7:30 a.m. St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department rst responders were called to a house at 1940 Nautilus Drive. When they arrived at the scene, they found individuals with injuries suffered when an outdoor staircase collapsed. The visitors had gathered on the stairs for one last vacation photograph before departing for home. Fire Chief Jay Abbott said 10-people were on the stairs when they fell. He said three were patients transported to Weems Memorial Hospital by ambulance, and two were carried in private vehicles. Information on the nature of the injuries was not available, but none were said to be life threatening. According to county records, the four-bedroom home was built in 1990. It sold in 2010 to the current owner for approximately $1.3 million. A local realtor said the home was extensively renovated in 2002-3. Eastpoint under boil water notice Special to the Times A boil water notice went into effect Monday morning for Eastpoint residents/ The Eastpoint Wa ter and Sewer Depart ment said water main on Franklin Street was broken by a road crew, which reduced pressure in the system. When the pressure falls below a certain point, a boil water notice is required until the water can be tested for bacteria. Any water used for drinking or cooking should be brought to a rolling boil for one min ute. The precautionary boil water notice was to remain in effect until the tests on water samples show the water is safe to drink. The water depart ment said they hoped wa ter sample results would be returned on Wednes day, June 25. If you have any ques tions, call the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District at 670-8177. Law Enforcement Arrest REPORT VISITORS INJURED IN STAIRWA Y COLLAPSE TR U LIA .CO M Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES LAF A YETTE GAZEBO VANDALIZED

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINI O N www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 A Section As I put my kids to bed I wonder what lies ahead Changes Comin On Written by Dean Dillon, Buddy Cannon, and Jimmy Darrell and recorded by Alabama Some time back I was asked to speak to an investment class at the University of Alabama. The experience was invigorating. Theres nothing like being around tens of thousands of young people enjoying the best years of their lives on a gorgeous spring day. Author Bill Bryson said the same about living in Hanover, N.H., but they dont conclude classes at Dartmouth with a resounding Roll Tide. The presentation focused on how our team makes investment decisions, how these choices differ for varying client objectives, and methods for establishing a productive balance of equities and xed income instruments in portfolios. The students questions afterwards centered around these same issues: investment strategies, inquiries involving particular securities, and how decisions are reached on market buys and sells. As I returned to Florida, I realized that while we had engaged in a theoretical discussion regarding investment choices, no one had asked about how to build an investment advisory rm as a business. There were no questions about client services apart from portfolio management. No inquiries about the costs of ofce space or software. No questions about payroll or employee benets. What the students really needed was not only a presentation on investing, but insights into the entrepreneurial experience. Somewhere around 75 percent of all self-made millionaires in America are business owners. As the U.S. job market devolves, this number is likely to increase. The days when someone handed you a solid paycheck with benets and a pension right out of college are rapidly disappearing. The ability of a young person to identify a need and ll it with a startup enterprise may represent the lifeblood of our economy in coming decades. Unemployment is now at 6.3 percent. This is down signicantly from 2009, when our unemployment rate stood at 10 percent. Yet, our domestic economic landscape is in trouble. There are still 1.49 million construction jobs missing, write Josh Boak and Chris Rugaber in an article entitled U.S. Job Market Recovers Losses Yet Appears Weaker. Factories have 1.65 million fewer workers Government payrolls have shrunk, taking middle class pay with them. Local school districts have 255,400 fewer employees. The U.S. Postal Service has shed 194,700 employees. Globalization and automation are wiping out millions of traditional employment opportunities. One of the best skills that a young person, or any person, can have is the ability to create and sustain ones own business. Small business has always been and remains the backbone of the U.S. economy. Creating a successful one may be the prime path to wealth for many younger Americans. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a FeeOnly and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. Future of the American workplace MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Page 4 By BR A D BUCK Special to The Times GA IN E SVI LLE Many parents presume their children will shun whole grains because they think they dont like them, a University of Florida researcher says, but a new UF study may start to debunk that idea. If whole grains are offered, kids eat them, according to a new study by researchers at UFs Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Specically, former graduate student Allyson Radford and two faculty members found children ate wholeand rened-grain foods in equal amounts. We tried to choose foods we thought kids would enjoy, such as cereal bars, macaroni and cheese and SunChips and found that they ate the ready-to-eat snack foods the most, said Radford, one of the studys authors. We were interested to see if they would eat the whole-grain foods as much as the rened-grain foods, and so we were pleasantly surprised that they would eat the same amount whether the food was whole or rened. Radford co-wrote the paper with assistant professor Wendy Dahl and professor Bobbi Langkamp-Henken, all of whom are in the food science and human nutrition department. The study was published online last week by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Eating whole grains, combined with a healthy diet, may reduce the risk of heart disease and help with weight management, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Examples of whole-grain foods include popcorn, oats, whole wheat bread and brown rice. Rened grains, enriched and fortied with nutrients, include foods such as white rice and white bread. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans call for at least half the grain consumers eat to be whole grains, and they urge adolescents to consume ve to seven ounces of grains daily, with at least half being whole grains. National surveys suggest adolescents consume far less, about 1 ounce, or the grain contained in one slice of bread. Federal dietary guidelines for the 2012-13 school year increased the whole grain required in school lunches. Starting this fall, schools must offer only whole-grain rich products. The new rules requiring more whole grains in school lunches should result in adolescents eating more of them, Dahl said, but many parents believe their kids wont eat whole grains. General Mills funded a broad study on the impact of whole grains on immunity. As part of the study, Radford wanted to know if children could meet the 2010 dietary guidelines for whole grains. For the study, 83 students in a Florida middle school were randomly assigned to receive either wholeor rened-grain foods over a six-week period in 2010. Of those, 42 students were in the rened grain group, while 41 were in the whole-grain group. Participants and their families were given rened-grain or wholegrain pasta, rice, bread and other foods to eat at home. And they were given wholeand rened-grain snack foods to eat at school. Researchers interviewed students weekly to see what fruits, vegetables and grains they ate in the previous 24 hours. Before the study, participants were eating about one ounce of whole grain per day. During the study, students in both groups reported eating more than six ounces of grains each day, and those given whole grains reported more than half their grain intake came from whole grains, meeting the 2010 dietary guidelines. Snacks served at school were the most popular grain foods the kids ate. Encouraging consumption of whole-grain foods that require little to no preparation may be the most effective means of increasing whole grain intake at home, said Radford, now a UF research study coordinator in food science and human nutrition. Brad Buck, a writer for the University of Florida, can be reached at bradbuck@u.edu. UF: Kids will eat whole grains By JOHN D UNN Special to The Times GA IN E SVI LLE Consumer sentiment among Floridians rose to a postrecession high in June, climbing four points to 82, according to a new University of Florida survey. Because the condence level has been wavering between the upper 70s and low 80s for more than a year, we did not expect this jump, said Chris McCarty, director of UFs Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. That surprise comes as Florida experiences a slowdown in housing starts and a rise in unemployment. All ve components comprising the index increased. Survey takers assessment of being nancially better off now than a year ago rose four points to 75, its highest level since the end of the Great Recession. Their expectations of improved personal nances one year from now increased ve points to 81. Respondents indicated they were also upbeat about the national economy over the coming year, registering a rise of seven points to 81. Their outlook for the next ve years rose two points to 78. Meanwhile, consensus on whether now is a good time to buy big household appliances rose four points to 94, another post-recession record. Junes burst of optimism was most evident among younger Floridians and those in low-income households. The current personal nances component among households with incomes under $30,000 a year shot up 18 points. The uptick is puzzling. This demographic is unlikely to benet from record levels in the stock market and price gains in the housing market that typically affect higher income households, McCarty said. And because of a lingering effect of the Great Recession, there has also been delay in household formation among younger Americans who have had difculty nding well-paying jobs and those saddled with student loans, he said. Something else may explain the optimism, McCarty said. Gas prices have fallen in the past month, but the Iraq crisis could change that trend. The state has also added jobs over the past year, though theyre mostly low-paying ones. Many of them are associated with leisure and hospitality, McCarty said. Those are the kinds that will be lled by people who live in lower income households. Although Floridas increase in consumer condence is welcomed news, McCarty said, it is worth remembering that at the end of two previous recessions occurring in 1990-91 and 2001, consumer condence was 89. In contrast, at the end of the Great Recession in June 2009 the index was 69. We are now ve years out from the Great Recession, and consumer condence stands at 83, McCarty said, but ve years after the rst two recessions, consumer condence was at 91 and 93. Clearly something is different about this recovery compared to previous recoveries. McCarty also noted that ve years after the end of the recession in the early 1990s unemployment stood at 5.4 percent, and ve years following the recession in the early 2000s it was 3.4 percent. Unemployment today is 6.3 percent after ve years. Conducted from June 1-21, the UF study reects the responses of 425 individuals representing a demographic cross-section of Florida. The index used by UF researchers is benchmarked to 1966, which means a value of 100 represents the same level of condence for that year. The lowest index possible is a 2; the highest is 150. John Dunn, a writer for the University of Florida, can be reached at dunnj@embarqmail.com. UF: Consumer condence at post-recession high GIV E HELP WHERE HELP IS N EE D E D If you live in Carrabelle, you have ate at Hog Wild. You can think of the place, and picture Linda and Ken Lapaz in your mind, Southern down home friendliness and a phenomenal buffet. Anytime there is a funeral, they are the only place in town that will provide food without being asked and always free of charge. They are quick to help anyone, or donate gift certicates for local fundraisers. Well now its our turn to help them. Ken Lapaz has cancer, a rare cancer, plasmacytoma. He needs $15,000 to go to Shands and receive treatment. There is an account set up at Centennial Bank under Linda Lapaz FBO Ken Lapaz. You can donate at any location; no amount is too small. Be a blessing to them, lets help Ken get the help he needs. When you go in to eat there, say a prayer over him and his wife. They need those too. Thank you for your support in advance. Laura O N eal TIM E TO CLO S E S I KE S C UT In response to the June 5 article about the oyster harvest being cut back (see Cuts in store for summer oyster harvest, pg. A1), if low river ow is in fact the new normal, it would make sense to help the problem by reducing the amount of saltwater that comes into the bay. This could be accomplished overnight by lling in Sikes Cut. Few important boats use this cut anymore, and the few that do have other routes to the Gulf. Whatever the reasons for dredging this cut back in the 1950s, none are as important as restoring the balance of salt and fresh water upon which the oyster beds were created and have reproduced for thousands of years. With less freshwater coming down the river, its time to have less saltwater coming in from the Gulf. Its time to close Sikes Cut. R ick D onahoe Yellow Springs, Ohio Eastpoint SA ND C RAB D EFE NDS CO N GRE SSM A N Dear Cus, did you see the letter in The Times from the lady that is supporting Gwen Graham and Nancy Pelosi for Congress? (See Southerland salvo just Tea Party extremism pg. A4, June 5, 2014 Times) My Uncle Skeeter who is very smart says he believes the writer is qualied to replace Susan Rice on Sunday morning talk shows, whatever that means. Did you see that part where she called our letterwriting friend Willie Norred a surrogate ack? I had to ask my brother-in-law, Shorty, what that meant. You know, Shorty is smart too. Shorty says its somebody that preaches every day of the week except Sunday on subjects ranging from Save Our Bay to Why Butteries Fly, and if you want to know why butteries y, go to your computator and click on Charlie Crist, whatever that means. I didnt get that part where she says that our congressman dont speak nicely about women. How could that be? The man has been married to his high school sweetheart for nearby 30 years and they have four girl children. Thats as silly as saying Gen. Dwight Eisenhower didnt like soldiers! Think about it! Folks sure claim lots of Rights I didnt know about. Some call these people Progressive. Shortys twin brother, Stumpy, says Progressives believe that these Rights would have been in our Constitution but they ran out of ink. Think about it! Ive had my say but I will leave you with this advice, save your wooden nickels. You never know when you may need one to call a taxi. Think about it! Sand C rab Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 26, 2014 reef, as well as creation of the Dixon Camp memo rial reef, about two-tenths of a mile further south of Robbys. Both the Camp and Redding families of the St. Teresa Beach community lost sons at young ages and approached OAR early on about donating funds in or der to memorialize them. OAR also had the support of the Thornal family, who lost their 19-year-old son Price last Easter in a trag ic trafc accident. Richardson said the deployment, conducted by Walter Marine, out of Orange Beach, Alabama, included three Super Reefs, large concrete and limestone prefabricated reef structures, that tower 15 feet above the Gulf sea oor in 60 feet of water. The placement of the Su per Reef forms is framed with 10 eight-foot tall reef structures known as Florida Specials, which incorporate native Florida limestone as part of their makeup. All total, this project will utilize three Super Reefs, and 30 Flori da Specials. Walter Marines web site says Florida Lime stone rock is comprised of ancient clam shells and matches a natural reef in both PH and substrate. Used previously in boulder form for articial reefs, Walter said it developed a patented process to embed the rock into the concrete reef surface, and that bor ing organisms that dwell on articial reefs cannot survive on a concrete reef but easily make the Flor ida Limestone reef their home. Richardson said the deployment costs about $125,000, paid for by a $55,000 grant from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis sion Division of Marine Fisheries Articial Reefs Program; a $15,000 match from the city of Carrabelle that came from OAR; and about $47,000 in additional private donations. Funds from the Big Bend Saltwater Classic have helped OAR complete its mission. State and fed eral funds come from a fee tacked on to recreational shing licenses, and from excise taxes that people pay on boats, motors, tack le, and the like. We could not have been able to make this reef proj ect a reality without the support of the city of Car rabelle, namely City Ad ministrator Courtney Mil lender, said Richardson. The city appreciates the increased opportunities for tourism that a project of this magnitude brings. It has been reported that for every dollar spent in reef development, $138 in tourism dollars are re turned back to the coastal communities. The state grant came af ter more than $1 million in requests came in for a halfmillion dollars in available grant funds, and Franklin and Wakulla counties each received $55,000. The project envisioned for the City of St. Marks is a realignment and en largement of the St Marks Reef, rst deployed in 1964. OAR, through the City of St. Marks, will be deploying over 75 prefab reef modules in a depth of 20 feet, and is also match ing $15,000 for this effort. OAR has submitted the grant paperwork to the FWC, and we are cur rently moving this project through the proper chan nels, said Richardson. He said re-permitting the reef expansion, after the original permit expired in 2011, was a lengthy pro cess, but OAR eventually secured approval form the Army Corps of Engineers. It took three years to repermit, Richardson said. Thats the hardest part, dealing with the Corps. Theyre awful. He said OAR had hoped to secure a contractor from Florida, but only Walter Marine, the largest deploy er of articial reefs in the nation, bid. Theres no body in our area thats do ing this, said Richardson. He said OAR, a com pletely volunteer group, is working with marine en thusiasts in Apalachicola to expand the reef off of George Island to the eats of Bob Sikes Cut, and per haps one in shallower wa ter off of Apalachicola. We got to get it permitted and it takes forever, Richard son said. He said they are also trying to permit a reef in shallower waters off Dog Island, perhaps in 25 to 30 feet deep waters. It would be closer to shore for smaller boats, Richardson said. A lot of people are downsizing and fuel costs are so much. Were targeting more in shore activity. He said by building one off Apalachicola in state waters, there would be more snapper habitat clos er to shore, and shermen could take advantage of a longer state season for the prized food sh. We have to make sure were not in shrimpers lanes, or sea turtle habi tat, Richardson said. We have to go through all the permitting obstacles. While articial reefs are popular with divers and shermen, they are not without their detractors. Some, such as the Ocean Conservancy, oppose their construction, contending that they exacerbate prob lems with overshing by concentrating large popu lations of sh in one area. In addition, they argue that there are too many ques tion marks as to the effect these structures have on the marine environment. the school board and the employees. These have tra ditionally been approved just prior to the Christmas break, or even later, and are retroactive back to July 1. Catherine Wood, presi dent of the Franklin County Teacher Association, said talks began in early May and that the employees team also included FCTA vice-president Jamie Du hart, FCTA treasurer Eli nor Mount-Simmons and Tammy Sasnett president, and Joy Towns, vice-presi dent, of the Franklin Edu cational Support Personnel Association (FESPA) Representing the school district were Shannon Venable, nance ofcer, and Tallahassee attorney Leonard Dietzen, the chief negotiator. Wood said the sides have tentatively agreed to raises for teachers and support staff, pending ratication. Teachers would get 1 per cent and support personnel 3 percent. The teachers were for tunate to have money from Tallahassee last year that totaled 5 percent of their incomes, Wood said. The support staff got nothing because the county was not in a position to offer anything. We went to bargaining determined that support staff needed to be respect ed for the jobs that they do and the best way the coun ty could do that is offering a raise, she said. Wood said the contract to be presented Monday night at the school would be for all employees, the approximately 80 teachers and 50 support personnel, not just union members. We are the bargaining agent but we bargain for all staff, not just our mem bers, she said. All are encouraged to come to this meeting. Never before has this been done, a summer rati cation vote, she said. She said the proposed contract also features new language that relates to the evaluation documenta tion. She said it offers stip ulations for pre and post conferencing with teach ers for observation and evaluations. In 2014-15 Florida is implementing new state guidelines that tie pay for performance, and rely more than before on evalu ations and test scores. She said a proposed change in health insurance could end Franklins status as one of the last counties in the state to fully cover the premium for individual coverage. Teachers have always had to cover the increased cost for family coverage. The proposal would cap the districts coverage of single person coverage at this years amount, and so employees would have to cover any increases in the cost of the plan. She said the district will continue to pay the premi um for dental coverage at 100 percent, which comes out to about $343 a year. Wood said the contract also makes changes to the differentiated pay scale, which covers supplemental for coaches, class sponsors, and other positions. If ratied, the band di rector would get the same supplemental as a head coach, and there would greater reimbursement for class sponsors, who would no longer have to share a single supplemental. Lerner, who is in Or lando this week receiving training on English Lan guage Arts formative as sessment tasks, said she was honored to have been named principal of the preKindergarten through 12th grade school. She taught second grade in Franklin County in 1985-86, after being hired by Janice Gordon at Brown Elementary School. Two hurricanes, one tropical depression and a success ful year of teaching later; I left to return to Washington County, she said. Lerner met and married the local Navy recruiter and taught in Washington County until 1990, when her rst son Matthew was born. The family moved when the Navy transferred Lerners husband to Brunswick, Maine and they lived there for four years during which time Lerners second son, Christian, was born. From there the Navy sent the family to China Lake, Cali fornia where they lived un til 1996. In 1996, Lerners hus band retired from the Navy and the family returned to Chipley, her hometown, and have lived there ever since. Lerner returned to teaching but in 2003 be came Washington Countys rst reading coach. In 2004 she began working with Reading First, part of the No Child Left Behind legis lation, and as a regional co ordinator for Reading First was assigned seven school districts, including Frank lin, where she worked with both Carrabelle and Brown Elementary. She had the opportunity to teach at the college level, at Chipola Junior College and Florida State Univer sity, and said she found teaching at this level to be extremely rewarding but missed working with teach ers and principals at the school level. In 2010 she returned to Washington County School District as district literacy specialist. In this role she worked with all schools in the district and supported literacy coaches, teach ers and principals as they moved the district initia tives forward. Lerner will have to earn her principal certication, and is enrolled in a program led by the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium to enable her to complete the necessary requirements for the needed certication. BARGAINING MEETING MONDAY All teachers and support staff are encouraged to attend an important bargaining meeting this Monday, June 30 at 5 p.m. in the lunch room of the Franklin County School. The meeting will discuss the recommendations of the bargaining agent of FCS. This informational meeting is endorsed by the executive boards of the Franklin County Teachers Association and Franklin Educational Support Personnel Association. There will be a vote taken at the end of this meeting. RAISE from page A1 PRINCIPAL from page A1 L OI S SW O B ODA | The Times Damage to a carport at the home of Shawn Bunnell off Avenue J in Carrabelle. computers, modems and credit card equipment. On Sunday, lights ickered in Eastpoint and on St. George Island, and parts of Apalachicola and Car rabelle were left without power for several hours. Cable service was cut for even longer in some areas. In addition to strong winds, storms on both Sun day and Monday brought abundant lightning and pounding rain. On Sun day, about a half-inch of rain was collected in Rod Gasches rain gauge in Carrabelle. On Monday, Gasches gauge collected just over an inch-and-ahalf. Based on radar ob servations, Fournier said Apalachicola received at least an inch of rain, and an area one mile west of Apalachicola received nearly 3.5 inches. The record for June 22 in Apalachicola, 3.33 inch es, was set in 1942. So far, in 2014, Apalachicola has received 30.44 inches of rain, 7.4 inches more than the normal rainfall of 23 inches based on records from 1981 to 2010. WEATHER from page A1 REEFS from page A1 SPECIA L TO T HE T IME S A reef is deployed from a barge. Charley Redding and Stewart Walter, contractor, next to an Eco-System Reef, four of which were deployed in the Robbys Reef Patch reef area Mrs. Lerner has the talent for enhancing programs and using her leadership skills to make learning more exciting for the faculty and the students they instruct. Bringing in Mrs. Lerner is a gain for Franklin County. Nina Marks Franklin County Schools superintendent

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 Ye s! Yo uc an be co me am em be r! If yo u, yo ur fa mi ly me mb er sa nd /o ry ou rb us in ess li ve ,w or k, wo rs hi p, or at te nd sc ho ol in Gu lf or Fr an kl in Co un ty or th eC it yo fM ex ic oB ea ch ,t he ny ou can be co me me mb er Ex pe ri en ce th eB es tF in do nt he Fo rg ot te nC oa st Wh en yo uj oi nE me ral dC oa st FC U, yo ub ec ome pa rt of ou rf am il y. Yo u re a me mb er ,n ot ac us to me r, an dy ou l ln ot ic et he di ff er en ce im me di at el y. Ou r co mm it me nt is to yo u, ou rm em be rs ,a nd we hop ey ou l lt ak ea dv an ta ge of ou r lo wl oa nr at es ,a sw el la s, our wi de ran ge of pr od uc ts an ds er vi ce s. We ar e he re fo ry ou 50 2W ood wa rd Av en ue ,P or tS ai nt Jo e, Ph :( 85 0) 22 711 56 10 1E as tR iv er Road ,W ew ah it ch ka ,P h: (8 50) 63 950 24 24 8U SH ig hw ay 98 ,E as tp oi nt ,P h: (8 50) 67 011 99 Em ai l: em er al dc oa st @f ai rp oi nt .n et www .e me ral dc oa st fc u. co m Th eF or go tt en Co as t s Co mm un it yC re di tU ni on fo r7 5Y ea rs

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, June 26, 2014 4518347 Celebrate this 4th of July the "RITE" Wa y! Visit our 3 Locations: 218 Hw y 71 S We wa hi tc hk a, FL (850) 639.2252 302 Ce ci l G. Co sti n Sr Bl vd. Po rt St Jo e, FL (850) 22 7.7099 117 Hw y 98 Ap ala chi co la FL (850) 653.8825 Remember to PICK UP YO UR PR ESCRIPTIONS BEFOR E THE FUN BEGINS! Wo rl d Cup He ad qu ar te rs Ev er y Ga me Ev er y Go al Be er an d Fo od Spe ci al s du ri ng th e ga me 111 2 EA ST GULF BEA CH DR. Luxurious beachfront home on beautiful St. George Island! Enjoy the wide east end beaches surrounded by the casual elegance of custom wainscoting, crown molding, elevator designer furnishings and sumptuous master baths with garden tubs. This wonder ful home has six bedrooms, three of them master suites, two separate living areas and a TV den. 18 15 EA ST GULF BEA CH DR Bayfront home on St. George Island with the best location on the island! The bay is right out your back door with great views from the living room, bedrooms and back por ch. And because the island is nar row in this area, you also have views of the Gulf from the front por ch. Hop on the paved bike path at the end of the drive and you're just 1/4 mile to the #3 beach in America at the SGI State Park! 535 WES T SA WY ER The best beach getaway ever! Light and bright, well-built with plenty of upgrades, including new top-level granite, new appliances, new HV AC, new water heater new whole-house water filter system, and new aerobic septic. Open floor plan with gorgeous kitchen, master bed and bath separated nicely from two guest bedrooms and shared bath. Amazing first tier beach home for sale on St. George Island! Right across the street from the beach with wonder ful beach views ever ywhere you look. This large home is for families to enjoy; 4 bedrooms on the first floor (2 w/ensuite baths and w/private doors to the beachfront deck, 2 share a jack-n-jill bath) plus wet bar & laundr y room. The top floor with elevator has the largest MBR, LR, DR and kitchen w/loads of windows overlooking the swimming pool & beach views. Big open kitchen w/walk-pantr y & breakfast bar there s room for extra chefs! Full size swimming pool w/extra wide deck space around. Private home till last summer already a popular rental! 2248 SA ILFISH DR Cheer ful Gulf front home in Casa del Mar! Custom built by premier builders, this quality home maximizes space. The open great room, kitchen and dining area has a wall of picture windows and beachfront doors opening to the decks. Large kitchen with loads of counters and a breakfast bar that seats six! Four large bedrooms offer plenty of privacy for all and the grand top floor master suite offers a jetted tub, separate shower and private balcony all accessible by elevator 10 65 E. GORRIE DRIVE Amazing first tier beach home for sale on St. George Island! Located right across the street from the beach with wonder ful beach views ever ywhere you look. This large home is for families to enjoy; four bedrooms on the first floor (2 with ensuite baths and with private doors to the beachfront deck, 2 share a jack-n-jill bath) plus wet bar and laundr y room. The top floor with elevator!has the largest master bedroom, living room, dining room and kitchen with loads of windows overlooking the swimming pool and beach views. Yo u wont mind cooking a feast in this big open kitchen with walk-pantr y and breakfast bar there s room for extra chefs! The kids are going to love the full size swimming pool with extra wide deck space around. Private home till last summer already a popular rental! 18 24 SEA OA T DR Picture yourself awakening each morning to the sun rising from a horizon dotted with fishing boats while dolphins swim by in the sur f. This elegant home features a custom kitchen with 42" cabinets and granite counter tops. The adjacent dining area looks onto the deck and the pristine beach. The living room includes a gas fireplace and open comfortable seating space. There are three private master bedroom suites, with expansive closets, plus an additional bedroom with bath and a fifth full bath. 19 16 NA UTILUS DR Stunning 100' wide beachfront lot in the heart of the St. George Plantation. Ideally situated as the last lot on the east end of Nautilus, you'll enjoy the privacy of being at the end of the road and in this unique case, the beach boardwalk is located at the center of Nautilus, so this lot has complete privacy Nestle your home amongst the dwar f beach oaks in the middle of the lot while enjoying the privacy offered by the low sea oatcovered dune protecting the beachfront. 14 31 PELIC AN LN Bayfront oasis in St. George Island Plantation! Custom designed with an ar chitectural feel of historic Apalachicola, this 4br/3ba home is situated to maximize stunning 270 degree views of the Bay Built by a true craftsman, the warm interior has pine paneling and trim, beamed ceilings and hardwood floors. Structural alterations were recently completed to connect the guest wing to the main house, for a great flow The 3 br/2ba guest wing is on the opposite side of the house from the master suite, and has its own living room and breakfast bar The main great room has soaring vaulted ceiling, two walls of windows and a large wood burning firepla 21 15 BLUE HER ON TRL Private bayfront home on nearly 3 acres! Located just one mile from Bob Sikes Cut, Stars on the Wa ter is a beautiful 5 bedroom home decorated in vintage Hemingway flair Lovely features include wide plank pine floors, crown molding and transoms over the exterior doors. Spacious cook-friendly kitchen with plenty of work space, glass front cabinets and a large island. Tw o bedrooms share a hall bath on the first floor and two master bedrooms and extra bedroom upstairs with another living area. Wide por ches offer wonder ful bayviews over the marsh. Hidden Cove is a lovely custom home located on a natural deep water cove with a private dock year round deep water! This well built home is tucked away on a private, wooded lot with two large screened por ches to enjoy the bay views. The great room is air y and bright with vaulted ceilings, new bamboo floors and French doors to the por ch. Wa ke up to views of the bay from the large master bedroom on the main floor Open kitchen has custom cabinets and a breakfast bar overlooking the great room. Tw o additional bedrooms upstairs share a bath and have private French doors to the top floor screened deck 59 AV ENUE D Location, location, location! Just one block to downtown Apalachicola, this is a prime spot for a rental property in the south side Historic district. This historic home has been converted to four apartments, each of them with a living room/ kitchen, bedroom and bath. Sit on the por ch in the evening and talk to your neighbors as they walk by or enjoy river views from the upstairs deck. All four units are currently rented at $500/month continue renting or keep one of the units vacant for you to enjoy being walking distance to all Apalachicola has to offer! 10 1 6TH ST Charming, historic home and operating B&B in wonder ful condition, just four blocks to downtown Apalachicola! The lovely Br yant House was built in 1898 by local ship builder Benjamin Br yant, and completely restored in 1996 by the current owners. Enjoy all the gracious features of a historic home; heart pine floors, walls, ceilings, hand cut trim, high ceilings, beautiful fireplaces, blended with modern conveniences to make your life easy Modern gourmet kitchen for discriminating chefs. Master bedroom suite on the main floor has an extra-large custom walk in closet and spacious master bath with Jacuzzi tub. All three bedrooms upstairs also have private, updated tile bathrooms. Much to love about the outside too, wide por ches, mature gardens and private back patio. Continue running as a B&B or use as a private home, your choice! 268 WA TER ST Live above your business in Historic Apalachicola! The old Coca Cola bottling building offers two stories of opportunity; the first floor has been renovated into a charming retail space with distinct areas to showcase unique products. Approx. 1890 sq. on the first floor includes a kitchen area, half bath, storage room and office, all cooled with window ACs. Upstairs is a classic warehouse loft; soaring ceilings and wood plank floors. The full lot behind the building is included so you'll own from Commer ce St. to Wa ter St double the exposure! 220 AV ENUE D Renovated bungalow in Historic Apalachicola! This 3BR/2BA classic Craftsman style home was built in 1930 and completely renovated in 2006 with new plumbing, HV AC, metal roof, Craftsman style doors and windows and Brazilian cherr y floors throughout. The fabulous kitchen has granite countertops with tile backsplash, custom cherr y cabinets, and stainless steel JennAir appliances. Both bathrooms have been completely updated with custom tile work and Dacor fixtures. This wonder ful home is on an oversized corner lot with a fenced area off the back door Yo u are just one block from the official 'Historic Southside' and a ten minute walk to downtown Apalachicola! Fantastic views over the Apalachicola Bay! This 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo is ideal, low maintenance living just a mile from downtown Apalachicola. Bright and air y interior with bamboo floors in the living area, granite countertops and tile in the kitchen. Tw o wonder ful decks where you can sit back and watch the boats go by on the bay from upstairs or downstairs, plus a nice deck on the back off the kitchen, per fect spot for a grill. This would make a great weekend/fishing getaway Sold furnished and move in ready can't beat this location for this great price! 15 0 HA THCOCK RD Immaculate home on a full acre just minutes to downtown Apalachicola! This 4 bedroom, 2 bath home has a wonder ful living room with high vaulted ceilings and French doors opening to the back patio. Just off to the side of the living room is the eat-in kitchen with breakfast bar all stainless appliances, Three of the bedrooms are on the opposite side of the house, including the master bedroom with large walk-in closet, master bath, private office and French doors opening to the back patio. With a full acre lot you have plenty of room for any outdoor extras storage building, swimming pool etc. on the centipede lawn. Elegant Florida cottage near downtown Apalachicola. This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home was thoughtfully designed to be a full time home and the quality construction is obvious with cherr y floors, fireplace, crown molding, plantation shutters and transoms over ever y window! The kitchen's dark granite counters & tile backsplash with custom white beadboard cabinets and stainless appliances are a beautiful blend of cottage with a modern flair Built-shelves and multiple closets make for a spacious master bedroom on its own side of the house with the two guest bedrooms sharing a hall bath on the other Great entertaining possibilities with a large screened deck opening off the dining room French doors, with a recessed hot tub in the privacy fenced back yard. Ma tc hm ak er s fo r Bu ye rs an d Se ll er s on th e Co as t fo r ov er 15 ye ar s #1 in sa les by vo lu m e si nc e 2007 CO NT AC T: Su sa n at (850)323-009 2, sb ass et t@s tg eo rge wi re d. co m 2014 BR ER A l ia te s LL C. An in dep en den tl y ow ne d an d op era te d bro ke r me mb er of BR ER A li at es LL C. Pr ud e nt ial th e Pr uden tial log o an d th e Ro ck sy mb ol ar e re gi st er ed se rv ice ma rk s of Pr ud e nt ial Fin an ci al In c. an d it s re la te d en ti ti es, re gi st er ed in ma ny ju ri sd ic ti on s wo rl dw ide Us ed un der licen se wi th no ot he r a li at io n wi th Pr ud e nt ial Eq ual Ho us in g Op po rt uni ty

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Local A8 | The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A relic of the rst Chapman School remains intact on the north side of U.S. 98. In the backyard of a house on Avenue M is a small shed made of thick cypress boards. It has double walls and three diamond-shaped windows set high in the side. There is a thick corrugated tin roof. Louis Van Vleet remembers the little shed from long ago. He said it was one of three outhouses that stood behind the old Chapman School built in the 1800s. Last week, he and Holly Lemons arrived at the Times ofce with pictures of the old school and a page from the 1913 Sanborn Insurance maps showing the main Chapman building, with three little buildings at the back of the block occupied by the school. There were small outbuildings at the northeast and northwest corners of the lot, and a larger outbuilding at the center rear. These were the outhouses. It may be that the two smaller outhouses were designated for girls and boys, and the larger shed in the middle for teachers. This arrangement was used at other schools of the same period. Lets go nd some history! said Lemons and we piled into her car and set off in search of the Chapman outhouse. When we arrived, Van Vleet looked at the little building with something like awe. My mother has probably been in there, he said. The shed on Avenue M has three doors, one on each end and one in the middle, so it was probably a three-seater. The little diamond-shaped windows, for ventilation and light, were set high enough so nobody could peek inside. Each of the doors was furnished with a lock, so you probably had to ask the teacher for a key when you wanted to use the necessity. The original oor would have had holes to allow waste to drop into a pit. This apparently has been covered with a new board oor without openings. There also would have been interior walls dividing the stalls, which have been removed, and the seats are gone as well. The pit under an outhouse had to be dug deep enough to prevent hookworms from escaping through the soil and infecting barefoot people near the privy. Hookworms can travel four feet through the soil, so pits were generally dug at least 6 or 7 feet deep. This would also reduce the problem of splashing. The building would have to be moved over a new pit periodically and the old pit capped with fresh soil from the new hole. The contents then degraded over time into very rich soil. Roderick Robinson and his sister own the property where the shed is located. He said the house there originally belonged to his grandmother, Georgia Livingston, who passed away in 1990. He said there was a second shed of similar design on the property at one time, but he tore it down. Robinson said it was smaller than the three-door shed still standing. That gives a clue the surviving outhouse is probably the large one that was located center rear behind the former Chapman Schools, and may have been the teachers privy. The building is substantial, with thick cypress beams supporting the roof. Robinson said a tree fell on the shed without doing serious damage several years ago. Robinson, 47, said the shed has been at its current site for as long as he can remember. He said his grandmother originally used it as a washhouse and he remembers it rst contained a scrubbing board and later a wringer washer. Recently, he cleaned the shed and found some treasures, which he shared with the Times. He found three textbooks dating to the 1950s: Social Studies Skills, Spelling in Everyday Life, and North American Neighbors, a geography text. These would not have come from the old Chapman School, which was torn down sometime in the 1920s or 1930s. The wood from the old school, probably cypress like the outhouse, was recycled to construct houses. Robinson also found an illustrated copy of Bible Footlights, a study guide for Christians, and a shing pole with rayon line and a cork handle. Thank you, Mr. Robinson, for allowing us to photograph your shed and sharing your artifacts and information. This is an interesting piece of history but it raises some questions. First, does anyone know if the three outhouses at the rst Chapman School were for boys, girls and teachers? Second, when was the old Chapman School dismantled and does anybody know which houses contain wood from the old school? Finally, when did indoor plumbing become common in Apalachicola? Can you answer these questions? If so, please contact the Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@ star.com. Inside of the Chapman outhouse Roderick Robinson displays a copy of Bible Footlights and shing rod he found in the old outhouse. I DO HOPE YOU WILL GET IT STRAIGHT A Bible study guide, found in the former Chapman School outhouse contained the following note written in pencil on lined paper. One has to wonder how this entire matter all worked out since she apparently never sent the letter. Apalachicola, Florida December 13, 1954 Dear Sirs I am writing you concerning this account you have charged me with. I have not ordered anything on account with you. I did order some curtains from you but I paid cash for them and I have the money order stubbs to prove that I payed for what I got. And have not ordered any thing else. I do hope you will get it straight. Oblige Mrs. Visa Adams 176 5 th St Apalachicola Florida P.S I do not even have a charge account with you all. P hotos by LO I S SWO B ODA | The Times Louis Van Vleet has known where the Chapman outhouse is located for many years. J A N GOR M A N | Special to The Times Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Solved! Experienced photographer Ed Tiley offered the following explanation for a strange image recorded by a game camera that was presented in last weeks Times. I have a guess that it is an insect, wrote Tiley. Looking at the image (wish it were larger) it is obviously a moving object. It is nearer the camera, and seemingly in range of the infrared light reected in the deers eye. Because it is moving (quickly and seemingly left to right and upward at a 30 degree angle), and nearer the camera, it blurs into that rectangular shape. Gary Carroll concurred. He wrote, Its a bug, ying past very close to the camera. The image is elongated because the bug moved during the exposure, and is overexposed because its very close to the infrared LED ash. The camera you mentioned has a quarter-second exposure time, plenty of time for a ying bug to have moved, but the deer at a distance did not move in that time. Look closely and you can even see a gleam off a the legs. Thanks for you insight, Gary and Ed! UFO MYSTERY SOLVED What was going on in the county 30 years ago this week? There were 400 fulltime residents on St. George Island. The Apalachicola A&P store had just held its going out of business sale, with 30 percent off all packaged items except tobacco. The Wilson family of Apalachicola held a reunion at Fort Gadsden State Park that was covered in a feature article in the Times. Hardees announced it would be open 24 hours a day from July 2 through 5 to accommodate holiday visitors for Independence Day. The Seafood Reef west of Apalachicola on U.S. 98 was looking for help and offered good pay, good benets and an insurance plan. Future Citizens for the Week were Chris and Chasity Richards, ages 4 and 8 years old. On the front page, the following story ran below the fold on Thursday, June 28. By LOIS SWOBODA LAW OFFICERS HARVEST WEEDS FOR BURNING By Roger Doherty Times Staff Reporter Local law enforcement ofcials discovered 600 marijuana plants last Wednesday during a raid on a eld adjacent to the Carrabelle River. The raid was made based on information supplied to Deputy Sheriff Archie Holton and Carrabelle Police Ofcer R.J. Brown. Five members of the Franklin County Sheriffs Department and Ofcer Brown participated in the raid. The 600 plants were discovered on three acres of land near Mill Road. About 220 of the plants were planted in pots. The lawmen picked the plants and carried them out to a truck during a thunderstorm for transport to the county jail. The plants were burned the following day at the jail. The eld was evidently a major operation. Lawmen discovered a specially mufed rototiller in the eld. They also found fertilizer, lime bags, manmade watering holes, a shovel and a bucket. There was evidence that the plants had been watered and dusted earlier in the day. Each plant would have been worth $1,000 when mature, according to Sheriff Jack Taylor Jr. Each mature plant, when dried, would yield about one pound of marijuana. This one raid netted $600,000 worth of marijuana. An additional 230 marijuana plants had been found in the City of Carrabelle earlier this week, and 90 plants had been discovered at another site. In all, 920 marijuana plants were found by Franklin County law enforcement ofcials last week. We have found somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,300 plants since April, Taylor said. The sheriffs department had no suspects in the case as of Tuesday morning. The case is still under investigation. Anyone who has information about marijuana plants being grown in Franklin County can call to report them to the Sheriffs Department. Names do not have to be given when reporting information. Last month, The Times attempted to collect information for an article about traditional Maypole celebrations in Franklin County. Unfortunately, we were unable to nd sufcient information and pictures for an article. Do you know about the maypole? We know there were at least two annual celebrations in Apalachicola, one at Trinity Church and one at Dunbar School. There may have been others. If you have pictures or information, please contact The Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star.com. DO YOU REMEMBER THE MAYPOLE? 30 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, June 26, 2014 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Franklin Countys un employment rate rose by 0.3 percentage point in May and is now higher than it was one year ago, when the work force was larger. According to prelimi nary numbers released Friday by the Florida De partment of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate for May rose to 5.6 from 5.3 percent, as the number grew from 283 to 300 people in search of work. This increase in job lessness occurred as the workforce grew by 52 peo ple, from 5,351 to 5,403. However, the current work force has 98 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,501 workers and the jobless rate was lower, at 5.4 percent. The May jobless pic ture tied the county with Bay, Orange and Gilchrist counties, for 24th best among Floridas 67 coun ties. Franklin was worse for unemployment than Union, Collier, Baker, Hol mes, Santa Rosa, Leon, Jackson, Liberty, Clay, Nassau, Seminole, Bro ward, Bradford, Jefferson, Sumter, St. Johns, Ala chua, Wakulla, Okaloosa, Monroe and Walton, the states best at 3.4 percent. The CareerSource Gulf Coast region (Bay, Gulf and Franklin coun ties) experienced a slight uptick in unemployment, as a number of economic indicators continue to im prove across the state. The size of the local in crease in unemployment is statistically insignicant, said Kim Bodine, executive director of CareerSource Gulf Coast. We do know, however, that there was a large-scale layoff that had the potential to affect the numbers slightly. The dif ference between April and May in terms of unemploy ment is historically at, so the rates have gotten our attention. Just dont add up The numbers that show we are losing jobs in leisure and tourism for our area just dont add up with other indicators that we see locally, she said. We had the same issue throughout last year. When the adjustments were made by the Federal Bu reau of Labor Statistics to the Local Area Unemploy ment Statistics (LAUS) data, we were no longer losing jobs in leisure and hospitality. Bodine also pointed out data reecting economic growth. Every county in our region shows an in crease in taxable sales, particularly in hotels and lodging taxes over last year, so to show a loss of 500 jobs just doesnt seem accurate to us, she said. We question the number. Our staff does a great job in working with area job seekers and employers. Honestly, they have been recognized as number one in the state several times now. That said, I encour age folks who are looking for a job or employers who have openings to reach out to the CareerSource Gulf Coast job center. The regions unemploy ment rate for May was 5.6 percent, up slightly from Aprils 5.2 percent. All three counties expe rienced growth in unem ployment, with Bay up 0.5 percent to 5.6 percent, and Gulf up 0.3 percent, to 6.0 percent. Out of a labor force of 104,180, there were 5,851 unemployed CareerSource Gulf Coast residents. The May 2014 rate was 0.8 percentage point lower than the regions year ago rate of 6.4 percent, while 0.5 percentage point below the May 2014 Florida rate of 6.1 percent. BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0 + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 Implants & Cr ow ns Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Wi lliam C. Knapk e, DDS Gen er al De nt is t Pa nam a City Sq uar e 61 7 We st 23 rd Str eet Pa nam a Ci ty FL Ca ll Fo r In fo rm at ion 1-8 88268 -77 18 Gr eat vs other Dent al pr ov iders 20144-1-T4 Fe es ef fe ctiv e thr ough 11 /2 1/14 Addition al fe es ma y be incurr ed depend ing on in div idu al cases Same-da y Cr ow n ser vice ma y no t be av ailable in cer ta in case s. Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Of ce #: (8 50 ) 8 7 2 -6 155. Single To oth Implant inc luding Cr ow n st ar ting at $ 1 89 5 De ntur e Im pla nts st ar ting at $ 1 59 5 Lo we r Ar ch $ 1 99 5 Sam eDa y Cr ow ns $ 69 5 Upper Ar ch The Jou rn ey Back Home With We ems Memorial Rehab Car e When you or a loved on e need a little mor e time to ge t back on your feet, We ems Memorial Re hab Car e is her e Right in your own ne ighborhood Give us a call today and let us help you make that jour ney back hom e. We ems Mem orial Rehab Ca re 135 Av enue G, Apalach icola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The Apalachicola Area Historical Society on Saturday afternoon chose a retired librarian and former history teacher as its president for the next two years. By unanimous election, at a meeting held at the home of Bill and Lynn Spohrer, the society voted for Carrie Kienzle to succeed Tom Daly as president. Also approved were another two-year term for vice president David Adlerstein, treasurer Fran Edwards and secretary Shirley Taylor. Selected to serve on the board of directors were Kathy Willis and Susan Buzzett Clementson. I really appreciate this honor, Kienzle told the luncheon audience. Im very excited. Kienzle, who has resided with husband, Charlie, in the historic district for the past eight years, brings a robust record of civic involvements in Apalachicola, including actively working with Trinity Episcopal Churchs Tour of Homes and with the municipal library board, as well as a seat on the citys board of adjustment. Her career has been marked by a lifelong passion for history as well as an extensive knowhow of the world of the modern library. After earning a masters degree in library and information science from the University of North Texas in 1990, Kienzle worked as a school librarian on the elementary, middle and high school levels before being named library director for the Irving, Texas, Independent School District, which comprises about 34,000 students. During her stint there, the American Library Association chose Irving as the school library media program of the year. And Kienzle has been a member of the Newbery Award Committee, which selects the best childrens book each year; the Caldecott Award Committee, which chooses the best picture book; and the Printz Award Committee, which selects the best young adult book. But even with that impressive resume, Kienzle made it clear in her remarks Saturday that the challenge ahead would be for everyone, whatever their background, to work harmoniously together. We have to leave our egos at the door, she said. We need to put on our oyster boots and roll up our sleeves. A native of Portland, Ore., who grew up in Rhode Island, where her father was an attorney for lumber interests, Kienzle earned an undergraduate degree from the University of Rhode Island with a double major in history and secondary education. In the early 1970s, she taught history in Middletown, R.I., and after living in various spots around the country, she and her husband settled in Texas. She and her husband have a son Charles, 28, living in Washington, D.C., and daughter Elizabeth, 32, in Lone Star, Texas, who has a son. Seth. In her remark Saturday, she lauded the restoration work of Terry and Pam Corcoran, who have renovated the Marshall House at 13th street and Avenue C; of Michaelin and David Watts, who have restored the Key House adjacent to Lafayette Park; and Lynn and Bill Spohrer, who have long been devoted to restoration of their home and commercial buildings downtown. Kienzle told of how she and her husband rst traveled here in 1990, after canceling their room at Seaside, because they had heard Apalachicola was for the intrepid. They stayed at the Gibson Inn and began a love affair with the town which has carried on to this day. She promised to help preserve, promote and protect the citys rich historical legacy, which includes one of the states largest collections of historically intact buildings. Kienzle said she is working on options for boosting fundraising, perhaps with the creation of an Society to help direct donations toward specic needs of the community. Its really never about money, she said. Its about having a vision and having the will. If you feel that you really know what youre doing and know where youre going, they will sign on. Kienzle to head Apalachicola historical society DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Carrie Kienzle is the new president of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society TOM DAL Y PHO T O COU RTES Y OF MAR Y LOU SHO RT The ASGI (Apalachicola-St. George Island) Cooperative Parish Nicaragua Mission Team, of the United Methodist Church, traveled to Nicaragua from June 7 to 15 Arriving in Leon with 1,000 pounds of luggage with clothes donated by local residents, Bibles, Vacation Bible School supplies, paint and sewing supplies. The team did 30 prayer walks throughout Telica, held VBS for more than 350 children, painted the inside of a church, cooked for 200 children in the Compassion feeding program and gave sewing lessons. Pictured above are, from left, Erica Protsman, Jessica Galloway, Brittanie Thompson, Missy Paterson, Mary Lou Short, Glory Miller, Ethelene Brown, Lola Fambro, Charolette Bacher, Grace Williams and Scarlet Smith. MISSION TEAM ASSISTS IN NICARAGUA County jobless rate ticks upward in May

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We had a good time visiting and table-hopping at the Lanark Village Boat Club last Saturday. Good food, good service and good friends. Who could ask for more? Our good friend Dot Bless picked me up and when we got to the boat club, it was already packed out. Dot was number 50 and I was 51 and they were still piling in. Dont forget about lunch on Thursday, July 3, at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Lunch will be served at noon. Hope you can make it. Maybe Ann Wilson will be on hand to check our blood pressure. Be watchin for you! Friday night, of course, is hamburger and chips at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Orders taken after 6 p.m. Your donation of $6 collected at the bar will get you a huge hamburger with chips. Call in take-out at 6979998. While you are waiting to enjoy your hamburger, you can play some bar bingo, shufeboard, pool and we also have pull tabs. Have a fun evening. Then its off to the reworks on the Carrabelle River in beautiful downtown. Things start lighting up at dark thirty. Mark your calendars for Saturday, July 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Members of the Community Church will hold a yard sale, auction and sh fry. Just follow the crowd to the corner of Spring and Oak streets in Lanark Village. Mullet, along with other sh, cole slaw, baked beans, grits, hushpuppy bread and tea will be on the menu. All that good food for a donation of $6. Donations for the sale are needed. If you cant bring them to the church, call 697-4195 and someone will be there to pick it up. Silent auction items include two Trane HVAC systems, two ranges, a dining room set, jewelry and more. Try your best to make it over. Proceeds from the sale, auction and sh fry will go toward repairs and restoration of the church and parsonage in Lanark Village. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember, dont drink a fth on the Fourth. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Rebecca Hutto is devoted to dogs and she has good reason. Working with the Franklin County Humane Society, Hutto has fostered more dogs over the years than she can remember and owned quite a few as well. She said her rst foster dog was Bub, a crazy terrier that spoke only Spanish. She said that so far this year, she has provided shelter to more than 30 canines until they could nd permanent accommodations. Her partner in her personal rescue mission is Monty, an AKC registered, 2-year old, liver and white Springer spaniel. Montys parents are a pair of Springers that belong to Huttos daughter in North Carolina. Monty is a big brother to all of the dogs I foster, said Hutto. He helps with toilet training and if one of the foster dogs wanders away all I have to do is say go nd puppy and he will nd the missing dog. Hutto said Monty, a puppy himself, adapts to the size of his foster siblings and is very careful not to be too rough. I have seen him play tug of war with a miniature dachshund. He was so careful. It was the funniest thing Ive ever seen, said Hutto. Hutto has a special place in her heart for Springers. When her daughter, Mariah, was 18 months old, the Hutto family lived in a mountaintop cabin near Asheville, N.C. One day the baby got out of the house, and dressed only in booties and a diaper, wandered into the woods with dogs belonging to the family. She was missing for hours. Eventually, all of the dogs returned home except for a Springer spaniel named Beulah. When searchers found the girl at the bottom of the mountain and miles from home, Beulah drew their attention to the child. Mariah was unhurt. Monty accompanies Hutto to work at the Peddlers Alley garden shop in downtown Apalachicola. Springers are working dogs. You have to give them a job, she said. He is our greeter. He is very good about getting people to come inside and plays with the children while their parents shop. Monty is paid for his services at Peddlers Alley. He takes his wages in dog biscuits provided by Oyster Bones of Apalachicola. Pe t of th e We ek HUMP HR EY an d hi s sis te r AU DR EY we re ow ne r sur re nde re d to us thi s we ek. Th ey ar e 9 mo nt h old Ch iwi en ie s an d su pe r sw ee t. Th ey ar e abo ut fu ll gr ow n at 12 lb s so th ey ar e a pe rf ec t si ze fo r ma ny hou se hold s. Th ey ar e bo th he ar tw or m ne ga ti ve an d wi ll be s/ n in th e ne xt we ek or so Co me me et thi s dyn am ic du o! Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to so cia liz e al l of ou r do gs a nd ca ts We ar e al way s lo ok in g fo r pe opl e wi ll in g to bri ng one of ou r an im al s in to th ei r hom e to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can spa re wo ul d be gr ea tl y appr ec ia te d. Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mo re de tai ls or vi si t th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hum an e Soc iet y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po in t Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bsi te at www .f or go tt en pe ts .o rg to se e mor e of ou r adop tab le pe ts PUB LI C NO T ICE OF AT TOR N EY -C LI EN T SE SS IO N NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at pu rs ua nt to Se ct ion 28 6. 01 1( 8) Fl or id a Sta tu te s, th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Boa rd of Co un ty Co mm is sion er s wi ll me et in Ex ec ut iv e Se ss ion at 34 Fo rb es St re et Ap al ac hi co la Fl or ida on Tu es da y, Jul y 1, 20 14 at 2: 30 p. m. or as soo n th er ea ft er as th e is sue ma y be he ar d, to re cei ve th e advic e of co un se l co nc ern in g th e fo ll ow in g pen di ng li ti ga ti on : Th e St Jo e Co mp an y v. Fr an kl in Co un ty Ca se No 20 13 -C A43 5, Fr an kl in Co un ty Circ ui t Co ur t. Co un ty At to rn ey Th oma s M. Sh ul er Co un ty La nd Us e At to rn ey Da vi d Th er iaque Cha ir ma n Ch er yl San de rs Co un ty Co mm is sion er Pi nk i Jac ke l, Co unt y Com mi ss ione r No ah Lo ck le y, Jr ., Co un ty Co mm is sion er Wi lli am Ma ss ey an d Co unt y Co mm is sion er Jo se ph Sm ok ey Pa rr is h wi ll be at te nd in g th e Ex ec ut iv e Se ss ion Th e en ti re Ex ec ut iv e Se ss ion wi ll be tr an scri be d by a ce rt ie d co ur t re por te r an d l ed wi th th e Co un ty Cl er k. Th e tr an scri pt of th e Ex ec ut iv e Se ss ion wi ll be ma de a pa rt of th e pu bl ic re cor d up on co ncl us io n of t he ab ove -r ef er en ce d li ti ga ti on Society A10 | The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 Sheriff Mike Mock, right, and Tax Collector Jimmy Harris, left, wished Dan Sangaree a Happy Birthday last week. Mr. Dan was 102 years old on June 20 and has been celebrating with family and friends from the community. He was born in 1912 during President Tafts term. Sangaree served in the Pacic Theatre during World War II. He spent much of his life managing cinemas, although he also dabbled in the seafood industry and was an inventor. He is best known around town as the orchid man for his great expertise with plants. For many years, he spread joy in the downtown business community by loaning blooming orchids to local businesses. Mayor Van Johnson declared June 20, 2012, Sangarees 100th birthday, to be Dan Sangaree Day in the city of Apalachicola. Happy birthday, Mr. Dan DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times A fundraiser Saturday evening at the Bowery Station germinated owered shirts, and more than $5,500, for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. The Hawaiian Shirt Night fundraiser drew a bounteous number of blouses, such as those above, worn by Doug Wakeman, left, Mike Shepard, right, and Cathy Buell, who operates OWahoo Hawaiian Shirt Rescue and provided shirts for rental and sale. HOLIDA Y IN W AIKIKI Special to the Times Paul Lancaster will be in concert at Apalachicola Assembly of God Churches this Sunday. Lancaster, who has been involved in full-time Christian music for more than 27 years, will be at First Assembly of God, 269 Brownsville Road, at 11 a.m. on Sunday morning, and at Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road, at 6 p.m. Sunday evening. He has been a recognizable face on many of the Gaither Homecoming videos and concert tours as a member of such well-known artists as The Mullins, The Nelons, The Martins and most recently, Palmetto State. His combined experience with these groups has afforded him the opportunity to win two Dove awards as well as tour with other well-known artists and speakers such as Mark Lowry, Clay Cross, Jaci Velasquez, Josh McDowell and most recently, The Judds (Wynonna and Naomi). He also has been seen lling in over the years with other well-known artists such as Karen Peck and New River, The Booth Brothers, Three Bridges and several others. My greatest ambition is to connect with the people in front of me. When Im singing lyrics about Gods unmatched love and sacrice, it makes me want to give everything Ive got to make sure that the message is received and understood by the listener, Lancaster said. Frankly, there is no joy or fulllment in singing anymore without knowing that fact. His selftitled debut CD is a collection of some of his favorite songs that inspired him from his childhood to the present. It includes hymns such as Great Is Thy Faithfulness, What A Friend We Have In Jesus, and a soulful rendition of His Eye Is On The Sparrow. Other favorites include He Looked Beyond My Fault penned by the late Dottie Rambo; Andre Crouchs Soon And Very Soon, a souped-up arrangement of Ill Fly Away and several more. Please dont miss the opportunity to see Paul Lancaster in concert. It will be an experience you wont soon forget! For more information, call 653-8651. Christian song stylist in concert Sunday Rebecca Hutto, dogs best friend L O IS S WO B O DA | The Times Rebecca and Monty Get ready for July 4 reworks on the river LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh P AUL LANCASTER Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Faith The Times | A11 Thursday, June 26, 2014 On Saturday morning, June 21, 2014, another child of God, Laurene Langley, of Eastpoint, was called home to be with her Lord. She was 97 years old and lived most of her life in Eastpoint. She was the last living member of a small group of women and a few men who established the Eastpoint Church of God. She was preceded in death by her husband, Willard Langley; her son, George Langley; her grandson, Danny Segree; her parents and all her siblings. She is survived by her children: Lee Roy (Margie) Langley, of Eastpoint, Bonnie Segree, of Eastpoint, Frances (Charles) Hicks, of Eastpoint, Winfred (Janeen) Langley, of Tallahassee, and Martha Argueta, of Eastpoint; 18 grandchildren, 19 greatgrandchildren; seven great-greatgrandchildren; and many nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Funeral services were at the Eastpoint Church of God on Tuesday afternoon, June 24, with visitation for family and guests preceding the service. A graveside service followed at Eastpoint Cemetery. Services were conducted by Kelley Funeral Home of Apalachicola. Laurene Langley LAURENE LANGLEY Ashley Marie Nichols was born on Aug. 11, 1977, in Memphis, Tenn., to George Deviney and Cathy Goodwin. She grew up in Tennessee and Mississippi, and moved to Florida nearly a decade ago and fell in love with St. George Island. She called Florida her home. Ashley was born with a big, beautiful smile and loved to share that smile with everyone. Ashley Marie passed away on Sunday, June 8, 2014, and left this Earth but she also left an amazing outlook on life. She was kind, sweet and very caring with a big heart. Ashley will be greatly missed by her family, her parents, George and Cathy; two half-brothers, Josh Deviney and Robby Goodwin; half-sister, Madison Deviney; and four beautiful and smart children, Cyndi Nicole, Autumn Skye, Sean Anthony and Jordan Layne. She was recently engaged to her best friend, Cole Nichols, the love of her life and soon to have been stepchildren, Jayden and Jole. She was known for her strong character, great personality and was very outgoing. She loved the beach, sun and sand. Ashley was a very hard worker at everything she did. Ashleys life was cut too short but she was happy and made all her loved ones happy. We all love and miss you, Mama A dusk memorial service was held on St. George Island on Saturday, June 14, and a memorial service and celebration of her life will be held Saturday, June 28, in Germantown, Tenn. Donations to the children can be made at any Franklin County Centennial Bank in the name of Ashley Nichols benet account. Ashley Nichols ASHLEY NICHOLS Pamela Kay Vinson Shaver, 48, Eastpoint, went to be with our Lord on Tuesday, June 17, 2014, after a valiant battle with a lengthy illness. Pam was born in Pasadena, Texas, and spent her life between Texas, Louisiana and Florida. Through her lifetime she never left the coastline and by the water is where she would nd her solace. Pam was a brilliant writer and dedicated her talents to The Lord. She gave inspira tion, wisdom and her whole heart to those she loved. She is survived by her mother, Sarah Aplin (David Holstein) Vinson, of East point; three children, Amber Nicole (Quinten Toole) Vinson, Preston Shaver and Sarah Emile and one grandson, Nathan Rotella, all of Eastpoint; two step daughters, Susie Shaver Sikes, of Cross Creek, and Cassie Shaver, of Gaines ville; one stepson, Richard Shaver Jr., Texas; sisters, Donna Burkhart (Don) White and Sonja (Bob) Reed, Suwannee; brothers, Oris Ray (Rhonda) Butler, Carrabelle, Wayne (Jessie) Vinson Jr., Old Town, and Phillip (Natasha) Vinson, Eastpoint; together with many nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. She was preceded in death by her father, Wayne Vinson Sr., from Eastpoint, and her husband, Richard Shaver, Suwannee. Pams life will be cel ebrated Saturday, June 28, at the Pavilion by the channel in Eastpoint from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. All family and friends are invited to come. God bless all of you who prayed for our dear Pam while she was sick and in pain. Her faith never faltered, and her inner strength showed through. Thank you God Almighty for sharing a Beautiful Soul! Pamela Vinson Shaver P AMELA VINSON SHA VER Becky Roberts Smith, of Fort Myers, departed this life on Monday, May 26, 2014. She was born on Aug. 28, 1952, in Apalachicola. She was the daughter of the late Herman (Red) Roberts and Catherine Roberts. She is survived by her husband, Billy Smith; three sons, Phil Smith, Chris Smith and Brian Smith; and one granddaughter, Olivia Smith. She had three sisters and one brother, Dorothy Snyder, Charles Roberts, Aileen Lopez and Linda Newell (Alvin). She was laid to rest at Hodges Cemetery in Lehigh Acres. Becky Roberts Smith Ruth M. Varner, 97, passed away Sunday, June 22, 2014, in Carrabelle. She was born in Arran, and moved to Carrabelle when she was 4 and spent her entire life in this area. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Carrabelle and a member of Crooked River Lighthouse Association. She was a sister, mother, aunt, grandmother and greatgrandmother who deeply loved Franklin County and the Apalachicola Bay region. She was an educator, a former city commissioner and a true Christian. She was loved and respected by all. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Florida Baptist Childrens Home, 8415 Buck Lake Road, Tallahassee, FL 32317. She is survived by three children: H.P Buddy Varner, Carrabelle, Nancy Varner, Grifn, Ga., and Thelma Varner Garner (Patrick), Englewood; four grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. Tholley Taylor of Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family. Ruth M. Varner Carlton Lee Wathen, a Carrabelle native, passed away Wednesday, June 18, 2014, at age 85. A dedicated merchant seaman for 39 years, Mr. Wathen started his initial (engine) training and received his certicate of graduation from U. S. Maritime Service Training Station in St. Petersburg on Dec. 7, 1947. Subsequent training led to an ofcially licensed position as Third Assistant Engineer, steam vessels on Feb. 2, 1953, and later Second Assistant Engineer of steam vessels on Sept. 22, 1983. He completed his maritime service ofcially in 1994. An Army veteran, inducted into the U.S. Army on March 11, 1953, Cpl. Carlton Lee Wathen served during and after the Korean War from 1953 to 1961 and was honorably discharged from the Army Reserve March 23, 1961. Mr. Wathen served as Carrabelles city commissioner from 1985 to 1993 and was elected mayor of Carrabelle where he faithfully served his community and town from 1991 to 1995. Member of the Episcopal Church of the Ascension. Christianhusband-father-brotherleader-volunteer and friend. Mr. Wathen is survived by his wife, Grace Mattair Wathen, Carrabelle; two daughters, Jennifer (Jeff) Lowery, Jacksonville, and Jessica (Joey) Ward, Apalachicola; sister, Winifred Bowyer, Tallahassee; 12 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren; American Legion, VFW, and Lions Club friends. He will be dearly missed by a huge family and many, many friends. Mr. Wathen was predeceased by father and mother, William Thales Wathen and Maude Elizabeth Wathen; brother, Thales Wathen Jr. and sister, Elizabeth Wathen Tyler. A memorial service will be held Saturday, June 28, at 10 a.m. at the Episcopal Church of the Ascension with Mother Phoebe McFarlin ofciating. The family will receive guests immediately after services directly behind the church in Wathen Hall. In lieu of owers, the family asks that donations be made to Church of the Ascension. David Conn of Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family. Carlton Lee Wathen CARL TON LEE W ATHEN Mrs. Martha Dell Wilson, 84, of Apalachicola, passed away Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Mrs. Wilson was born Oct. 17, 1929, in Alabama to Frutie and Alva Mae Hallford. She was a resident of the local area for 70 years, moving here from Southport. A member of Highland Park Community Church, she was a devoted Christian. Mrs. Wilson was a loving wife, mother and grandmother. She enjoyed gardening, shing, embroidering, swinging on her front porch, singing hymns and writing Christian poems and songs. Mrs. Wilson was preceded in death by her husband, James William Wilson; parents, Frutie and Alva Mae Hallford; stepfather, Wesly Bareld; six brothers; and three sisters. She is survived by her three sons, James Wilson and wife, Wondis, of Southport, David Wilson and wife, Gwinell, and Jerry Wilson and wife, Janie, all of Apalachicola; four daughters, Alethea Walker and husband, Donnie, of Apalachicola, Sarah Mathes and husband, Donnie, of Altha, Christine Holmes and husband, Pat, of Carrabelle, and Melanie Smith and husband, Barry, of Lanark Village; two sisters, Julia Booth and Sherry Ward; 18 grandchildren; 33 greatgrandchildren; and eight great-great grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday morning, June 6, at Highland Park Community Church with the Rev. Arthur Coulter ofciating. Interment followed at Magnolia Cemetery. The family received friends at the church Thursday evening, June 5. Asked to serve as active pallbearers were Donnie Walker Jr., David Wilson Jr., Tony Shiver Jr., Shawn Wilson, Kendall Curtis, William (Bubba) Wilson, Lenard Shiver, Steven McGuire and Aaron Kyser. Honorary pallbearer was Elijah Mathes. Southerland Family Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Martha Dell Wilson MARTHA DELL WILSON We would like to thank everyone from the bottoms of our heart for all the love, support, donations, words of encouragement during this heartbreaking lifechanging tragedy. Thank you. The Nichols Family Card of Thanks the Nichols Family Market Days Saturday in Carrabelle Gods Ministry for the Needy has been in operation now for six months! Time just ies when you are working for a wonderful cause in your community. Carrabelle United Methodist Church thanks everyone for participating in our mission to better serve the needy in Carrabelle and Lanark Village. It is a true blessing to all! Our June gathering for 2014 Market Days will be on Saturday, June 28, at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station. Summer hours are from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pulled pork dinners are on the menu, along with regular baked goods, live music and craft items for sale. Invite family, friends and neighbors to join you and experience the love and joy of Christian fellowship. Lanark church hosts July 12 fundraiser The Community Church in Lanark Village will hold a fundraiser on Saturday, July 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Community Church on 171 Spring Street in Lanark Village. All proceeds will be used for repairs and restoration of the Community Church and parsonage. There will be a silent auction, sh fry and yard sale with lots of live entertainment, featuring Cary Moon, H.J. Kuntry and more. Some auction items are two Trane HVAC systems, refrigerator, two ranges, dining room set, jewelry, art, Crooked River Grill dinner tickets, Hog Wild dinner tickets plus more. Bring a lawn chair and umbrella. It might get hot that weekend! For more information, call Shirley Cox at 697-4195. Dykes reunion held on Cape San Blas The Dykes family reunion, held in memory of Dora and Wiley Dykes, was held on Cape San Blas on Sunday, June 8. More than 70 family members from Nevada, Virginia, Tallahassee, Apalachicola and Port St. Joe attended. Faith BRIEFS THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on Obituaries

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WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TID E TA BLES MONT HL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, June 26 87 79 30 % Fr i, June 27 86 78 20 % Sa t, June 28 87 78 20 % Sun, June 29 86 78 30 % Mo n, June 30 86 79 30 % Tu es July 01 87 79 30 % We d, July 02 86 80 40 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 12 Thursday, June 26, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A Special to the Times The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) made several changes at a June 18 meeting in Fort Myers that will help combat the lionsh invasion in Florida waters. Lionsh are an in vasive species that have a negative effect on native wildlife and habitat. Approved changes going into effect Aug. 1 include: Prohibiting the im portation of live lionsh. Allowing the harvest of lionsh when diving with a rebreather, a device that recycles air and allows div ers to remain in the water for longer periods of time. Allowing participants in approved tournaments and other organized events to spear lionsh or other invasive species in areas where spearshing is not allowed. This will be done through a permitting system. Changes like these will make it easier for divers to remove lionsh from Florida waters and will help prevent addition al introductions of lionsh into marine habitats, said State Rep. Holly Raschein, who has been proactive in the lionsh-control efforts. From outreach and education to regulatory changes, controlling the lionsh population has been a priority for FWC staff. In 2013, they hosted the rst ever Lionsh Summit, which brought together various stake holders from the public as well as management and research elds to discuss the issues and brainstorm solutions. These changes were inspired in part by discussions at the Lionsh Summit. FWC combats lionsh invasion Offshore/Bottom Inshore/Bay Pier/Surf SPONSORED BY Offshore action is in between right now as federal red snapper is over and the July 1st re-opening of gag grouper. King sh have taken over all near shore wrecks and reefs with huge numbers. Good trout reports are the norm for St Joe Bay and East Bay. Hot summer weather has the sh biting at rst light, so dont sleep in. Other species, such as ounder and red sh, are abundant as well but are constantly moving because of tides and water temperature. Local area streams and creeks are producing nice bream and even good bass right now as well. Special to The Times Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Com mission (FWC) biologists provided an update at the agencys June Commis sion meeting in Fort Myers regarding Florida panther research and conservation programs. Due to the success of panther-conservation efforts over the past 40 years, the panther popula tion has grown signicant ly since the 1970s, when the panther was federally listed as endangered. Biologists have updat ed their population range estimate to reect an increase to 100-180 adult panthers in Florida. Based on this estimate and habi tat availability, panthers likely have reached their carrying capacity south of the Caloosahatchee River. Historically, panthers ranged throughout Florida and into seven other south eastern states. Today, most panthers are found south of the Caloosahatchee River in Florida. The FWC and partners such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ser vice are preparing for the natural expansion of the increasing population. Because large tracts of land are needed to sustain a healthy panther popula tion, private landowners will be crucial to range expansion. Due to the expansive habitat needs of the Flor ida panther, the continued growth of their population presents a unique chal lenge to the FWC and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said FWC Commissioner Liesa Priddy. As panther range expands, impacts on private landowners will continue to increase. With the increasing number of panthers, there also are increasing inter actions and conicts with people. The FWC and part ner agencies currently are working with landowners to address the challenges they may face in having panthers on their lands. We know panthers can prey upon pets and livestock, and we strive to nd solutions that work for people who experience these very real losses, said Thomas Eason, direc tor of the FWCs Division of Habitat and Species Conservation. People can help with panther research by re porting sightings at Flori daPantherNet.org. Re porting observations can help FWC biologists ad dress panther conserva tion needs by identifying the areas used by these large cats. Florida residents can support panther conser vation efforts by purchas ing a Protect the Panther license plate, available at BuyAPlate.com. Fees from license plate sales are the primary funding source for the FWCs research and management of Florida panthers. To report dead or in jured panthers, call the FWCs Wildlife Alert Ho tline at 888-404-FWCC (3922) or #FWC or *FWC on a cell phone. Florida panther population expanding By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The fall webworm, Hy phantria cunea, is a moth known principally for its caterpillar, which builds impressive silk tents that sometimes enclose en tire branches of hardwood trees. The tents appear in late summer or fall. Defolia tion by fall webworm cat erpillars does not usually cause damage to the tree, since they feed in late sum mer or fall, just before leaf drop. While the nests are unsightly, the caterpillars are not believed to harm otherwise healthy trees. Fall webworm caterpil lars will feed on any one of over 100 tree and shrub species. Preferred host plants include hickory, pe can, walnut, elm, alder, wil low, mulberry, oak, sweet gum, and poplar. The moth is native to North America, ranging from Canada to Mexico, and is one of the few in sect pests introduced from North America into other continents. Introduced into the former Yugoslavia in the 1940s (rstly recorded in 1949), it is now found in Europe from France to the Caspian Sea and in Central Asia where it continues to expand its range. It was also introduced into Japan in 1945 and is now pres ent across the northern hemisphere. One generation per year emerges in the north ern part of this moths range. In the southern part of its range, there are two or more generations annually. The caterpillars are highly variable in color, ranging from a pale yel low, to dark grey, with yel low spots and long or short bristles. There are two cream stripes along the sides. After the caterpillar enters a cocoon, the pupa stage overwinters in the bark and leaf litter at the base of the trees. It is dark brown and about 10 mm long. The thin brown co coon is made of silk cov ered with bits of twigs and dry leaves. The adult is mostly white in the north, but in the south, it may be marked with black or brown spots on the forewings. It is quite hairy, and the front legs have bright yellow or or ange patches. Several methods of con trol can be applied to web worms. Small nests can be pruned out of small to me dium trees. Try to detect the nests when only several leaves are involved. These small nests can be easily crushed. Do not burn the nests in trees as this may do additional damage to the tree. The bacterial insecti cide, Bacillus thuringen sis (Bt), is quite effective against fall webworms if it is applied when the larvae are small. Thoroughly cov er leaves next to nests. As these leaves are incorpo rated into the nest and eat en, the Bt will be ingested. Many standard chemical insecticides are also effec tive when applied to the fo liage surrounding the nest. Webworm tents soon to appear LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Webworm FWC | Special to The Times Florida panther wearing a radio collar for tracking and monitoring.

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com After dominating the District 4 All-Star Tourna ment two weeks ago at D. W. Wilson Field in Apala chicola, the Franklin Coun ty AA All-Stars are headed to Marianna to take on the best throughout the state. Coach Andy Pace and assistants William Chip man, Travis Bentley and Ricky Abercrombie have shepherded a crew of 7 and 8 year olds boys, and girl, to the state. The All-Stars dominated the June 13-16 district tour nament in Apalachicola, by winning all three of their games. In AA, teams use a pitching machine, with the coach feeding the baseball into the machine, which hurls it at a speed of 40 miles per hour, directly into the strike zone. The speed is constant for every game, Pace said. You cant change that. The ofcial blesses the readjustment of the ma chine, he said. If theres a aw in the machine, or if something is not set just right, there could be problems. Although they are not machines, but young peo ple, the Franklin County team was set just right at the district tourney. In their rst game Sat urday, June 14, the Frank lin County All-Stars won 19-4 over Port St. Joe, and then in their second game won 21-2 over Wewahitch ka. In the championship game Monday, June 16, the All-Stars again defeated Port St. Joe, this time 16-10, although it was their most lackluster performance of the tourney. We didnt do too bad, Pace said. As a team were hitting the ball great. We nished the district tour nament with close to an .800 team batting average. We need to concentrate on keep hitting the ball and defense and I think well do pretty good in the state tournament. Pace said two players are batting .1000 and just one player is batting be low .500. Hannah Abel, the teams only girl, and Brett Charles, rotate each inning on the mound, and while they dont pitch the ball, they are responsible for scooping up ground balls and making plays at the bases. Abel is one of two girls in the AA league in the county, the other Paces daughter, Mason. Theyre a defensive player at the pitchers mound, Pace said. They have to make a defen sive play on it. Weve been blessed to play pretty good defense. Franklin County, the district winner, and Port St. Joe, the runner-up, both leave to go to state Friday morning, in Marianna. There, at the Friday night banquet, theyll nd out who among the 16 teams they will face as they embark on a fairly tough schedule of games. There are four pools of four teams, and each team plays seven pool games, three on Saturday, two on Sunday and two on Monday. Depending on the out comes and how they are seaded in the pool, the top two teams in each pool go to an eight-team double elimination playoff, with the rst round at 8 p.m. Monday. That goes through Wednesday night. Youll play every day regardless, Pace said. You got to make sure your players are rested. Pace said players and coaches run through defen sive and offensive drills at practice. We pair them off one-on-one with coaches, he said. We go over situa tions, we practice as a live game situation. Sometimes its just like verbal practice, like What do you do when theres a man on rst base with one out? Just to get them thinking What do I do with the baseball? Parents have been busy fundraising, and thanks to a donation from the county parks and recreation, and from the cities of Apalachic ola and Carrabelle, the team is ready for state action. CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SPORT S www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 A Page 13 Section AA All-Stars head to state THE LINEUP No. 3 Logan Bentley, OF No. 5 Braden Shiver, OF No. 7 Hannah Abel, Pitcher No. 9 Brycin Kennedy, OF No. 11 Reed Nix, OF No. 16 Chase Millender, Catcher No. 17 Terry Proctor, SS No. 20 Cody Abercrombie, 1B No. 21 Jenzen Odom, 2B No. 22 Anthony Stulsky, OF No. 23 William Chipman, 3B No. 53 Brett Charles, Pitcher PHO T OS BY DAV I D AD LE R S T EIN | The Times Catcher Chase Millender makes a play at the plate The coaches address their players. Shortstop Terry Proctor. First baseman Cody Abercrombie makes a play. We pair them off one-on-one with coaches. We go over situations, we practice as a live game situation. Coach Andy Pace Angel All-Stars district runners-up The Franklin County Angels AllStars made up of girls ages 9-10, n ished as runners-up in District 2 after falling 10-1 to host team Marianna Monday night. At lower right, stand ing in back row, from left, are coach Kim Johnson, Ariel Andrews, Shirah Pelt, Ava McAnally, Tariah Jones, Coach Shawn Brannan, Jelly Bean Butler, Marci Kelley and Coach Re nae Bridges. Front row, from left are Gracie Smith, Kylah Ross, Abby John son, Sage Brannen, Brooklyn ONeal, and Trinity Barron. At lower left, Abby Johnson, left, and Gracie Smith hold the trophy. The ve teams in the district, Franklin, Wewahitchka, Sneads, Blountstown and Marianna, battled it out. Our girls played with their hearts and have it their all, Johnson said. Proud of my Angels and glad to be part of the Franklin County family! By DAVID ADLERSTEIN PHO T OS BY KIM JOHNSON | The Times Proud of my Angels and glad to be part of the Franklin County family! Coach Kim Johnson

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Local The Times | A15 Thursday, June 26, 2014 Special to the Times On Friday, June 20, a 14-foot, 2,300-pound shark passed about 60 miles south of St. George Island headed west. Experts say she may be headed for Texas. Katharine, a white shark (Latin name: carcharodon carcharias) has taken on celebrity status along with dozens of other sharks tagged with electronic tracking devices. The lovely Katharine, Kat for short, now has star status due to her unusual migratory meanderings. Chris Fischer is founder and expedition leader for OCEARCH, an acronym combing Ocean and Research, a non-prot organization with a global reach for research on great white sharks and other large apex predators. He said Katharine has become particularly popular among about 50 sharks being tracked because she often swims close to shore. I think what makes her special is she swam right down the east coast of Florida, right through Miami, right around Key West and then showed us for the rst time in history how the white shark gets up into the Gulf of Mexico, Fischer said in an interview with Computerworld. When she swims through these populated areas ... more and more people feel included and join in the movement. Though sharks like Katharine typically cruise up and down the eastern seaboard, she is currently crossing the Gulf of Mexico. Experts from OCEARCH believe she may be heading past the Mississippi River for the Texas coastline. Originally tagged by OCEARCH researchers off Cape Cod last August, she was named after Katharine Lee Bates, a Cape Cod native and writer of the patriotic song America the Beautiful. A dorsal n tag attached by OCEARCH uses a satellite to track a Katharines position each time she breaks the surface. Other tags include an RFID implant whose ping is picked up whenever the shark passes a special, underwater buoy; an accelerometer, similar to the technology used in an iPhone or Nintendo Wii, that detects up or down movement; and a Pop-off Satellite Archive Tag (PSAT), which acts as a general archive, recording average water depth, temperature and light levels. OCEARCH is a nonprot, global shark-tracking project that uses four tagging technologies to create a threedimensional image of a sharks activities. Researchers hope to develop successful conservation and management strategies by studying shark habits in detail. Katharine has become a social media sensation. Tens of thousands of people have visited the OCEARCH website in recent weeks, and its Facebook page has received as many as ve million visits a week and many of those visitors are looking for information about Katharine. On several occasions, she has crashed the servers at OCREACH. Why so much interest? In addition to her shoreline hugging habits, she may be pregnant. According to researchers, male white sharks and nonpregnant females typically return to breeding grounds every year, while pregnant females return every two years because of an 18month gestation period. Cape Cod is a white shark breeding ground, and typically, this time of year the sh begin voyaging back to that area, but not Katharine. Observers speculate this is because shes not trying to breed this year, which could mean she is already expecting. Katharine is also very interesting because this is the rst time a white shark has been tracked entering the Gulf. Up until now, researchers were uncertain of where the white sharks occasionally seen in the Gulf of Mexico came from. Well, Katharine came from New England. She traveled straight down the East Coast, past Miami and Key West und up the western side of the peninsula remaining within 200 miles of the shore the whole way and often venturing much closer. Should you stay out of the water knowing Katharine may be lurking there? Actually, Katharine is far more likely to be injured by humans than to injure one. Fischer said that 50 percent of the sharks tagged have been commercially caught and killed over the last year. This does help one understand the mind-blowing statistic that up to 100 million sharks per year are caught and killed, some just nned for a bowl of soup, he said. A research project that was started to advance science for conservation purposes has become a wakeup call for the global community to grasp the signicant mortality rate of shark populations. Over 50 researchers from more than 20 institutions have collaborated with OCEARCH to date with over three dozen research papers in process or completed. According to its website, OCEARCH expeditions, through the support of Caterpillar and other partners such as Costa, Yeti, Yamaha, Contender, SAFE boats and Mustad, generate satellite tracks and other forms of data for sharks, with planned expansion to other species in the future. Seventeen research expeditions have been conducted to date, with seven more scheduled through the end of 2015. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m Money is available to in crease the curbside appeal of Carrabelle businesses. The Carrabelle Commu nity Redevelopment Agen cy has a mission to reduce and eliminate blight within the designated redevelop ment area or district. To that end, they are offering grants to spiff up the busi ness district. A brochure and application forms for the program were debuted at a CRA meeting held Tuesday, June 17. The Community Re investment Act part of the Housing and Commu nity Development Act of 1977 is a federal law de signed to encourage com mercial banks and savings associations to help meet the needs of borrowers in all segments of their communities, including lowand moderate-income neighborhoods. The Com munity Reinvestment Act requires federal regulators to assess the record of each bank or thrift in helping to fulll its obligations to lend to low and moderate income borrowers. This record will then be used in evaluating applications for future approval of bank mergers, charters, acquisi tions, branch openings and deposit facilities. A CRA designates a district in need of revital ization. A baseline of tax revenue is set at the time of designation. From that date forward, any increase in property tax revenue, above the baseline, goes into a fund to be used to im prove structures within the district. Carrabelle established their CRA in 1993. Since then CRA, funds have been used toe upgrade public ar eas with landscaping and sidewalks. Now, the city is making CRA funds available as grants to upgrade exist ing buildings to improve appearance and environ ment, improve functional ity, eliminate code viola tions, and help ll vacant or underused spaces within the commercial district. According to a press release concerning the grants, The CRA seeks to increase pride of owner ship and to get feet on the street. Crowded sidewalks and occupied store-fronts indicate healthy economic activity and a safe environ ment; a place for people to come and enjoy. There is no fee to apply for a CRA grant; however, making application does not entitle the applicant to funding. Application must be made prior to Septem ber 2014 to be included in the next funding cycle if approved. The grant seeking pro cess begins with a pre-ap plication conference with CRA Director Courtney Millender to determine eligibility. Next, an appli cation must be led by the owner(s) of the property. Please submit applica tion and all documents as a complete package. In complete packets will be returned. A checklist will be provided. CRA staff will review and approve or deny the application packets in the order in which they are received. Once approved for fund ing, the grant recipient and CRA Director shall sign a Carrabelle Commercial Building Faade Grant Agreement. that describes the obligations and limita tions of the grant award. Next, all required plan review and building per mits must be approved and issued. When this is done, the project may proceed with the CRA obligated to reim burse costs as approved in the agreement. Any modications to nal plans will require re view and written approval from the CRA Director and board. Once the work is com plete, the grant recipient will be responsible to ar range for any required onsite inspection by the appli cable city or county ofcials as well as the CRA Direc tor. Improvements will be documented and compared with what was proposed at the time of application. If any discrepancies are not ed, the CRA has the right to request the discrepancies be corrected. Recipient also submits written proof of payment for all improvements. Interested parties may request an application for grant funding from the CRA Director. In order to promote the revitalization of the com mercial core of the rede velopment district, the current 2014-2015 grant program funding will be limited to properties with no identied code viola tions, unless the proposed improvements serve to correct violations. Properties must pay taxes to the county and have no signage or struc tures that violate existing land development or other code regulations, unless the violations will be corrected by the work described in the grant. Properties current and proposed future use must conform to the zoning map and must be legally permit ted commercial activities. Occupants must have maintained all required li censing to operate, as well as being current on all city utility accounts. For qualifying projects, expenses are eligible for an 80 percent grant rebate. The maximum amount of a proposed project is $20,000, thus the maximum grantfunding amount is capped at $16,000. Awards are currently limited to one award, per parcel, per CRA Fiscal Year (October thru September). Improved areas must be visible from the street or other public space. Labor and material costs that may be covered include professional design and engineering services re lated to exterior qualifying faade improvements. Types of eligible improve ments include removal or restoration of deteriorated or sub-standard exterior building material; masonry work or new stucco, brick or repairs; exterior paint ing; new or replacement windows, doors and wood work; removal or replace ment of signs, awnings, landscaping and fencing. Paving can be replaced. Roof repair or replacement may be included. Grants may be used to bring buildings in compli ance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Millender said informa tion about the grants has already been posted on FaceBook and the citys website. Funds will not be available until after the citys budget hearings but we wanted to go ahead and accept applications so we could get a feel for how much many to set aside for the grants, she said. I dont believe I told that! Least thats what everybody tells me when I tell it. Its like, Keep yo mouth shut and let folks think youre stupid or say something and remove all doubt. It wasnt the dumbest thing I have ever done but it ranks right up at the top. Ive claimed to be a lot of things but smart aint one of em. So here goes. Im on my sixth Toyota Land Cruiser since 1972. I just like em. My last one was a 1987, that had belonged to two different Mamas and all they did was haul kids back and to, and such and they had never even put it in four-wheel drive. It was nice and I have to have something like that to pull out my 28-foot Adventure Craft houseboat, Lily, my river tour boat. So when a storms coming I haul her out on this big special made trailer and park her in our front yard right across from the boat ramp at the Mill Pond. (The city got a grant to build a boat yard and a haul-out right in our front yard almost and theres a big pile of dirt where theyre diggin a retention pond. At rst I thought they might be building a community Olympic swimming pool, which would have been a lot better than the dog park they proposed at one time.) Any way this storm was comin and so I gured Id better haul Lily out, so I drove her down Scipio Creek to the Mill Pond, tied her up and got my Land Cruiser with the trailer hooked up and positioned them on the boat ramp in gear with the emergency brake on like Ive done no tellin how many times. Now Lily has a lot of surface area so when the winds blowin its like trying to dock a sailboat with the sails up. Whenever I do this, Lane always asks if she can help but me being so hard headed I always say, No thanks. So I cranked Lily up and started linin her up to get on the trailer, well the wind was blowing straight up Scipio Creek really hard and I was having a time controllin her and gettin her lined up but I nally did and everything was perfect, almost snug but not quite. So, I gave her a little goose and when I did my truck jumped out of gear and here she came rolling down the boat ramp toward me. You cant image a worse helpless, sinking feeling, but I was able to brace my truck with my boat and hold her steady until a gust got me and I knocked out my back window, then I knew I was done for and my Land Cruiser was headed for the bottom of the creek. When, lo and behold, out of nowhere came these three guys who got in the water, secured my truck, then pulled my truck and trailer out with their truck, unhooked my trailer and towed my truck to my yard, came back hooked up my trailer with their truck and pulled out Lily. Of course they wouldnt let me do anything for them and they came back by my house three times just to see if I was OK, they werent worried about my equipment they were concerned about me. Hey, thats the way it is around here, everybody looks after each other, if you need help you dont have to ask. What a blessing for me that Larry Segree and his crew were working on their shrimp boat at the Mill Pond when I needed help. By the way, I got a 1985 Land Cruiser and its better than the one I sunk. My trucks keep getting older and better, but, hey, so do I. Your friend, Capt. Gill GILL AUTREY Great white shark Katharine bypasses island Katherine on the day she was tagged in Cape Cod. R SNOW | OCREACH SPECI A L T O THE T IME S Carrabelles CRA district covers the business district from the pavilion to the Tillie Miller Bridge. Contact the city for Carrabelle CRA grants

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 Crossword PUZZLE Crossword SOLUTION Franklin Franklin focus This new page is being created to feature photographs submitted to the Times by our readers. We would like to make this page a regular addition to The Times, an opportunity for the photographers from throughout Franklin County, both residents and visitors alike, to highlight their best work capturing the beauty, excitement, energy and adventure of the world around them. Please send photographs to Dadlerstein@star .com. For more information, call 653-8894. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Enjoying the St. George island beach are, from left, Maliah Lockley, Kylee Smith and Kelsey Grif n. These acrobats passed through Carrabelle four years ago. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times An indigo bunting and a cardinal spotted in Carrabelle. ROD GASCHE | Special to the Times Members of the cast of Swamp Gas production at Franklin County School terrorize the neighborhood. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Tommy Stevens with his hawk Mylo. MICHAEL ALLEN | Special to the Times Sunrise at the St. George Island bridge.

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Local The Times | A17 Thursday, June 26, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces AD VERTISE HERE TO DA Y 227-7847 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EAR S E XPERIENCE P. O. Bo x4 39 Car ra belle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 00 66499 RG 00 65255 From staff reports The Nest has summer openings The Nests Afterschool and Summer Program is looking for children who want to do fun things with their friends this summer. There still are openings at both the Carrabelle and Eastpoint site. Summer Camp is Monday through Thursday (closed on Fridays) until July 31. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. There are fun activities planned throughout the summer. A Courtyard Garden is in the works and there will be writing, illustrating and publishing books this summer. Children also can participate in other activities, such as art, checkers/chess, character ed. technology, health and nutrition, computer, dance and drama. Free breakfast and lunch will be served. You will need to provide a snack for your child for the afternoon snack time. There will be limited snacks for those who do not have one; however, they might not be available every day. The Carrabelle site is at 1001 Gray Ave. and the Eastpoint site is at 85 School Road. Culinary classes at Gulf/ Franklin campus this fall Beginning this fall, students will have the opportunity to enroll in culinary classes at the Gulf/ Franklin Campus. These courses are designed to prepare students for employment as a chefs apprentice. In addition to gaining the knowledge and skills needed to become employed as a chefs apprentice, students who complete the chefs apprentice certi cate can continue their education and receive an associate of science degree in culinary management. The rst culinary courses offered by the Gulf/Franklin Campus will begin Aug. 25. For additional information regarding the culinary program, please contact Loretta Costin at 2279670, ext. 5503 or by email at lcostin@gulfcoast. edu. ANERR to host public meeting The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is hosting a public meeting and invites local and regional stakeholders to provide input to state and federal entities about what the reserve does and receive input on what stakeholders think the reserve should do that it doesnt. This includes a discussion of what the Reserve has accomplished in the last ve years. This meeting is part of an evaluation of reserve programs by NOAA, done once every ve years. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 1, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Written comments on your evaluation of reserve programs are encouraged, and participation at the public meeting is not required for submission. Written comments should be sent to Carrie Hall NOAA/NOS/OCRM, 1305 EastWest Highway, N/ORM7, Silver Spring, MD 20910, or via email to Carrie.Hall@noaa.gov no later than July 12. New correctional of cer course starts Aug. 25 A new correctional of cer program will be starting at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe, on Monday, Aug. 25. The program to prepare students for employment as correctional of cers includes the basic standards courses mandated for certi cation as a correctional of cer in Florida. Students who graduate from this program would typically work as correctional of cers within a county or state correctional facility. Upon completion of this program, students are eligible to take the state of cer certi cation exam for correctional of cers. The program, conducted using the new shorter curriculum, will meet Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for about three months. For more information, please call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 or email her at bburkett@gulfcoast.edu. A pplication deadline for Pell Grants and other nancial aid is fast approaching, so please call today or come by the of ce in Building B at the Gulf/Franklin Campus, 3800 Garrison Ave., Port St. Joe, to pick up your application packet. Two Alligator Point variances approved On June 16, county commissioners unanimously approved two variances recommended by the Board of Adjustments both at Alligator Point. The rst was a request to construct a single family dwelling 15 feet into the front setback line off of Fiesta Drive on property described as Lot 57, Holiday Beach, Unit 1, Alligator Point. The requested variance allowed owner Daniel Scheer to avoid encroaching on wetlands. The second was a request was to construct a single family dwelling 13 feet into the front setback line off of Alligator Drive on property at 1237 Alligator Drive. The variance allows owner Leenette McMillan to avoid encroaching on the dunes. McMillian resigns from hospital board At the June 16 meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce told commissioners that Homer McMillan of Carrabelle resigned from the Hospital Advisory Board. McMillan was appointed out of Commissioner William Masseys district. Massey said he had two possible replacements and was waiting to hear from them. Speed signs for Las Brisas At the June 16 county meeting, commissioners instructed Superintendent of Public Works Howard Nabors to install 25-mph speed limit signs in the Las Brisas community in Eastpoint. Residents requested the signs as a method of calming traf c in the development. News BRIEFS Saturday movie at Camp Gordon Johnston The lm Biloxi Blues will be shown Saturday morning at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II museum in Carrabelle. Biloxi Blues was the second of playwright Neil Simons semi-autobiographical trilogy (No. 1 was Brighton Beach Memoirs; No. 3 was Broadway Bound). Matthew Broderick stars as Simons alter ego Eugene Morris Jerome, who is drafted and shipped off to boot camp in Biloxi, Missi., in the waning days of World War II. The story begins as 20-year-old Jerome, from Brooklyn, is sent to Biloxi for basic training. There he meets a diverse assortment of soldiers, including the gentle intelligent Arnold Epstein (Corey Parker), the plays central gure. The piece portrays Epsteins struggle for power with middle-aged, harddrinking platoon leader Sgt. Merwin J. Toomey (Christopher Walken). In the plays most memorable scene, Epstein manages to force Toomey to perform 200 pushups in front of the platoon. The lm will be shown at 10:15 a.m. Saturday, June 28, at the museum, 1001 Gray Ave. in Carrabelle. Free popcorn will be available. Entry by donation and appreciated Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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A18| The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1130260FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENTPosition: Entry Level Closing Date: 7/10/2014 Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Fonda D. Davis, Director Solid Waste & Recycling Department 210 State Road 65, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 Phone (850) 670-8167e Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/ Armative Action/ Drug Free Workplace EmployerKnowledge, Skills and Abilities: AN EMPLOYEE IN THIS POSITION WILL OPERATE VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAVY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS ASSOCIATED WITH LANDFILL OPERATIONS, RIGHT OF-WAY DEBRIS REMOVAL AND RECYCLING ACTITITIES. OPERATE TRASH COMPACTOR TO COMPACT CLASS III WASTE AT THE COUNTY LANDFILL. OPERATE AIR CURTAIN INCINERATOR TO BURN YARD DEBRIS. OPERATE KNUCKLEBOOM TRUCK FOR RIGHT OF WAY DEBRIS REMOVAL. OPERATE TRACTORS, AND DRIVE DUMP TRUCKS TO HAUL EQUIPMENT. OPERATE EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS, AND PUSH MOWERS ETC. MUST HAVE THE ABILITY TO WASH, CLEAN AND PERFORM MINOR PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE ON ASSIGNED EQUIPMENT. ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE USING SPEECH, VISION AND HEARING; LIFT HEAVY OBJECTS (OVER 50 POUNDS); PUSH, PULL, WALK, STAND, KNEEL, BEND, STOOP, AND CLIMB; SIT IN A RESTRICTIVE POSITION FOR LONG PERIODS OF TIME. WORK OUTSIDE IN VARYING WEATHER CONDITIONS; WORK IS SUBJECT TO EXCESSIVE DIRT, GRIME, DUST, SOILING OF CLOTHING, EQUIPMENT NOISE AND VIBRATION, AND AT TIMES EXTREME TEMPERATURES AND HUMIDITY. ANIMAL CONTROL DUTIES MAYBE REQUIRED. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT.Minimum Qualication: Graduation from an accredited High School; or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma; and at least one (1) year prior experience in operating or driving the above mentioned equipment or any combination of training and experience which provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities to perform the job. Require knowledge of Florida trac laws with basic understanding of safety procedures. You must possess a Florida Drivers License with a favorable driving record. Must obtain a Class A Commercial Driving License (CDL) within the 6 months probation period. Supervising State Inmates may be required. 95254T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000275 DIVISION: US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON MORTGAGE SECURITIES CORP., CSMC MORTGAGEBACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 20067, PLAINTIFF vs. CONSTANCE CARVER ET AL, DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, and entered in Case No. 19-2012CA-000275 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp., CSMC Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-7, is the Plaintiff and Constance Carver and Daniel A. Dush, are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Aplachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 A.M. ET, Franklin County, Florida at on the 18th day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 26 AND 27, EACH BEING 50 FEET BY 199.5 FEET OF BLOCK 105, ACCORDING TO AN UNRECORDED 1956 MAP. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF JEFFERSON STREET, 1,418 FEET SOUTH AND 898.5 FEET WEST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID NORTH-WEST QUARTER, THENCE EAST 199.5 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 100 FEET, THENCE WEST 199.5 FEET, THENCE NORTH 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 30 JEFFERSON ST EASTPOINT FL 32328-3327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC-010329F01 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 19, 26, 2014 99329 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000375 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 3811 Frederica Road St. Simons Island, GA 31522, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM PARKER III, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff’s Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 2459.17 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 2175.67 FEET TO RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONINTUE NORTH 80 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 362.72 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN SOUTH 14 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 263.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 363.08 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 289.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1704 HWY 67A, CARABELLE, FL 32322, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on July 16, 2014, at 11:00a.m EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons with Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office no later than seven days prior to the proceeding. BILL KINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 2014 _______________________ ______________ Deputy Clerk 95332T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2012-CA-000084 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. BENJAMIN H. DILSAVER, ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, in the abovestyled cause, The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at on the SECOND FLOOR LOBBY; facing Hwy 98 of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on July 2, 2014 at 11:00 am the following described property: LOT 10, BLOCK 15 WEST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 472 BAYSHORE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850)5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated on June 16, 2014. By: Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FBN: 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com 11-12790-FC June 19, 26, 2014 95324T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000438 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. JANE B. PALMIER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order Cancelling and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated 9th day of June, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 19-2012-CA-000438 in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST the Plaintiff, and JANE B. PALMIER, et al, are the Defendants. Franklin County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 2, BLOCK “B”, BALD POINT ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES 43, 44 AND 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on 13th day of August, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 9, 2014 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provsion of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 W. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith, He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. June 26, July 3, 2014 95386T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN, COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 14-31-CP IN RE: ESTATE KAREN LEE HILDEBRANDT NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Karen Lee Hildebrandt, deceased, whose date of death was May 10, 2014; is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 14-31-14; the address of which is The Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: June 26. Personal Representative Loretta Westbrook 1949 Cape Street Carrabelle, Florida 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Charles A. Curran, FL Bar No. 274380 P.O. Box 549 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Phone (850) 697-5333 Email: cacurranlaw@ gmail.com June 26, July 3, 2014 99273T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISON CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000322 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., et al., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on July 9, 2014 at 11:00 AM (EST), at FRANKLIN County Courthouse Inside 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Lot 39, Beacon Ridge, Phase 3, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; LESS AND EXCEPT lands as shown in Official Records Book 905, Page 319 and Official Records Book 905, Page 328 and being described as: Begin at the Southwest corner of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence commence South 89 degrees 58 minutes 41 seconds East 668.32 feet to a round 3” concrete monument (#2919); thence commence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 30 seconds East 149.18 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261); thence North 60 degrees 06 minutes 23 seconds East 1042.87 feet to an iron rod and cap (#6475); thence North 34 degrees 16 minutes 01 seconds East 60 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261); thence North 55 degrees 43 minutes 59 seconds West 19.7 feet to a said iron rod and cap (#4261); thence continue North 55 degrees 47 minutes 30 seconds West 222.42 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261) which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 49 degrees 15 minutes 21 seconds East 890.62 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261); thence South 42 degrees 22 minutes 39 seconds West 391.67 feet; thence North 54 degrees 47 minutes 30 seconds West 107.75 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel 1.06 acres +/-as shown on survey by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc. Revised 7/14/05. TOGETHER WITH a 2004 Nobility Kingswood 66x28 Manufactured Home, Serial Numbers N8-11583A and N8-11583B. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: May 21, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. June 19, 26, 2014 99295T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192010CA 000190CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. CONSTANCE M. WOOD, ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 14th day of March, 2014, and entered in Case No. 192010CA 000190CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, l will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 A.M. on the 9th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 25 OF BLOCK F, ST. JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, PHASE 11, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 PAGES 23-29, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: Lot 25 Royal Tern Way, Carrabelle, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 7th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 19, 26, 2014 99321T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TIM OR CHRISTINA SAUNDERS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 313 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: Lot 14 ANGLERS HARBOR Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 19-07S-04W-1001-0000-01 40 Name is which assessed: BRYAN L. SANFORD & MICHAEL FORLUND All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST 2014, which is the 4th day of AUGUST 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th day of JUNE, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 10, 17, 2014 99319T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, THOMAS J. WEBB, III, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 159 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Lot 5 Block 153 City of Apalachicola Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0153-00 50 Name is which assessed: COLLIE MACK EDWARDS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST 2014, which is the 4th day of AUGUST 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th day of JUNE, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 10, 17, 2014 99339T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-417-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN REYNOLDS, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated, entered in Case No. 13-417-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Marilyn Reynolds, a single woman; Tress Anderson a/k/a Tress Mara Anderson a/k/a Tress M. Dameron, a married woman; Lighthouse Ridge Estates Unit III Homeowners’ Association, Inc.; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Inside 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11: 00 o’clock a.m. onAug ust 13, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit “A”. EXHIBIT “A” LOT 65, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to, the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet, thence run South 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence run North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 26, 2014 The Times | A19 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 112495625DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546WebID34284625 1124986SalesAssociate/PawnBrokerWouldyouliketomakegreatmoneyworking4x10 hrdaysaweek?Dan'sPawnislookingforenergetic, friendly,hard-workingteammembersinterestedin long-termemployment.Weoersalescommissions andfull-timeemployment,performancerewards, referralbonuses,professionaldevelopment,exible scheduleandagreatteamofco-workers!Ifyou areactiveandoutgoing,wecantrain.Mustbe18, physicallyt,andHSD/GED.DrugFree.NOcriminal background,ValidFLDL.Experienceaplus! Bilingualaplus!Checkusoutatdanspawn.comand applyinpersonat1314BayviewAve.,Mon-Fri10AM4PM,orcallforanappt(850)481-1115. WebID#:34292608 SECURITYOFFICERS ANDSUPERVISORS.Startingat$9.50/hr.Allpositionsarepermanent.1-888-948-2738or 850-563-1022WebID#:34292398 NOWHIRING 1124983 1129191 fornewKFCinCallaway.1+yearsmanagerial experiencepreferred.Applyatjobs.kfc.comorfax resumeto334-702-0302 RESTAURANT GENERALMANAGER 4518422The MainStay Suites is NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Guest Service Agent Full Time Position Thursday to Sunday 3:00 PM to 11:00PMCandidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. MainStay Suites 3951 E. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 550.00/mo. 2. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Furnished. W/D, fenced yard. 525.00/mo. 3. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, unfurnished. 450.00/mo. 4. 39-1 Carlton. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, carport. 650.00/mo. incl. utilities 5. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach. 1400.00/mo. 6. 202 1st St NE, Carrabelle. 5 bedroom, 2 baths, unfurnished. 1000.00/mo. 7. 1108 Tallahassee St., Carrabelle. 3 bedroom, 3 baths, unfurnished. 500.00/mo.8. 302 Woodill Rd., Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, W/D, 1 acre. 500.00/mo.9. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished. 550.00/mo. 10. 33-2 Holland. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 500.00/mo. 11. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 12. 811 Three Rivers Rd. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on water, deep water dock, garage, fenced yard, parking. 1000.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518300 said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 657.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41-seconds for an arc distance of 234.42 feel, thence run North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 111.58 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said rightof-way boundary 128.81 feet, thence run, South 59 degrees 44 minutes 15 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 128.81 feet, thence run North 59 degrees 44 minutes 15 minutes seconds West 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 66, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet, thence run South 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence run North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 East along said right-of-way boundary 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and aIong said curve with a radius of 657.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an are distance of 234.42 feet, thence run North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 240.39 feet to a point of curve to the right for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arch distance of 137.00 feet, thence run South 57 degrees 23 minutes 40 seconds East 350.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 3000.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arc distance of 122.68 feet, the chord of said arc being South 21 degrees 26 minutes 03 seconds West 122.67 feet, thence run North 59 degrees 44 minutes 15 seconds West 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 13th day of June, 2014. Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Court By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 2014 99359T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000252 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Jeffrey W. Little a/k/a Jeffrey Little; Alecia McCallister; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000252 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Jeffrey W. Little a/k/a Jeffrey Little are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on July 16, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 5, SUN ‘N SAND BEACHES, UNIT NO. 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 N. Federal Hwy, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-243341 FC02 CHE June 26, July 3, 2014 99351T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: July 12, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Jasmen Yon Bradley Charlton Judy Terry Before the sale date of July 12, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. June 26, July 3, 2014 99403T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000040 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., PLAINTIFF vs. SABRINA N. EVANS, ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 13, 2014, and entered in Case No. 19-2013-CA-000040 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Sabrina N. Evans, et al., are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 A.M. ET, Franklin County, Florida at on the 21st day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 4, BLOCK 212 (OLD BLOCK 49), KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1008 TALLAHASSEE ST. CARRABELLE, FL 32322-3209 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 17th day of June, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC-002819F01 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 26, July 3, 2014 Puppies: Hybrid Labra-Gold Retrievers $375 includes over $125 of vet preventitive care Born 3/20/14 Website: www .gracefulgoldenretriever atindianpass.com or Call Bob 850-227-2185 txt FL92479 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 GUN SHOWJuly 5 & 6 Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL92777 to 56654 GUN SHOW PENSACOLA FAIRGROUNDSJune 28th and 29th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL91098 to 56654 Banking Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 EducationInfant/Toddler CaregiversThis position provide quality early care and education to children age 0-3 years. CDA plus training and experience in working with young children accepted along with the willingness to receive additional training. Pay scale: $10.10-$12.70, plus excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34293148 Text FL93148 to 56654 EducationEarly Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and organizational skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34293147 Text FL93147 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291810 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291809 Medical/HealthClinical Case ManagerHuman Services Agency is seeking a Clinical Case Manager to provide input and case oversight to a Juvenile Diversionary Alternative Program for arrested youths. Position will require travel throughout Pensacola, Panama City, and Tallahassee areas. The incumbent must have a master’s degree in a social or behavioral science and two years of experience in youth and family counseling. Familiarity with the juvenile justice system and community resources are preferred. Please note the position title for which you are applying on any correspondence. Qualified applicants must complete a DISC Village employment application and submit to: 3333 W. Pensacola St., Suite 330, Tallahassee, FL 32304. Applications may be downloaded at www.discvillage.com. A separate application is required for each position applied for. EOE/Drug-Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34291658 Commercial Building For Rent. Hwy 98 Apalach 1000sf High Traffic 850-653-6900 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103Text FL86476 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. Available August 1 850-653-3838 Text FL92303 to 56654 Apalachicola : 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. 1br Cottage $400/mo Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft, Open Plan, 1Br, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Secluded in Trees, 1/2 mile from Beach. $400 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL92051 to 56654 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat, AWD Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. Ultimate Off Road SUV $21,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Susie’s Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.

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Local A20 | The Times Thursday, June 26, 2014 Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times To day (850) 653-886 8 YO UR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE TH AN 120 YE ARS YO UR HO MET OWN NE WSP APE R FOR MOR E TH AN 120 YE ARS TH E T IME S & C arrabel le A palachicola Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks Be autifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular Ba ya nd Br idge views with man yn ew upda te s. Re modeled ki tc hen (new ca binets ,c oun te rt ops ,s ink ,d isposal ,s tov e, dish wa sher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea tr ee ct iv ew indo w lm; 3l gB Rs with new mast er BA; priv ate oc ej ust o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2w alk -i nc losets .T his house is per fe ct fo re nt er taining with ah uge fr on tp or ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and wo od burning r eplac e. La ndsc ape has irriga tion we ll and na tiv ep lan ts .H igh ecienc yh ea t pump ,n ew ro of ,6a dditional in ro of insula tion. Sh immering Sa nds Re alt y STE VE HARRI S Ce ll: 850 -890-19 71 st ev e@s te ve sisla nd .com www .st ev esisl and .com ww w. 332 Co okS tr eet .com 29,000 REDUCED 850-899-5104 |8 50-697-9010 www .coasta lr eal tyinfo .com Cha rm in gh ou se on 1a cr ew it hin wa lk in gd is ta nce to bea ch .L ar ge scr ee ne dp or ch fo rc at ch in gb re ez es .O pe n o or pl an wi th ki tc he no ve rl oo ki ng r ep la ce in gr ea t ro om .R em od el ed an dm ov ei nr ea dy .D oes we ll on va ca ti on re nt al ma rk et MLS# 251526 $499,000 St. George Island GU LF VIE WH OM E We ll ma in ta in ed fu rn is he dh om ew it hs pe ct ac ul ar vi ew s of th eG ulf fr om th re el ev el s, 5B R, 4B A, La rg ep oo lw it h pr iva cy fe nc e, 3c ov er ed de ck s, El ev at or sh af tc ur re nt ly us ed fo rs to ra ge ,p an tr y&l in en cl os et s, We st Gu lf Be ac h Michael Billing s 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com Ma ry Se ym ou r (8 50 )7 28 -8 57 8 MLS# 250893 $34,900 Ap alachicola AP AL AC HI CO LA HI ST OR IC NO RT HS ID E Tw olo tP ar ce lo nt he CO RN ER of 5t h&A ve K! 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Bo th guest bedr ooms ha ve priv ate ba ths and the d en c an ser ve as a4 th be dr oo mw ith ah alf ba th or oc e / cr af tr oom .B eautiful full por ches for easy en te rt aining and enjo ying the Gu lf view .T hi sh ome also has ag as r eplac ea nd oak oors thr oughou tt he living/din ing ar eas .S qua re foo tage ,a cr eage and lot dimensions ar et ak en fr om Co un ty Pr oper ty Ap pr aiser s we bsit e. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-1 971 ww w. st ev esisland .com www .P o si t iv eS paceH ome .com REDUCED Ma ry Se ym ou r (8 50 )7 28 -8 57 8 ML S# 25 20 91 97 2E .G ul fB eac hD r. ,S t. Ge or ge Is lan d, FL Hig ha nd dr y2 nd ti er lo tl oc at ed in th eE as tG ul f Be ac he so eri ng gr ea tg ul fv ie ws Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. 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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) What was Aaron Spellings rst TV series as a writer/producer? Paladin, Johnny Ringo, Burkes Law, Love Boat 2) In 1965 who patented Pampers disposable diapers? Woodruff, Williams, Duncan, Johnson 3) Which mountain is the highest point above sea level in Louisiana? Sassafras, Mitchell, Daemon, Driskill 4) In relation to Elvis, who was Jesse Garon Presley? Father, Brother, Uncle, Cousin 5) How old was Stevie Wonder on having his rst No. 1 song? 10, 12, 14, 16 6) What year marked the death of humorist Erma Bombeck? 1985, 1990, 1996, 2002 7) What singing group did the Wilson brothers form in 1961? Doobie Brothers, Jan and Dean, Lettermen, Beach Boys 8) What former boxing champion is/was famed for his cooking grills? Holyeld, Foreman, Ali, Frazier 9) When did China detonate its rst atomic bomb? 1944, 1954, 1964, 1974 10) Whos Robert Allen Zimmerman? Bob Dylan, Neil Diamond, Mick Jagger, David Bowie 11) What is a Canada two-penny black? Stamp, Bird, Car, Rie 12) How many dice are used in the game of Yahtzee? 2, 3, 4, 5 13) What city bills itself as the Biggest Little City in the World? Reno, Atlantic City, Gatlinburg, Myrtle Beach 14) Rats fed a lowcalorie diet do what about 50 percent longer than other rats? Live, Sleep, Squeak, Run ANSWERS 1) Johnny Ringo. 2) Duncan. 3) Driskill. 4) Brother. 5) 12. 6) 1996. 7) Beach Boys. 8) Foreman. 9) 1964. 10) Bob Dylan. 11) Stamp. 12) 5. 13) Reno. 14) Live. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com