The Apalachicola times

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00274

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, June 12, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index High school students pace improved FCATsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Freshmen and sophomores at Franklin County High School posted their best reading test results in four years, to highlight a series of gains throughout the district at most grade levels on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test this year. For the rst time since FCAT 2.0 was introduced in 2011, a majority of ninthand 10th-graders were at Level 3 or better in reading, which is considered a satisfactory performance of grade level or even better. In the case of the 79 sophomores who took the test this spring, 51 percent were at grade level or better, 24 percentage points better than last years 27 percent, when only 55 students were tested. The best sophomores at the high school had done previously was just 38 percent at grade level or better in 2012. The biggest growth among sophomores was at Level 4, which was achieved by 25 percent of the class, more than double the best percentage it had posted since 2011. Among the 78 freshmen who were tested, 55 percent were at grade level or better, seven percentage points better than last year and 19 percentage points better than in 2011. At the middle school level, which includes grades six, seven and eight, the Apalachicola Bay Charter School posted strong results, especially in the math scores for its 27 seventhgraders. With no Level 1s and only 7 percent Level 2s, the school had 93 percent of its seventh-graders at grade level or better, part of a steady rise from just 60 percent at that level in 2011. In seventh-grade math, the percent at grade level or better dipped only slightly, from 71 to 69 percent, and in eighth-grade math, the percentage at grade or better jumped by Special to the TimesA 36-year-old St. George Island woman died early Sunday morning after her car overturned near the entrance of St. George Plantation. Ashley Marie Nichols, 36, was pronounced dead at the scene by Franklin County emergency medical staff, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report led by Cpl. Matthew Kirkland. The report said Nichols, driving a 1992 Acura Legend, was traveling west on Gulf Beach Drive about 3:20 a.m. when she failed to negotiate a curve at the entrance to the St. George Plantation, near Leisure Lane. The vehicle traveled off the roadway onto the south shoulder and overturned, striking several trees and ejecting Nichols before coming to rest on its roof facing easterly. The FHP report said Nichols was not wearing a seat belt, and a determination whether the crash was alcohol-related was pending. The highway patrol was assisted on scene by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, Franklin County EMS and the St. George Island Fire Department. Nichols was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and the medical examiners of ce for a post-mortem examination.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com At a pair of meetings last week, Franklin County residents made clear war games are not welcome in Tates Hell State Forest. The Air Force has struck a deal with the state to lease sections of Tates Hell as part of its Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI), a plan to relieve Eglin Air Force Bases crowded airspace by expanding military training operations to the Tates Hell and Blackwater River state forests. In the third of a series of meetings with Eglin representatives, residents from across the county took issue with an environmental impact statement (EIS) that contends training in Tates Hell would not affect the environment. The EIS was prepared by Leidos, a private defense contractor that works extensively with the Department of Defense. Leidos assesses the potential impacts, gathering information from the Air Force, State of Florida and other sources, said Air force spokesman Mike Spaits. The Air Force interdisciplinary team from Eglin, AFCEC and Headquarters Air Force then reviews and edits the document to prepare it for release. Lt. Col. Lynn Watkins presided over the meetings, which drew about two dozen attendees each, June 3 in Carrabelle and June 4 in Apalachicola. Displays of the Air Force proposal were available for viewing before the exchange of comments, but questions were not allowed during the meeting. State Forester Jim Karels opened the session by announcing that, while he would not comment, he was observing the proceedings for the Florida Forest Service, which will make the ultimate decision about how Tates Hell can be used. Eglin spokesmen Tom Tolbert and Spaits read aloud portions of the EIS, followed by three-minute statements from attendees. Although the time limit was strictly enforced, some speakers were given extra time by members of the audience who ceded them minutes. The EIS offers two alternatives for GRASI: use of Tates Hell or no expansion of the exercise area. At the Carrabelle meeting, Bruce McCormack, CEO of Gulf Unmanned Systems Center, said there is an alternative venue for war games. He said military groups, including Eglin, have used a 90,000-acre tract of privately owned land near Blountstown since 1999. GUSC would administer the lease of the available land using employees working in Franklin County, he said.No signi cant bene cial or adverse impactsAccording to the EIS, the Air Force has not identi ed any signi cant bene cial or adverse impacts associated with the proposed action. While the Air Force has identi ed the potential for adverse impacts to various resources, these impacts would be insigni cant. The federal Environmental Protection Agency has reviewed the EIS and will give its nal decision after the public comment period is completed, Air Force of cials said. At the meetings last week, a BENEFIT CONCERT FOR ASHLEYA bene t concert will be 7-10 p.m. June 19 at Black Marlins Bar & Grill, 212 E. Bay Shore Drive on St George Island. All proceeds from the $20 cover at the door will be donated to assist with nal expenses and the immediate needs of Ashley Nichols children. A meal and entertainment are included. There will also be an open cash bar. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Classi eds . . . A16-A17Superintendent revamp headed to votersBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County voters will have a chance in November to decide whether to continue to elect the superintendent of schools or switch to having the position be appointed by the school board. By a 3-1 vote June 5, the school board approved placing on the Nov. 4 countywide ballot a binding referendum that would end the direct election of the superintendent and have the school board responsible for making the hire, beginning in October 2016 at the completion of Superintendent Nina Marks term. County commissioners now have the responsibility to arrange to have the measure placed on the general election ballot. The only school board member to oppose placing the referendum before voters was Teresa Ann Martin. School board member David Hinton was absent. School board member Pam Shiver, who rst suggested the proposal to her colleagues a few months ago, made the motion, with a second from George Thompson. The only member of the audience to speak out on the matter was Carrabelles David Butler, who made a brief statement. INSIDEVeteran gets last wish for school, A9See SUPERINTENDENT A9 ASHLEY NICHOLSWoman killed in crash at Plantation entrance GULF REGIONAL AIRSPACE STRATEGIC INITIATIVEResidents sound off on GRASI war gamesLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTom Tolbert and Mike Spaits read excerpts from the Environmental Impact Statement before public comment was heard.See FCAT A6 See WOMAN KILLED A9 See GRASI A6VOL. 129 ISSUE 7Dancing with little stars, A8 Pop-up art at Freddys this weekendOn Friday and Saturday, June 13-14, come to the Freddys Re nery, above Tamaras Caf on Avenue D, for a Pop-Up art show, tea dance and gallery closing. On Friday, preview the art from 5-8 p.m. On Saturday, the art will be on display all day. From 2-5 p.m., there will be a tea dance to commemorate the re nerys last day.Full moon climb at lighthouse tonightA Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be today, June 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb, 8-9:30 p.m., includes hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15, $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, climb the lighthouse for a view of the full moon. Cost is $10, $5 for SGLA members. Make reservations at 927-7745.ANERR to host July 1 meetingThe Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve invites local stakeholders to provide input to state and federal entities about what the reserve does and what stakeholders think it should do. This includes a discussion of what ANERR has accomplished in the last ve years, as part of an evaluation of reserve programs by NOAA. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. July 1 at ANERR, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Island summer bingo every TuesdaySummer Bingo on St. George Island is at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave. Cost is 50 cents per card.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Carrabelle has put a hold on fencing Gulf Beach Drive. In 2009, Carrabelle took assignment of the lease for McKissack Beach from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. Last month, representatives of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection met with city staff and City Attorney Dan Hartman to discuss Carrabelles proposed land management plan. Creation of the plan is mandated by the DEP for leaseholders. Residents of the McKissack Lake Beach community, a subdivision dating back to the 1930s, have recently written to the DEP complaining about automobile trafc on the beach. Driving on McKissack Beach or any beach in the county is illegal except in an emergency. Hartman said DEP representatives asked the city to take steps to end beach driving. They asked that the city erect temporary fencing at the end of Gulf Beach Drive, which runs to the beach past Two Als at the Beach Caf. The DEP is looking to us because we hold the lease, Hartman said. He said DEP representatives pointed out a sign posted on Gulf Beach Drive states that driving on the beach and dunes is illegal. Commissioners said in the past, Carrabelle did not enforce the beach driving ban because the beach was not within the city limits. Robin Hilton, a local realtor, said people ignored the sign because nobody enforced the law. She asked that a Carrabelle patrol car be sent to the beach periodically for enforcement. Carrabelle Police Chief Craig Kincaid said he was willing to dispatch an ofcer to the beach. Whenever we got calls in the past to go down there, we were told it was the countys jurisdiction. My two previous chiefs said it was the county. I have no problem with ticketing and towing cars but I have to have a mandate, Kincaid said. Im not for cars running down the beach because you could run over somebody and kill them, Mayor Curley Messer said. I dont think we have any choice. If the state says its the law, you do it, said Commissioner Frank Mathes. Commissioner Olivia Massey said mullet shermen do not drive on the beach, but use an access road that runs behind the dunes. They have used that access road for 40 years, she said. Messer said he didnt want to stop people from shing. Im not real happy that the state is now looking to the city to enforce state laws, Commissioner Brenda La Paz said. We took assignment, Hartman said. Its our problem. He said if the city planned to continue with plans to develop the beach with bathrooms and parking, DEP would expect them to create a stormwater management system. Massey said a stormwater system would cost thousands of dollars to install. We dont have that money, said Mathes. La Paz asked if the city could return the lease to the state. We had nothing to do with this, she said. The city administrators and commissioners will bear the brunt. Hartman said Carrabelle leased the land to improve it and create a tourist attraction. Its the nicest beach anywhere on the bay. You can get the money to build a bathhouse and you will really have a drawing card, said developer Gene Langston. If you let the state take it, they will make it just like anyplace else, said Hilton. We have something unique here. Former city commissioner Gathena Parmenas said the city should avoid further expense by returning the beach to the state. Messer instructed Hartman to request the DEP send a representative to the next city meeting to discuss McKissack Beach before any further action is taken. Hartman said he believed most of the citys concerns over the beach and enforcement of driving laws were nancial. I think a lot of good ideas were passed around at the meeting, he said. ATTENTIONCURRENTANDFORMER WATERFRONTPROPERTYOWNERS: LASTCHANCEBPCLAIMSDEADLINEEXTENDEDIfyouownedwaterfrontpropertyalongtheGulfCoastbetweenApril20,andDecember31,2010,youmaybeeligiblefor thousandsofdollarsincompensationthroughtheBPsettlementfund(aslongasyouhavenotalreadysignedarelease withBP),simplyforowningyourwaterfrontpropertyduring thattime,andregardlessofwhetheryouhadvacationrentals ornot. IfyousoldwaterfrontpropertyalongtheGulfCoastbetween April20,andDecember31,2010,youmaybeeligiblefortens ofthousandsofdollarsincompensationthroughtheBPsettlementfund(aslongasyouhavenotalreadysignedarelease withBP).Ifyouenteredintoasalesagreementtosellyour waterfrontpropertyafterApril20,2010,andclosedpriorto December31,2010,youmaybeautomaticallyentitledtocompensationregardlessofwhetheryoucanprovelossofvalueto yourwaterfrontpropertyornot. Ourprocessforthistypeofclaimissimple,andwedoeverythingforyou.Our15%feeisdueonlyifwecollectfromBP, andyouwillnotbeliableforanycostsorexpensesinaddition tothefee.IfwefailtocollectfromBP,youwillnotoweusany costs,expensesorfees. Callusor emailus nowwithyourwaterfrontphysicaladdressandwewillcheckyourwaterfrontpropertyseligibilityon ourinteractivemapforpotentiallossofuseandorsalesloss compensation. PleasenotethatthedeadlinetoleBPclaimshasbeenextended.Thedeadlineis180daysfromyourrstpaymentunder theDWHSettlement(ifapplicable),or180daysafterthesettlementisnalized(thesettlementhasnotyetbeennalizeddue toBP'sappeals),whichevereventoccursrst.LawOfceJamesDorgan,P.C. Fairhope,Alabama 251-928-0192JamesRDorgan@gmail.comNorepresentationismadethatthequalityofthelegalservicestobeperformedis greaterthanthequalityoflegalservicestobeperformedbyotherattorneys. Brick pavers have been falling from the memorial wall in Carrabelle.Waterfront Partnership to fund park repairsBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com At their June 5 meeting, Carrabelles commissioners discussed problems with Veterans Park. Commissioner Brenda La Paz said she was contacted by Rod Gasche about repairs needed in the memorial adjacent to US 98. Gasche said the paint on the statue of an American ag is peeling. The fountain located at the west end of the park is not running. The statues of servicemen are in need of cleaning and brick pavers baring the names of servicemen are falling from a brick wall. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the falling tiles would need to be relocated. She said she contacted the company that manufactures the pavers said they couldnt be attached to a vertical brick surface. Mayor Curley Messer said the city has attempted to x the fountain but cannot keep it working. La Paz suggested the fountain be converted to a planter. She said she believed the Carrabelle Waterfront Partnership had several thousand dollars in an account dedicated to maintaining the park. Commissioners asked partnership President Tamara Allen to investigate what repairs to the park could be made with the available money. Date of county meeting changedAt their June 5 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to move the Tuesday, June 17 meeting to Monday, June 16. This will allow commissioners to attend the legislatures mandated ethics training. The meeting will be at 9 a.m. in the commission meeting room in the Annex Building at 34 Forbes Street in Apalachicola.  Digital Kids next week at Gulf/FranklinDigital Kids, an exciting class for young students to learn the skills they need to be successful in todays increasingly digital world, will be offered at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College on Thursday, June 19 from 9 a.m. until noon. Geared for students age 7-10, the class will provide students with the opportunity to learn keyboarding skills and computer skills through a variety of fun, hands-on activities. The cost for the class is $29 per student. You may register for the class on line at www.gulfcoast. edu/corpcollege/registration or by visiting the Gulf/Franklin Campus at 3800 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe. If you have questions or need additional information, please call the Gulf/Franklin Campus at 227-9670. Bear-proof dumpster for Seventh StreetOn June 5, Carrabelle city commissioners voted LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Carrabelle to discuss McKissack Beach with DEP LOIS SWOBODA | The Times News bBRiIEfsFSSee bB RiIEfsFS A14 Flo LO Rida IDA MEmo MO RY PRo O JECTMcKissack Beach circa 1930

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The Times | A3Thursday, June 12, 2014The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.JUNE 3Glenda J. Martina, 22, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)JUNE 4Willie E. Pelt, 32, Port St. Joe, possession of listed chemicals, and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Scott W. Burkett, 49, Port St. Joe, possession of listed chemicals, and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO)JUNE 5Christopher J. Thomas, 37, Panacea, burglary of a dwelling and grand theft (FCSO) Daniel Hicks, 33, Apalachicola, petit theft (FCSO) Bobbie L. Carrin, 49, Apalachicola, Pasco County violation of probation (FCSO)JUNE 6Buddy R. Richards, 20, Eastpoint, possession of cannabis, failure to appear and violation of probation (FCSO) Kimberly D. Harrington, 47, Lanark Village, resisting ofcer without violence, corruption by threats against public servant, felony eeing or attempting to elude and reckless driving (CPD) Leonard D. Martin, 52, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)JUNE 7Justin M. Pool, 34, Port St. Joe, criminal mischief and battery (FCSO) Phillip S. Creamer, 38, Apalachicola, violation of probation, failure to appear and sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Buddy K. Wood, 37, Port St. Joe, possession of cannabis (FCSO) Raymond E. Mullis, 56, St. George Island, DUI and driving while license revoked habitual (FCSO)JUNE 8Robert M. Schmidt, 46, Carrabelle, Gulf County warrant (FCSO) Jimmy H. Topham, 33, Eastpoint, petit theft (FCSO) Carrie Tipton, 30, Eastpoint, petit theft (FCSO) Marvin B. Campbell, 54, Apalachicola, possession of cannabis, possession of burglary tools with intent, burglary of a conveyance and violation of a domestic violence injunction (APD) Molly Hampton, 62, Carrabelle, resisting ofcer without violence, and giving false name or identication to an ofcer (CPD)JUNE 9Steve A. Jones, Jr., 23, Apalachicola, trespass after warning, and burglary of an occupied dwelling (APD) Dakota D. Crum, 18, Carrabelle, grand theft of a motor vehicle, reckless driving and leaving the scene of a crash with damage (FCSO) WATER SAFETY INVESTIGATION ATTENTION: ApalachicolaWaterCustomersInMay2013,theCityofApalachicolaWaterSystemnotiedresidents thattheirwaterfailedtomeetstandardssetbytheFloridaDepartment ofEnvironmentalProtectionandtheEPA. Duringroutinesafetytesting,theCityofApalachicolafoundlevels oftrihalomethanes(THMs)morethan50%higherthanestablished maximumcontaminantlevelsfordrinkingwater. THMscanalsobeinhaledandabsorbedthroughtheskin.Researchers discoveredthatbloodconcentrationsofTHMsrose5-to15-foldfollowing suchroutineactivitiesasshowering,bathingandhandwashing. Oftenfoundinindustrialsolventsandrefrigerants,THMsare consideredcarcinogenicandhavebeenlinkedtonumerouslifethreateninghealtheffects: LiverorKidneyFailure LiverorKidneyCancer ColonorRectalCancer BladderCancer AdversePregnancyOutcomes SeriousCentralNervousSystemDamage Ifyouoralovedonehasreceivedsuchadiagnosis,orafamilymember hasdiedfromoneoftheseconditions,andifyourwaterisprovidedby theCityofApalachicola,pleasecontactourrmforafreeconsultation. PANAMACITY1-800-800-8539 walborsky.comSources:U.S.EnvironmentalProtectionAgency,SafeDrinkingWaterInformationSystem(SDWIS)ViolationReport,CityofApalachicola,reportcreated 4/22/2014basedondataextractedon2/10/2014;NationalInstitutesofHealth,TapWaterandTrihalomethanes:FlowofConcernsContinues,Environmental HealthPerspectives,July2005,113(7):A474;TrihalomethanesinDrinking-water,WHOGuidelinesforDrinking-waterQuality,WHO/SDE/WSH/03.04/64 BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 50X150GULFLOT $35,000 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Arrest REPOrR TIts time for another election and, once again, some Franklin County citizens are taking the low road. Political signs relating to the upcoming county commission election have been stolen or vandalized in eastern Franklin County, in and around Lanark Village. Under Florida Statute 806.13, the placement of grafti and other acts of vandalism are considered criminal mischief, a second degree misdemeanor if the damage to such property is $200 or less. If the damage is greater than $200 but less than $1,000, it is a misdemeanor of the rst degree. If the damage is $1,000 or greater, it is a felony of the third degree. When the violation is related to placement of grafti, there is an additional ne of not less than $250 for a rst conviction; not less than $500 for a second conviction; and not less than $1,000 for a third or subsequent conviction. In addition, the perpetrator may be required to perform at least 40 hours of community service and, if possible, perform at least 100 hours of community service that involves the removal of grafti. If a minor commits a delinquent act, the parent or legal guardian is liable along with the minor for payment of the ne. If a minor is found to have placed grafti on any public property or private property, their drivers license can be revoked for not more than one year. Bill Snyder, a candidate for the Republican nomination for county commissioner in District 2, said vandals have cost him around $600. He spent much of the day June 5 cleaning the billboard shown above. Theyll come back and do it again tonight, he said. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott said complaints related to vandalism should be directed to the states attorneys ofce. People pay money for that (election materials), and people shouldnt go out and vandalize other candidates, she said. I know when I ran mine were vandalized bad and that was in 2008, all over the county. VANDALISM ON THE CAMPAIGN TrRAIL SS PECIAL TO THE TT IMESAn eight by 24-foot sign in Lanark Village has been vandalized several times. Law Enforcement

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 12, 2014 ASection Your cheatin heart will make you weep Your Cheatin Heart by Hank Williams Donald Sterling has now reneged on his agreement to sell the Los Angeles Clippers. Perhaps he changed course when he saw his impending tax bill. Im not a basketball fan, but when I heard that a professional basketball team was selling for $2 billion, I wondered how much the seller would actually clear after taxes. Astute advisors consider similar situations daily on behalf of their clients. How much will the client clear if a holding is liquidated? Or, how much will a client take home if he sells his business? After all, its not what you gross; its what you make after you settle with Uncle Sam that actually matters. Employing investment strategies that neglect a clients tax considerations can be detrimental to the clients nances. I read recently about a client who changed nancial advisors. The new advisor perused the clients portfolio, saw heavy allocations in one particular dividendpaying utility stock and immediately sold the majority of the security. Turns out the client had held the stock for several decades and had originally purchased it at a rock-bottom price. Because the stock had grown signi cantly in value, the capital gains taxes were exceptionally burdensome. Back to basketball. Mr. Sterling was reportedly selling the L.A. Clippers to former Microsoft Chief Steve Ballmer for $2 billion. Sterling bought the team in 1981 for $12.5 million, so the franchise has increased in value by $1.98 billion. Assuming no additions to his cost basis, Sterling would likely pay a 20 percent capital gains rate on this $1.98 billion, or just under $400 million. If the team is determined to be a non-passive asset, the Sterlings may have avoided the 3.8 percent Medicare surtax on net investment income. Whew. But Sterling isnt selling the Miami Heat, a team located in a state with no income taxes. The controversial sale is in California, which just raised its maximum state tax rate to 13.3 percent. Thats more than $260 million more owed in state taxes. Now weve got a tax liability of $660 million. Taxes are simply part of the equation, in business sales and investing. If youre considering working with a new investment advisor, ask him what kind of tax analysis will be performed on your holdings prior to the commencement of trading in your accounts. No need to shed tears for Mr. Sterling if the sale indeed goes through. His franchise ownership produced roughly a 16,000 percent return over a period of 33 years on his original investment. Thats an annualized rate of around 17 percent. This rate of return is surpassed, though, by potential new owner Steve Ballmer, whose original investment in Microsoft has earned him over 55,000 percent over the last 28 years. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC (6086121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. I not long ago returned from the University of Florida, where I attended workshops on promoting sustainability in our county extension of ces and beyond. I was highly impressed with the steps UF has gone through to reduce waste and increase recycling. Whether you are a Gator or Seminole fan, you should be impressed to learn that UFs main campus in Gainesville has achieved a waste recovery rate of nearly 35 percent and recycles over 5,500 tons of materials annually. They have adopted a different four Rs than I am familiar; they work to Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Re-buy. They also stressed that all of us the need not only to recycle but to think about how we can lower our consumption of disposal goods, reuse or share items and purchase items with recycled content. Everyone was encouraged to identify waste streams and institute reduction/recycling efforts as appropriate to our own of ce and our home. Lets review several ideas to do so. Several months ago I encouraged people to request removal from mailing lists for any unwanted hard copy catalogs, newsletters, magazines and junk mail. I will once again do so by encouraging you to utilizing this website: http://directmail. com/directory/mail_preference/ Default.aspx. You can also use your cell phone and a program called PaperKarma (www.paperkarma. com) to take a photo of the mailing label of the unwanted mailing, and they will contact the company directly to remove you from that speci c mailing list. I would highly encourage that in all of ces and homes, print in color only when absolutely necessary. Be certain that your computers printer default setting is set to print in black and white. In addition, print double-sided. Think of the number of sheets you would eliminate. Use scrap paper for drafts, and reuse envelopes to circulate internal communication at both of ce and home. This provides you with your living sustainably assignments for June. Small steps can result in great savings. Shelley Swenson is the UF/IFAS Franklin/Wakulla extension agent for food and consumer services.Past crimes do not justify alleged killingThis letter is in response to the article I read in the Apalachicola Times newspaper dated May 15, 2014, headlined Sexual predator killed during argument. First, according to the investigative report prepared by of cials at the Franklin County Sheriffs Department, Norman Bill Williams death is allegedly related to a person who struck him from behind with an ax handle below his left ear while he was arguing with another person who accused him of inappropriately touching a woman at his home. Speci cally, according to said investigative report, Norman Bill Williams death had nothing to do with him being a convicted sexual predator or habitual criminal in the past. So, morally, I dont feel that Williams death should have been portrayed in the manner which it was publicized in Franklin County. Also, I dont understand why of cials from the local states attorneys of ce are not pursuing possible criminal charges for an accessory after the fact to the alleged crime against the alleged witnesses who allowed Williams to lie unconscious for 30 minutes before someone at the home where the alleged incident occurred decided to call 911 for assistance. Lastly, Norman Bill Williams past criminal history should not be held against him by anyone to justify his alleged killing. Sincerely,Michael Wade Bar eldBlountstownAir Force offered alternative site for GRASIFollowing up to the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative public hearings held in Carrabelle and Apalachicola on June 3-4, I wanted to be sure the general public is aware that a reasonable alternative site was presented to the Air Force other than Tates Hell State Forest or Blackwater River State Forest. The site consists of approximately 90,000 acres of privately held land located primarily in Calhoun and adjacent counties, which has been used since 1999 for Special Operations Training. The original environment impact study was approved in 2002 and reapproved in 2011 for military operations. While these military exercises would be located outside of Franklin County (primarily Calhoun County), the project would be managed by our Gulf Unmanned Systems Center of ce in Carrabelle. Calhoun County and adjacent counties personnel would be employed to facilitate the training missions. I can be reached at GUSC in Carrabelle at 720-1500 or at our of ce in Carrabelle, 206 U.S. 98. Sincerely,Bruce McCormackPresident, Gulf Unmanned Systems CenterTimely, managed trash receptacles neededIts a shameful disgrace. While walking this Saturday, my wife and I passed by the city dock at 10 Foot Hole. What we witnessed was disgraceful: garbage strewn all around the one insuf cient receptacle beside the boat launch. It was a truly sad, reprehensible sight. Seeing some of the mess was about to get into the water, including an empty antifreeze can, I went home, got big trash bags and gathered up the mess myself. If trash receptacles are going to be provided, they need to be managed and serviced on a timely basis; that isnt happening. I assume Mayor Johnson would be aware of this situation since I see him riding around the area in his golf cart. I realize this condition is only symptomatic of a portion of the citizenry that has little regard for the appearance of our community and less regard for the health of the bay. However, if the mayor and council will take decisive, actionable steps to address this matter, maybe the beauty of our city will be preserved; but, it will take leadership. Thank you, Lacey Robinson Apalachicola Hank Williams, Donald Sterling and capital gains pain MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor Outlook Rural counties bene t in state budgetSpecial to The TimesThe Florida Legislature adjourned sine die on May 2, concluding its normal business and passing a balanced state budget. On June 2, Gov. Rick Scott signed the largest budget in Florida history, which contained signi cant education funding and investments in infrastructure and included $400 million in vehicle tag registration fee roll back. In House District 7, we were able to secure funding for numerous water, infrastructure and education projects while also protecting or increasing funding for scally constrained counties and our Rural Areas of Critical Economic Concern. State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, and State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, working together brought home $134 million for their district. District 7 covers all of Calhoun, Franklin, Gulf, Jefferson, Lafayette, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, and Wakulla counties, and parts of Leon County. I am very proud of the state dollars we were able to keep here in North Florida, Beshears said. Certainly, it can be challenging to advocate scally conservative ideals while also representing so many scally constrained rural counties. However, these infrastructure and education projects are critical, and I believe our state government should invest in these areas. I sincerely believe its my responsibility to represent all of the residents in House District 7, to remain cognizant of every dollar spent and to ensure we do not waste citizens hard earned dollars. Of particular interest to Franklin County were the following projects: $16,950 for the Dixie Theatre Foundation Inc.; $25,000 each to the City of Apalachicola and Franklins Promise Coalition Inc.; $50,000 each to Vrooman Park, the historical rehabilitation of Carrabelle Old City Hall and the re-roo ng of Chapman Auditorium; $350,000 to the rehabilitation of Fort Coombs Armory; $497,000 to the City of Apalachicola for work on the Chapman School Building; $404,342 for the School Readiness Program; $127,539 for the Voluntary pre-kindergarten program; $73,155 for Workforce Development; and $8 million for oyster shelling, best management practices, research and upgrades to oyster processing facilities. I will continue to do all I can to help House District 7 and protect our way of life here, Beshears said. I am honored and proud to represent Franklin County. Thank you for the privilege of allowing me to represent you. If you have any questions or concerns on the budget, email Beshears at Halsey.beshears@ my oridahouse.gov. HALSEY BESHEARSR-MonticelloWaste reduction: A universitys perspective Letters to the EDITOR Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. Share Your OPINIONS Page A4 SHELLEY SWENSON

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, June 12, 2014An antique metal cauldron was discovered in the mud at Alligator Harbor by Gail Heuring is currently on display outside of the Carrabelle History Museum. Museum Director Tamara Allen thought it was a cauldron used to concentrate salt by evaporating seawater. Last week, Chasing Shadows asked readers for information, and we got a reply from historian Joshua Goodman at the State Archives of Florida. We are grateful to Mr. Goodman for answering our question. Several of us here at the State Library and Archives were very intrigued by your recent story in the Apalachicola Times about the suspected saltmaking vessel from Alligator Point, and wed like to contribute, Goodman wrote. First off the object is almost certainly a salt kettle. If the rust were to be removed, it would look almost identical to a kettle on display at the state museum in Cedar Key farther on down the coast. Weve put our heads together and come up with several resources to assist Tamara Allen at the Carrabelle History Museum with learning more about saltmaking along Floridas coast. Goodman said an old standby concerning salt making during the Civil War in Florida is Ella Lonns 1932 article from the Florida Historical Quarterly, The Extent and Importance of Federal Naval Raids on Salt-Making in Florida, 1862-1865. The article is free through the Publication of Archival Library & Museum Materials. Visit http://palmm. fcla.edu/. Another paper on the subject, including the latest major research, can be found in Robert Taylors Rebel Storehouse: Florida in the Confederate Economy. Goodman took the liberty of checking the Franklin County Public Librarys catalog and said they didnt appear to have it. The Inter-library Loan service can get it, and the State Library has a circulating copy in Tallahassee. Florida Memory, the digital arm of the State Archives, has several good resources available, including a history of Civil War salt making written as part of the Federal Writers Project in Florida during the Great Depression. Visit oridamemory.com and run a search for salt making or salt works to see what else is available in the way of images and other documents. Goodman sent us a map drawn by Col. George Washington Scott during the Civil War depicting the Big Bend area, one of several from the collection of Col. Scott at the State Archives. Scott indicates the location of salt works throughout the region, including near Alligator Point, Goodman said. While he does not place any markings right on the point where the kettle was found, that should come as no surprise. These maps were approximate at best, and salt works were often moved from time to time to escape harassment by the ships of the Union blockade. FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECTIn 1961, the Florida Foxhunters Association had its 35th annual dog show on St. James Island. This photo of a man representing the Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce at the meeting appeared in the Tallahassee Democrat. Do you recognize him? If so, please call the Times at 653-8868 or email Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star .com.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThis antique metal cauldron was discovered in the mud at Alligator Harbor.FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECTDrawn by Col. George Washington Scott during the Civil War, this map indicates the location of salt works throughout the Big Bend region, including near Alligator Point. Kettle is evidence of salt making along coast WHO WELCOMED THE FOXHUNTERS?

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 ABERCROMBIEBOATRAMPIMPROVEMENTSPROJECT#007.097 NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDS TheFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionerswillreceivesealedbidsfromanyqualied person,companyorcorporationinterestedinconstructing: ABERCROMBIEBOATRAMPIMPROVEMENTS ProjectislocatedattheAbercrombieBoatRampattheendofBluffRoadinFranklinCounty,Florida andconsistsofconstructingapproximately340SFof4widetimberboardwalkandapproximately 800SFof8wideoatingdock. PlansandspecicationscanbeobtainedatPreble-Rish,Inc.,324MarinaDrive,PortSt.Joe,Florida 32456,(850)227-7200.CostforPlansandSpecicationswillbe$50.00persetandisnon-refundable. ChecksshouldbemadepayabletoPREBLE-RISH,INC.ThebidmustconformtoSection287.133(3) FloridaStatutes,onpublicentitycrimes. Completiondateforthisprojectwillbe45daysfromthedateoftheNoticetoProceedpresentedto thesuccessfulbidder.Liquidateddamagesforfailuretocompletetheprojectonthespecieddate willbesetat$500.00perday. Pleaseindicateontheenvelopethatthisisasealedbidfor AbercrombieBoatRampImprovements. Bidswillbereceiveduntil4:00p.m.(eastern),onMonday,June30,2014,attheFranklinCountyClerk's Ofce,FranklinCountyCourthouse,33MarketStreet,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida32320-2317, andwillbeopenedandreadaloudonJuly1,2014attheCountyCommissionmeeting,whichbegins at9:00a.m.,at34ForbesStreet,Apalachicola,FL. TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttowaiveinformalitiesinanybid,toaccept and/orrejectanyorallbids,andtoacceptthebidthatintheirjudgmentwillbeinthebestinterestof FranklinCounty.Allbidsshallremainrmforaperiodofsixtydaysaftertheopening. AllbiddersshallcomplywithallapplicableStateandlocallawsconcerninglicensingregistrationand regulationofcontractorsdoingbusinesstotheStateofFlorida. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecallClaySmallwoodat(850)227-7200. CouponExpires:6-30-14CODE:AP00 12 percentage points, from 64 to 76 percent of the 34 ABC Schoolers. Seventh-grade math students did phenomenal with 93 percent procient, said ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson. Karen Ward worked diligently with her students during class, her planning time and after school to help her students reach their full potential. We again had 100 percent of Mrs. Copelands students pass the End of Course Algebra I Exam for high school credit. Tanya Joanos had 73 percent of her seventh-grade students pass the new Civics End of Course Exam. Another strong spot at ABC was eighth-grade sci e nce, where Mrs. Keel has increased the p ercentage of grade level or better pro ciency over the past three years to 71 percent this year, 19 percentage points bet t er than in 2012. She also teaches our seventh-grade science and lays a great foundation, Johnson said. In contrast, just one-third of the 41 Franklin County eighth-graders were at grade level or better in sci e nce, down nine percentage points from last year. However, among the 52 Franklin County fth-grad e rs, the percentage at grade level or better increased to 60 percent, from 53 percent last year. This was ahead of the results among the 40 ABC School fth-graders, who had just 53 percent a t grade level or better, down 12 percentage points from last year. A look at the overall data from both schools shows Franklin County made im p rovements from 2013 on four of the seven assessment areas. Grades 9-10 went up 15 percentage points in reading, while grades 3-5 in c reased by ve percentage points in reading and six percentage points in math. Our teachers and stu d ents have a lot to be proud of as nal assessment re s ults were released today, Superintendent Nina Marks said. The application of new approaches in the class r oom, professional develop m ent put to good use, cur r iculum changes and grade level/subject a rea collegial support helped to move us forward. Our students are learning and these results verify such. I am very proud of the results. Well done. Look i ng toward next year, we will continue to study and address our weaknesses. Soaring to new heights in all areas of our education system will be the goal. Johnson was equally pleased with the ABC Schools results. Data showed that with the ex c eption of fth-grade math, in which just 48 percent of students are at grade level of better, about two-thirds of students in each grade are performing satisfactorily in reading and math. We did have t wo new teachers to fth grade who were teaching from Com m on Core math curriculum and merging the Next Gen e ration Science Standards as well, trying to lay the foundation for new Florida Standards and still cover i ng the NGSS too, John s on said. Also, we saw the greatest change in student population in fth grade. In almost every subject and grade level, our per c entage of prociency was above state average. I am very proud of our assess m ent results. Our teach e rs and students worked extremely hard this year. Every year, our teachers as s ess students, analyze the data and plan differentiated instruction that will meet the n eeds of their students. Our teachers provided addi t ional intervention to those students who required more practice. Parents also supported after-school tutoring allowing students to work with teachers to master critical reading and math skills. Johnson noted that sta t istics vary every year at each grade depending on the change in student popu l ation. We have seen good learning gains from our stu d ents not yet procient and those on grade level showed growth or maintained their level of prociency. This team of teachers and paraprofessionals did an excellent job from el e mentary to middle school laying strong foundational skills that resulted in stu d ent learning growth a nd gains at every grade level. I am so proud of the staff and students for what they have accomplished this year. number of commenters disagreed, many expressing concern over noise pollution. Jim Cummins of Alligator Point spoke at the Carrabelle meeting. Cummins is a retired board-certied engineer in noise engineering with 45 years of experience in environmental acoustics and industrial noise control. He said he was puzzled by the way sound pollution was measured in the EIS and said the techniques used were inappropriate. H e said the EIS assumes normal sound levels in the forest are too high. Understand that the f orest is very quiet, he said. While wind can cause (an increase in noise), we typically perceive these sounds as soothing. The sound of a gunshot is akin to being hit over the head with a mallet. He said abrupt sounds like explosions travel a longer distance than steady noise of the same intensity. Cummins said the amount of noise pro d uced by aircraft ying below 1,000 feet is above the prescribed OSHA (Occupation a l Safety and Health Administration) limit for hearing loss. Soldiers exposed to these levels will have permanent hearing loss without ever being in combat. Cummins said even the noise from air c raft o perating at 10,000 feet exceeds the EPA limit for acceptable sound levels in a community. In most cases, the proposed use is inappropriate to the area and will cause damage to the area and annoyance to the community, he said.Sound pollution a big concernSound pollution was also a concern for environmental guide Serge LaTour. He brought a video to Carrabelles meeting showing the effect of a yover by two heli c opters on Tates Hell wildlife. He was not allowed to present it in the meeting but was able to set up a demon s tration in another room. The scene is peaceful with ambient noise from birds and i nsects. When the aircraft pass over h ead, the sound is deafening. After the air c raft, the forest is completely silent. When communication shuts down, life in the swamp shuts down, LaTour said. The disturbance after that simple yover lasted hours. We all assumed you wouldnt be doing anything during hunting season. Theres not going to be anything left there to hunt after you guys nish. Betty Cummins of Alligator Point said the temporary placement of razor wire along roads would endanger free-ranging animals such as bears and deer. She wor r ied that animals, spooked by loud noise and unusual activity in the swamp, might b ecome entangled in the wire. LaTour also expressed concern about frightened animals leaving the area. Where are the bears going to go? he asked. We already have a problem with nuisance bears. The bears (eeing from the military exercises) will be displaced, scared, angry and disoriented. Theyre go i ng to be in the streets. Mark Nobles, manager of Carrabelles Thompson eld, said because of a lack of radar coverage and limitations on com m unications, he did not believe existing civilian air trafc could safely share the air space over Tates Hell with the proposed military air trafc ying at speeds of 250 to 600 mph. Our objection to your planned usage is not in any measure a reection of our pa t riotism, he said. I proudly served in the U.S. Marine Corps and have the utmost re s pect for our young men and women who serve our country today. It is also in con c ern for their safety during these training exercises that I point out major decien c ies in your plan. Nobles also worried about the econom i c impact on the county. Tates Hell State Forest is one of the largest employers in the county, providing income for families that would otherwise be suffering, he said. A surprise speaker in C arrabelle was Sue Early, who said she lives on the Wakul l a side of the Ochlocknee River. She said Wakulla residents adjacent to the state for e st were not notied of the meeting. I respectfully request that a workshop be held in Wakulla County, Early said. One of the last speakers in Apalachic o la was Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, who has staunchly opposed the military exercises since they were rst proposed. If Franklin County and its residents had been contacted (when the use of Tates Hell was rst discussed), we would have told you how we felt, and you could have saved a lot of time and m oney, she said. We supported the sale of that land to the state knowing that it took it off the tax rolls. We have something we value very much here. God has made us stewards. Ive worked mighty hard to keep this a rural area and make sure everybody re a lizes what we have. I dont want to see it messed up, because once its messed up, you cant get it back. Leave Tates Hell alone. We dont want you here except to visit. T o comment about GRASI, go to grasie i s.leidoseemg.com by June 23. FCAT from page A1 DIsSTRICT-WIdDE GROWTHThe following chart shows the changes in the percentage of students at Level 3 or better throughout the Franklin County Schools. Grade 2011 2012 2013 2014 4 56 59 57 61 5 60 44 52 57 6 56 60 52 54 7 46 57 56 50 8 40 49 51 54 9 36 38 46 54 10 30 38 25 51 GRASI from page A1

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, June 12, 2014 Wearepleasedtopresenttoyouthisyear'sAnnualWaterQualityReport.isreportisdesignedtoinformyouaboutthequalitywaterandserviceswedelivertoyouevery day.Ourconstantgoalistoprovideyouwithasafeanddependablesupplyofdrinkingwater.Wewantyoutounderstandtheeortswemaketocontinuallyimprovethewater treatmentprocessandprotectourwaterresources.Wearecommittedtoensuringthequalityofyourdrinkingwater.Ourwatersourceisgroundwaterfromsixwellsdrawnfrom theFloridanAquifer.Becauseoftheexcellentqualityofourwater,theonlytreatmentsrequiredarechlorinefordisinfectionpurposesandAquaGold,whichisapolyphosphate compoundinjectedasasequesteringagentthatneutralizesscaleandcorrosion. In2013theDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtectionperformedaSourceWaterAssessmentonoursystemandasearchofthedatasourcesindicatednopotentialsourcesof contaminationnearourwells.eassessmentresultsareavailableontheFDEPSourceWaterAssessmentandProtectionProgramwebsiteatwww.dep.state..us/swapp. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsaboutthisreportorconcerningyourwaterutility,pleasecontactAlligatorPointWaterResourceDistrict(APWRD),SaraTurnerat(850)349-2274.We encourageourvaluedcustomerstobeinformedabouttheirwaterutility.Ifyouwanttolearnmore,pleaseattendanyofourregularlyscheduledmeetings.eyareheldmonthlyon thethirdSaturdayofeachmonthat9:00a.m.,attheAPWRDOce,1378AlligatorDrive. AlligatorPointroutinelymonitorsforcontaminantsinyourdrinkingwateraccordingtoFederalandStatelaws,rules,andregulations.Exceptwhereindicatedotherwise,thisreport isbasedontheresultsofourmonitoringfortheperiodofJanuary1toDecember31,2013.DataobtainedbeforeJanuary1,2013,andpresentedinthisreportarefromthemost recenttestingdoneinaccordancewiththelaws,rules,andregulations. Inthetablebelow,youmayndunfamiliartermsandabbreviations.Tohelpyoubetterunderstandthesetermswehaveprovidedthefollowingdenitions: ActionLevel(AL):econcentrationofacontaminantwhich,ifexceeded,triggerstreatmentorotherrequirementsthatawatersystemmustfollow. InitialDistributionSystemEvaluation(IDSE):AnimportantpartoftheStage2DisinfectionBy-ProductsRule(DBPR).eIDSEisaone-timestudyconductedbywatersystems toidentifydistributionsystemlocationswithhighconcentrationsoftrihalomethanes(THMs)andhaloaceticacids(HAAs).WatersystemswilluseresultsfromtheIDSE,in conjunctionwiththeirStage1DBPRcompliancemonitoringdata,toselectcompliancemonitoringlocationsfortheStage2DBPR. LocationalRunningAnnualAverage(LRAA):theaverageofsampleanalyticalresultsforsamplestakenataparticularmonitoringlocationduringthepreviousfourcalendar quarters. MaximumContaminantLevelorMCL:ehighestlevelofacontaminantthatisallowedindrinkingwater.MCLsaresetasclosetotheMCLGsasfeasibleusingthebestavailable treatmenttechnology. MaximumContaminantLevelGoalorMCLG:elevelofacontaminantindrinkingwaterbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MCLGsallowforamarginof safety. MaximumResidualDisinfectantLevelorMRDL:ehighestlevelofadisinfectantallowedindrinkingwater.ereisconvincingevidencethatadditionofadisinfectantis necessaryforcontrolofmicrobialcontaminants. MaximumResidualDisinfectantLevelGoalorMRDLG:elevelofadrinkingwaterdisinfectantbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MRDLGsdonotreect thebenetsoftheuseofdisinfectantstocontrolmicrobialcontaminants. Non-Applicable(N/A):Doesnotapply Non-Detect(ND):meansnotdetectedandindicatesthatthesubstancewasnotfoundbylaboratoryanalysis. Partspermillion(ppm)orMilligramsperliter(mg/l):onepartbyweightofanalyteto1millionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Partsperbillion(ppb)orMicrogramsperliter(g/l):onepartbyweightofanalyteto1billionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Picocurieperliter(pCi/L):measureoftheradioactivityinwater. Ifpresent,elevatedlevelsofleadcancauseserioushealthproblems,especiallyforpregnantwomenandyoungchildren.Leadindrinkingwaterisprimarilyfrommaterialsand componentsassociatedwithservicelinesandhomeplumbing.APWRDisresponsibleforprovidinghighqualitydrinkingwater,butcannotcontrolthevarietyofmaterialsusedin plumbingcomponents.Whenyourwaterhasbeensittingforseveralhours,youcanminimizethepotentialforleadexposurebyushingyourtapfor30secondsto2minutesbefore usingwaterfordrinkingorcooking.Ifyouareconcernedaboutleadinyourwater,youmaywishtohaveyourwatertested.Informationonleadindrinkingwater,testingmethods, andstepsyoucantaketominimizeexposureisavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineorathttp://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. eStateofFloridaDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtection(DEP)setsdrinkingwaterstandardforsecondarycontaminantsandhasdeterminedthatChlorideandTotal DissolvedSolidsareaestheticconcernsatcertainlevelsofexposure.ChlorideandTotalDissolvedSolidsweresampledinAugust2012andwerefoundinhigherlevelsthanare allowedbytheState(MCLviolations).ChlorideandTotalDissolvedSolids,assecondarydrinkingwatercontaminants,donotposeahealthrisk.Wewillcontinuetosampleas requiredbyrule. esourcesofdrinkingwater(bothtapwaterandbottledwater)includerivers,lakes,streams,ponds,reservoirs,springs,andwells.Aswatertravelsoverthesurfaceofthelandor throughtheground,itdissolvesnaturallyoccurringmineralsand,insomecases,radioactivematerial,andcanpickupsubstancesresultingfromthepresenceofanimalsorfrom humanactivity. Contaminantsthatmaybepresentinsourcewaterinclude: (A)Microbialcontaminants,suchasvirusesandbacteria,whichmaycomefromsewagetreatmentplants,septicsystems,agriculturallivestockoperations,andwildlife. (B)Inorganiccontaminants,suchassaltsandmetals,whichcanbenaturally-occurringorresultfromurbanstormwaterruno,industrialordomesticwastewaterdischarges,oil andgasproduction,mining,orfarming. (C)Pesticidesandherbicides,whichmaycomefromavarietyofsourcessuchasagriculture,urbanstormwaterruno,andresidentialuses. (D)Organicchemicalcontaminants,includingsyntheticandvolatileorganicchemicals,whichareby-productsofindustrialprocessesandpetroleumproduction,andcanalsocome fromgasstations,urbanstormwaterruno,andsepticsystems. (E)Radioactivecontaminants,whichcanbenaturallyoccurringorbetheresultofoilandgasproductionandminingactivities. Inordertoensurethattapwaterissafetodrink,theEPAprescribesregulations,whichlimittheamountofcertaincontaminantsinwaterprovidedbypublicwatersystems.e FoodandDrugAdministration(FDA)regulationsestablishlimitsforcontaminantsinbottledwater,whichmustprovidethesameprotectionforpublichealth. Drinkingwater,includingbottledwater,mayreasonablybeexpectedtocontainatleastsmallamountsofsomecontaminants.epresenceofcontaminantsdoesnotnecessarily indicatethatthewaterposesahealthrisk.MoreinformationaboutcontaminantsandpotentialhealtheectscanbeobtainedbycallingtheEnvironmentalProtectionAgencysSafe DrinkingWaterHotlineat1-800-426-4791. ankyouforallowingustocontinueprovidingyourfamilywithclean,qualitywaterthisyear.Inordertomaintainasafeanddependablewatersupply,wesometimesneedto makeimprovementsthatwillbenetallofourcustomers.eseimprovementsaresometimesreectedasratestructureadjustments.ankyouforunderstanding. Somepeoplemaybemorevulnerabletocontaminantsindrinkingwaterthanthegeneralpopulation.Immuno-compromisedpersonssuchaspersonswithcancer undergoingchemotherapy,personswhohaveundergoneorgantransplants,peoplewithHIV/AIDSorotherimmunesystemdisorders,someelderly,andinfantscanbe particularlyatriskfrominfections.esepeopleshouldseekadviceaboutdrinkingwaterfromtheirhealthcareproviders.EPA/CDCguidelinesonappropriatemeans tolessentheriskofinfectionbyCryptosporidiumandothermicrobiologicalcontaminantsareavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotline(800-426-4791). Weworktoprovidetopqualitywatertoeverytap.Weaskthatallourcustomershelpusprotectourwatersources,whicharetheheartofourcommunity,ourwayoflifeandour childrensfuture.Ifyouhaveanyquestionsorconcernsabouttheinformationprovided,pleasefeelfreetocallanyofthenumberslisted.

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LocalA8 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 TheJourneyBackHome With WeemsMemorialRehabCare Whenyouoralovedoneneedalittlemore timetogetbackonyourfeet, WeemsMemorialRehabCareishere Rightinyourownneighborhood! Giveusacalltodayandletushelpyoumake thatjourneybackhome. WeemsMemorialRehabCare 135AvenueG,Apalachicola,FL32320 (850)653-8853 DisplayAdvertising.................4pm,ThursdayJune26th ClassiedAdvertising................5pm,FridayJune27th News,Obits,Etc.........................5pm,FridayJune27thDisplayAdvertising....................4pm,ThursdayJuly3rd ClassiedAdvertising.................5pm,MondayJuly7th News,Obits,Etc..........................5pm,MondayJuly7th Pam Nobles Studio presented its 33rd annual recital Saturday at the high school auditorium before a packed audience. The recital was a rousing success, with plenty of broad smiles, high-stepping dancers and creative choreography by Nobles, who has been running her studio since 1981. For lots more dance pictures, visit the Times Facebook page.PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesHolly Chambers leaps high in her solo done to Say Something. At left, Sienna Polous in This is the Way We Love to Dance. Performing together are Lanie Allen, Olivia Barineau, Trinity Barron, Chloe Davis, Ella Friedman, Skylar Layne, Myia Maxwell, Haley Miller, Lyndsey Stiefel, Shaylynn Suddeth and Leah Wren. Javana Pearson is all smiles in Put On a Happy Face. Daniel Foxworth and Rita Theis perform a Latin ballroom solo. Brooklyn Klink puts on a serious face.

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LocalThe Times | A9Thursday, June 12, 2014 BankOwnedSaleSaturday,June14thCallforapriorityappointment 850-566-6761Startingat$109,000DanAusleyTLGRealty850-566-6761 www.tlgproperty.com 1,2,&3bedroomsavailable.WaterfrontCondos-Lanark RegistrationBegins@10amET CompetitionBegins@11amET$1,000bonusforlongestlaunchover*533feet *CurrentWorldRecord PlusmanyotherprizesawardedthroughouttheeventTheBlueParrotisproudtodonateproceedstotheApalachicolaBayCharterSchoolForMoreInformationCall:(850)927.2987 SeeLiveCamatBlueParrotSGI.com MensDivision $200 Kids14-16Years Bicycle Kids11-13YearsFishingPolew/TackleBoxKids10&UnderFishingPolew/TackleBoxFreeStyleDivision$100WomensDivision$200FREET-Shirtw/ everyENTRYAdults:17&up-$30 Kids:under17-$20 During its June 5 meeting, the Franklin County School Board received a gift of a cherished American ag from the family of the late Rev. Lawrence Joseph Register, who died in March at the age of 86. Flanked by his sister, Cathy Carroll, Registers son Jimmy told the board their dad, an Air Force veteran of World War II, a Navy veteran of the Korean War and a former school employee, had a last wish to bestow this ag that meant so much to him to y in his honor as a veteran. They said their father, as a bus driver and maintenance worker for the district, greatly enjoyed his interaction with staff and students. Registers wife, Sarah Truman Register, and children Jimmy Register and Cathy Carroll worked a combined 65 years for the district, they said. He made many childrens science lessons come to life when showing them animals or insects he brought to school or found on the school grounds, Jimmy Register said. The art of grunting for earthworms turned into an unforgettable experience when classes would watch the worms come up out of the earth as Daddy worked his magic, though some thought they were snakes. Carroll and Register went on to recount how their father told us stories of being one of the forerunners of the Navy Seals before they became known as such, preparing the way for other soldiers to come after, completing his tasks. He guarded the Alaskan Islands from possible invasion from Japan into our county. Daddy had many wonderful, scary stories to tell. After the presentation, Gander suggested the ag rst be own over the district ofce beginning Veterans Day 2014. Thats a long way off, but it would be a little bit more special, he said. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN SUPERINTENDENT from page A1I think the people should be able to gure the facts, the pros and cons, he said. Its better than to have two elected bodies affecting our school process. Martin said she had spoken with voters in her district, which is the Hill area in Apalachicola on the northern and western side of U.S. 98. For the most part, they like it to be elected. There is a few thats for appointment, she said. Thats just my district, Martin said. I think it is because they didnt want to put the control in ve board members (hands), and they felt like if we did it the right way and we would but it only takes three board members to approve it. Martin said because there are single districts, not countywide voting for school board seats, these constituents believe we cant hold all ve board members accountable, and we would like to continue to control it ourselves. She stressed that Im open for everybody, and I work for everybody, but based on the views of her district constituents, they more likely want it to be elected. School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander, who is not running for reelection after 20 years on the board, said he preferred to let voters decide the matter. I do feel like let the people vote, let the people speak, and let the people do what they want to do, he said. After they approved placing the matter on the ballot box, the board members agreed the general election would be preferable to the Aug. 26 primary election for holding the referendum, because only those voters with a partisan preference vote in the primary. Only three states Florida, Alabama and Mississippi continue to elect superintendents, which is done in only 142 of just over 13,500 districts in America, or about 1 percent. In Florida, superintendents are elected in 41 of 67 districts, mostly in the smaller and mid-sized districts, including much of the Panhandle.Commencement lauded, vandalism deploredIn reviewing the events of the end of the school year, Gander complimented school ofcials with how well the senior recognition night and graduation exercises went. You hear so many negatives, and you look at those young people who graduated. There were a lot of concerns when we rst consolidated, he said. I was proud of everybody. I couldnt believe how many had dual enrolled and the honors they received. I think everybody did a real good job. I appreciate it. Martin brought up the matter of the end-of-the-year prank, which apparently was more serious than in past years. When there are pranks and the school gets destroyed, do we have a policy for that? she asked. Its not always all the seniors. It may be a lower grade involved in it. Sometimes, in the midst of it, a student will get hurt. Marks said the vandalism policy in place will be enforced after a complete investigation. The health, welfare, safety issue of it is (new) this year, she said. Theres been pranks (in years past), but its not impacted the safety. Martin said she would like to see a sit-down meeting held before the end of school with both seniors and juniors. Sometimes its not just seniors, she said. Director of Auxiliary Services Al London said class sponsors told students on multiple occasions not to do it, not to have a prank. We have some leads on who is involved, and the sheriffs ofce is involved in investigation. School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders said if a student breaks into school, that could be a criminal violation that would follow them past graduation. London said some of the schools cameras are not in working order. What happens when something serious happens and we dont have cameras? Martin asked. We have other systems in place that indicated who was involved, London said. I really dont want to discuss it. In a matter related to the cost of eld trips, Gander drew applause from the teachers and support personnel in the audience when he proposed to charge less to those who take eld trips. He said two buses to Panama City had been billed by the district $1,350, as the calculations had been done based on a state funding formula. At the next meeting, Id like to see a fee were going to charge, he said. Try to use actual gures for paying the driver. The class pays the driver and puts fuel in the bus. At the outset of the meeting, Marks and Gander presented Success Awards to three support personnel and three teachers, part of an effort by the district to set a standard of excellence for staffers. Support personnel who each received $250 checks were Melissa West, Delores Croom and Paul Bankston. Teachers who each received $500 checks were Cathy Wood, Elinor Mount Simmons and Laura King. I encourage them to share their notebooks to faculty and staff at the school, Marks said. In her report, Finance Director Shannon Venable said as of April 30, the district had a cushion of 3.02 percent, with $212,448 in restricted funds and $325,535 in unrestricted funds, for a total of $540,983. Im projecting it will be in the 3.06 percent range as of June 30, she said. Nichols worked as innkeeper of the St. George Inn. Senior Innkeeper Christina Woolston and Owner Olivier Monod posted a statement on Facebook after the accident. She has been a vibrant contribution to our establishment, they wrote. Ashley had four children; her younger one, Jordan is 3; Sean is 10; Autumn is 13; and Cindi is 17. If you can spare the time, feel free to mail (rather than email) a note addressed to them c/o St. George Inn, P.O. Box 250, Apalachicola, FL 32329. You may express and share memories of their mother, or any thoughts that you deem encouraging and comforting. WOMAN KILLED from page A1DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesJimmy Register and his sister Cathy Carroll present their fathers ag to the school district.Veteran gets last wish for school

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A10 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014PHOTOS LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesIn an ongoing series of demonstrations, artist Josefa Kotzman created a portrait of Tammy Owen on June 5, pictured at left. The Carrabelle Artist Association meets every other Thursday evening at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex in an effort to encourage new members. For more information, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CarrabelleArtistAssociation. BEAUTY CAPTURED IN CARRABELLE PetoftheWeek!MANNYisoneofmanykittenswearehousing atthistime.Wehavereducedouradoptionfee from$90.00to$75.00andforblackorblack andwhitekittens,only$50.00!Thesekittens arefullyvetted,felineleukemianegativeand spayedandneutered.Pleaseconsideradopting oneorouradorablefelines. Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocialize allofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingto bringoneofouranimalsintotheirhometobe fosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucan sparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisit theFranklinCountyHumaneSocietyat244 StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogonto thewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtosee moreofouradoptablepets. SocietyBryant Malone bornBryant Alyxander Malone (Bam Bam) was born on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. He weighed 7 pounds and was 19 inches long. Bryant is the son of Stephen and Alyse Malone, of Eastpoint, and little brother to Morgan, Stephen Jr., Cloey, JJ, Harmony, Jacob, Madalynn and Asher. Paternal grandparents are Mike and Jeanette Malone, of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Charles Woodman and Sonja Alday, of New Orleans, La. Birth GraduationsLouis James Anthony graduated with honors from Niceville High School on Thursday, June 5, 2014. Louis is the son of Ken and Sharon Anthony, of Niceville. He is the grandson of Julia and the late Louis H. Anthony, and James and Margaret Stokes, of Apalachicola. Louis plans to attend Northwest Florida State College to earn his associates of arts degree and then transfer to a state university to major in physics. Apalachicolas Morton McLemore was among the 156 members of the McCallie Schools Class of 2014 to graduate in May 18 commencement ceremonies on the McCallie campus. Morton, a boarding student, is the son of Lee and Tricia McLemore, of Apalachicola. McCallie, founded in 1905, is a college preparatory boarding and day school for boys on the western slope of Missionary Ridge in Chattanooga, Tenn. Considered one of the nations top independent schools, McCallies 156 seniors will attend 75 different colleges in 23 states plus the District of Columbia. Sixty percent of the class will use merit, athletic, academic, talent or lottery scholarships at the school they will attend, and many more earned scholarships at colleges they are choosing not to attend. Two boys have accepted appointments to military academies, one to West Point, one to Annapolis. Six boys accepted athletic grantsin-aid for their college, and another seven intend to continue their athletic careers in college.Special to The TimesIf anyone had told the conservative housewife that she would one night be driving around Tallahassee with a stoned, drunk homeless man in her back seat, imploring him no, demanding that he come back to her house, she would said they were nuts. But it happened. If anyone had told the Apalachicola bookseller that she would be handed yet another self-published book by the friend of a friend of a friend, devour it in one sitting, and immediately forward it to a well-known literary agent, she would have laughed. Or cried. But that happened too. An astonishingly frank memoir, Far Outside the Ordinary chronicles the period in the authors life when, during a routine physical exam, her 50year-old husband is given less than a year to live. After he and she subject themselves to a grueling round of increasingly unconventional treatments, they return to Tallahassee, she moves black caregivers into their home to provide around-the-clock care, and Prissy soon nds herself an observer and then a participant in events far outside the boundaries of her once ordinary life. Far Outside the Ordinary is also a story of happily-ever-after, a romantic fairy tale. When her high school boyfriend reappears in her life, Prissy learns that love has no expiration date. Sometimes a second chance at love can come disguised, and when least expected. This is an extraordinary book, said Dale Julian, proprietor of Downtown Books. It is so totally Tallahassee, and yet addresses the big themes of love, loss, and selfreinvention with utterly convincing candor and sometimes even humor. Im going to do my best to ensure its success. An artist at heart, new novelist Prissy Elrod lives in Tallahassee with her husband while her treasured family lives within four miles of her. Writing her rst novel was an exercise of courage. It took four years to write, three computers, two espresso machines, 48 how-to writing books, a Florida State University memoir-writing class, 24 blog subscriptions, a halfdozen periodical journals and 14 revised drafts. Elrod kept the manuscript to herself, not allowing anyone to read it for the rst three years of writing her story and nally, in 2013, she sent the draft to a Pushcart Prize-winning writer in Texas, engaging him to read the manuscript and provide feedback. Elrod is currently working on her second book. To contact visit www.PrissyElrod.com or prissy@elrod.com WHERE AND WHENJoin Prissy Elrod at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St. Apalachicola, on Saturday, June 14, from 1-3 p.m.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMESPrissy ElrodNew novelist to sign books SaturdaySpecial to The TimesThe Apalachicola Bay Area Chamber of Commerce members elected a new board of directors for the 2014-15 scal year on June 4 at the monthly business luncheon in Apalachicola. The board and membership welcome Karen Rudder, general manager of the St. George Island Plantation Home Owners Association; Bonnie Fulmer with Apalachicola Bay Animal Hospital; Craig Gibson with Weems Memorial Hospital and the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department; and Ira Mittleman, owner and chef of Iras at the Gibson Inn to this years board. Continuing for another term are Mike Koun, owner of the Gibson Inn, Brenda Ash, with Centennial Bank and an Apalachicola city commissioner; Donna Duncan, attorney with Sanders and Duncan; Jean Ulrich, a real estate agent with Century 21 Collins Realty and owner of Ulrich Construction; Bud Hayes, with the Franklin County Humane Society and the ABC School; Bev Hewitt, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill, the Soda Fountain, and the BackStreet Trading Company; Kristin Anderson, owner of LongDreamGallery.com; attorney Michael Shuler; Jerry Hall, with Seafood Grill, The Soda Fountain and BackStreet Trading Company; Ginny Griner, with Weems Memorial Hospital; and John Solomon, owner of Alle Cat Charters, president of the Florida Seafood Festival and president of the Weems Memorial Healthcare Foundation. Of cers for this year are Donna Duncan, president; Bud Hayes, vice-president; Kristin Anderson, secretary/historian; and Jerry Hall, treasurer. We would like to thank our retiring director Ouida Tartt, owner of the House of Tartts, a guest cottage in downtown Apalachicola, for her service and support over the years. Tartt is leaving the Forgotten Coast to live with her daughter in New Zealand. The election was held during the Chambers annual meeting at the Apalachicola United Methodist Church fellowship hall and catered by members of the UMC congregations of Apalachicola and St. George Island. During the same meeting members discussed and passed some minor changes to the bylaws. The Apalachicola Chamber was started in the early 1830s. Among its many presidents were ice machine inventor John Gorrie, and David Raney, builder of the Raney House, who made his fortune in cotton and served two terms as Apalachicolas mayor. In the 1980s, the chamber expanded its membership area to include Apalachicola Bay including Eastpoint and St. George Island. It currently has 390 members.Apalachicola chamber selects new board Louis Anthony graduates with honors Apalachicola student graduates from McCallie School

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The Times | A11Thursday, June 12, 2014 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService FaithBet you enjoyed all the stories and lms from World War II on television over the weekend. When you went to the movies during the war, they would run an update on how things were going over there. Dont forget hamburgers and chips at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 every Friday night. Orders taken after 6 p.m. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. Pizza night on Sunday at Legion Post 82 will start at 5 p.m. and end at 7 p.m. Pizza by the slice $1 each; full pizza $8 and pizza on the run $10. They have everything but anchovies. You can call in your order by dialing 697-9998. Open to the public both nights. While youre enjoying your hamburger or pizza, you can play some bar bingo, shufeboard, pulltabs or a game of pool. Come and enjoy an evening with your friends and neighbors. Better not forget Dad, this Sunday, June 14. Dads are like our Moms; God gave us each one father to cherish, love and obey. Treat him like a king. Members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will have your monthly sugar x ready on Saturday, June 21. Might as well start off the summer with a good, full breakfast. You can choose pancakes/French toast; bacon or sausage; eggs, coffee and juice. All for only $5 donation, which will be collected inside the door. See ya there! Dont worry about the calories. You can work them off at the June Birthday Bash at Legion Post 82. Finger food, your favorite beverage, games and music, music, music. Party starts at 6 p.m. Party hearty! The monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall has been canceled due to air conditioning problems. We lost another grand lady of the Village last week. Kay Grant passed away on June 2 at 3:10 a.m. Kay and her husband John lived in the Village for a long time and were very active in the early years. Pray for Kays eternal rest and for strength and peace for John. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better, but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWSJim WelshGod gave us each one fatherHOllLLIS VAIlLA SPECIAL THANK YOU to my friends and community for all the love and support youve provided during my current health challenges. I would never have made it this far without being held up by all of you. Thank you and God Bless you all.Hollis VailThHE OONNEAlL FAMIlL YWe would like to thank everyone for their prayers, cards, owers, special gifts, memories shared, smiles & hugs, phone calls. We know Andrew loved his family and community, and we are grateful and appreciate all of you. May God Bless you all. With our love and thanks,The ONeal FamilyPUttTT MMAStTERS TOURNAMENtTThe Friends of Franklin County Public Library would like to express thanks to this years sponsors of the annual PuttMasters tournament: Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf, Weems Memorial Hospital, Sign Design Eastpoint, Bob Landiss Touchpoint Printing, St. James Bay Golf and Grill, and Centennial Bank Eastpoint, Businesses and individuals that sponsored teams included Apalachicola Ace, George Pruett of the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department, members of Judy Little & Sondra Furbee Yoga Class, Butler Agency, Uta Hardy, SGI Realty, Wengs, Bobby James Metal Roong, Sometimes Its Hotter, Dails Seafood, Journeys of St. George Island, Newt and Adele Colston & Skip and Terri Kemp, Bob and Kara Landiss, Kate Aguiar & Cal Allen, and Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic, Businesses and individuals that sponsored a hole sign include The Rev. John & Sue Sink, Weems Memorial Hospital, Hammer Head Construction, Sea Oats Art Gallery, Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf, William Massey, Apalachicola Riverkeeper and Sign Design. Much thanks to Erica Sapp, Logo/Design and to The Red Pirate Family Grill & Oyster Bar, owners Jimmy & Shirley Sapp and their great staff, for hosting the event each year, and for providing the trophies presented to the winners. Cards of thTHANKSKay V. Grant, 92, of Lanark Village, died Monday, June 2, 2014 at St. James Bay Health & Rehab Center in St. James. Kay was born Oct. 15, 1921 in Manchester, Iowa. She was a member of Lanark Community Church, sang in its choir and served as treasurer for the churchs womens organization. Kay was an avid golfer and bridge player also. She is survived by her husband of 60-plus years, John Grant and numerous nieces and nephews and her close friends of Lanark Village. She is preceded in death by her daughter, Jeannie Grant. Memorial services are planned for a later date. Kay will be interred in Athens Community Cemetery in Athens, Ill. KKay V. Grant A memorial service for Lois Cobb Watkins will be held Saturday, June 21 at 11 a.m. at Fellowship Baptist Church in Apalachicola. We would like to invite friends and family to join us in the celebration of her life. She was born Sept. 13, 1939 and left us Friday, May 30, 2014. She is survived by her husband, R. C. Collie Watkins; and three sons, George (Carla) Watkins, of Apalachicola, and Rick Johnson and Dan Johnson, both of Ocala. She is survived by five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren that she loved very much. Lois comes from nine children. She is survived by three sisters and four brothers, from Middle Georgia. Lois was a loving and devoted wife, mother and MiMi. Mimi can always fix anything! She loved Apalachicola, where she was employed at the Franklin County Courthouse till her retirement. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that any donations in Lois memory be made to Weems Memorial Hospital.Lois Cobb WW atkinsAndrew Joseph Antekeier, age 72, of Eastpoint, died Friday, June 6, 2014, at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville from complications of treatment for advanced prostate cancer. The world lost a magic man when Andy left it. He was a force of nature with great zest for life and a love of people. He was a great cook who could never understand why anyone would need a recipe. He enjoyed a game of golf, pool, or cards, loved shing and growing things. He was a runner until he had to walk, a sailor until he chose instead to live by the sea, a hiker unafraid of what lay ahead on the trail, and the king of the campre. He was a great hugger and inventor of the hug sandwich, loved by his grandchildren. Andy never met a stranger. He bestowed special names on his loved ones, and was known by several himself, from Jose Gaspar to Mr. Weekend to his favorite of all, Popster the Wopster. He was a regular blood donor with 260 recorded donations over many years. Since retirement Andy has been a volunteer at the Franklin County Food Pantry. Andy loved sports and was a dedicated fan of the Michigan State Spartans. Anyone who met Andy quickly learned about the Green and White. He rooted passionately for all of the Spartan teams in good times and in bad, and always wore his colors. Andy was born Dec. 23, 1941, in Muskegon, Michigan to Arnold and Alberta Dion Antekeier, both of whom predecease him. He graduated from Muskegon Catholic Central High School, Class of 1960. He attended Muskegon Community College, Michigan State University, and Grand Valley University where he earned a bachelor of science degree with high honors in psychology in 1976. He worked full time during his 10-year pursuit of a college degree. In 1965, Andy married Barbara Charron in Muskegon. They had two children, Alison in 1967, and Andrew in 1969, both of whom survive him along with their mother, now Barbara Kendall. Andys career years centered around sales. He was a gifted salesman no matter what the product. He was a corporate recruiter and owned Antekeier Associates in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He continued in various sales jobs after relocating to Florida in 1981, eventually settling in Indian Rocks Beach. In 1988, he opened a retail store called TShirts N Stuff on Indian Rocks Beach which he operated for 10 years. It was a fun place with windows full of signs and cartoons alongside the merchandise. Those windows reected his liberal political and strong anti-war views, and his pride in being a lifelong Democrat. Shoppers came to the store as much for the conversations with Andy as for the Florida Tshirts he sold them. In 1989, Andy married Susan Clayton of Tampa. In Susan he found a person whose love of life was equal to his. They have managed to pack about 50 years of living into their 25 years together. In 1998, Andy and Susan discovered the small town of Eastpoint along Floridas Forgotten Coast. It was love at rst sight. After many years of planning and a lot of luck, they were able to retire to their place on Apalachicola Bay in 2006. During retirement they also enjoyed great times in their RV, camping, exploring the back roads, and the outdoors. They also have had the thrill of being grandparents. Andy is survived by his wife Susan, of Eastpoint; children Alison and Andrew, of Michigan, and John B. Bart Clayton and wife Shelley, and beloved grandchildren Ainsley Thomas and John Andrew, of Norcross, Georgia, and brother-in-law Ted Bodenheimer, of Raleigh, North Carolina. He is also survived by his brothers Ronald (Joanne) of Muskegon, Michigan; Jerry (Dianne) of Belleair; Father Charles and Kurt Wolfgang, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Gerard (Mary Katherine) of San Diego, California. and sisters Virginia (Jim Wier) and Paula Bostrom, of Muskegon, and Dolores (Ted) Kusmierz, of Grand Rapids. He was predeceased by sisters Merelise, Bernadette, Martha and Lucy. Other family survivors include much loved Aunt/ Mom Therese Lemieux of Traverse City, Mich., along with cousin/brothers and sisters Paul, Joe (Marcia), David (Antoinette), Marty (Sharron), Rochelle (Steve) Hammontree, Gene Lemieux (Alice) of Lady Lake and Martha (Dan) Noble of Sebring. His larger family includes nieces and nephews he loved and took great pride in, as well as many special cousins. To Andy, a friendship was priceless. Some special friends who are family and have stood by Andy and Susan through the years include Denise and Marc Skinner, Mike Brady, Karen and Craig Stiver, Mike Gately, Stephen Gately, Virginia Esposito, Gaile and Kevin Sheehan and Jack McGuinness. It was Andys express desire that there be no funeral service. A celebration of Andys life will be held at a later date. Suggested memorial gifts, should one wish, may be made to the Franklin County Food Pantry,192 14th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 (designate for food purchase), or Haven Hospice, 4200 NW 90th Blvd., Gainesville, FL 32606. To celebrate Andy today, hug a friend, say something nice or nothing at all, make someone laugh, hoist a cold one, watch a sunset. Keep on keeping on. Please visit the online guestbook at www. crevassesimplecremation. com/andrew-antekeier.AAndrew AAntekeier AANDREW A ANtTEKEIER Obituaries The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000.MONDAYMONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St.; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed DiscussionTUESDAY UESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; noon to 1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. ; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, OpenWEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, ClosedTHURSDAY URSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; Noon to 1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Drive; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion.FRIDAY RIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open DiscussionSASA TURDAY URDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea; 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive; 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, OpenSUNDAYSUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church; 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open Discussion AAAA MEEtTINgG SchCHEDUlLE

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From staff reports The Forgotten Coast Paddle Club is planning a special event for Indepen dence Day weekend. On Thursday, July 3, paddlers carry ing American ags will put in at the site of the old Breakaway Lodge off Bluff Road and paddle to Riverfront Park for the Independence Day festivities. Meet at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum at 9 a.m. and shuttle to Break away. The easy, 3-mile paddle should nish up about noon. Rental kayaks are available for $20 from Journeys of St. George Island and the maritime museum. Everyone is welcome. For more information, visit www.paddle2love.com On Saturday, June 7, members of the paddle club put in under the bridge near Battery Park and set off on a mission. The club has committed to help with Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 20. Last Sat urday, they scouted the area between Battery Park and Lafayette Park to make sure the task is feasible. If you are interested in becoming part of the Coastal Cleanup Navy, call Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. Reprinted from Florida Wildlife MagazineA backyard is far more than a place to install a pool, hold a barbecue, or toss a Frisbee. The sum of all North American yards and neighborhood green spaces equals major habitat for birds and other wildlife. Creating larger, connected patches of bird-friendly hab itat is one goal of the new YardMap citizen-science project from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. The project has undergone extensive testing by 10,000 users who created more than 6,700 maps. YardMap is ready for everyone and now is inviting new participants to join. People often think their yard is too small or too ur ban to impact wildlife, but that just isnt true, Yard Map project leader Rhian non Crain said. For many plant and animal species, a yard can mean the world. A buttery can live its whole life from egg through caterpillar to buttery in one persons yard, so it mat ters quite a lot if the owner uses pesticides. After signing up for the free online project, par ticipants zoom in on satel lite images to construct maps of their yards, local parks, workplaces, local cemeteries, or any other green space they know well. They mark the maps to show areas of lawn, buildings, na tive plants, feeders, and oth er landscape features. Sci entists and participants can see how the spaces connect to form larger landscapes and share information about improving habitats at home and across communities. By pairing habitat information with bird sightings, partici pants learn about the effects of different gardening prac tices at a much larger scale. Changes dont need to be dramatic. Putting in a few native plants, moving feeders closer to windows to reduce deadly collisions, or creating a brush pile birds can use to escape from predators can all have a signicant impact for local birds. Right now were losing 21 million acres of habitat every 10 years to residential development, Crain said. But we also know there are millions of people out there concerned about the environment, ready to tread more lightly on the land. Even if youre just starting your wildlife garden, wed love to share the journey as you document your prog ress with YardMap. Learn more at  content. yardmap.org.By Gill AutreySpecial to the Times So, I called Lois Swoboda cause shes my avian consultant. Shes one of only two folks Ive ever known with a Ph.D.; I cant remember the other ones name. She wrote her dissertation on the Argentina ant in Apalachicola that came in here on a boat from Argentina (thats how it got its name). Now she exterminates re ants, already here. She does it ergonomically or some word like that that PhDs use. If she had written a Ph.D. dissertation on how to keep yellow ies from bitin you, she would be worth multi-millions. But heres how you do it drink a couple of ounces of Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar each morning and they will let you alone (so will everybody else, get it at the Pig). Was I tellin yall why I called Lois? I guess I lost track. We both love the swallow kite, the most beautiful bird that graces the Forgotten Coast. Supposedly, its really rare. I had some bird folks on my boat who told me if I could nd a swallow kite nest to show them bird folks, I could make a million dollars. Lois thinks she might have seen an ivory billed woodpecker. If so, she will have a lot more millions than I. I thought I saw Elvis up in Johnsons Creek one time but I didnt have my camera but as I rounded the slough I saw a hound dog chasing a wild hog so he might have really been there. Anyway, I was out at Rivercrest Lodge gassing up Lily, my tour boat, because I thought I had a trip with some folks from Brazil who work for BASF, but they use different ways to write the date so I think maybe I got it wrong. As from Cool Hand Luke, I think we had a failure to communicate. I was pouring gas in the tank of my boat. I use non-ethanol gas because regular gas can ruin your engine, but thats getting into politics and we are talking about the swallow tailed kite, one of the greatest treasures of the Forgotten Cost. I heard this really shrill chirping sound that I have never heard before. I have seen many of them but I have never heard their call. I have a Sibley app on my iPhone. I was blessed to have couple on Lily from the ornithology lab at Cornell University and they identied 38 different species of birds in the 246,000-acre Apalachicola Estuarine Reserve, that in fact makes the Apalachicola Bay the most productive estuary in the Northern Hemisphere; they told me to get the app. So I was trying to put gas in my boat and I heard this loud chirping and I looked up, but my cap has a long bill so I couldnt see anything so I took my hat off and there were two swallow kites chasing a Mississippi kite. The one swallow kite was taking the lead and raisin hell. Now Lois thinks it was probably a territorial dispute. The kites chased each other for maybe 10 minutes, then the Mississippi kite landed in the top of a tree to rest and the two swallow-tailed kites kept dive bombing him for some time, then he took off with the others in hot pursuit and went behind the tree line and gone. Of course, I didnt have my camera, neither did Lois. If we had, I guess you would think you could nd us on the French Rivera sunbathing, or on some exotic island, but no, you would nd us right here on the Forgotten Cost, alive and tryin to keep folks from invading our nest on the Forgotten Coast, our real treasure. Your Friends, Capt. Gill and Lois Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Summertimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,June1282 7650% Fri,June1383 7540% Sat,June1483 7540% Sun,June1583 7730% Mon,June1685 7610% Tues,June1785 7710% Wed,June1886 7710% Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 12 Thursday, June 12, 2014 OUTDoo OO RS www.apalachtimes.comSection A SPONsSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomSurf shing is still doing well for those anglers prowling the shoreline with many nice trout and an occasional red sh being caught. Bay shing in St. Joseph Bay is reported good early and late around Blacks Island as well as Pompano Point. And the Cape still is producing great pompano and whiting catches. Looks like we will all be chasing the Kings for a few weeks and speaking of Kings, several reports of larger Kings have been turned in and the bite has been very good lately. Gag Grouper season will begin July 1. The week of Red Snapper season in federal waters is history for 2014 however Red Snappers may be caught in state waters through July 14. The federal waters season on Red Snapper was short but sweet as most everyone who went limited out or came close. John James Audubon drawing of the Swallow-tailed Kite.The kite ght Join YardMap project to create bird habitatPileated woodpeckers drill holes in trees in order to nd wood-boring insects. THEMO PATRIOTIS | Special to the TimesIndependence Day weekend paddle planned No-license freshwater shing this weekendThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is reminding Floridians and visitors they will be able to sh without a freshwater recreational shing license on Saturday and Sunday, June 14 and 15. These license-free shing days fall near National Fishing and Boating Week, a national celebration of shing and boating, which started June 1 and ran through June 8. The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundations www. TakeMeFishing.org website is a place to learn about events sponsored by businesses and communities during National Fishing and Boating Week, as well as locating shing sites, identifying recreational species and nding shing tips. The rst Saturday in September (Sept. 6, 2014) and the rst Saturday after Thanksgiving (Nov. 29, 2014) also have been designated license-free days, and the rst Saturday and Sunday in April (April 4-5, 2015) have been designated a license-free freshwater shing weekend. All bag limits, seasons and size restrictions apply on these dates. To make your shing day successful, check out MyFWC.com/Fishing for shing tips, locations and rules. Learn more about license-free shing days by visiting MyFWC.com/License and clicking on Do I Need One? and Free Fishing Days.

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CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SPORTs S www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 12, 2014 APage 13SectionTHE PERFECt T GAMEBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.comFifty-ve years ago this week, one of Apalachicolas favorite sons set a record for baseball prowess when he pitched a perfect game. It was 1959, Ron Blood worth, just 22 years old, had left the Washington Senators after a salary dispute and was lead pitcher for the Lin coln Chiefs, part of the minor league Three-I League, so named because it centered around teams in Illinois, Indi ana and Iowa. It had started as a bad sea son. The Chiefs, out of Lincoln, Neb., and a farm team for the Chicago White Sox, were on a losing streak. Bloodworths wife taught school in Apala chicola. When she called to dis cuss coming to stay with him at the end of the school year, he told her she had better wait until after his next game. He was worried. Blood worths record for the season stood at 2-4 and he was just returning from a disastrous three-game series against Des Moines. I had to do something, Bloodworth said. I decided I was going to be the leanest, meanest pitcher the Sherman Field had ever seen. The June 10 home game was against the Green Bay Bluejays, the number one team in the league with a 10-2 record, and six straight wins going into the June 10 doubleheader. The evenings rst game went poorly, with the Chiefs losing 10-1. The nightcap brought the Chiefs losing streak to a halt. The follow ing account of Bloodworths perfect game comes from Del Black, writing for the Lincoln Evening Journal: Thursday nights action started in a dismal fashion when Green Bay whipped the deep left-center to open the second, only to nd Pug Williams starting at the crack of the bat and hauling in the drive over his shoulder and near the fence. In the same inning, Fran Boniar, the winner of two mi nor league batting titles, hit a frozen rope, to the left of second base where Don Ba con was moving, leaning and stretching to haul in the shot. Tim Harkness brought the Shermantown crowd to its feet in the seventh with his screeching one-hopper, which was only inches foul. If fair, it would have gone for a triple. Pinch hitter John Os borne, batting with one out in the ninth, became the rst man to run the count to 3-2 on Bloodworth. Cool Ron nie came in with a curve ball that Osborne fouled over the grandstand for new life. Os borne then looked at a called third strike. One sports writer praised Bloodworth saying, (He) kept mixing up his multiplespeed curve and fast ball. His control was excellent. He ran the count to three balls on only three players. In the course of the game, only ve balls were hit into the outeld. I just kept moving the ball around trying to keep it break ing inside on all the hitters, Bloodworth said. The catch er would give me a signal and Id shake it off to confuse the batter. Theres a lot of mental stuff going on in batters head wondering what youre going to throw. The game nished 3-0. Centerelder Jim Lynn hit a 370-foot homer in the fourth inning. The Chiefs scored ad ditional runs in the sixth and seventh innings. Bloodworths masterpiece was only the second per fect game ever pitched in the ThreeIs. The rst, on Aug. 18, 1910, was the work of Red Faber. That game also nished 3-0. When the game was done, more than 600 fans stood to honor Bloodworth with applause. People start ed to leave before the game was over, but they must have been listening to the radio because, somehow, word got out, he said. They started ling back in at the end. Perhaps the greatest hon or bestowed on Bloodworth was praise from the manager of the Bluejays. This is what is good for baseball, especially minor league baseball. What a game that boy pitched. Its a great thing for the boy and a great thing for Lincoln, Stan Wasiak said. In those days, we had some good guys in the sport, Bloodworth said. Some real gentlemen. On leaving the mound, Bloodworth wrote his way through a throng of autograph seekers. When he reached the clubhouse, he was met by club president A. Q. Schimmel. Great game, Ronnie. The steaks are on me, Schimmel said as he shook the young pitchers hand. Bloodworth told reporters his greatest regret was that his wife didnt see the game. I called her afterwards and told her she could come on to Lincoln, he said. I told her I had pitched a perfect game and she said, Whats a perfect game? For those who might not be clear, a perfect game means the pitcher hurled 27 consecutive outs over nine innings. Not only were there no hits against the pitcher, but no batter reached rst base for any reason, such as on a walk, an error or being hit by a pitch. The feat is considered a rarity at all levels and has been achieved only 23 times in the history of major league baseball. Bloodworth now lives back in Apalachicola and has been with SunCoast Realty for about 20 years. Celebrating Ron Bloodworths record PHOTOS FROM THE COLLECTION Of F RR ON BLOODWORTH The 1959 Lincoln Chiefs were, front row, from left, Kent Lovelace (bat boy) Don Bacon, Al Schrader, Gene Martin, Kendle Hutchinson, Deacon Jones, Charles Lehman, Jim Lynn, Dean Busch (bat boy). Second row, from left, are Ira Hutchinson (manager) Ron Teunis, Ron Bloodworth, Dick Idzkowski, John Hoerner, Pug Williamson, Bryant Wasdell, Joel Horlen, Harold (Doc) Scockro (trainer). Third row, from left, are Don Gordon, George Olson, Al Brice, Jim Host, Dick Kimball, Malcolm Warren. Club President A. Q. Schimmel presents Ron Bloodworth with a trophy following his record-breaking game. PHOTOS bB Y DD AVID ID ADLERSTEIN DLERSTEIN | The TimesAbove left, anked by his parents, Heather and Bobby Curry, Bobby John Curry signs an athletic scholarship, with head coach Aaron York, left, and assistant coach Jonathan Creamer, standing. Above right, anked by his parents, Gene and Bridget McLeod, Logan McLeod signs an athletic scholarship, with head coach Aaron York, left, and assistant coach Jonathan Creamer, standing.3 more Seahawks sign scholarshipsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Three more Seahawks have committed to athletic scholarships, making for an unprecedented dozen Franklin County students athletes who have signed on the dotted line to play a sport in college. On May 30, the last day of school, three Seahawk seniors Bobby John Curry, Logan McLeod and James Newell were honored at a ceremony to celebrate their signing to play baseball with the Trinity Baptist College Eagles, at a private university in Jacksonville. This school has been blessed, baseball coach Aaron York told the assembly of students. Were adding to the history of the school, adding to the foundation. Theyre opening doors for you today. He said the three young men were helped in getting a chance to play for Trinitys newly instituted baseball program because the rst thing they (coaches) say is, number one, tell me about the kids character. These three men have displayed great character. Secondly, York said, the student-athletes earned the grades and test scores to enable them to play college ball, and thirdly, theyve worked hard at it. Theyve had a good support group, of teachers, of moms and dads, and of all the coaches. Curry said its a matter of working on and off the eld, including working out in the weight room. Newell thanked his parents, grandparents and teachers for pushing him, especially my Papa; he pushed me hard. He offered a big thank-you to assistant baseball coach Jonathan Creamer. McLeod offered thanks to the coaches as well, describing them as the best weve ever had, right here. York was assisted by Creamer and Mike Todd this past season. Our teachers really help us one-on-one, McLeod said. These teachers will help you get there, but youre going to have to push yourself. Curry, a pitcher, played three years in high school, while Newell, a pitcher and shortstop, and McLeod, a catcher and inelder, each played all four years. Flanked by his parents, Ronda Newell and Michael Newell, James Newell signs an athletic scholarship, with head coach Aaron York, left, and assistant coach Jonathan Creamer, standing. From staff reports ANERRNERR to host public meetingThe Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is hosting a public meeting and invites local and regional stakeholders to provide input to state and federal entities about what the reserve does and receive input on what stakeholders think the reserve should do that it doesnt. This includes a discussion of what the Reserve has accomplished in the past ve years. This meeting is part of an evaluation of reserve programs by NOAA, done once every ve years. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 1, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint, Florida 32328. Written comments on your evaluation of reserve programs are encouraged, and participation at the public meeting is not required for submission. Written comments should be sent to Carrie Hall NOAA/ NOS/OCRM, 1305 East-West Highway, N/ORM7, Silver Spring, MD 20910, or via email to Carrie.Hall@noaa. gov no later than July 12. HHelp the FWCWC locate rare upland birdsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission requests the publics help in locating three species of rare birds during their breeding seasons. The southeastern American kestrel, the burrowing owl and the painted bunting are rare and declining species that are often overlooked by traditional monitoring programs such as the North American Breeding Bird Survey. People are encouraged to use the FWCs new Rare Bird Registry to quickly map locations where they observe these species, with the option to upload photos and additional comments. Its quick and easy to use. Data submitted will be used by FWC scientists to identify important breeding areas for these species as well as estimate the size of their populations. The Rare Bird Registry is an excellent opportunity for the public to participate in research, said Karl Miller, a biologist at the FWCs Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. Sightings will provide the FWC with valuable data to help us study and conserve some of Floridas most unique and interesting species. This new website provides a great way to get involved. To assist the FWC in locating these rare birds, visit MyFWC.com/GetInvolved and select Citizen Science then Sightings for the Rare Bird Registry link. bBRIEfFS Heroes of the June 10 game were catcher Al Schrader, left, batter Jim Lynn, right and pitcher Ron Bloodworth, center.

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014unanimously to order a bear proof dumpster for the end of Seventh Street because bears have repeatedly raided the existing dumpster. The city currently pays $62 quarterly for the dumpster in use. The cost of the bear-proof dumpster is $88 quarterly.Tap fee waived for Carrabelle churchAt Carrabelles June 5 city commission meeting, Commissioner Olivia Massey asked that the $3,260 tap fee to connect the Carrabelle Church of God to the city sewer system be waived. The church has gone from 20 members to 120. They are overowing, she said. The commission voted unanimously to waive the fee.GUSC on track in CarrabelleOn Thursday, June 5, Gulf Unmanned Systems Center CEO Bruce McCormack signed the closing papers for the purchase of the old Gulf State Bank complex on US 98 in Carrabelle, which is now headquarters for GUSC. On the same day, GUSC nalized the lease on the old Hexaport factory on John McInnis Road which is now GUSC operations center. At the city meeting held later that evening, GUSC Chief Financial Ofcer Lisa Spooner told the assembly that GUSC now has 10 fulltime employees. Six are from Carrabelle and all reside in Franklin County. Spooner said GUSC will now begin work on landscaping for both headquarters and operations center and will locate a contractor to link the two facilities with secure ber optic cable. McCormack said he is in discussion with several potential clients. Carrabelle museum promised $50,000 for renovationsAt the June 5 city commission meeting in Carrabelle, Tamara Allen, president of Carrabelles Historical Society, said the Waterfront Partnership has been awarded a $50,000 grant to fund phase II of the restoration of the museum building, formerly city hall. She said the money will be used the seal the exterior plaster and paint the building. Allen said she has contacted a high level paint contractor from Tallahassee for an estimate.County to hire temporary ofce workerCounty commissioners voted unanimously to let the planning ofce hire a temporary worker for August and September, since one of the front staff will be out for six to eight weeks with knee replacement and another staff person has some extended time they will be off. The temporary worker will not receive any benets and will be paid the same as other parttime workers at $10 an hour.Emerald Warrior granted a discountCounty commissioners voted unanimously to reduce the amount Visual Awareness Technologies and Consulting (VATC) must pay for leasing the former Bay City Work Camp. VATC wrote the county to say that although they had leased the facility for 12 days earlier this spring, they had only used it for six days due to bad weather. Commissioners voted unanimously to charge them for nine days of use. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said VATC had not used the facility for the full span. He said they were late in picking up the keys. Pierce suggested that in the future, a clause be included in contracts to lease the facility stating county policy in the event of bad weather.Lighthouse association elects new boardOfcers and directors of the St. George Lighthouse Association were elected at the annual meeting held in Lighthouse Park on May 22. Ofcers for 2014 are Dennis Barnell, president; Jim Kemp, vice president; Terry Kemp, secretary; and Phyllis Vitale-Lewis, treasurer. Directors are Brant Banks, Dennis Barnell, Vito Bell, Bud Hayes, Bob Heide, Jim Kemp, Terry Kemp, Fred Stanley, and Phyllis Vitale-Lewis. Brant Banks, the newest board member, is a resident of Apalachicola and teaches history at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Outgoing directors are Richard Saucer and Kristy Branch Banks. At the annual meeting, Barnell introduced new Lighthouse Keeper Mark Vail, who succeeds retiring Keeper Stanley Colvin. In his report at the meeting, Vail said that visitation to the Lighthouse in 2013 was up by about 10 percent over previous years. More than 92,000 people have climbed the Lighthouse since its opening in Dec. 2008. Gift Shop Manager Carol Talley announced the successful implementation of a Quick Books Point of Sale system, and invited members to browse the new summer merchandise in the shop. Secretary Terry Kemp reported that as of the annual meeting date, SGLA membership stands at about 450 members. Volunteers needed at lighthouse museumThe St. George Lighthouse Association has vacancies for docents at the Lighthouse Museum. Docents perform a valuable service by educating visitors about the lighthouse, answering questions about the island, and preserving order in a small space. Docents can volunteer for a regular weekly shift, generally three hours, or ll in as their time is available. To volunteer, call 927-7745.County to purchase more Eastpoint waterfront At their June 3 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to purchase a sliver of land on the Eastpoint waterfront located between the Eastpoint Pavilion and the Patton Drive Boat Ramp. The owner, David Diehl offered the property for sale. The county will pay the assessed value of the land, $9,720, with funds from capital outlay. This parcel is a wedge with some 60 feet of waterfront. The county will now have 350 feet of waterfront with this purchase. County Planner Alan Pierce said the cost is roughly equal to the amount received from the Eastpoint Minimart for an encroachment onto county land in the same area, so in some sense that will balance out the withdrawal from capital outlay.Hurricane reentry tags in CarrabelleOn Wednesday, June 18, a representative of Franklin County Emergency Management will visit the Carrabelle Municipal Center, 1001 Gray Avenue, to distribute disaster reentry tags. These tags simplify reentry of the county after an evacuation. To get a tag, you must furnish proof of residence (ie. utility bills or other mail with a street address) and a current photo ID. You can also obtain a tag online at www. franklinemergencymanagement. com. If you have any questions, call 653-8977. Trades&Services ADVERTISEHERE TODAY227-7847 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter 4510547 KimHawkinsDavisCPA7811thStreet,ApalachicolaFL32320850-653-6875 ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD BRIEFS from page A2

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SchoolsA15 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 Franklin County HONOR ROLL ABC HONOR ROLLThe following is the Honor Roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at Franklin County Elementary School.First gradeAll As: Esteban Bernabe-Juan, Jerzy Jackson, Christopher Creek, Christian Daughtry, Josiah Friddle, Sarah Ham, Kamora Harris, Dezmonae Sanders, Bradley Page, Charity Larkin, Sy Bartlett, Lester Owens, Loghan Carver, Reshard Robinson, Dexton Teat A/B: Adrionna Martin, Harmony Malone, Daylen Gilbert, Nathan Rotella, Christopher Russell, Hunter Ard, Jordan Barber, Raegan Dempsey, Nyashia Davis, Cammie Gilbert, Jasmine Gray, Kassidy Denney, Emmanuel Marcum, Madison MillenderWagner, Ajaylen McNair, Robert Romero, Daniel Lively, Dominic Durbin, Jesus Pelico-Lopez, Estela Peralta-Virbes, Layla Dixon, Rosa Pascual-Juan, Lilianna Joiner, Michael Hill, Michelle Weisz, McKenna Young, Asya Owens, Ayla DericoSecond gradeAll As: William Chipman, Emily Patterson, Charles Glass, Bricyn Kennedy, Kirsten Martina, Onamae Millender, Corbin Pritchard, Terry Proctor, Mason Pace, Logan Bentley, Lonnie ONeal, Evan Ogden A/B: Cole Polous, Dakota Shiver, Zachary Thompson, Gavin Shelley, Christian Wilson, Joseph Bass, Aryauna Benjamin, Marcus Clayton, Hannah Creamer, Jayden Gray, Bradlynn Hutchins, Jesse Whitted, Owen Golden, Kayleigh Leonard, Ansley Savage, Tyler Baxley, Rebecca Mahon, Austin Millender, Anthony Stulsky, Jada Allen, Braden Shiver, Kylie Proctor, Laelah Carranza, Iliana GilmoreThird gradeAll As: Alondra Jimenez, Autumn Loesch, Grace Carroll, Lucy Edwards, Kylie Rudd, Marissa Gilbert, Ellis Billingsley A/B: Laura Woods, Don Davis, Emily Fichera, Tariah Jones, Tashawn Jones, Cloey Malone, Jaylan Prince, Jesse Mock, Tyasia Yarrell, Ethan Shirley, Emaleigh Segree, OMarion Kelley, Parker Martina, Shalyn Massey, Sarai Crumbliss, Adia Barber, Sara Johnsen, Dylan CulverFourth gradeAll As: Michael Melton, Savannah Brannan, Rachel Rudd, Annie Smith, Kristen Stancil, Larry Winchester, Maddison Whitten, Steven Cook, Brianna Cardwell A/B: Audrey Yowell, Trinity Barron, Blakely Curry, Jachob-Earl Thompson, Bryce Gilbert, Kevin Burch, Christian Custer, Ariel Andrews, Marina ONeal, Grace Patterson, Brendon Polous, Sarah Segree, Rebecca Shiver, Sydney Shuman, Ava McAnally, Robert Nessly, Mary Bareld, Amber Goldin, Merrideth Kiernan Fifth gradeAll As: William Gray, Katie Newman, Martina Granger, Shirah Pelt, A/B: Lorne Whaley, Caden Evans, Camron Evans, Stephen Malone, Katelyn Cox, Capri Cargill, Patrick Millender, Makayla Varner, Hollie Larkin, Layla Chisholm, Tressie Edwards, Marci Kelley, Destanie Proctor, Charlee Winchester, Shaydan Pearson, Francisco Juan, Tiauna Benjamin, Ethan Anderson SPECIAL tT O tT HE TIMEs S Third graders posing with their certicates for perfect 260 scores in the FCATs are, left, Alondra Jimenez, from Lynn Clarks class, for reading and math; and Kylie Rudd, from Jeannie Fords class, for math. The following is the honor roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. First gradeR. Ramsdell All As: Shlok Patel, Gracyn Paul, Jazmyn Pavon, Evie-Morgan Price, Promise Suddeth and Mabry Wallace. A/B: Josh Dykes, Desiree Messer, Olivia Poloronis and Joel Taylor H. Baroody All As: Zariah Harvey, Mya Huckeba, Issy Nations, Micahlyn ONeal and Krista Varnes A/B: Maleah Croom, Breahna Fleming, Shaylee Martina, Khali McNair and Ben Sanders.Second gradeS. Herrington All As: Peyton Blackburn, Nathaniel Bolinger, CJ Conway, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Taylor Mallon, and Jostyn Tipton A/B: Hannah Grace Abel, Cody Abercrombie, Landrick Moore, Malic ONeal, Charlie Ramsdell, and Weston Taranto J. Mallon All As: Reece Juno, William Luberto, Alexcia McNair, Taylor Pendleton, Isabella Price and Kiana Weeks A/B: Trinity Creamer, Esteban Juan Bernabe, Jentzen Odom and Aniyah RiveraThird gradeW. Martina All As: Lucy Neill, Arav Patel, Owen Poloronis, River Sheridan, Mahaley Shuler and Trinity Taylor A/B: Mitchell Adkins, Mason Moses and Mark Willis T. Moses All As: Eric Lau, Kylah Ross and John-Michael Thompson A/B: Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Daisy Jimenez, Laithan Kent, Jayden Nichols, Jackson Segree and Colin WengFourth gradeL. Bockelman All As: Meredith Alford, Dylan Grifn, Alex Itzkovitz, Myia Maxwell, Brooklyn ONeal, John Sanders, Gracie Smith and Nico Valenzuela A/B: Carson Davis, Severyn Everitt, Eulalia Gregorio, Gavin Lashley and Rory Ramsdell, M. Lee All As: Lanie Allen, Weston Bockelman, Lauren Conway, Ella Friedman, Andrew Monod and Stanley Tate A/B: Colin Amison, Logan Freeman, Genevieve Montgomery and Jeremy ShulerFifth gradeJ. Ammons All As: Camille Davis, Kaylee Hicks, Alex Joanos and Livia Monod A/B: Cody Cassidy, Devin Daniels, Stanley Gay, Skye Huber and Gregory Wilson L. Poloronis All As: Brycin Huckeba, Abby Johnson, Elizabeth McAnally, Madalyn Thompson and Jack Vail A/B: Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Jadyn Luberto, Clinton Rester, Caden Turrell and Jarvis TurrellSixth gradeKaren Ward All As: Cade Juno and Sophia Robertson A/B: Bailey Herrington, Jayden Justice, Krista Kelley, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Nash Ramsdell, Allison Register, Hannah Sweet and Chandler Wray Brant Banks All As: Alyssa Robinson, Drake Stanley and Camille WilliamsSeventh gradeTanya Joanos All As: Kevin Flores-Perez, Mikalin Huckeba and Jack Ramsdell A/B: Hailey Gay, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott and Ethan Vonier Anna Keel All As: Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer and Becca Willis EE ighth grade Melanie Copeland A/B: Brian Bareld, Mia Cummings, Joseph Martinez, Sallie Rose Paul and Audrianna Penamon Tara Ward All As: Christian Amison, Michaela Cassidy, Kobe Myers, Andrew Nguyen, Faith Sapp and Lucas Sasnett A/B: Nick Joanos, Brooke Martina, Savannah Montgomery, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Timothy Shuler and Madison Smith CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 12, 2014 The Times | A15 95142T PUBLIC NOTICE Solicitation Number: 14HM-6B-02-29-01-385 Title: Request for Documented Quote, Professional Contracting Services for the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Wind Retrofit The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is announcing the documented quote for professional contracting services for a wind retrofit on the EOC by shuttering all windows and doors and constructing a new hip roof. The selected firm will provide engineering or roof designs and construction plans, and contract or furnish all labor, materials, equipment tools, transportation, and supervision as indicated in the sealed drawings and specifications. The contractor must have a proven track record, extensive experience and holds a State of Florida Certified Building Contractors License. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any or all bids or any part thereof and/or to waive the information if such is deemed to be in the best interest of Franklin County. The county also reserves the right to reject the bid of any bidder who has previously failed to perform adequately after having once been awarded a prior bid for furnishing materials similar in nature to those materials mentioned in this bid. Download the Specification Details/ Attachments: www.frankline mergencymanagement.co m Point of Contact: Sole contact for the Documented Quote: Gail Leek. All questions pertaining to this solicitation must be submitted in writing to gleek@realknow.com. Please reference the solicitation number. Submission Deadline Date: June 30, 2014 at 4:00 PM EST Deliver three sealed copies of the Documented Quote to: Franklin County Clerks Office Attn: Michael Moron 33 Market Street, Suite 203 Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Published Dates: June 5, 12, 2014 95144T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2014-CA-000080 Bank of America, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Daryl F. Knopf a/k/a Daryl Knopf; et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: Carrabelle Landings Homeowners Association, Inc.; CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN: LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, c/o William S. Howell, R.A, 1727 County Highway 393 South, Carrabelle, FL 32459 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 6, CARRABELLE LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as Vacant -Lot 6 Carrabelle Landing, Landing Street, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 22nd day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Circuit and County Courts By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 13-269229 FCO2 CWF June 12, 19, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 99089T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes units:

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A16| The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Admin/ClericalNOTICETHE FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WILL CONSIDER APPLICANTS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITION:TEMPORARY PART TIME SECRETARIAL POSITIONFOR THE PLANNING & BUILDING DEPARTMENTJOB DESCRIPTION: Typing, Filing, Computer Skills, Office Equipment, Assisting Office Staff and Answering A Busy Multi-Phone Line System. Works well with the public and has familiarity in reading and interpreting maps. PAY: $10.00 Hour WORK WEEK: Monday -Friday 35 Hour Work Week (THIS IS A TEMPORARY POSITION THAT DOES NOT INCLUDE ANY BENEFITS AND WILL ONLY LAST UP TO SIX MONTHS) Applications can be obtained and submitted to the following: Franklin County Planning & Building Department, 34 Forbes Street, Ste 1, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 4:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014. FRANKLIN COUNTY IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Web Id 34291247 Text FL91247 to 56654 Admin/ClericalUF/IFAS Franklin County Extension Office HiringOffice Manager/Program Assistant position40 hours/week, $10-12/hour with benefits Experience required in word processing and spreadsheets, a typing test will be given during interviews. Responsible for office management, tracking budgets, assisting with Extension programs, updating social media pages, and serving the public on the phone and in person. For full job announcement or questions contact: Franklin County Extension Director at : elovestrand@ufl.edu or call the office at (850) 653-9337. The position will be open for applications June 12-26, 2014. Web Id 34291772 Text FL91772 to 56654 HEAD COACH FASTPITCH SOFTBALLThis position will manage & supervise the overall operations of the Softball program to assure compliance with national, state, & institutional guidelines; Develop an intercollegiate athletic softball program that has integrity & a positive environment for student athletes, sta, & fans, & will also be responsible for assuring the team has a consistently high graduation rate & competes at a championship level. For additional information about this position please visit: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr Minimum Qualications: Bachelors degree required, Masters preferred in a related eld, plus 2 years of 2 year College or University Womens Softball coaching experience; Head Coach or Assistant Coach. Or a minimum of 4 years of Head Coaching experience at the Senior High School level, or a combination of College coaching & Senior HS head coaching experience. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply.Salary Range Starts At: $52,020.00 Deadline to apply: 06/20/2014Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98; via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies.1129123 4518212CITY OF APALACHICOLA POLICE OFFICER POSITION OPENThe City of Apalachicola will receive applications for one full-time police ofcer position. Qualications include but are not limited to the following: 1. Florida Police Standards Certication preferred. 2. Must be able to pass required pre-employment drug screening and physical examination. 3. Must have a valid Florida Drivers License.Applications may be downloaded from the Citys website at www.cityofapalachicola.com or picked up during regular ofce hours (8:00 AM 4:00 PM Monday Friday) at City Hall 1 Avenue E or Apalachicola Police Department 127 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida. Applications will be received and considered until position is lled. For further information contact the Apalachicola Police Department at 850-653-9755.Fax and Email applications will not be considered.THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE AND FAIR HOUSING COMMUNITY 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 550.00/mo. 2. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Furnished. W/D, fenced yard. 525.00/mo. 3. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, unfurnished. 450.00/mo. 4. 39-1 Carlton. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, carport. 650.00/mo. incl. utilities 5. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach. 1400.00/mo. 6. 202 1st St NE, Carrabelle. 5 bedroom, 2 baths, unfurnished. 1000.00/mo. 7. 1108 Tallahassee St., Carrabelle. 3 bedroom, 3 baths, unfurnished. 500.00/mo.8. 302 Woodill Rd., Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, W/D, 1 acre. 500.00/mo.9. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished. 550.00/mo. 10. 33-2 Holland. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 500.00/mo. 11. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 12. 811 Three Rivers Rd. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on water, deep water dock, garage, fenced yard, parking. 1000.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518214 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Susies Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Pub: June 5, 12, 2014 99097T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA-000317 Section:___________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELETTINGER AKAMIKE ETTINGER; ELYSE ETTINGER; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; HIDDEN BEACHES PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION; HIDDEN BEACHES AT YENTBAYOU, INC.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 192011-CA-000317 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 2nd day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT12, HIDDEN BEACHES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6 ATPAGE 11 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99095T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2011-00448-CA DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. JENNIFER KERN, ET. AL. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, and entered in Case No.201100448-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Bank of America, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jennifer Kern and St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc., are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/out Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 at 11:00 A.M., Franklin County, Florida on the 16th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT7 OF SEAPINE VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4 PAGE 28 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/ALOT7 SEA PINE VILLA, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 20th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC -14-127369 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 5, 12, 2014 99143T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CA 000189 Section: ________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. EBE WALTER; HENRIETTA A. WALTER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SYNOVUS BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 19 2012 CA 000189 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 9th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 26 OF DOG ISLAND SUBDIVISION, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE (S) 23 & 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99145T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2014-0007-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF WYNETTE F. TUCKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS Pursuant to Florida Statute 733.2121 (2013) and Florida Probate Rules Rule 5.241 (2014), the administration of the estate of Wynette F. Tucker, deceased, whose date of death was January 13, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County. Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street. Suite 126, PO Box 368, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 5, 2014. Personal Representative: NICOLE TUCKER 140 Ed Padgett Rd. Lakeland, FL 33809 Attorney for Personal Representative: EDWIN A. GREEN, II, ESQ. FL Bar No. 0137244 215 Delata Court Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 222-7770 June 5, 12, 2014 99209T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 19-2012-CA-000448 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. ROBIN A. HYMAN, MICHAEL HYMAN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 22, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 40 IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH RANGE 5 WEST, AND EXTEND A LINE EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT 40 FOR 415.47 FEET; THENCE TURN 25 DEGREES 16 MINUTES LEFT FOR 118.70 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES RIGHT AND EXTEND A LINE SOUTHEASTERLY FOR 330.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE IN THE SAME DIRECTION FOR 66 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RETRACE THE LINE LAST DESCRIBED ABOVE IN A NORTHWESTERLY DIRECTION FOR 66 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE IN THE SAME DIRECTION FOR 300.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 30-U.S. 90; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES RIGHT ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR 100.00 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES RIGHT FOR 377 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THEN TURN RIGHT ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE FOR 101 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PART OF TRACTS 40 AND 41 IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND IN THE SUBDIVISION OF ST. GEORGE IN PLAT BOOK 1 AT PAGE 1, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN THAT SURVEY DATED 9/4/2008, PREPARED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES UNDER JOB # 01-386, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 40, ST GEORGE CITY, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN CO., FLORIDA AND RUN EAST 415.47 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 117.64 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 298.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE 25 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 110.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 105.46 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 25 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 373.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and commonly known as: 2458 HIGHWAY 98 W., CARRABELLE, FL 32322; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the 2nd floor Lobby of the Courthouse, at 33 Market St., in Apalachicola, Florida, on August 6, 2014 at 11:00 A.M. (Est.). Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of June, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Micheled Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 12, 19, 2014 Apalachicola128 22nd Ave Sat June 14th 8:-UntilYard SaleClothes, Small Kitchen Appliances, Household Goods, and Much More.Text FL90843 to 56654 Carrabelle: 1621 Hwy 98 West (old pawn shop), Sat, June 14th, 8am-?Yard SaleClothing, Furniture, & Lots of Other Great Items. Text FL91700 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative AssistantFor guest services. Happy and energetic person, good communication and computer skills. Ability to read and follow instructions. Come by and pick up application or email to visitorcentermanager@ammfl. org Apalachicola Maritime Museum 103 Water St, 850-653-2500 Web ID 34290443 Banking Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Web Id 34287017 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291810 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291809 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAdministrative ReceptionistThis full-time position requires excellent customer service skills & a smile! Must be neat, organized & attentive to detail with good computer skills & knowledge of Microsoft Word, Outlook & Excel. Good grammar, spelling & punctuation. Varied office duties including phones & walk-in traffic. Prefer prior office experience. Full-time Mon-Fri w/ great benefits. Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-5pm at: 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island or call Sandra 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34290509 Commercial Building For Rent. Hwy 98 Apalach 1000sf High Traffic 850-653-6900 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 2 bedroom handicap Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer Text FL72436 to 56654 Apalachicola: 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 Spot Advertising works!

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 12, 2014 The Times | A17

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LocalA18 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 BestValuesontheForgottenCoastContactTheTimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola AdvertiseHere RealEstatePicks ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,199,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com REDUCED 850-899-9988|850-697-9010www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Anothergreatdealonthecoast!!!-checkoutthislarge 2BR-meticulouslykeptunit.Almostnewappliances androof.Thisunithasthelargershower/tubcombo bath.Furniturenegotiableforaturnkey,moverightin. LowmaintenanceononeofthelargercourtyardsofLV -abundantpaverpatios.Screenporchthatcouldeasily beconverted/expandedtoFLroomforaddlspace. MLS#250854$69,900St.GeorgeIsland YOURPIECEOFTHEISLAND1/3acreinthequietpartoftheisland,justonelotinfrom thecornerof10thStreet&WestBayShoreDrive,easy beachaccessjust3shortblocksdown10thStreettoGulf ANDeasybayaccesstopublicparkjustdownBayShore Drive.ListedbyJohnShelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com 29,000 MLS#251429$274,900St.GeorgeIsland BEACHFRONTCONDOLeastExpensiveBeachfrontdwellingonSt.GeorgeIsland! Groundlevelbeachfrontcondounitinafour-plex,Cute twobedroom,onebathunit,newtileinkitchen&LR, Furnished,Screenedporchonbeachside,Washerand dryer,ListedbyJohnShelby 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com 850-566-6761or850-385-6363 www.tlgproperty.com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) His real name was Dino Crocetti, but what was his stage name? Stubby Kaye, Dean Martin, Red Skelton, Denver Pyle 2) Which Beverly Hillbillies character in real life was illiterate? Jethro, Granny, Cousin Pearl, Miss Jane 3) What was the name of Paladins (Richard Boone) horse during older TVs Have Gun Will Travel? Tramp, River, Fire, Rafter 4) Which of these was not an Elvis (Presley) movie? Kid Galahad, Kissin Cousins, Picnic, Wild In The Country 5) What is the largest city in the Arab League? Damascus, Beirut, Tripoli, Cairo 6) By best road mileage route which of these is closest to Phoenix, AZ? Omaha, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Memphis 7) What scale is used in geology to measure the size of loose rocks? Antioch, Otto, Wentworth, Marlin 8) Which Monkee is/was nicknamed Wool Hat as he often wore one? Davy, Micky, Peter, Michael 9) What was the middle name of the late TV host/producer Dick Clark? Howard, Thomas, Wagstaff, Westmoreland 10) In 1983 what ragtime pianistcomposer died ve days after his 100th birthday? John Roache, James P. Johnson, Robin Frost, Eubie Blake 11) When was David Bowie star-honored on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? 1997, 1999, 2006, 2013 12) How many million people was the Earths approximate population during Julius Caesars time? 2, 9, 110, 150 13) Chevy Chase starred in how many National Lampoon vacation movies? 2, 3, 4, 5 14) Approximately how many miles are in a 5K (kilometer) race? 2.5, 3.1, 4.2, 5.0 ANSWERS 1) Dean Martin. 2) Granny. 3) Rafter. 4) Picnic. 5) Cairo. 6) Omaha. 7) Wentworth. 8) Michael. 9) Wagstaff. 10) Eubie Blake. 11) 1997. 12) 150. 13) 4. 14) 3.1. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com SPECIAL tT O tT HE TIMEs SThis precious kitten showed up at a house in Apalachicola a couple of days ago. She needs a loving forever home very soon! She was skittish at rst but is now quite friendly and enjoys attention. If she nds a home, the Apalachicola woman said she would be happy to have her spayed and given rst  shots. She cannot keep her and there is no room at the local shelter for another kitten. Can you help nd this deserving kitten a loving home? Call  Bruce Hall 653-3820. MsMS. KIttTTY NEEDsS LOVING fFOREVER HOME



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, June 12, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index High school students pace improved FCATs By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Freshmen and sophomores at Franklin County High School posted their best reading test results in four years, to highlight a series of gains throughout the district at most grade levels on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test this year. For the rst time since FCAT 2.0 was introduced in 2011, a majority of ninthand 10th-graders were at Level 3 or better in reading, which is considered a satisfactory performance of grade level or even better. In the case of the 79 sophomores who took the test this spring, 51 percent were at grade level or better, 24 percentage points better than last years 27 percent, when only 55 students were tested. The best sophomores at the high school had done previously was just 38 percent at grade level or better in 2012. The biggest growth among sophomores was at Level 4, which was achieved by 25 percent of the class, more than double the best percentage it had posted since 2011. Among the 78 freshmen who were tested, 55 percent were at grade level or better, seven percentage points better than last year and 19 percentage points better than in 2011. At the middle school level, which includes grades six, seven and eight, the Apalachicola Bay Charter School posted strong results, especially in the math scores for its 27 seventhgraders. With no Level 1s and only 7 percent Level 2s, the school had 93 percent of its seventh-graders at grade level or better, part of a steady rise from just 60 percent at that level in 2011. In seventh-grade math, the percent at grade level or better dipped only slightly, from 71 to 69 percent, and in eighth-grade math, the percentage at grade or better jumped by Special to the Times A 36-year-old St. George Island woman died early Sunday morning after her car overturned near the entrance of St. George Plantation. Ashley Marie Nichols, 36, was pronounced dead at the scene by Franklin County emergency medical staff, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report led by Cpl. Matthew Kirkland. The report said Nichols, driving a 1992 Acura Legend, was traveling west on Gulf Beach Drive about 3:20 a.m. when she failed to negotiate a curve at the entrance to the St. George Plantation, near Leisure Lane. The vehicle traveled off the roadway onto the south shoulder and overturned, striking several trees and ejecting Nichols before coming to rest on its roof facing easterly. The FHP report said Nichols was not wearing a seat belt, and a determination whether the crash was alcohol-related was pending. The highway patrol was assisted on scene by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, Franklin County EMS and the St. George Island Fire Department. Nichols was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and the medical examiners of ce for a post-mortem examination. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com At a pair of meetings last week, Franklin County residents made clear war games are not welcome in Tates Hell State Forest. The Air Force has struck a deal with the state to lease sections of Tates Hell as part of its Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI), a plan to relieve Eglin Air Force Bases crowded airspace by expanding military training operations to the Tates Hell and Blackwater River state forests. In the third of a series of meetings with Eglin representatives, residents from across the county took issue with an environmental impact statement (EIS) that contends training in Tates Hell would not affect the environment. The EIS was prepared by Leidos, a private defense contractor that works extensively with the Department of Defense. Leidos assesses the potential impacts, gathering information from the Air Force, State of Florida and other sources, said Air force spokesman Mike Spaits. The Air Force interdisciplinary team from Eglin, AFCEC and Headquarters Air Force then reviews and edits the document to prepare it for release. Lt. Col. Lynn Watkins presided over the meetings, which drew about two dozen attendees each, June 3 in Carrabelle and June 4 in Apalachicola. Displays of the Air Force proposal were available for viewing before the exchange of comments, but questions were not allowed during the meeting. State Forester Jim Karels opened the session by announcing that, while he would not comment, he was observing the proceedings for the Florida Forest Service, which will make the ultimate decision about how Tates Hell can be used. Eglin spokesmen Tom Tolbert and Spaits read aloud portions of the EIS, followed by three-minute statements from attendees. Although the time limit was strictly enforced, some speakers were given extra time by members of the audience who ceded them minutes. The EIS offers two alternatives for GRASI: use of Tates Hell or no expansion of the exercise area. At the Carrabelle meeting, Bruce McCormack, CEO of Gulf Unmanned Systems Center, said there is an alternative venue for war games. He said military groups, including Eglin, have used a 90,000-acre tract of privately owned land near Blountstown since 1999. GUSC would administer the lease of the available land using employees working in Franklin County, he said. No signi cant bene cial or adverse impacts According to the EIS, the Air Force has not identi ed any signi cant bene cial or adverse impacts associated with the proposed action. While the Air Force has identi ed the potential for adverse impacts to various resources, these impacts would be insigni cant. The federal Environmental Protection Agency has reviewed the EIS and will give its nal decision after the public comment period is completed, Air Force of cials said. At the meetings last week, a BENEFIT CONCERT FOR ASHLEY A bene t concert will be 7-10 p.m. June 19 at Black Marlins Bar & Grill, 212 E. Bay Shore Drive on St George Island. All proceeds from the $20 cover at the door will be donated to assist with nal expenses and the immediate needs of Ashley Nichols children. A meal and entertainment are included. There will also be an open cash bar. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Classi eds . . . A16-A17 Superintendent revamp headed to voters By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County voters will have a chance in November to decide whether to continue to elect the superintendent of schools or switch to having the position be appointed by the school board. By a 3-1 vote June 5, the school board approved placing on the Nov. 4 countywide ballot a binding referendum that would end the direct election of the superintendent and have the school board responsible for making the hire, beginning in October 2016 at the completion of Superintendent Nina Marks term. County commissioners now have the responsibility to arrange to have the measure placed on the general election ballot. The only school board member to oppose placing the referendum before voters was Teresa Ann Martin. School board member David Hinton was absent. School board member Pam Shiver, who rst suggested the proposal to her colleagues a few months ago, made the motion, with a second from George Thompson. The only member of the audience to speak out on the matter was Carrabelles David Butler, who made a brief statement. INSIDE Veteran gets last wish for school, A9 See SUPERINTENDENT A9 ASHLEY NICHOLS Woman killed in crash at Plantation entrance GULF REGIONAL AIRSPACE STRATEGIC INITIATIVE Residents sound off on GRASI war games LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Tom Tolbert and Mike Spaits read excerpts from the Environmental Impact Statement before public comment was heard. See FCAT A6 See WOMAN KILLED A9 See GRASI A6 VOL. 129 ISSUE 7 Dancing with little stars, A8 Pop-up art at Freddys this weekend On Friday and Saturday, June 13-14, come to the Freddys Re nery, above Tamaras Caf on Avenue D, for a Pop-Up art show, tea dance and gallery closing. On Friday, preview the art from 5-8 p.m. On Saturday, the art will be on display all day. From 2-5 p.m., there will be a tea dance to commemorate the re nerys last day. Full moon climb at lighthouse tonight A Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be today, June 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb, 8-9:30 p.m., includes hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15, $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, climb the lighthouse for a view of the full moon. Cost is $10, $5 for SGLA members. Make reservations at 927-7745. ANERR to host July 1 meeting The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve invites local stakeholders to provide input to state and federal entities about what the reserve does and what stakeholders think it should do. This includes a discussion of what ANERR has accomplished in the last ve years, as part of an evaluation of reserve programs by NOAA. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. July 1 at ANERR, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Island summer bingo every Tuesday Summer Bingo on St. George Island is at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave. Cost is 50 cents per card.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m Carrabelle has put a hold on fencing Gulf Beach Drive. In 2009, Carrabelle took assignment of the lease for McKissack Beach from the Apalachicola National Es tuarine Research Reserve. Last month, representa tives of the Florida Depart ment of Environmental Protection met with city staff and City Attorney Dan Hartman to discuss Carra belles proposed land man agement plan. Creation of the plan is mandated by the DEP for leaseholders. Residents of the McKis sack Lake Beach communi ty, a subdivision dating back to the 1930s, have recently written to the DEP com plaining about automobile trafc on the beach. Driving on McKissack Beach or any beach in the county is illegal except in an emergency. Hartman said DEP rep resentatives asked the city to take steps to end beach driving. They asked that the city erect temporary fenc ing at the end of Gulf Beach Drive, which runs to the beach past Two Als at the Beach Caf. The DEP is looking to us because we hold the lease, Hartman said. He said DEP represen tatives pointed out a sign posted on Gulf Beach Drive states that driving on the beach and dunes is illegal. Commissioners said in the past, Carrabelle did not enforce the beach driving ban because the beach was not within the city limits. Robin Hilton, a local re altor, said people ignored the sign because nobody enforced the law. She asked that a Carrabelle patrol car be sent to the beach periodi cally for enforcement. Carrabelle Police Chief Craig Kincaid said he was willing to dispatch an ofcer to the beach. Whenever we got calls in the past to go down there, we were told it was the coun tys jurisdiction. My two pre vious chiefs said it was the county. I have no problem with ticketing and towing cars but I have to have a mandate, Kincaid said. Im not for cars running down the beach because you could run over some body and kill them, Mayor Curley Messer said. I dont think we have any choice. If the state says its the law, you do it, said Commissioner Frank Mathes. Commissioner Olivia Massey said mullet sher men do not drive on the beach, but use an access road that runs behind the dunes. They have used that access road for 40 years, she said. Messer said he didnt want to stop people from shing. Im not real happy that the state is now looking to the city to enforce state laws, Commissioner Bren da La Paz said. We took assignment, Hartman said. Its our problem. He said if the city planned to continue with plans to de velop the beach with bath rooms and parking, DEP would expect them to cre ate a stormwater manage ment system. Massey said a stormwa ter system would cost thou sands of dollars to install. We dont have that money, said Mathes. La Paz asked if the city could return the lease to the state. We had nothing to do with this, she said. The city administrators and commissioners will bear the brunt. Hartman said Carra belle leased the land to im prove it and create a tourist attraction. Its the nicest beach anywhere on the bay. You can get the money to build a bathhouse and you will really have a drawing card, said developer Gene Langston. If you let the state take it, they will make it just like anyplace else, said Hilton. We have something unique here. Former city commis sioner Gathena Parmenas said the city should avoid further expense by return ing the beach to the state. Messer instructed Hart man to request the DEP send a representative to the next city meeting to discuss McKissack Beach before any further action is taken. Hartman said he be lieved most of the citys con cerns over the beach and enforcement of driving laws were nancial. I think a lot of good ideas were passed around at the meeting, he said. AT TE NT IO N CU RR EN T AN D FO RM ER WA TE RF RO NT PR OP ER TY OW NE RS: LA ST CH AN CE BP CL AI MS DE AD LI NE EX TE ND ED I f yo u ow ne d wa te rf ro nt pr op er ty al on g th e Gu lf Co as t be tw ee n Ap ri l 20 a nd De cem be r 31 20 10 yo u ma y be el ig ib le fo r th ou sa nds of do ll ar s in co mp en sa ti on th ro ug h th e BP se tt le me nt fund (a s lo ng as yo u ha ve no t al r ea dy si gn ed a re le as e wi th BP ), si mp ly fo r ow ning yo ur wa te rf ro nt pr op er ty du ri ng th at ti me a nd re ga r dl ess of whe th er yo u had va ca ti on re nt al s or no t. If yo u so ld wa te rf ro nt pr op er ty al on g th e Gu lf Co as t be tw ee n Ap ri l 20 an d De ce mb er 31 20 10 yo u ma y be el ig ib le fo r te ns of th ou sa nd s of dol l ar s in co mp en sa ti on th ro ug h th e BP se tt le me nt fund (a s lo ng as yo u ha ve no t al re ad y si gn ed a re le as e wi th BP ). If yo u en te re d in to a sa le s ag re em e nt to se ll yo ur wa te rf ro nt pr op er ty af te r Ap ri l 20 20 10 a nd cl os ed pri or to De ce mb er 31 20 10 yo u ma y be au to ma ti ca ll y en ti tl ed to co mpe ns at io n re ga rd le ss of wh et he r yo u can pr ove lo ss of va lu e to yo ur wa te rf ro nt pr op er ty or no t. Ou r pr oce ss fo r th is ty pe of cla im is si mp le an d we do ev er yth in g fo r yo u. Ou r 15 % fe e is du e on ly if we co ll ec t fr om BP an d yo u wi ll no t b e li ab le fo r an y co s ts or ex pen se s in ad di ti on to th e fe e. If we fa il to co ll ec t fr om BP yo u wi ll no t ow e us an y co st s, ex pe nse s or fe es Ca ll us or em ai l us no w wi th yo ur wa te rf ro nt ph ys ic al ad d r es s an d we wi ll ch ec k yo ur wa te rf ro nt pr op er ty s el ig ib ili ty on ou r in te ra ct iv e ma p fo r po te nt ia l lo ss of us e an d or sa le s lo ss co mp en sa ti on Pl eas e no te th at th e de ad li ne to le BP c l ai m s ha s be en ex te nd ed Th e de ad li ne is 18 0 da ys fr om yo ur rs t pa ym en t un de r th e DW H Se tt le me nt (i f ap pl ic ab le ), or 18 0 da ys af te r th e se tt le me nt is na li ze d (t he se tt le me nt ha s no t ye t b ee n na liz ed du e to BP 's ap pe al s) wh ic he ve r ev en t oc cur s rs t. La w Of ce Ja me s Do rg an P. C. Fa ir ho pe Al ab ama 25 192 801 92 Ja me sR Do rg an @g ma il .c om No re pr es en ta ti on is ma de th at th e qu al it y of th e le g al se rv ic es to be pe rf or me d is gr ea te r th an th e qu al it y of le ga l se rv ic es to be pe rf or me d by ot he r at to rn ey s. Brick pavers have been falling from the memorial wall in Carrabelle. Waterfront Partnership to fund park repairs By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m At their June 5 meeting, Carrabelles commis sioners discussed problems with Veterans Park. Commissioner Brenda La Paz said she was con tacted by Rod Gasche about repairs needed in the memorial adjacent to US 98. Gasche said the paint on the statue of an Ameri can ag is peeling. The fountain located at the west end of the park is not running. The statues of ser vicemen are in need of cleaning and brick pavers baring the names of servicemen are falling from a brick wall. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the falling tiles would need to be relocated. She said she contacted the company that manufactures the pavers said they couldnt be attached to a vertical brick surface. Mayor Curley Messer said the city has attempted to x the fountain but cannot keep it working. La Paz suggested the fountain be converted to a planter. She said she believed the Carrabelle Water front Partnership had several thousand dollars in an account dedicated to maintaining the park. Commissioners asked partnership President Ta mara Allen to investigate what repairs to the park could be made with the available money. Date of county meeting changed At their June 5 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to move the Tuesday, June 17 meeting to Monday, June 16. This will allow commissioners to attend the legislatures mandated ethics training. The meeting will be at 9 a.m. in the commission meeting room in the Annex Building at 34 Forbes Street in Apalachicola. Digital Kids next week at Gulf/Franklin Digital Kids, an exciting class for young students to learn the skills they need to be successful in todays increasingly digital world, will be offered at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College on Thursday, June 19 from 9 a.m. until noon. Geared for students age 7-10, the class will provide students with the opportunity to learn keyboarding skills and computer skills through a variety of fun, hands-on activities. The cost for the class is $29 per student. You may register for the class on line at www.gulfcoast. edu/corpcollege/registratio n or by visiting the Gulf/Franklin Campus at 3800 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe. If you have questions or need additional information, please call the Gulf/Franklin Campus at 227-9670. Bear-proof dumpster for Seventh Street On June 5, Carrabelle city commissioners voted LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Carrabelle to discuss McKissack Beach with DEP LOIS SWOBODA | The Times News BRIEFS See BRIEFS A14 F LO R IDA ME MO RY PR O JECT McKissack Beach circa 1930

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The Times | A3 Thursday, June 12, 2014 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 3 Glenda J. Martina, 22, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 4 Willie E. Pelt, 32, Port St. Joe, possession of listed chemicals, and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Scott W. Burkett, 49, Port St. Joe, possession of listed chemicals, and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) JUNE 5 Christopher J. Thomas, 37, Panacea, burglary of a dwelling and grand theft (FCSO) Daniel Hicks, 33, Apalachicola, petit theft (FCSO) Bobbie L. Carrin, 49, Apalachicola, Pasco County violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 6 Buddy R. Richards, 20, Eastpoint, possession of cannabis, failure to appear and violation of probation (FCSO) Kimberly D. Harrington, 47, Lanark Village, resisting ofcer without violence, corruption by threats against public servant, felony eeing or attempting to elude and reckless driving (CPD) Leonard D. Martin, 52, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 7 Justin M. Pool, 34, Port St. Joe, criminal mischief and battery (FCSO) Phillip S. Creamer, 38, Apalachicola, violation of probation, failure to appear and sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Buddy K. Wood, 37, Port St. Joe, possession of cannabis (FCSO) Raymond E. Mullis, 56, St. George Island, DUI and driving while license revoked habitual (FCSO) JUNE 8 Robert M. Schmidt, 46, Carrabelle, Gulf County warrant (FCSO) Jimmy H. Topham, 33, Eastpoint, petit theft (FCSO) Carrie Tipton, 30, Eastpoint, petit theft (FCSO) Marvin B. Campbell, 54, Apalachicola, possession of cannabis, possession of burglary tools with intent, burglary of a conveyance and violation of a domestic violence injunction (APD) Molly Hampton, 62, Carrabelle, resisting ofcer without violence, and giving false name or identication to an ofcer (CPD) JUNE 9 Steve A. Jones, Jr., 23, Apalachicola, trespass after warning, and burglary of an occupied dwelling (APD) Dakota D. Crum, 18, Carrabelle, grand theft of a motor vehicle, reckless driving and leaving the scene of a crash with damage (FCSO) WA TER SA FE TY IN VE ST IG AT IO N AT TE NTI ON : Ap al ac hic ol a Wa te r Cu st om er s In Ma y 20 13 th e Ci ty of Ap al achi co la Wat er Sy st em no ti ed re sid en ts th at th eir wa te r fa il ed to me et st an d ar ds se t by th e Fl or ida De pa rt me nt o f En vi ro nm en ta l Pro te ct io n an d th e EP A. Du ri ng rou t in e sa fet y te st in g, th e Ci ty of Ap al ach ic ol a fo un d le ve ls of t ri halome tha ne s (T HM s) mor e tha n 50% higher tha n esta bl is he d ma xi mu m co nt ami na nt le ve ls fo r dr in ki ng wa te r. TH Ms ca n al so be in ha le d an d ab so rb ed th ro ug h th e sk in Re se ar che rs di sc ove re d th at bloo d co nc en tr ati on s of TH Ms ro se 5to 15 -f ol d fol lo wi ng su ch ro ut in e ac ti vi ti es as sh ow er in g, ba thi ng an d ha nd wa sh in g. Of te n fo un d in in du st ri al so lv en ts an d re fr iger an ts TH Ms ar e co ns id er ed ca rc in og enic an d ha ve bee n li nk ed to nu me rou s li fe th re at eni ng he al th ef fec ts : Li ve r or Ki dn ey Fa il ur e Li ve r or Ki dn ey Ca nc er Co lo n or Re ct al Ca nc er Bl ad de r Ca nc er Ad ve rs e Pr eg na nc y Ou tc ome s Se ri ou s Ce nt ra l Ner vo us Sy st em Da mage If yo u or a lo ve d one ha s re ce iv ed su ch a di ag nos is or a fa mil y me mb er ha s die d fr om one of the se co nd it io ns an d if yo ur wa te r is pr ov id ed by the Ci ty of Ap al ac h ic ol a, pl eas e co nt ac t ou r r m fo r a fr ee co ns ul ta tion PA NAMA CI TY 180 080 085 39 wa lb or sk y. co m So ur ce s: U. S. En viro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on Ag en cy Sa fe Dr ink in g Wa te r Inf or mat ion Sy st em (S DW IS ) Vi olat io n Re por t, Ci ty of Ap alachic ola re por t cr ea te d 4/2 2/ 20 14 ba se d on data ex tr ac te d on 2/ 10 /2 01 4; Na ti ona l In st it ut es of He alt h, T ap Wa te r an d Tr ih al omet ha ne s: Fl ow of Conce rn s Con tin ue s, En viro nm en ta l He al th Pe rs pe ct iv es July 20 05 11 3( 7) : A4 74 ; T ri ha lomet ha ne s in Dr ink in gwa te r, WH O Gu ide lin es fo r Dr ink in gwa te r Qu al it y, WH O/ SD E/ WS H/ 03 .0 4/ 64 BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0 + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 Arrest REPOR T Its time for another election and, once again, some Franklin County citizens are taking the low road. Political signs relating to the upcoming county commission election have been stolen or vandalized in eastern Franklin County, in and around Lanark Village. Under Florida Statute 806.13, the placement of grafti and other acts of vandalism are considered criminal mischief, a second degree misdemeanor if the damage to such property is $200 or less. If the damage is greater than $200 but less than $1,000, it is a misdemeanor of the rst degree. If the damage is $1,000 or greater, it is a felony of the third degree. When the violation is related to placement of grafti, there is an additional ne of not less than $250 for a rst conviction; not less than $500 for a second conviction; and not less than $1,000 for a third or subsequent conviction. In addition, the perpetrator may be required to perform at least 40 hours of community service and, if possible, perform at least 100 hours of community service that involves the removal of grafti. If a minor commits a delinquent act, the parent or legal guardian is liable along with the minor for payment of the ne. If a minor is found to have placed grafti on any public property or private property, their drivers license can be revoked for not more than one year. Bill Snyder, a candidate for the Republican nomination for county commissioner in District 2, said vandals have cost him around $600. He spent much of the day June 5 cleaning the billboard shown above. Theyll come back and do it again tonight, he said. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott said complaints related to vandalism should be directed to the states attorneys ofce. People pay money for that (election materials), and people shouldnt go out and vandalize other candidates, she said. I know when I ran mine were vandalized bad and that was in 2008, all over the county. VANDALISM ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL S PECIAL TO THE T IMES An eight by 24-foot sign in Lanark Village has been vandalized several times. Law Enforcement

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 12, 2014 A Section Your cheatin heart will make you weep Your Cheatin Heart by Hank Williams Donald Sterling has now reneged on his agreement to sell the Los Angeles Clippers. Perhaps he changed course when he saw his impending tax bill. Im not a basketball fan, but when I heard that a professional basketball team was selling for $2 billion, I wondered how much the seller would actually clear after taxes. Astute advisors consider similar situations daily on behalf of their clients. How much will the client clear if a holding is liquidated? Or, how much will a client take home if he sells his business? After all, its not what you gross; its what you make after you settle with Uncle Sam that actually matters. Employing investment strategies that neglect a clients tax considerations can be detrimental to the clients nances. I read recently about a client who changed nancial advisors. The new advisor perused the clients portfolio, saw heavy allocations in one particular dividendpaying utility stock and immediately sold the majority of the security. Turns out the client had held the stock for several decades and had originally purchased it at a rock-bottom price. Because the stock had grown signi cantly in value, the capital gains taxes were exceptionally burdensome. Back to basketball. Mr. Sterling was reportedly selling the L.A. Clippers to former Microsoft Chief Steve Ballmer for $2 billion. Sterling bought the team in 1981 for $12.5 million, so the franchise has increased in value by $1.98 billion. Assuming no additions to his cost basis, Sterling would likely pay a 20 percent capital gains rate on this $1.98 billion, or just under $400 million. If the team is determined to be a non-passive asset, the Sterlings may have avoided the 3.8 percent Medicare surtax on net investment income. Whew. But Sterling isnt selling the Miami Heat, a team located in a state with no income taxes. The controversial sale is in California, which just raised its maximum state tax rate to 13.3 percent. Thats more than $260 million more owed in state taxes. Now weve got a tax liability of $660 million. Taxes are simply part of the equation, in business sales and investing. If youre considering working with a new investment advisor, ask him what kind of tax analysis will be performed on your holdings prior to the commencement of trading in your accounts. No need to shed tears for Mr. Sterling if the sale indeed goes through. His franchise ownership produced roughly a 16,000 percent return over a period of 33 years on his original investment. Thats an annualized rate of around 17 percent. This rate of return is surpassed, though, by potential new owner Steve Ballmer, whose original investment in Microsoft has earned him over 55,000 percent over the last 28 years. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC (6086121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. I not long ago returned from the University of Florida, where I attended workshops on promoting sustainability in our county extension of ces and beyond. I was highly impressed with the steps UF has gone through to reduce waste and increase recycling. Whether you are a Gator or Seminole fan, you should be impressed to learn that UFs main campus in Gainesville has achieved a waste recovery rate of nearly 35 percent and recycles over 5,500 tons of materials annually. They have adopted a different four Rs than I am familiar; they work to Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Re-buy. They also stressed that all of us the need not only to recycle but to think about how we can lower our consumption of disposal goods, reuse or share items and purchase items with recycled content. Everyone was encouraged to identify waste streams and institute reduction/recycling efforts as appropriate to our own of ce and our home. Lets review several ideas to do so. Several months ago I encouraged people to request removal from mailing lists for any unwanted hard copy catalogs, newsletters, magazines and junk mail. I will once again do so by encouraging you to utilizing this website: http://directmail. com/directory/mail_preference/ Default.aspx. You can also use your cell phone and a program called PaperKarma (www.paperkarma. com) to take a photo of the mailing label of the unwanted mailing, and they will contact the company directly to remove you from that speci c mailing list. I would highly encourage that in all of ces and homes, print in color only when absolutely necessary. Be certain that your computers printer default setting is set to print in black and white. In addition, print double-sided. Think of the number of sheets you would eliminate. Use scrap paper for drafts, and reuse envelopes to circulate internal communication at both of ce and home. This provides you with your living sustainably assignments for June. Small steps can result in great savings. Shelley Swenson is the UF/IFAS Franklin/Wakulla extension agent for food and consumer services. Past crimes do not justify alleged killing This letter is in response to the article I read in the Apalachicola Times newspaper dated May 15, 2014, headlined Sexual predator killed during argument. First, according to the investigative report prepared by of cials at the Franklin County Sheriffs Department, Norman Bill Williams death is allegedly related to a person who struck him from behind with an ax handle below his left ear while he was arguing with another person who accused him of inappropriately touching a woman at his home. Speci cally, according to said investigative report, Norman Bill Williams death had nothing to do with him being a convicted sexual predator or habitual criminal in the past. So, morally, I dont feel that Williams death should have been portrayed in the manner which it was publicized in Franklin County. Also, I dont understand why of cials from the local states attorneys of ce are not pursuing possible criminal charges for an accessory after the fact to the alleged crime against the alleged witnesses who allowed Williams to lie unconscious for 30 minutes before someone at the home where the alleged incident occurred decided to call 911 for assistance. Lastly, Norman Bill Williams past criminal history should not be held against him by anyone to justify his alleged killing. Sincerely, Michael Wade Bar eld Blountstown Air Force offered alternative site for GRASI Following up to the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative public hearings held in Carrabelle and Apalachicola on June 3-4, I wanted to be sure the general public is aware that a reasonable alternative site was presented to the Air Force other than Tates Hell State Forest or Blackwater River State Forest. The site consists of approximately 90,000 acres of privately held land located primarily in Calhoun and adjacent counties, which has been used since 1999 for Special Operations Training. The original environment impact study was approved in 2002 and reapproved in 2011 for military operations. While these military exercises would be located outside of Franklin County (primarily Calhoun County), the project would be managed by our Gulf Unmanned Systems Center of ce in Carrabelle. Calhoun County and adjacent counties personnel would be employed to facilitate the training missions. I can be reached at GUSC in Carrabelle at 720-1500 or at our of ce in Carrabelle, 206 U.S. 98. Sincerely, Bruce McCormack President, Gulf Unmanned Systems Center Timely, managed trash receptacles needed Its a shameful disgrace. While walking this Saturday, my wife and I passed by the city dock at 10 Foot Hole. What we witnessed was disgraceful: garbage strewn all around the one insuf cient receptacle beside the boat launch. It was a truly sad, reprehensible sight. Seeing some of the mess was about to get into the water, including an empty antifreeze can, I went home, got big trash bags and gathered up the mess myself. If trash receptacles are going to be provided, they need to be managed and serviced on a timely basis; that isnt happening. I assume Mayor Johnson would be aware of this situation since I see him riding around the area in his golf cart. I realize this condition is only symptomatic of a portion of the citizenry that has little regard for the appearance of our community and less regard for the health of the bay. However, if the mayor and council will take decisive, actionable steps to address this matter, maybe the beauty of our city will be preserved; but, it will take leadership. Thank you, Lacey Robinson Apalachicola Hank Williams, Donald Sterling and capital gains pain MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Rural counties bene t in state budget Special to The Times The Florida Legislature adjourned sine die on May 2, concluding its normal business and passing a balanced state budget. On June 2, Gov. Rick Scott signed the largest budget in Florida history, which contained signi cant education funding and investments in infrastructure and included $400 million in vehicle tag registration fee roll back. In House District 7, we were able to secure funding for numerous water, infrastructure and education projects while also protecting or increasing funding for scally constrained counties and our Rural Areas of Critical Economic Concern. State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, and State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, working together brought home $134 million for their district. District 7 covers all of Calhoun, Franklin, Gulf, Jefferson, Lafayette, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, and Wakulla counties, and parts of Leon County. I am very proud of the state dollars we were able to keep here in North Florida, Beshears said. Certainly, it can be challenging to advocate scally conservative ideals while also representing so many scally constrained rural counties. However, these infrastructure and education projects are critical, and I believe our state government should invest in these areas. I sincerely believe its my responsibility to represent all of the residents in House District 7, to remain cognizant of every dollar spent and to ensure we do not waste citizens hard earned dollars. Of particular interest to Franklin County were the following projects: $16,950 for the Dixie Theatre Foundation Inc.; $25,000 each to the City of Apalachicola and Franklins Promise Coalition Inc.; $50,000 each to Vrooman Park, the historical rehabilitation of Carrabelle Old City Hall and the re-roo ng of Chapman Auditorium; $350,000 to the rehabilitation of Fort Coombs Armory; $497,000 to the City of Apalachicola for work on the Chapman School Building; $404,342 for the School Readiness Program; $127,539 for the Voluntary pre-kindergarten program; $73,155 for Workforce Development; and $8 million for oyster shelling, best management practices, research and upgrades to oyster processing facilities. I will continue to do all I can to help House District 7 and protect our way of life here, Beshears said. I am honored and proud to represent Franklin County. Thank you for the privilege of allowing me to represent you. If you have any questions or concerns on the budget, email Beshears at Halsey.beshears@ my oridahouse.gov. HALSEY BESHEARS R-Monticello Waste reduction: A universitys perspective Letters to the EDITOR Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. Share Your OPINIONS Page A4 SHELLEY SWENSON

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 12, 2014 An antique metal cauldron was discovered in the mud at Alligator Harbor by Gail Heuring is currently on display outside of the Carrabelle History Museum. Museum Director Tamara Allen thought it was a cauldron used to concentrate salt by evaporating seawater. Last week, Chasing Shadows asked readers for information, and we got a reply from historian Joshua Goodman at the State Archives of Florida. We are grateful to Mr. Goodman for answering our question. Several of us here at the State Library and Archives were very intrigued by your recent story in the Apalachicola Times about the suspected saltmaking vessel from Alligator Point, and wed like to contribute, Goodman wrote. First off the object is almost certainly a salt kettle. If the rust were to be removed, it would look almost identical to a kettle on display at the state museum in Cedar Key farther on down the coast. Weve put our heads together and come up with several resources to assist Tamara Allen at the Carrabelle History Museum with learning more about saltmaking along Floridas coast. Goodman said an old standby concerning salt making during the Civil War in Florida is Ella Lonns 1932 article from the Florida Historical Quarterly, The Extent and Importance of Federal Naval Raids on Salt-Making in Florida, 1862-1865. The article is free through the Publication of Archival Library & Museum Materials. Visit http://palmm. fcla.edu/. Another paper on the subject, including the latest major research, can be found in Robert Taylors Rebel Storehouse: Florida in the Confederate Economy. Goodman took the liberty of checking the Franklin County Public Librarys catalog and said they didnt appear to have it. The Inter-library Loan service can get it, and the State Library has a circulating copy in Tallahassee. Florida Memory, the digital arm of the State Archives, has several good resources available, including a history of Civil War salt making written as part of the Federal Writers Project in Florida during the Great Depression. Visit oridamemory.com and run a search for salt making or salt works to see what else is available in the way of images and other documents. Goodman sent us a map drawn by Col. George Washington Scott during the Civil War depicting the Big Bend area, one of several from the collection of Col. Scott at the State Archives. Scott indicates the location of salt works throughout the region, including near Alligator Point, Goodman said. While he does not place any markings right on the point where the kettle was found, that should come as no surprise. These maps were approximate at best, and salt works were often moved from time to time to escape harassment by the ships of the Union blockade. FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT In 1961, the Florida Foxhunters Association had its 35th annual dog show on St. James Island. This photo of a man representing the Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce at the meeting appeared in the Tallahassee Democrat. Do you recognize him? If so, please call the Times at 653-8868 or email Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star .com. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times This antique metal cauldron was discovered in the mud at Alligator Harbor. FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT Drawn by Col. George Washington Scott during the Civil War, this map indicates the location of salt works throughout the Big Bend region, including near Alligator Point. Kettle is evidence of salt making along coast WHO WELCOMED THE FOXHUNTERS?

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 AB ER CR OM BI E BO AT RA MP IM PR OV EM EN TS PR OJ EC T # 00 7. 09 7 NO TI CE TO RE CE IVE SE AL ED BI DS Th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Bo a rd of Co un ty Com mi ss ione rs wi ll re cei ve se al ed bids fr om an y qu al ie d pe rs on co mpa ny or corp o ra ti on int er es te d in co nst ru ct in g: AB ER CR OM BI E BO AT RA MP IM PR OV EM EN TS Pr oj ec t is lo ca te d at th e Ab er cr ombie Bo at Ra mp at th e en d of Bl uf f Roa d in Fr an kl in Co un ty Fl orid a an d co nsi st s of co ns tr uc ti ng ap pr ox im at el y 34 0 SF of 4 wi de ti mbe r bo ar dw al k an d ap pr ox im at ely 80 0 SF of 8 wid e oat in g do c k. Pl an s an d sp ec ic at ion s can be ob tai ne d at Pr eb le -R ish In c. 32 4 Ma ri na Dr iv e, Po rt St Jo e, Fl orid a 32 45 6, (8 50) 22 772 00 Co st fo r Pl ans an d Spe ci ca ti ons wi ll be $5 0.0 0 pe r se t an d is no n-r efun da bl e. Che ck s sh oul d be ma de pa ya bl e to PR EB LE -R IS H, IN C. Th e bid mu st co nf or m to Se ct ion 28 7. 13 3( 3) Fl orid a Sta tu te s, on pu bl ic en ti ty cri me s. Com pl et io n dat e fo r th is pr oje ct wi ll be 45 da ys fr om th e dat e of th e No ti ce to Pr oce ed pr es en te d to th e su cce ss fu l bi dde r. Li qui da te d da ma ge s fo r fa il ur e to co mplet e th e pr oj ec t on th e spe cie d dat e wi ll be se t at $5 00 .0 0 pe r da y. Pl eas e in di ca te on th e en ve lo pe th at thi s is a seal ed bid fo r A be rc ro mbi e Bo at Ra m p Im pr ov em en ts . Bids wi ll be re cei ve d un til 4: 00 p. m. (e as te rn ), on Monda y, Ju ne 30 20 14 at th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Cle rk 's Of c e, Fr an kl in Co un ty Co ur th ou se 33 Ma rk et St re et, Su it e 20 3, Ap al achic ola Fl or id a 32 32 023 17 an d wi ll be op en ed an d re ad al ou d on Jul y 1, 20 14 at th e Co un ty Co mm is si on me et in g, wh ich be gin s at 9: 00 a. m. at 34 Fo rb es St re et Ap al ac hic ol a, FL Th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mm is si one rs re se rv es th e ri gh t to wa iv e inf or mal it ie s in an y bid to ac cep t an d/ or re je ct an y or a ll bi d s, an d to ac cep t th e bid th at in th ei r ju dg me nt wi ll be in th e be st int er es t of Fr an kl in Co un ty Al l bid s sh al l re ma in rm fo r a pe ri od of six ty da ys af te r th e op en in g. Al l bidde rs sh al l com pl y wit h al l app li cab le Sta te an d lo cal la ws co nc ern in g li ce ns in g re gi st ra ti on an d re gu lat ion of co ntr ac to rs doi ng b usi ne ss to th e Sta te of Fl or id a. If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s, ple as e cal l Cl ay Smal lw ood at (8 50) 22 772 00 Coupon Expir es: 6-30-14 CODE: AP00 12 percentage points, from 64 to 76 percent of the 34 ABC Schoolers. Seventh-grade math students did phenomenal with 93 percent procient, said ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson. Karen Ward worked diligently with her students during class, her planning time and after school to help her students reach their full potential. We again had 100 percent of Mrs. Copelands students pass the End of Course Algebra I Exam for high school credit. Tanya Joanos had 73 percent of her seventh-grade students pass the new Civics End of Course Exam. Another strong spot at ABC was eighth-grade sci ence, where Mrs. Keel has increased the percentage of grade level or better pro ciency over the past three years to 71 percent this year, 19 percentage points bet ter than in 2012. She also teaches our seventh-grade science and lays a great foundation, Johnson said. In contrast, just one-third of the 41 Franklin County eighth-graders were at grade level or better in sci ence, down nine percentage points from last year. However, among the 52 Franklin County fth-grad ers, the percentage at grade level or better increased to 60 percent, from 53 percent last year. This was ahead of the results among the 40 ABC School fth-graders, who had just 53 percent at grade level or better, down 12 percentage points from last year. A look at the overall data from both schools shows Franklin County made im provements from 2013 on four of the seven assessment areas. Grades 9-10 went up 15 percentage points in reading, while grades 3-5 in creased by ve percentage points in reading and six percentage points in math. Our teachers and stu dents have a lot to be proud of as nal assessment re sults were released today, Superintendent Nina Marks said. The application of new approaches in the class room, professional develop ment put to good use, cur riculum changes and grade level/subject area collegial support helped to move us forward. Our students are learning and these results verify such. I am very proud of the results. Well done. Look ing toward next year, we will continue to study and address our weaknesses. Soaring to new heights in all areas of our education system will be the goal. Johnson was equally pleased with the ABC Schools results. Data showed that with the ex ception of fth-grade math, in which just 48 percent of students are at grade level of better, about two-thirds of students in each grade are performing satisfactorily in reading and math. We did have two new teachers to fth grade who were teaching from Com mon Core math curriculum and merging the Next Gen eration Science Standards as well, trying to lay the foundation for new Florida Standards and still cover ing the NGSS too, John son said. Also, we saw the greatest change in student population in fth grade. In almost every subject and grade level, our per centage of prociency was above state average. I am very proud of our assess ment results. Our teach ers and students worked extremely hard this year. Every year, our teachers as sess students, analyze the data and plan differentiated instruction that will meet the needs of their students. Our teachers provided addi tional intervention to those students who required more practice. Parents also supported after-school tutoring allowing students to work with teachers to master critical reading and math skills. Johnson noted that sta tistics vary every year at each grade depending on the change in student popu lation. We have seen good learning gains from our stu dents not yet procient and those on grade level showed growth or maintained their level of prociency. This team of teachers and paraprofessionals did an excellent job from el ementary to middle school laying strong foundational skills that resulted in stu dent learning growth and gains at every grade level. I am so proud of the staff and students for what they have accomplished this year. number of commenters disagreed, many expressing concern over noise pollution. Jim Cummins of Alligator Point spoke at the Carrabelle meeting. Cummins is a retired board-certied engineer in noise engineering with 45 years of experience in environmental acoustics and industrial noise control. He said he was puzzled by the way sound pollution was measured in the EIS and said the techniques used were inappropriate. He said the EIS assumes normal sound levels in the forest are too high. Understand that the forest is very quiet, he said. While wind can cause (an increase in noise), we typically perceive these sounds as soothing. The sound of a gunshot is akin to being hit over the head with a mallet. He said abrupt sounds like explosions travel a longer distance than steady noise of the same intensity. Cummins said the amount of noise pro duced by aircraft ying below 1,000 feet is above the prescribed OSHA (Occupation al Safety and Health Administration) limit for hearing loss. Soldiers exposed to these levels will have permanent hearing loss without ever being in combat. Cummins said even the noise from air craft operating at 10,000 feet exceeds the EPA limit for acceptable sound levels in a community. In most cases, the proposed use is inappropriate to the area and will cause damage to the area and annoyance to the community, he said. Sound pollution a big concernSound pollution was also a concern for environmental guide Serge LaTour. He brought a video to Carrabelles meeting showing the effect of a yover by two heli copters on Tates Hell wildlife. He was not allowed to present it in the meeting but was able to set up a demon stration in another room. The scene is peaceful with ambient noise from birds and insects. When the aircraft pass over head, the sound is deafening. After the air craft, the forest is completely silent. When communication shuts down, life in the swamp shuts down, LaTour said. The disturbance after that simple yover lasted hours. We all assumed you wouldnt be doing anything during hunting season. Theres not going to be anything left there to hunt after you guys nish. Betty Cummins of Alligator Point said the temporary placement of razor wire along roads would endanger free-ranging animals such as bears and deer. She wor ried that animals, spooked by loud noise and unusual activity in the swamp, might become entangled in the wire. LaTour also expressed concern about frightened animals leaving the area. Where are the bears going to go? he asked. We already have a problem with nuisance bears. The bears (eeing from the military exercises) will be displaced, scared, angry and disoriented. Theyre go ing to be in the streets. Mark Nobles, manager of Carrabelles Thompson eld, said because of a lack of radar coverage and limitations on com munications, he did not believe existing civilian air trafc could safely share the air space over Tates Hell with the proposed military air trafc ying at speeds of 250 to 600 mph. Our objection to your planned usage is not in any measure a reection of our pa triotism, he said. I proudly served in the U.S. Marine Corps and have the utmost re spect for our young men and women who serve our country today. It is also in con cern for their safety during these training exercises that I point out major decien cies in your plan. Nobles also worried about the econom ic impact on the county. Tates Hell State Forest is one of the largest employers in the county, providing income for families that would otherwise be suffering, he said. A surprise speaker in Carrabelle was Sue Early, who said she lives on the Wakul la side of the Ochlocknee River. She said Wakulla residents adjacent to the state for est were not notied of the meeting. I respectfully request that a workshop be held in Wakulla County, Early said. One of the last speakers in Apalachic ola was Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, who has staunchly opposed the military exercises since they were rst proposed. If Franklin County and its residents had been contacted (when the use of Tates Hell was rst discussed), we would have told you how we felt, and you could have saved a lot of time and money, she said. We supported the sale of that land to the state knowing that it took it off the tax rolls. We have something we value very much here. God has made us stewards. Ive worked mighty hard to keep this a rural area and make sure everybody re alizes what we have. I dont want to see it messed up, because once its messed up, you cant get it back. Leave Tates Hell alone. We dont want you here except to visit. To comment about GRASI, go to grasie is.leidoseemg.com by June 23. FCAT from page A1 DISTRICT-WIDE GROWTH The following chart shows the changes in the percentage of students at Level 3 or better throughout the Franklin County Schools. Grade 2011 2012 2013 2014 4 56 59 57 61 5 60 44 52 57 6 56 60 52 54 7 46 57 56 50 8 40 49 51 54 9 36 38 46 54 10 30 38 25 51 GRASI from page A1

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, June 12, 2014 We ar e pl ea se d to pr es en t to yo u th is ye ar 's An nu al Wa te r Qu al it y Rep or t. i s re po rt is de sig ne d to in for m yo u ab ou t th e qu al it y wa te r an d se rv ic es we de li ve r to yo u ev er y da y. Ou r co ns ta nt go al is to pr ov ide yo u wi th a sa fe an d depe nd ab le suppl y of dr in ki ng wa te r. We wa nt yo u to un de rs ta nd th e e or ts we ma ke to co nt in ua l ly im pr ov e th e wa te r tr ea tm en t pr oc es s an d pr ot ec t ou r wa te r re so ur ces We ar e co mmi tt ed to ens ur ing th e qu al it y of yo ur dr in ki ng wa te r. Ou r wa te r so ur ce is gr ou nd wa te r fr om s ix we l ls dr aw n fr om t he Flo ri da n Aq ui fe r. Be ca use of th e ex ce lle nt qu al it y of ou r wa te r, th e on ly tr ea tm en ts re qu ir ed ar e ch lo ri ne for di si nfe ct io n pu rp os es an d Aq ua Go ld wh ic h is a po ly ph osp ha te co mp ou nd in je ct ed as a se qu es te ri ng ag en t th at ne ut ra li ze s sc al e an d co rr os io n. In 2013 th e De pa rt me nt of En vi ro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on pe rf or me d a So ur ce Wa te r Ass es sm en t on ou r sy ste m an d a se ar ch o f th e da ta so ur ce s in di ca te d no po te nt ia l so ur ces of co nt ami na ti on ne ar ou r we ll s. e as se ssm en t re su lt s ar e av ai la bl e on t he FD EP So ur ce Wa te r Ass ess me nt an d Pr ot ec ti on Pr og ra m we bs it e at www .d ep .s ta te ..u s/s wa pp If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s ab ou t th is re po rt or co nce rn ing yo ur wa te r ut il it y, pl ea se co nt ac t Al li ga tor Po in t Wa te r Re so ur ce Dis tr ic t (APWRD), Sa ra Tu rn er at (850) 349-2274. We en co ur ag e ou r va lu ed cu stom er s to be in for me d ab ou t th ei r wa te r ut il it y. If yo u wa nt to le ar n mo re pl ea se at te nd an y of ou r re gu la rl y sc he du le d me e ti ng s. e y ar e he ld mo nt hl y on t he th ir d Sa tu rd ay of eac h mo nt h at 9:00 a.m., at th e APWRD O ce 1378 Al li ga tor Dr iv e. Al li ga tor Po in t ro ut i ne ly mo ni tor s for co nt ami na nt s in yo ur dr in ki ng wa te r acco rd ing to Fe de ra l an d St at e la ws, ru le s, an d re gu la ti on s. Ex ce pt wh er e in di ca te d ot he rw ise th is re po rt is ba se d on t he re su lt s of o ur mo ni tor ing for th e pe ri od of Ja nu ar y 1 to De ce mb er 31, 2013. Da ta ob ta in ed be for e Ja nu ar y 1, 2013, an d pr es en te d in th is re po rt ar e fr om th e mo st re ce nt te st in g do ne in acco rd an ce wi th th e la ws, ru le s, an d re gu la ti on s. In th e ta bl e be lo w, yo u ma y n d un fa mi li ar te rm s an d ab br ev ia ti on s. To he lp yo u be tt er un de rs ta nd th es e te rm s we ha ve pr ov ide d th e fol lo wi ng de n it io ns : Ac ti on Le ve l (AL): e co nce nt ra ti on of a co nt ami na nt wh ic h, if ex ce e de d, tr ig ger s tr ea tm en t or ot he r re qu ir em en ts th at a wa te r sy ste m mu st fol lo w. In it ia l Dis tr ib ut io n Sy ste m Ev al ua ti on (IDS E): An im po rt an t pa rt of th e St ag e 2 Dis in fe ct io n By -P ro du ct s Ru le (D BP R). e IDS E is a on e-t im e st ud y co nd uc te d by wa te r sy ste ms to ide nt if y di st ri bu t io n sy ste m loc at io ns wi th hi gh co nce nt ra ti on s of tr ih al o met ha nes (T HMs) an d ha loa cet ic ac id s (H AA s). Wa te r sy ste ms wi ll us e re su lt s fr om th e IDS E, in co nj un ct io n wi th th ei r St ag e 1 DB PR co mp li an ce mo ni tor ing da ta to se le ct co mp li an ce mo ni tor ing loc at io ns for t he St ag e 2 DB PR Lo ca ti on al Ru nni ng An nu al Av er ag e (LR AA): th e av er ag e of sa mp le an al yt ic al re su lt s for sa mp le s tak en at a pa rt ic ul ar mo ni tor ing loc at io n dur ing th e pr ev io us fou r ca le nd ar q ua rt er s. Ma xi mu m Co nt ami na nt Le ve l or MC L: e hi gh es t le ve l of a co nt ami na nt th at is al lo we d in dr in ki ng wa te r. MC Ls ar e se t as cl os e to t he MC LG s as fe as ib le us ing th e be st av ai la bl e tr ea tm en t te ch no lo gy Ma xi mu m Co nt ami na nt Le ve l Go al or MC LG : e le ve l of a co nt ami na nt in dr in ki ng wa te r be lo w wh ic h th er e is no kn ow n or exp ec te d ri sk to he al th MC LG s al lo w for a ma rg in of sa fe ty Ma xi mu m Re si du al Dis in fe ct an t Le ve l or MRD L: e hi gh es t le ve l of a di si nfe ct an t al lo we d in dr in ki ng wa te r. e re is co nv in ci ng ev ide nce th at ad dit io n of a di si nfe ct an t is neces sa ry for co nt ro l of mi cr ob ia l co nt ami na nt s. Ma xi mu m Re si du al Dis in fe ct an t Le ve l Go al or MRD LG : e le ve l of a dr in ki ng wa te r di si nfe ct an t be lo w wh ic h th er e is no kn ow n or exp ec te d ri sk to he al th MRD LG s do no t re e ct th e be ne t s of th e use of di si nfe ct an ts to co nt ro l mi cr ob ia l co nt ami na nt s. No n-A ppl ic ab le (N/A): Do es n ot ap pl y No n-D et ec t (ND): me an s no t de te ct ed an d in di ca te s th at th e su bs ta nce wa s no t fou nd by la bo ra tor y an al ys is Pa rt s pe r mi ll io n (p pm ) or Mi ll ig ra ms pe r lit er (m g/l): on e pa rt by we ig ht of an al yt e to 1 mi ll io n pa rt s by we ig ht of th e wa te r sa mp le Pa rt s pe r bi ll io n (p pb ) or Mi cr og ra ms pe r lit er (g/l): on e pa rt by we ig ht of an al yt e to 1 bi ll io n pa rt s by we ig ht of th e wa te r sa mp le P ic oc ur ie pe r lit er (pC i/L): me as ur e of th e ra di oa ct iv it y in wa te r. If pr es en t, el ev at ed le ve ls of le ad ca n ca use se ri ou s he al th pr ob le ms, esp ec ia ll y for pr eg na nt wo me n an d yo ung c hi ld re n. Le ad in dr in ki ng wa te r is pr im ar il y fr om ma te ri al s an d co mp on en ts as so ci at ed wi th se rv ic e lin es an d ho me pl um bi ng APWRD is re sp on si bl e for pr ov id ing hi gh qu al it y dr in ki ng wa te r, bu t ca nn ot co nt ro l th e va ri et y of ma te ri al s use d in pl um bi ng co mp on en ts. Wh en yo ur wa te r ha s be en si tt ing for se ve ra l ho ur s, yo u ca n mi ni mi ze th e po te nt ia l for le ad exp os ur e by u sh ing yo ur tap for 30 se co nd s to 2 mi nu te s be for e us ing wa te r for dr in ki ng or co ok ing If yo u ar e co nce rn ed ab ou t le ad in yo ur wa te r, yo u ma y wi sh to ha ve yo ur wa te r te ste d. In for ma ti on on le ad in dr in ki ng wa te r, te st in g met ho ds an d ste ps yo u ca n tak e to mi ni mi ze exp os ur e is av ai la bl e fr om th e Sa fe Dr in ki ng Wa te r Ho tl in e or at ht tp://w ww .e pa .go v/s af ew at er/l ead e St at e of Flo ri da De pa rt me nt of En vi ro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on (D EP) se ts dr in ki ng wa te r sta nd ar d for se co nd ar y co nt ami na nt s an d ha s de te rm in ed th at Ch lo ri de an d To ta l Dis so lv ed So li ds ar e aes th eti c co nce rn s at ce rt ai n le ve ls of exp os ur e. Ch lo ri de an d To tal Dis so lv ed So li ds we re sa mp le d in Au gu st 2012 an d we re fou nd in hi gh er le ve ls th an ar e al lo we d by th e St at e (M CL vi ol at io ns ) C hl or ide an d To ta l Dis so lv ed So li ds as se co nd ar y dr in ki ng wa te r co nt ami na nt s, do no t po se a he al th ri sk We wi ll co nt in ue to sa mp le as re qu ir ed by ru le e so ur ces of dr in ki ng wa te r (b ot h tap wa te r an d bo tt le d wa te r) in cl ude ri ve rs la kes st re am s, po nd s, re se rv oi rs spr ing s, an d we l ls As wa te r tr av el s ov er th e su rf ace of th e la nd or t hr oug h th e gr ou nd it d is so lv es n at ur al ly oc cu rri ng mi ne ra ls an d, in so me ca se s, ra di oa ct iv e ma te ri al an d ca n pi ck up su bs ta nces re su lt ing fr om th e pr es en ce of ani ma ls or fr om hu ma n ac ti vi ty Co nt ami na nt s th at ma y be pr es en t in so ur ce wa te r in clu de : (A) Mi cr ob ia l co nt am in an ts, su ch as vi ru se s an d ba ct er ia wh i ch ma y co me fr om sew ag e tr ea tm en t pl an ts, se pt ic sy ste ms, ag ri cu lt ur al li ve sto ck op er at io ns, an d wi ldl if e. (B) In or ga ni c co nt ami na nt s, su ch as sa lt s an d met al s, wh ic h ca n be na tu ra ll y-o cc ur ri ng or re su lt fr om ur ba n stor mw at er ru no in du st ri al or do mes ti c wa ste wa te r di sc ha rg es oi l an d gas pr od uc ti on mi ni ng or fa rm ing (C) Pe st ic ide s an d he rbi ci de s, wh ic h ma y co me fr om a va ri et y of so ur ces su ch as ag ri cu lt u re ur ba n stor mw at er ru no an d re si de nt ia l use s. (D) Or ga ni c ch em ic al co nt ami na nt s, in c lu ding sy nt het ic an d vo la ti le or ga ni c ch em ic al s, wh ic h ar e by -p ro du ct s of in du st ri al pr oc es se s an d pe tr ol eu m pr od uc ti on an d ca n al so co me fr om gas sta ti on s, ur ba n stor mw at er ru no an d se pt ic sy ste ms. (E) Ra di oa ct iv e co nt ami na nt s, wh ic h ca n be na tu ra ll y oc cu rri ng or be th e re su lt of oi l an d gas pr od uc ti on an d mi ni ng ac ti vi ti e s. In or de r to ens ur e th at tap wa te r is sa fe to dr in k, th e EP A pr es cr ib es re gu la ti on s, wh ic h lim it th e am ou nt of ce rt ai n co nt ami na nt s in wa te r pr ov ide d by pu bl ic wa te r sy ste ms. e Fo od an d Dr ug Ad mi ni st ra ti on (FD A) re gu la ti on s es ta bl is h lim it s for co nt ami na nt s in bo tt le d wa te r, wh ic h mu st pr ov ide th e sa me pr ot ec ti on for pu bl ic he al th Dr in ki ng wa te r, in c lu ding bo tt le d wa te r, ma y re as on ab ly be exp ec te d to co nt ai n at le as t sm al l am ou nt s of so me co nt ami na nt s. e pr es en ce of co nt ami na nt s doe s no t ne c ess ar il y in di ca te t ha t th e wa te r po se s a he al th ri sk Mo re in for ma ti on ab ou t co nt ami na nt s an d po te nt ia l he al th e ec ts ca n be ob ta in ed by ca ll ing th e En vi ro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on Ag en cy s Sa fe Dr in ki ng Wa te r Ho tl in e at 1-800-426-4791. a nk yo u for al lo wi ng us to co nt in ue pr ov id ing yo ur fa mi ly wi th cl ea n, qu al it y wa te r th is ye ar In or de r to ma in ta in a sa fe an d depe nd ab le wa te r sup pl y, we so met im es n eed to ma ke im pr ov em en ts th at wi ll b en e t al l of ou r cu stom er s. es e im pr ov em en ts ar e so met im es re e ct ed as ra te st ru ct ur e ad ju st me nt s. a nk yo u for un de rs ta nd ing So me pe op le ma y be mo re vu lne ra bl e to co nt am ina nt s in drin ki ng wa te r tha n the ge ne ra l po pu la ti on Im mu no-c om pr om is ed pe rs on s su ch as pe rs on s wi th ca nc er und er go in g che mo the ra py pe rs on s wh o ha ve und er go ne or ga n tr an sp la nt s, pe op le wi th HIV/AIDS or ot he r imm une sy st em dis or de rs, so me el de rly an d inf an ts ca n be pa rt icu la rly at ris k fr om inf ec ti on s. es e pe op le sh ou ld se ek adv ic e ab ou t drin ki ng wa te r fr om the ir he al th ca re pr ov ide rs. EP A/CD C gu ide lines on ap pr op ri at e me an s to le ss en the ris k of inf ec ti on by Cr yp to sp or id iu m an d ot he r mi cr ob io lo gic al co nt am ina nt s ar e av ai la bl e fr om the Sa fe Drin ki ng Wa te r Ho tline (800-426-4791). We wo rk to pr ov ide to p qu al it y wa te r to ev er y tap We as k th at al l ou r cu stom er s he lp us pr ot ec t ou r wa te r so ur ces wh ic h ar e th e he ar t of o ur co mmu ni ty ou r wa y of li fe an d ou r ch il dr en s fu tu re If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s or co nce rn s ab ou t th e in for ma ti on pr ov ide d, pl ea se fe el fr ee to ca ll an y of th e nu mb er s li ste d.

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Local A8 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 The Jou rn ey Back Home With We ems Memorial Rehab Car e When you or a loved on e need a little mor e time to ge t back on your feet, We ems Memorial Re hab Car e is her e Right in your own ne ighborhood Give us a call today and let us help you make that jour ney back hom e. We ems Mem orial Rehab Ca re 135 Av enue G, Apalach icola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 Display Ad ve rt ising ................. 4 pm, Th ursdayJ une 26th Classi ed Ad ve rt ising ................ 5 pm, Fr iday Ju ne 27th New s, Obits, Et c .. .. . .. . .. . .. ..... 5 pm, Fr iday Ju ne 27th Display Ad ve rt ising .................... 4 pm, Th ursday Ju ly 3r d Classi ed Ad ve rt ising ................. 5 pm, Monday Jul y 7th New s, Obits, Et c . .. . .. . .. . .. ...... 5 pm, Monday Jul y 7th Pam Nobles Studio presented its 33rd annual recital Saturday at the high school auditorium before a packed audience. The recital was a rousing success, with plenty of broad smiles, high-stepping dancers and creative choreography by Nobles, who has been running her studio since 1981. For lots more dance pictures, visit the Times Facebook page. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Holly Chambers leaps high in her solo done to Say Something. At left Sienna Polous in This is the Way We Love to Dance. Performing together are Lanie Allen, Olivia Barineau, Trinity Barron, Chloe Davis, Ella Friedman, Skylar Layne, Myia Maxwell, Haley Miller, Lyndsey Stiefel, Shaylynn Suddeth and Leah Wren. Javana Pearson is all smiles in Put On a Happy Face. Daniel Foxworth and Rita Theis perform a Latin ballroom solo. Brooklyn Klink puts on a serious face.

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, June 12, 2014 Bank Owned Sale Satur da y, June 14th Call for a priority appointment 850-566-6761 Starting at $109,000 Dan Ausley TLG Realty 850-566-6761 www .tlgproperty .com 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms av ailable Wa terfr ont CondosLanark Re gistr ation Begins @ 10 am ET Competi tion Begins @ 11 am ET $1,000 bonus for longest launch over *533 feet *Curr ent Wo rld Recor d Plus man y other pr iz es aw ar de d thr oughout the ev en t Th e Blue Pa rr ot is pr oud to donat e pr oceeds to the Apalac hicola Ba y Char te r Sc hool For Mor e Infor mation Call: (850) 927.2987 See Live Cam at BlueParr otSGI.com Men s Division $200 Kids 14-16 Ye ars Bicycle Kids 11-13 Ye ars Fishing Pole w/ Ta ckle Box Kids 10 & Under Fishing Pole w/ Ta ckle Box Fr ee Style Division $100 Wo men s Division $200 FREE TShirt w/ every ENTR Y Adults: 17 & up $30 Kids: under 17 $20 During its June 5 meet ing, the Franklin County School Board received a gift of a cherished Ameri can ag from the family of the late Rev. Lawrence Jo seph Register, who died in March at the age of 86. Flanked by his sister, Cathy Carroll, Registers son Jimmy told the board their dad, an Air Force veteran of World War II, a Navy veteran of the Korean War and a former school employee, had a last wish to bestow this ag that meant so much to him to y in his honor as a veteran. They said their father, as a bus driver and main tenance worker for the district, greatly enjoyed his interaction with staff and students. Registers wife, Sarah Truman Reg ister, and children Jimmy Register and Cathy Car roll worked a combined 65 years for the district, they said. He made many chil drens science lessons come to life when showing them animals or insects he brought to school or found on the school grounds, Jimmy Register said. The art of grunting for earth worms turned into an un forgettable experience when classes would watch the worms come up out of the earth as Daddy worked his magic, though some thought they were snakes. Carroll and Register went on to recount how their father told us stories of being one of the forerun ners of the Navy Seals be fore they became known as such, preparing the way for other soldiers to come after, completing his tasks. He guarded the Alaskan Islands from possible inva sion from Japan into our county. Daddy had many wonderful, scary stories to tell. After the presentation, Gander suggested the ag rst be own over the dis trict ofce beginning Veter ans Day 2014. Thats a long way off, but it would be a little bit more special, he said. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN SUPERINTENDENT from page A1 I think the people should be able to gure the facts, the pros and cons, he said. Its better than to have two elected bodies affecting our school process. Martin said she had spoken with voters in her district, which is the Hill area in Apalachicola on the northern and western side of U.S. 98. For the most part, they like it to be elected. There is a few thats for appoint ment, she said. Thats just my district, Martin said. I think it is because they didnt want to put the control in ve board members (hands), and they felt like if we did it the right way and we would but it only takes three board members to approve it. Martin said because there are single districts, not countywide vot ing for school board seats, these constituents believe we cant hold all ve board members accountable, and we would like to continue to con trol it ourselves. She stressed that Im open for everybody, and I work for everybody, but based on the views of her district constituents, they more likely want it to be elected. School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander, who is not running for reelection after 20 years on the board, said he preferred to let voters decide the matter. I do feel like let the people vote, let the people speak, and let the peo ple do what they want to do, he said. After they approved placing the matter on the ballot box, the board members agreed the general elec tion would be preferable to the Aug. 26 primary election for holding the referendum, because only those vot ers with a partisan preference vote in the primary. Only three states Florida, Ala bama and Mississippi continue to elect superintendents, which is done in only 142 of just over 13,500 districts in America, or about 1 per cent. In Florida, superintendents are elected in 41 of 67 districts, mostly in the smaller and mid-sized districts, including much of the Panhandle. Commencement lauded, vandalism deplored In reviewing the events of the end of the school year, Gander com plimented school ofcials with how well the senior recognition night and graduation exercises went. You hear so many negatives, and you look at those young people who graduated. There were a lot of con cerns when we rst consolidated, he said. I was proud of everybody. I couldnt believe how many had dual enrolled and the honors they re ceived. I think everybody did a real good job. I appreciate it. Martin brought up the matter of the end-of-the-year prank, which ap parently was more serious than in past years. When there are pranks and the school gets destroyed, do we have a policy for that? she asked. Its not always all the seniors. It may be a lower grade involved in it. Some times, in the midst of it, a student will get hurt. Marks said the vandalism policy in place will be enforced after a com plete investigation. The health, welfare, safety issue of it is (new) this year, she said. Theres been pranks (in years past), but its not impacted the safety. Martin said she would like to see a sit-down meeting held before the end of school with both seniors and juniors. Sometimes its not just se niors, she said. Director of Auxiliary Services Al London said class sponsors told stu dents on multiple occasions not to do it, not to have a prank. We have some leads on who is involved, and the sheriffs ofce is involved in investigation. School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders said if a student breaks into school, that could be a criminal violation that would follow them past graduation. London said some of the schools cameras are not in working order. What happens when something serious happens and we dont have cameras? Martin asked. We have other systems in place that indicated who was involved, London said. I really dont want to discuss it. In a matter related to the cost of eld trips, Gander drew applause from the teachers and support per sonnel in the audience when he pro posed to charge less to those who take eld trips. He said two buses to Panama City had been billed by the district $1,350, as the calculations had been done based on a state fund ing formula. At the next meeting, Id like to see a fee were going to charge, he said. Try to use actual gures for paying the driver. The class pays the driver and puts fuel in the bus. At the outset of the meeting, Marks and Gander presented Suc cess Awards to three support per sonnel and three teachers, part of an effort by the district to set a standard of excellence for staffers. Support personnel who each received $250 checks were Melissa West, Delores Croom and Paul Bankston. Teachers who each received $500 checks were Cathy Wood, Elinor Mount Simmons and Laura King. I encourage them to share their notebooks to faculty and staff at the school, Marks said. In her report, Finance Director Shannon Venable said as of April 30, the district had a cushion of 3.02 per cent, with $212,448 in restricted funds and $325,535 in unrestricted funds, for a total of $540,983. Im projecting it will be in the 3.06 percent range as of June 30, she said. Nichols worked as innkeeper of the St. George Inn. Senior Innkeeper Christina Woolston and Owner Ol ivier Monod posted a statement on Facebook after the accident. She has been a vibrant contri bution to our establishment, they wrote. Ashley had four children; her younger one, Jordan is 3; Sean is 10; Autumn is 13; and Cindi is 17. If you can spare the time, feel free to mail (rather than email) a note addressed to them c/o St. George Inn, P.O. Box 250, Apalachicola, FL 32329. You may express and share memories of their mother, or any thoughts that you deem encouraging and comforting. WOMAN KILLED from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Jimmy Register and his sister Cathy Carroll present their fathers ag to the school district. Veteran gets last wish for school

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A10 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 PHOTOS LOIS SWOBODA | The Times In an ongoing series of demonstrations, artist Josefa Kotzman created a portrait of Tammy Owen on June 5, pictured at left The Carrabelle Artist Association meets every other Thursday evening at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex in an effort to encourage new members. For more information, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CarrabelleArtistAssociation. BEAUTY CAPTURED IN CARRABELLE Pe t of th e We ek MAN NY is one of ma ny ki tt en s we ar e ho us in g at th is ti me We ha ve re du ce d ou r adop ti on fe e fr om $9 0. 00 to $7 5.0 0 an d fo r bl ack or bl ack an d wh it e ki tt en s, on ly $5 0. 00 Th es e ki tt en s ar e fu ll y ve tt ed fe li ne le uk em ia ne ga ti ve an d sp ay ed an d ne ut er ed Pl eas e co nsi de r adop ti ng one or ou r ado rab le fe li ne s. Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to soc ia li ze al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts We ar e al way s lo ok i ng fo r pe ople wi ll in g to bri ng on e of ou r an im al s in to th ei r hom e to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can spa re wo ul d be gr ea tl y ap pr ec ia te d. Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hum an e Soc iet y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po int Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bsit e at www .f or go tt en pe ts .o rg to se e mor e of ou r adop tab le pe ts Society Bryant Malone born Bryant Alyxander Malone (Bam Bam) was born on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. He weighed 7 pounds and was 19 inches long. Bryant is the son of Stephen and Alyse Malone, of Eastpoint, and little brother to Morgan, Stephen Jr., Cloey, JJ, Harmony, Jacob, Madalynn and Asher. Paternal grandparents are Mike and Jeanette Malone, of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Charles Woodman and Sonja Alday, of New Orleans, La. Birth Graduations Louis James Anthony graduated with honors from Niceville High School on Thursday, June 5, 2014. Louis is the son of Ken and Sharon Anthony, of Niceville. He is the grandson of Julia and the late Louis H. Anthony, and James and Margaret Stokes, of Apalachicola. Louis plans to attend Northwest Florida State College to earn his associates of arts degree and then transfer to a state university to major in physics. Apalachicolas Morton McLemore was among the 156 members of the McCallie Schools Class of 2014 to graduate in May 18 commencement ceremonies on the McCallie campus. Morton, a boarding student, is the son of Lee and Tricia McLemore, of Apalachicola. McCallie, founded in 1905, is a college preparatory boarding and day school for boys on the western slope of Missionary Ridge in Chattanooga, Tenn. Considered one of the nations top independent schools, McCallies 156 seniors will attend 75 different colleges in 23 states plus the District of Columbia. Sixty percent of the class will use merit, athletic, academic, talent or lottery scholarships at the school they will attend, and many more earned scholarships at colleges they are choosing not to attend. Two boys have accepted appointments to military academies, one to West Point, one to Annapolis. Six boys accepted athletic grantsin-aid for their college, and another seven intend to continue their athletic careers in college. Special to The Times If anyone had told the conservative housewife that she would one night be driving around Tallahassee with a stoned, drunk homeless man in her back seat, imploring him no, demanding that he come back to her house, she would said they were nuts. But it happened. If anyone had told the Apalachicola bookseller that she would be handed yet another self-published book by the friend of a friend of a friend, devour it in one sitting, and immediately forward it to a well-known literary agent, she would have laughed. Or cried. But that happened too. An astonishingly frank memoir, Far Outside the Ordinary chronicles the period in the authors life when, during a routine physical exam, her 50year-old husband is given less than a year to live. After he and she subject themselves to a grueling round of increasingly unconventional treatments, they return to Tallahassee, she moves black caregivers into their home to provide around-the-clock care, and Prissy soon nds herself an observer and then a participant in events far outside the boundaries of her once ordinary life. Far Outside the Ordinary is also a story of happily-ever-after, a romantic fairy tale. When her high school boyfriend reappears in her life, Prissy learns that love has no expiration date. Sometimes a second chance at love can come disguised, and when least expected. This is an extraordinary book, said Dale Julian, proprietor of Downtown Books. It is so totally Tallahassee, and yet addresses the big themes of love, loss, and selfreinvention with utterly convincing candor and sometimes even humor. Im going to do my best to ensure its success. An artist at heart, new novelist Prissy Elrod lives in Tallahassee with her husband while her treasured family lives within four miles of her. Writing her rst novel was an exercise of courage. It took four years to write, three computers, two espresso machines, 48 how-to writing books, a Florida State University memoir-writing class, 24 blog subscriptions, a halfdozen periodical journals and 14 revised drafts. Elrod kept the manuscript to herself, not allowing anyone to read it for the rst three years of writing her story and nally, in 2013, she sent the draft to a Pushcart Prize-winning writer in Texas, engaging him to read the manuscript and provide feedback. Elrod is currently working on her second book. To contact visit www.PrissyElrod.com or prissy@elrod.com WHERE AND WHEN Join Prissy Elrod at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St. Apalachicola, on Saturday, June 14, from 1-3 p.m. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Prissy Elrod New novelist to sign books Saturday Special to The Times The Apalachicola Bay Area Chamber of Commerce members elected a new board of directors for the 2014-15 scal year on June 4 at the monthly business luncheon in Apalachicola. The board and membership welcome Karen Rudder, general manager of the St. George Island Plantation Home Owners Association; Bonnie Fulmer with Apalachicola Bay Animal Hospital; Craig Gibson with Weems Memorial Hospital and the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department; and Ira Mittleman, owner and chef of Iras at the Gibson Inn to this years board. Continuing for another term are Mike Koun, owner of the Gibson Inn, Brenda Ash, with Centennial Bank and an Apalachicola city commissioner; Donna Duncan, attorney with Sanders and Duncan; Jean Ulrich, a real estate agent with Century 21 Collins Realty and owner of Ulrich Construction; Bud Hayes, with the Franklin County Humane Society and the ABC School; Bev Hewitt, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill, the Soda Fountain, and the BackStreet Trading Company; Kristin Anderson, owner of LongDreamGallery.com; attorney Michael Shuler; Jerry Hall, with Seafood Grill, The Soda Fountain and BackStreet Trading Company; Ginny Griner, with Weems Memorial Hospital; and John Solomon, owner of Alle Cat Charters, president of the Florida Seafood Festival and president of the Weems Memorial Healthcare Foundation. Of cers for this year are Donna Duncan, president; Bud Hayes, vice-president; Kristin Anderson, secretary/historian; and Jerry Hall, treasurer. We would like to thank our retiring director Ouida Tartt, owner of the House of Tartts, a guest cottage in downtown Apalachicola, for her service and support over the years. Tartt is leaving the Forgotten Coast to live with her daughter in New Zealand. The election was held during the Chambers annual meeting at the Apalachicola United Methodist Church fellowship hall and catered by members of the UMC congregations of Apalachicola and St. George Island. During the same meeting members discussed and passed some minor changes to the bylaws. The Apalachicola Chamber was started in the early 1830s. Among its many presidents were ice machine inventor John Gorrie, and David Raney, builder of the Raney House, who made his fortune in cotton and served two terms as Apalachicolas mayor. In the 1980s, the chamber expanded its membership area to include Apalachicola Bay including Eastpoint and St. George Island. It currently has 390 members. Apalachicola chamber selects new board Louis Anthony graduates with honors Apalachicola student graduates from McCallie School

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The Times | A11 Thursday, June 12, 2014 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Faith Bet you enjoyed all the stories and lms from World War II on television over the weekend. When you went to the movies during the war, they would run an update on how things were going over there. Dont forget hamburgers and chips at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 every Friday night. Orders taken after 6 p.m. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. Pizza night on Sunday at Legion Post 82 will start at 5 p.m. and end at 7 p.m. Pizza by the slice $1 each; full pizza $8 and pizza on the run $10. They have everything but anchovies. You can call in your order by dialing 697-9998. Open to the public both nights. While youre enjoying your hamburger or pizza, you can play some bar bingo, shufeboard, pulltabs or a game of pool. Come and enjoy an evening with your friends and neighbors. Better not forget Dad, this Sunday, June 14. Dads are like our Moms; God gave us each one father to cherish, love and obey. Treat him like a king. Members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will have your monthly sugar x ready on Saturday, June 21. Might as well start off the summer with a good, full breakfast. You can choose pancakes/French toast; bacon or sausage; eggs, coffee and juice. All for only $5 donation, which will be collected inside the door. See ya there! Dont worry about the calories. You can work them off at the June Birthday Bash at Legion Post 82. Finger food, your favorite beverage, games and music, music, music. Party starts at 6 p.m. Party hearty! The monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall has been canceled due to air conditioning problems. We lost another grand lady of the Village last week. Kay Grant passed away on June 2 at 3:10 a.m. Kay and her husband John lived in the Village for a long time and were very active in the early years. Pray for Kays eternal rest and for strength and peace for John. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better, but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh God gave us each one fatherHOLLIS VAIL A SPECIAL THANK YOU to my friends and community for all the love and support youve provided during my current health challenges. I would never have made it this far without being held up by all of you. Thank you and God Bless you all. Hollis VailTHE ONEAL FAMIL Y We would like to thank everyone for their prayers, cards, owers, special gifts, memories shared, smiles & hugs, phone calls. We know Andrew loved his family and community, and we are grateful and appreciate all of you. May God Bless you all. With our love and thanks, The ONeal FamilyPUTT MASTERS TOURNAMENT The Friends of Franklin County Public Library would like to express thanks to this years sponsors of the annual PuttMasters tournament: Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf, Weems Memorial Hospital, Sign Design Eastpoint, Bob Landiss Touchpoint Printing, St. James Bay Golf and Grill, and Centennial Bank Eastpoint, Businesses and individuals that sponsored teams included Apalachicola Ace, George Pruett of the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department, members of Judy Little & Sondra Furbee Yoga Class, Butler Agency, Uta Hardy, SGI Realty, Wengs, Bobby James Metal Roong, Sometimes Its Hotter, Dails Seafood, Journeys of St. George Island, Newt and Adele Colston & Skip and Terri Kemp, Bob and Kara Landiss, Kate Aguiar & Cal Allen, and Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic, Businesses and individuals that sponsored a hole sign include The Rev. John & Sue Sink, Weems Memorial Hospital, Hammer Head Construction, Sea Oats Art Gallery, Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf, William Massey, Apalachicola Riverkeeper and Sign Design. Much thanks to Erica Sapp, Logo/Design and to The Red Pirate Family Grill & Oyster Bar, owners Jimmy & Shirley Sapp and their great staff, for hosting the event each year, and for providing the trophies presented to the winners. Cards of THANKS Kay V. Grant, 92, of Lanark Village, died Monday, June 2, 2014 at St. James Bay Health & Rehab Center in St. James. Kay was born Oct. 15, 1921 in Manchester, Iowa. She was a member of Lanark Community Church, sang in its choir and served as treasurer for the churchs womens organization. Kay was an avid golfer and bridge player also. She is survived by her husband of 60-plus years, John Grant and numerous nieces and nephews and her close friends of Lanark Village. She is preceded in death by her daughter, Jeannie Grant. Memorial services are planned for a later date. Kay will be interred in Athens Community Cemetery in Athens, Ill. Kay V. Grant A memorial service for Lois Cobb Watkins will be held Saturday, June 21 at 11 a.m. at Fellowship Baptist Church in Apalachicola. We would like to invite friends and family to join us in the celebration of her life. She was born Sept. 13, 1939 and left us Friday, May 30, 2014. She is survived by her husband, R. C. Collie Watkins; and three sons, George (Carla) Watkins, of Apalachicola, and Rick Johnson and Dan Johnson, both of Ocala. She is survived by five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren that she loved very much. Lois comes from nine children. She is survived by three sisters and four brothers, from Middle Georgia. Lois was a loving and devoted wife, mother and MiMi. Mimi can always fix anything! She loved Apalachicola, where she was employed at the Franklin County Courthouse till her retirement. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that any donations in Lois memory be made to Weems Memorial Hospital.Lois Cobb W atkins Andrew Joseph Antekeier, age 72, of Eastpoint, died Friday, June 6, 2014, at E.T. York Hospice Care Center in Gainesville from complications of treatment for advanced prostate cancer. The world lost a magic man when Andy left it. He was a force of nature with great zest for life and a love of people. He was a great cook who could never understand why anyone would need a recipe. He enjoyed a game of golf, pool, or cards, loved shing and growing things. He was a runner until he had to walk, a sailor until he chose instead to live by the sea, a hiker unafraid of what lay ahead on the trail, and the king of the campre. He was a great hugger and inventor of the hug sandwich, loved by his grandchildren. Andy never met a stranger. He bestowed special names on his loved ones, and was known by several himself, from Jose Gaspar to Mr. Weekend to his favorite of all, Popster the Wopster. He was a regular blood donor with 260 recorded donations over many years. Since retirement Andy has been a volunteer at the Franklin County Food Pantry. Andy loved sports and was a dedicated fan of the Michigan State Spartans. Anyone who met Andy quickly learned about the Green and White. He rooted passionately for all of the Spartan teams in good times and in bad, and always wore his colors. Andy was born Dec. 23, 1941, in Muskegon, Michigan to Arnold and Alberta Dion Antekeier, both of whom predecease him. He graduated from Muskegon Catholic Central High School, Class of 1960. He attended Muskegon Community College, Michigan State University, and Grand Valley University where he earned a bachelor of science degree with high honors in psychology in 1976. He worked full time during his 10-year pursuit of a college degree. In 1965, Andy married Barbara Charron in Muskegon. They had two children, Alison in 1967, and Andrew in 1969, both of whom survive him along with their mother, now Barbara Kendall. Andys career years centered around sales. He was a gifted salesman no matter what the product. He was a corporate recruiter and owned Antekeier Associates in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He continued in various sales jobs after relocating to Florida in 1981, eventually settling in Indian Rocks Beach. In 1988, he opened a retail store called TShirts N Stuff on Indian Rocks Beach which he operated for 10 years. It was a fun place with windows full of signs and cartoons alongside the merchandise. Those windows reected his liberal political and strong anti-war views, and his pride in being a lifelong Democrat. Shoppers came to the store as much for the conversations with Andy as for the Florida Tshirts he sold them. In 1989, Andy married Susan Clayton of Tampa. In Susan he found a person whose love of life was equal to his. They have managed to pack about 50 years of living into their 25 years together. In 1998, Andy and Susan discovered the small town of Eastpoint along Floridas Forgotten Coast. It was love at rst sight. After many years of planning and a lot of luck, they were able to retire to their place on Apalachicola Bay in 2006. During retirement they also enjoyed great times in their RV, camping, exploring the back roads, and the outdoors. They also have had the thrill of being grandparents. Andy is survived by his wife Susan, of Eastpoint; children Alison and Andrew, of Michigan, and John B. Bart Clayton and wife Shelley, and beloved grandchildren Ainsley Thomas and John Andrew, of Norcross, Georgia, and brother-in-law Ted Bodenheimer, of Raleigh, North Carolina. He is also survived by his brothers Ronald (Joanne) of Muskegon, Michigan; Jerry (Dianne) of Belleair; Father Charles and Kurt Wolfgang, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Gerard (Mary Katherine) of San Diego, California. and sisters Virginia (Jim Wier) and Paula Bostrom, of Muskegon, and Dolores (Ted) Kusmierz, of Grand Rapids. He was predeceased by sisters Merelise, Bernadette, Martha and Lucy. Other family survivors include much loved Aunt/ Mom Therese Lemieux of Traverse City, Mich., along with cousin/brothers and sisters Paul, Joe (Marcia), David (Antoinette), Marty (Sharron), Rochelle (Steve) Hammontree, Gene Lemieux (Alice) of Lady Lake and Martha (Dan) Noble of Sebring. His larger family includes nieces and nephews he loved and took great pride in, as well as many special cousins. To Andy, a friendship was priceless. Some special friends who are family and have stood by Andy and Susan through the years include Denise and Marc Skinner, Mike Brady, Karen and Craig Stiver, Mike Gately, Stephen Gately, Virginia Esposito, Gaile and Kevin Sheehan and Jack McGuinness. It was Andys express desire that there be no funeral service. A celebration of Andys life will be held at a later date. Suggested memorial gifts, should one wish, may be made to the Franklin County Food Pantry,192 14th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 (designate for food purchase), or Haven Hospice, 4200 NW 90th Blvd., Gainesville, FL 32606. To celebrate Andy today, hug a friend, say something nice or nothing at all, make someone laugh, hoist a cold one, watch a sunset. Keep on keeping on. Please visit the online guestbook at www. crevassesimplecremation. com/andrew-antekeier.Andrew Antekeier ANDREW ANTEKEIER Obituaries The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St.; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed DiscussionT UESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; noon to 1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. ; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, ClosedTH URSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; Noon to 1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Drive; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion.F RIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church; 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension; 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open DiscussionSA T URDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea; 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive; 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church; 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open Discussion AA MEETING SCHEDULE

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From staff reports The Forgotten Coast Paddle Club is planning a special event for Indepen dence Day weekend. On Thursday, July 3, paddlers carry ing American ags will put in at the site of the old Breakaway Lodge off Bluff Road and paddle to Riverfront Park for the Independence Day festivities. Meet at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum at 9 a.m. and shuttle to Break away. The easy, 3-mile paddle should nish up about noon. Rental kayaks are available for $20 from Journeys of St. George Island and the maritime museum. Everyone is welcome. For more information, visit www.paddle2love.com On Saturday, June 7, members of the paddle club put in under the bridge near Battery Park and set off on a mission. The club has committed to help with Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 20. Last Sat urday, they scouted the area between Battery Park and Lafayette Park to make sure the task is feasible. If you are interested in becoming part of the Coastal Cleanup Navy, call Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. Reprinted from Florida Wildlife Magazine A backyard is far more than a place to install a pool, hold a barbecue, or toss a Frisbee. The sum of all North American yards and neighborhood green spaces equals major habitat for birds and other wildlife. Creating larger, connected patches of bird-friendly hab itat is one goal of the new YardMap citizen-science project from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. The project has undergone extensive testing by 10,000 users who created more than 6,700 maps. YardMap is ready for everyone and now is inviting new participants to join. People often think their yard is too small or too ur ban to impact wildlife, but that just isnt true, Yard Map project leader Rhian non Crain said. For many plant and animal species, a yard can mean the world. A buttery can live its whole life from egg through caterpillar to buttery in one persons yard, so it mat ters quite a lot if the owner uses pesticides. After signing up for the free online project, par ticipants zoom in on satel lite images to construct maps of their yards, local parks, workplaces, local cemeteries, or any other green space they know well. They mark the maps to show areas of lawn, buildings, na tive plants, feeders, and oth er landscape features. Sci entists and participants can see how the spaces connect to form larger landscapes and share information about improving habitats at home and across communities. By pairing habitat information with bird sightings, partici pants learn about the effects of different gardening prac tices at a much larger scale. Changes dont need to be dramatic. Putting in a few native plants, moving feeders closer to windows to reduce deadly collisions, or creating a brush pile birds can use to escape from predators can all have a signicant impact for local birds. Right now were losing 21 million acres of habitat every 10 years to residential development, Crain said. But we also know there are millions of people out there concerned about the environment, ready to tread more lightly on the land. Even if youre just starting your wildlife garden, wed love to share the journey as you document your prog ress with YardMap. Learn more at content. yardmap.org. By Gill Autrey Special to the Times So, I called Lois Swoboda cause shes my avian consultant. Shes one of only two folks Ive ever known with a Ph.D.; I cant remember the other ones name. She wrote her dissertation on the Argentina ant in Apalachicola that came in here on a boat from Argentina (thats how it got its name). Now she exterminates re ants, already here. She does it ergonomically or some word like that that PhDs use. If she had written a Ph.D. dissertation on how to keep yellow ies from bitin you, she would be worth multi-millions. But heres how you do it drink a couple of ounces of Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar each morning and they will let you alone (so will everybody else, get it at the Pig). Was I tellin yall why I called Lois? I guess I lost track. We both love the swallow kite, the most beautiful bird that graces the Forgotten Coast. Supposedly, its really rare. I had some bird folks on my boat who told me if I could nd a swallow kite nest to show them bird folks, I could make a million dollars. Lois thinks she might have seen an ivory billed woodpecker. If so, she will have a lot more millions than I. I thought I saw Elvis up in Johnsons Creek one time but I didnt have my camera but as I rounded the slough I saw a hound dog chasing a wild hog so he might have really been there. Anyway, I was out at Rivercrest Lodge gassing up Lily, my tour boat, because I thought I had a trip with some folks from Brazil who work for BASF, but they use different ways to write the date so I think maybe I got it wrong. As from Cool Hand Luke, I think we had a failure to communicate. I was pouring gas in the tank of my boat. I use non-ethanol gas because regular gas can ruin your engine, but thats getting into politics and we are talking about the swallow tailed kite, one of the greatest treasures of the Forgotten Cost. I heard this really shrill chirping sound that I have never heard before. I have seen many of them but I have never heard their call. I have a Sibley app on my iPhone. I was blessed to have couple on Lily from the ornithology lab at Cornell University and they identied 38 different species of birds in the 246,000-acre Apalachicola Estuarine Reserve, that in fact makes the Apalachicola Bay the most productive estuary in the Northern Hemisphere; they told me to get the app. So I was trying to put gas in my boat and I heard this loud chirping and I looked up, but my cap has a long bill so I couldnt see anything so I took my hat off and there were two swallow kites chasing a Mississippi kite. The one swallow kite was taking the lead and raisin hell. Now Lois thinks it was probably a territorial dispute. The kites chased each other for maybe 10 minutes, then the Mississippi kite landed in the top of a tree to rest and the two swallow-tailed kites kept dive bombing him for some time, then he took off with the others in hot pursuit and went behind the tree line and gone. Of course, I didnt have my camera, neither did Lois. If we had, I guess you would think you could nd us on the French Rivera sunbathing, or on some exotic island, but no, you would nd us right here on the Forgotten Cost, alive and tryin to keep folks from invading our nest on the Forgotten Coast, our real treasure. Your Friends, Capt. Gill and Lois Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TID E TA BLES MONT HL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, June 12 82 76 50 % Fr i, June 13 83 75 40 % Sa t, June 14 83 75 40 % Sun, June 15 83 77 30 % Mo n, June 16 85 76 10 % Tu es June 17 85 77 10 % We d, June 18 86 77 10 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 12 Thursday, June 12, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Surf shing is still doing well for those anglers prowling the shoreline with many nice trout and an occasional red sh being caught. Bay shing in St. Joseph Bay is reported good early and late around Blacks Island as well as Pompano Point. And the Cape still is producing great pompano and whiting catches. Looks like we will all be chasing the Kings for a few weeks and speaking of Kings, several reports of larger Kings have been turned in and the bite has been very good lately. Gag Grouper season will begin July 1. The week of Red Snapper season in federal waters is history for 2014 however Red Snappers may be caught in state waters through July 14. The federal waters season on Red Snapper was short but sweet as most everyone who went limited out or came close. John James Audubon drawing of the Swallow-tailed Kite. The kite ght Join YardMap project to create bird habitat Pileated woodpeckers drill holes in trees in order to nd wood-boring insects. THEMO PATRIOTIS | Special to the Times Independence Day weekend paddle planned No-license freshwater shing this weekend The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is reminding Floridians and visitors they will be able to sh without a freshwater recreational shing license on Saturday and Sunday, June 14 and 15. These license-free shing days fall near National Fishing and Boating Week, a national celebration of shing and boating, which started June 1 and ran through June 8. The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundations www. TakeMeFishing.org website is a place to learn about events sponsored by businesses and communities during National Fishing and Boating Week, as well as locating shing sites, identifying recreational species and nding shing tips. The rst Saturday in September (Sept. 6, 2014) and the rst Saturday after Thanksgiving (Nov. 29, 2014) also have been designated license-free days, and the rst Saturday and Sunday in April (April 4-5, 2015) have been designated a license-free freshwater shing weekend. All bag limits, seasons and size restrictions apply on these dates. To make your shing day successful, check out MyFWC.com/Fishing for shing tips, locations and rules. Learn more about license-free shing days by visiting MyFWC.com/License and clicking on Do I Need One? and Free Fishing Days.

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CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SPORT S www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 12, 2014 A Page 13 Section THE PERFEC T GAME By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Fifty-ve years ago this week, one of Apalachicolas favorite sons set a record for baseball prowess when he pitched a perfect game. It was 1959, Ron Blood worth, just 22 years old, had left the Washington Senators after a salary dispute and was lead pitcher for the Lin coln Chiefs, part of the minor league Three-I League, so named because it centered around teams in Illinois, Indi ana and Iowa. It had started as a bad sea son. The Chiefs, out of Lincoln, Neb., and a farm team for the Chicago White Sox, were on a losing streak. Bloodworths wife taught school in Apala chicola. When she called to dis cuss coming to stay with him at the end of the school year, he told her she had better wait until after his next game. He was worried. Blood worths record for the season stood at 2-4 and he was just returning from a disastrous three-game series against Des Moines. I had to do something, Bloodworth said. I decided I was going to be the leanest, meanest pitcher the Sherman Field had ever seen. The June 10 home game was against the Green Bay Bluejays, the number one team in the league with a 10-2 record, and six straight wins going into the June 10 doubleheader. The evenings rst game went poorly, with the Chiefs losing 10-1. The nightcap brought the Chiefs losing streak to a halt. The follow ing account of Bloodworths perfect game comes from Del Black, writing for the Lincoln Evening Journal: Thursday nights action started in a dismal fashion when Green Bay whipped the deep left-center to open the second, only to nd Pug Williams starting at the crack of the bat and hauling in the drive over his shoulder and near the fence. In the same inning, Fran Boniar, the winner of two mi nor league batting titles, hit a frozen rope, to the left of second base where Don Ba con was moving, leaning and stretching to haul in the shot. Tim Harkness brought the Shermantown crowd to its feet in the seventh with his screeching one-hopper, which was only inches foul. If fair, it would have gone for a triple. Pinch hitter John Os borne, batting with one out in the ninth, became the rst man to run the count to 3-2 on Bloodworth. Cool Ron nie came in with a curve ball that Osborne fouled over the grandstand for new life. Os borne then looked at a called third strike. One sports writer praised Bloodworth saying, (He) kept mixing up his multiplespeed curve and fast ball. His control was excellent. He ran the count to three balls on only three players. In the course of the game, only ve balls were hit into the outeld. I just kept moving the ball around trying to keep it break ing inside on all the hitters, Bloodworth said. The catch er would give me a signal and Id shake it off to confuse the batter. Theres a lot of mental stuff going on in batters head wondering what youre going to throw. The game nished 3-0. Centerelder Jim Lynn hit a 370-foot homer in the fourth inning. The Chiefs scored ad ditional runs in the sixth and seventh innings. Bloodworths masterpiece was only the second per fect game ever pitched in the ThreeIs. The rst, on Aug. 18, 1910, was the work of Red Faber. That game also nished 3-0. When the game was done, more than 600 fans stood to honor Bloodworth with applause. People start ed to leave before the game was over, but they must have been listening to the radio because, somehow, word got out, he said. They started ling back in at the end. Perhaps the greatest hon or bestowed on Bloodworth was praise from the manager of the Bluejays. This is what is good for baseball, especially minor league baseball. What a game that boy pitched. Its a great thing for the boy and a great thing for Lincoln, Stan Wasiak said. In those days, we had some good guys in the sport, Bloodworth said. Some real gentlemen. On leaving the mound, Bloodworth wrote his way through a throng of autograph seekers. When he reached the clubhouse, he was met by club president A. Q. Schimmel. Great game, Ronnie. The steaks are on me, Schimmel said as he shook the young pitchers hand. Bloodworth told reporters his greatest regret was that his wife didnt see the game. I called her afterwards and told her she could come on to Lincoln, he said. I told her I had pitched a perfect game and she said, Whats a perfect game? For those who might not be clear, a perfect game means the pitcher hurled 27 consecutive outs over nine innings. Not only were there no hits against the pitcher, but no batter reached rst base for any reason, such as on a walk, an error or being hit by a pitch. The feat is considered a rarity at all levels and has been achieved only 23 times in the history of major league baseball. Bloodworth now lives back in Apalachicola and has been with SunCoast Realty for about 20 years. Celebrating Ron Bloodworths record PHOTOS FROM THE COLLECTION O F R ON BLOODWORTH The 1959 Lincoln Chiefs were, front row, from left, Kent Lovelace (bat boy) Don Bacon, Al Schrader, Gene Martin, Kendle Hutchinson, Deacon Jones, Charles Lehman, Jim Lynn, Dean Busch (bat boy). Second row, from left, are Ira Hutchinson (manager) Ron Teunis, Ron Bloodworth, Dick Idzkowski, John Hoerner, Pug Williamson, Bryant Wasdell, Joel Horlen, Harold (Doc) Scockro (trainer). Third row, from left, are Don Gordon, George Olson, Al Brice, Jim Host, Dick Kimball, Malcolm Warren. Club President A. Q. Schimmel presents Ron Bloodworth with a trophy following his record-breaking game. PHOTOS B Y D AV ID A DLERSTEIN | The Times Above left anked by his parents, Heather and Bobby Curry, Bobby John Curry signs an athletic scholarship, with head coach Aaron York, left, and assistant coach Jonathan Creamer, standing. Above right anked by his parents, Gene and Bridget McLeod, Logan McLeod signs an athletic scholarship, with head coach Aaron York, left, and assistant coach Jonathan Creamer, standing. 3 more Seahawks sign scholarships By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Three more Seahawks have committed to athletic scholarships, making for an unprecedented dozen Franklin County students athletes who have signed on the dotted line to play a sport in college. On May 30, the last day of school, three Seahawk seniors Bobby John Curry, Logan McLeod and James Newell were honored at a ceremony to celebrate their signing to play baseball with the Trinity Baptist College Eagles, at a private university in Jacksonville. This school has been blessed, baseball coach Aaron York told the assembly of students. Were adding to the history of the school, adding to the foundation. Theyre opening doors for you today. He said the three young men were helped in getting a chance to play for Trinitys newly instituted baseball program because the rst thing they (coaches) say is, number one, tell me about the kids character. These three men have displayed great character. Secondly, York said, the student-athletes earned the grades and test scores to enable them to play college ball, and thirdly, theyve worked hard at it. Theyve had a good support group, of teachers, of moms and dads, and of all the coaches. Curry said its a matter of working on and off the eld, including working out in the weight room. Newell thanked his parents, grandparents and teachers for pushing him, especially my Papa; he pushed me hard. He offered a big thank-you to assistant baseball coach Jonathan Creamer. McLeod offered thanks to the coaches as well, describing them as the best weve ever had, right here. York was assisted by Creamer and Mike Todd this past season. Our teachers really help us one-on-one, McLeod said. These teachers will help you get there, but youre going to have to push yourself. Curry, a pitcher, played three years in high school, while Newell, a pitcher and shortstop, and McLeod, a catcher and inelder, each played all four years. Flanked by his parents, Ronda Newell and Michael Newell, James Newell signs an athletic scholarship, with head coach Aaron York, left, and assistant coach Jonathan Creamer, standing. From staff reports ANERR to host public meeting The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is hosting a public meeting and invites local and regional stakeholders to provide input to state and federal entities about what the reserve does and receive input on what stakeholders think the reserve should do that it doesnt. This includes a discussion of what the Reserve has accomplished in the past ve years. This meeting is part of an evaluation of reserve programs by NOAA, done once every ve years. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 1, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint, Florida 32328. Written comments on your evaluation of reserve programs are encouraged, and participation at the public meeting is not required for submission. Written comments should be sent to Carrie Hall NOAA/ NOS/OCRM, 1305 East-West Highway, N/ORM7, Silver Spring, MD 20910, or via email to Carrie.Hall@noaa. gov no later than July 12. Help the FWC locate rare upland birds The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission requests the publics help in locating three species of rare birds during their breeding seasons. The southeastern American kestrel, the burrowing owl and the painted bunting are rare and declining species that are often overlooked by traditional monitoring programs such as the North American Breeding Bird Survey. People are encouraged to use the FWCs new Rare Bird Registry to quickly map locations where they observe these species, with the option to upload photos and additional comments. Its quick and easy to use. Data submitted will be used by FWC scientists to identify important breeding areas for these species as well as estimate the size of their populations. The Rare Bird Registry is an excellent opportunity for the public to participate in research, said Karl Miller, a biologist at the FWCs Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. Sightings will provide the FWC with valuable data to help us study and conserve some of Floridas most unique and interesting species. This new website provides a great way to get involved. To assist the FWC in locating these rare birds, visit MyFWC.com/GetInvolved and select Citizen Science then Sightings for the Rare Bird Registry link. BRIEFS Heroes of the June 10 game were catcher Al Schrader, left, batter Jim Lynn, right and pitcher Ron Bloodworth, center.

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 unanimously to order a bear proof dumpster for the end of Seventh Street because bears have repeatedly raided the existing dumpster. The city currently pays $62 quarterly for the dumpster in use. The cost of the bear-proof dumpster is $88 quarterly. Tap fee waived for Carrabelle church At Carrabelles June 5 city commission meeting, Commissioner Olivia Massey asked that the $3,260 tap fee to connect the Carrabelle Church of God to the city sewer system be waived. The church has gone from 20 members to 120. They are overowing, she said. The commission voted unanimously to waive the fee. GUSC on track in Carrabelle On Thursday, June 5, Gulf Unmanned Systems Center CEO Bruce McCormack signed the closing papers for the purchase of the old Gulf State Bank complex on US 98 in Carrabelle, which is now headquarters for GUSC. On the same day, GUSC nalized the lease on the old Hexaport factory on John McInnis Road which is now GUSC operations center. At the city meeting held later that evening, GUSC Chief Financial Ofcer Lisa Spooner told the assembly that GUSC now has 10 fulltime employees. Six are from Carrabelle and all reside in Franklin County. Spooner said GUSC will now begin work on landscaping for both headquarters and operations center and will locate a contractor to link the two facilities with secure ber optic cable. McCormack said he is in discussion with several potential clients. Carrabelle museum promised $50,000 for renovations At the June 5 city commission meeting in Carrabelle, Tamara Allen, president of Carrabelles Historical Society, said the Waterfront Partnership has been awarded a $50,000 grant to fund phase II of the restoration of the museum building, formerly city hall. She said the money will be used the seal the exterior plaster and paint the building. Allen said she has contacted a high level paint contractor from Tallahassee for an estimate. County to hire temporary ofce worker County commissioners voted unanimously to let the planning ofce hire a temporary worker for August and September, since one of the front staff will be out for six to eight weeks with knee replacement and another staff person has some extended time they will be off. The temporary worker will not receive any benets and will be paid the same as other parttime workers at $10 an hour. Emerald Warrior granted a discount County commissioners voted unanimously to reduce the amount Visual Awareness Technologies and Consulting (VATC) must pay for leasing the former Bay City Work Camp. VATC wrote the county to say that although they had leased the facility for 12 days earlier this spring, they had only used it for six days due to bad weather. Commissioners voted unanimously to charge them for nine days of use. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said VATC had not used the facility for the full span. He said they were late in picking up the keys. Pierce suggested that in the future, a clause be included in contracts to lease the facility stating county policy in the event of bad weather. Lighthouse association elects new board Ofcers and directors of the St. George Lighthouse Association were elected at the annual meeting held in Lighthouse Park on May 22. Ofcers for 2014 are Dennis Barnell, president; Jim Kemp, vice president; Terry Kemp, secretary; and Phyllis Vitale-Lewis, treasurer. Directors are Brant Banks, Dennis Barnell, Vito Bell, Bud Hayes, Bob Heide, Jim Kemp, Terry Kemp, Fred Stanley, and Phyllis Vitale-Lewis. Brant Banks, the newest board member, is a resident of Apalachicola and teaches history at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Outgoing directors are Richard Saucer and Kristy Branch Banks. At the annual meeting, Barnell introduced new Lighthouse Keeper Mark Vail, who succeeds retiring Keeper Stanley Colvin. In his report at the meeting, Vail said that visitation to the Lighthouse in 2013 was up by about 10 percent over previous years. More than 92,000 people have climbed the Lighthouse since its opening in Dec. 2008. Gift Shop Manager Carol Talley announced the successful implementation of a Quick Books Point of Sale system, and invited members to browse the new summer merchandise in the shop. Secretary Terry Kemp reported that as of the annual meeting date, SGLA membership stands at about 450 members. Volunteers needed at lighthouse museum The St. George Lighthouse Association has vacancies for docents at the Lighthouse Museum. Docents perform a valuable service by educating visitors about the lighthouse, answering questions about the island, and preserving order in a small space. Docents can volunteer for a regular weekly shift, generally three hours, or ll in as their time is available. To volunteer, call 927-7745. County to purchase more Eastpoint waterfront At their June 3 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to purchase a sliver of land on the Eastpoint waterfront located between the Eastpoint Pavilion and the Patton Drive Boat Ramp. The owner, David Diehl offered the property for sale. The county will pay the assessed value of the land, $9,720, with funds from capital outlay. This parcel is a wedge with some 60 feet of waterfront. The county will now have 350 feet of waterfront with this purchase. County Planner Alan Pierce said the cost is roughly equal to the amount received from the Eastpoint Minimart for an encroachment onto county land in the same area, so in some sense that will balance out the withdrawal from capital outlay. Hurricane reentry tags in Carrabelle On Wednesday, June 18, a representative of Franklin County Emergency Management will visit the Carrabelle Municipal Center, 1001 Gray Avenue, to distribute disaster reentry tags. These tags simplify reentry of the county after an evacuation. To get a tag, you must furnish proof of residence (ie. utility bills or other mail with a street address) and a current photo ID. You can also obtain a tag online at www. franklinemergencymanagement. co m If you have any questions, call 653-8977. Tr ades & Ser vi ces AD VERTISE HERE TO DA Y 227-7847 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD BRIEFS from page A2

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Schools A15 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 Franklin County HONOR ROLL ABC HONOR ROLL The following is the Honor Roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at Franklin County Elementary School. First grade All As: Esteban Bernabe-Juan, Jerzy Jackson, Christopher Creek, Christian Daughtry, Josiah Friddle, Sarah Ham, Kamora Harris, Dezmonae Sanders, Bradley Page, Charity Larkin, Sy Bartlett, Lester Owens, Loghan Carver, Reshard Robinson, Dexton Teat A/B: Adrionna Martin, Harmony Malone, Daylen Gilbert, Nathan Rotella, Christopher Russell, Hunter Ard, Jordan Barber, Raegan Dempsey, Nyashia Davis, Cammie Gilbert, Jasmine Gray, Kassidy Denney, Emmanuel Marcum, Madison MillenderWagner, Ajaylen McNair, Robert Romero, Daniel Lively, Dominic Durbin, Jesus Pelico-Lopez, Estela Peralta-Virbes, Layla Dixon, Rosa Pascual-Juan, Lilianna Joiner, Michael Hill, Michelle Weisz, McKenna Young, Asya Owens, Ayla Derico Second grade All As: William Chipman, Emily Patterson, Charles Glass, Bricyn Kennedy, Kirsten Martina, Onamae Millender, Corbin Pritchard, Terry Proctor, Mason Pace, Logan Bentley, Lonnie ONeal, Evan Ogden A/B: Cole Polous, Dakota Shiver, Zachary Thompson, Gavin Shelley, Christian Wilson, Joseph Bass, Aryauna Benjamin, Marcus Clayton, Hannah Creamer, Jayden Gray, Bradlynn Hutchins, Jesse Whitted, Owen Golden, Kayleigh Leonard, Ansley Savage, Tyler Baxley, Rebecca Mahon, Austin Millender, Anthony Stulsky, Jada Allen, Braden Shiver, Kylie Proctor, Laelah Carranza, Iliana Gilmore Third grade All As: Alondra Jimenez, Autumn Loesch, Grace Carroll, Lucy Edwards, Kylie Rudd, Marissa Gilbert, Ellis Billingsley A/B: Laura Woods, Don Davis, Emily Fichera, Tariah Jones, Tashawn Jones, Cloey Malone, Jaylan Prince, Jesse Mock, Tyasia Yarrell, Ethan Shirley, Emaleigh Segree, OMarion Kelley, Parker Martina, Shalyn Massey, Sarai Crumbliss, Adia Barber, Sara Johnsen, Dylan Culver Fourth grade All As: Michael Melton, Savannah Brannan, Rachel Rudd, Annie Smith, Kristen Stancil, Larry Winchester, Maddison Whitten, Steven Cook, Brianna Cardwell A/B: Audrey Yowell, Trinity Barron, Blakely Curry, Jachob-Earl Thompson, Bryce Gilbert, Kevin Burch, Christian Custer, Ariel Andrews, Marina ONeal, Grace Patterson, Brendon Polous, Sarah Segree, Rebecca Shiver, Sydney Shuman, Ava McAnally, Robert Nessly, Mary Bareld, Amber Goldin, Merrideth Kiernan Fifth grade All As: William Gray, Katie Newman, Martina Granger, Shirah Pelt, A/B: Lorne Whaley, Caden Evans, Camron Evans, Stephen Malone, Katelyn Cox, Capri Cargill, Patrick Millender, Makayla Varner, Hollie Larkin, Layla Chisholm, Tressie Edwards, Marci Kelley, Destanie Proctor, Charlee Winchester, Shaydan Pearson, Francisco Juan, Tiauna Benjamin, Ethan Anderson SPECIAL T O T HE TIME S Third graders posing with their certicates for perfect 260 scores in the FCATs are, left, Alondra Jimenez, from Lynn Clarks class, for reading and math; and Kylie Rudd, from Jeannie Fords class, for math. The following is the honor roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. First grade R. Ramsdell All As: Shlok Patel, Gracyn Paul, Jazmyn Pavon, Evie-Morgan Price, Promise Suddeth and Mabry Wallace. A/B: Josh Dykes, Desiree Messer, Olivia Poloronis and Joel Taylor H. Baroody All As: Zariah Harvey, Mya Huckeba, Issy Nations, Micahlyn ONeal and Krista Varnes A/B: Maleah Croom, Breahna Fleming, Shaylee Martina, Khali McNair and Ben Sanders. Second grade S. Herrington All As: Peyton Blackburn, Nathaniel Bolinger, CJ Conway, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Taylor Mallon, and Jostyn Tipton A/B: Hannah Grace Abel, Cody Abercrombie, Landrick Moore, Malic ONeal, Charlie Ramsdell, and Weston Taranto J. Mallon All As: Reece Juno, William Luberto, Alexcia McNair, Taylor Pendleton, Isabella Price and Kiana Weeks A/B: Trinity Creamer, Esteban Juan Bernabe, Jentzen Odom and Aniyah Rivera Third grade W. Martina All As: Lucy Neill, Arav Patel, Owen Poloronis, River Sheridan, Mahaley Shuler and Trinity Taylor A/B: Mitchell Adkins, Mason Moses and Mark Willis T. Moses All As: Eric Lau, Kylah Ross and John-Michael Thompson A/B: Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Daisy Jimenez, Laithan Kent, Jayden Nichols, Jackson Segree and Colin Weng Fourth grade L. Bockelman All As: Meredith Alford, Dylan Grifn, Alex Itzkovitz, Myia Maxwell, Brooklyn ONeal, John Sanders, Gracie Smith and Nico Valenzuela A/B: Carson Davis, Severyn Everitt, Eulalia Gregorio, Gavin Lashley and Rory Ramsdell, M. Lee All As: Lanie Allen, Weston Bockelman, Lauren Conway, Ella Friedman, Andrew Monod and Stanley Tate A/B: Colin Amison, Logan Freeman, Genevieve Montgomery and Jeremy Shuler Fifth grade J. Ammons All As: Camille Davis, Kaylee Hicks, Alex Joanos and Livia Monod A/B: Cody Cassidy, Devin Daniels, Stanley Gay, Skye Huber and Gregory Wilson L. Poloronis All As: Brycin Huckeba, Abby Johnson, Elizabeth McAnally, Madalyn Thompson and Jack Vail A/B: Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Jadyn Luberto, Clinton Rester, Caden Turrell and Jarvis Turrell Sixth grade Karen Ward All As: Cade Juno and Sophia Robertson A/B: Bailey Herrington, Jayden Justice, Krista Kelley, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Nash Ramsdell, Allison Register, Hannah Sweet and Chandler Wray Brant Banks All As: Alyssa Robinson, Drake Stanley and Camille Williams Seventh grade Tanya Joanos All As: Kevin Flores-Perez, Mikalin Huckeba and Jack Ramsdell A/B: Hailey Gay, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott and Ethan Vonier Anna Keel All As: Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer and Becca Willis E ighth grade Melanie Copeland A/B: Brian Bareld, Mia Cummings, Joseph Martinez, Sallie Rose Paul and Audrianna Penamon Tara Ward All As: Christian Amison, Michaela Cassidy, Kobe Myers, Andrew Nguyen, Faith Sapp and Lucas Sasnett A/B: Nick Joanos, Brooke Martina, Savannah Montgomery, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Timothy Shuler and Madison Smith CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, June 12, 2014 The Times | A15 95142T PUBLIC NOTICE Solicitation Number: 14HM-6B-02-29-01-385 Title: Request for Documented Quote, Professional Contracting Services for the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Wind Retrofit The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is announcing the documented quote for professional contracting services for a wind retrofit on the EOC by shuttering all windows and doors and constructing a new hip roof. The selected firm will provide engineering or roof designs and construction plans, and contract or furnish all labor, materials, equipment tools, transportation, and supervision as indicated in the sealed drawings and specifications. The contractor must have a proven track record, extensive experience and holds a State of Florida Certified Building Contractors License. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any or all bids or any part thereof and/or to waive the information if such is deemed to be in the best interest of Franklin County. The county also reserves the right to reject the bid of any bidder who has previously failed to perform adequately after having once been awarded a prior bid for furnishing materials similar in nature to those materials mentioned in this bid. Download the Specification Details/ Attachments: www.frankline mergencymanagement.co m Point of Contact: Sole contact for the Documented Quote: Gail Leek. All questions pertaining to this solicitation must be submitted in writing to gleek@realknow.com. Please reference the solicitation number. Submission Deadline Date: June 30, 2014 at 4:00 PM EST Deliver three sealed copies of the Documented Quote to: Franklin County Clerks Office Attn: Michael Moron 33 Market Street, Suite 203 Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Published Dates: June 5, 12, 2014 95144T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2014-CA-000080 Bank of America, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Daryl F. Knopf a/k/a Daryl Knopf; et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: Carrabelle Landings Homeowners Association, Inc.; CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN: LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, c/o William S. Howell, R.A, 1727 County Highway 393 South, Carrabelle, FL 32459 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 6, CARRABELLE LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as Vacant -Lot 6 Carrabelle Landing, Landing Street, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 22nd day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Circuit and County Courts By: Terry Segree Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 13-269229 FCO2 CWF June 12, 19, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 99089T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes units:

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A16| The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Admin/ClericalNOTICETHE FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WILL CONSIDER APPLICANTS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITION:TEMPORARY PART TIME SECRETARIAL POSITIONFOR THE PLANNING & BUILDING DEPARTMENTJOB DESCRIPTION: Typing, Filing, Computer Skills, Office Equipment, Assisting Office Staff and Answering A Busy Multi-Phone Line System. Works well with the public and has familiarity in reading and interpreting maps. PAY: $10.00 Hour WORK WEEK: Monday -Friday 35 Hour Work Week (THIS IS A TEMPORARY POSITION THAT DOES NOT INCLUDE ANY BENEFITS AND WILL ONLY LAST UP TO SIX MONTHS) Applications can be obtained and submitted to the following: Franklin County Planning & Building Department, 34 Forbes Street, Ste 1, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 4:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014. FRANKLIN COUNTY IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Web Id 34291247 Text FL91247 to 56654 Admin/ClericalUF/IFAS Franklin County Extension Office HiringOffice Manager/Program Assistant position40 hours/week, $10-12/hour with benefits Experience required in word processing and spreadsheets, a typing test will be given during interviews. Responsible for office management, tracking budgets, assisting with Extension programs, updating social media pages, and serving the public on the phone and in person. For full job announcement or questions contact: Franklin County Extension Director at : elovestrand@ufl.edu or call the office at (850) 653-9337. The position will be open for applications June 12-26, 2014. Web Id 34291772 Text FL91772 to 56654 HEAD COACH FASTPITCH SOFTBALLThis position will manage & supervise the overall operations of the Softball program to assure compliance with national, state, & institutional guidelines; Develop an intercollegiate athletic softball program that has integrity & a positive environment for student athletes, sta, & fans, & will also be responsible for assuring the team has a consistently high graduation rate & competes at a championship level. For additional information about this position please visit: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr Minimum Qualications: Bachelors degree required, Masters preferred in a related eld, plus 2 years of 2 year College or University Womens Softball coaching experience; Head Coach or Assistant Coach. Or a minimum of 4 years of Head Coaching experience at the Senior High School level, or a combination of College coaching & Senior HS head coaching experience. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply.Salary Range Starts At: $52,020.00 Deadline to apply: 06/20/2014Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98; via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies.1129123 4518212CITY OF APALACHICOLA POLICE OFFICER POSITION OPENThe City of Apalachicola will receive applications for one full-time police ofcer position. Qualications include but are not limited to the following: 1. Florida Police Standards Certication preferred. 2. Must be able to pass required pre-employment drug screening and physical examination. 3. Must have a valid Florida Drivers License.Applications may be downloaded from the City’s website at www.cityofapalachicola.com or picked up during regular ofce hours (8:00 AM … 4:00 PM Monday … Friday) at City Hall … 1 Avenue E or Apalachicola Police Department … 127 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida. Applications will be received and considered until position is lled. For further information contact the Apalachicola Police Department at 850-653-9755.Fax and Email applications will not be considered.THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE AND FAIR HOUSING COMMUNITY 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 550.00/mo. 2. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Furnished. W/D, fenced yard. 525.00/mo. 3. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, unfurnished. 450.00/mo. 4. 39-1 Carlton. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, carport. 650.00/mo. incl. utilities 5. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach. 1400.00/mo. 6. 202 1st St NE, Carrabelle. 5 bedroom, 2 baths, unfurnished. 1000.00/mo. 7. 1108 Tallahassee St., Carrabelle. 3 bedroom, 3 baths, unfurnished. 500.00/mo.8. 302 Woodill Rd., Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, W/D, 1 acre. 500.00/mo.9. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished. 550.00/mo. 10. 33-2 Holland. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 500.00/mo. 11. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 12. 811 Three Rivers Rd. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on water, deep water dock, garage, fenced yard, parking. 1000.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518214 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Susie’s Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Pub: June 5, 12, 2014 99097T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA-000317 Section:___________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELETTINGER AKAMIKE ETTINGER; ELYSE ETTINGER; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; HIDDEN BEACHES PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION; HIDDEN BEACHES AT YENTBAYOU, INC.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 192011-CA-000317 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 2nd day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT12, HIDDEN BEACHES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6 ATPAGE 11 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99095T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2011-00448-CA DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. JENNIFER KERN, ET. AL. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, and entered in Case No.201100448-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Bank of America, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jennifer Kern and St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc., are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/out Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 at 11:00 A.M., Franklin County, Florida on the 16th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT7 OF SEAPINE VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4 PAGE 28 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/ALOT7 SEA PINE VILLA, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 20th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC -14-127369 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 5, 12, 2014 99143T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CA 000189 Section: ________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. EBE WALTER; HENRIETTA A. WALTER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SYNOVUS BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 19 2012 CA 000189 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 9th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 26 OF DOG ISLAND SUBDIVISION, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE (S) 23 & 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99145T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2014-0007-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF WYNETTE F. TUCKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS Pursuant to Florida Statute 733.2121 (2013) and Florida Probate Rules Rule 5.241 (2014), the administration of the estate of Wynette F. Tucker, deceased, whose date of death was January 13, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County. Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street. Suite 126, PO Box 368, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 5, 2014. Personal Representative: NICOLE TUCKER 140 Ed Padgett Rd. Lakeland, FL 33809 Attorney for Personal Representative: EDWIN A. GREEN, II, ESQ. FL Bar No. 0137244 215 Delata Court Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 222-7770 June 5, 12, 2014 99209T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 19-2012-CA-000448 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. ROBIN A. HYMAN, MICHAEL HYMAN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 22, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 40 IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH RANGE 5 WEST, AND EXTEND A LINE EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT 40 FOR 415.47 FEET; THENCE TURN 25 DEGREES 16 MINUTES LEFT FOR 118.70 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES RIGHT AND EXTEND A LINE SOUTHEASTERLY FOR 330.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE IN THE SAME DIRECTION FOR 66 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RETRACE THE LINE LAST DESCRIBED ABOVE IN A NORTHWESTERLY DIRECTION FOR 66 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE IN THE SAME DIRECTION FOR 300.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 30-U.S. 90; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES RIGHT ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR 100.00 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES RIGHT FOR 377 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THEN TURN RIGHT ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE FOR 101 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PART OF TRACTS 40 AND 41 IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND IN THE SUBDIVISION OF ST. GEORGE IN PLAT BOOK 1 AT PAGE 1, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN THAT SURVEY DATED 9/4/2008, PREPARED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES UNDER JOB # 01-386, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 40, ST GEORGE CITY, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN CO., FLORIDA AND RUN EAST 415.47 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 117.64 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 298.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE 25 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 110.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 105.46 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 25 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 373.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and commonly known as: 2458 HIGHWAY 98 W., CARRABELLE, FL 32322; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the 2nd floor Lobby of the Courthouse, at 33 Market St., in Apalachicola, Florida, on August 6, 2014 at 11:00 A.M. (Est.). Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of June, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Micheled Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 12, 19, 2014 Apalachicola128 22nd Ave Sat June 14th 8:-UntilYard SaleClothes, Small Kitchen Appliances, Household Goods, and Much More.Text FL90843 to 56654 Carrabelle: 1621 Hwy 98 West (old pawn shop), Sat, June 14th, 8am-?Yard SaleClothing, Furniture, & Lots of Other Great Items. Text FL91700 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative AssistantFor guest services. Happy and energetic person, good communication and computer skills. Ability to read and follow instructions. Come by and pick up application or email to visitorcentermanager@ammfl. org Apalachicola Maritime Museum 103 Water St, 850-653-2500 Web ID 34290443 Banking Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34287017 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291810 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291809 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAdministrative ReceptionistThis full-time position requires excellent customer service skills & a smile! Must be neat, organized & attentive to detail with good computer skills & knowledge of Microsoft Word, Outlook & Excel. Good grammar, spelling & punctuation. Varied office duties including phones & walk-in traffic. Prefer prior office experience. Full-time Mon-Fri w/ great benefits. Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-5pm at: 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island or call Sandra 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34290509 Commercial Building For Rent. Hwy 98 Apalach 1000sf High Traffic 850-653-6900 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 2 bedroom handicap Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer” Text FL72436 to 56654 Apalachicola : 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 Spot Advertising works!

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 12, 2014 The Times | A17

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Local A18 | The Times Thursday, June 12, 2014 Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Tim es To day (850) 653-886 8 YO UR HOMET OWN NEW SP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YE ARS YO UR H OMET OWN NE WSP APE R F OR M ORE THAN 120 Y EARS TH E T IME S & C arrabel le A palachicola Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. Su nr oom, scr eened &o pen por ches ,h ot tub o MBR suit e, lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho we ra nd gar den tub detached gar age ,g as r eplac e, gr anit ec oun te rt ops ,s tainless ki tc hen, wine co oler ,b uilt-in co rner ca binets .A menities include co mmunit y dock ,p ool ,t ennis co ur ts .M ain living ar ea &m ast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs fo rp riv ac yw /p riv ate por ch. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-19 71 st ev e@st ev esisland .com www .288m agnol iaba yd r. com ww w. st ev esislan d. com MLS 248897 ST .G EORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 P ositiv eS pace -I mmac ula te ly main tained cu st om home designed by ar chit ec tL ar ry Bu rk eo n ao ne acr el andsc aped lot in pr estigious St .G eor ge Pl an ta tion! Th is one ow ner home is beautifully furnished and fe at ur es Gu lf views acr oss the en tir es outhern wa ll of the house .T he sp ac io us mas te r suit et ota ll yo cc upi es the 2nd oor with easy ac ce ss to the laundr yr oo mf ro mt he bedr oom. Bo th guest bedr ooms ha ve priv ate ba ths and the d en c an ser ve as a4 th be dr oo mw ith ah alf ba th or oc e / cr af tr oom .B eautiful full por ches for easy en te rt aining and enjo ying the Gu lf view .T hi sh ome also has ag as r eplac ea nd oak oors thr oughou tt he living/din ing ar eas .S qua re foo tage ,a cr eage and lot dimensions ar et ak en fr om Co un ty Pr oper ty Ap pr aiser s we bsit e. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-1 971 ww w. st ev esisland .com www .P o si t iv eS paceH ome .com REDUCED 850-899-9988 |8 50-697-9010 www .coasta lr eal tyinfo.co m An oth er gr ea td ea lo nt he co as t! !! -c he ck ou tt hi sl ar ge 2B Rmet icu lo us ly ke pt un it. Al mo st ne wa pp li an ce s an dr oo f. Th is uni th as th el ar ge rs ho we r/ tu bc omb o ba th .F ur ni tu re ne go ti ab le fo rat ur nk ey ,m ov er ight in Lo wm ai nt en an ce on one of th el ar ge rc ou rt ya rd so fL V -a bund an tp av er pat io s. Sc re en por ch that co uld ea si ly be co nv er te d/ ex pa nd ed to FL ro om fo ra dd ls pa ce MLS# 250854 $69,900 St. George Island YO UR PI EC EO FT HE IS LA ND 1/ 3a cr ei nt he qu ie tp ar to ft he is la nd ,j us to ne lo ti nf ro m th ec or ner of 10 th St re et &W es tB ay Shor eD ri ve ,e as y be ac ha cce ss ju st 3s hor tb lo ck sd ow n1 0th St re et to Gu lf AN De as yb ay ac ce ss to pu bl ic par kj us td ow nB ay Sh or e Dr iv e. Li st ed by Jo hn Sh el by 800-344-757 0 850-927-477 7 www .sgirealty .com 29,000 MLS# 251429 $274,900 St. George Island BE AC HF RO NT CO ND O Le as tE xp ens iv eB eac hf ro nt dwe ll in go nS t. Ge or ge Is la nd Gr ou nd le ve lb ea ch fr on tc on do un it in af ou rpl ex ,C ut e tw ob ed ro om ,o ne ba th un it ,n ew ti le in ki tc he n&L R, Fu rn is he d, Sc re en ed po rc ho nb eac hs id e, Wa sh er an d dr ye r, Li st ed by Jo hn Sh el by 800-344-757 0 850-927-477 7 www .sgirealty .com 850-566-67 61 or 850-385-6363 www .tlgproperty .com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) His real name was Dino Crocetti, but what was his stage name? Stubby Kaye, Dean Martin, Red Skelton, Denver Pyle 2) Which Beverly Hillbillies character in real life was illiterate? Jethro, Granny, Cousin Pearl, Miss Jane 3) What was the name of Paladins (Richard Boone) horse during older TVs Have Gun Will Travel? Tramp, River, Fire, Rafter 4) Which of these was not an Elvis (Presley) movie? Kid Galahad, Kissin Cousins, Picnic, Wild In The Country 5) What is the largest city in the Arab League? Damascus, Beirut, Tripoli, Cairo 6) By best road mileage route which of these is closest to Phoenix, AZ? Omaha, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Memphis 7) What scale is used in geology to measure the size of loose rocks? Antioch, Otto, Wentworth, Marlin 8) Which Monkee is/was nicknamed Wool Hat as he often wore one? Davy, Micky, Peter, Michael 9) What was the middle name of the late TV host/producer Dick Clark? Howard, Thomas, Wagstaff, Westmoreland 10) In 1983 what ragtime pianistcomposer died ve days after his 100th birthday? John Roache, James P. Johnson, Robin Frost, Eubie Blake 11) When was David Bowie star-honored on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? 1997, 1999, 2006, 2013 12) How many million people was the Earths approximate population during Julius Caesars time? 2, 9, 110, 150 13) Chevy Chase starred in how many National Lampoon vacation movies? 2, 3, 4, 5 14) Approximately how many miles are in a 5K (kilometer) race? 2.5, 3.1, 4.2, 5.0 ANSWERS 1) Dean Martin. 2) Granny. 3) Rafter. 4) Picnic. 5) Cairo. 6) Omaha. 7) Wentworth. 8) Michael. 9) Wagstaff. 10) Eubie Blake. 11) 1997. 12) 150. 13) 4. 14) 3.1. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com SPECIAL T O T HE TIME S This precious kitten showed up at a house in Apalachicola a couple of days ago. She needs a loving forever home very soon! She was skittish at rst but is now quite friendly and enjoys attention. If she nds a home, the Apalachicola woman said she would be happy to have her spayed and given rst shots. She cannot keep her and there is no room at the local shelter for another kitten. Can you help nd this deserving kitten a loving home? Call Bruce Hall 653-3820. MS. KITTY NEEDS LOVING FOREVER HOME