The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00273

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, June 5, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM PP hone: 850-653-8868 WW eb: apalachtimes.com EE -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8893 CC irculation: 800-345-8688 DEAEADLILINESES FOOR NEEXTT WEEWEEK: SSchool News & SSociety: 11 a.m. Friday Real EEstate AAds: 11 a.m. Thursday LLegal AAds: 11 a.m. Friday CClassied Display AAds: 11 a.m. Friday CClassied LLine AAds: 5 p.m. Monday CContact Us OOut to see IIndex By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com In the seven years of Franklin County High School commencements, last weeks ranked among the most en ergetic and enthusiastic of ceremonies, as 63 seniors re ceived diplomas as members of the Class of 2014. The condent swagger in the gymnasium air May 29 was seized early by Class President Jathan Martin, who snapped a sele of himself and his classmates before of fering a welcome address that featured a pop quiz. Now seniors, I know you thought your high school tests were all over, but heres a pop quiz. The answer to each question of this pop quiz is simple: The class of 2014, he said, before launching into ve questions, each of which was responded to loudly by his classmates collective answer. Which class had over 10 athletes signed to colleges? he asked. Which class had students who directed and performed in Franklin County Schools rst Broadway production? Which class body was ac cepted to over 30 colleges and universities? Which class earned over 450 college credit hours? *Which class received over $600,000 in scholarship money? Martin continued, each answer coming back The Class of 2014, loud and clear. Throughout our high school career, we have en acted hard-work, determina tion, and resilience. So, we welcome you to the night where we birth our futures, he said. Tonight is the night where you will witness histo ry. Tonight is the night where the class that has excelled far By AMandaANDA BanANKsS The News Herald APALACHICOLAAPALACHICOLA The daily harvest of oyster in Apalachicola Bay will be drastically reduced, under new Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commis sion ruled announced last week. The changes run from now through Aug. 31. Because Apalachicola Bay oysters have signi cantly declined in popula tion due to lack of freshwa ter ow in previous years, these changes are intend ed to help the oyster popu lation recover from the ef fects of low river ow. The FWC worked with the Franklin County oyster industry to implement the temporary changes, and the industry agrees the measures are a way to en sure the long-range health of the industry. The FWC is support ing us and theyre listen ing to us, said Shannon Hartseld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Hartseld said his orga nization asked for some of the changes, including the harvest limits and closure of some areas, and that they are happy with the new regulations. The changes include: Prohibiting commer cial and recreational har vest of oysters in the area commonly known as East Hole; Lowering the daily commercial harvest and possession limit from 20 to eight bags (each bag is equivalent to 60 pounds or two ve-gallon buckets) of oysters in the shell per person; Lowering the daily recreational harvest, ves sel and possession limit to ve gallons of oysters in the shell (previously two bags per day with one bag being equivalent to 60 pounds or two ve-gallon buckets); Prohibiting commer cial oyster harvests on Fri days and Saturdays. All other harvest regu lations remain in effectCuts in store for summer oyster harvestTake a look at summer harvesting areas on Page A8 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com With nearly a half-mil lion dollars in grant money on its way from the Florida Legislature, Apalachicola city ofcials have their sights set on a proposal to transform the 80-yearold Chapman Schools into a new home for the municipal library. Apalachicola Librar ian Caty Greene reported Tuesday to city commis sioners that a $497,000 public library construction grant from the Division of Library and Informa tion Services survived Gov. Scotts veto pen. The grant calls for the remod eling of the 6,400 square foot Chapman Schools for use as an independent municipal library headquarters. Because the school district in 2009 deeded the building to the county, the library plan will have to secure the blessing of the county commission. In addition, accom modations would have to be made to relocate the ofce of Apalachic ola cardiologist Dr. Shezad Sanaul lah, who recently renewed a threeyear lease with the county for use of the building. Currently, Sanaullah pays $1,961 per month, which includes $1,833 annual tax. His bill will be reduced by $100 monthly because he has installed a separate water meter and will pay his own water bill. Theres a good deal of nego tiation that needs to go in that re spect, said Greene, noting that the lease has a six-month cancel lation clause, for whatever reason, Apalach envisions library at Chapman Schools We back down from nothing PHOTOS BY BY DA A VI I D AA DLE LE RSTEI STEI N | The TimesSalutatorian Jathan MartinClass of 2014 graduates in unisonBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Strong performances by Apala chicola Bay Charter School fourth and eighth graders set the standard for countywide improvement in FCAT writ ing scores in 2014. The percentage of ABC Schools 35 eighth graders who posted a passing grade of 3.5 or better in essay writing rose by 13 percentage points, from 50 to 63 percent, the best it has been in the three years the test has been given. Among the schools 39 fourth grad ers, the improvement in scores at satis factory or above rose by 12 percentage points, from 44 to 56 percent. This cur rent percentage of the class who posted satisfactory scores is double the 28 per cent of ABC fourth graders who did so in 2012. I am extremely pleased with our fourth grade and eighth grade writing scores, said ABC School Principal Chi mene Johnson. Both grade levels were above state average and our teachers motivated their students to do their best and use the writing strategies they have been taught. Our mission is that every student reach their full academic and social potential. Every year is a different year with students with varying capa bilities, she said. Our teaching staff works diligently to provide the best ed ucational foundation for their students to be successful and show growth every year. At Franklin School, eighth graders showed an impressive jump of 17 per centage points who were at satisfactory and above in their essay writing, a leap to 41 percent from 24 percent last year, and 26 percent the year before that. But the number of Franklin fourth graders at satisfactory or better slid to 40 percent, seven percentage points be hind last years 47, and nearly the same as the 41 percent of fourth graders who were satisfactory or better in 2012. Among Franklin County High School 10th graders, the percentage at sat isfactory and above slid to 37 percent, ve percentage points below last years 42, but ve head of 2012s 32 percent.See LIBrRArR Y A8 See GrRAduDUATIOnN A6 See fFCAT A6ABC paces writing FCAT gains As I think about all of my peers both the ones I know personally and the rest of you I know, without a shred of doubt that we will make a change in the world VALEdDICTOrRIAnN LLAurURA GGALLEGOS VALEdDICTOrRIAnN BrBRIA WW ALkKErR Many of us know which direction we would like to go in and yet some of us have no clue where to start... Its okay to simply not know. Now is the time to nd out who you truly are. vV Ol L 129 Iss SS Ue E 6 CCATY GrGREEnNE Apalachicola city librarianOpinion . . . . . . ............ AA4 Society . . . . . . ........... AA10 Faith . . . . . . . ............. AA11 Outdoors . . . . . .......... AA12 Tide Chart . . . . . ......... AA12 Sports . . . . . . ............ AA13 Classieds . . . ...... AA14-AA15 Those dang yellowies, AA2 T T he L L ongest Day at museum S S aturday Camp Gordon Johnston World War II museum will show the lm The Longest Day at 10:15 a.m. on Saturday, June 7 in honor of the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The movie is lmed in the style of a docudrama and concentrates on events on both sides of the channel. This lm is one in a series shown monthly to educate museum visitors on the sacrices made, for us, by the World War II generation. Free popcorn will be served. Admission is by donation and appreciated.Full moon climb at lighthouse June 12The June Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, June 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb is from 8-9:30 p.m. and includes light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people can climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. Reservations are recommended. Please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Network with other businesses June 12Network with other area business owners at the Apalachicola Bay Chamber Business After Hours Monday, at Up The Stairs, 76 Market Street in Apalachicola on Thursday, June 12 from 5:30-7 pm.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Its a bad year for yellow ies. Yellow ies, a common name for tabanids, are in the family that also includes horse ies. There are more than 300 species of tabanids in North America, whose other common names include pine ies and deer ies. Tabanid ies are among the most highly evolved insects making them one of the most highly adapted animals on the planet. All tabanids are erce biters with slashing/sponging mouthparts adapted to consuming blood. The mouthparts feature a blade similar to a Ginsu knife with a serrated edge. Because they are blood-feeders, they can transmit diseases such as tularemia and anthrax between prey animals Some people develop allergic reactions to the bites, which swell and turn into nasty red sores. Fly attacks result in lowered gains and low milk production in livestock animals. In 1976, estimated losses in the United States were $40 million. Adult tabanids are swift, strong iers and can travel more than a mile from their breeding areas. Most deer ies require a blood meal to develop eggs. However, they also feed on pollen, nectar honeydew excreted by sucking insects like aphids. Adult tabanids are encountered in Florida between May and September. Most tabanids overwinter as larvae, form a cocoon and emerge during the spring and early summer. Most tabanid larvae develop in water, animal droppings or mud. The majority have a yearlong life cycle but some larger species may take two or three years to mature. Adult life span is 30-60 days. Tabanids are ambush attackers that lie in wait in shady areas under bushes and trees for a chance to feed. They locate prey mainly by vision. Attacks occur during daylight, with peak activity beginning at sunrise and two hours before sunset. They are drawn to moving objects, especially darkcolored ones, and are attracted to the color blue. There are no effective biological control programs for controlling tabanids. Native insects including some dragonies feed on them. They are also parasitized by wasp species that place paralyzed yellow ies in their nests as food for developing wasp larvae. The large burrowing sand wasps seen in late spring and early summer are among the most effective yellow y predators and, although they have a hornet-like appearance, do not sting. Cattle egrets and killdeer also feed on tabanids. There is no known chemical method of control for yellow y populations. Traps can be effective in small areas. Commonly used traps take the form of a dark ball covered with glue to ensnare the pests reducing the population in the immediate area. DEET, citronella and geranium oil are effective repellants. Ear tags and collars impregnated with pesticides help control attacks on animals. For personal protection, avoid being outside around dusk and dawn. Use a repellant. Wear long pants and a long sleeved shirt and choose light colors. Most tabanids tend to swarm around the highest point on their prey, although yellow ies also attack the legs. There is evidence that wearing a tall hat will help discourage them from biting; it has been suggested the tall peaked hats depicted on crackers or hillbillies were worn to discourage tabanids. Early Florida settlers used the leaves of beautyberry as a repellant for ies and other biting insects. They rubbed them on exposed skin and tucked them under the harness of horses, mules and oxen. Modern research has found this plant an effective insect repellant, and a commercial formulation is under development. Several Franklin County residents have suggested ways to live with deer ies. Gill and Lane Autrey drink a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar every morning, which they say acts as a natural repellant. This author has experimented with drinking cider vinegar, and it does seem to discourage yellow ies. Highly sensitive to yellow y bites, Glynda Ratliff of St. George Island has a suggestion for those who have already been bitten. As soon as possible, tape a slice of raw potato over the bite. Ratliff has found it signicantly reduces her swelling. The University of Florida has developed a trolling y trap found to be highly effective in tabanid control. The trap is a blue cylinder mounted on a slow-moving object and coated with glue. The cylinder can be mounted on a lawnmower, fourwheeler, golf cart or a cap. According to researchers, you can create an effective personal protection device by coating a blue plastic cup with tanglefoot, glue for trapping insects available in hardware stores. Mount the inverted cup on a blue ball cap and the ies will be more attracted to it than to the wearer. Flies drawn to you by the carbon dioxide you exhale will land on the cup and be trapped. Some people may nd wearing such a device embarrassing. A trap for the general area of outdoor activity can be made by painting a sixinch plastic owerpot blue and coating in with tanglefoot. The pot must then be mounted on a moving object like a lawnmower or golf cart. This trap is only effective when in motion. Circling an area several times will reduce the number of yellow ies temporarily until more y in from the surrounding area. The trap will not work if it sits in one place, even if it is rotating or shaking. Traps must be moved through space. If you keep a trolling trap mounted on your lawnmower or golf cart, you will reduce y numbers during their regular use. Deer ies usually y at heights lower than 10 feet and usually attack the highest available area on the human body rst. Walking with a trap mounted on a pole and shaken overhead can be effective. Tanglefoot can be messy but can be readily removed with hand cleaners that contain citrus extracts. GoJo Natural Orange Pumice Hand Cleaner works very well. NorthFloridaMedicalCenters,Inc.MEDICALCENTER Eastpoint Acceptingmostinsurance(includingCapitalHealthPlan),Medicare, Medicaid,andslidingfeeavailabletoqualifyingpatientsastpointMedicalCenterwouldliketocelebrateSheilaAllen, ARNPforheryearsinFranklinCountyprovidinghealthcare tothecommunityonbehalfofNorthFloridaMedicalCenters. PleasefeelfreetostopbyandprovideMs.Allenyourwell wishesassheembracesanewchallengewithIndianHealth ServicestoimprovethehealthofNativeAmericans. AlthoughEastpointMedicalCenterwillhavechanges,high qualityhealthcareatEastpointMedicalCenterwillcontinue. AnnRubin,PAandAngelCortes, MDwillbeavailableforhealth careservicesatEastpointMedical Center,includingwellwomens services. Toscheduleanappointment, pleasecall850-670-8585. BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 50X150GULFLOT $35,000 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 ILLUSTRATi I ON COURTESY OF U U Ni I VERSi I TY OF FF LORi I DAAbove, a tabanid y. At left,Trolling yellow y trap. At top, beautyberry. Beating the bite of the yellow yBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Carrabelle will install fencing at the southern end of Gulf Beach Drive within the next two weeks. On Friday, Carrabelle city staff met with Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) representatives to discuss the management plan for McKissack Beach. Carrabelle has leased the beach from the DEP and is required to create a management plan for the public beach. City Attorney Dan Hartman said the meeting was preliminary. He said the city has led a proposed management plan with DEP. He said the main topic discussed was how to control, in both the long and short term, vehicles illegally driving on the beach. Hartman said DEP told the city to erect temporary fencing across Gulf Beach Drive within two weeks. City Administrator Courtney Millender said that while DEP requested orange webbing of the type used at road construction sites, she hopes to install something more durable. Residents (of McKissack Beach) have been complaining about vehicles on the beach for 20 years, Hartman said. Now that the city has a management plan, we are ultimately responsible for that property. We are bringing ourselves into the role of protecting that property. Now we are the entity (the residents) complain to. Hartman said in the past, complaints about vehicles on the beach were routed to the sheriff. He said the city and DEP discussed measures the city might take to enhance county enforcement. Hartman said that although the city has submitted a management plan for the property to DEP, there would be many more workshops to tweak the plan and take public input. The point now is to block off where they are entering to drive to the point, said Hartman. The DEP feels if access to the dunes is removed, (the dunes) will rebuild on their own over time. Hartman said it was optimistic to believe blocking Gulf Beach Drive would solve the problem of beach driving and damage to the McKissack dunes. All we can do is try to control the parts that we have control over, he said. He said stormwater running down Gulf Beach Drive from US 98 was also a factor in the destruction of the dunes. Hartman said drivers will still have at least two other access points to McKissack Beach that are on private property. Residents of McKissack Beach wrote to DEP requesting automobile trafc be barred from the beach and dunes. They say they dont want to deny access to a public beach but do want to protect the dunes from automobile trafc. LOLO IS S SS WO O BODA ODA | The TimesCars are parked on the dunes at McKissack Beach.Carrabelle to fence off Gulf Beach Drive

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, June 5, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A chair from the Gorrie Furniture Company speaks to the history and commerce of the last century in the county. Historian Valerie Sherlock, who has authored a biography of Dr. John Gorrie, inventor of air conditioning and the ice machine, was the rst to respond to last weeks Chasing Shadows on the chair. She said it had no direct connection to Dr. Gorrie. Many Apalachicola businesses were named after Gorrie, she said. I have a bottle manufactured by the Gorrie Bottle Company. Next, Apalachicola native Frances Cook provided an important clue. She remembered the furniture company was at the corner of Avenue D and US 98 at the site of what is now Up the Stairs restaurant. The furniture store occupied what had once been the Dreamland Theatre. Harry Falk, who worked at the store, remembered there were still hand-painted murals from the theatre at the rear of the building. The building was built prior to 1900. Before it was the Gorrie Furniture Company, it was the Grifn Furniture Company. Cook remembered her mother bought furniture from Grifn in 1925, the year of her wedding. Grifn sold the store to H. I. Flowers, who sold it to an employee W.S. Dobbins before retiring to Jacksonville. Dobbins operated it with his sonin-law William Owens who started out as an employee. Owens played Class D baseball and visited Apalachicola for games at Porter Field. That may have been what rst brought him to the town. After he settled down here to work in the furniture store and married the bosss daughter, he was active as both a player and a coach. Dobbins, also a baseball enthusiast, was instrumental in bringing players to the area, sometimes boarding them. The team recruited players from Cuba. Gorrie Furniture must have prospered because Falk, Owenss son-in-law, said, In the early days all the local communities had little furniture stores. We also had stores in Carrabelle and Sopchoppy. Falk managed the Carrabelle store. None of the furniture was manufactured locally. Harrys wife, Ida Falk, Owenss daughter, remembered traveling as a child by train to Jacksonville to purchase furniture from the Riverside Furniture company. During the 1950s, when developers converted the ofcers quarters at Lanark Village to retirement homes, the Gorrie Furniture Company maintained three fullyfurnished units onsite for prospective buyers and sold furniture by the houseful to retirees. Falk said the store sometimes ordered pieces to be made to specications, and those pieces were stamped with the name Gorrie Furniture Company, so the chair discovered by Apalachicolas Montez Davis must have been one of those specially ordered pieces. After Owens died, the store passed to his daughters, Ida and Barbara, who sold it to Charles Marks, Sr. He turned it into an antique store and eventually, Coastal Telephone rented the upper oor for storage. Cook said in the early 1970s, the store had become rundown, and the area around it frequented by drunks. It may have been a derelict who started the re by which the building was destroyed in 1972. The re started at the back door. At around 2:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 3, the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department received a call about a warehouse re on Avenue D and Market Street. Port St. Joes re department also responded but despite their best efforts, the building was destroyed by 3:30 a.m. Janice Martina remembers walking downtown to watch the conagration, and Delores Roux said she and her husband drove over from Eastpoint. An article in the Times reported that a number of young men who were not ofcial reghters pitched in to help extinguish the blaze. Thats the way this little town is, when trouble comes, they all stick together, a witness said. Among those who joined the ght were Richard Zingarelli, Wayne Joiner, Terry Wyklingett and David Amison. The re was so hot it broke out windows of buildings across Market Street. A witness commented that if the building to the west had not been brick, the entire row of businesses would have been destroyed. Even the brick building was damaged beyond use. Fire Chief Joe Zingarelli, among the rst on the scene, said the cause of the re appeared to be arson. George Martina, who managed an antique shop on the rst oor, said the second level was a total loss and most of his stock suffered water damage. An estimated $33,000 in damage was caused by the re, which in todays dollars would be $184,000. FLORIDA MEm M ORY PROJECT The Dreamland Theatre, which later became the Gorrie Furniture Company. At right, This Christmas ad for the Gorrie Furniture company circa 1942 shows a woman playing an upright piano. JJust an old salt (cauldron)By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin County has always been salty! This antique metal cauldron was discovered in the mud at Alligator Harbor by Gail Heuring. It is currently on display outside of the Carrabelle History Museum. Museum Director Tamara Allen believes it is an old cauldron used to concentrate salt by evaporating seawater. She would like to know more about the old pot and the salt works that was once located at Alligator Point. Chasing Shadows would like to help. If you have any information about the salt works or this cauldron, please contact the Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star.com. LOILOI S SWO O BODA ODA | The TimesThe chair manufactured by the Gorrie Furniture company. LOILOI S SWO O BODA ODA | The Times SHaADOWs S Chasing

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 5, 2014 ASection By LYNN CLARKSpecial to the Times A number of factors contributed to this years improvement in thirdgrade FCAT scores at Franklin County School. TeamworkOver the summer of 2013, teachers were asked to change grade levels. Katrina Ham and I were two of the teachers who were reassigned. I moved from the fourth to the third grade, while my colleague, Katrina Ham, moved from the rst to the third grade. Both of us were eager to accept the challenge, as were current thirdgrade teachers Pam Schaffer and Jeannie Ford. We began developing a pacing guide for the reading and math curriculum to ensure all FCATtested standards would be taught by testing time. This guide was followed closely throughout the year. The newly adopted reading curriculum Journeys by Harcourt Publishing presented challenges that were addressed by extending the ve-day lesson plan to a sevenday lesson plan, to allow for more in-depth teaching of the material. In this plan, they incorporated ve 20-minute small group sessions ve days a week with the skill based learning stations highly saturated with the Journeys targeted skills for that lesson. In addition to this, third-graders were divided into skill level groups and received 25 minutes each afternoon with one of the four teachers in Intensive Reading Instruction. This was both remedial as well as enrichment to meet the needs of all students. All four teachers worked together to make these groups uid as students learning needs changed.Class sizeEach third-grade class had between 14 and 16 students.FidelityIt was very important throughout the year to teach the core reading and math curriculum with delity. Everything taught was based on a Next Generation Sunshine State Standards as well as incorporating Common Core standards. Students and teachers together kept track of their learning and were praised when each skill was mastered. ConsistencyAll four third-grade teachers followed the curriculum closely and were simultaneously teaching the same lessons each day. That way, at the end of the day, hallway conversations were held about what went well and what needed to be tweaked. This kept ideas and creative juices owing and made teaching fresh and new with each weeks lessons.Data-driven instructionPeriodically, assessments were given in math and reading using the STAR Reading, STAR Math programs as well as Discovery Educations Reading and Math Assessments. The data collected from these assessments gave the teachers an idea of what skills needed more attention and on what skills the students had demonstrated success. They also used data from the FAIR Reading test that is given to all students in Floridas schools. This data helped determine which of our intensive reading instruction the students needed.Parent communication/ supportWeekly folders with assessments, reports from assessments, behavior and grades were sent home on the same day each week. Parents were encouraged to sign and return with questions or comments. Phone calls and email were also used to communicate with students as they met struggles as well as when they experienced success! One of the most important things we did as a grade level to prepare our students for this years FCAT testing period was teaching all of the tested standards before the testing period. We used supplemental materials to make sure we got everything covered; Coach Reading and Coach Math and Mountain Math were some of the supplements used. Administration worked diligently with the Panhandle Area Education Consortium to provide professional development throughout the year. Many of Franklin County School teachers participated in cooperative learning workshops based on Kagan structures (Kagan Publishing). We used these strategies with our students on a regular basis to help them become excited about learning. Inside/Outside circle, Hand up Pair Up, Showdown, Quiz-Quiz Trade these activities helped our students make a physical connection with many of the abstract concepts taught and tested. Overall, being positive throughout the year with our students and giving them the con dence that they had been taught all they needed to know to be able to succeed! They were READY and they KNEW they were READY to do their very best! If you expect them to succeed ... they WILL! Lynn Clark is a third-grade teacher at the Franklin County School. Abdul-Jabbar couldntve made these priceswith a sky hook. From a song by Johnny Guitar WatsonDo things cost more or less than they did a year ago? Lets see. Costs associated with housing went up 2.8 percent. But it costs a whopping 7.7 percent more to heat and cool it. (Honey, cancel the purchase of that new McMansion!) Rental costs escalated 2.9 percent. Homeowners insurance has gone up by 3.5 percent. Water, sewer and trash collection services have increased in cost by 3.4 percent. Heres more. Health and hospital related services both cost 4.7 percent more than they did a year ago. It costs 2.3 percent more to dine out than it did last year. But grocery food skyrocketed across the board: Meat prices jumped by 5.2 percent and fresh fruits by 5 percent. A haircut will cost you 1.4 percent more. A drink and a smoke is more expensive (We may need both before were done here). Alcohol went up by 1.1 percent and tobacco and smoking products by 3.7 percent. Tuition escalated in price by 3.3 percent. Whew. Now, consider things that have decreased in price. Seems impossible, right? Expenses related to transportation are actually 1.2 percent less expensive than a year ago. New vehicles are down in price by 0.5 percent. Motor fuel has declined in price by 4.6 percent (Lets wait until summer is over to declare victory on this one). Wireless and landline telephone services? Now theyre 2.3 percent less expensive. Shoes? A percent less costly. Household furnishings have declined in price by 1.5 percent. Airline fares have decreased by 4.1 percent. (Hard to believe, right?) Whats it all mean? We do indeed have signi cant in ation in essential (nondiscretionary) service items, like heat and air conditioning, food and health insurance. But many frequently used services actually cost less, like gas and cell phones. So in ation is really not rampant. In fact, most economists consider de ation a greater current threat to the economy. What is causing us to think prices are outrageous is that wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. A person earning robust compensation is meeting his grocery bill with ease. But without a quality paycheck, everything looks expensive. In ation not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with signi cant opportunities to pro t from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register. Prudent investors and advisers seek out those sectors and companies that have in exible demand, or whose customers have to continue buying their products or services, whether the price of the product goes up 5 percent or not. As always, an investors age, risk tolerance, unique nancial goals and time horizon should be considered. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (6086121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor.Southerland salvo just Tea Party extremismAs a political surrogate, Mr. Willie Norred gives a perfect introduction to the avor of the coming campaign of Steve Southerland in Franklin County. (See letters to the editor, May 29, 2014 issue.) The general tone of Mr. Norreds political attack (veiled in an aw-shucks humorous letter) is patronizing and demeaning to women. Does a letter from a political ack provide distance and deniability for Mr. Southerland while carrying the message of the campaign? I am sure Mr. Southerland will try to make it so. The real issue, of course, is not a persons heritage, although Gwen Grahams could not be better, but what a candidate stands for and how hard they will ght for the issues that are important to average Americans. Is it any wonder that Mr. Southerlands campaigns rst salvo seeks to cloud the real issues by inciting fear and division? Can we help but notice that this expression of Tea Party philosophy, which Mr. Southerland effectively espouses as well, is clearly out of step with the majority of Americans? Let us keep in mind that those with which Mr. Southerland hopes to identify are the same people that have proposed and passed legislation that the Tea Party extremists favor including bills that: limit the publics right to vote, close down the government, costing millions and adversely affecting the economy and jeopardizing the welfare of veterans, seniors, and working Americans, limit the right to quality health care, obstruct a womans right to make her own health decisions, keep working Americans from making a livable wage, harm the public school system and demonize our teachers Little Lady, really? We would do well to have a woman with the stellar credentials of Gwen Graham to represent us in Congress. Mr. Southerland, this election is not about Nancy Pelosi, cleaning mullet or drinking tea. It is about your record as a congressman. If you dont respect the voters of District 2 enough to support their issues, at least dont resort to belittling them.Betty Croom Apalachicola Q. I received a notice from Local Records Of ce stating I could send them $89 for a complete property pro le and copy of the only document that identi es me as a property owner. What is this? A. To my knowledge, these notices sent by Local Records Of ce have been going around for a few years now. There is no af liation between Local Records Of ce and the Clerk of the Court, who is responsible for keeping the of cial records. The notice tells recipients that they can receive a copy of their property deed and a complete property pro le by sending $89 to an address in Tallahassee. These notices include a coupon people can detach and mail back with their checks, noting the $89 service fee. This may not be against the law, but I believe it is certainly misleading because there is no need to pay such a high price to get a public record. Nobody needs to pay $89 to receive a copy of their deed. Deeds and other of cial records are now easily obtained online or at our courthouse from my of ce. Hard copies cost $1 per page, and certi ed documents cost an additional $2. Uncerti ed copies can be downloaded and printed free in Franklin County by using the Public Records Search under Quick Links at www.franklinclerk.com. If you have any questions or comments about this column, forward them to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or by email to mmjohnson@ franklin.clerk.com. Visit the clerks website at www.franklinclerk.com. YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEEMarcia Johnson MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor OutlookIn ation, de ation, McMansions and Johnny Guitar Watson Giving students the con dence to succeed Letter to the EDITORProperty pro les easily, cheaply obtainable Page 4Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. Share Your OPINIONS

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By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.comGulf Coast Aggregates is seeking permission to extend their mining operations into Tates Hell State Forest. At the county meeting on Tuesday morning, St. George Island real estate agent Sandy Mitchem asked com missioners for a letter to the state supporting a plan to ex tend fossil oyster shell mining operations onto state land. Mitchem said the exist ing mine, on 165 acres of private land, is about to play out. Not only would it pos sibly help our bay, it would cre ate a lot of jobs for all of us, she said. If it will create jobs, I am for it, she said. She said the mining op eration started with two em ployees and has now grown to a staff of 18 or 19, eight of whom are Franklin County residents. Mitchem said the private land where the mine is lo cated is surrounded by state land. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked if the land in question was part of the Walnut Creek watershed and how many acres the mining company was seeking to use. I dont know even if theyll give us the extended property, Mitchem said. The rst part of the pro cess is a few letters and then we could request 5,000 or 10,000 acres. Sanders said if the cur rent strip mine was extend ed, it would be adjacent to privately owned land includ ing her home. Every time they dynamite up there, it puts tannic acid in my water, Sanders said. Count Planner Alan Pierce said the land Gulf Ag gregates wants to use is part of Tates Hell State Forest. It was purchased for en vironmental preservation, he said. You would have to put it back the way it was as a wetland and not a lake. He said state require ments for restoration of wet lands after use are so strin gent he didnt believe Gulf Aggregates could repair the land after it was mined. Mitchem said she envi sioned a lake with walking paths around it. If we cant get the expansion, then the job opportunity for Franklin County wont be there, she said. You are talking about taking wild lands and turning it into a manicured park-like area and I can just tell you theres no way, Pierce said. He said he had received a list of what would need to be done during the project from Gulf Coast Aggregates. You would be removing 20 feet of overburden, getting the shells out and the state would want you to put it back the way it was. I dont see how thats even possible, Pierce said. Its just a request of ex tended land so we can dig down, Mitchem said. Gulf Aggregates needs to meet certain standards before any letter of support is written, Sanders said. I would like to see us table this until she can come back with the guarantees and have it worked out with the state before she comes to us. Once (the state) sees the county commissions signature they will move ahead with this. Commissioner Pinki Jack el said she and Mitchem had discussed the matter before the meeting. I didnt realize you were going to be here to day, said Jackel. I asked you for more information. I asked some of the same questions that Commissioner Sanders just voiced. I am in favor of jobs. I cannot vote to give a carte blanche letter of endorse ment. This is the same thing we tell everyone comes before us. What are the conditions of this letter? Bring us your let ter of what youre expecting us to endorse. Let us have the county attorney review it, she said. We are in a very environmentally sensitive area. We want to do the best thing and strike the balance between environment and man. I want to know exactly what Im sponsoring. Sanders said there is an area already approved for mining across County Road 67. If I were you, I would try to nd any other land to deal with rather than go to the state, Pierce said. The county tried to get just 100 acres for a prison, which was a public benet on public land and we couldnt even get 100 acres. Jackel asked if the use of public land would have to go before the legislature for nal approval. Absolutely, this is just the rst step, Mitchem said. I want to support you but I have got to have the in formation,. Ask the state to come with you and appear before the board, I have got to know what I am voting to get the county into, Jackel said. It boils down to this. Its what you call strip mining. You cant put back what you take out, Sanders said. As an example were talking about a lake and walk ing areas. A park. A recre ational facility. It wouldnt be put back they way it is now because theres no way, Mitchem said. WATER SAFETY INVESTIGATION ATTENTION: ApalachicolaWaterCustomersInMay2013,theCityofApalachicolaWaterSystemnotiedresidents thattheirwaterfailedtomeetstandardssetbytheFloridaDepartment ofEnvironmentalProtectionandtheEPA. Duringroutinesafetytesting,theCityofApalachicolafoundlevels oftrihalomethanes(THMs)morethan50%higherthanestablished maximumcontaminantlevelsfordrinkingwater. THMscanalsobeinhaledandabsorbedthroughtheskin.Researchers discoveredthatbloodconcentrationsofTHMsrose5-to15-foldfollowing suchroutineactivitiesasshowering,bathingandhandwashing. Oftenfoundinindustrialsolventsandrefrigerants,THMsare consideredcarcinogenicandhavebeenlinkedtonumerouslifethreateninghealtheffects: LiverorKidneyFailure LiverorKidneyCancer ColonorRectalCancer BladderCancer AdversePregnancyOutcomes SeriousCentralNervousSystemDamage Ifyouoralovedonehasreceivedsuchadiagnosis,orafamilymember hasdiedfromoneoftheseconditions,andifyourwaterisprovidedby theCityofApalachicola,pleasecontactourrmforafreeconsultation. PANAMACITY1-800-800-8539 walborsky.comSources:U.S.EnvironmentalProtectionAgency,SafeDrinkingWaterInformationSystem(SDWIS)ViolationReport,CityofApalachicola,reportcreated 4/22/2014basedondataextractedon2/10/2014;NationalInstitutesofHealth,TapWaterandTrihalomethanes:FlowofConcernsContinues,Environmental HealthPerspectives,July2005,113(7):A474;TrihalomethanesinDrinking-water,WHOGuidelinesforDrinking-waterQuality,WHO/SDE/WSH/03.04/64 Arrest REPORTThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 20 Summer S. Harris, 24, Tallahassee, withholding child support (FCSO) Evan R. Perry, 27, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) James E. West, 52, Apalachicola, trespass on property after warning (APD) Timothy J. Carpenter, 22, Eastpoint, workers compensation fraud (FCSO) May 21 Nathaniel W. Lee, 25, Apalachicola, resisting ofcer with violence, possession of cannabis, battery, criminal mischief and possession of a rearm by a convicted felon (FCSO) May 22 Frederic E. Kahler, 52, Apalachicola, interception of wire or electronic communication prohibited (FCSO) Jessica H. Montgomery, 29, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) Tiffany M. Davis, 33, Eastpoint, two counts of possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Johnnie R. Davis, 45, Eastpoint, possession of listed chemicals, manufacture of methamphetamines, possession of a controlled substance, and four counts of possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Tammy L. Golden, 51, Crestview, violation of probation (FCSO) May 24 Amy Hicks, 37, Apalachicola, driving while license revokedhabitual (APD) Victor W. Cain, 38, Eastpoint, withholding child support (FCSO) Ashley L. Sessions, 32, Perry, DUI (CPD) May 25 Billy D. Dalton, 39, driving while license revoked-habitual (APD) Timothy C. Register, 22, Eastpoint, DUI and expired drivers license (CPD) Eric A. Tatum, 34, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Shelly L. Polous, 35, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) James I. Daniels Jr., 68, Crawfordville, possession of cannabis (FCSO) Willie L. English, 54, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) John Y. Bixler, 21, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence (FWC) William Dameron, 28, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) May 26 Misty L. Morales, 40. Carrabelle, falsely impersonating ofcer (FCSO) May 27 Charles O. Brannen Jr., 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Dawn Morris, 54, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Leighton L. Morris Jr., 25, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Keelah A. Williams, 45, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Alexander J. Williams, 24, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Roderick Robinson, 47, Port St. Joe, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver (FCSO) May 28 Vickie H. Maples, 49, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) Clifford W. Sutcliffe Jr., 25, Carrabelle, aggravated battery great bodily harm, and burglary of an occupied dwelling (CPD) May 29 Fred C. Massey, 49, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) May 30 Harvey D. Heath, 58, Pensacola, DUI (CPD) Nelson R. Flint III, 21, St. George Island, violation of probation (FCSO) May 31 Dylan E. Nunez, 22, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Samantha L. Emswiler, 20, Lanark Village, battery (FCSO) Rhine W. Abas, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Janet L. Ross, 45, Soddy Daisy, Tenn., domestic battery (FCSO) June 1 Benjamin K. Jones, 24, Tallahassee, DUI, introduction of contraband into a correctional facility and possession of cannabis (FCSO) Brad B. Milligan, 31, Tallahassee, Leon County violation of probation (FCSO) FWC REPORTOfcers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, together with Florida Highway Patrol troopers and Franklin County sheriffs deputies, participated in a public safety operational detail coinciding with the 2014 White Trash Bash during the Memorial Day holiday weekend at Dog Island and Alligator Point. The detail was designed to protect Floridas boating public through enhanced boating safety patrol, increase voluntary compliance from the boating  public through education and enforcement of the BUI and DUI laws as well as all highway safety and trafc laws, provide a highly visible law enforcement presence and increase multi-agency working relationships. During the detail, 69 vessels were boarded with 504 users being checked. The citations and warnings issued included 17 boating safety warnings, 21 resource warnings, eight uniform boating citations for boating safety violations, one arrest for operating a vessel while impaired, 23 uniform trafc citations, and 23 trafc warnings. Twelve individuals were assisted during the detail with three being medical emergencies that required transport to the mainland for medical treatment. Shell mining rm seeks Tates Hell land SANDY MITCHEmM Law EnforcementThe Times | A5Thursday, June 5, 2014

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014beyond any other class, will turn their tassels. Following his receiving a plaque from Principal Eric Bidwell and Guidance Coun selor Roderick Robinson for being salutatorian, and Lau ra Gallegos and Bria Walker each one for being valedic torian, Martin delivered the address reserved for the second best grade point av erage in the class. Martin opened his ad dress by thanking Jesus, and then his parents Sheila and Anthony Martin, of Apala chicola, two extraordinary individuals who believed in every dream I had and did everything they could to help me achieve them. I thank my mentors who pushed me pass my limits. I thank my clique, ev ery friend, and every family member who has helped to get me to this place, he said. And a special thanks to the greatest youth department, Chosen Generation, for al lowing me to hone in on my leadership skills these past years. Martin who is headed to Florida A & M University on an academic scholarship, then referred to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s famous I Have A Dream speech. Even though we have a ways to go, Dr. Kings dream has come into fruition to night as history has been made with a black girl, a His panic girl, and a little militant yella black boy achieving top rank honors in academics, in a predominantly white school, said Martin. Just like Dr. King, I too, have a dream, a dream deeply rooted in the suc cess of my class, he con tinued. I have the privilege to graduate with some of best students to come out of Franklin County. I have dream that today, we will set the precedent for the classes to come. I have a dream that we will be the one to defy stereotypes and lies of infe riority, and produce national success stories, he said. Martin challenged his classmates to set goals to be the best in all their future endeavors. And when thats done, we will be able to speed up that day when we realize that whether we are doctors, lawyers, oystermen, or waiters, we can achieve success that is noteworthy, for we should not measure our success by the number of zeroes at the end of our check, but by the number of lives we affect, he said. Greatness lies within each one us, but we have to make the choice to tap in to it and produce something that will make an impact. Gallegos, daughter of Antonio and Angelica Gal legos, of Eastpoint, headed to the honor program at the University of Florida, was next to speak. She said she originally planned to forego her opportunity to speak, until last week, when a persistent and determined friend of mine convinced me to give one. She told me that if I had a message for the class that I should give it be fore I missed the chance to do so. Gallegos said she went home and thought about it and decided she did have a message for her class, as well as for my family and the families of my classmates, teachers, and mentors. To those families, Gal legos offered thanks for their support. None of us could have gotten here without you, she said. You have taught us how to be better people, made sure we got to this day, and many of you are here now to see us transition to the next part of our lives. To my classmates, I think I speak for most of us when I say that high school went by faster than we ever imagined it would. I remem ber being a freshman and thinking about how long high school would be, but then when my junior year started I thought to myself where did the time go? As I think about all of my peers both the ones I know per sonally and the rest of you I know, without a shred of doubt that we will make a change in the world. You are all so determined and tal ented. I know all of you will achieve your dreams. Never give up, she said. To my close friends, thank you for always be ing there for me. You have changed my life and I am a better person because of you, Gallegos said. I want to wish each and every one of you success in whatever endeavors you choose to pursue. Class of 2014, We did it! Walker, daughter of Da vid and Harolyn Walker, of Apalachicola, also headed to Florida A & M University, was the second valedicto rian to speak. She spoke in warm, direct tones to her classmates, at one time fac ing away from the podium to address them directly. Behind every graduate is a great support system. Mine just happens to be the best, she said at the out set of her remarks, which included expressions of thanks to God, her parents, guidance counselor Robin son, educational mentor Dr. Lois Catlin, and three best friends. A big thanks to ev eryone who has gave me an encouraging word or piece of advice, both solicited and unsolicited, Walker said. I stand in front of you with a heart lled with hap piness and fear. These last four years have been lled with laughter and tears. Thank you for all of the memories made from our rst color wars to senior trip; I truly have had a blast. I have one last favor to ask of you, she said. Create a story your grandchildren wont be able to believe. We are always bom barded with this one ques tion: what are you going to do after high school? Some of us already have the rest of our lives planned out. Many of us know which direction we would like to go in and yet some of us have no clue where to start, Walker said. But thats OK. Its okay to simply not know. Now is the time to nd out who you truly are. Many of us cannot wait to kiss Franklin County good bye and then there are some of us who cannot imagine calling another place home. Although Franklin County is a beautiful place, this is your chance to explore what the world has to offer. So go to a few parties and have a good time; go further south and immerse yourself in dif ferent cultures; jump on a midnight train that leads to nowhere in particular; climb the worlds tallest moun tains; if youre looking for a hunting challenge, visit Af rica and hunt their big 5, she said. Most importantly, follow your dream. As our class quote says Dream what you dare to dream. Go where you want to go. Be who you want to be. Live. Allow no one to tell you what you are capable of. We are the Class of 2014. We back down from nothing. With the high school band, under the direction of Karl Lester, performing the accompanying Pomp and Circumstance, the class streamed into the crowded gym in an orderly fashion, two by two, before ascend ing to the bleachers in front. Class Vice President Ste fan DeVaughn, a graduate with High Honors headed to the honors college at Uni versity of West Florida, led the Pledge of Allegiance. Athletic Director Mike Swe att then sang an exception ally vibrant rendition of the National Anthem. Class Secretary Deborah Dempsey, who is headed to the University of West Flor ida, offered the invocation. She and Brook Pittman, who is headed to Gulf Coast State College) each gradu ated with Highest Honors, as did Gallegos, Walker and Martin. Bidwell, together with Superintendent Nina Marks, handed out diplomas follow ing the addresses. Class Sponsors Dolores Croom and Kassi Malcolm, togeth er with teacher Jennifer Edwards, read the names of each of the graduates and their parents as well as their future plans. Students earning High Honors were Andrea Cupid (Florida A & M University), Jessica Shields (Florida State University), Amber Adkins (San Antonio Com munity College), Ally Mil lender (George Wallace Community College) and Gracyn Kirvin (Faulkner University). A diploma with Honors was given to Jennifer Strat ton (Pitt University), Cam eron White (Trinity Baptist College), Adriana Reeder (Faulkner University), Lo gan McLeod (Trinity Bap tist College), Josie Turner (Tallahassee Community College), Ryan Babb, Alex Causey (Louisiana College), Shannon Fuller (Gulf Coast State College), Samantha Everson (Santa Fe Commu nity College), Lea Venable (Gulf Coast State College), Tevis Page (Gulf Coast State College), Malachi Parker (Florida State University), James Bailey (University of West Florida), and Graham Kirvin (Thomas University). Receiving standard high school diplomas were Brit taney Ashley (University of Florida), Dixie Back, Paul Benton III, Kristina Boyd (Gulf Coast State College), Dasia Carr (Santa Fe Com munity College) Ashley Carroll (George Wallace Community College), Vic toria Coleman, Savannah Cook, Chad Coulter, Antonio Croom (Gulf Coast State Col lege) Alviauna Cummings, Bobby Curry (Trinity Bap tist College), Matthew Davis (Wyotech), Myel DeCourcey, Cynthia Duncan (North Florida Cosmetology Insti tution), Toronto Fuller (Chef school), James Gordon, Jr. (Alabama Job Corps), James Harris, Kyle Hathcox (U.S. Marine Corps), Kevin Heath, Heather Holton, Marlyn Lee (Tallahassee Community College), Cody Lyston (Technical school for welding), Austin Martina, Steven McAnally, Haleigh Ming (Haney Tech College), Morgan Mock, James New ell (Trinity Baptist College), Wesley Norred, Kristen Put nal (LPN program at Lively Tech), Mason Ray (Trade school), Caulin Sheridan (Tallahassee Community College), Dallas Shiver, Kyle Smith, Justin Spann (Technical school), Michael Stevens (Technical school), Leonard Ward (Gulf Coast State College), and Mercury Wynn (TCC Pat Thomas Law Academy). Each student presented the class ower, the lily, to their loved ones, as hug, kisses and tears abounded. A slide show prepared by Edwards and the yearbook staff followed, and as the lights came up afterwards, the seniors joined in an a ca pella version of When Im Gone, with soloists inter spersed among the recita tion by rows, or by guys and girls, or the right section and the left. After Marks authorized the turning of the tassels, Elinor Mount Simmons, who chaired the graduation committee, wished all well as students and their fami lies alike led out of the gym into the clear, cool summer evening. CouponExpires:6-15-14CODE:AP00 ABERCROMBIEBOATRAMPIMPROVEMENTSPROJECT#007.097 NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDS TheFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionerswillreceivesealedbidsfromanyqualied person,companyorcorporationinterestedinconstructing: ABERCROMBIEBOATRAMPIMPROVEMENTS ProjectislocatedattheAbercrombieBoatRampattheendofBluffRoadinFranklinCounty,Florida andconsistsofconstructingapproximately340SFof4widetimberboardwalkandapproximately 800SFof8wideoatingdock. PlansandspecicationscanbeobtainedatPreble-Rish,Inc.,324MarinaDrive,PortSt.Joe,Florida 32456,(850)227-7200.CostforPlansandSpecicationswillbe$50.00persetandisnon-refundable. ChecksshouldbemadepayabletoPREBLE-RISH,INC.ThebidmustconformtoSection287.133(3) FloridaStatutes,onpublicentitycrimes. Completiondateforthisprojectwillbe45daysfromthedateoftheNoticetoProceedpresentedto thesuccessfulbidder.Liquidateddamagesforfailuretocompletetheprojectonthespecieddate willbesetat$500.00perday. Pleaseindicateontheenvelopethatthisisasealedbidfor AbercrombieBoatRampImprovements. Bidswillbereceiveduntil4:00p.m.(eastern),onMonday,June30,2014,attheFranklinCountyClerk's Ofce,FranklinCountyCourthouse,33MarketStreet,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida32320-2317, andwillbeopenedandreadaloudonJuly1,2014attheCountyCommissionmeeting,whichbegins at9:00a.m.,at34ForbesStreet,Apalachicola,FL. TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttowaiveinformalitiesinanybid,toaccept and/orrejectanyorallbids,andtoacceptthebidthatintheirjudgmentwillbeinthebestinterestof FranklinCounty.Allbidsshallremainrmforaperiodofsixtydaysaftertheopening. AllbiddersshallcomplywithallapplicableStateandlocallawsconcerninglicensingregistrationand regulationofcontractorsdoingbusinesstotheStateofFlorida. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecallClaySmallwoodat(850)227-7200. GRADUATION from page A1 The following are the 2014 FCAT 2.0 instructions for the expository writing portion of the test. GRADE 4 What do you like most about school? Think about what you like most about school. Now write to explain what you like most about school. GRADE 8 Writing Situation: When people think about Florida, they often think about beaches, sports, or certain animals. DD irections: If you had to choose one thing that best represents Florida, what would it be? Now write to explain the thing that best represents Florida to you. GRADE 10Writing Situation: To honor the accomplishments of the rst president of the United States, George Washington, his picture has been printed on the dollar bill since 1869. DD irections: Think about another person whose actions in life show that he or she also deserves such an honor. Now write to explain why this person is worthy of having his or her picture printed on the dollar bill. FCAT from page A1What made the ABC Schools eight grade writ ing results so impressive is that teachers shurnk the size of all the point catego ries below the satisfactory 3.5 score. The percentage of students with 3.0 scores or below shrank from 51 to 37 percent of its students. The percentage at 3.5 scores was nearly identical to last year at 25 percent, while the percentage of 4.0 scores ballooned from 11 percent last year to 31 per cent in 2014. The school also had 14 percent of its eighth graders receiving scores of 4.5, 5.0 and 5.5. Among ABC School fourth graders, there were none with a 4.5 score or bet ter, but the percentage of 4.0 scores more than doubled, from 12 to 26 percent. The percentage of 3.5 scores also grew, from 24 to 31 percent, which is nearly double the 16 percent in 2012. Only 15 percent of ABC fourth grad ers had scores below 3.0. Among Franklin fourth graders, 43 percent of the 63 students who took the test had scores below 3.0, and there was a slight shrink age in the percentage of those scoring 4.0 or 4.5 over last year. Among the 41 eighth graders, the data showed Franklin had made sub stantial gains in shrinking the percentage of the low est performing students, down to 19 percent from 54 percent one year ago. The growth occurred in the percentage of 3.0 scorers, from 22 to 39 percent, with more modest gains in each of the higher performing categories. THE wWRItTINgG tTEstST PROMPtsTS PHOt T Os S BY BY DADA VID ID ADAD LER ER STEIN EIN | The TimesKaren Shields prepares to hug her daughter Jessica. At left, Tevis Page, left, and Graham Kirvin. MMORE ONlLINE See lots more commencement photos on the Times Facebook page

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, June 5, 2014The Nest seeks used gamesThe Nest in Eastpoint is seeking gently used checker and chess sets for the summer program. Call (843) 338-6851. Sets can be dropped off at the Times ofce on Commerce Street in Apalachicola or at the Nest at the former Brown Elementary School in Eastpoint.The Longest Day at museum SaturdayCamp Gordon Johnston World War II museum will show the lme The Longest Day at 10:15 a.m. on Saturday, June 7 in honor of the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The Longest Day is lmed in the style of a docudrama. Beginning in the days leading up to DDay, this lm concentrates on events on both sides of the channel such as the Allies waiting for the break in the poor weather and the anticipation of the Axis forces defending northern France. The lm, winner of two Academy Awards, pays particular attention to the decision by Gen. Eisenhower, supreme commander of the Allied forces. This lm is one in a series shown monthly to educate museum visitors on the sacrices made, for us, by the World War II generation. Free popcorn will be served. Admission is by donation, and appreciated.Full moon climb at lighthouse June 12The June Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, June 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 8 to 9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:40 p.m. and the moon will rise at 8:17 p.m. on June 12. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Network with other businesses June 12Network with other area business owners at the Apalachicola Bay Chamber Business After Hours Monday, at Up The Stairs, 76 Market Street in Apalachicola on Thursday, June 12 from 5:30-7 p.m..Update on the SHIP programOn May 20, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners the proposed legislative budget contains $350,000 for the Franklin County State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) program. He said this is the rst time in several years the program has been fully funded. Commissioners also voted unanimously to use up to $5,000 to repair a roof damaged in recent heavy rains. Pierce said Governor Scott issued an executive emergency order that allows Lori Switzer, SHIP coordinator, to receive applications from qualied residents whose houses have been damaged. SHIP has received one application for a roof repair and the cap on the amount of funds is $5,000. Repairs will be paid for with money set aside for hurricane damage last year. The funds are available because there were no storms.WWII museum to take part in Thank YouThe Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum has been invited to participate in Leon Countys third annual Operation Thank You on Friday, June 6 at the Leon County Courthouse in Tallahassee at 9 a.m. This years Operation Thank You will honor local World War II veterans and remember the 70-year anniversary of D-Day. It was seven decades ago when American, British and Canadian forces invaded the beaches of Normandy, France signaling the long-awaited liberation of Europe from German occupation. The Museum will set up a display, which demonstrates the participation of forces that trained in Franklin County during WWII. Included will be uniforms, gear, maps and photos as well as information about the museum located in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex. The renowned Tallahassee Swing Band will perform during the event and play songs from the s and s to remember the era of large swing bands. For further information, contact Matt Cavell, Leon County community and media relations at 606-5300. The Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum is a 501 c (3) non-prot corporation and is funded, in part, by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council.Change of date for July county meetingAt the May 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to change the date of the second July county meeting from Tuesday, July 15 to Wednesday, July 16. The meeting will still begin at 9 a.m. and will be held at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola. The change will allow all ve commissioners to attend a meeting of the National association of Counties. Commissioner plan to support Leon County Commissioner Bryan DesLoge who is running for vice president of the organization.Commission discusses jail roofAt their May 20 meeting, county commissioners discussed replacing the roof at the county jail on County Road 65 in Eastpoint. The dilemma is that while the ofce and jail need a new roof, and the Hazard Mitigation grant provides some funds, the grant only provides 75 percent, and so the county is responsible for the rest, County Planner Alan Pierce said. The countys share could be as much as $194,000 in cash, or in-kind. The county does not have that much cash. Pierce said he was investigating whether it is realistic to try and use county labor for the match. Contractors dont normally want to rely upon someone elses labor, he said. He said the county wanted the contractor to warrantee the construction. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked if there was a cheaper option for the roof. Pierce said the county would have to go back to the Planning and Zoning Board to change the plans. Jackel said she wanted to explore less expensive designs for the roof. At the end of the day, youve got to have a roof, she said. We can still do a roof out there and not break the bank.Alligator Point revetment removal completeOn May 20, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners removal of coastal debris in the form of damaged revetment ordered by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has been completed. The debris was located on alligator Point Drive in front of the old KOA Campground.Island summer bingo on TuesdaysSummer Bingo, on Tuesday evenings on St. George Island, has begun. It is at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Avenue, beginning at 7 p.m. The cost is 50 cents per card.Time for summer camp registration!Enrollment for Project Impact Camp Funshine: Fizz, Boom, Splash is open. Students from pre-K to eighth grade will be served at the ABC site and pre-K to 12th grade at the city site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program is Fizz, Boom, READ and was developed by the 2014 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. The focus this year will be on STEM subjects, (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) with other summer highlights including pottery program, art & crafts, science experiments, computer technology, chess tournament, sports and several eld trips. The second year of Boats Rock! was launched during the April antique boat show. A special basketball and leadership camp will also be offered. The summer performing arts program will feature video production with a lm premiere at the end of the summer. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 9 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week. Credit recovery classes will be offered at the City Site Monday to Thursday during program hours. Enrollment may be limited. The summer program is provided free of charge. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Families may enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 3700145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola. News BRiIEfsFS Special to The TimesThe Franklin County Public Library has been the recipient of many generous donations coming in many different forms. On May 16, the musical talents of the professional music group Melodime, performed for a large group of teens and adults from Apalachicola, Eastpoint, and Carrabelle. Their musical style was unique and they played a variety of tunes from their CDs and You Tube videos, and answered the questions posed by the inquisitive audience. This performance was part of the Rock by the Sea three-day tour to raise funds for several benefactors, one of which was FCPL! The teens were able to ask questions about how they got their start in the music business, what gave them the inspiration to create this group, and if they made money. The responses were honest and seemed to spark enthusiasm for this interesting group. Not only does this group perform benet concerts, they buy instruments, mentor students, and provide music material to take with them to Haiti to be given to youths at an orphanage. One of the musicians told me that he lived by the thought that God doesnt bless hands that are full. In other words, they believe in paying it forward. The library was presented with a very generous check from the Rock by the Sea representative Rick Watson to be used for the youth from the Franklin County Library. Words do not express our real appreciation for gifts like this. FCPL has also received other donations from the Ben Watkins Foundation, The Philaco Womens Club of Apalachicola and private donations. In the same spirit as the musical group, the library will pay it forward to our patrons and the Franklin County community. Other donations included a painting by Carrabelle artist Penney Anderson, and a ag from Woodmen of the World. As in other years, the library offers a special program in the summer to keep children focused on reading by providing a Summer Library Program. This year we are expanding our programs even further because of the generosity we have received. This summers free program is called Fizz, Boom, Read and it has a science theme. It will run from June 16 to July 18. For the youngest kids, ages 2 to 7,we have a program on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at the Carrabelle branch and on Fridays at 3 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch. For the Tweensages 8 to 12well be meeting on Wednesdays at 3 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch and on Thursdays at 3 p.m. at the Carrabelle branch. And for the Teens, ages 13 to 17, come to the Eastpoint branch on Fridays at 1 p.m. or Carrabelle on Saturdays at noon. There will be weekly door prizes. Come by either branch to pick up registration forms. Sign your children up now as there are limited spaces available. The Summer Library Program isnt just for kids. Adults should come out to either branch to enjoy some of the interesting programs we have lined up for them. To start off you can learn more about recycling from our local experts at the Franklin County Solid Waste Department. Come to the Eastpoint branch on Tuesday, June 24 at 11 a.m. or the Carrabelle branch on Thursday, June 26 at 11 a.m.to nd out more on this topic. Other adult programs include a talk given by Wakulla County Extension Director Les Harrison on planning your fall garden. That will take place on Tuesday, July 15 at 1 p.m. at the Carrabelle branch and July 17 at 11 a.m. at the Eastpoint branch. Also, come to the Eastpoint branch at 11 a.m. on July 22 or the Carrabelle branch at 11 a.m. on July 24 to learn about crime scene investigation from Lt. Carl Whaley from the Franklin County Sheriffs Department. There will be door prizes given at each of the adult programs. All age groups are invited to play Library Bingo throughout the Summer Library Program. You have to play in order to win one of the great prizes like a digital Polaroid, a nine-inch tablet or for the kids a deluxe wagon! Throughout the summer well be offering our regular library programs. Join us for yoga, tness, or book chat, to name a few. And theres still time to attend the Writers Forum for both beginning and accomplished writers. This program takes place on Wednesdays at 1:00 at the Eastpoint Branch and will run through June 18th. Call our Eastpoint Branch at 670-8151 or our Carrabelle Branch at 697-2366 if you have any questions. Sp P Ecial CIAL tT O Th H E Ti I MEs S Melodime performing at the Eastpoint Branch of Franklin County Public LibraryLibrary rocked by generous donations

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LocalA8 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014by either party. I think our best inter est is to nd the physicians a suitable place to move, she said. This is an elegant building, for an elegant purpose. Mayor Van Johnson said he planned to have a work ing lunch today with County Commissioner Smokey Parish, whose district in cludes the historic property adjacent to the home of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Greene said the grant dat ed back to 2008, when Cindi Giametta, the citys former grants manager, wrote and submitted the initial grant application. Greene took over managing the process in 2011, and clearly was over joyed Tuesday night that the money was nally owing down. She said a more detailed plan will have to be worked out in the coming days, and that the state said it is ex ible with the 90-day deadline in place for it to receive de tailed assurance that the city, owns, lease, or has un conditional use resolution from the buildings owner. The state says 90 days is exible, as long as its by the time we put the project out to bid, said Greene. She said architect fees, which include planning costs, are expected to total $38,000 of the award, with $89,000 earmarked to install an elevator, $92,000 for initial equipment and the remain ing $278,000 towards the ac tual remodeling. In addition, the state ap propriated $50,000 during the 2014 session to place a new roof over the building, Greene said. Plus theres the possibility of utilizing some of the more than $400,000 bequeathed to the library by the estate of Margaret Key about a decade ago. Now I need to sit down with architects, she said. I know it would have to have certain things done to the interior to make it functional but I never expected to get the money. Susan Buzzett-Clem entson, chair of the library board, said she expects to see a stepped-up fundrais ing effort for private sector dollars in the weeks and months ahead. Since obtaining per mission from the county to include the school in this years Tour of Homes, there has been an outpour of com munity interest in seeing the building restored, she said. Greene was asked by Apalachicola resident Bob by Miller about how ongoing utility and maintenance fees would be covered. She said she was not yet in a position to make those determina tions as librarian. Miller also suggested that the value of having a cardiologist in town needed to be weighed against that of a library. Were all up against his torical preservation, said Johnson. This is an 80-year piece of our history. The Florida Trust for Historic Preservation two years ago listed the site among Floridas Eleven Most Endangered Historic Sites. In addition, during the 36th annual conference of the Florida Trust held in Tampa this year, the Trust announced the school was identied as a success for ongoing preservation fund ing efforts. Last year, Kara J. Litvi nas, a graduate student in historic preservation at the University of Florida, wrote a thesis on Chapmans adaptive use as a partial ful llment of the requirements for her masters degree in historic preservation. In the case of Apalachic ola, the reuse of Chapman School is just one example of a type of catalyst project that could spark positive community growth, she wrote. Under the states Rural Economic Development Im itative, the city benets from a waiver of any matching re quirement for the $497,000 grant. PresentsFranklinCountySeaHawksAuditorium June7,2014at6:07P.M.Ticketsareonsalenowcall653-8078 SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S A look at the summer harvesting areas. Area 1671, commonly known as East Hole, is the blue lined area east of the St. George Island Bridge LIBRARY from page A1 SUMMER OYsSTER HARVEsSTING

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From staff reports For an experience you wont forget, come spend a week on the Choctawhatchee Bay in Niceville for snorkeling, marine education, arts and crafts, outdoor activities, archery, kayaking, campres, skits and many other exciting activities at 4-H Camp Timpoochee. Franklin County youth ages 8-13 will have a great time at the 4-H Camp, to be Monday to Friday, July 7-11. This years theme is Welcome to Our Jungle! This ve-day residential camp costs $225 for Franklin County youth, which includes lodging, meals, canteen snacks, program supplies and a T-shirt. Dont miss out on this exciting opportunity. Camp is lled on a rst come, rst served basis. So sign up now. Registration forms are available at the Franklin County Extension Ofce at 66 Fourth St. in the Fort Coombs Armory building in Apalachicola. Stop by, give us a call at 653-9337, or email metaylor@u.edu to request a registration form. The registration deadline is Monday, June 30, or earlier if lled. 4519186 PetoftheWeek!Areyoulookingtoadoptasmallbreeddog? WehaveseveralattheAdoptionCenterwaiting fortheirforeverhomes.Nomatterwhatkind ofdogyoumaybelookingfor,ifyouwillbea littlepatient,wewillbeabletomatchyouwith yourtruelove.Besuretocheckourwebsite frequentlytomonitorourintakes!www. forgottenpets.org Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocialize allofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingto bringoneofouranimalsintotheirhometobe fosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucan sparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisit theFranklinCountyHumaneSocietyat244 StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogonto thewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtosee moreofouradoptablepets. SocietyA10 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 Saturday recital All About DanceFrom staff reportsIts All About Dance at the 33rd annual Pam Nobles Dance Studios recital at 6:07 p.m. Saturday, June 7, at the Franklin County Seahawks Auditorium. Dance students from Apalachicola, Eastpoint, Carrabelle and Port St. Joe will perform. Tickets are $8 at the door. Old songs, new songs, fast and perky songs will ll the auditorium as the danc ers perform jazz, tap and ballet in the upbeat and en tertaining recital. The entire range of Nobles The Best dancers range from 18 months to 70-plus, showing off at the All About Dance recital. Old time favorites include Body Rock by the littlest dancers, Hey Good Looking, Heartbeat Drumbeat, exciting dances by the Hot Flashes, with a solo by June Gray, topped off by Scott Bensons choreography in a 1234 Mix. General admission tick et price is $8 for adults and children at the door, but reserved seats now are be ing sold for $10 and general admission for $4 until the recital. The program book is $5. Special to the TimesFranklin County Schools Food and Nutrition Services attended the 2014 Florida School Nutrition Association Conference at Disneys Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando. Eight staff members, Robin Tennille, April Dalton, Terry Hilton, Rachel Shiver, Jennifer Anderson, Tammy Nichols, Shirley Freeman and Mary Jean Johnson, attended breakout sessions and the food and equipment show. On April 26, at the general session and awards presentation, Franklin County won the following awards: Presidents Award: April Dalton (President of Chapter in Franklin County) Florida Jump Start Elementary Award: Mary Louise Shiver (Breakfast Week theme Celebrating Breakfast) Florida Jump Start Secondary Award: Mary Louise Shiver Nutrition Award: Terry Hilton (Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program kickoff theme Down in the CORN Field) Super School Award Elementary: April Dalton (Lunch Week theme School Lunch Across the USA) Super School Award Secondary: April Dalton We were proud to display our portfolios with photos of students from Franklin County School participating in the themed programs. We continue to teach our students the importance of eating breakfast to start the day. We promote the importance ofr eating fresh vegetables and fruits at lunch and supper. We cant forget to include that 60 minutes of exercise keep the body energized. Everyone is welcome to come see our portfolios and watch the students eat their healthy meals. Food service takes home awards SPECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S Franklin County food service employees, April Dalton, left, and Terry Hilton hold up the many awards won by their staff. 4-H summer camp registration now open Community plants tree for Linda ArnoldMiddle schoolers explore Crooked River LightFrom staff reportsThe last weeks of school are full of excitement about the upcoming summer, so a eld trip is the best thing for a bunch of restless students. Spencer Tolberts sixth grade students and also some seventh-graders  enjoyed a day of activities at Crooked River Lighthouse Park. Climbing the 103-foot tower was a highlight of the outing which included hands-on exploring with laser lights and prisms, a tour of the keepers house museum, a scavenger hunt and trying out the clothes wringer in the newly restored 1895 wash house. Everyone enjoyed the 70 foot wooden pirate ship in the picnic area Visit this city park and see the lighthouse any day from dawn until dusk. Visit the museum Thursday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Tower climbing available on the weekends (or Thursday and Friday, too, if we have enough volunteers). The museum is full of fascinating local maritime history. Arrangements can be made for a special educational program for small group visits during the summer. Call 697-2732 and leave a message. On Friday afternoon at the Apalachicola Municipal Library, a brief ceremony was held to dedicate a crepe myrtle tree planted in memory of Linda Arnold, who died Feb. 25. Funds for the tree and the plaque were provided by members of the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department, who brought over their trucks and their members for the ceremony. Linda and Harry Arnold, second from right, were instrumental in the creation of the re department, and in the start of the annual chili cook-off more than three decades ago. Speaking at the gathering were Fire Chief Jay Abbott, right, reghter Bud Hayes, second from left, and reghter Kevin Delahanty, left. Not pictured is Alice Collins, a longtime friend of the Arnolds, who spoke about the contribution that Linda and Harry Arnold have made to the island. DA A VI I D AA DLE LE RSTEI TEI N | The TimesFunds were provided by members of the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department JOA OA N MATEMATE Y | Special to the Times   Jazmyne Farmer,  Tonnor Segree, Honesti Williams running wet clothes through a wringer and being grateful they live with modern technology

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FaithThe Times | A11Thursday, June 5, 2014Andrew Blair ONeal was born Jan. 27, 1965, in Apalachicola to Wayne and Grace ONeal of Apalachicola. He was called home to rest with his Father on Sunday, June 1, 2014, in Apalachicola, after trying to go out oystering to make an honest days living to take care of his family. He was baptized and conrmed at Holy Family Catholic Church where he also served as a altar boy. He attended Apalachicola High School and later joined the Job Corps where he earned his GED and received a welding trade. He worked as a welder with Misener Marine and later started his own business as a commercial oysterman. Andrew was a loyal and devoted family man who cared about his family and community. He was always willing to lend a helping hand in any situation. Those to be forever blessed by his life is his wife, Carla ONeal, who he married on June 26, 1998. To this marriage, they brought together 10 children, Shawanna Woods, Jorel ONeal, Serita Givens, Ricoh ONeal, Andrea ONeal, Grace ONeal, Cynthia Sanders, Shellie Sanders, Pete Sanders, and Brendan Hutchins. He leaves to cherish his memory his parents Wayne and Grace ONeal of Apalachicola; in-laws Mitchell McCalpin of Apalachicola and Sarah French of Eastpoint, two sisters, Wanda Owens (Glen), of Waycross, Ga., and Natalie Booth (Otis), of Tallahassee; four brothers Wayne ONeal Jr. and Leon ONeal (Sherry), all of Apalachicola, Lawrence ONeal (Angel), of Macon, Ga., and Ryan ONeal (Cheyenne), of Tampa; Godmother Rose McCoy Thomas, of Apalachicola; and a host of nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and many sorrowing friends. The viewing will be at Kelley Funeral Home Friday evening, June 6, from 5 to 6 p.m., with rosary said at 6 p.m. The funeral Mass will be at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola on Saturday morning, June 7 at 10 a.m., followed by interment at Magnolia Cemetery.Andrew Blair ONeal obOBITUaARIES AnNDREW oOnNEaAL Norma FelshawPatmore was surrounded by family on  Wednesday, May 21, 2014, as she entered her eternal rest. Norma and her late husband, Mr. Harold Felshaw, moved to Carrabelle Beach in 1969. Norma  worked  for Dr. Sands, as  an ofce manager  for about  20 years. Ms. Norma  volunteered  so much  of her time while her girls were students of  Carrabelle High School; she once  was given a  Perfect Attendance Award by the staff of CHS. There have been so many lives she has touched in a positive way. Her infectious smile could literally make a difference in your day and she was a person who could laugh at herself. She enjoyed spending time with family and friends, who all knew the topic of food was bound to come up. Norma would sit and watch the beach for hours as she painted. She felt blessed to have her paintings used as a logo for the Florida Seafood Festival, hung in the State Capitol, and in various other places.  Norma got the most joy when giving her art to people she cherished. Norma was a member of the Carrabelle United  Methodist Church, sang in the  choir and  assisted with  the  designing of the stain glass windows. She wasnt a grandmother that brought her grandchildren into the kitchen to bake cookies. Instead, they were handed a sketch pad and a pencil or a paintbrush and paint book. Visits to Carrabelle always involved walks down the beach collecting shells and driftwood. Swimming would include diving for sand dollars,  she loved showing them the cross, then white doves from the center of  a sand dollar, others were left in the sun to dry out, she would use the sand dollars as a canvas to paint a picture  of the same area they  came from.  After her move to Jacksonville, each year she attended Disney on Ice, with  her daughter, grandchildren and greatgrandchildren,  which she enjoyed as much as they did.  Several years she went to Mickeys Very Merry Christmas at Disney World, where she became seven years old again. Each October,  she attended the annual Southern Womens Show, where of course she spent most of her time at the food sampling booths. Her family is certain her love of food had a  lot to do with her saying, Christmas had become to commercialized, other than for the children, gifts for her closest friends and family  needed to be homemade, not bought. She also loved to travel, after going throughout the United  States and Canada. Her  last trip was with her brother, Frank Brownell, to his wife Annies  homeland in the Philippines.  During their  two-month trip she also  went to Hong Kong. Along with her brother, she leaves behind her husband, Lou; three daughters Cindy Beck (Bill) of Jacksonville, Sheri Keith and Lisa Hartseld Bartholf (Danny), of Tallahassee; stepson Harold Felshaw Jr.  (Norma), Orlando; seven grandchildren: Jason, Amie, Ryan, Christyn, Aubrey, James Lee and Leslie; and nine great-grandchildren. There will be an informal gathering for friends with family on Saturday, June 7, at 2 p.m. at Carrabelle United Methodist Church. Norma Felshaw-Patmore noNORMaA fFELSHaA WpaPA TMoORE Lunch on tap for rst ThursdaysBy Jim Welsh Special to the TimesHappy hurricane season! Time to review your escape route and check your survival kit. The season will be a happy one, if we dont have any storms. But the way the weather is around the rest of our country, who knows? Just be prepared. Coming attractions. The movie The Longest Day, will be shown at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, on Saturday, June 7. The movie will start at 10:30 a.m. The museum is at 1001 Gray Ave. in the Carrabelle Complex. Hope you can join us for lunch this afternoon. Thats right, this after noon. The information I had in my column last week I got from a hand written note taped to the top of the desk where you make your donations for lunch and it was still there last week. We will have lunch on the rst Thursday in July, August and September. The lunch line forms at noon. Be watchin for ya! Jim the deejay will be ready to play music for your dancing and listening pleasure at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center on Saturday, June 7. Jim will have things spin ning at 7 p.m. Grab your favorite drink, your snack to share, your dancing shoes and, oh yes, your main squeeze and dance into the night. It takes two to tango! After the 5 p.m. Mass this Saturday, June 7, at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, we will have our monthly covered dish supper in the parish hall. Visitors wel come. Pizza night on Sunday at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will start at 5 p.m. and end at 7 p.m. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember our little prayer: God grant me patience and I want it now. Until next time, God bless America, our troops and the poor, the home less and the hungry. LanaLANARK nNEWS Jim Welsh The following is the updated schedule for Al coholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more informa tion, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MMONDDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion TUESDTUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDWEDNESDESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, Closed THURSDTHURSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Drive 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Dis cussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion SSATURD TURDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First Unit ed Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUSUNDDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference aaAA MEETInNG SCHEDULE Making music for Market DaysOn Saturday, May 31, the United Methodist Church of Carrabelle and Gods Ministry for the Needy hosted a Market Days fundraiser including a rummage sale, bake sale, hot dogs and live music. Seen here, the Rev. Aaron Batey, far left, strummed guitar and sang accompanied by Jim Short and Mike Nepote on drums. The turnout was a little less than I had ex pected based on other months, but we raised twice what you expect ed from the turnout, Batey said. I want to thank everybody in the community. Batey said money raised during Market Days goes to help needy families, through a com mittee that examines situations on a case-bycase basis. During May, Gods Ministry for the Needy bought grocer ies for a single parent family left homeless by a fire. LL OIS IS SWSW OBOD D A | The Times Like us on THE APAlLACHICOlLA t TIMES 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService

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Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,June583 7520% Fri,June684 7520% Sat,June784 7520% Sun,June884 7630% Mon,June984 7630% Tues,June1084 7540% Wed,June1184 7530% Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 12 Thursday, June 5, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomSurf shing is doing well for those anglers prowling the shoreline with many nice trout and red sh being caught. Surf shing on the Cape is still producing great pompano and whiting catches. Dont be surprised if you occasionally hook up with a shark. Most are being caught in the middle of the water column with an ample amount of chum on wrecks and off hard bottom. The MBARA sites out of Mexico Beach also have an abundance of sh, but get out early so as to get a good spot. The week of Red Snapper season in federal waters is here. The Gulf is full of Red Snapper and not just a few shermen chasing them. The marine forecast is favorable for the next few days and off shore shing should be very good. By FRANK SARGEANTFrankmako1@outlook.com Dont blink or youll miss the red snapper season in the Gulf of Mexico this year. It opens June 1, slams shut again just nine days later on June 10 thanks to a Byzantine federal management system that tightens the regulations ever more as the shery gets better and better. (If we get a tropical storm on or about June 1, say goodbye to the entire season.) Federal regulators say the rules are for the good of the sh and ultimately of the shermen. But in fact, most experienced reef anglers say red snapper shing is now better than it has been in at least 40 years thanks to an extended period of tight harvest regulations, and also perhaps due to the success of sh excluder devices on shrimp nets, allowing millions of juvenile snapper to escape these days when in the past they would have wound up as bycatch, dead on the deck. The snapper are both much larger than they have been in decades, and much more numerous, according to hundreds of reports from shermen all around the northern half of the state and at least as far south as Tampa Bay. Its not just in Florida waters; Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas also report booming snapper populations. So why dont the feds want to pony up longer seasons and more generous bag limits? Because of a bizarre twist in the way they calculate the harvest they measure it in pounds, and when their best estimate of a conservation-smart harvest is achieved, they call for closure. Snapper grow fast and live a long time, and consequently anglers are now catching tons of whoppers which means that they can catch a lot fewer before they reach those limits set by the feds. To be sure, these restrictions are not arbitrarily contrived by the sh managers they are mandated by the MagnusonStevens act, and more recently by a court decision but both these directives are based on badly-designed harvest surveys, which are the direct responsibility of the federal scientists. It is much like the paradoxical Catch 22, and its causing a furious reaction among shermen and state shery managers from Florida to Texas most Gulf states are now moving rapidly toward putting their own harvest surveys in place for the species, tapping the capabilities of smart phones so that anglers can record their catches conveniently the minute they hit RED SNAPPER SEASON SHORT BUT SWEETRANDY ROCHELLE | Special to the TimesWhopper red snapper such as this one are now abundant throughout the Gulf of Mexico experienced skippers say there are more and bigger snapper than at any time in the past 50 years and many wonder why, when thats the case, the federal season is only nine days long. FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the TimesRed snapper must be at least 16 inches long to be kept, and the limit is two daily. The species is widely recognized as one of the best table sh in the Gulf.See RED SNAPPER A13Early opening of bay scallop seasonFrom staff reportsOn May 20, Gov. Rick Scott announced the bay scallop season will open three days early this year. Opening the season early and on a weekend will create additional recreational opportunities for Florida residents and visitors while recognizing the importance of economic bene ts to coastal communities where this activity occurs. I requested the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission open the season early this year to bene t our communities who rely on our sheries, Scott said. The bay scallop shery is especially important to Floridas Big Bend region and by opening the bay scallop season three days earlier, Floridians throughout this area will have more opportunities to enjoy our natural treasures and provide for their families. The season, which usually opens July 1, will open Saturday, June 28. The FWC also will bring a proposal to its commissioners at a future meeting to change future season openings to the Saturday before July 1, unless July 1 happens to be a Saturday. The recreational season will open in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The season will remain open through Sept. 24, with the rst day of the closure on Sept. 25. All other regulations, including bag and vessel limits, apply. Learn more by visiting MyFWC. com/Fishing.

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Special to the TimesTwo summer basketball teams, one for age 14 and under boys, and one for age 17 and under, have hit the court running on behalf of Franklin County basketball. In early May, the two teams, under the direction of basketball coach Mike Sweatt, took part in the Tallahassee Capital Challenge Basketball Tournament. The 14-under team split this tournament, losing 36-34 in the rst game, but getting its rst tournament win of the offseason against the North Florida Christian travelling team 32-30. Johnny Jones was leading scorer with 14 points and Tyler Pendleton led with 14 rebounds. Cash Creamer, Landon Able, Jan Lowe, Landon Nash and Daijon Penamon all played vital roles in the win. Other team members who contributed were Mikalin Huckaba, Aric Sowell, Tyrell Green, Elijah Decoursey, Cameron Nash, Jonathan Jones and Jack Harris. The 17-under team took its opening game of the tournament 44-28 over the 10th Grade Tallahassee Warhawks. The team then won a squeaker 50-49 nal against the Chiles/Maclay Timberwolves. Kelsey Jones hit two big three-pointers to put the Seahawks up 48-47 with under a minute to play. Sharod Senatus got a steal then passed up the oor to KK Wilson for the icing layup. The Timberwolves hit a late shot to come within one point. We were down by as many as 16 in the beginning of the second half, Sweatt said. We came back with our defense, transition offense, and some really good timely shooting from Josue Barahona, Jones, and Senatus, great defensive play from Marshall Sweet, Tyler Howard, and Tyler Farmer, who both hit some big layups in our comeback stretch, too. The team took the next game 68-35 in a rematch against the 10th Grade Warhawks. We all played well on defense which created a lot of easy shots in transition offensively. Farmer, Howard, Sweet, Barahona, Senatus, Wilson, Kelsey Jones and Nathan Jones all played and contributed in this game, Sweatt said. The Seahawks fell in the championship 59-53 against the 11th Grade Tallahassee Warhawks. Sweet led the way in scoring, hitting six three-pointer, totaling out with 22 points for the championship game. We ran out of gas in this game, Sweatt said. It was our third game of the day and a lot of the players played in the football red/black game earlier that morning so they were pretty tired. We had a couple of players with leg cramps and back cramps. No excuse, I thought we still had chances to win this game if we would have hit our free throws and nished better around the basket. During one stretch, the score was knotted 42-42 late in the game, after a Hawks run that featured back-toback dunks, with Kelsey Jones getting a steal and dunk, then Kelsey getting another steal and assist to Senatus who dunked it. It was an exciting game early but we de nitely ran out of energy, Sweatt said. This tournament qualied the team for the Youth Basketball of America State Tournament played in Fort Myers on May 30-June 1. The tournament started off great with a big win over Premier Elite 58-50. We closed the game out well going on a 16-7 run to nish the game, said Sweatt. The Seahawks lost their next game 76-59 against the Lakeland Xpress. It was tied up late 51-51 but with cold shooting from the Hawks, the Xpress took advantage and went on a big run to close the game. We struggled the whole tournament with shooting behind the arc, Sweatt said. It seemed like we just never were comfortable shooting the ball. The team was unable to make it to bracket play on Sunday after they lost 56-51 vs. Florida Saints. We got frustrated with an array of missed layups and missed shots and never seemed to get interested in playing the game until the last few minutes, when they realized that this could be it for the tourney, Sweatt said. Overall I was not pleased with our play at the state tournament and thought we could have performed a lot better. The team nished in 10th place in the state. The teams total points quali ed Franklin County for a wild card bid to Nationals, in Orlando June 30 to July 5. The Seahawks next tournament is June 13-15 at the Leach Center and Civic Center in Tallahassee at the Florida State Team Camp, in which both the junior varsity and varsity teams will be participating. Sunday will be the tournament day on June 15. The players will meet the coaches, players and staff at Florida State University while playing in the team camp/tournament. Also the Dade Street Varsity League in Tallahassee will be starting up June 17. The 17-under team will be playing every Tuesday in this league and there will be a playoff at the end of league play at the end of July. Also there are two other tournaments that the 14-under team will be playing in as well in July. The 14-under team will also have two scrimmage games vs. Port St. Joe Junior High Team in the next couple of weeks as well. We would certainly like to thank all of our sponsors and a big special thanks to the Franklin County commissioners for their contribution to the state tournament. Without it we would not have been able to go and get these young men this experience, Sweatt said. Sponsors include Waterstreet Potters, Fishermans Choice, Bluff Road Storage, Gunn Heating and A/C, Inc, Kings Plumbing, Inc, Erin Rodriguez Construction, Waterstreet Seafood, Piggly Wiggly, Ace Hardware Mark Willis Apalachicola, Reds Family Store, Transport Auto Broker Inc, Chandas Laundry and Cleaning Inc, Danny Gilbert, Tamaras/Tapas Bar and Restaurant, Four Kids Minus Four, LLC, and Beach Pros Realty Jolly Rogers.CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 5, 2014 APage 13Section RED SNAPPER from page A12the docks. In an unprecedented rebellion against the federal management system, most Gulf states have all but quit cooperating with the NOAA system on this species. These days, state management is really starting to make sense, while it didnt 30 years back. In the bad old days, only commercial shermen had lobbyists and power to control the rules, and many sheries suffered as a result. But these days, the checks and balances of local recreational anglers and conservationists weigh in for keeping the maximum number of quality-sized sh in the water and even the saltiest old commercial harvesters have nally come to realize that it just simply makes sense to guard the resource, so that they can not only make money shing today, but also tomorrow, next month and next year. It should be noted that thanks goes to not only state agencies but also federal biologists for much of the research on offshore species that has made this awakening happen. Florida, like other Gulf states, has set a much longer red snapper season in state waters, up to 9 nautical miles offshore, extending from May 25 to July 14 this year. How this all plays out remains to be seenhopefully, better shery stock analysis will put an end to the foolishness and restore some measure of cooperation between state and federal management agencies. In the meantime, whether you sh state or federal waters, here are some tactics that consistently produce results on red snapper.How to get emAnglers who regularly target red snapper say they are not exactly bottom sh, even though they are nearly always found around hard structure. Theyre usually found over structure, but not as often down in the structure like grouper. Experts seek out what they call a snapper Christmas tree show on their sonar screens before dropping a line. The pyramid or tree is the shape made by a school of snapper, with most deep, fewer at the top. In 200 feet of water the stack may extend as much as 50 feet off bottom. Gulf red snapper are typically found in 60 foot depths and more, on out to the edge of the continental shelf at around 250 to 280 feet beyond this zone, the bottom drops away to a mile deep and more, and common reef sh are not found in those depths. The Panhandle has a unique shery in that there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of private reefs, that is junk that skippers have dropped on otherwise barren sand bottom to attract snapper old washing machines, steel drums, all sorts of bulky trash. Its not legal any more, but there are still many of these reefs around, and smart skippers have dozens of them in their GPS machinesall very carefully protected from other skippers who might want to pirate their sh. There are also numerous legally-placed arti cial reefs, including tugboats, barges and ships as well as demolition rubble, that attract lots of sh; these can be found on any good offshore chart, or visit www.myfwc.com and type arti cial reefs in the search box. In general, the procedure is for the skipper to head for his favorite GPS number, drop anchor uptide when he gets there, and then let the anglers lower an assortment of frozen thread ns, cigar minnows or squid down on 60-poundtackle. Using braided line makes it easier to feel the bite and get a good hookset, but youll need at least ve feet of 60 to 80-pound-test mono leader to fool the sh and keep their teeth clear of the braid. (In extremely clear water or where the sh are being shed hard, its sometimes necessary to go to lighter tackle to fool snapperyou lose many but you get bit more often.) Weights of 4 ounces and more are needed to get the bait deep, and hook sizes are typically 6/0 and larger circle hooks, extrastrong. Circle hooks are required by law, as are hook removers, both aimed at improving survival of released reef sh. Venting devices, required formerly, no longer are on the must have list. The angler drops the bait to bottom, then takes up several turns of the reel to suspend the bait in the snapper zonekeeping an eye on the sonar will help you put the bait where the sh are. The snappers take it from there. When you feel a bite, you reel like mad and hopefully the circle hook digs in. Jerking on the rod to set the hook rarely works when using circle hooks; just keep tension on the line and reel very fast and the sh will usually set the hook itself. Red snapper these days typically average 5 to 8 pounds, but there are many, many of 10 pounds and more, and 20-pounders are not unheard of. The limit is two per angler per day, minimum size 16 inches. Red snapper are among the tastiest of all sh, and are great broiled, fried or baked. Special to the TimesThe 17-and-under Seahawks team at the state tournament in Fort Myers.Summer hoop season heats up Journeys masters miniature golf fundraiserFrom staff reportsThis years Putt Masters bene t miniature golf tournament raised $4,000 to support the Franklin County public libraries. This years winners are included Pat Hardman, who earned Hot Shot honors for having the most holes in one. First place honors went to Masters of the Putt, Journeys of St. George Island with 160 points. Team members were Dayle Flint, Clint Taylor, Ashley Friend and Jeremy Willoughby. Second place, with 171 points, were The Foot Wedge Crew, Newt and Adele Colston and Skip and Terry Kemp. Third place was taken by The Book Worms, Bob and Kara Landiss, Kate Aguiar, and Cal Allen with 175 points. This years sponsors include Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf; Weems Memorial Hospital; Sign Design in Eastpoint; Bob LandissTouchpoint Printing; St. James Bay Golf Resort; The Apalachicola Seafood Grill and Steakhouse and Centennial Bank. Businesses and individuals that sponsored teams include Apalachicola Ace Hardware, George Pruett, members of Judy Little and Sondra Furbee yoga class, Butler Agency, Uta Hardy, St. George Island Realty, We ngs, Bobby James Metal Roo ng, Sometimes Its Hotter, Dails Seafood, Journeys of St. George Island, Newt and Adele Colston; Skip and Terri Kemp, Bob and Kara Landis, Kate Aguiar, Cal Allen, and Apalachicola Bay Anima Clinic. Businesses and individuals that sponsored a hole sign include Rev. John and Sue Sink, Weems Memorial Hospital, Hammer Head Construction, Sea Oats Art Gallery, Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf, William Massey, Apalachicola Riverkeepers and Sign Design. Much thanks to Erica Sapp, Logo/Design and to The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar, owners Jimmy & Shirley Sapp and their great staff for hosting the event and providing the trophies presented to the winners. Make sure to visit the Facebook pages of the Franklin County Public Library and The Friends of Franklin County Public Library for news, programs, announcements and pictures from Putt Masters 2014.SPECIAL TO THE TIMESMembers of Uta Hardys Hardy Girls are, from left, Alexy Erickson, Summer Granger, Tina Granger and Ivy Crane. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesKarl Lucy of Eastpoint tees off during the Franklin County Public Library miniature golf fundraiser Saturday.

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A14| The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95142T PUBLIC NOTICE Solicitation Number: 14HM-6B-02-29-01-385 Title: Request for Documented Quote, Professional Contracting Services for the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Wind Retrofit The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is announcing the documented quote for professional contracting services for a wind retrofit on the EOC by shuttering all windows and doors and constructing a new hip roof. The selected firm will provide engineering or roof designs and construction plans, and contract or furnish all labor, materials, equipment tools, transportation, and supervision as indicated in the sealed drawings and specifications. The contractor must have a proven track record, extensive experience and holds a State of Florida Certified Building Contractors License. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any or all bids or any part thereof and/or to waive the information if such is deemed to be in the best interest of Franklin County. The county also reserves the right to reject the bid of any bidder who has previously failed to perform adequately after having once been awarded a prior bid for furnishing materials similar in nature to those materials mentioned in this bid. Download the Specification Details/ Attachments: www.frankline mergencymanagement.co m Point of Contact: Sole contact for the Documented Quote: Gail Leek. All questions pertaining to this solicitation must be submitted in writing to gleek@realknow.com. Please reference the solicitation number. Submission Deadline Date: June 30, 2014 at 4:00 PM EST Deliver three sealed copies of the Documented Quote to: Franklin County Clerks Office Attn: Michael Moron 33 Market Street, Suite 203 Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Published Dates: June 5, 12, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 99013T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 28, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000342CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 9th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of May, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Terry Segree As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99047T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000128 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. DARYL THOMAS WALLACE, ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 1, 2014, in the above-styled cause, The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Clerks Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on June 12, 2014 at 8:00 am the following described property: LOT 16 AND 17, BLOCK 257, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: LOT 16 & 17 BLOCK 257, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand on this 22nd day of May, 2014. Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99045T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE THE FOLLOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY OF G.J. GRACE, LLC OR ITS ASSIGNS WILL ON JUNE 13, 2014 AT 9:00 A.M. EASTERN TIME AT 25 BEGONIA STREET, EASTPOINT, FLORIDA BE SOLD BY CENTENNIAL BANK FOR CASH IN ACCORDANCE WITH .109, FLORIDA STATUTES (2013): Metal interior display racks Window panes and frames of varying sizes A-framed wood storage device Outside metal storage shelves, desk chairs with plastic armrests Assorted metal movable shelving Varying types of wood planks, moldings and other millworks Wooden pallets Office desk Telephone VCR and tube TV 4-drawer file cabinet For additional information contact Monica Lemieux at (850) 6538805. DATED THIS 21ST DAY OF MAY 2014. Pub Dates: May 29, June 5, 2014 99063T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000277 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1; Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA K. KENNISTON; FRANCIS W. KENNISTON;ET AL Defendants RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated January 15, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000277 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1, Plaintiff and SANDRA K. KENNISTON, Et Al; are defendant(s). The Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT http://www. franklinclerk.com/ IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES, AT 11:00 AM, June 12, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: SOUTHEAST 45 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 17 OF CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 92 5TH ST, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 22nd day of May, 2014. By: Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99079T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000359 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes; Franklin County, Florida; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2011CA-000359 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 17, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST1983.60 FEETTO THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WESTALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY1128.67 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYRUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 58 SEC-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 5, 2014 The Times | A15 4518321HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAILABLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519140 ONDS WEST380.99 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST114.51 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST114.35 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.37 FEETTO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST381.12 FEETTO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF BUCK STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY114.59 FEETTO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST381.10 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 May 29, June 5, 2014 99081T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000130 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Diane Dodgen; Unknown Spouse of Diane Dodgen; United States of America; United States of America, Department of Treasury; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000130 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Diane Dodgen are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 12, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE EASTERLYONEHALF (BEING 100 FEETIN WIDTH BY THE FULLLENGTH THEREOF), OF THE FOLLOWING TRACT OR PARCELOF LAND: APARCELOF LAND IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH, 978.5 FEET, TO ACONCRETE MARKER; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.8 FEET, TO APOINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST169 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, WHICH SAID LAST POINTIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 219 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF THE 100FOOTRIGHT-OFWAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 30; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE MEANDERING SAID SHORE LINE OF SAID SOUND, IN AN EASTERLYDIRECTION, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCELOF LAND FRONTING 200 FEET ON STATE ROAD NO. 30, AND EXTENDING THE SAME WIDTH TO ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH, 978.50 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.80 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 204.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 254.00 FEET, TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY, 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 256.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER OF SAID ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE, 100.02 FEET, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-199999 FC02 WCC May 29, June 5, 2014 99089T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes Self Service Storage Facility Act 83.80283.809 F.S. Gulf Coast Storage LLC will sell, for cash, to the highest bidder(s) OR may opt to retain the contents of the following storage units: #83-60 Jamie Atchison #87 Angie Arroyo #103 Amy Hicks The facility will dispose of the contents at 241 Patton Dr., Eastpoint, Florida at 8:00 am June 21, 2014. The parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Pub: June 5, 12, 2014 99097T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA-000317 Section:___________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELETTINGER AKAMIKE ETTINGER; ELYSE ETTINGER; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; HIDDEN BEACHES PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION; HIDDEN BEACHES AT YENTBAYOU, INC.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 192011-CA-000317 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 2nd day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT12, HIDDEN BEACHES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6 ATPAGE 11 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99095T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2011-00448-CA DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. JENNIFER KERN, ET. AL. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, and entered in Case No.201100448-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Bank of America, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jennifer Kern and St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc., are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/out Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 at 11:00 A.M., Franklin County, Florida on the 16th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT7 OF SEAPINE VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4 PAGE 28 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/ALOT7 SEA PINE VILLA, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 20th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC -14-127369 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 5, 12, 2014 99105T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENTOF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF AGENCYACTION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice its issuance of a permit File Number:19-0325756-001-EG to Ben Mathewson, to construct a Single Family Dock Extension with the relocation of the terminal platform and 2 boat lifts, within the landward extent of Apalachicola Bay, a Class II Florida waterbody/ Aquatic Preserve, The project is located at 316 Marks Street, Saint George Island Section 29, Township 9 South, Range 6 West,, Franklin County, Florida. Aperson whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Under subsection 62110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. Peti tions must be filed within 14 days of publication of this notice. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. Apetition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) Aconcise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. Apetition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd MS 55, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Pub: June 5, 2014 99143T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CA 000189 Section: ________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. EBE WALTER; HENRIETTA A. WALTER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SYNOVUS BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 19 2012 CA 000189 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 9th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 26 OF DOG ISLAND SUBDIVISION, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE (S) 23 & 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99145T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2014-0007-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF WYNETTE F. TUCKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS Pursuant to Florida Statute 733.2121 (2013) and Florida Probate Rules Rule 5.241 (2014), the administration of the estate of Wynette F. Tucker, deceased, whose date of death was January 13, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County. Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street. Suite 126, PO Box 368, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 5, 2014. Personal Representative: NICOLE TUCKER 140 Ed Padgett Rd. Lakeland, FL 33809 Attorney for Personal Representative: EDWIN A. GREEN, II, ESQ. FL Bar No. 0137244 215 Delata Court Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 222-7770 June 5, 12, 2014 Basset pups. $450. 8 weeks. AKC, vet health cert. 850-225-4379 Apalachicola: 208 Ellis Van Vleet Sat. June 7th 8a-untilMoving SaleMisc. Furniture, Desks, Books, Clothes, Dishes, and Even a Kitchen Sink. Text FL91144 to 56654 Eastpoint 93 Rose Dr(Off N Bayshore Dr. in Magnolia Bluff, Follow Signs.) Sat. June 7th 8a-?Large Garage Sale/ Estate SaleLots of Treasures and Collectibles. Something For Everyone. Port Saint Joe, 674 Jones Homestead Rd, Friday, Saturday and Sunday June 6th, 7th and 8th, 8am to 5pm.2 Family Yard SaleLots of Items! Text FL90750 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Acct Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative AssistantFor guest services. Happy and energetic person, good communication and computer skills. Ability to read and follow instructions. Come by and pick up application or email to visitorcentermanager@ammfl. org Apalachicola Maritime Museum 103 Water St, 850-653-2500 Web ID 34290443 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Web Id 34287017 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAdministrative ReceptionistThis full-time position requires excellent customer service skills & a smile! Must be neat, organized & attentive to detail with good computer skills & knowledge of Microsoft Word, Outlook & Excel. Good grammar, spelling & punctuation. Varied office duties including phones & walk-in traffic. Prefer prior office experience. Full-time Mon-Fri w/ great benefits. Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-5pm at: 123 W Gulf Beach Dr or call Sandra 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34290509 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 2 bedroom handicap Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer Text FL72436 to 56654 Apalachicola: 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Susies Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 Trades&Services ADVERTISEHERE TODAY227-7847 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter 4510547 KimHawkinsDavisCPA7811thStreet,ApalachicolaFL32320850-653-6875 ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com On Saturday, a group of animal lovers took the rst step toward controlling the feral cat population on St. George Island with a trap/neuter/release program (TNR). TNR is the method of feral cat control endorsed by Alley Cat Allies, a national organization to protect and stabilize feral cat populations. According to the ACA website, TNR involves humanely trapping stray and feral cats and having them vaccinated and spayed/neutered before returning them to their outdoor home. It is the only effective method of stabilizing outdoor cat colonies. As a result of TNR, the birth of new kittens in the colony slows down and eventually ends when all the cats are spayed or neutered. In addition, socialized cats and kittens are spayed/ neutered and then often put up for adoption, causing an immediate reduction in the population size. After using the cruel, costly catch and kill method for decades and failing to stabilize cat populations, local ofcials and animal control ofcers everywhere have realized that they need a completely different approach. Some TNR programs have now been in place for as many as 25 years. Helen Gore and Cathy Buell, cofounders of St. George Island Cat Allies together with June Crawford of Aiken, S.C., organized Saturdays meeting at the St. George Island United Methodist Church. They began their crusade by rescuing 14 feral cats trapped at an island housing development and slated for execution. Eight of those cats are now housed in Apalachicola awaiting adoption. Gore said to further their rescue mission, the Allies need four things. Volunteers are needed to help trap and transport cats. Volunteers would not be expected to handle the animals, only traps or crates containing them. Traps are the second component of the proposed program. The preferred brand is Tru Catch because it will not injure small kittens. The cost of a Tru Catch trap is between $50 and $60. The third necessary component is a veterinary clinic where the cats can be neutered. The Allies are still weighing their options for veterinary care. Depending on the option chosen for veterinary care, the group also might need a safe, climate-controlled space to house cats overnight after surgery. Finally, the program needs money. Bill Henderson, founder of Miss Kitty Feline Sanctuary Inc. in Thomasville, Ga., spoke to the group on Saturday. The money is out there but you have to ask, he said. Henderson and his wife, Bettye, successfully operate a cat sanctuary that houses about 150 felines at any given time. He said in addition to slowing population growth, a TNR program enhances the quality of life for both cats and the people who live near them because the cats are healthier and less prone to ghting. He called the trap-to-euthanize method of cat population control a death machine that kills 4 million cats annually in the U.S. Gore said she felt the meeting was a great success. About 20 people turned out for the discussion. Several people came forward at the meeting to offer to take an active role in the effort, including Willie Norred and Mary Ann Durrer, who has taken the job of treasurer. We will continue to announce our meetings hopefully via the Times as well as individual emails, Gore wrote in a follow-up email. She said she and Buell plan to request to speak with the Civic Club on St. George Island and perhaps the homeowners association in the Plantation. We are in need of others who may be interested in becoming board members for our organization, Gore said. Our immediate goals are to continue to seek volunteer support; to look for seed money, through donations and/or people to assist us with fundraisers; to search for vehicles to utilize for transport of cats and/or kittens; to nd a suitable air-conditioned storage room/facility for caged cats post-surgery; to earn money for the purchase of traps; and of course to become a non-prot/501(c)(3) organization. Penelopes Pet Stop in Eastpoint has offered to help with housing cats post-surgery. If you want to help by either volunteering, making a donation or adopting a cat, call at Gore 323-0123 or Buell at 370-1125. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) On a technicality, what other state besides Alaska and Hawaii was ofcially admitted to the Union in 1950s? TX, OH, IA, OK 2) What was the Titanics emergency lifeboat #1 dubbed as by the press? Lucky Stars, Money Tree, Millionaires Boat, Cash Bow 3) Reportedly on his historic ight, what doll did Charles Lindbergh take along? G.I. Joe, Felix the Cat, Raggedy Andy, Bugs Bunny 4) When did Tom Brokaw sign off (retire) as anchor of NBC Nightly News? 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006 5) What are ASL, BSL, JSL, and DSL types of? Sign languages, UFOs, Signature loans, Dreams 6) Which of these sports or sporting activities has a sin bin? Boxing, Bowling, Hockey, Snowboarding 7) Whats a split among the members of a church when they no longer agree on what they believe? Sceptre, Scherzo, Schism, Scrag 8) From Harry Potter whats the name that most witches and wizards fear to speak? Voldemort, Flitwick, Diagon, Dumbledore 9) What do more school kids say is the worst thing served in the school cafeteria? Broccoli, Meatloaf, Fish sticks, Lima beans 10) Where is National Museum of Roller Skating located? Atlantic City, NJ; Fresno, CA; Lincoln, NE; Florence, SC 11) What is known medically as trimethylxanthine? Morphine, Glucose, Starch, Caffeine 12) A scimitar is a type of what? Headache, Sword, Fence, Stallion 13) When did newscaster Paul Harvey make his rst national broadcast from Chicago? 1945, 1950, 1955, 1960 14) A state of complete happiness is known as whatnumber heaven? First, Third, Seventh, Tenth ANSWERS 1) OH. 2) Millionaires Boat. 3) Felix the Cat. 4) 2004. 5) Sign languages. 6) Hockey. 7) Schism. 8) Voldemort. 9) Meatloaf. 10) Lincoln, NE. 11) Caffeine. 12) Sword. 13) 1950. 14) Seventh. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com HIStTORIC APa ALaAChHICOLaA KItt TTENS fFREE tTO GOOD hHOME SS PECIa A L tT O Th H E TIMESThese four kittens and their mother have taken up residence between the House of Tartts and Raney Guest Cottage on Avenue F. The mother and the black kitten have already been claimed by a visitor from Sarasota. The other three kittens, a calico and two silver tabbies, still need homes. Caroline Weiler, who is fostering the family, said she will help take care of shots and neutering. The kittens are healthy and have been handled, so they are extremely friendly. If you want a souvenir of Apalachicola to take home or even a kitten for your Apalachicola home, call Weiler at 653-9749. Animal lovers launch cat control program on islandLOISLOIS SS WO O BOD OD A | The TimesBill Henderson and retired veterinarian Will Rosenbaum, right, discuss St. George Islands trap/neuter/release program and low-cost neutering before the Saturday meeting on the island.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, June 5, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM P hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8893 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com In the seven years of Franklin County High School commencements, last weeks ranked among the most en ergetic and enthusiastic of ceremonies, as 63 seniors re ceived diplomas as members of the Class of 2014. The condent swagger in the gymnasium air May 29 was seized early by Class President Jathan Martin, who snapped a sele of himself and his classmates before of fering a welcome address that featured a pop quiz. Now seniors, I know you thought your high school tests were all over, but heres a pop quiz. The answer to each question of this pop quiz is simple: The class of 2014, he said, before launching into ve questions, each of which was responded to loudly by his classmates collective answer. Which class had over 10 athletes signed to colleges? he asked. Which class had students who directed and performed in Franklin County Schools rst Broadway production? Which class body was ac cepted to over 30 colleges and universities? Which class earned over 450 college credit hours? *Which class received over $600,000 in scholarship money? Martin continued, each answer coming back The Class of 2014, loud and clear. Throughout our high school career, we have en acted hard-work, determina tion, and resilience. So, we welcome you to the night where we birth our futures, he said. Tonight is the night where you will witness histo ry. Tonight is the night where the class that has excelled far By AMANDA BANKS The News Herald APALACHICOLA The daily harvest of oyster in Apalachicola Bay will be drastically reduced, under new Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commis sion ruled announced last week. The changes run from now through Aug. 31. Because Apalachicola Bay oysters have signi cantly declined in popula tion due to lack of freshwa ter ow in previous years, these changes are intend ed to help the oyster popu lation recover from the ef fects of low river ow. The FWC worked with the Franklin County oyster industry to implement the temporary changes, and the industry agrees the measures are a way to en sure the long-range health of the industry. The FWC is support ing us and theyre listen ing to us, said Shannon Hartseld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Hartseld said his orga nization asked for some of the changes, including the harvest limits and closure of some areas, and that they are happy with the new regulations. The changes include: Prohibiting commer cial and recreational har vest of oysters in the area commonly known as East Hole; Lowering the daily commercial harvest and possession limit from 20 to eight bags (each bag is equivalent to 60 pounds or two ve-gallon buckets) of oysters in the shell per person; Lowering the daily recreational harvest, ves sel and possession limit to ve gallons of oysters in the shell (previously two bags per day with one bag being equivalent to 60 pounds or two ve-gallon buckets); Prohibiting commer cial oyster harvests on Fri days and Saturdays. All other harvest regu lations remain in effect Cuts in store for summer oyster harvest Take a look at summer harvesting areas on Page A8 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com With nearly a half-mil lion dollars in grant money on its way from the Florida Legislature, Apalachicola city ofcials have their sights set on a proposal to transform the 80-yearold Chapman Schools into a new home for the municipal library. Apalachicola Librar ian Caty Greene reported Tuesday to city commis sioners that a $497,000 public library construction grant from the Division of Library and Informa tion Services survived Gov. Scotts veto pen. The grant calls for the remod eling of the 6,400 square foot Chapman Schools for use as an independent municipal library headquarters. Because the school district in 2009 deeded the building to the county, the library plan will have to secure the blessing of the county commission. In addition, accom modations would have to be made to relocate the ofce of Apalachic ola cardiologist Dr. Shezad Sanaul lah, who recently renewed a threeyear lease with the county for use of the building. Currently, Sanaullah pays $1,961 per month, which includes $1,833 annual tax. His bill will be reduced by $100 monthly because he has installed a separate water meter and will pay his own water bill. Theres a good deal of nego tiation that needs to go in that re spect, said Greene, noting that the lease has a six-month cancel lation clause, for whatever reason, Apalach envisions library at Chapman Schools We back down from nothing PHOTOS BY BY D A V I D A D LE R STEI N | The Times Salutatorian Jathan Martin Class of 2014 graduates in unison By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Strong performances by Apala chicola Bay Charter School fourth and eighth graders set the standard for countywide improvement in FCAT writ ing scores in 2014. The percentage of ABC Schools 35 eighth graders who posted a passing grade of 3.5 or better in essay writing rose by 13 percentage points, from 50 to 63 percent, the best it has been in the three years the test has been given. Among the schools 39 fourth grad ers, the improvement in scores at satis factory or above rose by 12 percentage points, from 44 to 56 percent. This cur rent percentage of the class who posted satisfactory scores is double the 28 per cent of ABC fourth graders who did so in 2012. I am extremely pleased with our fourth grade and eighth grade writing scores, said ABC School Principal Chi mene Johnson. Both grade levels were above state average and our teachers motivated their students to do their best and use the writing strategies they have been taught. Our mission is that every student reach their full academic and social potential. Every year is a different year with students with varying capa bilities, she said. Our teaching staff works diligently to provide the best ed ucational foundation for their students to be successful and show growth every year. At Franklin School, eighth graders showed an impressive jump of 17 per centage points who were at satisfactory and above in their essay writing, a leap to 41 percent from 24 percent last year, and 26 percent the year before that. But the number of Franklin fourth graders at satisfactory or better slid to 40 percent, seven percentage points be hind last years 47, and nearly the same as the 41 percent of fourth graders who were satisfactory or better in 2012. Among Franklin County High School 10th graders, the percentage at sat isfactory and above slid to 37 percent, ve percentage points below last years 42, but ve head of 2012s 32 percent. See LIBRAR Y A8 See GRADUATION A6 See FCAT A6 ABC paces writing FCAT gains As I think about all of my peers both the ones I know personally and the rest of you I know, without a shred of doubt that we will make a change in the world VALEDICTORIAN LAURA GALLEGOS VALEDICTORIAN BRIA W ALKER Many of us know which direction we would like to go in and yet some of us have no clue where to start... Its okay to simply not know. Now is the time to nd out who you truly are. V O L 129 I SS U E 6 CATY GREENE Apalachicola city librarian Opinion ............ A4 Society ........... A10 Faith ............. A11 Outdoors .......... A12 Tide Chart ......... A12 Sports ............ A13 Classieds ...... A14-A15 Those dang yellowies, A2 T he L ongest Day at museum S aturday Camp Gordon Johnston World War II museum will show the lm The Longest Day at 10:15 a.m. on Saturday, June 7 in honor of the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The movie is lmed in the style of a docudrama and concentrates on events on both sides of the channel. This lm is one in a series shown monthly to educate museum visitors on the sacrices made, for us, by the World War II generation. Free popcorn will be served. Admission is by donation and appreciated. Full moon climb at lighthouse June 12 The June Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, June 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb is from 8-9:30 p.m. and includes light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people can climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. Reservations are recommended. Please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Network with other businesses June 12 Network with other area business owners at the Apalachicola Bay Chamber Business After Hours Monday, at Up The Stairs, 76 Market Street in Apalachicola on Thursday, June 12 from 5:30-7 pm.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Its a bad year for yellow ies. Yellow ies, a common name for tabanids, are in the family that also includes horse ies. There are more than 300 species of tabanids in North America, whose other common names in clude pine ies and deer ies. Tabanid ies are among the most highly evolved insects making them one of the most highly adapted animals on the planet. All tabanids are erce biters with slashing/spong ing mouthparts adapted to consuming blood. The mouthparts feature a blade similar to a Ginsu knife with a serrated edge. Be cause they are blood-feed ers, they can transmit dis eases such as tularemia and anthrax between prey animals Some people devel op allergic reactions to the bites, which swell and turn into nasty red sores. Fly attacks result in low ered gains and low milk pro duction in livestock animals. In 1976, estimated losses in the United States were $40 million. Adult tabanids are swift, strong iers and can travel more than a mile from their breeding areas. Most deer ies require a blood meal to develop eggs. However, they also feed on pollen, nectar honeydew excreted by suck ing insects like aphids. Adult tabanids are en countered in Florida be tween May and September. Most tabanids overwinter as larvae, form a cocoon and emerge during the spring and early summer. Most tabanid larvae develop in water, animal droppings or mud. The majority have a yearlong life cycle but some larger species may take two or three years to mature. Adult life span is 30-60 days. Tabanids are ambush attackers that lie in wait in shady areas under bushes and trees for a chance to feed. They locate prey mainly by vision. Attacks occur during daylight, with peak activity beginning at sunrise and two hours be fore sunset. They are drawn to mov ing objects, especially darkcolored ones, and are at tracted to the color blue. There are no effective biological control programs for controlling tabanids. Na tive insects including some dragonies feed on them. They are also parasitized by wasp species that place par alyzed yellow ies in their nests as food for developing wasp larvae. The large bur rowing sand wasps seen in late spring and early sum mer are among the most ef fective yellow y predators and, although they have a hornet-like appearance, do not sting. Cattle egrets and killdeer also feed on tabanids. There is no known chemical method of control for yellow y populations. Traps can be effective in small areas. Commonly used traps take the form of a dark ball covered with glue to en snare the pests reducing the population in the imme diate area. DEET, citronella and geranium oil are effective repellants. Ear tags and col lars impregnated with pes ticides help control attacks on animals. For personal protection, avoid being outside around dusk and dawn. Use a repel lant. Wear long pants and a long sleeved shirt and choose light colors. Most tabanids tend to swarm around the highest point on their prey, although yel low ies also attack the legs. There is evidence that wearing a tall hat will help discourage them from bit ing; it has been suggested the tall peaked hats depict ed on crackers or hillbillies were worn to discourage tabanids. Early Florida settlers used the leaves of beau tyberry as a repellant for ies and other biting in sects. They rubbed them on exposed skin and tucked them under the harness of horses, mules and oxen. Modern research has found this plant an effective insect repellant, and a commer cial formulation is under development. Several Franklin County residents have suggested ways to live with deer ies. Gill and Lane Autrey drink a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar every morn ing, which they say acts as a natural repellant. This au thor has experimented with drinking cider vinegar, and it does seem to discourage yellow ies. Highly sensitive to yel low y bites, Glynda Ratliff of St. George Island has a suggestion for those who have already been bitten. As soon as possible, tape a slice of raw potato over the bite. Ratliff has found it signicantly reduces her swelling. The University of Flori da has developed a trolling y trap found to be highly effective in tabanid control. The trap is a blue cylinder mounted on a slow-moving object and coated with glue. The cylinder can be mount ed on a lawnmower, fourwheeler, golf cart or a cap. According to research ers, you can create an effec tive personal protection de vice by coating a blue plas tic cup with tanglefoot, glue for trapping insects avail able in hardware stores. Mount the inverted cup on a blue ball cap and the ies will be more attracted to it than to the wearer. Flies drawn to you by the carbon dioxide you exhale will land on the cup and be trapped. Some people may nd wearing such a device embarrassing. A trap for the general area of outdoor activity can be made by painting a sixinch plastic owerpot blue and coating in with tangle foot. The pot must then be mounted on a moving ob ject like a lawnmower or golf cart. This trap is only effective when in motion. Circling an area several times will reduce the num ber of yellow ies temporar ily until more y in from the surrounding area. The trap will not work if it sits in one place, even if it is rotating or shaking. Traps must be moved through space. If you keep a trolling trap mounted on your lawn mower or golf cart, you will reduce y numbers during their regular use. Deer ies usually y at heights lower than 10 feet and usually attack the high est available area on the human body rst. Walking with a trap mounted on a pole and shaken overhead can be effective. Tanglefoot can be messy but can be readily removed with hand cleaners that contain citrus extracts. GoJo Natural Orange Pum ice Hand Cleaner works very well. Nor th Flo rida Medica l Cen te r s, Inc MEDI CAL CENT ER E astp oi nt Ac cep ti ng mo st in su ra nc e (in cl udin g Ca pit al He al th Pl an ), Me dic ar e, Me dic ai d, an d sl idin g fe e av ai la bl e to qu al if yi ng pa ti en ts as tp oi nt Me dic al Ce nt er wo ul d li ke to ce le br at e She il a Al le n, ARN P fo r he r ye a rs in Fr an kl in Co un ty pro vi din g he al th ca re to th e co mm uni ty on be ha lf of No rt h Flo ri da Me dic al Ce nt er s. Pl ea se fe el fr ee to st op by an d pro vi de Ms. Al len yo ur we ll wi she s as sh e em br aces a ne w ch al len ge wi th In di an He al th Se rv ices to im pro ve th e he al th of Na ti ve Am er ic ans Al th ou gh Eas tp oi nt Me di ca l Ce nt er wi ll ha ve ch an ge s, hi gh qu al it y he al th ca re at Eas tp oi nt Me di ca l Ce nt er wi ll co nt in ue An n Ru bi n, PA an d An ge l Co rt es, MD wil l be av ai la bl e fo r he al th ca re se rv ices at Ea st po in t Me dic al Ce nt er in cl udin g we ll wo me n s se rv ices. To sc he du le an ap po in tm en t, pl ea se ca ll 850 -670-8585. BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0 + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 ILLUSTRAT I ON COURTESY OF U N I VERS I TY OF F LOR I DA Above a tabanid y. At left ,Trolling yellow y trap. At top beautyberry. Beating the bite of the yellow y By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Carrabelle will install fencing at the southern end of Gulf Beach Drive within the next two weeks. On Friday, Carrabelle city staff met with Florida Department of Environ mental Protection (DEP) representatives to discuss the management plan for McKissack Beach. Carrabelle has leased the beach from the DEP and is required to create a management plan for the public beach. City Attorney Dan Hart man said the meeting was preliminary. He said the city has led a proposed man agement plan with DEP. He said the main topic discussed was how to con trol, in both the long and short term, vehicles ille gally driving on the beach. Hartman said DEP told the city to erect temporary fencing across Gulf Beach Drive within two weeks. City Administrator Courtney Millender said that while DEP requested orange webbing of the type used at road construction sites, she hopes to install something more durable. Residents (of McKis sack Beach) have been complaining about vehicles on the beach for 20 years, Hartman said. Now that the city has a management plan, we are ultimately re sponsible for that property. We are bringing ourselves into the role of protecting that property. Now we are the entity (the residents) complain to. Hartman said in the past, complaints about ve hicles on the beach were routed to the sheriff. He said the city and DEP dis cussed measures the city might take to enhance county enforcement. Hartman said that al though the city has submit ted a management plan for the property to DEP, there would be many more work shops to tweak the plan and take public input. The point now is to block off where they are en tering to drive to the point, said Hartman. The DEP feels if access to the dunes is removed, (the dunes) will rebuild on their own over time. Hartman said it was op timistic to believe blocking Gulf Beach Drive would solve the problem of beach driving and damage to the McKissack dunes. All we can do is try to control the parts that we have control over, he said. He said stormwater running down Gulf Beach Drive from US 98 was also a factor in the destruction of the dunes. Hartman said drivers will still have at least two other access points to McK issack Beach that are on private property. Residents of McKissack Beach wrote to DEP re questing automobile trafc be barred from the beach and dunes. They say they dont want to deny access to a public beach but do want to protect the dunes from automobile trafc. LO I S S W O B ODA | The Times Cars are parked on the dunes at McKissack Beach. Carrabelle to fence off Gulf Beach Drive

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, June 5, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A chair from the Gorrie Furniture Company speaks to the history and commerce of the last century in the county. Historian Valerie Sherlock, who has authored a biography of Dr. John Gorrie, inventor of air conditioning and the ice machine, was the rst to respond to last weeks Chasing Shadows on the chair. She said it had no direct connection to Dr. Gorrie. Many Apalachicola businesses were named after Gorrie, she said. I have a bottle manufactured by the Gorrie Bottle Company. Next, Apalachicola native Frances Cook provided an important clue. She remembered the furniture company was at the corner of Avenue D and US 98 at the site of what is now Up the Stairs restaurant. The furniture store occupied what had once been the Dreamland Theatre. Harry Falk, who worked at the store, remembered there were still hand-painted murals from the theatre at the rear of the building. The building was built prior to 1900. Before it was the Gorrie Furniture Company, it was the Grifn Furniture Company. Cook remembered her mother bought furniture from Grifn in 1925, the year of her wedding. Grifn sold the store to H. I. Flowers, who sold it to an employee W.S. Dobbins before retiring to Jacksonville. Dobbins operated it with his sonin-law William Owens who started out as an employee. Owens played Class D baseball and visited Apalachicola for games at Porter Field. That may have been what rst brought him to the town. After he settled down here to work in the furniture store and married the bosss daughter, he was active as both a player and a coach. Dobbins, also a baseball enthusiast, was instrumental in bringing players to the area, sometimes boarding them. The team recruited players from Cuba. Gorrie Furniture must have prospered because Falk, Owenss son-in-law, said, In the early days all the local communities had little furniture stores. We also had stores in Carrabelle and Sopchoppy. Falk managed the Carrabelle store. None of the furniture was manufactured locally. Harrys wife, Ida Falk, Owenss daughter, remembered traveling as a child by train to Jacksonville to purchase furniture from the Riverside Furniture company. During the 1950s, when developers converted the ofcers quarters at Lanark Village to retirement homes, the Gorrie Furniture Company maintained three fullyfurnished units onsite for prospective buyers and sold furniture by the houseful to retirees. Falk said the store sometimes ordered pieces to be made to specications, and those pieces were stamped with the name Gorrie Furniture Company, so the chair discovered by Apalachicolas Montez Davis must have been one of those specially ordered pieces. After Owens died, the store passed to his daughters, Ida and Barbara, who sold it to Charles Marks, Sr. He turned it into an antique store and eventually, Coastal Telephone rented the upper oor for storage. Cook said in the early 1970s, the store had become rundown, and the area around it frequented by drunks. It may have been a derelict who started the re by which the building was destroyed in 1972. The re started at the back door. At around 2:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 3, the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department received a call about a warehouse re on Avenue D and Market Street. Port St. Joes re department also responded but despite their best efforts, the building was destroyed by 3:30 a.m. Janice Martina remembers walking downtown to watch the conagration, and Delores Roux said she and her husband drove over from Eastpoint. An article in the Times reported that a number of young men who were not ofcial reghters pitched in to help extinguish the blaze. Thats the way this little town is, when trouble comes, they all stick together, a witness said. Among those who joined the ght were Richard Zingarelli, Wayne Joiner, Terry Wyklingett and David Amison. The re was so hot it broke out windows of buildings across Market Street. A witness commented that if the building to the west had not been brick, the entire row of businesses would have been destroyed. Even the brick building was damaged beyond use. Fire Chief Joe Zingarelli, among the rst on the scene, said the cause of the re appeared to be arson. George Martina, who managed an antique shop on the rst oor, said the second level was a total loss and most of his stock suffered water damage. An estimated $33,000 in damage was caused by the re, which in todays dollars would be $184,000. FLORIDA ME M ORY PROJECT The Dreamland Theatre, which later became the Gorrie Furniture Company. At right This Christmas ad for the Gorrie Furniture company circa 1942 shows a woman playing an upright piano. Just an old salt (cauldron) By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin County has always been salty! This antique metal cauldron was discovered in the mud at Alligator Harbor by Gail Heuring. It is currently on display outside of the Carrabelle History Museum. Museum Director Tamara Allen believes it is an old cauldron used to concentrate salt by evaporating seawater. She would like to know more about the old pot and the salt works that was once located at Alligator Point. Chasing Shadows would like to help. If you have any information about the salt works or this cauldron, please contact the Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star.com. LOI S SW O B ODA | The Times The chair manufactured by the Gorrie Furniture company. LOI S SW O B ODA | The Times SHADOW S Chasing

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 5, 2014 A Section By LYNN CLARK Special to the Times A number of factors contributed to this years improvement in thirdgrade FCAT scores at Franklin County School. Teamwork Over the summer of 2013, teachers were asked to change grade levels. Katrina Ham and I were two of the teachers who were reassigned. I moved from the fourth to the third grade, while my colleague, Katrina Ham, moved from the rst to the third grade. Both of us were eager to accept the challenge, as were current thirdgrade teachers Pam Schaffer and Jeannie Ford. We began developing a pacing guide for the reading and math curriculum to ensure all FCATtested standards would be taught by testing time. This guide was followed closely throughout the year. The newly adopted reading curriculum Journeys by Harcourt Publishing presented challenges that were addressed by extending the ve-day lesson plan to a sevenday lesson plan, to allow for more in-depth teaching of the material. In this plan, they incorporated ve 20-minute small group sessions ve days a week with the skill based learning stations highly saturated with the Journeys targeted skills for that lesson. In addition to this, third-graders were divided into skill level groups and received 25 minutes each afternoon with one of the four teachers in Intensive Reading Instruction. This was both remedial as well as enrichment to meet the needs of all students. All four teachers worked together to make these groups uid as students learning needs changed. Class size Each third-grade class had between 14 and 16 students. Fidelity It was very important throughout the year to teach the core reading and math curriculum with delity. Everything taught was based on a Next Generation Sunshine State Standards as well as incorporating Common Core standards. Students and teachers together kept track of their learning and were praised when each skill was mastered. Consistency All four third-grade teachers followed the curriculum closely and were simultaneously teaching the same lessons each day. That way, at the end of the day, hallway conversations were held about what went well and what needed to be tweaked. This kept ideas and creative juices owing and made teaching fresh and new with each weeks lessons. Data-driven instruction Periodically, assessments were given in math and reading using the STAR Reading, STAR Math programs as well as Discovery Educations Reading and Math Assessments. The data collected from these assessments gave the teachers an idea of what skills needed more attention and on what skills the students had demonstrated success. They also used data from the FAIR Reading test that is given to all students in Floridas schools. This data helped determine which of our intensive reading instruction the students needed. Parent communication/ support Weekly folders with assessments, reports from assessments, behavior and grades were sent home on the same day each week. Parents were encouraged to sign and return with questions or comments. Phone calls and email were also used to communicate with students as they met struggles as well as when they experienced success! One of the most important things we did as a grade level to prepare our students for this years FCAT testing period was teaching all of the tested standards before the testing period. We used supplemental materials to make sure we got everything covered; Coach Reading and Coach Math and Mountain Math were some of the supplements used. Administration worked diligently with the Panhandle Area Education Consortium to provide professional development throughout the year. Many of Franklin County School teachers participated in cooperative learning workshops based on Kagan structures (Kagan Publishing). We used these strategies with our students on a regular basis to help them become excited about learning. Inside/Outside circle, Hand up Pair Up, Showdown, Quiz-Quiz Trade these activities helped our students make a physical connection with many of the abstract concepts taught and tested. Overall, being positive throughout the year with our students and giving them the con dence that they had been taught all they needed to know to be able to succeed! They were READY and they KNEW they were READY to do their very best! If you expect them to succeed ... they WILL! Lynn Clark is a third-grade teacher at the Franklin County School. Abdul-Jabbar couldntve made these priceswith a sky hook. From a song by Johnny Guitar Watson Do things cost more or less than they did a year ago? Lets see. Costs associated with housing went up 2.8 percent. But it costs a whopping 7.7 percent more to heat and cool it. (Honey, cancel the purchase of that new McMansion!) Rental costs escalated 2.9 percent. Homeowners insurance has gone up by 3.5 percent. Water, sewer and trash collection services have increased in cost by 3.4 percent. Heres more. Health and hospital related services both cost 4.7 percent more than they did a year ago. It costs 2.3 percent more to dine out than it did last year. But grocery food skyrocketed across the board: Meat prices jumped by 5.2 percent and fresh fruits by 5 percent. A haircut will cost you 1.4 percent more. A drink and a smoke is more expensive (We may need both before were done here). Alcohol went up by 1.1 percent and tobacco and smoking products by 3.7 percent. Tuition escalated in price by 3.3 percent. Whew. Now, consider things that have decreased in price. Seems impossible, right? Expenses related to transportation are actually 1.2 percent less expensive than a year ago. New vehicles are down in price by 0.5 percent. Motor fuel has declined in price by 4.6 percent (Lets wait until summer is over to declare victory on this one). Wireless and landline telephone services? Now theyre 2.3 percent less expensive. Shoes? A percent less costly. Household furnishings have declined in price by 1.5 percent. Airline fares have decreased by 4.1 percent. (Hard to believe, right?) Whats it all mean? We do indeed have signi cant in ation in essential (nondiscretionary) service items, like heat and air conditioning, food and health insurance. But many frequently used services actually cost less, like gas and cell phones. So in ation is really not rampant. In fact, most economists consider de ation a greater current threat to the economy. What is causing us to think prices are outrageous is that wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. A person earning robust compensation is meeting his grocery bill with ease. But without a quality paycheck, everything looks expensive. In ation not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with signi cant opportunities to pro t from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register. Prudent investors and advisers seek out those sectors and companies that have in exible demand, or whose customers have to continue buying their products or services, whether the price of the product goes up 5 percent or not. As always, an investors age, risk tolerance, unique nancial goals and time horizon should be considered. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (6086121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. Southerland salvo just Tea Party extremism As a political surrogate, Mr. Willie Norred gives a perfect introduction to the avor of the coming campaign of Steve Southerland in Franklin County. (See letters to the editor, May 29, 2014 issue.) The general tone of Mr. Norreds political attack (veiled in an aw-shucks humorous letter) is patronizing and demeaning to women. Does a letter from a political ack provide distance and deniability for Mr. Southerland while carrying the message of the campaign? I am sure Mr. Southerland will try to make it so. The real issue, of course, is not a persons heritage, although Gwen Grahams could not be better, but what a candidate stands for and how hard they will ght for the issues that are important to average Americans. Is it any wonder that Mr. Southerlands campaigns rst salvo seeks to cloud the real issues by inciting fear and division? Can we help but notice that this expression of Tea Party philosophy, which Mr. Southerland effectively espouses as well, is clearly out of step with the majority of Americans? Let us keep in mind that those with which Mr. Southerland hopes to identify are the same people that have proposed and passed legislation that the Tea Party extremists favor including bills that: limit the publics right to vote, close down the government, costing millions and adversely affecting the economy and jeopardizing the welfare of veterans, seniors, and working Americans, limit the right to quality health care, obstruct a womans right to make her own health decisions, keep working Americans from making a livable wage, harm the public school system and demonize our teachers Little Lady, really? We would do well to have a woman with the stellar credentials of Gwen Graham to represent us in Congress. Mr. Southerland, this election is not about Nancy Pelosi, cleaning mullet or drinking tea. It is about your record as a congressman. If you dont respect the voters of District 2 enough to support their issues, at least dont resort to belittling them. Betty Croom Apalachicola Q. I received a notice from Local Records Of ce stating I could send them $89 for a complete property pro le and copy of the only document that identi es me as a property owner. What is this? A. To my knowledge, these notices sent by Local Records Of ce have been going around for a few years now. There is no af liation between Local Records Of ce and the Clerk of the Court, who is responsible for keeping the of cial records. The notice tells recipients that they can receive a copy of their property deed and a complete property pro le by sending $89 to an address in Tallahassee. These notices include a coupon people can detach and mail back with their checks, noting the $89 service fee. This may not be against the law, but I believe it is certainly misleading because there is no need to pay such a high price to get a public record. Nobody needs to pay $89 to receive a copy of their deed. Deeds and other of cial records are now easily obtained online or at our courthouse from my of ce. Hard copies cost $1 per page, and certi ed documents cost an additional $2. Uncerti ed copies can be downloaded and printed free in Franklin County by using the Public Records Search under Quick Links at www.franklinclerk.com. If you have any questions or comments about this column, forward them to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or by email to mmjohnson@ franklin.clerk.com. Visit the clerks website at www.franklinclerk.com. YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEE Marcia Johnson MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook In ation, de ation, McMansions and Johnny Guitar Watson Giving students the con dence to succeed Letter to the EDITOR Property pro les easily, cheaply obtainable Page 4 Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. Share Your OPINIONS

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By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Gulf Coast Aggregates is seeking permission to extend their mining operations into Tates Hell State Forest. At the county meeting on Tuesday morning, St. George Island real estate agent Sandy Mitchem asked com missioners for a letter to the state supporting a plan to ex tend fossil oyster shell mining operations onto state land. Mitchem said the exist ing mine, on 165 acres of private land, is about to play out. Not only would it pos sibly help our bay, it would cre ate a lot of jobs for all of us, she said. If it will create jobs, I am for it, she said. She said the mining op eration started with two em ployees and has now grown to a staff of 18 or 19, eight of whom are Franklin County residents. Mitchem said the private land where the mine is lo cated is surrounded by state land. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked if the land in question was part of the Walnut Creek watershed and how many acres the mining company was seeking to use. I dont know even if theyll give us the extended property, Mitchem said. The rst part of the pro cess is a few letters and then we could request 5,000 or 10,000 acres. Sanders said if the cur rent strip mine was extend ed, it would be adjacent to privately owned land includ ing her home. Every time they dynamite up there, it puts tannic acid in my water, Sanders said. Count Planner Alan Pierce said the land Gulf Ag gregates wants to use is part of Tates Hell State Forest. It was purchased for en vironmental preservation, he said. You would have to put it back the way it was as a wetland and not a lake. He said state require ments for restoration of wet lands after use are so strin gent he didnt believe Gulf Aggregates could repair the land after it was mined. Mitchem said she envi sioned a lake with walking paths around it. If we cant get the expansion, then the job opportunity for Franklin County wont be there, she said. You are talking about taking wild lands and turning it into a manicured park-like area and I can just tell you theres no way, Pierce said. He said he had received a list of what would need to be done during the project from Gulf Coast Aggregates. You would be removing 20 feet of overburden, getting the shells out and the state would want you to put it back the way it was. I dont see how thats even possible, Pierce said. Its just a request of ex tended land so we can dig down, Mitchem said. Gulf Aggregates needs to meet certain standards before any letter of support is written, Sanders said. I would like to see us table this until she can come back with the guarantees and have it worked out with the state before she comes to us. Once (the state) sees the county commissions signature they will move ahead with this. Commissioner Pinki Jack el said she and Mitchem had discussed the matter before the meeting. I didnt realize you were going to be here to day, said Jackel. I asked you for more information. I asked some of the same questions that Commissioner Sanders just voiced. I am in favor of jobs. I cannot vote to give a carte blanche letter of endorse ment. This is the same thing we tell everyone comes before us. What are the conditions of this letter? Bring us your let ter of what youre expecting us to endorse. Let us have the county attorney review it, she said. We are in a very environmentally sensitive area. We want to do the best thing and strike the balance between environment and man. I want to know exactly what Im sponsoring. Sanders said there is an area already approved for mining across County Road 67. If I were you, I would try to nd any other land to deal with rather than go to the state, Pierce said. The county tried to get just 100 acres for a prison, which was a public benet on public land and we couldnt even get 100 acres. Jackel asked if the use of public land would have to go before the legislature for nal approval. Absolutely, this is just the rst step, Mitchem said. I want to support you but I have got to have the in formation,. Ask the state to come with you and appear before the board, I have got to know what I am voting to get the county into, Jackel said. It boils down to this. Its what you call strip mining. You cant put back what you take out, Sanders said. As an example were talking about a lake and walk ing areas. A park. A recre ational facility. It wouldnt be put back they way it is now because theres no way, Mitchem said. WA TER SA FE TY IN VE ST IG AT IO N AT TE NTI ON : Ap al ac hic ol a Wa te r Cu st om er s In Ma y 20 13 th e Ci ty of Ap al achi co la Wat er Sy st em no ti ed re sid en ts th at th eir wa te r fa il ed to me et st an d ar ds se t by th e Fl or ida De pa rt me nt o f En vi ro nm en ta l Pro te ct io n an d th e EP A. Du ri ng rou t in e sa fet y te st in g, th e Ci ty of Ap al ach ic ol a fo un d le ve ls of t ri halome tha ne s (T HM s) mor e tha n 50% higher tha n esta bl is he d ma xi mu m co nt ami na nt le ve ls fo r dr in ki ng wa te r. TH Ms ca n al so be in ha le d an d ab so rb ed th ro ug h th e sk in Re se ar che rs di sc ove re d th at bloo d co nc en tr ati on s of TH Ms ro se 5to 15 -f ol d fol lo wi ng su ch ro ut in e ac ti vi ti es as sh ow er in g, ba thi ng an d ha nd wa sh in g. Of te n fo un d in in du st ri al so lv en ts an d re fr iger an ts TH Ms ar e co ns id er ed ca rc in og enic an d ha ve bee n li nk ed to nu me rou s li fe th re at eni ng he al th ef fec ts : Li ve r or Ki dn ey Fa il ur e Li ve r or Ki dn ey Ca nc er Co lo n or Re ct al Ca nc er Bl ad de r Ca nc er Ad ve rs e Pr eg na nc y Ou tc ome s Se ri ou s Ce nt ra l Ner vo us Sy st em Da mage If yo u or a lo ve d one ha s re ce iv ed su ch a di ag nos is or a fa mil y me mb er ha s die d fr om one of the se co nd it io ns an d if yo ur wa te r is pr ov id ed by the Ci ty of Ap al ac h ic ol a, pl eas e co nt ac t ou r r m fo r a fr ee co ns ul ta tion PA NAMA CI TY 180 080 085 39 wa lb or sk y. co m So ur ce s: U. S. En viro nm en tal Pr ot ec ti on Ag en cy Sa fe Dr ink in g Wa te r Inf or mat ion Sy st em (S DW IS ) Vi olat io n Re por t, Ci ty of Ap alachic ola re por t cr ea te d 4/2 2/ 20 14 ba se d on data ex tr ac te d on 2/ 10 /2 01 4; Na ti ona l In st it ut es of He alt h, T ap Wa te r an d Tr ih al omet ha ne s: Fl ow of Conce rn s Con tin ue s, En viro nm en ta l He al th Pe rs pe ct iv es July 20 05 11 3( 7) : A4 74 ; T ri ha lomet ha ne s in Dr ink in gwa te r, WH O Gu ide lin es fo r Dr ink in gwa te r Qu al it y, WH O/ SD E/ WS H/ 03 .0 4/ 64 Arrest REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 20 Summer S. Harris, 24, Tallahassee, withholding child support (FCSO) Evan R. Perry, 27, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) James E. West, 52, Apalachicola, trespass on property after warning (APD) Timothy J. Carpenter, 22, Eastpoint, workers compensation fraud (FCSO) May 21 Nathaniel W. Lee, 25, Apalachicola, resisting ofcer with violence, possession of cannabis, battery, criminal mischief and possession of a rearm by a convicted felon (FCSO) May 22 Frederic E. Kahler, 52, Apalachicola, interception of wire or electronic communication prohibited (FCSO) Jessica H. Montgomery, 29, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) Tiffany M. Davis, 33, Eastpoint, two counts of possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Johnnie R. Davis, 45, Eastpoint, possession of listed chemicals, manufacture of methamphetamines, possession of a controlled substance, and four counts of possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Tammy L. Golden, 51, Crestview, violation of probation (FCSO) May 24 Amy Hicks, 37, Apalachicola, driving while license revokedhabitual (APD) Victor W. Cain, 38, Eastpoint, withholding child support (FCSO) Ashley L. Sessions, 32, Perry, DUI (CPD) May 25 Billy D. Dalton, 39, driving while license revoked-habitual (APD) Timothy C. Register, 22, Eastpoint, DUI and expired drivers license (CPD) Eric A. Tatum, 34, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Shelly L. Polous, 35, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) James I. Daniels Jr., 68, Crawfordville, possession of cannabis (FCSO) Willie L. English, 54, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) John Y. Bixler, 21, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence (FWC) William Dameron, 28, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) May 26 Misty L. Morales, 40. Carrabelle, falsely impersonating ofcer (FCSO) May 27 Charles O. Brannen Jr., 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Dawn Morris, 54, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Leighton L. Morris Jr., 25, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Keelah A. Williams, 45, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Alexander J. Williams, 24, Apalachicola, public affray (APD) Roderick Robinson, 47, Port St. Joe, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver (FCSO) May 28 Vickie H. Maples, 49, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) Clifford W. Sutcliffe Jr., 25, Carrabelle, aggravated battery great bodily harm, and burglary of an occupied dwelling (CPD) May 29 Fred C. Massey, 49, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) May 30 Harvey D. Heath, 58, Pensacola, DUI (CPD) Nelson R. Flint III, 21, St. George Island, violation of probation (FCSO) May 31 Dylan E. Nunez, 22, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Samantha L. Emswiler, 20, Lanark Village, battery (FCSO) Rhine W. Abas, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Janet L. Ross, 45, Soddy Daisy, Tenn., domestic battery (FCSO) June 1 Benjamin K. Jones, 24, Tallahassee, DUI, introduction of contraband into a correctional facility and possession of cannabis (FCSO) Brad B. Milligan, 31, Tallahassee, Leon County violation of probation (FCSO) FWC REPORT Ofcers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, together with Florida Highway Patrol troopers and Franklin County sheriffs deputies, participated in a public safety operational detail coinciding with the 2014 White Trash Bash during the Memorial Day holiday weekend at Dog Island and Alligator Point. The detail was designed to protect Floridas boating public through enhanced boating safety patrol, increase voluntary compliance from the boating public through education and enforcement of the BUI and DUI laws as well as all highway safety and trafc laws, provide a highly visible law enforcement presence and increase multi-agency working relationships. During the detail, 69 vessels were boarded with 504 users being checked. The citations and warnings issued included 17 boating safety warnings, 21 resource warnings, eight uniform boating citations for boating safety violations, one arrest for operating a vessel while impaired, 23 uniform trafc citations, and 23 trafc warnings. Twelve individuals were assisted during the detail with three being medical emergencies that required transport to the mainland for medical treatment. Shell mining rm seeks Tates Hell land SANDY MITCHEM Law Enforcement The Times | A5 Thursday, June 5, 2014

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 beyond any other class, will turn their tassels. Following his receiving a plaque from Principal Eric Bidwell and Guidance Coun selor Roderick Robinson for being salutatorian, and Lau ra Gallegos and Bria Walker each one for being valedic torian, Martin delivered the address reserved for the second best grade point av erage in the class. Martin opened his ad dress by thanking Jesus, and then his parents Sheila and Anthony Martin, of Apala chicola, two extraordinary individuals who believed in every dream I had and did everything they could to help me achieve them. I thank my mentors who pushed me pass my limits. I thank my clique, ev ery friend, and every family member who has helped to get me to this place, he said. And a special thanks to the greatest youth department, Chosen Generation, for al lowing me to hone in on my leadership skills these past years. Martin who is headed to Florida A & M University on an academic scholarship, then referred to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s famous I Have A Dream speech. Even though we have a ways to go, Dr. Kings dream has come into fruition to night as history has been made with a black girl, a His panic girl, and a little militant yella black boy achieving top rank honors in academics, in a predominantly white school, said Martin. Just like Dr. King, I too, have a dream, a dream deeply rooted in the suc cess of my class, he con tinued. I have the privilege to graduate with some of best students to come out of Franklin County. I have dream that today, we will set the precedent for the classes to come. I have a dream that we will be the one to defy stereotypes and lies of infe riority, and produce national success stories, he said. Martin challenged his classmates to set goals to be the best in all their future endeavors. And when thats done, we will be able to speed up that day when we realize that whether we are doctors, lawyers, oystermen, or waiters, we can achieve success that is noteworthy, for we should not measure our success by the number of zeroes at the end of our check, but by the number of lives we affect, he said. Greatness lies within each one us, but we have to make the choice to tap in to it and produce something that will make an impact. Gallegos, daughter of Antonio and Angelica Gal legos, of Eastpoint, headed to the honor program at the University of Florida, was next to speak. She said she originally planned to forego her opportunity to speak, until last week, when a persistent and determined friend of mine convinced me to give one. She told me that if I had a message for the class that I should give it be fore I missed the chance to do so. Gallegos said she went home and thought about it and decided she did have a message for her class, as well as for my family and the families of my classmates, teachers, and mentors. To those families, Gal legos offered thanks for their support. None of us could have gotten here without you, she said. You have taught us how to be better people, made sure we got to this day, and many of you are here now to see us transition to the next part of our lives. To my classmates, I think I speak for most of us when I say that high school went by faster than we ever imagined it would. I remem ber being a freshman and thinking about how long high school would be, but then when my junior year started I thought to myself where did the time go? As I think about all of my peers both the ones I know per sonally and the rest of you I know, without a shred of doubt that we will make a change in the world. You are all so determined and tal ented. I know all of you will achieve your dreams. Never give up, she said. To my close friends, thank you for always be ing there for me. You have changed my life and I am a better person because of you, Gallegos said. I want to wish each and every one of you success in whatever endeavors you choose to pursue. Class of 2014, We did it! Walker, daughter of Da vid and Harolyn Walker, of Apalachicola, also headed to Florida A & M University, was the second valedicto rian to speak. She spoke in warm, direct tones to her classmates, at one time fac ing away from the podium to address them directly. Behind every graduate is a great support system. Mine just happens to be the best, she said at the out set of her remarks, which included expressions of thanks to God, her parents, guidance counselor Robin son, educational mentor Dr. Lois Catlin, and three best friends. A big thanks to ev eryone who has gave me an encouraging word or piece of advice, both solicited and unsolicited, Walker said. I stand in front of you with a heart lled with hap piness and fear. These last four years have been lled with laughter and tears. Thank you for all of the memories made from our rst color wars to senior trip; I truly have had a blast. I have one last favor to ask of you, she said. Create a story your grandchildren wont be able to believe. We are always bom barded with this one ques tion: what are you going to do after high school? Some of us already have the rest of our lives planned out. Many of us know which direction we would like to go in and yet some of us have no clue where to start, Walker said. But thats OK. Its okay to simply not know. Now is the time to nd out who you truly are. Many of us cannot wait to kiss Franklin County good bye and then there are some of us who cannot imagine calling another place home. Although Franklin County is a beautiful place, this is your chance to explore what the world has to offer. So go to a few parties and have a good time; go further south and immerse yourself in dif ferent cultures; jump on a midnight train that leads to nowhere in particular; climb the worlds tallest moun tains; if youre looking for a hunting challenge, visit Af rica and hunt their big 5, she said. Most importantly, follow your dream. As our class quote says Dream what you dare to dream. Go where you want to go. Be who you want to be. Live. Allow no one to tell you what you are capable of. We are the Class of 2014. We back down from nothing. With the high school band, under the direction of Karl Lester, performing the accompanying Pomp and Circumstance, the class streamed into the crowded gym in an orderly fashion, two by two, before ascend ing to the bleachers in front. Class Vice President Ste fan DeVaughn, a graduate with High Honors headed to the honors college at Uni versity of West Florida, led the Pledge of Allegiance. Athletic Director Mike Swe att then sang an exception ally vibrant rendition of the National Anthem. Class Secretary Deborah Dempsey, who is headed to the University of West Flor ida, offered the invocation. She and Brook Pittman, who is headed to Gulf Coast State College) each gradu ated with Highest Honors, as did Gallegos, Walker and Martin. Bidwell, together with Superintendent Nina Marks, handed out diplomas follow ing the addresses. Class Sponsors Dolores Croom and Kassi Malcolm, togeth er with teacher Jennifer Edwards, read the names of each of the graduates and their parents as well as their future plans. Students earning High Honors were Andrea Cupid (Florida A & M University), Jessica Shields (Florida State University), Amber Adkins (San Antonio Com munity College), Ally Mil lender (George Wallace Community College) and Gracyn Kirvin (Faulkner University). A diploma with Honors was given to Jennifer Strat ton (Pitt University), Cam eron White (Trinity Baptist College), Adriana Reeder (Faulkner University), Lo gan McLeod (Trinity Bap tist College), Josie Turner (Tallahassee Community College), Ryan Babb, Alex Causey (Louisiana College), Shannon Fuller (Gulf Coast State College), Samantha Everson (Santa Fe Commu nity College), Lea Venable (Gulf Coast State College), Tevis Page (Gulf Coast State College), Malachi Parker (Florida State University), James Bailey (University of West Florida), and Graham Kirvin (Thomas University). Receiving standard high school diplomas were Brit taney Ashley (University of Florida), Dixie Back, Paul Benton III, Kristina Boyd (Gulf Coast State College), Dasia Carr (Santa Fe Com munity College) Ashley Carroll (George Wallace Community College), Vic toria Coleman, Savannah Cook, Chad Coulter, Antonio Croom (Gulf Coast State Col lege) Alviauna Cummings, Bobby Curry (Trinity Bap tist College), Matthew Davis (Wyotech), Myel DeCourcey, Cynthia Duncan (North Florida Cosmetology Insti tution), Toronto Fuller (Chef school), James Gordon, Jr. (Alabama Job Corps), James Harris, Kyle Hathcox (U.S. Marine Corps), Kevin Heath, Heather Holton, Marlyn Lee (Tallahassee Community College), Cody Lyston (Technical school for welding), Austin Martina, Steven McAnally, Haleigh Ming (Haney Tech College), Morgan Mock, James New ell (Trinity Baptist College), Wesley Norred, Kristen Put nal (LPN program at Lively Tech), Mason Ray (Trade school), Caulin Sheridan (Tallahassee Community College), Dallas Shiver, Kyle Smith, Justin Spann (Technical school), Michael Stevens (Technical school), Leonard Ward (Gulf Coast State College), and Mercury Wynn (TCC Pat Thomas Law Academy). Each student presented the class ower, the lily, to their loved ones, as hug, kisses and tears abounded. A slide show prepared by Edwards and the yearbook staff followed, and as the lights came up afterwards, the seniors joined in an a ca pella version of When Im Gone, with soloists inter spersed among the recita tion by rows, or by guys and girls, or the right section and the left. After Marks authorized the turning of the tassels, Elinor Mount Simmons, who chaired the graduation committee, wished all well as students and their fami lies alike led out of the gym into the clear, cool summer evening. Coupon Expir es: 6-15-14 CODE: AP00 AB ER CR OM BI E BO AT RA MP IM PR OV EM EN TS PR OJ EC T # 00 7. 09 7 NO TI CE TO RE CE IVE SE AL ED BI DS Th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Bo a rd of Co un ty Com mi ss ione rs wi ll re cei ve se al ed bids fr om an y qu al ie d pe rs on co mpa ny or corp o ra ti on int er es te d in co nst ru ct in g: AB ER CR OM BI E BO AT RA MP IM PR OV EM EN TS Pr oj ec t is lo ca te d at th e Ab er cr ombie Bo at Ra mp at th e en d of Bl uf f Roa d in Fr an kl in Co un ty Fl orid a an d co nsi st s of co ns tr uc ti ng ap pr ox im at el y 34 0 SF of 4 wi de ti mbe r bo ar dw al k an d ap pr ox im at ely 80 0 SF of 8 wid e oat in g do c k. Pl an s an d sp ec ic at ion s can be ob tai ne d at Pr eb le -R ish In c. 32 4 Ma ri na Dr iv e, Po rt St Jo e, Fl orid a 32 45 6, (8 50) 22 772 00 Co st fo r Pl ans an d Spe ci ca ti ons wi ll be $5 0.0 0 pe r se t an d is no n-r efun da bl e. Che ck s sh oul d be ma de pa ya bl e to PR EB LE -R IS H, IN C. Th e bid mu st co nf or m to Se ct ion 28 7. 13 3( 3) Fl orid a Sta tu te s, on pu bl ic en ti ty cri me s. Com pl et io n dat e fo r th is pr oje ct wi ll be 45 da ys fr om th e dat e of th e No ti ce to Pr oce ed pr es en te d to th e su cce ss fu l bi dde r. Li qui da te d da ma ge s fo r fa il ur e to co mplet e th e pr oj ec t on th e spe cie d dat e wi ll be se t at $5 00 .0 0 pe r da y. Pl eas e in di ca te on th e en ve lo pe th at thi s is a seal ed bid fo r A be rc ro mbi e Bo at Ra m p Im pr ov em en ts . Bids wi ll be re cei ve d un til 4: 00 p. m. (e as te rn ), on Monda y, Ju ne 30 20 14 at th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Cle rk 's Of c e, Fr an kl in Co un ty Co ur th ou se 33 Ma rk et St re et, Su it e 20 3, Ap al achic ola Fl or id a 32 32 023 17 an d wi ll be op en ed an d re ad al ou d on Jul y 1, 20 14 at th e Co un ty Co mm is si on me et in g, wh ich be gin s at 9: 00 a. m. at 34 Fo rb es St re et Ap al ac hic ol a, FL Th e Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mm is si one rs re se rv es th e ri gh t to wa iv e inf or mal it ie s in an y bid to ac cep t an d/ or re je ct an y or a ll bi d s, an d to ac cep t th e bid th at in th ei r ju dg me nt wi ll be in th e be st int er es t of Fr an kl in Co un ty Al l bid s sh al l re ma in rm fo r a pe ri od of six ty da ys af te r th e op en in g. Al l bidde rs sh al l com pl y wit h al l app li cab le Sta te an d lo cal la ws co nc ern in g li ce ns in g re gi st ra ti on an d re gu lat ion of co ntr ac to rs doi ng b usi ne ss to th e Sta te of Fl or id a. If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s, ple as e cal l Cl ay Smal lw ood at (8 50) 22 772 00 GRADUATION from page A1 The following are the 2014 FCAT 2.0 instructions for the expository writing portion of the test. GRADE 4 What do you like most about school? Think about what you like most about school. Now write to explain what you like most about school. GRADE 8 Writing Situation: When people think about Florida, they often think about beaches, sports, or certain animals. D irections: If you had to choose one thing that best represents Florida, what would it be? Now write to explain the thing that best represents Florida to you. GRADE 10 Writing Situation: To honor the accomplishments of the rst president of the United States, George Washington, his picture has been printed on the dollar bill since 1869. D irections: Think about another person whose actions in life show that he or she also deserves such an honor. Now write to explain why this person is worthy of having his or her picture printed on the dollar bill. FCAT from page A1 What made the ABC Schools eight grade writ ing results so impressive is that teachers shurnk the size of all the point catego ries below the satisfactory 3.5 score. The percentage of students with 3.0 scores or below shrank from 51 to 37 percent of its students. The percentage at 3.5 scores was nearly identical to last year at 25 percent, while the percentage of 4.0 scores ballooned from 11 percent last year to 31 per cent in 2014. The school also had 14 percent of its eighth graders receiving scores of 4.5, 5.0 and 5.5. Among ABC School fourth graders, there were none with a 4.5 score or bet ter, but the percentage of 4.0 scores more than doubled, from 12 to 26 percent. The percentage of 3.5 scores also grew, from 24 to 31 percent, which is nearly double the 16 percent in 2012. Only 15 percent of ABC fourth grad ers had scores below 3.0. Among Franklin fourth graders, 43 percent of the 63 students who took the test had scores below 3.0, and there was a slight shrink age in the percentage of those scoring 4.0 or 4.5 over last year. Among the 41 eighth graders, the data showed Franklin had made sub stantial gains in shrinking the percentage of the low est performing students, down to 19 percent from 54 percent one year ago. The growth occurred in the percentage of 3.0 scorers, from 22 to 39 percent, with more modest gains in each of the higher performing categories. THE WRITING TEST PROMPTS PHO T O S BY BY DA V ID AD L ER ST EIN | The Times Karen Shields prepares to hug her daughter Jessica. At left Tevis Page, left, and Graham Kirvin. MORE ONLINE See lots more commencement photos on the Times Facebook page

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, June 5, 2014 The Nest seeks used games The Nest in Eastpoint is seeking gently used checker and chess sets for the summer program. Call (843) 338-6851. Sets can be dropped off at the Times ofce on Commerce Street in Apalachicola or at the Nest at the former Brown Elementary School in Eastpoint. The Longest Day at museum Saturday Camp Gordon Johnston World War II museum will show the lme The Longest Day at 10:15 a.m. on Saturday, June 7 in honor of the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The Longest Day is lmed in the style of a docudrama. Beginning in the days leading up to DDay, this lm concentrates on events on both sides of the channel such as the Allies waiting for the break in the poor weather and the anticipation of the Axis forces defending northern France. The lm, winner of two Academy Awards, pays particular attention to the decision by Gen. Eisenhower, supreme commander of the Allied forces. This lm is one in a series shown monthly to educate museum visitors on the sacrices made, for us, by the World War II generation. Free popcorn will be served. Admission is by donation, and appreciated. Full moon climb at lighthouse June 12 The June Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, June 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 8 to 9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:40 p.m. and the moon will rise at 8:17 p.m. on June 12. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Network with other businesses June 12 Network with other area business owners at the Apalachicola Bay Chamber Business After Hours Monday, at Up The Stairs, 76 Market Street in Apalachicola on Thursday, June 12 from 5:30-7 p.m.. Update on the SHIP program On May 20, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners the proposed legislative budget contains $350,000 for the Franklin County State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) program. He said this is the rst time in several years the program has been fully funded. Commissioners also voted unanimously to use up to $5,000 to repair a roof damaged in recent heavy rains. Pierce said Governor Scott issued an executive emergency order that allows Lori Switzer, SHIP coordinator, to receive applications from qualied residents whose houses have been damaged. SHIP has received one application for a roof repair and the cap on the amount of funds is $5,000. Repairs will be paid for with money set aside for hurricane damage last year. The funds are available because there were no storms. WWII museum to take part in Thank You The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum has been invited to participate in Leon Countys third annual Operation Thank You on Friday, June 6 at the Leon County Courthouse in Tallahassee at 9 a.m. This years Operation Thank You will honor local World War II veterans and remember the 70-year anniversary of D-Day. It was seven decades ago when American, British and Canadian forces invaded the beaches of Normandy, France signaling the long-awaited liberation of Europe from German occupation. The Museum will set up a display, which demonstrates the participation of forces that trained in Franklin County during WWII. Included will be uniforms, gear, maps and photos as well as information about the museum located in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex. The renowned Tallahassee Swing Band will perform during the event and play songs from the s and s to remember the era of large swing bands. For further information, contact Matt Cavell, Leon County community and media relations at 606-5300. The Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum is a 501 c (3) non-prot corporation and is funded, in part, by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. Change of date for July county meeting At the May 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to change the date of the second July county meeting from Tuesday, July 15 to Wednesday, July 16. The meeting will still begin at 9 a.m. and will be held at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola. The change will allow all ve commissioners to attend a meeting of the National association of Counties. Commissioner plan to support Leon County Commissioner Bryan DesLoge who is running for vice president of the organization. Commission discusses jail roof At their May 20 meeting, county commissioners discussed replacing the roof at the county jail on County Road 65 in Eastpoint. The dilemma is that while the ofce and jail need a new roof, and the Hazard Mitigation grant provides some funds, the grant only provides 75 percent, and so the county is responsible for the rest, County Planner Alan Pierce said. The countys share could be as much as $194,000 in cash, or in-kind. The county does not have that much cash. Pierce said he was investigating whether it is realistic to try and use county labor for the match. Contractors dont normally want to rely upon someone elses labor, he said. He said the county wanted the contractor to warrantee the construction. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked if there was a cheaper option for the roof. Pierce said the county would have to go back to the Planning and Zoning Board to change the plans. Jackel said she wanted to explore less expensive designs for the roof. At the end of the day, youve got to have a roof, she said. We can still do a roof out there and not break the bank. Alligator Point revetment removal complete On May 20, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners removal of coastal debris in the form of damaged revetment ordered by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has been completed. The debris was located on alligator Point Drive in front of the old KOA Campground. Island summer bingo on Tuesdays Summer Bingo, on Tuesday evenings on St. George Island, has begun. It is at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Avenue, beginning at 7 p.m. The cost is 50 cents per card. Time for summer camp registration! Enrollment for Project Impact Camp Funshine: Fizz, Boom, Splash is open. Students from pre-K to eighth grade will be served at the ABC site and pre-K to 12th grade at the city site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program is Fizz, Boom, READ and was developed by the 2014 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. The focus this year will be on STEM subjects, (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) with other summer highlights including pottery program, art & crafts, science experiments, computer technology, chess tournament, sports and several eld trips. The second year of Boats Rock! was launched during the April antique boat show. A special basketball and leadership camp will also be offered. The summer performing arts program will feature video production with a lm premiere at the end of the summer. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 9 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week. Credit recovery classes will be offered at the City Site Monday to Thursday during program hours. Enrollment may be limited. The summer program is provided free of charge. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Families may enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 3700145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola. News BRIEFS Special to The Times The Franklin County Public Library has been the recipient of many generous donations coming in many different forms. On May 16, the musical talents of the professional music group Melodime, performed for a large group of teens and adults from Apalachicola, Eastpoint, and Carrabelle. Their musical style was unique and they played a variety of tunes from their CDs and You Tube videos, and answered the questions posed by the inquisitive audience. This performance was part of the Rock by the Sea three-day tour to raise funds for several benefactors, one of which was FCPL! The teens were able to ask questions about how they got their start in the music business, what gave them the inspiration to create this group, and if they made money. The responses were honest and seemed to spark enthusiasm for this interesting group. Not only does this group perform benet concerts, they buy instruments, mentor students, and provide music material to take with them to Haiti to be given to youths at an orphanage. One of the musicians told me that he lived by the thought that God doesnt bless hands that are full. In other words, they believe in paying it forward. The library was presented with a very generous check from the Rock by the Sea representative Rick Watson to be used for the youth from the Franklin County Library. Words do not express our real appreciation for gifts like this. FCPL has also received other donations from the Ben Watkins Foundation, The Philaco Womens Club of Apalachicola and private donations. In the same spirit as the musical group, the library will pay it forward to our patrons and the Franklin County community. Other donations included a painting by Carrabelle artist Penney Anderson, and a ag from Woodmen of the World. As in other years, the library offers a special program in the summer to keep children focused on reading by providing a Summer Library Program. This year we are expanding our programs even further because of the generosity we have received. This summers free program is called Fizz, Boom, Read and it has a science theme. It will run from June 16 to July 18. For the youngest kids, ages 2 to 7,we have a program on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at the Carrabelle branch and on Fridays at 3 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch. For the Tweensages 8 to 12well be meeting on Wednesdays at 3 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch and on Thursdays at 3 p.m. at the Carrabelle branch. And for the Teens, ages 13 to 17, come to the Eastpoint branch on Fridays at 1 p.m. or Carrabelle on Saturdays at noon. There will be weekly door prizes. Come by either branch to pick up registration forms. Sign your children up now as there are limited spaces available. The Summer Library Program isnt just for kids. Adults should come out to either branch to enjoy some of the interesting programs we have lined up for them. To start off you can learn more about recycling from our local experts at the Franklin County Solid Waste Department. Come to the Eastpoint branch on Tuesday, June 24 at 11 a.m. or the Carrabelle branch on Thursday, June 26 at 11 a.m.to nd out more on this topic. Other adult programs include a talk given by Wakulla County Extension Director Les Harrison on planning your fall garden. That will take place on Tuesday, July 15 at 1 p.m. at the Carrabelle branch and July 17 at 11 a.m. at the Eastpoint branch. Also, come to the Eastpoint branch at 11 a.m. on July 22 or the Carrabelle branch at 11 a.m. on July 24 to learn about crime scene investigation from Lt. Carl Whaley from the Franklin County Sheriffs Department. There will be door prizes given at each of the adult programs. All age groups are invited to play Library Bingo throughout the Summer Library Program. You have to play in order to win one of the great prizes like a digital Polaroid, a nine-inch tablet or for the kids a deluxe wagon! Throughout the summer well be offering our regular library programs. Join us for yoga, tness, or book chat, to name a few. And theres still time to attend the Writers Forum for both beginning and accomplished writers. This program takes place on Wednesdays at 1:00 at the Eastpoint Branch and will run through June 18th. Call our Eastpoint Branch at 670-8151 or our Carrabelle Branch at 697-2366 if you have any questions. S P E CIAL T O T H E T I ME S Melodime performing at the Eastpoint Branch of Franklin County Public Library Library rocked by generous donations

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Local A8 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 by either party. I think our best inter est is to nd the physicians a suitable place to move, she said. This is an elegant building, for an elegant purpose. Mayor Van Johnson said he planned to have a work ing lunch today with County Commissioner Smokey Parish, whose district in cludes the historic property adjacent to the home of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Greene said the grant dat ed back to 2008, when Cindi Giametta, the citys former grants manager, wrote and submitted the initial grant application. Greene took over managing the process in 2011, and clearly was over joyed Tuesday night that the money was nally owing down. She said a more detailed plan will have to be worked out in the coming days, and that the state said it is ex ible with the 90-day deadline in place for it to receive de tailed assurance that the city, owns, lease, or has un conditional use resolution from the buildings owner. The state says 90 days is exible, as long as its by the time we put the project out to bid, said Greene. She said architect fees, which include planning costs, are expected to total $38,000 of the award, with $89,000 earmarked to install an elevator, $92,000 for initial equipment and the remain ing $278,000 towards the ac tual remodeling. In addition, the state ap propriated $50,000 during the 2014 session to place a new roof over the building, Greene said. Plus theres the possibility of utilizing some of the more than $400,000 bequeathed to the library by the estate of Margaret Key about a decade ago. Now I need to sit down with architects, she said. I know it would have to have certain things done to the interior to make it functional but I never expected to get the money. Susan Buzzett-Clem entson, chair of the library board, said she expects to see a stepped-up fundrais ing effort for private sector dollars in the weeks and months ahead. Since obtaining per mission from the county to include the school in this years Tour of Homes, there has been an outpour of com munity interest in seeing the building restored, she said. Greene was asked by Apalachicola resident Bob by Miller about how ongoing utility and maintenance fees would be covered. She said she was not yet in a position to make those determina tions as librarian. Miller also suggested that the value of having a cardiologist in town needed to be weighed against that of a library. Were all up against his torical preservation, said Johnson. This is an 80-year piece of our history. The Florida Trust for Historic Preservation two years ago listed the site among Floridas Eleven Most Endangered Historic Sites. In addition, during the 36th annual conference of the Florida Trust held in Tampa this year, the Trust announced the school was identied as a success for ongoing preservation fund ing efforts. Last year, Kara J. Litvi nas, a graduate student in historic preservation at the University of Florida, wrote a thesis on Chapmans adaptive use as a partial ful llment of the requirements for her masters degree in historic preservation. In the case of Apalachic ola, the reuse of Chapman School is just one example of a type of catalyst project that could spark positive community growth, she wrote. Under the states Rural Economic Development Im itative, the city benets from a waiver of any matching re quirement for the $497,000 grant. Pr es en ts Fr an kl in Co un ty Se aH aw ks Au di to ri um Ju ne 7, 20 14 at 6: 07 P. M. Ti ck et s ar e on sa le no w ca ll 65 380 78 SPECIAL TO T HE T IME S A look at the summer harvesting areas. Area 1671, commonly known as East Hole, is the blue lined area east of the St. George Island Bridge LIBRARY from page A1 SUMMER OYSTER HARVESTING

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, June 5, 2014 Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times To day (850) 65 3-8868 YO UR HO MET OWN NE WS PA PE R FO R MO RE THA N 12 0 YE ARS YO UR HO MET OWN NE WSP APE R FOR MOR E TH AN 120 YE ARS TH E T IME S & C arrabel le A palachicola Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. Su nr oom, scr eened &o pen por ches ,h ot tub o MBR suit e, lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho we ra nd gar den tub detached gar age ,g as r eplac e, gr anit ec oun te rt ops ,s tainless ki tc hen, wine co oler ,b uilt-in co rner ca binets .A menities include co mmunit y dock ,p ool ,t ennis co ur ts .M ain living ar ea &m ast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs fo rp riv ac yw /p riv ate por ch. 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Th eh om eh as 2m as te rb ed ro om s, ea ch wi th its ow nb at hr oo ma nd wa lk -i nc loset .N ic es iz e li vi ng ro om wi th ag as r ep lac ef or th ec hi ll yw int er ni ght s. Si to ny our fron tp or ch an dw at ch ea gle ss oa ra cr os st he sun set $275,000 3BR/2BA ,b uilt in 2004, this immac ula te home wa st hough tfully designed to be af ull time and the qualit yc onstr uc tion is eviden ti nt he cherr y oors re plac e, cr ow nm olding ,c ust om ki tc hen, plan ta tion shutt ers and tr ansoms ov er ev er yw indo w. 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Ge org eI sl an d WO ODE DR ES ID EN TI AL LO T Gr ea td ea lo naq ui et st re et wi th at tr ac ti ve ne ig hb or in g ho me s, ju st of fp av ed Ba yS hor eD ri ve ,o ne bl oc kf ro ma de ep ca na l, tw ob lo ck sf ro mt he Ba y, ve ry go od ch an ce fo r av ie wo ft he ca na l/ Ba yf ro me le va te dh om e, La nd St re et. Li st ed by Ja ni eB ur ke 4519184 29,000 Be autifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular Ba ya nd Br idge views with man yn ew upda te s. Re modeled ki tc hen (new ca binets ,c oun te rt ops ,s ink ,d isposal ,s tov e, dish wa sher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea tr ee ct iv ew indo w lm; 3l gB Rs with new mast er BA; priv ate oc ej ust o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2w alk -i nc losets .T his house is per fe ct fo re nt er taining with ah uge fr on tp or ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and wo od burning r eplac e. La ndsc ape has irriga tion we ll and na tiv ep lan ts .H igh ecienc yh ea t pump ,n ew ro of ,6a dditional in ro of insula tion. Sh immering Sa nds Re alt y STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-8 90-19 71 st ev e@st ev esislan d. com ww w. st ev esislan d. com ww w. 332C ookS tr eet .com MLS# 251621 10 16 TH STREET ,A PA LAC HICOLA $397,00 0 Th eB ry an tH ouse B&B is o er ed fo rs ale! Liv et he dr eam of oper at ing yo ur ow n B&B ,j ust fo ur shor tb locks fr om do wn tow nA palach. Co mplet ely re no vate da nd in ex ce llen tc ondition, yo um ust see this charming 4BR/4BA hist oric beaut y. Be autiful modern ki tc hen, with gr anit ea nd highend applianc es ,a ll ba thr ooms ar ee n suit ea nd upda te d. Co zy sun ro om with stained glass ,B ah ama shutt ers .K ee p ru nning as aB &B or use as ap ersonal re sidenc e. Hist oric charm, with modern co nv enienc e! ww w. st geor gewir ed .c om Sh immering Sa nds Re alty THOMPSON BA SSET TT EAM Ce ll: 850-6 53-6621 www .st geor geislandr ealesta te .com

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From staff reports For an experience you wont forget, come spend a week on the Choctawhatchee Bay in Niceville for snorkeling, marine education, arts and crafts, outdoor activities, archery, kayaking, campres, skits and many other exciting activities at 4-H Camp Timpoochee. Franklin County youth ages 8-13 will have a great time at the 4-H Camp, to be Monday to Friday, July 7-11. This years theme is Welcome to Our Jungle! This ve-day residential camp costs $225 for Franklin County youth, which includes lodging, meals, canteen snacks, program supplies and a T-shirt. Dont miss out on this exciting opportunity. Camp is lled on a rst come, rst served basis. So sign up now. Registration forms are available at the Franklin County Extension Ofce at 66 Fourth St. in the Fort Coombs Armory building in Apalachicola. Stop by, give us a call at 653-9337, or email metaylor@u.edu to request a registration form. The registration deadline is Monday, June 30, or earlier if lled. 4519186 Pe t of th e We ek Ar e yo u lo ok in g to adop t a sm al l br eed do g? We ha ve se ve ral at th e Ad op ti on Ce nt er wa it in g fo r th ei r fo re ve r ho m es No ma tt er wha t ki nd of do g yo u ma y be lo ok i ng fo r, if yo u wi ll be a li tt le pa ti en t, we wi ll be a ble to ma tc h yo u wi th yo ur tr ue lo ve Be sur e to ch ec k ou r we bs it e fr eq ue nt ly to mo ni to r ou r in ta ke s! www fo rg ot te np ets .o rg Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to soc ia liz e al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts We ar e al way s lo ok i ng fo r pe opl e wi ll in g to bri ng on e of ou r an im al s in to th ei r hom e to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can spa re wo ul d be gr ea tl y appr ec iat ed Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hum an e Soc iet y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po in t Yo u ma y lo gon to th e we bsi te at www .f or go tt en pe ts .o rg to se e mor e of ou r adop tab le pe ts Society A10 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 Saturday recital All About Dance From staff reports Its All About Dance at the 33rd annual Pam Nobles Dance Studios recital at 6:07 p.m. Saturday, June 7, at the Franklin County Seahawks Auditorium. Dance students from Apalachicola, Eastpoint, Carrabelle and Port St. Joe will perform. Tickets are $8 at the door. Old songs, new songs, fast and perky songs will ll the auditorium as the danc ers perform jazz, tap and ballet in the upbeat and en tertaining recital. The entire range of Nobles The Best dancers range from 18 months to 70-plus, showing off at the All About Dance recital. Old time favorites in clude Body Rock by the littlest dancers, Hey Good Looking, Heartbeat Drumbeat, exciting dances by the Hot Flashes, with a solo by June Gray, topped off by Scott Bensons choreography in a 1234 Mix. General admission tick et price is $8 for adults and children at the door, but reserved seats now are be ing sold for $10 and general admission for $4 until the recital. The program book is $5. Special to the Times Franklin County Schools Food and Nutrition Services attended the 2014 Florida School Nutrition Association Conference at Disneys Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando. Eight staff members, Robin Tennille, April Dalton, Terry Hilton, Rachel Shiver, Jennifer Anderson, Tammy Nichols, Shirley Freeman and Mary Jean Johnson, attended breakout sessions and the food and equipment show. On April 26, at the general session and awards presentation, Franklin County won the following awards: Presidents Award: April Dalton (President of Chapter in Franklin County) Florida Jump Start Elementary Award: Mary Louise Shiver (Breakfast Week theme Celebrating Breakfast) Florida Jump Start Secondary Award: Mary Louise Shiver Nutrition Award: Terry Hilton (Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program kickoff theme Down in the CORN Field) Super School Award Elementary: April Dalton (Lunch Week theme School Lunch Across the USA) Super School Award Secondary: April Dalton We were proud to display our portfolios with photos of students from Franklin County School participating in the themed programs. We continue to teach our students the importance of eating breakfast to start the day. We promote the importance ofr eating fresh vegetables and fruits at lunch and supper. We cant forget to include that 60 minutes of exercise keep the body energized. Everyone is welcome to come see our portfolios and watch the students eat their healthy meals. Food service takes home awards SPECIAL TO THE T IME S Franklin County food service employees, April Dalton, left, and Terry Hilton hold up the many awards won by their staff. 4-H summer camp registration now open Community plants tree for Linda Arnold Middle schoolers explore Crooked River Light From staff reports The last weeks of school are full of excitement about the upcoming summer, so a eld trip is the best thing for a bunch of restless students. Spencer Tolberts sixth grade students and also some seventh-graders enjoyed a day of activities at Crooked River Lighthouse Park. Climbing the 103-foot tower was a highlight of the outing which included hands-on exploring with laser lights and prisms, a tour of the keepers house museum, a scavenger hunt and trying out the clothes wringer in the newly restored 1895 wash house. Everyone enjoyed the 70 foot wooden pirate ship in the picnic area Visit this city park and see the lighthouse any day from dawn until dusk. Visit the museum Thursday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Tower climbing available on the weekends (or Thursday and Friday, too, if we have enough volunteers). The museum is full of fascinating local maritime history. Arrangements can be made for a special educational program for small group visits during the summer. Call 697-2732 and leave a message. On Friday afternoon at the Apalachicola Municipal Library, a brief ceremony was held to dedicate a crepe myrtle tree planted in memory of Linda Arnold, who died Feb. 25. Funds for the tree and the plaque were provided by members of the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department, who brought over their trucks and their members for the ceremony. Linda and Harry Arnold, second from right, were instrumental in the creation of the re department, and in the start of the annual chili cook-off more than three decades ago. Speaking at the gathering were Fire Chief Jay Abbott, right, reghter Bud Hayes, second from left, and reghter Kevin Delahanty, left. Not pictured is Alice Collins, a longtime friend of the Arnolds, who spoke about the contribution that Linda and Harry Arnold have made to the island. D A V I D A D LE RS TEI N | The Times Funds were provided by members of the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department J OA N MATE Y | Special to the Times Jazmyne Farmer, Tonnor Segree, Honesti Williams running wet clothes through a wringer and being grateful they live with modern technology

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Faith The Times | A11 Thursday, June 5, 2014 Andrew Blair ONeal was born Jan. 27, 1965, in Apalachicola to Wayne and Grace ONeal of Apalachicola. He was called home to rest with his Father on Sunday, June 1, 2014, in Apalachicola, after trying to go out oystering to make an honest days living to take care of his family. He was baptized and conrmed at Holy Family Catholic Church where he also served as a altar boy. He attended Apalachicola High School and later joined the Job Corps where he earned his GED and received a welding trade. He worked as a welder with Misener Marine and later started his own business as a commercial oysterman. Andrew was a loyal and devoted family man who cared about his family and community. He was always willing to lend a helping hand in any situation. Those to be forever blessed by his life is his wife, Carla ONeal, who he married on June 26, 1998. To this marriage, they brought together 10 children, Shawanna Woods, Jorel ONeal, Serita Givens, Ricoh ONeal, Andrea ONeal, Grace ONeal, Cynthia Sanders, Shellie Sanders, Pete Sanders, and Brendan Hutchins. He leaves to cherish his memory his parents Wayne and Grace ONeal of Apalachicola; in-laws Mitchell McCalpin of Apalachicola and Sarah French of Eastpoint, two sisters, Wanda Owens (Glen), of Waycross, Ga., and Natalie Booth (Otis), of Tallahassee; four brothers Wayne ONeal Jr. and Leon ONeal (Sherry), all of Apalachicola, Lawrence ONeal (Angel), of Macon, Ga., and Ryan ONeal (Cheyenne), of Tampa; Godmother Rose McCoy Thomas, of Apalachicola; and a host of nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and many sorrowing friends. The viewing will be at Kelley Funeral Home Friday evening, June 6, from 5 to 6 p.m., with rosary said at 6 p.m. The funeral Mass will be at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola on Saturday morning, June 7 at 10 a.m., followed by interment at Magnolia Cemetery. Andrew Blair ONeal OBITUARIES ANDREW ONEAL Norma FelshawPatmore was surrounded by family on Wednesday, May 21, 2014, as she entered her eternal rest. Norma and her late husband, Mr. Harold Felshaw, moved to Carrabelle Beach in 1969. Norma worked for Dr. Sands, as an ofce manager for about 20 years. Ms. Norma volunteered so much of her time while her girls were students of Carrabelle High School; she once was given a Perfect Attendance Award by the staff of CHS. There have been so many lives she has touched in a positive way. Her infectious smile could literally make a difference in your day and she was a person who could laugh at herself. She enjoyed spending time with family and friends, who all knew the topic of food was bound to come up. Norma would sit and watch the beach for hours as she painted. She felt blessed to have her paintings used as a logo for the Florida Seafood Festival, hung in the State Capitol, and in various other places. Norma got the most joy when giving her art to people she cherished. Norma was a member of the Carrabelle United Methodist Church, sang in the choir and assisted with the designing of the stain glass windows. She wasnt a grandmother that brought her grandchildren into the kitchen to bake cookies. Instead, they were handed a sketch pad and a pencil or a paintbrush and paint book. Visits to Carrabelle always involved walks down the beach collecting shells and driftwood. Swimming would include diving for sand dollars, she loved showing them the cross, then white doves from the center of a sand dollar, others were left in the sun to dry out, she would use the sand dollars as a canvas to paint a picture of the same area they came from. After her move to Jacksonville, each year she attended Disney on Ice, with her daughter, grandchildren and greatgrandchildren, which she enjoyed as much as they did. Several years she went to Mickeys Very Merry Christmas at Disney World, where she became seven years old again. Each October, she attended the annual Southern Womens Show, where of course she spent most of her time at the food sampling booths. Her family is certain her love of food had a lot to do with her saying, Christmas had become to commercialized, other than for the children, gifts for her closest friends and family needed to be homemade, not bought. She also loved to travel, after going throughout the United States and Canada. Her last trip was with her brother, Frank Brownell, to his wife Annies homeland in the Philippines. During their two-month trip she also went to Hong Kong. Along with her brother, she leaves behind her husband, Lou; three daughters Cindy Beck (Bill) of Jacksonville, Sheri Keith and Lisa Hartseld Bartholf (Danny), of Tallahassee; stepson Harold Felshaw Jr. (Norma), Orlando; seven grandchildren: Jason, Amie, Ryan, Christyn, Aubrey, James Lee and Leslie; and nine great-grandchildren. There will be an informal gathering for friends with family on Saturday, June 7, at 2 p.m. at Carrabelle United Methodist Church. Norma Felshaw-Patmore NORMA FELSHA WPA TMORE Lunch on tap for rst Thursdays By Jim Welsh Special to the Times Happy hurricane sea son! Time to review your escape route and check your survival kit. The sea son will be a happy one, if we dont have any storms. But the way the weather is around the rest of our country, who knows? Just be prepared. Coming attractions. The movie The Longest Day, will be shown at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, on Saturday, June 7. The movie will start at 10:30 a.m. The museum is at 1001 Gray Ave. in the Carrabelle Complex. Hope you can join us for lunch this afternoon. Thats right, this after noon. The information I had in my column last week I got from a hand written note taped to the top of the desk where you make your donations for lunch and it was still there last week. We will have lunch on the rst Thursday in July, Au gust and September. The lunch line forms at noon. Be watchin for ya! Jim the deejay will be ready to play music for your dancing and listening pleasure at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center on Sat urday, June 7. Jim will have things spin ning at 7 p.m. Grab your favorite drink, your snack to share, your dancing shoes and, oh yes, your main squeeze and dance into the night. It takes two to tango! After the 5 p.m. Mass this Saturday, June 7, at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, we will have our monthly cov ered dish supper in the parish hall. Visitors wel come. Pizza night on Sunday at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will start at 5 p.m. and end at 7 p.m. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remem ber our little prayer: God grant me patience and I want it now. Until next time, God bless America, our troops and the poor, the home less and the hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh The following is the updated schedule for Al coholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more informa tion, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion TUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Dis cussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, Closed THURSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Dis cussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Drive 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Dis cussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion SA TURDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First Unit ed Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the seren ity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference AA MEETING SCHEDULE Making music for Market Days On Saturday, May 31, the United Methodist Church of Carrabelle and Gods Ministry for the Needy hosted a Market Days fundraiser including a rummage sale, bake sale, hot dogs and live music. Seen here, the Rev. Aaron Batey, far left, strummed guitar and sang accompanied by Jim Short and Mike Nepote on drums. The turnout was a little less than I had ex pected based on other months, but we raised twice what you expect ed from the turnout, Batey said. I want to thank everybody in the community. Batey said money raised during Market Days goes to help needy families, through a com mittee that examines situations on a case-bycase basis. During May, Gods Ministry for the Needy bought grocer ies for a single parent family left homeless by a fire. L O IS SW OBO D A | The Times Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice

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Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TIDE TA BLES MONTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, June 5 83 75 20 % Fr i, June 6 84 75 20 % Sa t, June 7 84 75 20 % Sun, June 8 84 76 30 % Mo n, June 9 84 76 30 % Tu es June 10 84 75 40 % We d, June 11 84 75 30 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 12 Thursday, June 5, 2014 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Surf shing is doing well for those anglers prowling the shoreline with many nice trout and red sh being caught. Surf shing on the Cape is still producing great pompano and whiting catches. Dont be surprised if you occasionally hook up with a shark. Most are being caught in the middle of the water column with an ample amount of chum on wrecks and off hard bottom. The MBARA sites out of Mexico Beach also have an abundance of sh, but get out early so as to get a good spot. The week of Red Snapper season in federal waters is here. The Gulf is full of Red Snapper and not just a few shermen chasing them. The marine forecast is favorable for the next few days and off shore shing should be very good. By FRANK SARGEANT Frankmako1@outlook.com Dont blink or youll miss the red snapper season in the Gulf of Mexico this year. It opens June 1, slams shut again just nine days later on June 10 thanks to a Byzantine federal management system that tightens the regulations ever more as the shery gets better and better. (If we get a tropical storm on or about June 1, say goodbye to the entire season.) Federal regulators say the rules are for the good of the sh and ultimately of the shermen. But in fact, most experienced reef anglers say red snapper shing is now better than it has been in at least 40 years thanks to an extended period of tight harvest regulations, and also perhaps due to the success of sh excluder devices on shrimp nets, allowing millions of juvenile snapper to escape these days when in the past they would have wound up as bycatch, dead on the deck. The snapper are both much larger than they have been in decades, and much more numerous, according to hundreds of reports from shermen all around the northern half of the state and at least as far south as Tampa Bay. Its not just in Florida waters; Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas also report booming snapper populations. So why dont the feds want to pony up longer seasons and more generous bag limits? Because of a bizarre twist in the way they calculate the harvest they measure it in pounds, and when their best estimate of a conservation-smart harvest is achieved, they call for closure. Snapper grow fast and live a long time, and consequently anglers are now catching tons of whoppers which means that they can catch a lot fewer before they reach those limits set by the feds. To be sure, these restrictions are not arbitrarily contrived by the sh managers they are mandated by the MagnusonStevens act, and more recently by a court decision but both these directives are based on badly-designed harvest surveys, which are the direct responsibility of the federal scientists. It is much like the paradoxical Catch 22, and its causing a furious reaction among shermen and state shery managers from Florida to Texas most Gulf states are now moving rapidly toward putting their own harvest surveys in place for the species, tapping the capabilities of smart phones so that anglers can record their catches conveniently the minute they hit RED SNAPPER SEASON SHORT BUT SWEET RANDY ROCHELLE | Special to the Times Whopper red snapper such as this one are now abundant throughout the Gulf of Mexico experienced skippers say there are more and bigger snapper than at any time in the past 50 years and many wonder why, when thats the case, the federal season is only nine days long. FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the Times Red snapper must be at least 16 inches long to be kept, and the limit is two daily. The species is widely recognized as one of the best table sh in the Gulf. See RED SNAPPER A13 Early opening of bay scallop season From staff reports On May 20, Gov. Rick Scott announced the bay scallop season will open three days early this year. Opening the season early and on a weekend will create additional recreational opportunities for Florida residents and visitors while recognizing the importance of economic bene ts to coastal communities where this activity occurs. I requested the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission open the season early this year to bene t our communities who rely on our sheries, Scott said. The bay scallop shery is especially important to Floridas Big Bend region and by opening the bay scallop season three days earlier, Floridians throughout this area will have more opportunities to enjoy our natural treasures and provide for their families. The season, which usually opens July 1, will open Saturday, June 28. The FWC also will bring a proposal to its commissioners at a future meeting to change future season openings to the Saturday before July 1, unless July 1 happens to be a Saturday. The recreational season will open in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The season will remain open through Sept. 24, with the rst day of the closure on Sept. 25. All other regulations, including bag and vessel limits, apply. Learn more by visiting MyFWC. com/Fishing.

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Special to the Times Two summer basketball teams, one for age 14 and under boys, and one for age 17 and under, have hit the court running on behalf of Franklin County basketball. In early May, the two teams, under the direction of basketball coach Mike Sweatt, took part in the Tallahassee Capital Challenge Basketball Tournament. The 14-under team split this tournament, losing 36-34 in the rst game, but getting its rst tournament win of the offseason against the North Florida Christian travelling team 32-30. Johnny Jones was leading scorer with 14 points and Tyler Pendleton led with 14 rebounds. Cash Creamer, Landon Able, Jan Lowe, Landon Nash and Daijon Penamon all played vital roles in the win. Other team members who contributed were Mikalin Huckaba, Aric Sowell, Tyrell Green, Elijah Decoursey, Cameron Nash, Jonathan Jones and Jack Harris. The 17-under team took its opening game of the tournament 44-28 over the 10th Grade Tallahassee Warhawks. The team then won a squeaker 50-49 nal against the Chiles/Maclay Timberwolves. Kelsey Jones hit two big three-pointers to put the Seahawks up 48-47 with under a minute to play. Sharod Senatus got a steal then passed up the oor to KK Wilson for the icing layup. The Timberwolves hit a late shot to come within one point. We were down by as many as 16 in the beginning of the second half, Sweatt said. We came back with our defense, transition offense, and some really good timely shooting from Josue Barahona, Jones, and Senatus, great defensive play from Marshall Sweet, Tyler Howard, and Tyler Farmer, who both hit some big layups in our comeback stretch, too. The team took the next game 68-35 in a rematch against the 10th Grade Warhawks. We all played well on defense which created a lot of easy shots in transition offensively. Farmer, Howard, Sweet, Barahona, Senatus, Wilson, Kelsey Jones and Nathan Jones all played and contributed in this game, Sweatt said. The Seahawks fell in the championship 59-53 against the 11th Grade Tallahassee Warhawks. Sweet led the way in scoring, hitting six three-pointer, totaling out with 22 points for the championship game. We ran out of gas in this game, Sweatt said. It was our third game of the day and a lot of the players played in the football red/black game earlier that morning so they were pretty tired. We had a couple of players with leg cramps and back cramps. No excuse, I thought we still had chances to win this game if we would have hit our free throws and nished better around the basket. During one stretch, the score was knotted 42-42 late in the game, after a Hawks run that featured back-toback dunks, with Kelsey Jones getting a steal and dunk, then Kelsey getting another steal and assist to Senatus who dunked it. It was an exciting game early but we de nitely ran out of energy, Sweatt said. This tournament qualied the team for the Youth Basketball of America State Tournament played in Fort Myers on May 30-June 1. The tournament started off great with a big win over Premier Elite 58-50. We closed the game out well going on a 16-7 run to nish the game, said Sweatt. The Seahawks lost their next game 76-59 against the Lakeland Xpress. It was tied up late 51-51 but with cold shooting from the Hawks, the Xpress took advantage and went on a big run to close the game. We struggled the whole tournament with shooting behind the arc, Sweatt said. It seemed like we just never were comfortable shooting the ball. The team was unable to make it to bracket play on Sunday after they lost 56-51 vs. Florida Saints. We got frustrated with an array of missed layups and missed shots and never seemed to get interested in playing the game until the last few minutes, when they realized that this could be it for the tourney, Sweatt said. Overall I was not pleased with our play at the state tournament and thought we could have performed a lot better. The team nished in 10th place in the state. The teams total points quali ed Franklin County for a wild card bid to Nationals, in Orlando June 30 to July 5. The Seahawks next tournament is June 13-15 at the Leach Center and Civic Center in Tallahassee at the Florida State Team Camp, in which both the junior varsity and varsity teams will be participating. Sunday will be the tournament day on June 15. The players will meet the coaches, players and staff at Florida State University while playing in the team camp/tournament. Also the Dade Street Varsity League in Tallahassee will be starting up June 17. The 17-under team will be playing every Tuesday in this league and there will be a playoff at the end of league play at the end of July. Also there are two other tournaments that the 14-under team will be playing in as well in July. The 14-under team will also have two scrimmage games vs. Port St. Joe Junior High Team in the next couple of weeks as well. We would certainly like to thank all of our sponsors and a big special thanks to the Franklin County commissioners for their contribution to the state tournament. Without it we would not have been able to go and get these young men this experience, Sweatt said. Sponsors include Waterstreet Potters, Fishermans Choice, Bluff Road Storage, Gunn Heating and A/C, Inc, Kings Plumbing, Inc, Erin Rodriguez Construction, Waterstreet Seafood, Piggly Wiggly, Ace Hardware Mark Willis Apalachicola, Reds Family Store, Transport Auto Broker Inc, Chandas Laundry and Cleaning Inc, Danny Gilbert, Tamaras/Tapas Bar and Restaurant, Four Kids Minus Four, LLC, and Beach Pros Realty Jolly Rogers. CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 5, 2014 A Page 13 Section RED SNAPPER from page A12 the docks. In an unprecedented rebellion against the federal management system, most Gulf states have all but quit cooperating with the NOAA system on this species. These days, state management is really starting to make sense, while it didnt 30 years back. In the bad old days, only commercial shermen had lobbyists and power to control the rules, and many sheries suffered as a result. But these days, the checks and balances of local recreational anglers and conservationists weigh in for keeping the maximum number of quality-sized sh in the water and even the saltiest old commercial harvesters have nally come to realize that it just simply makes sense to guard the resource, so that they can not only make money shing today, but also tomorrow, next month and next year. It should be noted that thanks goes to not only state agencies but also federal biologists for much of the research on offshore species that has made this awakening happen. Florida, like other Gulf states, has set a much longer red snapper season in state waters, up to 9 nautical miles offshore, extending from May 25 to July 14 this year. How this all plays out remains to be seenhopefully, better shery stock analysis will put an end to the foolishness and restore some measure of cooperation between state and federal management agencies. In the meantime, whether you sh state or federal waters, here are some tactics that consistently produce results on red snapper. How to get em Anglers who regularly target red snapper say they are not exactly bottom sh, even though they are nearly always found around hard structure. Theyre usually found over structure, but not as often down in the structure like grouper. Experts seek out what they call a snapper Christmas tree show on their sonar screens before dropping a line. The pyramid or tree is the shape made by a school of snapper, with most deep, fewer at the top. In 200 feet of water the stack may extend as much as 50 feet off bottom. Gulf red snapper are typically found in 60 foot depths and more, on out to the edge of the continental shelf at around 250 to 280 feet beyond this zone, the bottom drops away to a mile deep and more, and common reef sh are not found in those depths. The Panhandle has a unique shery in that there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of private reefs, that is junk that skippers have dropped on otherwise barren sand bottom to attract snapper old washing machines, steel drums, all sorts of bulky trash. Its not legal any more, but there are still many of these reefs around, and smart skippers have dozens of them in their GPS machinesall very carefully protected from other skippers who might want to pirate their sh. There are also numerous legally-placed arti cial reefs, including tugboats, barges and ships as well as demolition rubble, that attract lots of sh; these can be found on any good offshore chart, or visit www.myfwc.com and type arti cial reefs in the search box. In general, the procedure is for the skipper to head for his favorite GPS number, drop anchor uptide when he gets there, and then let the anglers lower an assortment of frozen thread ns, cigar minnows or squid down on 60-poundtackle. Using braided line makes it easier to feel the bite and get a good hookset, but youll need at least ve feet of 60 to 80-pound-test mono leader to fool the sh and keep their teeth clear of the braid. (In extremely clear water or where the sh are being shed hard, its sometimes necessary to go to lighter tackle to fool snapperyou lose many but you get bit more often.) Weights of 4 ounces and more are needed to get the bait deep, and hook sizes are typically 6/0 and larger circle hooks, extrastrong. Circle hooks are required by law, as are hook removers, both aimed at improving survival of released reef sh. Venting devices, required formerly, no longer are on the must have list. The angler drops the bait to bottom, then takes up several turns of the reel to suspend the bait in the snapper zonekeeping an eye on the sonar will help you put the bait where the sh are. The snappers take it from there. When you feel a bite, you reel like mad and hopefully the circle hook digs in. Jerking on the rod to set the hook rarely works when using circle hooks; just keep tension on the line and reel very fast and the sh will usually set the hook itself. Red snapper these days typically average 5 to 8 pounds, but there are many, many of 10 pounds and more, and 20-pounders are not unheard of. The limit is two per angler per day, minimum size 16 inches. Red snapper are among the tastiest of all sh, and are great broiled, fried or baked. Special to the Times The 17-and-under Seahawks team at the state tournament in Fort Myers. Summer hoop season heats up Journeys masters miniature golf fundraiser From staff reports This years Putt Masters bene t miniature golf tournament raised $4,000 to support the Franklin County public libraries. This years winners are included Pat Hardman, who earned Hot Shot honors for having the most holes in one. First place honors went to Masters of the Putt, Journeys of St. George Island with 160 points. Team members were Dayle Flint, Clint Taylor, Ashley Friend and Jeremy Willoughby. Second place, with 171 points, were The Foot Wedge Crew, Newt and Adele Colston and Skip and Terry Kemp. Third place was taken by The Book Worms, Bob and Kara Landiss, Kate Aguiar, and Cal Allen with 175 points. This years sponsors include Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf; Weems Memorial Hospital; Sign Design in Eastpoint; Bob LandissTouchpoint Printing; St. James Bay Golf Resort; The Apalachicola Seafood Grill and Steakhouse and Centennial Bank. Businesses and individuals that sponsored teams include Apalachicola Ace Hardware, George Pruett, members of Judy Little and Sondra Furbee yoga class, Butler Agency, Uta Hardy, St. George Island Realty, We ngs, Bobby James Metal Roo ng, Sometimes Its Hotter, Dails Seafood, Journeys of St. George Island, Newt and Adele Colston; Skip and Terri Kemp, Bob and Kara Landis, Kate Aguiar, Cal Allen, and Apalachicola Bay Anima Clinic. Businesses and individuals that sponsored a hole sign include Rev. John and Sue Sink, Weems Memorial Hospital, Hammer Head Construction, Sea Oats Art Gallery, Sacred Heart Hospital on The Gulf, William Massey, Apalachicola Riverkeepers and Sign Design. Much thanks to Erica Sapp, Logo/Design and to The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar, owners Jimmy & Shirley Sapp and their great staff for hosting the event and providing the trophies presented to the winners. Make sure to visit the Facebook pages of the Franklin County Public Library and The Friends of Franklin County Public Library for news, programs, announcements and pictures from Putt Masters 2014. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Members of Uta Hardys Hardy Girls are, from left, Alexy Erickson, Summer Granger, Tina Granger and Ivy Crane. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Karl Lucy of Eastpoint tees off during the Franklin County Public Library miniature golf fundraiser Saturday.

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A14| The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95142T PUBLIC NOTICE Solicitation Number: 14HM-6B-02-29-01-385 Title: Request for Documented Quote, Professional Contracting Services for the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Wind Retrofit The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is announcing the documented quote for professional contracting services for a wind retrofit on the EOC by shuttering all windows and doors and constructing a new hip roof. The selected firm will provide engineering or roof designs and construction plans, and contract or furnish all labor, materials, equipment tools, transportation, and supervision as indicated in the sealed drawings and specifications. The contractor must have a proven track record, extensive experience and holds a State of Florida Certified Building Contractors License. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any or all bids or any part thereof and/or to waive the information if such is deemed to be in the best interest of Franklin County. The county also reserves the right to reject the bid of any bidder who has previously failed to perform adequately after having once been awarded a prior bid for furnishing materials similar in nature to those materials mentioned in this bid. Download the Specification Details/ Attachments: www.frankline mergencymanagement.co m Point of Contact: Sole contact for the Documented Quote: Gail Leek. All questions pertaining to this solicitation must be submitted in writing to gleek@realknow.com. Please reference the solicitation number. Submission Deadline Date: June 30, 2014 at 4:00 PM EST Deliver three sealed copies of the Documented Quote to: Franklin County Clerks Office Attn: Michael Moron 33 Market Street, Suite 203 Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Published Dates: June 5, 12, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 99013T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 28, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000342CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 9th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of May, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Terry Segree As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99047T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000128 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. DARYL THOMAS WALLACE, ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 1, 2014, in the above-styled cause, The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on June 12, 2014 at 8:00 am the following described property: LOT 16 AND 17, BLOCK 257, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: LOT 16 & 17 BLOCK 257, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand on this 22nd day of May, 2014. Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99045T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE THE FOLLOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY OF G.J. GRACE, LLC OR ITS ASSIGNS WILL ON JUNE 13, 2014 AT 9:00 A.M. EASTERN TIME AT 25 BEGONIA STREET, EASTPOINT, FLORIDA BE SOLD BY CENTENNIAL BANK FOR CASH IN ACCORDANCE WITH §715.109, FLORIDA STATUTES (2013): Metal interior display racks Window panes and frames of varying sizes A-framed wood storage device Outside metal storage shelves, desk chairs with plastic armrests Assorted metal movable shelving Varying types of wood planks, moldings and other millworks Wooden pallets Office desk Telephone VCR and tube TV 4-drawer file cabinet For additional information contact Monica Lemieux at (850) 6538805. DATED THIS 21ST DAY OF MAY 2014. Pub Dates: May 29, June 5, 2014 99063T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000277 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1; Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA K. KENNISTON; FRANCIS W. KENNISTON;ET AL Defendants RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated January 15, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000277 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1, Plaintiff and SANDRA K. KENNISTON, Et Al; are defendant(s). The Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT http://www. franklinclerk.com/ IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES, AT 11:00 AM, June 12, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: SOUTHEAST 45 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 17 OF CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 92 5TH ST, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 22nd day of May, 2014. By: Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99079T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000359 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes; Franklin County, Florida; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2011CA-000359 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 17, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST1983.60 FEETTO THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WESTALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY1128.67 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYRUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 58 SEC-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 5, 2014 The Times | A15 4518321HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAILABLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519140 ONDS WEST380.99 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST114.51 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST114.35 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.37 FEETTO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST381.12 FEETTO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYOF BUCK STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY114.59 FEETTO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST381.10 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 May 29, June 5, 2014 99081T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000130 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Diane Dodgen; Unknown Spouse of Diane Dodgen; United States of America; United States of America, Department of Treasury; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000130 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Diane Dodgen are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 12, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE EASTERLYONEHALF (BEING 100 FEETIN WIDTH BY THE FULLLENGTH THEREOF), OF THE FOLLOWING TRACT OR PARCELOF LAND: APARCELOF LAND IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH, 978.5 FEET, TO ACONCRETE MARKER; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.8 FEET, TO APOINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST169 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, WHICH SAID LAST POINTIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 219 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF THE 100FOOTRIGHT-OFWAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 30; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE MEANDERING SAID SHORE LINE OF SAID SOUND, IN AN EASTERLYDIRECTION, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCELOF LAND FRONTING 200 FEET ON STATE ROAD NO. 30, AND EXTENDING THE SAME WIDTH TO ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH, 978.50 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.80 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 204.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 254.00 FEET, TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY, 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 256.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER OF SAID ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE, 100.02 FEET, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-199999 FC02 WCC May 29, June 5, 2014 99089T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility Act” 83.80283.809 F.S. Gulf Coast Storage LLC will sell, for cash, to the highest bidder(s) OR may opt to retain the contents of the following storage units: #83-60 Jamie Atchison #87 Angie Arroyo #103 Amy Hicks The facility will dispose of the contents at 241 Patton Dr., Eastpoint, Florida at 8:00 am June 21, 2014. The parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Pub: June 5, 12, 2014 99097T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA-000317 Section:___________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAELETTINGER AKAMIKE ETTINGER; ELYSE ETTINGER; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; HIDDEN BEACHES PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION; HIDDEN BEACHES AT YENTBAYOU, INC.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 192011-CA-000317 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 2nd day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT12, HIDDEN BEACHES, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6 ATPAGE 11 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99095T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2011-00448-CA DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. JENNIFER KERN, ET. AL. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, and entered in Case No.201100448-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Bank of America, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jennifer Kern and St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc., are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/out Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 at 11:00 A.M., Franklin County, Florida on the 16th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT7 OF SEAPINE VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4 PAGE 28 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/ALOT7 SEA PINE VILLA, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 20th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC -14-127369 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. June 5, 12, 2014 99105T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENTOF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF AGENCYACTION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice its issuance of a permit File Number:19-0325756-001-EG to Ben Mathewson, to construct a Single Family Dock Extension with the relocation of the terminal platform and 2 boat lifts, within the landward extent of Apalachicola Bay, a Class II Florida waterbody/ Aquatic Preserve, The project is located at 316 Marks Street, Saint George Island Section 29, Township 9 South, Range 6 West,, Franklin County, Florida. Aperson whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Under subsection 62110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. Peti tions must be filed within 14 days of publication of this notice. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. Apetition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) Aconcise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. Apetition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd MS 55, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Pub: June 5, 2014 99143T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CA 000189 Section: ________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. EBE WALTER; HENRIETTA A. WALTER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SYNOVUS BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 19 2012 CA 000189 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder, for cash on the 9th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 26 OF DOG ISLAND SUBDIVISION, UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE (S) 23 & 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 21st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 Philadelphia Rd. Baltimore, MD 21237 June 5, 12, 2014 99145T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2014-0007-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF WYNETTE F. TUCKER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS Pursuant to Florida Statute 733.2121 (2013) and Florida Probate Rules Rule 5.241 (2014), the administration of the estate of Wynette F. Tucker, deceased, whose date of death was January 13, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County. Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street. Suite 126, PO Box 368, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 5, 2014. Personal Representative: NICOLE TUCKER 140 Ed Padgett Rd. Lakeland, FL 33809 Attorney for Personal Representative: EDWIN A. GREEN, II, ESQ. FL Bar No. 0137244 215 Delata Court Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 222-7770 June 5, 12, 2014 Basset pups. $450. 8 weeks. AKC, vet health cert. 850-225-4379 Apalachicola: 208 Ellis Van Vleet Sat. June 7th 8a-untilMoving SaleMisc. Furniture, Desks, Books, Clothes, Dishes, and Even a Kitchen Sink. Text FL91144 to 56654 Eastpoint 93 Rose Dr(Off N Bayshore Dr. in Magnolia Bluff, Follow Signs.) Sat. June 7th 8a-?Large Garage Sale/ Estate SaleLots of Treasures and Collectibles. Something For Everyone. Port Saint Joe 674 Jones Homestead Rd, Friday, Saturday and Sunday June 6th, 7th and 8th, 8am to 5pm.2 Family Yard SaleLots of Items! Text FL90750 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Acct Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative AssistantFor guest services. Happy and energetic person, good communication and computer skills. Ability to read and follow instructions. Come by and pick up application or email to visitorcentermanager@ammfl. org Apalachicola Maritime Museum 103 Water St, 850-653-2500 Web ID 34290443 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34287017 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAdministrative ReceptionistThis full-time position requires excellent customer service skills & a smile! Must be neat, organized & attentive to detail with good computer skills & knowledge of Microsoft Word, Outlook & Excel. Good grammar, spelling & punctuation. Varied office duties including phones & walk-in traffic. Prefer prior office experience. Full-time Mon-Fri w/ great benefits. Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-5pm at: 123 W Gulf Beach Dr or call Sandra 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34290509 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 2 bedroom handicap Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer” Text FL72436 to 56654 Apalachicola : 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Susie’s Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, June 5, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces AD VERTISE HERE TO DA Y 227-7847 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Bui lding Supplies &A uto Repair Carrab elle 697-3333 We Del iv er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center 4510547 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 78 11th Str eet, Apalachicola FL 32320 850-653-6875 RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachic ola, FL 32320 Pho ne: (850) 653-8122 Cell :( 850) 653-7654 Laban Bont rager ,D MD Monica Bontra ger ,D MD By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com On Saturday, a group of animal lov ers took the rst step toward controlling the feral cat population on St. George Is land with a trap/neuter/release program (TNR). TNR is the method of feral cat control endorsed by Alley Cat Allies, a national organization to protect and stabilize fe ral cat populations. According to the ACA website, TNR involves humanely trapping stray and feral cats and having them vaccinated and spayed/neutered before returning them to their outdoor home. It is the only effective method of stabilizing out door cat colonies. As a result of TNR, the birth of new kittens in the colony slows down and eventually ends when all the cats are spayed or neutered. In addition, socialized cats and kittens are spayed/ neutered and then often put up for adop tion, causing an immediate reduction in the population size. After using the cruel, costly catch and kill method for decades and fail ing to stabilize cat populations, local ofcials and animal control ofcers ev erywhere have realized that they need a completely different approach. Some TNR programs have now been in place for as many as 25 years. Helen Gore and Cathy Buell, co founders of St. George Island Cat Allies together with June Crawford of Aiken, S.C., organized Saturdays meeting at the St. George Island United Method ist Church. They began their crusade by rescuing 14 feral cats trapped at an island housing development and slated for execution. Eight of those cats are now housed in Apalachicola awaiting adoption. Gore said to further their rescue mis sion, the Allies need four things. Volunteers are needed to help trap and transport cats. Volunteers would not be expected to handle the animals, only traps or crates containing them. Traps are the second component of the proposed program. The preferred brand is Tru Catch because it will not injure small kittens. The cost of a Tru Catch trap is between $50 and $60. The third necessary component is a veterinary clinic where the cats can be neutered. The Allies are still weighing their options for veterinary care. Depending on the option chosen for veterinary care, the group also might need a safe, climate-controlled space to house cats overnight after surgery. Finally, the program needs money. Bill Henderson, founder of Miss Kitty Feline Sanctuary Inc. in Thomasville, Ga., spoke to the group on Saturday. The money is out there but you have to ask, he said. Henderson and his wife, Bettye, suc cessfully operate a cat sanctuary that houses about 150 felines at any given time. He said in addition to slowing pop ulation growth, a TNR program enhanc es the quality of life for both cats and the people who live near them because the cats are healthier and less prone to ghting. He called the trap-to-euthanize meth od of cat population control a death ma chine that kills 4 million cats annually in the U.S. Gore said she felt the meeting was a great success. About 20 people turned out for the discussion. Several people came forward at the meeting to offer to take an active role in the effort, includ ing Willie Norred and Mary Ann Durrer, who has taken the job of treasurer. We will continue to announce our meetings hopefully via the Times as well as individual emails, Gore wrote in a follow-up email. She said she and Buell plan to re quest to speak with the Civic Club on St. George Island and perhaps the hom eowners association in the Plantation. We are in need of others who may be interested in becoming board mem bers for our organization, Gore said. Our immediate goals are to continue to seek volunteer support; to look for seed money, through donations and/or people to assist us with fundraisers; to search for vehicles to utilize for trans port of cats and/or kittens; to nd a suit able air-conditioned storage room/facil ity for caged cats post-surgery; to earn money for the purchase of traps; and of course to become a non-prot/501(c)(3) organization. Penelopes Pet Stop in Eastpoint has offered to help with housing cats post-surgery. If you want to help by either volun teering, making a donation or adopting a cat, call at Gore 323-0123 or Buell at 370-1125. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) On a technicality, what other state besides Alaska and Hawaii was ofcially admitted to the Union in 1950s? TX, OH, IA, OK 2) What was the Titanics emergency lifeboat #1 dubbed as by the press? Lucky Stars, Money Tree, Millionaires Boat, Cash Bow 3) Reportedly on his historic ight, what doll did Charles Lindbergh take along? G.I. Joe, Felix the Cat, Raggedy Andy, Bugs Bunny 4) When did Tom Brokaw sign off (retire) as anchor of NBC Nightly News? 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006 5) What are ASL, BSL, JSL, and DSL types of? Sign languages, UFOs, Signature loans, Dreams 6) Which of these sports or sporting activities has a sin bin? Boxing, Bowling, Hockey, Snowboarding 7) Whats a split among the members of a church when they no longer agree on what they believe? Sceptre, Scherzo, Schism, Scrag 8) From Harry Potter whats the name that most witches and wizards fear to speak? Voldemort, Flitwick, Diagon, Dumbledore 9) What do more school kids say is the worst thing served in the school cafeteria? Broccoli, Meatloaf, Fish sticks, Lima beans 10) Where is National Museum of Roller Skating located? Atlantic City, NJ; Fresno, CA; Lincoln, NE; Florence, SC 11) What is known medically as trimethylxanthine? Morphine, Glucose, Starch, Caffeine 12) A scimitar is a type of what? Headache, Sword, Fence, Stallion 13) When did newscaster Paul Harvey make his rst national broadcast from Chicago? 1945, 1950, 1955, 1960 14) A state of complete happiness is known as whatnumber heaven? First, Third, Seventh, Tenth ANSWERS 1) OH. 2) Millionaires Boat. 3) Felix the Cat. 4) 2004. 5) Sign languages. 6) Hockey. 7) Schism. 8) Voldemort. 9) Meatloaf. 10) Lincoln, NE. 11) Caffeine. 12) Sword. 13) 1950. 14) Seventh. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com HISTORIC AP ALACHICOLA KITTENS FREE TO GOOD HOME S PECI A L T O T H E TIMES These four kittens and their mother have taken up residence between the House of Tartts and Raney Guest Cottage on Avenue F. The mother and the black kitten have already been claimed by a visitor from Sarasota. The other three kittens, a calico and two silver tabbies, still need homes. Caroline Weiler, who is fostering the family, said she will help take care of shots and neutering. The kittens are healthy and have been handled, so they are extremely friendly. If you want a souvenir of Apalachicola to take home or even a kitten for your Apalachicola home, call Weiler at 653-9749. Animal lovers launch cat control program on islandLOIS S W O B OD A | The Times Bill Henderson and retired veterinarian Will Rosenbaum, right, discuss St. George Islands trap/neuter/release program and low-cost neutering before the Saturday meeting on the island.