The Apalachicola times

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00275

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, July 10, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM D EAEA D LILI N ESES F OO R N EE X TT WEEWEE K: SS chool News & SS ociety: 11 a.m. Friday Real EE state AA ds: 11 a.m. Thursday LL egal AA ds: 11 a.m. Friday CC lassied Display AA ds: 11 a.m. Friday CC lassied LL ine AA ds: 5 p.m. Monday CC ontact Us OO ut to see II ndex By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A referendum to double the county’s 2 percent bed tax appears to be headed for the November ballot. At the July 1 county meeting, Tourist Develop ment Council (TDC) board members Paul Parker and Walter Armistead request ed the proposed increase be placed on the regular ballot to save the cost of a special election. Last September, backto-back motions by Com missioner and TDC Chair Pinki Jackel, to double the county’s bed tax and then to increase it by just one percentage point, both died for lack of a second. At last week’s meeting, commissioners voted 41 to place the question of doubling the tax to a pub lic referendum, with Com missioner Noah Lockley opposed. The discussion was then tabled while the TDC considered the referendum. At the same meeting, Lockley moved to bring the administration of the TDC in-house, but the measure failed by a 2-3 vote, with Commission ers Cheryl Sanders, Wil liam Massey and Jackel opposed. On July 1, Jackel told commissioners the TDC board had voted unani mously to request the ref erendum be placed on the November ballot. Parker told commission ers the increase is needed to end the off-season and County to consider bed tax hike By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School had an enviable performance on this past school year’s end-ofcourse examinations, tests of state standards that play an increasingly important role in determining stu dents’ achievement. All 17 of the ABC School eighth grad ers who took the Algebra I Florida End of Course (EOC) Assessments passed them, well ahead of the state average of just 66 percent. Statewide, the two highest categories, the 4s and 5s, each included 14 percent of the more than 207,000 Florida students who took this exam for the rst time. “The majority (at the ABC School) were 4s and 5s,” said ABC School VicePrincipal Elizabeth Kirvin. The biggest chunk of Florida stu dents, 38 percent, earned a 3, consid ered a passing score. The remaining third of all students throughout the state did not pass the EOC, and includ ed an assortment of twice as many 2s as there were 1s. Kirvin credited the success to two math teachers, Karen Ward, who teaches seventh grade math, and Melanie Copeland, who is in her fourth year there and teaches algebra. In addition, nearly three-quarters of the 26 ABC School seventh graders, 73 percent, who took the Civics EOC assessment, passed it. These 19 stu dents all scored in the highest third, at a rate double the state average on the test, which was administered for the rst time last spring. ABC schoolteacher Tanya Joanos, who is moving to the Wakulla County Schools next year, “did an excellent job with civics students,” said Kirvin. ”They performed exceptionally well.” The EOC testing, which also ex tends to Biology 1, Geometry and U.S. History, are a key part of the state’s Next Generation Strategic Plan to boost student achievement and im prove college and career readiness. ABC middle schoolers nail EOCs By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com There’s no grand and el egant way to put it: Apalachic ola busted a move at its third annual July 3 Independence Day celebration like nobody’s business. The party on the day pre ceding the day 238 years ago when the Declaration of In dependence was signed by 56 revolutionaries, was by far bigger than and as good as ever, climaxing in an electri fying reworks display that shimmered over the river. Sponsored by Apalachicola Main Street, in partnership with the city, the event ex panded the two previous years with an all-day affair that may have brought as many as 7,000 people downtown, ac cording to law enforcement crowd estimates. “From the hump of the Third 3rd’s a charm AA PALACHICOLA 4TH OfF J uU LY D A A V I I D AA D LE LE R STEI STEI N | The Times The Hillside Choir performed gospel music. At top reworks shimmer over the Apalachicola River AA nnual July 3 celebration explodes with excitement See THI rdRD A2 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com County commissioners last week pressed Weems Memorial Hospital executives on the need to expand hospital employee benets, including a retirement package. At a joint meeting July 1 with the hospital board, requested by the county, commissioners made it clear they would like the hospi tal to move forward on boosting compensation. At the same time, Weems ex ecutives told the county the hospi tal’s nancial situation is gradually improving, and that it is essential to maintain and expand the facility as a vital economic engine. The joint meeting did not ad dress the upcoming transition at the top, as Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth is leaving next week to return to Iowa, and assume an executive post there. Over the July 4 weekend, members of the hospi tal board played host to a leading candidate for the Weems job. By unanimous vote, the county commis sion on July 1 approved $75,000 in settlements in a nearly ve-year-old case in which a hospi tal ambulance struck a vehicle on the Gorrie bridge. Attorney Scott Se gal, a member of the team of litigation counsel hired through the Florida League of Cities, recommended that the county accept two settlement agree ments, with Patricia Rickards and her daughter Kay la Rickards. The accident took place in Nov. 2009 fol lowing the Florida Seafood Festival when a county ambulance rear-ended the Rick ards’ vehicle on the bay bridge. “There is no dispute who was responsible for the acci dent (but there is to the) nature and extent of injuries sustains County pushes on Weems employee benets See EOC s A11 SS COTT SS EGAL JOH nN GrGR AHAM D rR JAMES SS TOC kK WELL County OKs accident settlement See WEEMS A11 See SETTLEME nN T A11 See BE dD TAxX A4 CC -Quarters YY outh Fishing TT ournament Kids from all over the South are invited to attend the 10th annual Youth Fishing Tournament. Open to all kids 16 and younger. Registration is required on-site at C-Quarters Marina, 501 St. James Ave., Carrabelle There are nine categories of sh with three places in each category. There will be trophies awarded for each category. On Saturday morning, the kids can sh from docks or, if they can go out on a boat, they are allowed to sh the Carrabelle River up to Dog Island. There will be a weighmaster available all day. Lunch will be provided to the kids (hot dogs, baked beans, chips and cokes) while the ofcials determine the tournament winners. Sponsored by Jimmie Crowder of C-Quarters Marina, FishFloridaTag. org and local businesses. For information call 697-8400. II sland golf gatherings At 7:30 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, men gather in the parking lot of the St. George Island Methodist Church to form carpools to go golng. For information, call 927-2000. SS ummer bingo Family Bingo is hosted by St. George Island Civic Club, upstairs at the rehouse, 324. E. Pine Ave, St. George Island at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Everyone is welcome. Opinion . . . . . . ............ AA 4 Society . . . . . . ............ AA 6 Faith . . . . . . . .............. AA 7 Outdoors . . . . . . ........... AA 8 Tide Chart . . . . . .......... AA 8 Sports . . . . . . . ............. AA 9 Classieds . . . ...... AA 12AA 13 volVOL 129 Iss SS U e E 11 PP hone: 850-653-8868 WW eb: apalachtimes.com EE mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8893 CC irculation: 800-345-8688 ALLEALLE N MATHISMATHIS | Special to The Times At left Charlie Mathis celebrates the red, white and blue Queenly quest, AA 6

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 10, 2014 The Jou rn ey Back Home With We ems Memorial Rehab Car e When you or a loved on e need a little mor e time to ge t back on your feet, We ems Memorial Re hab Car e is her e… Right in your own ne ighborhood Give us a call today and let us help you make that jour ney back hom e. We ems Mem orial Rehab Ca re 135 Av enue G, Apalach icola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 Coupon Expir es: 7-31-14 CODE: AP00 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The St. George Island Independence Day parade has become a destination in its own right. With over 100 “oats” this was the biggest and wettest parade in island history Parade Director Vicki Frost did a great job contacting sponsors and awarding prizes to parade participants. She and the organiz ers of the event offered special thanks to re ghters, rst responders and the Sheriff’s Department who insured that the parade was both fun and safe. Parks and Recreation also performed above and beyond to keep beaches and parks clean and welcoming in the face of record crowds. Visitors from a dozen states participated in this year’s USA birthday bash and many said they were repeat visitors to beautiful St. George to strike up the band and join in the parade. There are still some of our special edi tion parade T-shirts available for $15.00 at Eddy Teach’s. All proceeds from the sale of the shirts go to the Franklin County Humane Society. bridge back to Eastpoint, both sides of the road were completely blocked,” Main Street Chairman Jim Bachrach said. “It was crazy, man.” Beginning at noon, a whole afternoon earlier than typically the case, Riverfront Park was alive with food – recracker shrimp, low country boil, freedom fries and hot dogs. And to drink the crowd enjoyed the commercial variety as well as the new locally-brewed Oyster City beer. “We got a great deal on their blonde and brown, and all the revenue went to Main Street,” Bachrach said. “The hit was the recracker shrimp, that was awesome. We had rave reviews about that.” Plus, there was plenty of fun as the fes tivities got underway. Five bands took the stage, and Project Impact offered lots of children’s’ activities, face painting, games, “and beads and a lot of free kid stuff handed out,” said Bachrach He said the early start showed some promise, better than expected, but it will be up to planners for next year whether to pare back the hours to later in the afternoon. “The real guts of this thing happened from 4-11 p.m.,” he said. “Noon to 4 p.m. didn’t come close.” At about 6 p.m., the parade gathering at Lafayette Park signaled that this year would be the biggest to date. “There was a long line of golf carts, and it went on and on, at least 60 motorized somethings,” Bachrach said. Presiding over the festivities were Roy and Marjorie Solomon as Lady Liberty and Uncle Sam. As the parade wound its way down town, the 70 volunteers, with help from city staff, continued their efforts as the crowd swelled. “All the work was done by volunteers, many were restaurant owners and workers and stuff like that,” Bachrach said. Following the parade, the crowd enjoyed scooped vanilla ice cream, kept intact in a freezer at the Apalachicola Center for His tory, Culture and the Arts, Mayor Van John son welcomed the gathering, as the rst hint of dusk began to settle on the festivi ties. The silent auction all afternoon led to a live auction conducted by Harry Arnold and Chuck Spicer, and that brought in ad ditional monies. As a lead-in to the reworks, Tobacco Road offered its brand of electried coun try, and the Hillside Choir, led by Pastor Horace Solomon with solos by Maxine Kel logg, presented gospel music to an appre ciative crowd. Charles Elliott, the county’s veterans service ofcer, offered remarks as a salute to those who have fought to secure the nation’s freedoms, and Debi Fletcher sang an electrifying version of the StarSpangled Banner, For the third year in a row, the reworks were done by Pyro-Shows out of Tennes see. “They’ve been so wonderful for us,” said Bachrach. “It’s been bigger every year. We’ve increased the number of re works and we’ll continue to that.” Donations from sponsors, augmented by the proceeds from food and beer sales, more than covered the $15,000 price tag for the show. The 18-minute reworks show, from 9:18 to 9:36 p.m. took a lot of advance preparation by local pyrotechnic wizard Mike Cates and his crew, by loading a bunker on the barge with all the combustibles, and conguring all the wiring and the electronics. “It takes two days to get all the stuff built on the barge,” which was donated by Bill Grimes, and moved into place by Tommy Ward’s crew, said Bachrach. After securing the required approval from both Homeland Security and the Coast Guard, event organizers made sure the explosives were under the watch of law enforcement personnel, he said. Following the reworks, a rare trafc jam gripped the downtown, as trafc slowly made its way back to accommodations in Apalachicola, St. George Island, Eastpoint and Carrabelle. By about 1 a.m., the clean-up crew nal ly called it quits, Bachrach said. “We were wore out but we’re incredibly pleased at the turnout,” he said. “The vol unteers make this happen and it’s a crosssection of this community. It’s not a small group, but from all walks of life, all organi zations in town. Every organization in this city had someone working.” Organizers say ever since the city be gan its July 3 tradition a few years ago, it’s worked well, giving locals and visitors alike a chance to get their holiday celebration started while preventing any clashes with other festive family fun on July 4 itself. “It’s turned out to be the luckiest, smart est move we’ve ever made,” Bachrach said. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Franklin County natives set up a barricade of beach umbrellas and rushed from behind them with water guns attacking visiting oat riders. At right Leon and Caroline Beneeld and family took rst place in the parade for a group that included several golf carts. Seen here is Lady Liberty fashioned from duct tape and PVC. Hain Henderson on the right designed the family T-shirts. Visitors shine in island Independence Day spectacle At left Madeline Murrey of Roswell Georgia takes aim at a boatload of revelers on July 4. At right the battle never grew heated since the water kept it cool. THIRD from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Marjorie and Roy Solomon portrayed Lady Liberty and Uncle Sam.

PAGE 3

` ”  }” ‡’ ƒi   v G ^ •” v’ ”  v ƒ ] *“ “G  *G *   ‹  ’ ƒ G }” r š ”  H • •v v ‡ ”’ ‡ •š ] § ‡  G }” r B  ‹ C’ ƒ ` ”  B  ‹ C’  ƒ š ¨•  š ”   š• ”’š   v š ‹’ ”§ ¨ v}  „” § ” • • v  ‚” š ” š v’ ‹ • ”   ‡ ƒ„ š ”’  v v‚   v š ”  v‚  š ” G ƒ • • v v ‡” ’ ‡ •š v’ ” G B ‹  C’ƒ `” WA TER SA FE TY IN VE ST IG AT IO N AT TE NTI ON : Ap al ac hic ol a Wa te r Cu st om er s In Ma y 20 13 th e Ci ty of Ap al achi co la Wat er Sy st em no ti ed re sid en ts th at th eir wa te r fa il ed to me et st an d ar ds se t by th e Fl or ida De pa rt me nt o f En vi ro nm en ta l Pro te ct io n an d th e EP A. Du ri ng rou t in e sa fet y te st in g, th e Ci ty of Ap al ach ic ol a fo un d le ve ls of t ri halome tha ne s (T HM s) mor e tha n 50% higher tha n esta bl is he d ma xi mu m co nt ami na nt le ve ls fo r dr in ki ng wa te r. TH Ms ca n al so be in ha le d an d ab so rb ed th ro ug h th e sk in Re se ar che rs di sc ove re d th at bloo d co nc en tr ati on s of TH Ms ro se 5to 15 -f ol d fol lo wi ng su ch ro ut in e ac ti vi ti es as sh ow er in g, ba thi ng an d ha nd wa sh in g. Of te n fo un d in in du st ri al so lv en ts an d re fr iger an ts TH Ms ar e co ns id er ed ca rc in og enic an d ha ve bee n li nk ed to nu me rou s li fe th re at eni ng he al th ef fec ts : Li ve r or Ki dn ey Fa il ur e Li ve r or Ki dn ey Ca nc er Co lo n or Re ct al Ca nc er Bl ad de r Ca nc er Ad ve rs e Pr eg na nc y Ou tc ome s Se ri ou s Ce nt ra l Ner vo us Sy st em Da mage If yo u or a lo ve d one ha s re ce iv ed su ch a di ag nos is or a fa mil y me mb er ha s die d fr om one of the se co nd it io ns an d if yo ur wa te r is pr ov id ed by the Ci ty of Ap al ac h ic ol a, pl eas e co nt ac t ou r r m fo r a fr ee co ns ul ta tion PA NAMA CI TY 180 080 085 39 wa lb or sk y. co m So ur ce s: U. S. En viro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on Ag en cy Sa fe Dr ink in g Wa te r Inf or mat ion Sy st em (S DW IS ) Vi olat io n Re por t, Ci ty of Ap alachic ola re por t cr ea te d 4/2 2/ 20 14 ba se d on data ex tr ac te d on 2/ 10 /2 01 4; Na ti ona l In st it ut es of He alt h, “T ap Wa te r an d Tr ih al omet ha ne s: Fl ow of Conce rn s Con tin ue s, ” En viro nm en ta l He al th Pe rs pe ct iv es July 20 05 11 3( 7) : A4 74 ; “T ri ha lomet ha ne s in Dr ink in gwa te r, ” WH O Gu ide lin es fo r Dr ink in gwa te r Qu al it y, WH O/ SD E/ WS H/ 03 .0 4/ 64 Local The Times | A3 Thursday, July 10, 2014 Arrest REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apala chicola Police Department, Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defen dants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 30 Jonathan Carmichael, 27, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JULY 1 Frank G. Kraus, 38, Lanark Village, expired driver license (FHP) Tonya C. Seamon, 41, Carrabelle, possession of cannabis (FCSO) JULY 2 Holden E. Foley, 19, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Joe L. Morales, 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Emily L. Seger, 19, Lanark Village, violation of probation (FCSO) David W. McDaniel, 59, Apalachicola, DUI (APD) Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Bristol man injured in SR 65 crash From staff reports A 40-year-old Bristol man was critically injured early Sunday when his sport utility vehicle trav eled off State Route 65 and slammed into a wooded tree line. Horace A. Harris was traveling north on SR 65, just past Teresa Road, when his 1997 Chevro let Tahoe veered on to the left shoulder about 12:39 a.m. After steering right, Harris overcor rected and traveled back on to the west shoulder before colliding with two trees. After impact, Harris, who was not wearing a seatbelt, backed the ve hicle “from the wooded tree line and drove south on the west shoulder of SR 65 for 32 feet,” read the report, prepared by Florida Highway Patrol Trooper F. C. Hening. Harris was transported to Bay Medical Center Sacred Heart Health System. Slick ruled incompetent in murder case By Wes Locher Special to the Times Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, charged with killing his mother, Renee Gail Coffey, in their Cape San Blas home in May was deemed mentally incompetent to stand trial. During Slick’s arraignment hearing July 1, Circuit Judge John Fishel made the decision to send Slick back to the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee for ongoing evaluation. Slick was sent to the state hospital after his arrest on two counts each of arson and burglary stemming from res at the Port St. Joe Masonic Lodge in Dec. 2012. Slick also was deemed incompetent to proceed on those charges. He was treated and released on bond, posted by Coffey. While in Chattahoochee, Slick was diagnosed with depression and later attempted suicide while out on bond. During the July 1 hearing, Slick told Fishel he didn’t want a lawyer and would represent himself. Fishel appointed a public defender to the case and explained that a lengthy hearing would rst need to be held to determine whether Slick could act as his own attorney, but it couldn’t be scheduled until Slick had been deemed competent by his doctors. Slick did not object to Fishel’s ruling and did not enter a plea. Slick’s next court date was not scheduled. “Your honor,” Slick asked Fishel. “Is this going to be like the last time?” “Not exactly,” Fishel replied. Halifax Media Group employee Chris Olwell contributed to this report. jJ ARROD SLICK Like us on THE APAlL ACHICO lL A TIMES From staff reports The “Operation Dry Water” campaign launched during the past week. Northwest Regional ofcers focused on boating safety education and awareness on drinking and boating. Throughout the campaign, ofcers inspected 901 vessels and contacted 2,510 residents taking an educational approach. There were 36 boating citations issued and 152 boating safety warnings issued. Six arrests for BUI were made. Ofcer Kinney arrested  a subject for BUI on Cypress Springs. The operator was transported to the Washington County Jail for booking and was determined to have a .152 blood alcohol level. Ofcers Molnar and Bartlett conducted a vessel stop on a personal watercraft. While conducting the boating safety inspection, the ofcers noticed the operator displayed signs of impairment. At the conclusion of the eld sobriety tasks, the subject was arrested for BUI. The subject provided a breath sample of .209 and .215. Last year, nine people died from boating accidents related to alcohol and drug use in Florida. That represents 15 percent of the state’s boating fatalities for 2013. “Alcoholand drug-related boating accidents are preventable,” said Capt. Tom Shipp of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Boating and Waterways Section. “Even one death is too many. We want all boaters to enjoy the freedom to get out on the water and the opportunity to do it safely.” Boaters who have had too much to drink or who are impaired by drugs are a great danger to the boating public. “If you’re caught boating under the inuence, you may be ned and jailed, your boat may be seized, and you could lose your boating privileges,” Shipp said. “But most importantly, you are risking your life, the lives of your passengers and the lives of other people out on the water.” Saving lives is what “Operation Dry Water” is really all about. Law enforcement agencies in all 50 states and several U.S. territories typically participate, interacting with tens of thousands of boaters throughout the weekend each year and taking hundreds of impaired operators off the water before they could kill or injure themselves or someone else. “Being under the inuence of alcohol or drugs impairs a boat operator’s vision and reaction time,” Shipp said. “Sun, wind, fatigue and other conditions can intensify the effects alcohol or drugs have on a boater.” Intoxicated boaters are also susceptible to injuries or falling overboard because of impaired coordination and balance. The FWC reminds boaters to be careful and that they are responsible for making decisions that keep themselves and others safe. “We want everyone to have a great time and stay safe on the water,” Shipp said. “Carelessly choosing to operate a boat while impaired is a decision that can result in a tragic ending to an otherwise wonderful day on the water.” For more information, please visit www.operationdrywater.org or MyFWC. com/Boating. FWC launches Operation Dry Water

PAGE 4

“I went to my brother to ask for a loan…’cause I’m busted.” — from the song “Busted” written by Harlan Howard and Daniel Ticotin, and recorded by Ray Charles There’s a famous story, full of pathos, about Jim Thorpe, the man voted the most outstanding American athlete of the rst half of the 20th century. Retired from his professional football and baseball careers, the tale features Thorpe standing in the rain outside a theatre in 1951 without enough money to see the picture. The movie that was playing? “Jim Thorpe: All-American,” starring Burt Lancaster. Long ago athletes were admittedly not paid lucrative salaries, so a former athlete’s nancial fall was not so astonishing nor so steep. But in this era of wellpaid performers, the number of professional players who experience bankruptcy is stunning. Why does this keep happening? There are a myriad number of reasons, including brief career arcs, poor tax planning, exorbitant personal spending habits and bad investment advice. And when athletes go broke, it’s big news. We seldom read about those who have wisely invested their assets. I’m not a football enthusiast, but I read recently where former Florida Gator and current NFL star Joe Haden was offered a guaranteed 12 percent return when his investment advisor guided him into purchasing promissory notes from a rm called Success Trade. Turns out the arrangement was a Ponzi scheme, not unlike Alan Stanford’s 10 percent guaranteed CD returns from his Antigua bank. Success Trade is now barred from FINRA (Financial Industry Regulatory Authority) membership for the fraudulent sale of securities and must pay $13.7 million in restitution, mostly to current and former professional athletes. Truthfully, though, it’s not just athletes who are vulnerable to grandiose investment schemes. Many of Bernie Madoff’s clients were sophisticated investors. The promise of stable, double digit returns was too enticing to bypass. After all, if someone offered you a guaranteed 12 percent annual return on your investment, would you be interested? Sure you would. So would I. Unfortunately, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. So if an advisor tells you, “You’ll never have a negative statement,” or “I guarantee this annual return,” it’s wise to reect very soberly on your relationship. Investments do not always escalate in value, month by month, without interruption. Nor do they provide guaranteed returns. You might also ask your advisor, “What was your clients’ average absolute return in 2008?” and “What defensive investments do you recommend to protect my assets if the market experiences a signicant correction?” The idea is to have more up statements than down, and depending on your age, goals and risk tolerance, for your portfolio to reect your particular investment needs. No player wins every game, and no investment arrangement can provide guaranteed returns. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (6086121~www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. Athlete Saga: Jim Thorpe, Joe Haden and Ray Charles MA rR GA rR E tT R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook WhWH E r R E WAS PAm M NOb B LES JULY 4th TH ? Dear Editor, My wife, myself and many of our friends were wondering why Pam Nobles and her “Dancing Troupe of Young Men & Women” weren’t included in the 4th of July Parade (held on July 3rd)? To us, Pam, her Mom and Those Kids are the ‘’Highlight” of any event held in Apalachicola. We especially enjoyed their show which was held at The Dixie Theatre. We hope to see them at many events in the future because These Kids Are Our Future. Lathan Hudson Letter to the E dD I tT O rR Early this year, the picturesque Dan River in North Carolina was hit by a devastating toxic spill that spread 70 miles downstream, poisoning the water and everything in it. Why am I telling you about an environmental disaster which happened hundreds of miles away from us? Because our own Apalachicola River is vulnerable to the same series of events, and we need to do everything we can to prevent this from happening here. The hazardous coal ash that fouled the Dan River was stockpiled at a Duke Energy coal-red power plant site. Like other power companies, Duke stores the hazardous ash that’s left over from burning coal in huge, unlined pits. When a pipe at the Duke plant failed, 140,000 tons of coal ash and contaminated wastewater went into the river. We have toxic coal ash stockpiled along the Apalachicola, at Gulf Power Company’s Scholz Generating Plant near Sneads. And it is leaking into the river. In June 2013, samples of bright orange contamination leaking out of the pits contained arsenic at levels 300 times the amount considered safe for drinking water. Besides poisonous arsenic, the coal ash also contains toxics like cadmium, and chromium – well-known carcinogens – as well as aluminum, barium, beryllium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc, selenium, and the neurotoxin mercury. This is a public hazard. On June 4, Apalachicola Riverkeeper, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, and Waterkeeper Alliance led a federal lawsuit against Gulf Power under the Clean Water Act. The public-interest law rm Earthjustice is representing us in the suit. Before we led the lawsuit, we informed Gulf Power of the illegal pollution we documented, and then gave the company four months to begin addressing the problems. We also asked for documentation to support Gulf’s claim that the leaking impoundment at the Scholz plant is not at risk of failing. The utility refused to do either, and we were forced to go to court to protect the Apalachicola and the people who use it. Gulf Power has a federal Clean Water Act permit, which allows the corporation to discharge limited amounts of treated wastewater from a specic outfall directly into the Apalachicola River. But, as our lawsuit points out, untreated contaminants are leaking at other places at the site, and those discharges are not covered by the permit. These toxic chemical leaks – and the company’s failure to report them – violate Gulf Power’s federal permit requirements under the Clean Water Act. Coal ash impoundments are the number one source of toxic water pollution in the United States, dumping more heavy metals and other harmful substances into our waterways than the next nine most polluting industries, combined. While the Clean Water Act does protect waterways from many forms of pollution, there are no federal safeguards specic to coal ash pollution. We need to remedy this dangerous situation. In Washington, 11 public-interest groups and a Native American tribe are involved in a legal agreement to compel the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to nalize new federal regulations dealing with the handling and disposal of coal ash waste. Powerful energy corporations managed to avoid these regulations for decades, and have aggressively fought to weaken the new standards proposed by the EPA. Meanwhile, here along the Apalachicola, Gulf Power needs to stop polluting our public waterway with its toxic waste. It isn’t fair for a corporation to risk our common resource as if it were a private dumping ground. On June 6, the day before the National Trails Day, the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of the Interior ofcially designated the Apalachicola River Blueway as a national recreation trail. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis called the Apalachicola “a rare gem” that “ows through one of the nation’s richest hotspots of biodiversity … a tapestry of wild landscapes and vanishing cultures.” We know how special the Apalachicola is, and we are so very grateful for its gifts. That’s why we took the big step of going to court to stop this dangerous pollution that affects us all. After 61 years of electricity generation at the Scholz plant, Gulf Power has announced that it will stop burning coal at the Scholz facility next year. But as the disaster on the Dan River taught us, coal ash lagoons are dangerous regardless of whether the power plant is still operating. Duke Energy closed the Dan River plant in 2011, but years-worth of coal ash remained in the lagoon that collapsed in February. Unless Gulf Power starts taking responsibility for its mess, its coal ash pits will continue polluting the Apalachicola for years to come. We are doing all that we can to prevent a disaster like Duke Energy’s hazardous waste spill on the Dan River from happening here. Let’s hope Gulf Power will too. Dan Tonsmeire has served both as Riverkeeper and as the organization’s executive director since May 2010. DA nN TO nN S mM EI rR E make tourism a more sustainable in dustry in the county. He said with in creased tourism, more people would be employed fulltime. Parker said evidence of the effec tiveness of increased advertising is in the results of advertising subsidized by funds provided by BP during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. “We are up to a $50 million indus try and pushing for $100 million. Our goal is to make it a year-round eco nomic engine,” he said. Parker said that, during the oil spill, the county spent $2 million and brought in $4 million in new revenue. He said half of the proposed tax increase would be spent on market ing. He said out-of-county market ing provides the greatest return, but with decreased funding, the county cannot advertise nationally. He said that, out of about $900,000 collected under the current 2 percent tax, only about $100,000 is spent on advertising nationally. “Under the new math, if we now collect $900,000, we would theoreti cally collect ($1.8 million), Jackel said. Parker said $450,000 of that would be dedicated to national advertising. “That’s back to the level of advertis ing we were able to generate when we got the really generous grants from BP,” he said. “I don’t see any of this money trick ling down to District 3,” said Lockley. “I’m not going to vote for something that only benets a few people.” Parker said the improvements would benet the entire county. In his remarks, Parrish said Apalachicola is not properly repre sented on the TDC board. “It’s ‘Franklin County TDC’ (and) it should be inclusive of the entire county,” Parrish said. “I do agree with doing offseason advertising and trying to make the tourist industry sustainable, but I represent District 4 and they are not represented on this board. I keep saying this and it falls on deaf ears.” Parker said Apalachicola City Commissioner Frank Cook and busi ness owner Beverly Hewitt represent Apalachicola on the TDC board. “They are not collectors of the tax,” said Parrish. In an interview later, Hewitt said she represents the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, which has members from all of the communities bordering Apalachicola Bay, and not only Apalachicola. Parrish also said that the TDC had not provided the board with informa tion about the presentation prior to Tuesday’s meeting. Jackel said Coun ty Planner Alan Pierce, who was not present, was responsible for provid ing the information in advance and had failed to do so. Jackel and Parker said which vendors would be contracted to do the increased advertising had not been discussed. Parker said the TDC would continue to use some existing vendors but might consider bringing in an outside consultant. Jackel said, if funding to the TDC is increased, the TDC would have to revise their plan to promote the area. She said TDC Administrator Curt Blair said the new tax could not take effect until January 2015 and the rst funds would be received in March. Commissioner Noah Lockley asked how much of the current TDC budget is spent on administration. County Attorney Michael Shuler said that under the ordinance, ad ministrative funding could not exceed 9 percent. Jackel said she believed the actual amount spent was 6 or 7 percent. Lockley asked if administrative fees would double with increased funding. Parker said it would remain capped at 9 percent of the total money collected. “The ratio doesn’t have to stay the same if the TDC board makes a differ ent recommendation,” Jackel said. Parker said the second penny of the additional sales tax collected would go to developing infrastructure and funding not-for-prots. Commission Chair Cheryl Sand ers said renovation of the Coombs Ar mory had top priority for funding. She said she also supported increased funding for the Camp Gordon John ston Museum. She said a third important project was public restrooms for the beach at Alligator Point. During the public comment por tion of the meeting, Alan Feiffer, pres ident of the Alligator Point Taxpayers Association (APTA) asked Sanders to come and discuss the bathrooms with APTA. He said that the addition of bathrooms would bring increased trafc to the beach and that parking was already insufcient for visitors to the site. Sanders said before voting on including a referendum on the No vember ballot, she wanted to see the wording. Jackel moved that Shuler pre pare a referendum for consideration. Massey seconded the motion and it passed with Lockley and Parrish opposed. Shuler said he could present a draft at the next county meeting. Jackel said the TDC had until Sep tember to provide the referendum to the Supervisor of Elections. Once again, Lockley moved to bring administration of the TDC un der county control and Parrish sec onded the motion. Jackel asked if the board should do this while the current contract with TDC Administrator Curt Blair was still in effect. She said the contract comes before the board at the rst August meeting. Lockley’s motion failed, with Massey, Jackel and Sanders opposed. Sanders said she felt the board should wait and review the contract. BED TAX from page A1 Toxic coal ash puts river at risk USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINIo O N www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 10, 2014 A Page 4 Section

PAGE 5

Special to The Times Perhaps North Florida’s rst “seaside resort”, St. Teresa has been enjoyed by generations of North Florida and South Georgia families. Much of its early history has been lost or is available only through family records, some dating back six generations. Ed Moore’ presentation utilizes maps, letters, newspaper articles, photographs, local histories, deeds and other legal documents to trace the origin and development of this special community. Beginning with the early Spanish explorations, this review progresses to the establishment of the “resort” community in 1873, to the present day. Primary attention is given to the period from the founding of the community in 1873 to the beginning of its modern history in the late 1940’s. Moore will describe the lengthy travel of early St. Teresa families by train, boat, and wagon, bringing cows for fresh milk and chickens for fresh eggs for their summers at the coast. He will also discuss the role of storms in the history of St. Teresa and Franklin County, the bygone St. Teresa Hotel, and the entertaining commentary in the contemporary newspapers. SPEAKER BIO Ed Moore, a Tallahassee native, graduated from Leon High School in 1958, FSU in 1961 and from the University of Florida Law School in 1964. Practicing law and engaging in business in Tallahassee for more than 50 years, Ed is now retired. He and his family spend much of their time at St. Teresa. Ed’s rst summer at St. Teresa was 1941 and he has enjoyed each since except for a couple of war years. Ed’s extended family dates back to the founding of St. Teresa. II n front of PP opham’s store In this photo from the 1920s, an unidentied gentleman, possible Postmaster Jesse Warren or William Popham himself, is seen posing in front of what appears to be Popham’s store on Market Street, near the present site of Tamara’s Tapas Bar. Popham, a poet, author and minister, gained lasting fame as a smooth-talking real estate developer. He rst came to Franklin County in 1916, and enchanted with the possibility of developing St. George Island, he dreamed of developing a community on the island that could support itself by cultivating oysters in the bay. To process, can and warehouse the promised glut of oysters, Popham hired Adolph Maddox in 1923 to build a two-story 61,000 square foot building on Wharf lots 7 and 8, on what is now Water Street, just south of the present day Apalachicola Maritime Museum. The wooden building with metal siding was built on pilings that extended out over the water. The two-story central section was distinguished by four gabled bays. Spelled out in oyster shells on the building was “Popham Oyster Factory No. 1.” Even as the building was under construction, Popham faced legal problems, as the US Post Ofce was investigating whether he used the mail to obtain money illegally from investors. In 1925, Popham was found guilty and served a term in the penitentiary in Atlanta. Can you identify the man in this picture? If so, please contact The Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star.com. In a recent Chasing Shadows article, Exploring the Chapman outhouse, we published a letter from Mrs. Visa Adams to an unknown merchant complaining about an incorrect charge to her name. Apalachicola’s own Eula Rochelle read the story and immediately recognized the writer as a close friend of her sister, Missionary Catherine Robinson. The letter read as follows: December 13, 1954 Dear Sirs I am writing you concerning this account you have charged me with. I have not ordered anything on account with you. I did order some curtains from you but I paid cash for them and I have the money order stubbs to prove that I payed for what I got. And have not ordered any thing else. I do hope you will get it straight. Oblige Mrs. Visa Adams 176 5th St Apalachicola Florida Rochelle said, “(Visa) married Georgia Livingston’s brother Bill Adams, both are now dead. She lived on Fifth Street in a shotgun house, behind Mayor (Van Johnson’s) mother’s house, Engeline Johnson.” The house has now been torn down. Visa was godmother of Eula Rochelle’s oldest son, Larry Brown, but had no children of her own. She was a member of First Born Church of the Living God, pastored by W.H. Willis. “She liked to sh, she loved to sh,” Rochelle said. + + 1 0 *)0' 2 ,10 1 +'+ )'11 && 2102+' 1'0 '( + '1/+ $ )2+ '* / '+.0+ + (+ 0+* 0 + 0/ # 2 + 0 +'(1+ '+ $ " BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0’ + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 Implants & Cr ow ns Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Wi lliam C. Knapk e, DDS Gen er al De nt is t Pa nam a City Sq uar e 61 7 We st 23 rd Str eet Pa nam a Ci ty FL Ca ll Fo r In fo rm at ion 1-8 88415 -16 38 Fe es ef fe ctiv e thr ough 11 /2 1/14 Addition al fe es ma y be incurr ed depend ing on in div idu al cases Same-da y Cr ow n ser vice ma y no t be av ailable in cer ta in case s. Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Of ce #: (8 5 0 ) 87 26 1 5 5 Gr eat vs other Dent al pr ov iders 20144-3-T4 Single To oth Implant inc luding Cr ow n st ar ting at $ 1 89 5 De ntur e Im pla nts st ar ting at $ 1 59 5 Lo we r Ar ch $ 1 99 5 Sam eDa y Cr ow ns $ 69 5 Upper Ar ch More on the Chapman outhouse Times reader Miriam Hemphill, who grew up in Apalachicola shared these thoughts on modern plumbing in the area after reading about the Chapman outhouse. Thanks, Miriam! “You wondered when running water became common in Apalach. I of course don’t remember but I have a good idea. When I was working on a family history some years ago I looked long and hard at two old Apalach postcards I own, both showing “bird’s eye views” of the town. Both show our house (now Willoughby Marshall’s house) in the foreground, and the view is from above. So, I gured they had to have been taken from the water tank that stood for many years at Ave. D and 6th St., where there is a sort of circle now. The house had a wooden shingle roof then, and porches all around. So of course, I was dying to know when that picture was taken. Nobody in the family had a clue. After some time during which I wrote to all the old people, the churches, the courthouse, etc., I decided to ask Jimmy Nichols if he knew he had been writing the column about early Apalach for ages and I had written a few for him when he was ailing. In a week or so, I got a reply from him. He had contacted the Florida Archives in Tallahassee and they had told him the tank was constructed in 1912. So, some time shortly after that, people got running water. My parents graduated from Chapman High in 1914, so maybe they used the “facility” for a while. Mother went to the old St. Patrick’s (that burned) through 8th grade but Daddy went to Chapman all the way.” FLORIDA MEm M ORY PP ROJEc C T The old water tower. LOILOI S SWO O B ODA ODA | The Times Visa Adams found Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES WANT TO GO? WH aA T: FSUCML Conservation Lecture WHEN: July 10, 2014 7pm WHERE: FSUCML Auditorium Ed Moore gives presentation on St. Teresa community EE D MOORE MORE ONLINE Get more news, features and photos at apalachtimes.com

PAGE 6

A6 | The Times Thursday, July 10, 2014 Pe t of th e We ek TA YL OR is a 4 mo nt h old "B ox ad or ". Pa rt La b, pa rt bo xe r. Sh e an d he r sis te r ar e ve ry soc ia l, ha pp y an d pl ay fu l pu ps Th ey wi ll be fa ir ly bi g do gs so wi ll ne ed ro om to ru n an d pl ay pr ef er ab ly wi th a co up le of ol de r ki ds We in vi te yo u to th e sh el te r to me et th es e fu n sis te rs Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to soc ia liz e al l of ou r do gs an d c at s. We ar e al way s lo ok in g fo r pe op le wi lli ng to bri ng on e of ou r an im al s int o th ei r hom e to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u ca n sp ar e wo ul d be gr ea tl y a pp re cia te d. Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hum an e Soc ie ty at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po int. Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bs it e at www .f or go tt en pe ts .o rg to se e mor e of ou r ado pt ab le pe ts Society Kamryn Poloronis born Kamryn Shae Poloronis, daughter of Lindsey and Tyler Poloronis, of Apalachicola, was born Monday, June 30 at Gulf Coast Medical Center. The new little sister to brothers Karcen and Gannon Poloronis was born at 12:53 p.m. She weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces, and was 20 inches long Maternal grand[parents are Scott and Pam Shiver, of Eastpoint. Maternal great-grandparents are Barbara and Bobby Shiver, of Eastpoint, and Connie and Jim Cooper, of Eastpoint, Maternal great-greatgrandmother is Selma Roberts, of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Debbie and Tim Poloronis, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are Dollie and the late Pete Poloronis, of Apalachicola, and the late Addie and Louise Ward, of Apalachicola. Birth Engagement Courtney Register, John Tharpe engaged Mr. and Mrs. Shellie G. Rowell, Jr., of Carrabelle, are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming wedding of their daughter, Courtney Elizabeth Register, of Clarksville, to John Aubrey Tharpe II, also of Clarksville. The bride-to-be’s maternal grandparents are the late Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert C. Aubrey. Her paternal grandparents are Thelma Rowell and the late Shellie G. Rowell, Sr, of Carrabelle. Courtney is a 1999 graduate of Carrabelle High School and attended Gulf Coast State College’s correctional ofcer basic standard class. She became a correctional ofcer in 2001, and was employed at Gulf Correctional institution in Wewahitchka for 12 years. She is now employed at Liberty Correctional Institution in Bristol as a classication ofcer. The groom-to-be is the son of Iona Tharpe and the late John Aubrey Tharpe, of Clarksville. His maternal grandparents are the late John and Trudy Herndon, of Clarksville. The groom’s paternal grandparents are the late William and AddieLou Tharpe, both of Clarksville. John is a 1989 graduate of Blountstown High School and started with the Florida Department of Corrections in 1993. He worked for 20 years as a correctional ofcer at Calhoun Correctional Institution in Blountstown and retired in Nov. 2013. The couple is planning a Sept. 27, 2014 wedding at the couple’s home in Clarksville. No local invites are being sent. All friends and family are invited to attend. Brownsworth named to Iowa State Dean’s List Courtney Brownsworth was among more than 7,024 Iowa State University undergraduates to be recognized for outstanding academic achievement by being named to the 2014 spring semester Dean’s List. Brownsworth, 19, will be a junior at Iowa State University where she is majoring is public relations/mass communications. She is the daughter of Ray and Lori Brownsworth, of Apalachicola. Students named to the Dean’s List must have earned a grade point average of at least 3.50 on a 4.00 scale while carrying a minimum of 12 credit hours of graded course work. Ramsden earns Emory law degree April Ramsden received a Doctor of Law from the School of Law of Emory University in Atlanta, Ga., at its 169th commencement ceremony on May 12. Ramsden is the daughter of Jon Ramsden and Fran Bauer, of Apalachicola, Emory University is known for its demanding academics, outstanding undergraduate experience, highly ranked professional schools and state-of-the-art research facilities. Emory encompasses nine academic divisions as well as the Michael C. Carlos Museum, The Carter Center, the Yerkes National Primate Research Center and Emory Healthcare, Georgia’s largest and most comprehensive health care system. Special to The Times The Florida Seafood Festival is beginning its search for this year’s queen. The festival will hold this year’s festival pageant on Saturday, Aug. 2 at the Franklin County School. Pageant organizers are now looking for contestants. Girls who would like to participate have to be between age 16 and 18, and either a junior or senior in high school. The girls must live in Franklin County. The festival also requires contestants have never been married, have not had a child, and are not pregnant. Miss Florida Seafood wins a $1,000 scholarship from the seafood festival committee and attends several parades in surrounding counties to help promote Franklin County seafood and the Florida Seafood Festival. She also makes several personal appearances on TV and radio. Young ladies interested in participating in the event should email the Florida Seafood Festival by at food@ oridaseafoodfestival.com or message them at the Florida Seafood festival Facebook page Would you like to be Miss Florida Seafood? JOHN AU breBRE Y TH arpeARPE II aA N dD COU rtRTN eE Y E liLI Z abetABET H R eE G isterISTER Graudation Wedding Laura OO ’ NN eal, Michael Toole to be married Shaun, Lonnie and Kendra want you to know that their mom is Happy Happy Happy! Michael Toole and Laura O’Neal will become one in the eyes of God on Saturday, July 12, 2014. The ceremony will take place at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Center, at 142 River Road. Servant of the Lord, Don Carroll, will preside over the service, and a reception will follow. All close friends of the couple are welcomed to attend.

PAGE 7

Local A7 | The Times Thursday, July 10, 2014 Local _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 Cu mb aa Mo nu me nt s, In c. Se rvi ng NW Fl or id a Si nc e 1963 JA MES (J R) GR OV ER Ph : 850-674-8449 Ce ll : 850-899-0979 jrg ro v@ms n.c om Bl ou nt st ow n, FL 32424 Cu mb aa Mo nu men ts has be en at 19041 Sr 20 We st Bl ou ns to wn for 50+ Ye ar s. We ta ke p ride in hel pi ng yo u wi th se le ct in g the ri gh t mo nu men t for yo ur lo ve d on e. So co me by or gi ve us a ca ll or we wil l co me by you r ho me, gr av es it e, et c. >{‹Œ Xt„tq †Œo A†{„tŒŒ 8y’‹qy $" !& et‹t t—q{t r op†’ –yo ?†rŒ r†{„x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '=m o‚ '"% "" # & " # %"# " & R’‹Œt‹ X‹†•{rtr r’‹{„x ‹tx’o‹ qy’‹qy Œt‹•{qtŒ Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{ ~” …—” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH OBITUARIES Martha (Marty) Wainwright Wood died Thursday, July 3, 2014, at her home in Apalachicola after a recent diagnosis of leukemia. She left this life the same way she lived it, with dignity and grace; surrounded by her family and pets. Marty was born on Dec. 24, 1931, in Starke, to William M. Wainwright and Blanche McNeal Wainwright. Relocating to Tallahassee at a young age, Marty graduated from Leon High School and attended Florida State University before assuming the duties of an ofcer’s wife upon her marriage to U.S. Air Force pilot, Maj. Fred. E. Bailey. Together they had three children and when Fred was killed in Vietnam in 1966, Marty returned her family to Tallahassee. She married a childhood friend, George M. Wood and they relocated to Apalachicola in 1976. Marty worked for the Franklin County Property Appraiser’s ofce for 15 years before retiring. She enjoyed shing, reading, bird watching and caring for a host of rescue pets. Marty was widowed again when George died in 2007. The hallmark of her life was her unconditional love and devotion to her family and she took great joy in spending time with her children, grandchildren, and greatgrandchildren. Marty was preceded in death by her husbands, Fred E. Bailey and George M. Wood; her brother, Bill Wainwright, and sister, Patsy W. Wilson. She will be greatly missed by her surviving family; her son, Clay W. Bailey and daughter, Robin L. Bailey, both of Apalachicola; daughter, Laura L. Bailey, Tallahassee; stepson, Michael Wood (Susie), Okeechobee; grandchildren, Erin B. Babb, Jordyn Zingarelli, Cayle Zingarelli, Cole Horton, Whitney Wood; and great-grandchildren, Tate, Reyd and Olivia; sistersin-law, Phyllis Bailey, Pat Roberts, and Sara Jean Wainwright; daughter-inlaw, Gayle Pace; and many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. The family wishes to express their sincere gratitude for the compassionate assistance provided by Big Bend Hospice that allowed Marty to spend every available moment left to her at her home as she wished. She requested a private, familyonly service. In lieu of owers, she asked that donations be made on her behalf to Big Bend Hospice and/or the Animal Rescue/Humane Society of your choice. Martha Wainwright Wood mM ARTHA wW OOD Stephen Roger Davis, 75, of Apalachicola, passed away Saturday July 5, 2014, in Panama City following an extended illness. He was a lifelong resident of Apalachicola and was a commercial sherman. He loved the Apalachicola Bay. Mr. Davis was preceded in death by his parents, Lloyd and Virginia Davis, and his wife, Earlean Davis. He is survived by his two sons, Dale Davis and wife, Montez; and Marty Davis; ve grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, three sisters, Margaret Allen, Juanita Brown and Patricia Smith; one brother, Johnny Davis and many nieces and nephews. A funeral was Wednesday afternoon, July 9, at Living Waters Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Magnolia Cemetery. Visitation was one hour before the service at the church. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. SS tephen DD avis Mr. Walter A. Mock, 79, of Old Town passed away Saturday, July 5, 2014 following a brief illness. Mr. Mock was born in Carrabelle, but had lived in Old Town for six years after moving there from Perry. He was a veteran of the United States Air Force and retired from the Proctor and Gamble Paper Company in Perry. Mr. Mock was a member of the Cross City Pentecostal Holiness Church and was preceded in death by his parents, Jessie and Mabel Mock; a son, Walter A. Mock Jr.; three sisters and one brother. Mr. Mock was survived by his wife of 45 years, Peggy Mock; his daughters Angelia J. (Ronnie) Dean and Stacy (Dean) Watson; his sons, Jimmy Sutton and Freddie (Stacy) Mock; a daughter-in-law Bambi Mock; his brothers Herbert (Catherine) Mock, Theron (Sherry) Mock, and Donnie (Betty Ruth) Mock; and a sister, Jessie Mae (Jim) Bockelman. Fifteen grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and numerous nieces, nephews and other family members also survive. A memorial service for Mr. Mock was Wednesday afternoon, July 9, at the Cross City Pentecostal Holiness Church with Pastor Randy Richardson and Pastor Wendell Rudd ofciating. Arrangements are under the direction of Watson Funeral Home, Trenton. Walter AA Mock Yard sale this Saturday By Jim Welsh Special to the Times Well now, how about our very own Marcia Johnson? Congratulations and keep up the good work. Had a good time at our annual picnic at the Lanark Village Boat Club on the Fourth of July. We will gater at the boat club again on July 19 for our monthly sugar x. Pancakes, French toast, bacon and sausage, eggs, grits coffee and juice. Yum, yum! Members of the boat club are always happy to prepare and serve. Everyone welcome. You donation of $5 will be collected inside the door. See ya there. This Saturday, July 12, is the yard sale, auction and sh fry at the community church at the corner of Spring and Oaks Streets here in the village. Proceeds from the sale, auction and sh fry will go towards repairs and restoration of the church and parsonage. Things get underway at 9 a.m. and continue until 4 p.m. Oh, did I mention live entertainment? Enjoy! Thanking you for your support in advance. The July Birthday Bash will be Saturday, July 19, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. The lounge will start jumping at 6 p.m. Party hearty! Got word that Chastie Wardwell had passed away. Pray for eternal peace and comfort for her friends and family. I would have lunch with her from time to time at St. James Bay Rehab. We will really miss her. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember, ASAP also stands for always say a prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. LANARK NE wW S Jim Welsh From staff reports Lanark church hosts SS aturday fundraiser The Community Church in Lanark Village will host a fundraiser from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 12, at the Community Church at 171 Spring St. in Lanark Village. All proceeds will be used for repairs and restoration of the Community Church and parsonage. There will be a silent auction, sh fry and yard sale with lots of live entertainment, featuring Cary Moon, H.J. Kuntry and more. Some auction items are two Trane HVAC systems, refrigerator, two ranges, dining room set, jewelry, art, Crooked River Grill dinner tickets, Hog Wild dinner tickets plus more. Bring a lawn chair and umbrella; it might get hot that weekend. For more information, call Shirley Cox at 697-4195. Faith BRIEF We would like to thank everyone and every organization for your thoughts, prayers and gifts. This has been the most difcult year in our lives. We could not have made it without the support of the community. Rachel is improving and if things continue, she could be taken off the liver transplant list. Thanks again to everyone. Gene, Joan and RR achel HH uckeba Card of THANKS HUCKEBA FAmM I lL Y Culinary classes at Gulf/Franklin campus this fall From staff reports Beginning this fall, students will have the opportunity to enroll in culinary classes at the Gulf/ Franklin Campus. These courses are designed to prepare students for employment as a chef’s apprentice. In addition to gaining the knowledge and skills needed to become employed as a chef’s apprentice, students who complete the chef’s apprentice certicate can continue their education and receive an associate of science degree in culinary management. The rst culinary courses offered by the Gulf/Franklin Campus will begin Aug. 25. For additional information regarding the culinary program, please contact Loretta Costin at 227-9670, ext. 5503 or by email at lcostin@gulfcoast.edu. OBITUARIES Robert Michael Malone, “Mike,” was born Oct. 8, 1956, in Augusta, Georgia to Pauline and the now late Robert Malone. Mike passed away Friday, June 27, 2014, in Panama City with his loving wife of 35 years by his side. Mike proudly served in the United States Navy, worked tirelessly in construction and retired from the Franklin County School District. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette Malone; son, Stephen Malone and his wife, Alyse; daughter, Elizabeth Devlin and her husband, Larry; mother Pauline Brown; sisters, Lynn Field and Beverly Parker; brothers, Tommy Malone and Wade Malone and 13 grandchildren Morgan, Stephen Jr., Cloey, J.J., Harmony, Jacob, Madalynn, Asher, Bryant, Isaiah, Little Larry, Emily and Bekah. He is preceded in death by his son, Robert Michael Malone Jr. and his father, Robert Wesley Malone. Weep not for me though I am gone Into the gentle night Grieve if you will, but not for long Upon my soul’s sweet ight. There is no need for tears. I am at peace, my soul is at rest There is no pain, I suffer not, For with your love I was so blessed. I am in a place of comfort The fear now is gone. Put those things in your thoughts, In your memory I live on. Remember not my ght for breath Remember not the strife Please do not dwell upon my death But celebrate my life. RR obert Michael ‘Mike’ Malone Oct. 8, 1956 June 27, 2014 mM IKE mM A lL ONE NN ew correctional ofcer course starts A A ug. 25 A new correctional ofcer program will be starting at the Gulf/ Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe, on Monday, Aug. 25. The program to prepare students for employment as correctional ofcers includes the basic standards courses mandated for certication as a correctional ofcer in Florida. Students who graduate from this program would typically work as correctional ofcers within a county or state correctional facility. Upon completion of this program, students are eligible to take the state ofcer certication exam for correctional ofcers. The program will meet Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. for about three months. For more information, call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 or email her at bburkett@gulfcoast. edu. A pplication deadline for Pell Grants and other nancial aid is fast approaching.

PAGE 8

Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Thursday, July 10, 2014 O UTDoo OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TID E TA BLES MONT HL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, July 10 85 76 40 % Fr i, July 11 85 77 40 % Sa t, July 12 87 77 40 % Sun, July 13 86 78 40 % Mo n, July 14 87 79 20 % Tu es July 15 87 79 10 % We d, July 16 86 79 40 % Several people have brought one of these attractive insects to me over the last few weeks. This is the Eyed Click Beetle (Alaus oculatus). Many of us played with smaller species of click beetle as children. All beetles are attracted to lights. If you touch one of these acrobatic creatures, it will ip itself in the air to escape making a loud clicking noise when it does so. The Eyed Beetle, which is almost two inches long, can launch itself four inches into the air when it clicks. The prominent false eyespots on the back are to fool predators into thinking the beetle is very large as many simple animals judge the size of potential prey by the size of the eyes. This is the reason for eyespots found on the wings of many moths and butteries. Eyed Beetles eat very little as adults but the larvae called wireworms are ferocious predators of other insects and an asset to any garden. Found under logs and other dark, damp places, the two-inch Alaus oculatus larva looks like a stocky, yellowishbrown, segmented worm. It has a at, dark brown rectangular head that ends in two powerful jaws. The jaws, which resemble small crab legs, are used to disable and dismember prey. This makes the Eyed Beetle unusual as most wireworms eat plants and can be serious garden pests. My friend Lana Heady was the rst to bring me this beetle. Curiously, she said it was blown out of a refrigeration line. How that happened is hard to understand but, by coincidence, Harry, another friend showed me some pictures of a leaf covered cocoon he found in the fuel line of a disused engine. He said the foot-long object, which contained multiple grubs and was difcult to dislodge. He also said that he or somebody he knew has encountered a similar blockage, on several other occasions. That made me wonder if bugs in machinery is a common occurrence and with the help of Jan Peters, I located an article on the subject in PCT Magazine, a journal for pest control operators. According to the article, insects infesting equipment is commoner and more dangerous than might be supposed. In 1996, Flight 301 departing the Dominican Republic crashed into the ocean minutes after takeoff killing 189 people. A navy salvage team located the black box and investigators listened to a horrifying recording of the last minutes before the crash. An air speed gauge located on the exterior of the plane indicated that the Boeing 757 was traveling dangerously fast. The copilot concurred with the judgment. The pilot took measures to slow the aircraft, ignoring other factors indicating that the plane was actually traveling too slowly. The aircraft stalled and fell from the sky. What caused the incorrect readings? The speed gage or pitot (pee-toe) consists of a tube with a narrow hole. Pilots the world over know it is prone to being blocked by ice, debris or living creatures, “bugged and plugged” as the aeronautical saying goes. The ill-fated airplane had been sitting unused for three weeks before take-off. While no pitot was ever recovered from the wreck, investigators theorized that the instrument had been blocked by an insect, probably a mud dauber or other solitary wasp nesting inside the tube. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda LOIS S SS WOBOD D A | The Times Alaus oculatus What’s gumming up the works? GG ag grouper season closes here Gag grouper opened for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state waters and all Gulf fed eral waters Tuesday, July 1. The same day, the sea son closed in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. The gag grouper recreational harvest season in Gulf of Mexico state waters, not including Franklin, Jefferson, Wakulla and Taylor counties, will remain open through Dec. 3, closing Dec. 4. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties were open from April 1 through June 30 and will not be open during the July 1-through-Dec. 3 season. The four-county region includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. Regional seasons such as these provide additional shing opportunities and access while continuing to rebuild the gag grouper population to sustainable levels. Monroe County is also excluded from this sea son because it follows the Atlantic season for gag grouper. In state and federal Gulf waters, the gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size limit is 22 inches total length and the daily bag limit is two gag grouper per person within the four-sh grouper aggregate limit. Gag grouper also opens in Gulf federal waters July 1; the season closing date is yet to be determined. Gag caught in federal waters during the federal sea son may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jef ferson and Taylor counties, but boats with gag grou per aboard may not stop and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. LOIS S SS WOBOD D A | The Times On July 3, the Forgotten Coast Paddle Club, working in cooperation with the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, staged a four-mile paddle from the site of the old Breakaway Lodge to the maritime museum downtown. About 40 paddlers participated. The adventurers encountered eagles, ospreys and alligators but were relatively untroubled by insects and, once the channel was reached, a breeze made the trip remarkably cool and pleasant. The paddle club plans to sponsor at least one monthly paddle for the duration of the year. To keep on top of paddle club events, visit www. paddle2love.com. Page 8 ON THE R iI VER aA G aiAI N SS PECial IAL T o O TT HE TiTI MES Organizer Ada Long said she wished to thank everyone who helped with the July 5 post-Independence Day cleanup on St. George Island. All agreed that most of the island was cleaner than usual after the July 4 celebration because the county had already cleaned up most of the mess, but the 15 volunteers collected more than 20 full trash bags of litter. Part of the cleanup crew. From the left are Terry Kemp, Jo Pearman and Ray, Pete Ritch, Bob Pruitt, Ada Long, Beth Appleton, Dail Mullins, and Elaine Rosenthal. Other volunteers not pictured were Dave Harbaugh, Skip Kemp, and Ana Anthius. A C lL E aA N iI S laLA ND iI S aA H aA PPY iI S laLA ND SPON sS ORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom King sh are still on the inshore wrecks – troll deep with dusters or bump troll some hard tails, look for bait balls. The gag grouper bite has been slow the last couple of weeks, be patient with them and sh with lighter tackle. Snapper season is coming to a close, so get them while you can. Scallop season is in full form around Black’s Island. Grab the kids and some masks and snorkels and head on out. Trout and red sh are biting, the WindMark area is a good place to get away from the scallops.

PAGE 9

*** PR IM AR Y EL EC TI ON Au gu st 26 20 14 ** *V OT ER INF OR MA TI ON ** VO TE R RE GI STR AT IO N BO OK S CL OS E* *J UL Y 28 20 14 (M ond ay) ** ABS EN TE E VO TI NG (V ot ing by Ma il )* *A BS EN TE ES AR E NO W AVA IL AB LE Yo u ma y ca ll th e o ce fo r mor e in fo rm at ion at (8 50 ) 65 395 20 Au gu st 20 ,2 01 4 – De ad li ne fo r Su pe rv is or s to re ce iv e re qu es t fo r ab se nt ee ba ll ot s to be ma il ed fo r th e Pr im ar y El ec ti on Au gu st 21 20 14 Fi rst da y fo r Su pe rv is or s to pr ov id ed abs en te e ba ll ot s to de si gn ee s fo r th e Pr im ar y El ec ti on (D es ig ne e ma y pi ck up no m or e th an tw o ab se nt ee ba ll ot s an d mu st ha ve wr it te n au th or iz at ion fr om th e vo te r). ** EA RL Y VO TI NG ** Au gu st 11 th – 23r d 8: 30 am – 5: 30 pm (M on ) (F ri ) We ek en d Ho ur s 8: 30 am – 4: 30 pm El ec ti on s O ce – 47 Av e F, Ap al ac hi co la FL Car ra be ll e An ne x – 16 47 HW Y 98 E, Ca rr ab el le, FL ** E LE CT IO N FA CT S* FL OR ID A IS A CL OS ED PR IMA RY ST AT E – whe n th e vo te r get s th ei r ba ll ot fo r th e pr im ar y, th e ba ll ot wi ll co nt ai n on ly ca nd id at es in th e pa rty th at th ey are re gi st er ed in add it ion to th e non pa rt is an ra ce s (j ud g es an d sc ho ol bo ar d) .T he on ly ex ce pt ion to thi s is whe n th er e is a UN IV ER SA L PR IMA RY CO NTE ST (W he n th er e is no oth er pa rty opp os it ion an d al l ca nd id at es are of on ep ar ty al l re gi st er ed vo te rs ma y vo te in th is ra ce re ga rdl es s of pa rty a li at ion ). Vo te rs re gi st er ed wi th no pa rty a li at io n or wi th a min or pa rty wi ll on ly ha ve non pa rt is an ca nd id at es on th ei r pr im ar y ba ll ot wi th th e ex ce pt ion of a UN IV ER SA L PR IMA RY CO NTE ST GE NE RA L EL EC TI ON Th os e ca nd id at es no t ap pe ar in g on th e Pr im ar y El ec ti on Ba ll ot wi ll be on th e Ge ne ra l El ec ti on Ba ll ot in No ve mb er Th ey do no t ap pe ar on th e Pr im ar y ba ll ot unl es s th ey ar e f ac in g op po si ti on wi thin th ei r ow n pa rty Fl or id a La w Re qu ir es Ph ot o Si gn at ur e ID Wh en Vo ti ng or Yo u Mus t Vo te a Pr ov is ion al Ba ll ot Fr ank li n Co un ty Su pe rv is or of El ec ti on s Id a Co op er Ell io tt 47 Av e. F Ap al ac hi co la FL 32 32 0 (8 50 ) 65 395 20 fa x (8 50 ) 65 390 92 ic el li ot t@ vo te fr an kl in .c om www .v ot ef ra nk li n. co m CARRABELLE • A A PALAc C HIc C OLA S PORTs S www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 10, 2014 A Page 9 Section Teat seeks nancial support for Seahawks By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Ashley Teat is a faith ful supporter of Frank lin County youth and he needs your support for the Seahawks. Teats has been turning up at meetings and of ces all around the county to seek nancial support for his hometown football squad. At a recent meeting of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, he said, “Let’s make Friday Seahawks Day.” He suggested everyone wear silver, black and crimson on Friday to support the team and asked merchants to post support posters in their windows. “I was born and raised here so maybe that’s why I am such a big supporter of the Seahawks. We have to support our kids. We need your help,” he said. He told attendees that the Seahawks spend around $20,000 annually replacing and reconditioning equipment. A yer distributed at the meeting said, “One common misconception is that there are plenty of funds through ticket booth receipts to pay for the football program. This is not true. Some of the monies certainly used for re lated bills, such as ofcials, equipment, and they are also a source of funding other sports at Frank lin County. Our program is basically, what we make it. For those who do not know the football program is pri marily funded with money we raise throughout the year. The majority of the money comes from sponsorship do nations, family donations and concessions. The money we raise goes directly back to our kids in the program.” Teat and the Seahawks suggest two ways to support the team. Individuals can purchase “sentiment signs” to show support for their favorite player. The 12x12 inch signs cost $25. The will be posted at the stadium and given to the player at the end of the sea son. What a great decoration for the wall of a college dorm room. Also available are sponsor ship signs for $125 and up. For $400, you can purchase a 4x6 sign that will hang in the sta dium for a full year. Ads are due July 18. For more information or to show your support, call Head Football Coach Aaron York 850-774-2903 or Teat at 653-6955. Belles head to state tournament By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The Franklin County Belles, an All-Star group of the nest 13to 15-year-old softball players in the coun ty, left today for the state tournament in Okeechobee. The team, coached by Jo seph Ferrell with assistance from Brock Johnson and Wade Blevins, is set to play its rst game in the double elimination tournament at 9 a.m. Friday against nemesis West Pasco. The local girls from East point, Carrabelle and Apala chicola hope to earn a berth in the nationals by emerging atop a eld that also includes teams from Okeechobee, Lake Placid and Belleview. The All-Star squad, com prised of girls from regular season winner the Carra belle Rampage, and Apala chicola Seahawks, emerged victorious at the District 2 championship Saturday, June 21 in Marianna. Both games were against Sneads, and the Belles won the opener easily, 15-5. But the second game turned out to be a tough outing. “We came out in the rst inning and had four runs, and in the third inning we got another two, to go up 61,” Ferrell said. Sneads struck back in the fourth inning, bringing home four runs, to trail 6-5. After two scoreless innings by the Belles, Sneads pulled ahead in the bottom of the sixth by scoring two runs to go up 7-6. “In the last at bat in the top of the seventh, it was crunch time,” said Ferrell. “We got them all to the cor ner and said ‘How bad do you want it?’ “The girls just turned it on,” he said. “They came out and posted three runs in the top of the seventh to go up 9-7.” In the bottom of the sev enth, Jaylyn Charles struck out the rst batter, walked the second and struck out the third, before getting the last out on an ineld ground er that ended with the Sneads runner out at rst. Charles, who moved here two years ago from Polk County, put in a strong performance, as did fellow pitchers Megan Collins and Alexus Johnson. “All three pitched really well,” Ferrell said. “We all hit the ball well but catcher Savannah Alday hit ex ceptionally well in the tournament.” Ten of the dozen players on the squad played for the Lady Seahawks last year, all but two of these on the JV squad and two from the var sity roster. “We want to thank everyone who donated in the last two weeks towards our trip to state to represent Franklin County,” Ferrell said. “Visi tors and family members have all really chipped in to help these girls get down to state.” PHOTOS BY KIM JOH OH N SO SO N | Special to the Times The Belles hoist their district championship trophy high. THE L inIN EUP No. 00 Madison Smith C/LF No. 1 Alexus Johnson SS No. 5 Adrianna Butler CF No. 8 Myranda McLeod 3B No. 9 Kaleigh Hardy 1B No. 12 Savannah Alday C No. 15 Kimmie Boone 2B No. 17 Melanie Collins SS/C No. 18 Megan Collins P/1B No. 22 Anna Riley LF No. 27 Lacey Hutchins RF No. 53 Jaylyn Charles P/SS Pitcher Jaylyn Charles shows her winning form. Alexus Johnson guards the hole at shortstop. The Belles celebrate their district championship, with, front from left, coaches Brock Johnson, Joseph Ferrell and Wade Blevins. Franklin Hawks battle at national tourney Special to the Times The Franklin County Basketball Academy Five Star Franklin Hawks placed in the top 10 in the Youth Basketball of America National Basketball Tournament, which took place June 29 to July 5 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando. The tournament drew teams from Canada, Puerto Rico, Mex ico and teams spread from California to Michigan. “We struggled to put a complete game to gether throughout this tourney. Picked a bad time to play poorly,” coach Mike Sweatt said. “Our offense wasn’t the problem as we aver aged almost 60 points per game. Our defense, though, gave up almost 70 points per game.” The Hawks played teams from California, Georgia, Chicago and Florida, as there were 15 teams from around the nation that made the national tournament for the 17-and under division. Kelsey Jones and Tyler Howard were both unable to take part in the tourney, with Ty ler’s absence due to an injury he sustained in football and Kelsey taking part in a family trip. “This hurt us defensively with rebounds, blocking shots, and our ‘help man defense.’ This is most likely the reason we lacked defen sively in this tourney,” Sweatt said. “We were competitive in every game but could not get the defensive stops needed to pull out a game. “On a bright note our team did win the team shooting competition during the team competitions’ games. So out of the 15 teams we placed rst in this,” Sweatt said. Kenneth Wilson, Marshall Sweet, Josue Barahona, Sharod Senatus, Nathan Jones, Tyler Farmer, and Patrick Harvey all were a part of this great tournament. “With only seven players and missing two starters, it was hard to close out ball games,” said Sweatt. “We lost a couple of games on last possession shots because we could not get stops. “We are proud though that we were one of three Florida teams who made the tourney,” Sweatt said. “We would like to thank the Frank lin County Commissioners for their donation. Without it, these kids would not have been able to participate. Our other sponsors this year are Waterstreet Potters, Fisherman’s Choice, Bluff Road Storage, Gunn Heating and A/C Inc., King’s Plumbing, Erin Rodriguez Construction, Water street Seafood, Piggly Wiggly, ACE Hardware Willis  Apalachicola, Red’s Family Store, TP Transport Inc., Chanda’s Laundry and Cleaning Inc., Danny Gilbert, Tamara’s Tapas Bar, Willis Hardware Inc., Four Kids Minus Four  LLC and Beach Pros Realty/Jolly Rogers.” Sweatt said the 14 and younger team is heading to a tournament July 12-13 at the Bethel Community Church in Tallahassee. The nal tournaments for  the 14-and-under and the 17-and-under squads  are July 25-27 at Tallahassee Community College. 

PAGE 10

Local A10 | The Times Thursday, July 10, 2014 Crossword PUZZLE S p P ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S Kara Landis of St. George Island sent this picture of her dog Simon on his way to St. Joe Bay. Landis said, “It took him a while to get used to the mask and realize he had to breathe through his mouth.” Simon found his forever home with Kara and Bob Landis after a brief sojourn in the Frankin County Humane Society shelter.Always consider adoption as an option when looking for a companion animal. Special to The Times Through the FloridaLearns STEM (Scholars Project’s Talent Development Program), talented and gifted high school juniors and seniors from small and rural districts across Florida are participating in Field Site/Workplace Experiences this summer. These experiences are made possible through partnerships with leaders in STEM industries, such as local businesses, agencies, the military, and higher education faculty. The experiences offered by these STEM Talent Developers are preparing STEM Scholars to become STEM-ready by demonstrating the value of a career in STEM areas through real world interactions with STEMrelated employers. S p P ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S Franklin County High School students Max Davis and Cash Creamer, participants in an 8-day STEM Field Experience, measure indicators of water quality in the Apalachicola Bay with Jenna Harper from the Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. SIMON GOIN’ SCALLO pP IN gG F-stop Franklin wants pictures from talented amateurs and we want to know what’s going on so, next week, send us a picture of your picnic. The weather is great and we know lots of people will be spending time outside. Send us some snaps of you and your friends. Send you pictures to dadlerstein@star.com and put the words Franklin photos in the subject line. PHOTOs S BY DAVId D AdAD LERs S TEIN | The Times “American sweethearts” Peyton and Karli Grove, granddaughters of Bill and Linda Grove, enjoy Carrabelle Beach, on Independence Day Garyson, Madison and Bentley Millender relax after the Carrabelle reworks Mya Barber, daughter of Cody and Darla Barber, at the reworks in Carrabelle. Crossword S OLUTIONOLUTION Davis and Creamer are STEM scholars

PAGE 11

Local The Times | A11 Thursday, July 10, 2014 The meeting opened with ap proval of an accident settlement dating back to a Nov. 2009 accident when a Weems ambulance rearended a vehicle on the bay bridge (See sidebar) After the settlement was unanimously approved, the meet ing moved to the key matters at hand. Brownsworth was under the weather, so much of the discussion was directed to the hospital’s new chief nancial ofcer, and interim CEO, John Graham. In his nancial report, Graham said May brought in about $21,000 to the bottom line, and that by year’s end, he expected to see an improved nancial performance over the previous year. “If the in come or loss from the operations projects out, that ultimate bottom line will be 42 percent better than as of end of 2013,” he said. He said the two clinics have posted a $44,192 prot year-todate, with the one in Carrabelle about twice as busy as the one in Apalachicola. Graham said the clinic in Carrabelle is seeing about 25 patients a day, and the Apala chicola one about 12. Graham responded to a ques tion from Commissioner Pinki Jackel that billings are being sent out “sometimes in a timely man ner and sometimes they’re not. We’re diligently working on that.” The CFO stressed that a key indicator the entire revenue on an adjusted per-patient basis you can see is up 16 percent over 2013. “Overall things are getting bet ter,” Graham said, “That’s a pretty good increase for a year, a really good progress from one year to the next.” He said Weems has made a change in the collection company responsible for ambulance charg es and that “it is hard to tell” what type of improvement there will be. “It’s too early to tell you a real number you can hang your hat on,” Graham said. He said success with collec tions is “pretty much at the mercy of your patient mix. As time goes on that will be a better ratio of the numbers. Sometimes it will take a year, maybe two, to get a physician in and established and get their practice as they want it. You can’t rush it.” The hospital has about $545,000 cash on hand, about 27 days worth, he said, noting that 20 percent of patients are on Medicare, 10 per cent on Medicaid, and the rest self-pay. “That’s why reserves are 70 percent,” Graham said. “We’re maybe collecting less than 10 per cent of all the self pays.” EMPLOY eeEE COSTS RUN $300,000 A MONTH The discussion then moved to benet and pension options that Weems is now exploring. “It’s an ongoing process, we’re not to the nal point yet.” Graham said the 1 cent sales tax has brought in receipts of $525,000 year to date, and that salaries for the year, for all employees, includ ing those with the ambulance and at the clinics, have run $2.4 million, about $300,000 a month. Commissioner Noah Lockley pressed Graham for a breakout of the costs to pay just salaried employees, and Brownsworth said that has not been tracked separately. Dr. James Stockwell, a Talla hassee gastroenterologist who has been active in doing procedures at Weems, said he has expanded his focus on ghting colon cancer by becoming an advocate for rural health care, “to improve timely ac cess to quality care and help build a healthier community.” He said the economic down turn and the absence of local doc tors has taken its toll, but that the future can be bright by making the recent choices. “There’s a certain urgency here,” he said. “It does take time to get somebody. We have a wonderful community and we have a hospital that’s on the rise with dedicated staff, we have TMH (Tallahassee Memorial Hospital) and we have a med school (Florida State). “A lot of times people come to you wanting money,” Stockwell said. “What needs to happen is a focus, a commitment, and co operation and people talking to each other. We do have a lot of resources; we need community involvement.” Stockwell said he is meeting on June 26 with a dean at the Florida State School of Medicine to see about putting a medical student at Weems for a rotation during the summer. “You do not want to lose your health care industry in this town. It’s clean, it’s high-tech,” he said. “It spends $5 million in the local economy and that could easily double with a caregiver here. They want to come where there’s good health care. “You do have competition, seri ous competition. If we as a team let those services go elsewhere, the community’s going to lose money,” said Stockwell. He said more marketing could be done to underscore the quality, skilled people working at Weems, and to look at enhancement of services, such as the stroke pro gram, and the benets provided by telemedicine. “Keep your focus on those folks and continue your support for the Weems system because that’s what needs to be the center of health care in this community,” Stockwell said. “If we lose this hos pital, the health care in this com munity will suffer. We’re going to lose lots of money and that’s bad business.” Weems human resource direc tor Ginny Griner outlined why key Weems executives are paid directly by TMH, with which Weems has an afliation agreement. She said the better benet package improves recruitment options. “It doesn’t look right to me,” said Lockley. “Especially when they (Weems employees) are ask ing for benets.” Griner said 63 Weems employ ees are in the group health insur ance plan, and that vision, dental and term life insurance are also offered. “If it’s good enough for the work ers, it ought to be good enough for the CEO,” said Lockley. “We want to make sure every body’s treated fairly,” said Chair Cheryl Sanders. “Our employees stuck with us through thick and thin. My thing is as soon as we can, we can get benets for em ployees, whether it be an increase in hourly pay, or whatever you all may choose to be done. It needs to be done; they’ve done the ultimate sacrice. I don’t want employees to think we don’t appreciate what they do.” Griner said Weems “has made great strides to provide great ben ets. We have great plans, and we’re moving. It takes a little bit of money and forward thinking. We’re moving in that direction.” Jackel said staying competi tive in the job market is of critical importance. “We need to move ex peditiously for a retirement plan,” she said. “Until we have similar benets as our neighbor to the west, we’re not going to be able to keep good employees. We have good people also who have left the county.” Tr ades & Ser vi ces AD VERTISE HE RE TO DA Y 227 -78 47 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7 654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD &! $+& !$ () $! -# (#* ,%) !& ,! &"& &! !$ && L ICENSED AND I NSURED • 20 Y EAR S E XPERIENCE P. O. Bo x4 39 Car ra belle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 00 66499 RG 00 65255 JOE'S LA WN CARE IF IT'S IN YO UR YA RD LET JOE TA KE CA RE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES ,T REE TRIMMING AND REMO VA LA LSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION ,P LANTING AND BEDDING AV AILABLE CA LL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO .COM Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 EOC s from page A1 “We’re moving towards them in every subject,” said Kirvin. EOC assessments are described by the state as “computer-based, criterionreferenced assessments that measure the Next Gen eration Sunshine State Stan dards for specic courses, as outlined in their course descriptions. “ The rst assessment to begin the transition to endof-course testing in Florida was the 2011 Algebra 1 EOC Assessment. In 2014, 83 Franklin County High School eighth and ninth graders took the Algebra 1 EOC, and 46 per cent passed it, well below the state average. Of these, most were 3s, with a handful of 4s and 5s. Of the 54 percent of these Algebra I students who did not pass the EOC, two-thirds of them scored a 2 and one-third a 1. In Civics, 56 Franklin County seventh graders took the test, and of these 54 per cent scored a 1, 34 percent scored a 2, and 13 percent scored a 3, well below the state average of 35 percent. The Biology 1 and Geom etry EOC were administered for the rst time in spring 2012, and the U.S. History EOC was administered for the rst time in spring 2013. In Biology, 23 Franklin County freshmen, and 73 sophomores, took the EOC, and of these 70 percent earned a passing grade, bet ter than the state average of 68 percent. Of those Frank lin County students who did not pass, nearly all were at level 2, with only a couple students scoring a 1. Of those nearly 70 Se ahawk students who passed, about 40 were Level 3s, 16 were 4s, and 14 were 5s in the Biology EOC, closely mirror ing the state averages. In Geometry, which is given the year after a stu dent takes Algebra 1, a to tal of 90 Franklin County students took the EOC. Of these, 59 percent scored a 3 or better, a few percentage points below the state aver age of 64 percent. Among the Franklin County freshmen and soph omores who took the test, 30 percent scored a 3, the same as the state average, while 22 percent scored a 4, right at the state average, and 7 percent scored a 5, which is at a rate half the state average. Among the 41 percent of FCHS students who did not pass the Geometry EOC, about twice as many scored a 2 than did a 1, closely mir roring the state average. In History, 35 FCHS stu dents took the EOC in U.S. History, and 54 percent passed it, 11 percentage points below the state aver age of 65. While among the state’s nearly 157,000 high school students who took the U.S. History EOC, 18 percent scored a 5, no FCHS stu dents scored at that level. Among Level 4s, 23 percent of county students were at that level, a little better than the state average, which was also the case among Level 3, which included 31 percent of the local students. Of the 46 percent of FCHS students who did not pass the History EOC, about two-thirds were 2s and the rest 1s. “They can retake it, there may be a summer retake, and they don’t have to retake the course,” said Kirvin. “This assessment is one snapshot in the day of the child. For whatever reason they may not have performed to their full potential, and there is va lidity to a retake. Some don’t test well when they’re fully capable of passing.” W eeEE MS from page A1 in the accident,” Segal said. “We had some questions whether what they claimed was attributed to the ac cident. They did have doc tors willing to support their claims.” Segal said a June 16 me diation was able to reach a settlement of $75,000, $43,000 for Patricia Rickards and $32,000 for their daugh ter. Had the matter gone to court, the county could have faced a total maximum cost of $200,000, plus attorney costs, the attorney said. This is because the state’s sovereign immunity law caps the county’s exposure at $100,000 per incident. Segal said there is no deductible on the county’s insurance policy, so none of the payment will not come out of the county coffers. “There is no admission of fault and no admission of li ability,” he said. “We believe this is a good resolution.” — By D AA VID AA D LL E RSTRST EI NN S e E TTLe E M e E NT from page A1 District patterns The following are the district-wide results in each of the four End of Course examinations over the past four years. The percentages show the number of students who passed, with a score of 3 or better. 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 Algebra 1 40 48 59 55 Biology 1 44 58 70 Geometry 29 59 59 U.S. History 44 54

PAGE 12

A12 | The Times Thursday, July 10, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95486T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2010-CA-000403 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD M. WILLIAMS ,ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC.; GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered April 29, 2014 in Civil Case No. 2010CA-000403 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is Plaintiff and RONALD M. WILLIAMS ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 13th day of August, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 19, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of June, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk 13-04551-3 July 10, 17, 2014 95428T PUBLIC NOTICE The annual report of the J. Ben Watkins Foundation, Inc. is available at the address noted below for inspection during normal business hours by any citizen who so requests within 180 days after publication of this notice of its availability. Additionally, copies of said annual report are available upon payment of reasonable copy charges. J. Ben Watkins Private Foundation, Inc. 564 Rhoden Cove Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32312 The principal manager is J. Ben Watkins III; telephone (850) 4884782. July 3, 2014 95506T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 10-000149-CA GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, vs. DENISE ROUX A/K/A DENISE ELAINE ROUX; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 23rd day of June, 2014 and entered in Case No. 10-000149-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County Florida, wherein GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC is the Plaintiff and DENISE ROUX A/K/A DENISE ELAINE R SUNTRUST BANK UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANNE E. INGLE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALLISON JOHN INGLE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUSAN ROUX KEITH; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DENISE ROUX IN POSSESSION OF PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 27th Day of August the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 AND 19, BLOCK 262, GREATER APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, A SUBDIVISION OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA ACCORDING TO MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK M, PAGES 436-437 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711, Dated this 25th day of June, 2014 MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Of The Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. P.O. Box 9908 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-0908 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No.: 09-77361 July 10, 17, 2014 99321T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TIM OR CHRISTINA SAUNDERS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 313 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: Lot 14 ANGLERS HARBOR Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 19-07S-04W-1001-0000-01 40 Name is which assessed: BRYAN L. SANFORD & MICHAEL FORLUND All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST 2014, which is the 4th day of AUGUST 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 13th day of JUNE, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk June 26, July 3, 10, 17, 2014 99455T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-0428CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PETE MANGHAM and JOSEPH HAWKINS, individually and as sole heirs of Sharon E. Hawkins, and UNKNOWN HEIRS OR DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF SHARON E. HAWKINS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 30th day of April, 2014, entered in Case No.: 13-0428-CA in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is Plaintiff, and PETE MANGHAM (“Mangham”) and JOSEPH HAWKINS (“Hawkins”), individually and as sole heirs of Sharon E. Hawkins, and UNKNOWN HEIRS OR DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF SHARON E. HAWKINS (“Estate”), are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 2nd Floor Lobby at the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), on August 27, 2014, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said final judgment, to-wit: A parcel of land in Fractional Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point marked by an old concrete monument, said monument being the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 27 and run thence North 00 degrees 25 minutes 53 seconds West (bearing base) 1774.24 feet to an old concrete monument, thence North 89 degrees 57 minutes 31 seconds East 215.68 feet to an old concrete monument on the Northeast right of way of a 66 foot roadway; thence South 00 degrees 25 minutes 53 seconds East 72.49 feet to a point on the Southwestern right of way of said road; thence South 66 degrees 00 minutes East 388.21 feet along said Southwest right of way to a point of curve to the right; thence along said curve with a radius of 279.0 feet thru a central angle of 37 degrees 41 minutes 30 seconds for an arc distance of 182.74 feet; thence continue along said right of way South 28 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 479.19 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 28 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 264.31 feet to a concrete monument located at the intersection of said right of way and the West right of way of State Road S-384-A, also being on a curve concave to the Southeast; thence Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 527.46 feet thru a central angle of 18 degrees 33 minutes 06 seconds for an arch length of 170.78 feet (chord of said arc being South 52 degrees 27 minutes 12 seconds West 170.04 feet); thence leaving said right of way North 28 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds West 264.31 feet; thence North 52 degrees 27 minutes 12 seconds East 170.04 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 25th day of June, 2014. In accordance with the Americans With Disabinties Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850653-8861. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk if Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99447T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-55-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KATHY LEE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KATHY LEE; CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), N.A., n/k/a CITIBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, the names being fictitious to account for parties who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 17, 2014, in Case No.: 14-55-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST on July 16, 2014 the following described property: Lots 10 and 11, Block B of LANARK BEACH UNIT NO.1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with that certain 1992 Singlewide Mobile Home, ID #HMST6505GA, Title #63190654. DATED: June 18, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99467T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 6, Township 8 South, Range 3 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run North 6926’36” East, 1290.64 feet to an old concrete monument marking the Intersection of the Easterly boundary of the 100.00 foot right-of-way of a State Road with the Southerly boundary of the 66.00 foot right-ofway of the Gulf Shore Drive: thence run South 2315’00” East along the Easterly boundary of said State Road a distance of 170.00 feet, more or less, to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run North 2315’00” West along said Easterly right-of-way boundary, 170.00 feet, more or less, to an old concrete monument marking the intersection of said Easterly right-of-way boundary with the Southerly boundary of the 66.00 foot right-ofway of Gulf Shore Drive; thence run North 6650’00” East along said Southerly right-ofway boundary, 300.00 feet to a concrete monument, said concrete monument being located South 6650’00” West, 100.00 feet from the Northwest corner of Lot 1, Block “1”, of the Corrective Replat of Dog Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 2, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 34, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, leaving said southerly right-of-way boundary run South 2310’00” East, 194.00 feet, more or less, to the approximate mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico, thence run South 7124’40” West along said mean high water line 300.71 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Being the same lands as described in Official Records Book 350, Page 175, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH all the buildings and other structures and plants, shrubs, trees and sod now or hereafter on said land, and all fixtures, chattels, and articles of personal property now or hereafter affixed to or used in connection with said premises, including but not limited to plumbing and bathroom fixtures, air conditioning and sprinkler systems, furnaces, elevators, swimming pool, carpeting, window awnings, shades and blinds; and also encumbering any and all materials and supplies (including but not limited to bricks, lumber, concrete products, roofing materials, electrical equipment such as air conditioning, refrigeration, heating apparatuses), now or hereafter placed upon the mortgaged premises or utilized in the construction of any improvements on the mortgaged premises; and as to any property which does not form a part or parcel of the real estate, or does not constitute a fixture, this instrument is also deemed to be a security agreement under the Uniform Commercial Code for the purpose of creating a security interest in such property, which Mortgagor hereby grants to Mortgagee as a secured party under the Uniform Commercial Code. TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the same, together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in anywise appertaining, including all permits and/or land use authorizations issue by governmental agency or authority in connection with the mortgaged premises, and all easements in any way pertaining to the mortgaged premises, all rights-of-way and/or water rights used or available in connection with the mortgaged premises, and the rents, issues and profits thereof unto the Mortgagee in fee simple. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count I entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JANE A. DOERFER, Defendant, and the docket number of which is 2014-CA000010. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL, 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of June 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99469T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property Parcel 1: Lot 3, WILLOW ACRES ESTATES, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 4, WILLOW ACRES ESTATES, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lot 14-B, (unrecorded) Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 17, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run North 89 degrees 09 minutes 39 seconds West 123.39 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue North 89 degrees 09 minutes 39 seconds West 429.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds East 347.32 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the Southeasterly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot wide dirt roadway, thence run South 79 degrees 48 minutes 19 seconds East, along said right-of-way boundary 135.77 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), lying on a curve concave to the Northwesterly, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and said curve with a radius of 145.32 feet, through a central angle of 37 degrees 57 minutes 56 seconds for an arc distance of 96.29 feet, chord being North 81 degrees 23 minutes 49 seconds East 94.54 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 29 degrees 54 minutes 09 seconds East 396.48 feet to the Point of Beginning. P ersonal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however, established. pursuant to the Sum-

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, July 10, 2014 The Times | A13 Detailed Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com Real Estate Auction10 Properties Selling ABSOLUTE, No Minimums, No Reserves!!IN FLORIDA, GEORGIA & SOUTH CAROLINA30 Bank-Owned Properties Residential€Commercial€Industrial€Land BID LIVE AT THE AUCTION OR ONLINETuesday, July 22 @ 11amSale Site: Holiday Inn Atlanta Perimeter/Dunwoody, 4386 Chamblee Dunwoody Rd, Atlanta, GAGAL:2034€FL:AB-1488€SC:002815R€10%BuyersPremiumFEATURING in FLORIDA16.82 AcresApalachicolaBay/St.GeorgeSound WaterfrontResid.&Comm.Land includesSeveralCommercialBldgsPROPERTYLOCATION:U.S. Hwy. 98 & 1st Street, EastPoint,FL 1127800 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished $550.00 mo. 2. 39-5 Holland, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, w/d, fenced yard $525.00 mo. 3. 24-3 Pine St, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, unfurnished $450.00 mo. 4. 39-1 Carlton, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, carport $650.00 mo. incl. utilities 5. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle, 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach $1400.00 mo. 6. 202 1st St NE, Carrabelle, 5 bedroom, 2 baths, unfurnished $1000.00 mo. 7. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished $550.00 mo.8. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths $1000.00 mo. 9. 811 Three Rivers Rd. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on water, deep water dock, garage, fenced yard, parking $1000.00 mo. 10. 39-2 Carlton, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, Lanark Village $750.00 mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518442 4518474The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for possible elementary teaching positions for the 2014-15 school year. Classroom teachers must be eligible for Florida teacher certication. Also accepting applications for possible teaching assistant positions and substitutes for PK-8. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or cjohnson@abceagles.org Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in Destin Private equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 Susie’s Cleaning Service 20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! mary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK by asset acquisition from the FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION as receiver for COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JOHNNY C. MILLENDER and SHEILA L. MILLENDER, Defendants. and the docket number of which is: 2013 CA 000440. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Judson C. Brandt, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99519T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2012-CA-000298 PHH Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs. Palmer H. Philyaw; Unknown Spouse of Palmer H. Philyaw; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2012CA-000298 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff and Palmer H. Philyaw are defendant (s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on July 31, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 11, 12, 13, 14 AND 15, BLOCK 261, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK M, PAGE 436 IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOW IN GENERAL USE, SAID LAND BEING SITUATE IN AT PORTION OF THE AFORESAID CITY DESCRIBED AS “GREATER APALACHICOLA”. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 N Federal Hwy, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-245101 FC01 PHH July 3, 10, 2014 99471T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000421-CA BANK OF EASTMAN, Plaintiff, vs. MARK GRIFFIS, THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida Nonprofit Corporation, and RONDA HOBBY f/k/a RONDA HOBBY WALKER, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: Lot 1, Block B, 300 Ocean Mile Phase 1, subdivision as per plat or map thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, at page 26, of the public records of Franklin County, Florida. Also known as 1760 East Gulf Beach Drive, B-1, St. George Island, Florida 32328. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, in the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 27, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of June, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 3, 10, 2014 99551T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000266CAAXMX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR STARM 2007-2, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL DAGNESE, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment dated June 17, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 13000266CAAXMX, in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR STARM 2007-2, is the Plaintiff, and PAUL DAGNESE, et al., are the Defendants. Franklin County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 15, BAY COVE VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGE 18 AND 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on 21st day of August, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 18, 2014 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provsion of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 W. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith, He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. July 10, 17, 2014 99561T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Case No.: 12-00093-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT J. MATHEWS, JR., a/k/a ROBERT JOHN MATHEWS, JR., UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT J. MATHEWS, JR., a/k/a ROBERT JOHN MATHEWS, JR., n/k/a LISA MATHEWS, and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, by and through the FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 3, 2014, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the 2nd Floor Lobby, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 1 Commence at the most Easterly corner of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, unit 2, a subdivision as per plat or map thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 15, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida and run North 18 degrees 48 minutes 48 seconds West 150.00 feet, thence run South 71 degrees 22 minutes 41 seconds West 20.00 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 37 minutes 19 seconds West 71.71 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning continue North 18 degrees 37 minutes 19 seconds West 288.29 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. 300, thence run North 71 degrees 22 minutes 41 seconds East along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 165.00 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 37 minutes 19 seconds East 288.29 feet, thence run South 71 degrees 22 minutes 41 seconds West 165.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH a 30 foot wide beach view easement, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the most Easterly corner of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, unit 2, a subdivision as per plat or map thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, page 15, of the Public records of Franklin County, Florida and run North 18 degrees 48 minutes 48 seconds West 150.00 feet, thence run South 71 degrees 22 minutes 41 seconds West 20.00 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 37 minutes 19 seconds West 71.71 feet, thence run North 71 degrees 22 minutes 41 seconds East 209.70 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning continue North 71 degrees 22 minutes 41 seconds East 30.00 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 415.25 feet to the approximate mean high water line of Gulf of Mexico, thence run South 69 degrees 13 minutes 45 seconds West along said approximate mean high water line 30.02 feet thence run North 18 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds West 416.37 feet to the Point of Beginning. This Notice dated this 26th day of June, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 10, 17, 2014 99585T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-66-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER THOMPSON, a/k/a CHRIS THOMPSON; TABAITHA D. THOMPSON, a/k/a TABAITHA DIANE THOMPSON RAY; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TABAITHA D. THOMPSON, a/k/a TABAITHA DIANE THOMPSON RAY, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 26, 2014, in Case No.: 14-66-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST on September 3, 2014 the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 2 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 1982.61 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 2619.78 FEET ALONG RIDGE ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 114.36 FEET ALONG RIDGE ROAD TO A POINT; THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD, RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST 381.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST 114.36 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST 381.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING LOT 51 NORTH RIDGE ROAD, EASTPOINT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS SHOWN ON THE UNRECORDED PLAT OF TARPON SHORES SUBDIVISION PREPARED BY TOM M. HOWARD, REGISTERED LAND SURVEYOR, DATED NOVEMBER 22, 1983. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1998 SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, ID #17L02637. DATED: June 26, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 10, 17, 2014 99583T PUBLIC NOTICE Franklin County Board of County Commissioners Emergency Management Request for Qualifications Franklin County Emergency Management has received an agreement for $10,900 and is seeking qualified contractors to execute a Homeland Security Exercise Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Compliant Exercise. Deliverables: The selected contractor will be responsible for conducting three exercise planning meetings, executing a functional exercise and developing and completing the After Action Report and Improvement Plan. In addition, the contractor will be responsible for assisting the county emergency management office with completing all required quarterly reports, submitting request for reimbursement and conducting the close out report. Basis for Selection: Prospective contractors will submit the following by July 25, 2014 to be considered for award: 1. Proposed completion date (10%) 2. Previous experience with Franklin County Emergency Management (30%) 3. Qualifications of firm (30%) 4. Minority Contractor (30%) Submissions can be made via email to the attention of Pamela Brownell, the Emergency Management Director at em3frank@ fairpoint.net. Questions: Any questions regarding the project should be directed in writing no later than July 18, 2014 to Pamela Brownell at em3frank@ fairpoint.net. Pub: July 10, 17, 2014 99593T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000321CAAXMX DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LIZZETTE DEARINGER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 24, 2014 and entered in Case No. 13000321CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and LIZZETTE DEARINGER; WHISPERING PINES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. A DISSOLVED CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 3rd day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 5, WHISPERING PINES (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BLOCK 235 OF THE OFFICIAL MAP OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID BLOCK 235, A DISTANCE OF 282.72 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 41.96 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 13.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 52 SECONDS SECONDS WEST 136.49 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 26.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 103.54 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 14.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 225 CORNELIUS RIZER STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 24, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850. 577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. F13010945 July 10, 17, 2014 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL90403 to 56554 Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternFront Desk Breakfast Attendant Weekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34293798 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers Bussers BLUE PARROT NOW HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34293190 HospitalityHousekeeping Inspector PTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291812 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291811 Medical/Health Home Health Care Aide/CNA Needed to assist, run errands, light housework and befriend my husband 3-4 hrs per day several days/week. 850-697-1424/559-8737 Web ID 34294109 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL86476 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. Available August 1 850-653-3838 Text FL92303 to 56654 Apalachicola : 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft, Open Plan, 1Br, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Secluded in Trees, 1/2 mile from Beach. $400 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL92051 to 56654 Just Remodeled 2bd/1ba House, CH&A, $900/mo, 1st & Last. $500/dep No Smoking or Pets. 850-653-4293 Port St Joe: 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, references call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $1400 mo + $500 dep 850-370-6001 No Better Buy Than This! 348 Old Ferry Dock Rd.-Two story w/ 2 bedrooms & bath on top floor, bottom floor has master bedroom & bath, living, kitchen, dining, solarium areas with .5 bath. Living and dining room has high ceiling with fans. Concrete slab on bottom floor with interior floors covered with carpet and vinyl. Interior walls and ceiling are sheetrock. All interior doors are white with trim in pickled oak. Kitchen and sun room have large bay windows. Living room has gas fireplace (can be converted to wood burning) surrounded by stone. Exterior walls are stained cypress with stone accent foundation and columns. Roof is covered with architectural shingles. Home has central heat & air & is connected to city water and sewer. Chain link fence w/ electric gate encloses all but one side of property. Property located two blocks from Apalachicola Bay & Highway 98 in Eastpoint, FL. Home is NOT in flood zone. 850-323-1744, roycar0613@gmail.com txt FL94244 to 56654 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat, AWD Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. Ultimate Off Road SUV $21,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

PAGE 14

Local The Times | A14 Thursday, July 10, 2014 Local TRIVIA FUN EDITOR’S NOTE: “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a daily feature in The News Herald. WHAT BRIDGE CONNECTS DD ETROIT, MII wW ITH WINDSOR, OO NTARIO? Ambassador, Homestead, Confederation, Lion’s Gate EE VERY HUmM AN BEING SPENT ABOUT HO wW LONG AS A SINGLE CELL? 10 seconds, 1 minute, 30 minutes, 6 hours WHAT wW AS THE FIRST NA mM E OF CC ELSIUS OF TE mM PERATURE-mM EASURING FAmM E? Uppsala, Mario, Anders, Wilhelm WHICH AA POLLO mM ISSION mM ADE FAmM OUS, “ HH OUSTON, wW E HAVE A PROBLEmM ”? 10, 12, 13, 15 WHO’S BEEN CALLED “ LL A PP ETITE QUEBECOISE”? Celine Dion, Beyonce, Kate Moss, Augusta WHAT DOES A GOURmM AND ORDINARILY LOVE? Farms, Food, Fences, Fright ANSANS W ERSERS : Ambassador, 30 minutes, Anders, 13, Celine Dion, Food Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com WILSON CASEY Trivia Guy From staff reports FF ull moon climb SS aturday at lighthouse The July Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Saturday, July 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and will include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:42 p.m. and the moon will rise at 8:52 p.m. July 12. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of the island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. II s your child ready for kindergarten? Parents, is your child ready for kindergarten? Early Education and Care currently is accepting applications for Early Head Start for the 2014-15 school year.  Early Head Start is a federally funded program for young children from low-income families promoting socialization and school readiness. To be eligible, the family must meet federal income guidelines, reside in Franklin County and children must be between newborn and age 2. Services are offered at no cost.   Pregnant mothers and parents of children with disabilities are encouraged to apply. For more information, call 6533366 or stop by Franklin County Early Head Start, 162 Ave. E in Apalachicola between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. CC all for grant applications Florida’s Wildlife Legacy Initiative is seeking applications for research projects on community-based oyster restoration and living shoreline These projects are being developed to address the goals of Florida’s State Wildlife Action Plan. Florida’s Wildlife Legacy Initiative has identied the project need and objectives. Applicants are asked to submit project proposals that detail the approach best suited to meet the stated objectives. To be considered, applicants must submit a completed State Wildlife Grant application, fully developed scope of work, budget and match commitment letter that specically relate to the needs and objectives of these projects. Staff invites researchers to submit applications for Florida’s State Wildlife Grants Program. Applications are due by noon July 28. Applications should be prepared in accordance with Florida’s State Wildlife Grants Program Guidelines, which can be found on the State Wildlife Grants Apply for a Grant Web page. Applicants will be notied about selected projects by Feb. 13, 2015. Selected projects will start no earlier than July 1, 2015. Should you have any questions regarding the grant cycle or application requirements, please contact Andrea Alden, the State Wildlife Grants Coordinator, at Andrea.Alden@MyFWC.com or Robyn McDole, the Assistant State Wildlife Grants Coordinator, at Robyn.McDole@MyFWC.com. News BRIEFS Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times To day (850) 653-8 868 YO UR HO MET O WN NE WS PA PE R FO R MO RE TH AN 12 0 YE AR S YO UR H OMET OW N NE WS PA PER F OR M OR E T HA N 120 YE ARS TH E T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks Be autifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular Ba ya nd Br idge views with man yn ew upda te s. Re modeled ki tc hen (new ca binets ,c oun te rt ops ,s ink ,d isposal ,s tov e, dish wa sher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea tr ee ct iv ew indo w lm; 3l gB Rs with new mast er BA; priv ate oc ej ust o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2w alk -i nc losets .T his house is per fe ct fo re nt er taining with ah uge fr on tp or ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and wo od burning r eplac e. La ndsc ape has irriga tion we ll and na tiv ep lan ts .H igh ecienc yh ea t pump ,n ew ro of ,6a dditional in ro of insula tion. Sh immering Sa nds Re alt y STE VE HARRI S Ce ll: 850 -890-19 71 st ev e@s te ve sisla nd .com www .st ev esisl and .com ww w. 332C ookS tr eet .com 850 -8999988 |8 50 -6 97-9 010 ww w. coa stalr ealtyi nfo.co m Ex cl us iv eg at ed co mm un it yf or th ed is ce rn in gb uy er .O ne of th e pe rf ec tp la ce sa lon gt he co as tw it hg org eo us sa ndy be ac he s, br ea th ta ki ng vi sta s, un li mi te ds ta rr yn igh ts, pi ct ur ep er fe ct sunr ise s, mo onrise s, an ds uns et s. Enj oy th es er en it y, nat ure abo un ds -w at ch dolp hin s, ea gl es ,o spr ey ,s pri ng an df al lb ir d mig ra ti ons, and ot he r" lo cal s" .A mple dr eam hom eb ui ld in ga re a, in cl ud es la nd acros se as em en tr oad .Y our se cr et wo rl da wa its yo u. Tu rn av ac at ion int oa li fe st yle .C al lf or de tai ls an dv ie wing MLS#252155 $729,000 St George Island BE AC HF RO NT LO T La nd mar kl oca ti on !T he ON LY 10 0’ wi de be ac hf ro nt lo t in th eG ulf Bea ch es fo rs al e! Lo ca te dn ex tt oa1 00 'w id e be ac he as em en tw it had un ew al ko ve r, th ee as te rn mo st be ac hf ro nt lo ti nt he Gu lf Be ac he sp ro vi di ng op en vi ew st o th eE as tE nd .Ar ar eo ff er John Shelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250351 $629,000 Eastpoint MA GNO LI AB LU FF SB AY FR ON T Wa te rv ie ws fr om ev er yr oo m, 10 ’c ei li ng s, cr ow nm ol di ng r ep la ce ,h ar dw oo d oo rs &t il e, 3B R2 -1 /2 BA ,m as si ve MB R, la rg eo pe nd ec k&2 nd o or ba lc on y, ga ra ge se par at es to ra ge bl dg ,m at ur el an ds ca pi ng ,d oc k&p ie r. No rt hB ay Sh or eD r. 800-344-757 0 850-927-477 7 www .sgirealty .com Jan ie Bu rk e Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. Su nr oom, scr eened &o pen por ches ,h ot tub o MBR suit e, lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho we ra nd gar den tub detached gar age ,g as r eplac e, gr anit ec oun te rt ops ,s tainless ki tc hen, wine co oler ,b uilt-in co rner ca binets .A menities include co mmunit y dock ,p ool ,t ennis co ur ts .M ain living ar ea &m ast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs fo rp riv ac yw /p riv ate por ch. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-8 90-1971 st ev e@st ev esislan d. com www .288m agno liaba yd r. com ww w. st ev esisla nd .com 29,000 % ,,%/ 0*0 *&*32 )5 # ## ( # # ( $ ! # $ !# $ " $ # ((( + + &* +4 4 1+ 4 )& 2 2* + % ++ & + & &' 4 + 4 +& 1 & 32 0 + 2 5 +2 +&* & 2 44 -+ + + + &) +& + + 2 5 + 25 + ) 5+ &4 1& & 2 55 2 0 4 & &2 & +& 4 + )3 & *' & 4 2) ) 2 2 1 + + 52 2 0 Al ic eC ol li ns ()$ + = =; $5 /= 3 85 0. 92 7. 31 00 ph one |8 50 .6 53 .6 73 7m obil e / =6 5/3 : ; 5 -% /; 5 95 =/ 4 ! www .c en tur y2 1c olli ns re al ty .c om 0 :5 ;3 "= 4 = ;4 /0 45 ;95 4: >5 *3 > 2 ;= !! /3 5 6 /2 5 5 /= 5 5= ; 9/ 5 43 >> ; 6 /> 5 3 #= / / ; >> ; 6 65 "= >;3 ; 5 4 = 5 ; 3 *2 ;< 5 :; <; 9 /; = 8 $ .! 3 > 3: 56 <; 3 :5 4; ; 9 >* =; ;9 > ; : 3/ : 54 / =3 5; =; 9* 5 5 ; >* = 6 6& 35 5 ; 54 9/ / 95 *5 3 :5 4 ;= 4= ;6 5 ;3 5 ; 4 25 5 =5 49 =/ 6 4 >/ 5 2/ :: / / /3 ; 2 *9 / =; 5 & 5 =/3 5; /= =5 4* 3 > 5 ; 5 4 =/ / ; 2 =; 4 53 ; 5 >* 6 35; =; 9 3: /3 :5 6 6 :5 :5 / 5 / 3 5 5 54 3 : ; : 2 9 6 3 55 /4 > 5 ;= = / 3 3 ; ; 3< ; 53 /2= 5 6 : ; 3/ 5 53 ; */ 4 5 5 9 3 / ;9 ; : 3 5 5 =/ ; 4 5/ =6 5 > / 5 = ; ; 9 53 4 :> 5* = >; 5 2 5/ 3:5 6% 5 9 5 = / 4 %: 2 / ; >5 = /= = 4 / 1 8 3 3 =5 / 4 ; 5* /> 5 3 #= / / ; / ; $3 99 ,0 00 ML S# 25 13 41 RE DUCE D