The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00272

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, May 29, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index 3rd-grade FCATs up Franklin County students show hefty gains By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Paced by a double-digit increase in the percentage of students performing at grade level or better, Franklin County School third-graders performed the best they have in the last four years in both reading and math. In doing so, the Franklin County students narrowed the gap that had emerged since 2011 between it and the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. The ABC School saw a decline FCHS to graduate 64 tonight Gallegos, Walker top the class By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High School will present diplomas to 64 graduates at 7 p.m. today, led by two young ladies both of whom posted perfect 4.0 grade point averages. Leading the Class of 2014 will be two valedictorians, Laura Yasmin Gallegos, daughter of Antonio and Angelica Gallegos of Eastpoint, and Bria Delia Walker, daughter of David and Harolyn Walker of Apalachicola. Gallegos is headed to the University of Florida and Walker to Florida A&M University. The class salutatorian is Jathan A’niah Martin, son of Sheila and Anthony Martin of Apalachicola. He also will be attending FAMU on an academic scholarship. Also receiving highest honors, for a grade point average of between 3.75 and 4.0, By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com An unusually large crowd of about 60 people gathered for remembrance and fellowship on Memorial Day at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. The ceremony was brief, highlighted by an original prayer composed by Chaplain Barbara Cook. Founding member Bill Miller welcomed “everybody except the yellow ies” to the post. He read the poem “Freedom” by John Alton Robinson to the assembly. After the Pledge of Allegiance, Cook read her prayer for the day, written in a moment of inspiration. A mockingbird trilled in accompaniment to the solemn thoughts of those present. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In a moving tribute to heroism and hospitality, St. George Island welcomed scores of residents and visitors alike to share Monday in the dedication of a new agpole at the lighthouse. Twenty-one volleys from miniature cannons opened the Memorial Day ceremony, overseen by Jim Kemp, By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In a brief ceremony Monday morning, about two dozen people gathered at veterans Memorial Plaza in Apalachicola to commemorate Memorial Day. In his remarks, Al Mirabella, the new commander of American Legion Post 106, reminded the gathering of the price of freedom and recounted examples of courage and sacri ce made by solders in Iraq, as well as those who stormed the beaches of Co-Valedictorian Laura Gallegos Co-Valedictorian Bria Walker Salutatorian Jathan Martin DISTRICTWIDE GROWTH The chart below shows the percentage of the roughly 100 third-graders district-wide who scored at an achievement level of 3 or better, considered satisfactory performance. Year Reading Mathematics 2011 50 39 2012 45 31 2013 46 40 2014 49 50 See FCAT A11 See FCHS A10 MEMORIAL DAY 2014 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times American Legion Post 106 Commander Al Mirabella speaks to the gathering at Veterans Memorial Plaza in Apalachicola on Memorial Day. ‘We are here; you are welcome’ DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times U.S. Marine Joe Garrity res one of the cannons in the 21-gun salute. ‘God, the commander of heaven’s armies’ LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Of cers of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 stand with heads bowed in prayer during the Memorial Day ceremony. From left are Chaplain Barbara Cook, Ladies’ Auxiliary President Fran Weeks, Sons of the American Legion Adjutant and Treasurer Bill Miller, Post Commander Tommy Larson, Third Vice Commander Bob Ochala and Post Adjutant Greg Kristofferson. ‘Please be proud of me’ See ST. GEORGE ISLAND A10 See CARRABELLE A11 See APALACHICOLA A11 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A12 Faith . . . . . . A13 Outdoors . . . . . A14 Tide Chart . . . . A14 Sports . . . . . . A15 Classi eds . . . A22-A23 VOL. 129 ISSUE 5 Congratulations, Class of 2014, A7 Putt-Masters tourney set for Saturday Saturday, May 31, marks the fourth annual PuttMasters Tournament, the signature fundraiser that bene ts the Franklin County Public Library. Businesses, groups and individuals sponsor four-person teams, which tee off at noon. At 5 p.m. will be a ceremony to see who will take home Green Champ caps and trophy. The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar in Eastpoint hosts the event. For more info, contact Anna Carmichael at 2731174 or anna.carmichael@ yahoo.com. Market Days in Carrabelle Saturday Carrabelle United Methodist Church and “God’s Ministry” for the Needy will host Market Days May Gathering from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 31, at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3. Music will be provided by local talent. ‘Midway’ movie at museum Saturday The lm “Midway,” which chronicles the Battle of Midway, a turning point in World War II in the Paci c, will be shown at 10:15 a.m. Saturday, May 31, at Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. Free popcorn will be available. Entry is by donation and appreciated. Island summer bingo starts Tuesday Summer Bingo on St. George Island will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave. The cost will be 50 cents per card.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 Z€ Š} C~ Œ’– cp …„ ) $%" # '' Ap alachicola Are a Historic al Society Pre sents &! ( &% HE AL TH Y ST AR T’ S BA BY SH OW ER Tu es da y, Ju ne 3, 20 14 4: 00 PM ES T Th e Ce nt en ni al Bu il di ng 30 0 Al le n Me mo ri al Wa y Po rt St Jo e, FL FR EE AD MI SS IO N Fo od Fu n, Ga me s an d LO TS OF DO OR PR IZ ES He al th y St ar t’ s 6t h An nu al Bab y Sh ow er We in vi te al l Fr an kl in and Gu lf Co un ty pr eg na nt wo me n, ne w par en ts wh o ha ve ha d a ba by wi th in th e la st si x mo nt hs an d th ei r fam il ie s to jo in us fo r: Th er e wi ll be in fo rm at io n st at io ns on var io us to pi cs su ch as : Ca r Se at Sa fe ty Sm ok in g Ce ss at io n, Ch il db ir th Sa fe Sl ee p, Co mm un it y Re so ur ce s an d ven do rs of fe ri ng me rc ha nd is e fo r pu rc ha se Pl us lo ts of fa bu lo us do or pr iz es Ev er y ba by de se rv es a He al th y St ar t! Fo r Mo re In fo rm atio n, Ca ll 180 089 595 06 Ba y, Fr an kl in & Gu lf Co un ti es Special to the Times St. George Island’s Julian G. Bruce State Park has again been voted one of the Top 10 Beaches in the U.S. for the fourth year. Dr. Stephen Leatherman (Dr. Beach) announced the annual ranking of beaches last week. The 2014 ranking maintains the SGI beach in its #3 position that it reached in 2013. This is the fourth year that the ninemile beach park located at the east end of St. George Island has made Dr. Beach’s list. The continued Top 10 ranking is good news for Josh Hodson, St. George Island State Park manager. “This is a testament to our great beaches and also to the staff and volunteers here.” According to Hodson, park attendance has increased by approximately 10 percent each year since the island park has made Dr. Beach’s list. The list takes into consideration such factors as beach width at low tide, beach material (from cobbles to fine sand), beach conditions (from erosional to depositional), sand softness, water and air temperatures, number of sunny days, amount of rain, wind speeds, size of breaking waves, number of waves (width of breaker zone), beach slope underwater(from steeply sloping bottom to gently sloping bottom), longshore current, rip currents, color of sand, from gray to white/pink, tidal range, beach shape, bathing area bottom conditions, turbidity, water color, floating or suspended human material, algae in water amount, red tide, smell, wildlife, pests, presence of sewarage/runoff, outfall lines on/ across the beach, seaweed/jellyfish on the beach, trash and litter, oil and tar balls, glass and rubble, views and vistas, buildings/Urbanism, access, misfits, vegetation, well-kept grounds, amenities, lifeguards, safety record, domestic animals, noise, presence of seawalls, riprap, concrete, intensity of beach use, off-road vehicles, floatables in water (garbage, toilet paper), public safety (eg, pickpockets, crime), and competition for free use of beach (eg, fishermen, boaters, water-skiers). Leatherman is professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at Florida International University. He received his Ph.D. in environmental (coastal) sciences from the University of Virginia, and completed his undergraduate degree in geosciences at North Carolina State University. He has authored or edited 16 books, including Sea Level Rise: Causes and Consequences; Barrier Island Handbook; Overwash Processes; Cape Cod: From Glaciers to Beaches; and America’s Best Beaches. He has also authored over 200 journal articles and technical reports, including articles in both Science and Nature. Leatherman has provided expert testimony multiple times for the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives. He was also the onscreen host and co-producer of the 1992 film “Vanishing Lands,” winner of three international film awards, including the Golden Eagle. Island beach named to Top Ten List 2014 TOP 10 The complete top 10 for 2014 is as follows: 1. Duke Kahanamoku Beach, Waikiki, Oahu, Hawaii 2. Barefoot Beach Bonita Springs, Florida 3. St. George Island State Park 4. Waimanalo Bay Beach Park Oahu, Hawaii 5. Hamoa Beach, Maui, Hawaii 6. Cape Hatteras, Outer Banks of North Carolina 7. Cape Florida State Park Key Biscayne, Florida 8. Coast Guard Beach Cape Cod, Massachusetts 9. Beachwalker Park Kiawah Island, South Carolina 10. Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, Naples, Florida L O O IS SWO O B O O DA | The Times Wildowers on St. George Island

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 t o‘’ LFgGF NO Cr edit REFUSED * Cer tain re str ictions and exclusions ap ply Applicants mu st meet all State and Fe der al identication ve ri cation re quir ements and State age re quir ements Of fe r not av aila ble to ap plicants in def ault on a Badcoc k account or in an activ e bankr uptc y. Of fe r va lid thr ough June 9, 2014 at par ticipating stor es only Pr ices and offer s effectiv e May 27 June 9, 2014. 197 Highw ay 98 Eastpoint (850) 67 0-4 334 Car melle 109920 dual re clining sof a po we r chaise wa llsav er re cliner 11419 7 wh ile sup plies las t SA VE 201.95 $ 298 re g 499.95 Don’ t fo rget Da d on I™ ‹{ ' —~ ALL sof as sleeper s, futo ns & klik kla ks (w hile supplies las t excludes sectionals) av aila ble SA VE 225.95 $ 674 re g 899.95 after 25% discount 25 % sleeper s, futo ns 25 25 25 OF F Me talindo II 993809/10 queen pa nel bed (headboar d, fo otboa rd rails) dr esser & mirr or SA VE 320 .90 $ 479 re g 799.90 25 to 40 % 40 40 40 OF F ALL 5 pc bedr ooms af te r 40 % di sc ount SA VE 201. 95 $ 398 re g. 599.95 Pa nama 888208 4 pc inc ludes: lo ve sea t, cof fee ta ble, & 2 club ch air s SA VE 101. 95 $ 398 re g. 499.95 Outdoor Fur nitur e Cedar Key 901654 5 pc inc ludes: ta ble & 4 sid e chair s af te r 30 % di sc oun t Local The Times | A3 Thursday, May 29, 2014

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I remember the day I realized that I had PTSD. It was during group therapy in 1999 at the VA Hospital three years after I had been diagnosed with it and awarded disability. One of the guys was talking about his feelings after coming home from Vietnam through Travis Air Force Base in 1970. When he described what it was like for him it nally hit me. I understood. Up until that moment I had felt like a con man. Somehow, I had snuck one past the Veteran’s Administration, the psychologists, the doctors, and the Vietnam Veterans of America. Despite 10 years of ashbacks, and nightmares, with the smell of burning feces, blood, and the red clay of Nam coating the back of my throat with a smell that I still taste, I didn’t believe I was damaged. They did, however, and that’s all that counted. I no longer had to worry about being homeless, feeding my sons or educating them because I was now a ward of the VA. I’m told that one of the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder is memory loss. My experience wasn’t loss of memory; it was more like being unable to decipher if the memory was true or just something I conjured up. Until that day in group therapy, my memories had no other witnesses, but here was someone else who had shared that spell cast at the gates of Travis Air Base in 1970. It was an epiphany that rocked me. That understanding began a gradual peeling away of the hard crust I had built up around myself to keep from feeling. After 30 years of successfully stuf ng feelings, like a noxious odor, they began to ooze through the cracks and I had to nally deal with them. Is it possible that you never heard the story of how the young men called to duty in Vietnam, were greeted by their fellow citizens on the day they returned home? My children couldn’t believe it. From the rst to the last day, every trooper in Nam ticked off the days remaining until the magic number approached to go home. They were “Short Timers.” When asked how long they had left, they answered with cutesy sayings like; “I’m so short I have to look up to see an ant’s ass.” Cute, but their eyes were redrimmed, crowded with fear because in “The Nam” we all knew, anything could happen until you landed safely stateside. Ultimately, the lucky short-timers found themselves sitting on the tarmac with 200 others, hoping, but afraid to believe until nally that freedom bird started rolling. Inching along, then gathering speed until, nose up, we felt wheels up and we were airborne. At that very moment there was a huge collective roar of relief as we all realized we had made it. We were going home. When we touched down at Travis Air Force Base, we were ushered into a huge warehouse where we spent about 24 hours processing out. Here they got us showers, new uniforms, haircuts, medical exams, everything we needed. In one door and out the other, the next day I found myself on the loading dock getting into a cab, one of many waiting to take us wherever we wanted. With my ticket in hand, I shouted to my driver, “Airport!” No one warned us. I don’t know what I would have done if they had, but it still amazes me that no one had warned us. It was an ambush. As we pulled out of the gate I was greeted by a mob of war protesters. They were pounding the windows and hood of the cab, carrying signs that called me a murderer, screaming “baby killer.” As my cabby pulled away quickly, we were barraged with fruits and vegetables. I wasn’t just wounded. I was gutted. I was 22 years old. I had done everything I was asked to do for my country. I had seen horri c things that would remain with me for a lifetime, but I had done nothing to be so reviled. Why had my country turned on me? I can’t tell you why, but I exchanged my ticket and went to Denver instead of heading home. It took me two weeks to go home. I later discovered that a lot of guys did similar things. Some never went home. Then there are those who came back but are still gone. I often wonder if those people who met all those returning planes tell their children and friends what they actually did to protest that unjust war. Perhaps they have since joined that religious group that protests at the funerals of the dead boys coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan. Maybe they became politicians and went to Congress. This Memorial Day, the news is full of the problems at the veterans’ hospitals. Our politicians are pointing ngers, threatening hearings, investigations, all ghting for press time so they can “say” what needs to be done. The Congress is drawing sides, salivating at the opportunity afforded just before mid-term elections. All this energy, time and money being spewed forth, all for one purpose: How does it translate into votes? This should sound familiar. Our politicians want to divide us so they can point to the “others” as being different and wrong-minded, when they ask for our donations. With enough money they can ght those on the other side of the aisle. Listen to them. Democrat or Republican, deep down we know they just want money. It reminds me of that big radio station down in Del Rio, Texas back in the ’60s. Remember the one that asked for your donation, and in return they would send you a “genuine autographed picture of Jesus Christ?” Their promise may strike an emotional chord with you, but deep down you know what they want. If we want the answer to the VA mess we really don’t have to pay some bloviator congressman $180,000 a year for the answer. Simply, we know how to x the problem. We do it every day by honoring our own commitments in our daily lives. Congress should do the same. They should honor the commitment they made to America’s military when they sent us to war by simply paying the bill, no matter the amount. We paid with our blood, no matter the amount. Apalachicola resident Michael Ortiz y Pino is a veteran of the U.S. Army 1967-70. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, May 29, 2014 A Page 4 Section 42 years of living within your means LETTERS TO THE EDITOR USAF beware of dangers in Tate’s Hell Although I can’t condone violence, the residents of Franklin County should give Bobby Bullock a reward and a “thank you,” write off the expenses Norman B. Williams cost US ALL and warn the U.S. Air Force that Tate’s Hell may be more dangerous for training than they think – if Franklin County Corrections continues to parole guys like Williams into a SWAMP! Martin Capron Mullet shing part of McKissack Beach It has been brought to my attention that I misspoke at the recent county commission meeting regarding the amount of mullet shing off McKissack Beach. I stand corrected. There has been, and I hope always will be, mullet shing off McKissack Beach. I love mullet. Bo May Political advice from Cus and Sand Crab I read in your sister paper, the Panama City News Herald, that the Democratic candidate for Congress from Florida’s 2nd Congressional District has opened her campaign by issuing a position statement on the economy. It appears that she has a plan for the middle class and the small business person. Does that sound familiar like in Obama? What happened to the candidate that declared to represent all the people? It was about here that my computer died but I would bet my collection of political buttons that she failed to mention that in her working years that she has never bought a paper clip, rubber band or produced a payroll. I’m sure she explained that she acquired her political savvy through osmosis. You see, her daddy had some political notoriety in his time. I promise, the NSA didn’t help in my intercepting a communication a few days ago from two old friends, Cus and Sand Crab. It’s attached for you and your readers to digest. Enjoy and have a nice day. Dear Cus, Some say the little woman running against Congressman Steve Southerland is a very re ned lady. They say that she been a keeping company in high society circles in Miami, Washington, D.C. and Tallahassee all of her life. Why she’s even lived in the Governor’s Mansion. Yep, I’m told she can hold one of those itty-bitty tea cups with the best of ‘em. The little lady wants to represent you and me in the Congress of the United States ‘cause she says she’s one of us. How can that be? I’ll bet she’s never ever cleaned a mullet, treed a raccoon, tasted squirrel head stew and I really doubt she’s a member of the NRA. She may have a problem convincing folks in this area of the state that she knows what’s best for what we want. That ain’t the only problem the little lady faces. My uncle Skeeter is real smart. Why he even keeps his food stamps in his 401(k), whatever that is. Anyhow, Uncle Skeeter says that a vote for the little lady is a vote for Nancy Pelosi to return as Speaker of the House of Representatives and nobody wants that! I’ve had my say. So long for now. Your friend, Sand Crab Willie Norred St. George Island “Who is gonna’ make it? We’ll nd out… in the long run…” – from “The Long Run” by Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Bob Seger Please allow me to introduce you to David and Rose, who have been married for 42 years. Like many young couples, David and Rose began their married lives with virtually no assets. Throughout their marriage, however, they lived on 80 percent of their combined salaries. The other 20 percent was invested, saved and tithed. As young adults, the couple used part of their savings as a down payment and bought the least expensive home in a nice neighborhood. Each month, they paid extra toward principal and eventually paid off the mortgage in 20 years. They still make their residence there. David earned more than $100,000 annually only in the latter part of his career and Rose’s pay grade never reached that level. The couple raised three children, took an annual family vacation, and paid for braces for two children. All three children attended college, but they all worked during school. David drove an older, dependable car, a mid-size sedan and the odometer eventually passed 300,000 miles. While he kept his auto spotless, it was surrounded in his of ce parking lot by more attractive, newer models, and his af nity for his older car became a subject of mirth for his co-workers. David, who wore a coat and tie to work, always bought his suits on sale. Rose and David also bought needed household items on sale throughout their marriage. What’s the point? The couple now enjoys an investment account with a value of well over $1 million dollars. And they have no debt. When Rose retired, David asked her if she wanted anything special to celebrate that milestone. Rose asked for a trip to Ireland. The couple spent four weeks touring Europe, returned exhausted but ful lled, then resumed their relatively frugal lifestyle. It’s a happy habit they can’t seem to break. “I’m still a coupon clipper at heart,” Rose said. “I can’t stand wastefulness.” David bought a new BMW convertible recently, but only takes it out on weekends. Rose says he really prefers driving his old, dependable sedan, the one with 300,000 miles. The couple are the prototypical millionaires next door, and while they are completely ctional, their story rings true. In fact, you may recognize parts or all of your own lifestyle and history in this ctional portrayal. You would never recognize them as millionaires while waiting in line at Wal-Mart, where they did much of their shopping. Rose and David never attempted to emulate the lifestyles of those whose wealth seemed more obvious. The importance of saving and investing wisely can only be evaluated over time. It’s not fancy, but it still works. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a “FeeOnly” and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook SHARE YOUR OPINIONS Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times’ editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste. The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. Memorial Day stirs a veteran’s memories MICHAEL ORTIZ Y PINO Guest Column Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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The Times | A5 Thursday, May 29, 2014 Special to The Times On May 21, investigators with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce arrested John nie R. Davis, 45, and Tiffany M. Davis, 33, of Eastpoint, for drug-related offenses. A press release from the sheriff’s ofce said an inves tigation revealed Johnnie Davis was actively engag ing in the manufacturing of methamphetamine. A search was conducted of the Davis residence in Eastpoint, dur ing which deputies located signicant items believed to be used in the production of methamphetamine. Cannabis and prescription pills were also located. Johnnie Davis was charged with possession of listed pre cursor chemicals, manufac ture of methamphetamines, possession of methamphet amine, and four counts of pos session of paraphernalia. Tif fany Davis was charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance, for meth amphetamine and Klonopin. Two busted for meth in Eastpoint The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. MAY 12 Brandon L. Hill, 22, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Kenneth J. Pontones, 27, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 46, Apalachicola, two counts of sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) MAY 13 June M. Davis, 30, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Marvin D. Braswell, 53, Carrabelle, Holmes County warrant (FCSO) Rachel L. Bateman, 28, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Gary D. Nichols, Jr., 40, Olive Branch, Miss., battery, violation of a domestic violence injunction and violation of probation (FCSO) MAY 15 Michael T. Allen, 18, Apalachicola, assault on a school employee (FCSO) MAY 16 Joseph C. Cogburn, 33, Alford, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing (FCSO) Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, operating a tattoo establishment without a license (FCSO) MAY 19 Jessica M. Opie, 27, Eastpoint, domestic battery and failure to appear (FCSO) Catherine N. Millender, 36, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Arrest REPORT By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com A Port St. Joe man has been formally charged with murder in the death of his mother in their Cape San Blas residence. Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, already in custody on arson charges stemming from incidents in 2012, was charged with an open count of murder Friday in the slaying of his mother, Renee Gail Coffey, 58. Slick was rst appeared in the murder charge Fri day morning and is being held without bond in the Gulf County Jail. Investigators respond ing to a 9-1-1 call from Slick the afternoon of May 18 found Coffey unconscious and unresponsive in her home at 7525 Cape San Blas Road. Slick told dispatch ers in the emergency call that his mother had been “assaulted,” according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Coffey died of her inju ries at the scene. Slick was subsequently interviewed by deputies and later by investigators, Harrison said. Slick, a suspect in ar sons of the Masonic Lodge in Port St. Joe in 2012, and who was out on bond se cured by Coffey, quickly became the prime suspect and was taken into cus tody on the arson charges, for which he faces up to 30 years in prison. A home security system indicated Slick and Coffey were the lone occupants of the Cape San Blas home at the time of the incident, in vestigators learned. The system also re vealed no indication of a breach of the house or any other person in or around the house during the time frame of the incident. Slick told investigators he and his mother left the residence earlier in the day and made several stops in Callaway before returning home, which were con rmed through receipts and in-store video. Upon returning home, Slick told investigators, he went into the backyard to tend the family dog, re maining there for 30 min utes before going inside. He said he found his mother with “her throat slit and her head bashed in, but I didn’t know she was going to die,” according to the ar resting afdavit. The home security sys tem, however, showed Slick going inside the residence upon returning home and Coffey following roughly one minute later, according to investigators. Slick sent a text message to his brother about bring ing home a grocery item a few minutes later and is seen leaving the residence, phone in hand appearing to be in conversation, roughly three minutes prior to the 9-1-1 call. The system showed no other individual present. Investigators found what appeared to be blood spatters on Slick’s shoes. JARROD SLICK RR ENEE CC OFFEY Suspect arrested in Cape San Blas murder JOHNNIE RR DD AVIsS TT IFFANY M. DD AVIsS By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A golf cart stolen Sunday night from 126 Avenue D in Apalachicola cost a local vet eran a measure of his free dom this Memorial Day. City residents are familiar with the sight of Russ Boyd cruising around town in a bright blue golf cart with his yellow Labrador retrievers, Laverne and Abby. The former pilot suffers from macular degeneration and cannot drive. The cart is his only means of transporta tion but he gets by just ne. Or he did until someone stole the cart. At around 5 a.m. Sunday, Boyd was awakened by La verne and Abby barking at the door. He went to see what was wrong but found nothing. “Even if there had been someone at the cart, I’m not sure I could have seen them at that distance,” he said. On Sunday morning, he herded his dogs outside, plan ning to ride downtown for brunch, but to his surprise, his golf cart was gone. He called the Apalachic ola police who promised to search for the cart. But with wife Kay out of town, Boyd’s holiday weekend had taken a downturn. After speaking with neigh bors, Boyd learned a new grill was stolen from an adjacent yard about two weeks ago. “I think it’s a shame that someone like my father, a veteran who gave so much for other people’s freedom, should have his taken away by a thief,” said his daughter Kristie. “I don’t guess you can shame someone like that but shame on them anyway.” Boyd said the loss of the cart, an 1 2003 Club Car, is es pecially upsetting because it has sentimental attachments. He has owned the blue cart for nine years. The dogs and cart were spotted by a Sports Illustrated photographer and appeared in the 2013 swimsuit issue, part of which was pho tographed in Apalachicola. “It just has a lot of happy memories tied up in it,” he said. Ah la Carte golf cart rent als has provided Boyd with a temporary replacement free of charge. Boyd said he would pay a reward for information lead ing to the return of the cart. If you can help, please con tact the Apalachicola Police Department or contact Boyd directly at 653-8573. Special to The Times A 15-year-old Apalachicola male, who es caped custody while on a transport May 19 to the juvenile detention center in Tallahas see, was arrested in Apalachicola the follow ing day, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel. The juvenile was being transported to ju venile detention by a Franklin County deputy when he asked to use the restroom at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The juvenile escaped from custody by running from the deputy. Wakulla assisted the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce in locating the juvenile who was reported missing by Franklin County at 5:38 p.m. The search included the Wakulla County Correctional Institution K-9 Unit, Franklin County Correctional Institution K9 Unit, Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and both the Wakulla and Franklin County sher iff’s ofces. Ofcers continued the search until 11:10 p.m. before calling it off for the night. Helicop ters in the area at the time of the search were not part of the law enforcement operation. On May 20, Franklin County deputies ar rested the escaped teenager at his home. He was transported back to the Wakulla County Jail where he was booked on the escape charge, and released back to the custody of the Franklin Sheriff’s Ofce. The juvenile is facing charges of burglary, dealing in stolen property and grand theft in Franklin County. Deputy Will Hudson, Lt. Brent Sanders, Sgt. Ryan Muse, Deputy Gibby Gibson, Capt. Chris Savary and Sgt. Danny Harrell investi gated from the WCSO. Special to The Times An Apalachicola man who acciden tally shot himself in the leg caused a urry of concern Wednesday morning, May 21, including the brief lockdown of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. According to the sheriff’s ofce, around 10:50 a.m. Na thaniel W. Lee, 25, 145 Sixth Street, was on the porch of his mother’s house on Ninth Street, near Sylvester Wil liams Park, when he was putting a handgun back in his pants and shot himself in the leg, causing a nonlife-threatening esh wound. Because he had several outstanding warrants, “he didn’t want to get the law involved, he didn’t want to go to the hospital,” said Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes. Instead, he left his moth er’s house, and was hiding in a nearby house when sher iff’s deputies apprehended him within the hour. After being cleared by Weems Memorial Hospi tal, Lee was transported to the county jail, where he was booked on warrants connected to drug-related activities. Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce Capt. Chester Cream er said Lee was charged with resisting ofcer with violence, possession of can nabis, battery, criminal mis chief and possession of a rearm by a convicted felon. The city may charge him with discharging the weapon in city limits, he said. Lt. Kevin Newell, the school resource ofcer at the ABC School, took the precaution of ensuring that no students went outside until the man was caught. “The guy was on foot, still had a bicycle, and we didn’t know if he had a weapon on him,” said Creamer. “For safety reasons, they didn’t want any kids out on the playground.” Varnes said the inci dent ultimately made law enforcement’s job easier. “We had been trying to nd him anyway,” he said. “I guess you could say that this helped us.” NN ATHANIEL W. LL EE Franklin County juvenile captured after escape Law Enforcement Gun accident in Apalachicola leads to lockdown SPECIAL TO TT HE TT I m M E s S The missing golf cart Golf cart stolen from local veteran

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0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t L‚ £  }Œt} WB[DB=]L VU ††›  — \] 9[ =VQQL\LVU =BU][B… # # # # # # # !! # # ! # # # # # # # Š ^“n  A‹„„{‘{‹Š As Š“ s GG J›Ÿ P Z‹ “ ^“ O‹ sU FR Š KKP^_ <] GKG2 # # # # $ ! #" $ An nounc em en t Pa re nt s it is ti me to re gi st er yo ur ch il d fo r th e 20 14 -2 01 5 Sc ho ol Ye ar Pl eas e pic k up a re gi st ra ti on pack et at th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Sc ho ol on Hw y 98 Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Boa r d Of c e at 85 S ch oo l Road Ea st po int or go on lin e at fra nk li nc ou nt ys ch oo ls. or g an d do wn lo ad th e re gi st ra ti on pack et. On ce yo u ha ve co mplet ed th e pack et an d ha ve al l th e re qui re d do cu me nt s tu rn th e pack et in to th e sc ho ol of c e, yo ur ch il d’ s te ac he r or th e di st ri ct of c e. A co mplet e re gi st r at io n pa ck e t is re qui re d fo r yo ur ch il d to be re gi st er ed an d re cei ve cl as s as si g nm en ts fo r th e ne xt ye ar so ple as e co mpl e te th e pack et an d re tu rn it to th e sc ho ol or di st ri ct of c e as soo n as po ss ib le so yo ur ch il d’ s sc he dule wi ll be re ad y fo r th e 20 14 -2 01 5 sc ho ol ye ar If yo u ar e re gi st er in g fo r th e PK pr og ram an d wo ul d lik e to be co nside re d fo r wr ap ar ou nd se rv ic es fo r th e af te rn oo n PK pr og ram yo u wi ll al so ne ed to co mplet e an appl ic at io n fo r He ad Sta rt Th es e fo rm s ar e ava il abl e at va ri ou s lo ca ti ons in th e Co unt y an d at th e Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Boa r d Of c e. Re gi st er no w fo r th e 20 14 – 20 15 sc ho ol ye ar Who knows Gorrie chairs…. In the rst two Chasing Shadows columns, we asked questions about photographs from the Florida Memory Project collection. This week our historical mystery is a little different. Montez Davis of Apalachicola would like to know the origin of a chair purchased by her father-inlaw’s sister, Patricia Smith, who lives in Mississippi. Smith, an avid yard sale attendee, purchased a chair for her brother at an out-of-state sale. What caught her eye was a stamp on the underside of the seat. The chair was manufactured by the Gorrie Furniture Company of Apalachicola. A search of the Internet provided no information about the company, but perhaps a search of local memories would prove more fruitful. Do you remember the Gorrie Furniture Company? If you have any information about the company, please contact The Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star.com. SHADOW s S Casting By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ AA palachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission is investigating an abandoned derelict vessel that sank while moored in Carrabelle. On April 30, Janice Ma rois, a cruiser who was living on her own boat, the Seaweed, noticed the un named boat was in serious trouble. “I looked up and noticed that the boat was listing dangerously and appeared almost ready to sink,” she wrote, in a blog. “This was about 6 p.m. and it looked like her aft quarter was only about 6 inches or so above the water. Indeed, within a half hour she’d overturned and sunk.” Carrabelle received an inch of rain the day the boat sank and precipitation was, at times, torrential. Marois said no fuel was released when the boat capsized and sank. She had been watching the abandoned vessel for weeks. She said she be lieved a man and woman living on the unnamed craft didn’t know how to anchor the vessel. Marois watched the boat drift around the harbor with every incom ing and outgoing tide until it nally wound up tied to a dock wedged between two abandoned shrimp boats. She said the boat’s oc cupants seemed uncon cerned about the situation and frequently left the craft to go to onshore bars and eateries. Marois said the boat remained docked there two weeks, and then was anchored away from the dock and the occupants appeared to have left. The vessel continued to drift with the tides until she sank. Marois said, at the time the boat sank, it did not dis play current registration numbers. An employee of Fath oms, a Carrabelle raw bar, said she spoke to the boat’s occupants, and they had told her they did not own the boat but planned to buy it. She said the boat had been in Carrabelle for sev eral years, both on a trailer and in the water. The capsized boat had a black bottom and was ini tially difcult to see until someone marked it with two red buoys. In a telephone interview May 23, FWC Lt. Charlie Wood said FWC is in the process of investigating the boat and has obtained the name of the owner. He said the owner was arranging to raise the vessel. Wood said that because the boat is not in the main channel, it is not a hazard to navigation. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Words stamped on the underside of the chair. At left the chair probably had an upholstered back at one time. F lo LO R ida IDA MEmo MO RY PRo O JECT … and who is this girl? This picture we ran earlier was taken around 1965 by state photographer Karl Holland. The classroom is at Chapman High School. The man in the picture is biology teacher Orlis Burton. The girl with him is unidentied. Do you know her? Where is she now? – By LOIS SWOBODA Like us on THE APAlL ACHICO lL A TIMES JaJA NET Ma A R ois OIS | Special to The Times The derelict vessel, before it sank. Abandoned vessel sinks in Carrabelle Harbor

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, May 29, 2014 We ar e so pr oud of yo u! Yo ur fa mil y Co ng ra tu la ti on s Ma so n, 4518183 61 Av e E., Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-2161 AMBER EE LIZ aA BETH ADKINS BB RITT a A NEY F a A ITH ASHLEY MM ORG aA N RR Y a A N BaBA BB DD IXIE HH OPE BaBA CK J aA MES RR OY BaBA ILEY PaPAUL JOSEPH BB ENTON IIIIII KK RISTIN aA JEWELL BB OYD TT H aA D aA EISH aA SaSA ’KERI aA CaCA RR ASHLEY MM ORG aA N CaCA RROLL ALEX JUSTIN CaCA USEY VICTORI aA LL EIGH CC OLEM aA N SavaSAVANN aA H NN ICOLE CC OOK CC H aA D FR aA NKLIN CC OULTER ANTONIO BB R aA NDON CC ROOM AL v V I aA UN aA FELICE CC UMMINGS ANDRE aA LL YNN CC UPID BB OBBY JOHN CC URRY MaMA TTHEW HH OG aA N DavDAVIS MM YEL CC H aA NELLE DD ECOURCEY DD EBOR aA H RR OSE DD EMPSEY SS TE faFAN WW ILSON DD EV a A UGHN CC YNTHI aA MaMA RIE DD UNC aA N SaSA M aA NTH aA DaDA WN EvEV ERSON SS H aA NNON NN ICOLE FULLER TT ORRI aA NTO LavLAVON FULLER LaLA UR aA YaYASMIN GaGA LLEGOS J aA MES DD EMETRICE GG ORDON, JR. J aA MES RR ICH aA RD HaHA RRIS AUSTIN KK YLE HaHA THCOX KK E vV IN LL OUIS HH E aA TH HH E aA THER LL EIGH HH OLTON CC HRISTI aA N WaWA YNE JONES GG R aA CYN WW HITNEY KK IR v V IN GG R aA H aA M ADRON KK IR v V IN MaMA RLYN SS H aA E LL EE CC ODY WaWA YNE LL YSTON J aA TH aA N A’NIaA H MaMA RTIN AUSTIN KK YLE MaMA RTINaA SS TE vV EN SS IDNEY MM CAN aA LLY LL OG aA N KK IRK MM C LL EOD BB R aA XTON ALEX aA NDRI aA MM ILLENDER HaHA LEIGH J aA SON MM ING MM ORG aA N BB ROOKE MM OCK J aA MES LOUIS NN EWELL WW ESLEY CC OLE NN ORRED TT E vV IS EE MILY PaPAGE MaMA L aA CHI VICTOR PaPARKER BB ROOK MaMA RIE PP ITTM aA N KK RISTEN LaLA BETH PP UTN aA L MaMA SON KK YLE RaRA Y ADRI aA N aA MaMA RIE RR EEDER CaCA ULIN DaDA YNE SS HERID aA N JESSIC aA MaMA RIE SS HIELDS TT RIST a A N DaDA LL aA S SS HI vV ER KK YLE DD OUGL aA S SS MITH JUSTIN EE MORY SS P a A NN MM ICH aA EL MaMA TTHEW SS TE vV ENS JENNI fF ER LL YNN SS TR aA TTON JOSIE ANN TT URNER LL E aA DaDA WN VEN aA BLE BB RI aA DD ELI aA WaWALKER LL EON aA RD F a A RRIEW WaWARD CaCA MERON CC H aA SE WW HITE MM ERCURY J aA MES WW YNN Franklin C C ounty H H igh S S chool C LASS OF 2014 CONGRATS GG RADS!

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A8 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com The Franklin County High School Class of 2014 harvested about $650,000 in academic and athletic scholarships Friday night. After Stefan DeVaughn, vice president of the class, led the Pledge of Allegiance, Ashley Carroll, a member of the Class of 2014, offered a stirring rendition of the National Anthem. Deborah Dempsey, class secretary, led the invoca tion, followed by a welcome from Jathan Martin, the class president. Superintendent Nina Marks offered greetings in the form of the “Ten Commandments of Good Manners.” Bria Walker, the class treasurer, read the class tribute poem she had writ ten. Principal Eric Bidwell, School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander and Rod erick Robinson, the high school guidance counselor, then presented medals to Walker as well as Laura Gallegos, who share vale dictorian honors. Several scholarships were then presented, fol lowed by a passing of the torch through a candle lighting ceremony between class ofcers of 2014 and 2015. The evening closed with class tribute song by Logan McLeod, and acknowledg ments by Principal Eric Bidwell. The following is a list of the scholarships, the name of the presenter and the recipients: Apalachicola Masonic Lodge (Carl Duncan) $500 scholarships to Cyn thia Duncan and Logan McLeod Apalachicola Bay Char ter School (Chimene John son) two $250 scholarships to Gracyn Kirvin and Gra ham Kirvin Apalachicola Bay Ro tary School (Alan Pierce) $1,000 scholarship to Bria Walker Barbara Massey Memo rial (Roderick Robinson) $500 scholarship to Jathan Martin Carr Memorial (Dr. Lois Catlin) two $750 scholar ships Bria Walker and Lau ra Gallegos Centennial Bank (Bren da Ash) two $500 scholar ships to Cameron White and Jathan Martin College for Every Stu dent (Eric Bidwell) $3,000 scholarship to Lea Venable Dixie Youth Softball (Roderick Robinson) $1,500 scholarship to Marlyn Lee Eastpoint Church of God (Scott Shiver) $1,000 schol arships to Cameron White and Alex Causey Edwin Ruge Scholar ships (Roderick Robinson) two $1,000 scholarships to Gracyn Kirvin and Jathan Martin; and two $750 schol arships to Alex Causey and Ashley Carroll FairPoint Communica tions (Cookie Dearinger) $750 scholarship to Ally Millender Florida Seafood Festival (Carl Whaley) Four $500 scholarships to Ally Millen der, Brook Pittman, Jathan Martin and Ashley Carroll Forgotten Coast Build ers Association (Roderick Robinson) two $1,500 schol arships to Ally Millender and Brook Pittman Franklin County School Nutrition Association (April Dalton), $500 scholarship to Cameron White Franklin County School Trust (Roderick Robinson) two $1,000 scholarships to Brook Pittman and Lea Venable Franklin County School Board (Jimmy Gander and Teresa Ann Martin) four $1,000 scholarships to Lenny Ward, Lea Venable, Brook Pittman and Tevis Page Franklin County Sher iff’s Ofce (Lt. Allen Ham) $500 scholarship to James Harris Franklin County Teach ers’ Association (Jamie Duhart) ve $50 scholar ships to Christina Boyd, Deborah Dempsey, Stefan DeVaughn, Haleigh Ming and Bria Walker Franklin Educational Support Personnel (Delores Croom) $50 schol arship to Cody Lyston Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association (An nada Faircloth) $500 schol arship to Cameron White Friends of the Reserve (Heidi Montgomery) two $500 scholarships to Brook Pittman and Bria Walker Franklin County Edu cation Foundation (Lois Catlin) $250 scholarships to Laura Gallegos, Bria Walk er, and Jathan Martin; and $250 scholarships in name of retiring educations Eddie Joseph to Myel DeCourcey and James Bailey, and $250 scholarships in the name fo retiring education Sharon Browning Tevis Page and Laura Gallegos H’COLA (Brenda Ash) two $250 scholarships to Bria Walker and Jathan Martin Loretta Taylor Memo rial (Roderick Robinson) two $500 scholarships to Cameron White and Ashley Carroll Love & Worship Center School of Arts (Damien Davis) $500 scholarships to Andrea Cupid and Jathan Martin Love & Worship Center Daniel White Memorial (Damien Davis) $500 schol arship to Jathan Martin Mamie Humphries Me morial (Roderick Robinson) four-year, $12,000 scholar ship to Jathan Martin Montgomery Founda tion (Roderick Robinson) ve $800 scholarships to Malachi Parker, Andrea Cupid, Cameron White, Logan McLeod and James Bailey Phoenix Family (Lois Catlin) a $250 scholarship to Deborah Dempsey and Andrea Cupid Philaco Women’s Club (Ginny Griner) two $1,000 scholarship to Brook Pitt man and Jathan Martin Project HOPE (Myrtice Wynn) $300 scholarships to Deborah Dempsey, Andrea Cupid and Ashley Carroll Seahawk Boosters (Carl Whaley) four $500 scholar ships to Ally Millender, Gra cyn Kirvin, Logan McLeod and Cameron White. SWAT (Delores Croom) gave $700 in total gifts to Bria Walker, Jatrhan Mar tin and Andrea Cupid, who had been members since eighth grade; to Myel De Courcey, who joined in the 10th grade; and to Laura Gae4llgos and Deborah Dempsey, who joined this year. Take Stock in Children (Lois Catlin) multi-year scholarships worth nearly $25,000 annually to James Bailey, Jathan Martin, Myel DeCourcey, Deborah Dempsey, Andrea Cupid and Tevis Page, with hon orary awards to Laura Gal legos and Bria Walker Tyler Eddy Memorial (Jennifer Edwards), named for a young man, an active athlete and hunter, a future member of the Class of 2014, who died while still a boy. Two scholarships, each worth $500 to James Harris and Graham Kirvin Willie Speed Memorial (Allyson Speed) two $250 scholarships to Brook Pitt man and Bria Walker Yent Family Memorial (Jim Hastings) $500 schol arships to Bria Walker and Laura Gallegos BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0’ + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 Fr an kl in Co un ty Sc ho ol Di st ri ct do es no t di sc ri mina te ba se d on ra ce co lo r, re li gi on se x, nat io na l or igi n, ag e, ha nd ic ap or ma ri ta l sta tu s or ag ai ns t an y gr oup of c ia ll y wi th th e Bo y Sco ut s of Am er ic a or an y oth er yo ut h gr oup li st ed in ti tl e 36 of th e Un it ed Sta te s Cod e as a pat ri ot ic so ci e ty ( Se mi -a nnua l no n di sc ri min atio n an no unc em en t) Local Davis reminds graduates ‘you are equipped with greatness’ By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com Sunday afternoon’s bac calaureate at the Eastpoint Church of God was a handson affair for all involved. From Lenny Ward’s stir ring piano solo, to Cam eron White’s strumming of his guitar, to the personal words of eight pastors who embraced in prayer all who came forward to receive, it was an inspiring afternoon. “I have someone greater living on the inside of me,” said Pastor Damien Davis, a 2010 Franklin High School graduate who received spir ited applause from the Class of 2014 who attended, nearly all 64 of the senior class. Davis, who was raised in the Love and Worship Cen ter and became licensed in Jan 2010, and now serves as youth pastor, studied at the Southeastern University seminary in Lakeland. He graduated from Gulf Coast State College with an asso ciate’s degree in business administration, and is now completing his senior year at Florida State University. Displaying polished ora torical skills, Davis began by reminding the class that in closing this chapter of their ABOVE: Ashley Carroll sings the National Anthem. RIGHT: The Franklin County School Nutrition Association’s April Dalton presnts a check to Cameron White. Class of 2014 reaps academic rewards PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The Times LEFT: Ella Speed poses with recipients Bria Walker, left, and Brook Pittman, recipients of the award given in the name of her late husband, Willie Speed. CENTER: The Florida Seafood Festival’s Carl Whaley stands with scholarship winners, from left, Ashley Carroll, Jathan Martin, Brook Pittman and Ally Millender. RIGHT: Take Stock in Children’s Lois Catlin, center, stands with scholarship winners, from left, Tevis Page, James Bailey, Myel DeCourcey, Jathan Martin, Deborah Dempsey, Andrea Cupid and honorary winners Laura Gallegos and Bria Walker. Pastors pray with students at baccalaureate PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The Times LEFT: Pastor Don Carroll prays with James Harris. CENTER: Pastor Damien Davis. RIGHT: Lenny Ward. Pastors Scott Shiver, left, and Gene McLeod pray with students. See B aA CC alaALA U reaREA T eE A9

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 are Deborah Rose Dempsey and Brook Marie Pittman. Students earning High Hon ors, for a GPA of 3.5-3.75, are Andrea Lynn Cupid, Jessica Marie Shields, Stefan Wilson DeVaughn, Amber Elizabeth Ad kins, Braxton Alexandria Millen der and Gracyn Whitney Kirvin. A diploma with Honors, for a GPA between 3.0 and 3.5 will be Jennifer Lynn Stratton, Cam eron Chase White, Adriana Ma rie Reeder, Logan Kirk McLeod, Josie Ann Turner, Morgan Ryan Babb, Alex Justin Causey, Shan non Nicole Fuller, Samantha Dawn Everson, Lea Dawn Ven able, Tevis Emily Page, Malachi Victor Parker, James Roy Bailey and Graham Adron Kirvin. Receiving standard high school diplomas will be Brit taney Faith Ashley, Dixie Hope Back, Paul Joseph Benton III, Kristina Jewell Boyd, Thadaei sha Sa’keria Carr, Ashley Mor gan Carroll, Victoria Leigh Cole man, Savannah Nicole Cook, Chad Franklin Coulter, Antonio Brandon Croom, Alviauna Fe lice Cummings, Bobby John Curry, Matthew Hogan Davis, Myel Chanelle Decourcey, Cyn thia Marie Duncan, Torrianto Lavon Fuller, James Demetrice Gordon, Jr., James Richard Harris, Austin Kyle Hathcox, Kevin Louis Heath, Heather Leigh Holton, Marlyn Shae Lee, Cody Wayne Lyston, Austin Kyle Martina, Steven Sidney McA nally, Haleigh Jason Ming, Mor gan Brooke Mock, James Louis Newell, Wesley Cole Norred, Kristen Labeth Putnal, Mason Kyle Ray, Caulin Dayne Sheri dan, Tristan Dallas Shiver, Kyle Douglas Smith, Justin Emory Spann, Michael Matthew Ste vens, Leonard Farriew Ward and Mercury James Wynn. On Friday, at senior recogni tion night ( See Page A8 ), the students celebrated their com mitment to learning. ”Dream what you dare to dream, go where you want to go, be what you want to be — live,” an anonymous quote is the class motto. The class color is blue, the class ower the lily and the song “It’s Time.” Parents tradition ally receive a ower from their son or daughter after each has received their diploma in the high school gymnasium Friday. INSIDE Franklin County High School graduates, A7 Senior Recognition Night and Baccalaureate, A8 FCHS from page A1 ST. GEORgG E I sS LAND from page A1 PHOTOs S BY DAVID ADLERST T EIN | The Times At left, Rhonda Lambert casts her eyes on the plaque dedicated in her late husband’s honor. At right is Retired Coast Guard Chief Petty Ofcer Mark Vail. From left are Josh and Karina Hollingsworth singing the National Anthem, County Commissioner Pinki Jackel and Alex Hinson. with the St. George Lighthouse Association. Musical selections from the Franklin County High School Band, directed by Karl Lester, offered stirring and at times somber accompaniment as the gathering commemorated the sacrice of thousands of Ameri can lives, given as the ultimate contribution to the nation’s free dom and endurance. Dennis Barnell, a Navy vet eran who was among the early, dedicated proponents of rebuild ing the lighthouse after it was shattered into pieces by Hurri cane Dennis, introduced the 21cannon salute. Later, he joined fellow Navy vet Fred Stanley, Marine Joe Garrity and John Ficklen III in setting off the guns. Navy veteran Fred Lambert Sr. raised the ag from where it had stood at half-mast since sunrise. He did so in honor of a central theme of the occasion, the dedication of this maritime agpole donated by his late son, Jimmy Lambert, who died in May 2013 after a battle with co lon cancer An avid sailor, boater and sherman, Lambert and his wife, Rhonda, had a house on the island for almost four decades. Friends and family wanted to donate to honor his memory in Lighthouse Park, and a maritime agpole was chosen. Jimmy’s widow was on hand to unveil the plaque at the base of the pole. “He was a patriotic American who loved his country and his ag,” Lambert’s friend Alex Hin son said. “Let this be a symbol of hospitality and friendship.” He said his friend always had “a ready smile and a ready hug. You would not meet a nicer per son; you could not have a better friend.” Hinson said when the Lam berts would arrive at the island, they would put out the ag at their Plantation home, which said to all “We are here; you are welcome; come see us.” Hinson said he hoped the same is now being said to visitors to the island as they arrive at the lighthouse, its centerpiece. “This is a tting tribute,” he said. The Lamberts’ niece and nephew, Josh and Karina Hol lingsworth, sang the National Anthem, followed by an invoca tion from Rev. Themo Patriotis, of the St. George Island United Methodist Church. “The men and women we honor today have shown great love, not just for friends but for strangers,” he said. “For those they never met. We’re praying for those who are alive today. They’re giving their lives right now so that we may pray.” County Commissioner Pinki Jackel followed with the keynote remarks. “We are reminded as those solemn shots rang out of those we have known and loved, those that we have admired and respected, and those that we will never forget making the ultimate sacrice one can make for the preservation of our freedom.” Jackel, whose district in cludes the entire island, outlined a brief history of Memorial Day and of the more than 1 million lives lost on the battleeld in U.S. wars. “Our nation is currently at war, and today we should take the time to say a prayer for our active troops and their families and to thank a veteran for their service to our country and for our freedom.” The commissioner told of her father-in-law, a decorated World War II veteran who received two Purple Hearts and a Silver Star during his service in Europe. She told of his book “The Lucky In fantryman,” which got its name because “he was lucky to have served and lucky to call himself a veteran.” Jackel closed with a thankyou to all who have labored long hours to create and expand a re built lighthouse, to the Lambert family and for everyone’s “won derful display of the importance of family and love for each other and your community.” Retired Coast Guard Chief Petty Ofcer Mark Vail read the poem “My Name is Old Glory,” and the afternoon closed with more selections by the high school band.

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, May 29, 2014 in grade level or better performance of almost 20 percentage points in reading and nine in math, to where both subjects are now at the 53-54 percent level, almost identical to 2011. In the last two years, the ABC School had reached to almost three-quarters of its student body at grade level or better in reading, and almost two-thirds in math. Franklin School is now 6 percentage points behind, at 47 percent at grade level or better in both reading and math. This is considerably better than last year’s math scores, where just 29 percent of third-graders were at grade level or better. In fact, since the FCAT 2.0 was instituted in 2011, the third-grade math scores are 16 percentage points better than they’ve ever been. In reading, the improvement was 14 percentage points better than last year’s 33 percent. The 47 percent of students at pace with their learning is about the same as in 2011, when it was 48 percent. “We were pleased to receive some reports of growth, a direct reflection of teachers teaching the standards required for mastery,” Superintendent Nina Marks said. As the data is studied and the strengths and weaknesses evaluated, decisions on the direction of the pre-K-12 school will be made. “Thank you to the teachers, parents and community volunteers who have been involved with creating a well-rounded education for the students of Franklin County,” she said. ABC Principal Chimene Johnson said she was proud of the hard work of the school’s third-graders and staff. “Student proficiency in reading and math was just below state average. We had several new students in our third grade and both teachers developed intervention plans to meet the needs of all students. This year, schools across the state were initially mandated to implement Common Core standards. Our teachers used Common Core curriculum as well as merging the FCAT 2.0 Florida standards. They did a wonderful job of tracking our student progress through progress monitoring three times a year and analyzing the data to drive their instruction.” Franklin math scores on the rise A breakdown of the data for the 59 Franklin third-graders in mathematics shows that in all ve categories — from the lowest performing 1s to the highest performing 5s — the move was in a positive direction. The largest drop was in the number of 1s, who are students who fail to show any mastery of the test questions and appear to be at least a year behind, if not more, in learning gains. The number of 1s dropped considerably, from 45 down to 19 percent. The growth at level 2s was at 34 percent, 9 percentage points better than last year. At level 3s, which is grade level, it was at 34 percent, 13 points better than last year. Level 4s roughly doubled, from 5 to 10 percent; and Level 5s remained at 3 percent of the third-graders. At ABC, level 1s and level 2s in math both grew, to where 46 percent of the school’s 37 thirdgraders have a level of achievement below passing. Level 3s in math dropped from 37 to 30 percent, while level 4s and 5s were both pretty constant, from 20 to 19 percent of 4s, and 6 to 5 percent of 5s. At ABC, level 5s in reading shrank by a tiny amount, from 11 to 8 percent, while level 4s contracted considerably, from 40 to 25 percent of third-graders. The largest growth was in level 2s, considered behind grade level, which expanded from 9 percent of third-graders to fully one-third. Level 1s also shrank by only a little, from 17 to 14 percent. At Franklin, level 5s in reading were at 20 percent, the lowest that performance level has been since 2011. Level 2s are at 32 percent, almost identical to last year. The percentage of level 3s was at 22 percent, the best it’s been in four years and twice the percentage it was last year, albeit for a smaller number of third-graders, with 16 fewer tested than the 75 in 2013. Level 4s at Franklin went from 21 to 17 percent, while level 5s were at 8 percent, much better than the 1 percent last year. FCAT from page A1 “Dear Heavenly Father, O Holy One, Thank you for this beautiful day. Please bless and protect everyone who is here today. God, you are the commander of heaven’s armies. Lord, I would like to think that more than 1 million men and women who have lost their lives are now in heaven under your command. Lord, please bless and comfort all the families who have lost loved ones in wars. There will always be wars and rumors of wars until our Lord returns to Earth again. “Please bless and protect our servicemen and women who are serving throughout the world due to the war on terrorism. May we now have a moment of silence and honor our veterans who lost their lives defending our nation.” There was a moment of silence for those who have fallen in defense of America and to preserve freedom. Miller then was presented with a plaque commemorating a Lifetime Service Award from the Legion post. It also was announced that Franklin County High School senior Stephan DeVaughn is recipient of the Post’s School Medal Award for History and Patriotism. Legion member Dan Cox offered special thanks to Greg Kristofferson for placing ags at the grave of veterans to mark Memorial Day and Veteran Day The group then adjourned to a covered dish lunch, followed by the retirement of American ags. Normandy and perished there. “These are the champions who helped free a continent,” President Ronald Reagan said in a 1984 dedication ceremony. “These are the heroes who helped end a war.” Mirabella told of other soldiers who gave their lives and were honored by presidents with the Medal of Honor. “We don’t just honor those with the highest medals or even those who participated in the most hellacious re ghts,” he said. “We honor the more than 1 million men and women who lost their lives defending America in wars from the Revolution to the global war on terrorism.” Mirabella told of Pvt. First Class Jesse Givens, who wrote a letter to his 6-year-old daughter Dakota before he left for Iraq, with instructions for his family to open it only if he died there. “Never be afraid to be yourself,” he wrote his daughter. “I will always be there in our park, when you dream, so we can play. I love you, and hope someday you will understand why I didn’t come home. Please be proud of me.” The ceremony featured a joint singing of “God Bless America” and the laying of a wreath at the Three Servicemen Statue Detail, by Navy veteran Frank Cook. APALACHICOLA from page A1 FREEDOM By John Alton Robinson LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The empty chair is a reminder of and memorial to those who gave all ghting for freedom. CARRABELLE from page A1 From the tomb of the Unknown Soldier To the silver-haired crowns of our fathers, From the shores of Tripoli To the Paci c’s pearl-green waters, I wish to give a tribute, A four-starred salute today, For those who fought so bravely For our freedom and American way. We take our rights for granted, But they were earned in blue-red blood And courage beyond the call of duty In France’s cold, wet mud. Beginning with the Revolution Through the Saudi Arabian sands Men have fought and suffered And died on foreign lands. So salute this Memorial Day And many more to come. Through blood and guts and glory, Our freedom has been won. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Chaplain Charles Scott offers a closing prayer. At top is the laying of the wreath at the Three Servicemen Statue Detail.

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A12 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 KI TT EN S! Ju st lo o k at thi s be au ti fu l li tt er of ki tt en s. We ha ve do ze ns of go rg eo us ki tt en s ju st wa it in g to be adop te d. Th ey ha ve be en te st ed va cc in at ed an d sp ay ed an d ne ut er ed Th ey wi ll mak e gr ea t fa mi ly pe ts an d/ or co mp an ion s fo r pe opl e li vin g al one We ha ve re du ce d ou r adop ti on fe e fr om $9 0. 00 to $7 5. 00 du e to th e sh ee r nu mb er s we ar e tr yi ng to hom e. Vo lu nt ee rs ar e de sp er at el y ne ed ed to soc ia li ze al l of ou r do gs an d ca ts We ar e al way s lo o ki ng fo r pe ople wi ll in g to bri ng on e of ou r an im al s in to th ei r hom e to be fo st er ed fo r va ri ou s ne ed s. An yt im e yo u can spa re wo ul d be gr ea tl y ap pr ec ia te d. Ca ll Ka re n at 67 084 17 fo r mor e det ai ls or vi sit th e Fr an kl in Co un ty Hum an e Soc iet y at 24 4 Sta te Road 65 in Ea st po int Yo u ma y lo go n to th e we bsit e at www .f or go tt en pe ts .o rg to se e mor e of ou r adop tab le pe ts Kaci Brooke Harrell, daughter of Dona and Casey Harrell of Eastpoint, celebrated her 4th birthday on Sunday, May 25, with a “Frozen” themed party at her home with family and friends. Maternal grandparents are Connie and DeWitt Polous of Eastpoint. Greatgrandparents are Ruby Dykes and the late GW. Dykes of Apalachicola and Mary and James Polous of Eastpoint. Paternal grandmother is Deneen Crum Harrell of Eastpoint. Great-grandparents are James and Barbara Crum of Eastpoint. Society Special to the Times M.W. Gordon’s new murder mystery, “Gill Net Games,” features Apalachicola and the Gulf Coast both as crime scenes and as ground zero for recent controversial changes to Florida’s gill net ban. Dead bodies entangled in gill net are popping up in the Gulf, and near law professorturnedy shing guide McDuff Brooks’ Montana cabin. Someone is seeking revenge for the passage of the ban, which pits commercial shermen against recreational anglers, Florida Fish and Wildlife, and animal rights activists. The author presumably knows whereof he writes. He is a University of Florida College of Law professor emeritus and a Montana y sherman. Join him at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St. in Apalachicola, for an afternoon of lively conversation and book signing from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, May 31. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A new art exhibit on display at the Plantation Clubhouse features four local artists with distinctively different styles. At an open house Sunday, May 25, art lovers were treated to a glimpse of works by four Franklin County residents who work in a wide variety of media. Each artist was given a wall of the Plantation Room to ll, and the artists more than ful lled the mission. Katherine Neill, occupying the east wall, describes herself as a self-taught artist. A resident of Franklin County since 1990, she paints in watercolor, oil and acrylic, and draws using charcoal and ink. She creates her pieces en plein air. Her paintings on display at the clubhouse include portraits and landscapes. Much of Neill’s work is minimalistic, and her creations have an airy, Impressionistic feel. Subjects on display include Dog Island, East Pass and three haunting winter beach scenes. Neill’s works can also be viewed at the Oystercatcher on U.S. 98 in Apalachicola. On the southern wall are oils by 40-year resident Joyce Estes of Eastpoint., who also has painted silks on display. Her realistic oils include beach scenes in cool inviting colors with sugary sand and huge cloudy skies. Other landscapes are cool and green like “Live Oak” and “Quiet Marsh,” both rendered in oil. Her silks depict local wildlife, plants and landscapes. Estes is the president of Silk Painters International. Her work is also on display at Sea Oats Gallery on St. George Island. On the east wall is a display of sculptures and assemblies by Ken Richardson, who moved to the Plantation from Missouri two years ago. His works are fanciful animals created from junk. Richardson said when he rst began to dabble in art, he sometimes purchased material but eventually resolved to use only found objects. A fearfully large mosquito is built around an old aluminum pitcher. Two charming no seeums are created from a pair of salt and pepper shakers provided by a friend. Several of his sh have wristwatch eyes created from broken wristwatches that once belonged to his late father. Richardson said his father was the inspiration for his style of sculpture. “He always made things from nothing,” he said. His current exhibit is composed of animals fashioned mainly from wood and aluminum. He also experimented with clay, welding and is an accomplished musician. On the north wall hangs a body of work by Lynn Wilson, who has owned a home in Franklin County since 1985 and resides in Apalachicola. Wilson’s works, often done en plein air, are realistic landscapes built around the working waterfront, historic local structures and the natural beauty of the barrier islands, beach and swamp. While she has painted for many years, Wilson recently embraced her artistic ambitions and threw herself into painting full time after selling the Coombs House Inn. She is a founding member of the Apalachicola Pastel Association and founding president of the Artists of Apalachicola. Bunny Ison, chair of the Plantation Arts Committee, said the show would run until Labor Day. She said in planning the show, her goal was to display the work of artists who reside here full-time. The exhibition is open to Plantation homeowners and guests, and visitors renting a home in the Plantation. For security reasons, the Plantation Room remains locked when no event is in progress, but for the duration of the summer art show, it will be opened from 5-7 p.m. Thursdays. A number of works sold during Sunday’s premiere. Ison said all four artists have committed to providing replacements for pieces sold throughout the duration of the exhibit, so the walls of the Plantation Room will remain full the entire summer. KELLEHER TO COMMAND LANARK LEGION POST Happy BIRTHDAY Kaci Harrell turns 4 M.W. GORDON ‘Gill net’ mystery author to sign book THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Plantation summer art focuses on county artists A school of fanciful sh from the exhibit of works by Ken Richardson. Many of Katherine Neill’s paintings, like “December” here, are airy and minimalistic. “Garden Gate” by Lynn Wilson is an inviting landscape. “Beach Path” by Joyce Estes is rendered in painted silk. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times From left, a familiar Apalachicola landmark is painted plein air by Lynn Wilson. “Blue Parrot” by Katherine Neill has an Impressionistic feel. No See’um by Ken Richardson was assembled from discarded metal. Live Oak is an oil painting by Joyce Estes. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times On July 1, Tim Kelleher takes the helm at Camp Gordon Johnston Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village. His training begins June 2. Kelleher achieved the rank of sergeant during his service as a Marine from 1973 to 1979. A resident of Lanark Village, he replaces Commander Tommy Larsen, also of Lanark.

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The Times | A13 Thursday, May 29, 2014 The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion TUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Women’s AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Men’s AA, Closed THURSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion SATURDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur ch -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P. O. Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 >{‹Œ Xt„tq †Œo A†{„tŒŒ 8y’‹qy $" !& et‹t t—q{t r op†’ –yo ?†rŒ r†{„x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '=m o‚ '"% "" # & " # %"# " & R’‹Œt‹ X‹†•{rtr r’‹{„x ‹tx’o‹ qy’‹qy Œt‹•{qtŒ Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{ ~” …—” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Jennifer Rhodes McClain Sunrise: Feb. 6, 1961 Sunset: June 1, 2013 Dear Mama It seems like it was only yesterday that you were here with us and today makes a year that the Lord called you home. There are no words to express how much we LOVE & MISS you & Molly. So today we ask an Angel to give you lots of HUGS & KISSES from your family & friends. So while you’re sleeping, your legacy lives on through your family & friends who knew you the best. Thinking of you on this beautiful day. Love Always, Your family A memorial service for Michel James Amaltano, beloved husband of Deb and beloved father of Taylor, will be Tuesday evening. June 3, 2014. Born July 15, 1962, Michel left us in body on Dec. 8, 2013, but not in spirit or love. There will be a small gathering at Carrabelle Beach on Tuesday at dusk, around 8:30 or 8:45 p.m. Weather permitting, we will be sending sky lanterns to heaven in celebration of Michel and his life. Those who knew and loved him are welcome to attend. Michel James Amaltano Gregory Carl Binkley of Carrabelle passed away Friday, May 16, 2014, along with his wife, Barbara Dean Binkley. Funeral services were Friday afternoon, May 23, at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel in Dothan, Ala. He was born June 11, 1952, in Louisville, Ky. He was preceded in death by his parents, John G. Binkley and Blanche Lois Nair. Survivors include his sister, Sharon (Bill) Lone, Mountville, S.C.; his brothers, James Binkley, S.C., and Ronald (Judy) Binkley, Leavenworth, Ind.; his best friend, Tim Murray; and numerous nieces, nephews and friends. Flowers will be accepted and contributions can be made to The Wounded Warriors Project Association, Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675. Gregory Binkley Barbara Dean Binkley of Carrabelle passed away Friday, May 16, 2014, along with her husband, Gregory Carl Binkley. Funeral services were Friday afternoon, May 23, at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel in Dothan, Ala. She was born March 19, 1957, in Marion, Ala. She was preceded in death by her parents, Royce L. Grant and Marie Skinner Grant; her sister, Helen Harielson, and her grandson Grant Waring Reed. Survivors include her children, Kristy Jenkins Reed and anc, Taylor Barbaree, of Dothan; Henry Hauenstein of Quincy; and David Hauenstein of Bonifay; her grandchildren Jordis and Judson Reed, and Gracelyn Hauenstein; her brothers and sisters, Lamar and Joann Grant of Bonifay, Lisa and Wayne Stephens of Ponce de Leon, Lynn and John Archer of Baker and Tanessa and Ricky Byrd of Ponce de Leon; and numerous nieces, nephews and friends. Flowers will be accepted, or contributions can be made to the American Red Cross. Barbara Binkley Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola would like to invite friends and family to join us on Sunday, June 8, at 11:45 a.m., following our church service, for a memorial reception in memory of Ruby Maddox-Radebaugh. Radebaugh, 92, passed away at her Apalachicola home Saturday afternoon, May 24, 2014. Ruby Maddox-Radebaugh Hope you can join us for lunch this afternoon. This will be the last Thursday lunch until the fall. We will, however, have a Father’s Day lunch on Thursday, June 12, and a lunch on Thursday, July 4. June 7 will be the monthly, Over 50 Dance. All you need to bring is a snack to share, your favorite beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. Jim the DJ will start off at 7 p.m. Both the lunch and dance are at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center in Carrabelle. Put your left foot out and bring it back. Didn’t get to the Legion on Monday. The Memorial Day ceremonies were always moving, and I’m sure this one was, too. Called Nick Dadona, and the picnic lunch at the boat club was very well attended. He said to thank you all again for your support. Did you catch the article last week in the Times about the trip to Washington, D.C.? It was great. Our friends and neighbors, Mary Britz and Don MacLean, had a wonderful time. Congratulations to you both! Got word that Colleen Holden had passed away. She was the woman that made the beautiful porcelain dolls. We were very good friends for many years. Pray for her eternal rest and for strength and comfort for Mike and the family. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember, friends are like stars in the sky. We don’t always see them, but we know they’re there. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. Eula Rochelle I would like to thank the Lord, for his guardian angels for building my ramp for me, where I can go in and out of my house. May God bless you all with love, Eula Rochelle I would like to recognize Franklin County School senior Jessica Shields for the amazing job she did creating and painting the sets for the play “Hairspray” recently presented at Franklin County School. I sincerely regret that her name was inadvertently omitted from the play’s program. Jessica is one of our most talented seniors, and we are so grateful for the time and effort she put into the play. She devoted countless hours painting the backdrops for Mr. Pinky’s Hefty Hideaway and the bedroom scene. Her help meant so much to us. We could not have presented this play without her. With sincere regrets, Patty Creamer Media specialist Franklin County School Obituaries In Loving M emoryEMORY Thursday lunches wrap up today until fall Special to The Times Revival in Eastpoint through Sunday There’ll be faith in action this week in Eastpoint, with a tent revival daily through Sunday, June 1, next to Taylor’s Building Supply, 268 U.S. 98. The theme is “How to Stand in Difcult Times Keeping Your Faith.” Evening services start at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 31, for Youth Night, with hot dogs and drinks served at 5:30 p.m. Sunday morning breakfast will be served at the tent at 8 a.m., with Sunday morning services at 9:30 a.m. Market Days at Messer Pavilion Saturday Carrabelle United Methodist Church and “God’s Ministry” for the needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 31, at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink. Music will be provided by local talent. Thank you all for visiting us at the Riverfront Festival last month. We are looking forward to seeing you again. Remember, God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing. Healthy Start Baby Shower Tuesday Healthy Start’s sixth annual Baby Shower will be at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, at The Centennial Building, 300 Allen Memorial Way in Port St. Joe. We invite all Franklin and Gulf County pregnant women, new parents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for a special evening. There will be information stations on various topics such as car seat safety, shaken baby, childbirth, safe sleep, community resources and vendors offering merchandise for purchase. Free admission, plus food, fun, games and lots of fabulous door prizes! Special games for Dads! For more information, call 800-8959506, ext. 100. Faith B riefsRIEFS AA Meeting S cheduCHEDU L eE Cards of T hanHAN K sS Jessica Shields LanarLANAR K newsNEWS Jim Welsh Faith

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m A colony of rare plants is being marked for preservation by Duke Energy. A routine environmental survey along the Duke Power transmission lines between Eastpoint and Carrabelle has revealed something highly unusual. Telephus spurge, Euphorbia telephiodes, isn’t much to look at but it is quite rare. This relative of familiar plants like poinsettia, crown of thorns, and pencil cactus, is found only in Bay, Gulf and Franklin Counties within 4 miles of the Gulf of Mexico. Biologists Annie Doyle and Lee Walton of Flatwoods Consulting Group, an environmental consulting rm employed by the energy giant, were surveying along transmission lines in Gulf and Franklin Counties prior to pole replacement when they discovered a colony containing about 1,500 of the rare spurge plants. Walton said Dr. Vivian Negrn-Ortiz, at the Panama City of ce of US Fish and Wildlife (USFW), was excited about the discovery. “It is an important nd because telephus spurge habitat is usually in con ict with development, so management they will be providing is important,” she said. Negrn-Ortiz, who is the recovery lead for 10 listed plant species in the Panhandle, has written extensively of telephus spurge. She said the plant is unusual in that it exhibits tremendous genetic variation, which might indicate it was once common in its current range. Surveys conducted between 1988 and 2007 indicate fewer than 20,000 remain. Telephus spurge is protected under Florida law. It is illegal to dig, damage, transport or sell this perennial herb, which the USFW lists as a threatened species. Telephus spurge is threatened due to development and wild re suppression. The plant thrives in disturbed areas like power line easements and in pine forest with an open canopy. Populations tend to appear after a wild re or a disturbance like mowing, and dwindle as taller plants increase in number. The newly discovered group of plants is located in an area of scrub adjacent to a wetland. Walton and Doyle said this is not the only unknown colony of telephus spurge they have found during their power easement survey, but is by far the largest, and possibly the second largest known colony in existence. Populations are also known to exist in Box R. The spurge was rst described by famed Apalachicola botanist Alvan Chapman in 1860. It has a male and female form and a large tuberous root that allows it to persist in times of drought. It can grow to be 12 inches tall. It has several stems and waxy foliage with cuplike reddish-green owers that appear from April through August. Negrn-Ortiz praised Duke Power for its cooperative attitude in managing the rare plant. According to a ve-year status review for telephus spurge prepared by Negron-Ortiz, the species has a high potential for recovery. But in a telephone interview, she said global climate change could negatively affect telephus spurge because of its limited range. Wayne Richardson, environmental specialist for Duke Power, said the area would be marked with cardboard signs until metal signs can be installed. He said measures would be taken to protect the plants from routine mowing. Negrn-Ortiz said the power easement is an ideal area for managing the rare plant since there is no tree canopy. Richardson said the colony would be monitored for two years after the new poles are installed. Negrn-Ortiz said a new survey of known populations of telephus spurge is planned for next year. Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TIDE TA BLES MONTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Ma y 29 81 74 30 % Fr i, Ma y 30 81 72 30 % Sa t, Ma y 31 83 74 30 % Sun, June 1 82 75 30 % Mo n, June 2 81 74 30 % Tu es June 3 82 74 30 % We d, June 4 82 75 10 % JOE’S LA WN CA RE IF IT’S IN YO UR YA RD LET JOE TA KE CA RE OF IT • FULL LA WN SERV ICES • TREE TRIMM ING AND REMOV AL • ALSO CLEA NG UTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANT ING AND BEDDIN G AVA ILAB LE CALL JOE @8 50-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM www.apalachtimes.com O UTDOORS Page 14 Beginning in late April, intrepid wild ower enthusiasts can track down threadleaf sundew in our area and this rare beauty is well worth the effort needed to nd it. Threadleaf sundew or Drosera liformis is also commonly known as dew-thread. Some consider the variety found in Florida to be a separated species, D. Tracyi Other experts believe all threadlead sundews are a single species and this is supported by the fact that widely separated populations can interbreed and produce fertile offspring. This plant occurs naturally only in wetlands. While populations are found from Nova Scotia south to Florida and along the state’s coastal plain, it is considered imperiled throughout its range. It is listed as an endangered species in Florida and is believed extinct in Rhode Island. Like its small common cousin the sundew, threadleaf sundew is a carnivore. During the winter, the foliage shrinks back to a at rosette but when warm weather arrives, new leaves appear. The leaves are stem-like and unroll like the ddleheads of ferns. They are covered in tentacles coated with mucilage that ensnare insects, which are then digested. Protein obtained from feeding is stored in large roots. The leaves may be green or red and are especially beautiful when backlit, as the mucilage glistens like crystal. In our area threadleaf sundew can ower from May through October. The ve-petaled owers are pink to pale lavender and borne on tall lea ess stems. Like most sundews, this plant is easily propagated from leaf cuttings. It can be purchased from many sources but remember, it is illegal to collect this plant in the wild. To root leaf cuttings, oat them in distilled water in a small jar wrapped in plastic. These plants prefer full sun and nutrient-free sandy soil. Never fertilize carnivorous plants. Threadleaf sundew a rare beauty BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Measures taken to protect rare plant SPONSORED BY As we enter the last week of May, most schools will be letting out for the summer and the crowds of anglers will soon arrive. Fishing is great now from the surf and from shore as well. Good inshore species such as trout and red fish are returning in good numbers to the head of St. Joe Bay. Surf fishing on the Cape has been producing great pompano and whiting catches with the occasional shark in the mix. State water red snapper opened last weekend to great success and many anglers took advantage of the good weather to bring in some great fish. Our state season is short this year, so get out when can.MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are loaded with red snapper and most are higher in the water than you think, so lighten up your tackle and bring plenty of chum. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Biologists Annie Doyle, left, and Lee Walton, center, discovered the colony of spurge. They are contractors who work closely with Wayne Richardson, right, an environmental specialist for Duke Energy. Below is a Telephus spurge.

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CARRABELLE • A A PALAc C HIc C OLA S PORTs S www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, May 29, 2014 A Section \› M [ ›9‹‹ ; }› \›• ›> W •› \› M Ž—D }} •c ‚• Œ›… M U~” s‘‘Š…~— ŽŠ¢ š —…Ž‚Š~”~z~…‘š ’œsŠ…¢…Ž‚ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ 8 ‘”‹ ~~ …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| sŽ| …ŽzŠœ|~| …Ž š„~ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ ~’œsŠ š s ” ‘œ”z„s—~—  s=’’’ ” ‹”~‡ T ‹Žš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| Ž ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ …ŽzŠœ|…Ž‚ ”~Šsš~| ‘”‹ ~~: sŽ| ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš— s”~ ”~’œ…”~| ~’œsŠ š ‡s1b  …Ž…š…sŠ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ s‹œŽš œŽš…Š ‘”‹ …— ‘s…| …Ž œŠŠ‡ \„~ ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš …ŠŠ w~ ”œŽ|~| š š„~ Ž~¡š „…‚„~—š „Š~ |ŠŠs” sŽ| ‹s¢ w~ „…‚„~” š„sŽ š„~ ‹…Ž…‹œ‹ ‘s¢‹~Žš š„sš œŠ| w~ ”~’œ…”~| … š„~ ‘œ”z„s—~ s— s ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~‡ Z~‚œŠs” szzœŽš š~”‹— s‘‘Š¢ š ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ C” Ž~ szzœŽš—4 Vœ”z„s—~ 8VZ …— ‡--bq Q…Ž…‹œ‹ QŽš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š <„s”‚~ …— ‡ A¡…—š…Ž‚ zs”|„Š|~”— —„œŠ| —~~ š„~…” z”~|…š zs”| s‚”~~‹~Žš ” š„~…” s‘‘Š…zswŠ~ š~”‹—‡ [œw‡~zš š z”~|…š s‘‘”sŠ‡ Special to The Times Two teams from Wewahitch ka, populated by players from Franklin County, were the big winners in the co-ed softball tournament played at DW Wil son Field on May 17. Sis teams took part, with all proceeds going to help send Dixie Youth League teams to state tournaments. Participating were the Sharks, sponsored by Shaun Donahoe Real Estate; the Panthers, spon sored by Carrabelle Christian Center; Jerry’s Logging from Wewa; Taunton’s Family, from Wewa; Liberty County; and the Finch team. The winners, shown at top, were Jerry’s Logging, with play ers, from left, Leigh Wray, Jerry Taunton Kim McMillion, Lloyd Alford, Amy Boone, Jamie Par rish, Timmy Poloronis, Caleb Kembro, Steve Bass, Tyler Polo ronis, Jodie Parrish, Willie Mc Nair and David Barber. The runners-up, shown at bottom, were Taunton’s of Wewa, and featured, from left, Jeremy Summers, Kim Johnson, Hunter Hysmith, Ashleigh Price, Jerry Taunton, Wesley Taunton, Mary Taunton Luke Taunton, Tim Taunton and Jay Shiver. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com EASTPOINT — By and large, Franklin County High School coach Aaron York was pleased with his team’s play in the spring jamboree May 20. That is, until the last 3:30 in the game, when a fum ble, and a pair of intercep tions, led to 19 unanswered points, and a 31-14 Temple Christian victory over the Seahawks. In all, the Soldiers picked off ve of sophomore quarterback Matt Murray’s passes, and scooped up a pair of fumbles, to come back from a 14-0 decit ear ly in the second quarter. “We always want some body to throw the ball,” said Billy Reese, coach of the Class 2A Jackson ville school for the past six years. “Our bread-and-but ter is pass defense.” Reese had eighth grade quarterback Reynard Grif n briey open the game briey in place of sopho more starting quarterback Aaron Cabrera-Steel, but that led to a fumble and interception that the Se ahawks were able to capi talize on. After back-to-back catches by junior wide receiver Cole Wheeler, freshman running back Marshall Sweet was able to run it in from the 2 with 2:10 left in the rst quarter. Sophomore kicker Walker DeVaughn booted the extra point for a 7-0 lead. About three minutes lat er, Sweet ran it in from the 24–yard line, and sopho more kicker Josue Baraho na booted the extra point, for a 14-0 lead. With 7:06 left in the half, Temple Christian eighth grader Jahveon Nicholson intercepted the ball and ran it into Seahawk terri tory. Three plays later, with 5:00 left, Cabrera-Steele hit Nicholson with a 9-yard pass and the Solders were on the scoreboard. With 38 seconds left in the half, Nicholson again picked off a Murray pass, and this time CabreraSteele followed suit by running the ball in from 12 yards out. The Seahawks kept their lead at 14-12 through the entire third quarter, and most of the fourth be fore sophomore fullback Trenton Lee coughed up the ball on a fourth-and-one dive, with 3:30 left to play. About two minutes later, Cabrera-Steele hit junior Isaiah Carpenter on a short curl for a 25-yard touch down score to go ahead 18-14. Ten seconds later, Joe Kapral picked off a pass at the Seahawk 35 yard line, and galloped in for a 24-14 bulge. Carpenter ended the scoring with a pick-6 in from the 40-yard-line, fol lowed by a Nicholson kick, for a 31-14 score. “We turned the ball over way too much,” said York, who dressed 41 players for the spring outing. “We just can’t turn the ball over and be successful.” SEAHAWK FOOTBALL SCHEDULE V a A R sitSIT Y 2014 Friday, Aug. 22 Wewahitchka (Fall Classic) Away 8 Friday, Aug. 29 Evangelical Christian Academy (Fort Meyers) Away 7 Friday, Sept. 5 Red Level High School, Alabama Home 7 Friday, Sept. 12 Sneads Home 8 Friday, Sept. 19 Liberty (District) Away 7:30 Friday, Sept. 26 Aucilla Christian Away 7:30 Friday, Oct. 3 Port St. Joe (District) Home 7:30 Friday, Oct. 10 Open Friday, Oct.17 West Gadsden (District) Homecoming Home 7:30 Thursday, Oct. 30 Wewa (Seafood Festival) Home 7:30 Friday, Nov. 7 Vernon Away 8 Friday, Nov. 14 1st Round State Playoffs TBA P hotos HOTOS couCOU R tes TES Y ofOF K i I M J ohnson OHNSON | Special to The Times Wewa teams win co-ed tourney Page 15 LEFT: Seahawk sophomore linebacker Jake Robinson tackles Soldier quarterback Aaron Cabrera-Steel. RIGHT: Seahawk sophomore kicker Walker DeVaughn kicks an extra point. Turnovers plague Hawks in spring game P hotos HOTOS bB Y DAVID ADLER R STEIN | The Times Seahawk sophomore quarterback Matt Murray prepares a handoff.

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A16 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 Local By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m This weekend, Franklin County was visited by 32 energetic activists. For the third consecutive year, Bike and Build wheeled in on US 98 and made an overnight stop at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola. Sister Jeanne Drea said she received the rst inquiry from the group by telephone in 2011. “They called and asked, ‘Do you have showers?’ and I said ‘No, but we have a hose,’” she said. On Sunday evening, the cyclists were treated to a lowcountry boil for supper and slept on mats on the oor of the parish hall. Since 2003, Bike and Build has contributed around $5 million to housing groups to fund affordable housing projects planned and executed by almost 1,500 young adults. Riders alternate days of riding and construction. Riders on the southern route start in Jacksonville and wind up in Monterey, California. On travel days, the group bikes around 60 miles. The bikers traveled from here to Panama City and then to Defuniak Springs. The group will be on the road for two-and-a-half months. Beginning in 2006, following Hurricane Katrina, the southern route was moved to skirt the Gulf Coast from the Panhandle to New Orleans and build days have focused on restoring communities damaged by the 2005 storm. The group will spend June 2 through 7 doing construction in New Orleans, and then travel to Baton Rouge where they will spend another day working as builders before taking off for North Texas. Riders are accompanied by a support van but they still travel light. Each biker has a hydration pack to make sure they have plenty to drink in hot weather. They carry oor mats for sleeping and quick drying microber towels. Many of the riders also carry video cameras on their handlebars. Although they have days off built into the trip, they stop riding only for dangerous weather like lightning. Participants need not have previous building or cycling experience, or even a bicycle; Bike and Build provides the bicycle, which participants are allowed to keep upon completion of the trip. Bicycles are manufactured by Giant Bikes, USA of Newbury Park, California and are provided to Bike and Build at a discount. Riders are required to complete 10 hours of  “sweat equity”  working with affordable housing groups before beginning the trip, and are required to ride at least 500 miles in training before their summer begins. Group leader Gregory Powell said the group works closely with Habitat for Humanity. Each group of riders has four team leaders. For most participants, who stopped here, this was their rst crosscountry ride. Leaders arrange for lodgings on the trip and take turns driving the support vehicle. There were 32 cyclists ranging in age from 18 to 25 in the group that biked through the county this year. The majority of Bike and Build participants are college students. Each rider must earn at least $4,500 to win the right to participate in a cross-country adventure. Participants come from 47 states and Canada. Part of the money is used to support construction projects during the trip and the rest is donated to affordable housing projects chosen by the riders. Each rider can send $500 to the project or community of their choice. According to Wikipedia, Bike and Build was spun off from the  Yale  Habitat Bicycle Challenge, and was founded by Marc Bush, a Yale alumnus. He was also the director of Bike and Build from 2003-05. Chris Webber, a trip leader on the northern U.S. route in 2005, was hired as Bike and Build’s rst program director in 2006. He was hit and killed in a pedestrian accident in New York City in March 2007. Bike and Build maintains a memorial fund in his honor, and raises money for the fund with an alumni-only ride that takes place in Florida each winter. To learn more about Bike and Build visit http:// bikeandbuild.org/cms/ Activists ride for affordable housing LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Bike and Build riders setting off at 8:30 a.m. on Memorial Day are, from left, Gaurang Garg, Wyandotte, Mich.; Kristin Heinrich, Andover, Mass; Morgan Durand, Charlotte, N.C.; Molly McLaughlin, Kalamazoo, Mich.; Elle Martin, Fort Worth, Texas; and Dan Kaminsky, Brooklyn, N.Y. Special to The Times Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf is expanding its services once again in Franklin County. Beginning Wednesday, June 4, Sacred Heart Rehabilitation will accept patients for physical and occupational therapy in Apalachicola. Speech therapy will be added in the coming weeks. The clinic will offer assessment and treatment of orthopedic, neurologic and movement disorders caused by pain, illness, as well as speech and language disorders. Patients will be treated one-on-one by a licensed therapist. Staff at Sacred Heart Rehabilitation in Apalachicola will include physical therapists Joe Saniesteban, PhD, and Anne Kenny for physical therapy services. Anne and Joe are current residents of Apalachicola and are excited to be serving the Franklin County area. Licensed occupational therapist Chrystal Cox, MS, will be providing occupational therapy. She currently resides in Port St. Joe with her husband, Phil. If you are interested in these services, you may visit the new location at 76 Market Street or call 3701780 for more information. You may also ask your doctor for a referral and have it faxed to 370-1781. Special to the Times This year continues to be a big year for author Michael Lister. In 2014, he’s celebrating his 20th anniversary as a writer with the re lease of his third Jimmy “Soldier” Ri ley noir novel, “The Big Hello.” This follows 2011’s “The Big Goodbye” and 2013’s “The Big Beyond.” “The Big Hello” is the conclusion of the thrilling noir trilogy set in the Panhandle of the 1940s. Find out Soldier and Lauren’s fate in the thrilling conclusion to Lister’s landmark “Big” noir series. Walk the mean streets of wartime Panama City with Jimmy “Soldier” Riley, a wound ed, woman-haunted knight errant in Lister’s resonant new noir series Publisher’s Weekly calls “a promising private detective series set in 1940s Florida,” and Library Journal says “peppered with snappy dialog, this hard-boiled mystery by award winner Lister is a swell read.” John Dufresne said Lister “has the world of Florida Panhandle noir all to himself. Tough, violent, and hard-boiled, this novel of obsession and suspense will remind you of Ray mond Chandler, Graham Greene, and why you started reading crime novels in the rst place.” Lister plans to celebrate the re lease of “The Big Hello” with a book release reception and signing at No Name Caf, at 306 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. this Sat urday, May 31. Lister will read from the book and sign copies. Then, the following weekend, the novel will come alive in the form of an old-time radio show on stage in front of an audience. Performances will be 7 p.m. June 6 and 7 at Sarzin Hall, Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Tickets can be ordered at MichaelLister.com or purchased at the No Name signing. Lister said it has been an amaz ing experience to see “The Big Hel lo” come off the page and onto the stage. Some of the most rewarding and interesting projects he’s been involved with in recent years have been GCSC stage adaptations of his novels “Double Exposure” and “The Big Goodbye.” “I love that these are presenta tions of the book more than just typi cal stage adaptations, which means the audience doesn’t lose anything from the books,” Lister said. “Our ap proach with all three is an enhanced experience of the book. But it’s even more so this time, since we’re do ing the play as an old-time ’40s radio show on the stage.” “Shakespeare wrote that ‘the play is the thing,’ but for me the book is the thing,” Lister said. “It’s all about the book — bringing the book to life for the audience, who I still view as ‘readers,’ and collaborating with the cast and crew to give the audience the best ‘reading’ experience possible.” “The Big Hello” stars for the sec ond time Allen Walker as the main character, private detective Jimmy “Soldier” Riley. Walker originally played Riley in GCSC’s production of “The Big Goodbye,” and has per formed all three audio books in the series. Each $20 ticket to the live perfor mance includes a copy of the new novel. Lister’s ultimate goal with the play is to encourage people to read the book. “In the play we will be stopping short of presenting the entire book so that the audience can read the nal few chapters on their own — but with the voices of the actors and the expe rience of the play still fresh in their minds,” Lister said. “It’s going to be a unique and fascinating experience.” SPECial IAL T o O THE TiTI MEs S Bob and Rhonda Parker of Lanark Village are trying to locate Jack, a black-and-white rat terrier that disappeared on Sunday, May 25. Jack was last seen near Oak Street west of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. He was wearing an American ag collar. If you have information about Jack, please call 464-8809 or 929-2370. Lister celebrates release of ‘The Big Hello’ Sacred Heart expands R aA T TE rriRRI E rR losLOS T iI N L aA N arAR K

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Local The Times | A17 Thursday, May 29, 2014 By John Hentz Special to the Times (Editor’s note: This is the second of a series on the memories of the Apalachicola River by the late Panama City native John Hentz. These were transcribed by Beverly Mount Douds.) PAGE 5 (South is Bloody Bluff – North is Fort Gadsden Creek, near Smith Creek) At mile 18 site of the trading post owned the English rm of Panton & Leslie and Etc. A large chain, later taken over by Forbes. The had 1200 cows here at one time. In the early history of Florida, there was a frontier trading post on the East Bank of the river at about mile marker #18, known as Prepress Bluff. One time the trading company had over 1200 cattle here. Part of the land credit to Panton, Leslie and company, a British Trading Post by the Indians in payment in debts owed by the Indians. It was called the Forbes Purchase and was as far as St. Marks. Steamboat “Cuba” snagged and sank 3miles above Bloody Bluff in March 1839, it was a side wheeler. PAGE 6 (Heading north is Owl Creek, entering Liberty County. South was Ft. Gadsden State Park, Forbes Island, and Harding Landing) Willis Landing on the upper Brothers with paved access out to Hwy 71. I have shed this area for many years. There is one BIG Gator that lives in the upper end of this swift water. The upper part of Brickyard-cut off slough next to the Apalachicola River was stopped up with logs and known as “Log Jam”. It was not accessible for many years until the U.S. Engineers cleared it out. One night back in 1940 before the road was paved from Willis Landing on the Brother’s out to Hwy 71, a friend of mine was coming out from Willis Landing and was meeting a car. Before they met the other car came to a curve in the road and ran across the ditch and into the woods and hit a tree. My friend stopped his car and ran out and hollered, “my friend, what happened”? By that time the man had gotten out of his car and was staggering around and he says “I stopped up there at that lling station and asked the man which way to Willis Landing” and he says, “you see this here straight road, and it went straight. In Spanish Florida, Fort Gadsden was built by the British on Spanish about 1814. It harbored runaway Negro slaves and hostile Indians and was known as a Negro Fort. It was from July 27, 1816 in orders from Andrew Jackson. There were 320 people in the fort at the time and 270 of them were killed and most of them wounded. The fort was later rebuilt by Capt. James Gadsden and named for him. He was General Jackson’s engineer, it was rebuilt in 1817. North on Owl Creek is partly Franklin County and partly Liberty County. It’s accessible by road on the Liberty County side and has a public camp and boat ramp. I’ve seen some awful big gators on this creek. PAGE 7 (North is Kennedy Creek, Hentz, Simmons and Larkins Landings) (South of the page is Owl Creek in Franklin/ Liberty County). In 1846 the steamboat “Oconie” sunk at the west bank of the river about 150/200 yards near Brushy Creek. It collided with the steamboat “Osceola”. The old steamboat boiler and pistons are on display at Fort Gadsden State Park and are probably off the “Oconie” instead of the train as stated on the sign. In the 1800s Grandma Kelley saw one of the Hathcocks kill a man on deck of the steamboat here with a hatchet near Brushy and Neal’s Landing in Liberty County. When Tom Scott was killed, he had taken my father’s place as head of a Timber cutting crew for Cypress Lumber Company in Apalachicola. He was shot from the bushes at his camp one night. The case was not salved. PAGE 8 (North is mile marker 30, near Camp House, between the Chipola Cut/off and Apalachicola Rivers. South is Kennedy Creek at Upper Elbow). The William Hentz family lived for more than 20 years on the upper Reaches of Kennedy. They moved from here in 1889 when he was 16 years old. Battle Bend, the U S Engineers cut out this bend and stopped it up. (Middle of the page/map is Camp House at mile marker #28. There used to be a wharf here and a lot of turbulence. (Left side the river is now in Gulf County, and the right side is in Liberty, just at where the Brothers River begins).(Also known as Three Rivers. That includes Brothers, Chipola, and Apalachicola Rivers) Heading north near Douglas Landing……Before the Chipola Cut/off was dug in 1916 steamboats serving the area up down river including Wewa, & Vacincty had to turn around and go back down to the Junction. Of the Chipola and Apalach rivers to proceed up the Apalachicola River. Digging the Chipola Cut/off was a mighty big aid to the steamboat men. The Chipola Cut/off is mighty0000000000000000 crooked so I suspect there was a slough that ran through the cut and the cut/off fall _____ ______ it? PAGE 9 (North, Camp House, near mile marker #33. Left side of river shows Upper Piney Reach Dikes). The swiftest areas on the river is at Double Points. (Middle of page on Liberty County side.) The 3 rd steamboat “Chipola” was built in Apalachicola in 1911. It was snagged and lost in the Chipola River in 1923. I remember this boat. In the early 1950s, my father John Hentz Sr., nephew Jimmy Carmore (?) John L. Hentz, my son and I camped on the east of the river. I hunted the Liberty County side, the river was high and Jimmy got lost in the back water and almost froze to death, “Big Piney Reach” called “Lower Piney Reach” today used to be considered the swiftest part of the river. Back in logging days people had to paddle their boats up and down it. My father said once he heard an old Negro logging hand, swear under oath that it was 2 miles down river and four miles up the river. This happened in Federal Court. PAGE 10 Top left side of page is the Gulf County side, mile marker 38. In the year 1886 on May 2nd, the steamboat Lee was lost in Moccasin slough. It was a stern wheeler, 121 ft. long, 21 ft wide. I don’t see how it got in there, that slough must have been a lot larger, back then than it is today. The steamboat Elizabeth a paddle wheeler was built in 1842 in Marietta, Ohio, it sunk about 200 yards above Styx. My people and the men that worked with them used to run logs through the Virginia Cut. Note: written in the middle of the map at Judges Camp and River Styx under Louis Bend on Moccasin Slough. In the 1950s Judge Mercer Spear and I saw 13 wild turkeys around 1 p.m. in the day How in the world did the steamboat Bertha Lee get in here? (on the right side of the river near River Styx). On Jan 4 th 1844, the steamboat Fanny Elssler burned at mile marker #35 in the narrows. The re started in the wood supply. She was run ashore, and all the people escaped. My Grandfathers’ family build on the upper end of Kennedy Creek until the year 1889. River Styx, this was Bill Larkins and family’s stamping grounds. This area is known as “The Briar Patch”, it’s bounded on the east by Kennedy Creek and on the south by Sheppard Slough. Sheppard’s Lake and River Styx and on the west by a River Swamp. PAGE 11 Top of the page is Iola Landing, mile marker #45, bottom (south) is Gator Slough and Lanier Apiary, near mile marker #39. (right side rst) In the 1800 there was a post ofce and hotel here at Iola, in 1837 a railroad was built from St. Joe to here a distance of 28 miles. It was abandoned about 1839/40. The 2 nd steamboat Chipola was built here in 1886, it was a stern wheeler. The Chipola Cut-off was completed in 1916 In the year 1899 on June 29, the steamboat Apalachee, a stern wheeler was snagged in the Chipola-Cut-off and at last, one killed. The John W. Callahan Jr. struck a snag about 2 miles south of Wewahitchka and was sunk. One life was lost, and the Captain was Roy Connell, this was on 3/25/23, if so, it was raised because it was still in operation in 1927. Lucille White says it was 1923 when the Callahan Jr. cut her father’s launch in two at the Bristol Landing. People used to tell me that they could see the wreckage of the Callahan until a few years ago. In 1841 the term ??? of the railroad Iola was described as located upon a beautiful bluff of the Apalachicola River (m#45) connected with the steamer running Tri-weekly. Mr. Davidson is the post master and overseer of a ne orange grove as did S.S. Alderman, J.W. Keyes, and J.A. Donaldson. It was the site of a friendly Indians Settlement in 1823 occupied by John Blount. He was a friend and guide of General Andy Jackson. He later moved to Blountstown. The U.S. post ofce at Iola See MEMORIES A18 FLORIDA MM EMORY PROJECTSteamboat Chipola moored at Iola in 1922. The River Styx. M E mM ORIES OF THE Apalachicola River Nor th Fl ori da Me di ca l Ce nt e rs Inc MEDI CAL CENTE R E as tp oint Ac cep ti ng mo st in su ra nc e (in cl udin g Ca pi ta l He al th Pl an ), Me dic ar e, Me dic ai d, an d sl idin g fe e av ai la bl e to qu al if yi ng pa ti en ts as tp oi nt Me dic al Ce nt er wo ul d li ke to ce le br at e Sh ei la Al len, ARNP fo r he r ye ar s in Fr an kl in Co un ty pro vi din g he al th ca re to th e co mm uni ty on be ha lf of No rt h Flo ri da Me dic al Ce nt er s. Pl ea se fe el fr ee to st op by an d pr ov ide Ms. Al len yo ur we ll wi she s as she em br aces a ne w ch all en ge wi th In di an He al th Se rv ices to im pr ov e th e he al th of Na ti ve Am er ic an s. Al th oug h Eas tp oi nt Me di ca l Ce nt er wi ll ha ve ch an ge s, hi gh qu al it y he al th ca re at Eas tp oi nt Me di ca l Ce nt er wi ll co nt in ue An n Ru bi n, PA an d An ge l Co rt es, MD wi ll be av ai la bl e fo r he al th ca re se rv ices at Ea st po in t Me dic al Ce nt er in cl udin g we ll wo me n’ s se rv ices. To sc he du le an ap po in tm en t, pl ea se ca ll 850-670-8585. > ST JOS EP H BA Y GO LF CL UB SP EC IAL S JUN IOR GO LFE RS (1 7 AND UN DE R) PL AY FR EE WI TH AN AD UL T PA YI NG GO LF ER FR ANKL IN & GU LF CO UN TI ES ON LY SI NG LE AND FA MI LY ME MBE RS HI PS NO IN ITI AT ION FE E & FI RS T MO NTH DU ES FR EE WI TH A 12 MON TH CO MMI TM EN T (M US T PA Y BA LA NC E BY CA SH CH EC K, OR CR ED IT CA RD AT TI ME OF SI GN UP ) CA LL TH E PR O SH OP TO DA Y FO R MO R E INF ORM AT ION OR ST OP BY 850 -2 27 -1 75 1. CA LL TH E PR O SH OP FO R IN FO RM AT ION ON FR EE GO LF LE SS ON S FO R C HIL DR EN EA CH FR ID AY IN JUN E. 70 0 CO UN TR Y CL UB RO AD PO RT ST JO E, FL 32 456

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Local A18 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 was established in 1838, and was discontinued in 1845. The site of Iola was originally owned by the Kentucky Deaf and Dumb Asylum. PAGE 12 North (top of the page) is Porter Landing in Calhoun County. During the 1980s on a Sunday afternoon, a boy named Ronnie Taylor struck something and was throw from his boat and drowned at upper end of Porter Reach. A big alligator lays out here on the west bank of the river at the lower end of this slough (mile marker #47). South (bottom of page) at mile marker #46 is the road to Iola Landing and the right side of the river is in Liberty County, also the Florida River is below Green Back Lake. One early Monday morning in October 1920, my father John Hentz Sr. and his cousin Will Durham and I came down to the old Lindsey place on the Florida River to go hunting and shing. We intended to go to Green Back Lake but got lost and wound up on Dog Slough. (top right side of page, on the Liberty County side) We killed 2 turkeys and caught all the sh we could carry. I was only nine years old at the time. PAGE 13 North is Coons Landing (mile marker #55) left side of river is Calhoun County, right side is Liberty. South is Dog Slough, Queen City Lake, and Dick’s Point. The steamboat Queen City was one of the most -----fun?-boats that ran the river. It operated on the river for many years. It must have sunk here on Queen City Point, but I have not found a record of it. If it sank here it had to have been raised and put back into service. The records said that it was built in Columbus and dismantled there. About the year 1900 Charles B. Wingate was one of the pilots on the Queen City One cold morning about 1950, I shot a squirrel on the west bank of Queen city Lake and the biggest buck I ever saw jumped in the lake right behind me and was all the way across the middle of the lake splashing water at least 40 feet in every direction. The lake was about belly deep on him. I just stood there with my little shot in my gun and watched him go. That was some sight with the sun glistering off the water. (Middle of the map/page at mile marker #52 is Equiloxic, Liberty Co. side). I have hunted this Equiloxic Creek and Florida River swamp all my life. I have memories of hunting and shing trips in the area. (Red Hill and Double Bridges founded listed here. When Capt. Wingate blew that whistle it scared those Indians to death. Some ran to the deck and jumped in the river, and all that could ran down the gang plank. PAGE 15 North is Lundy Lake (right side of river) at mile marker #65. Calhoun County is on the left side. William Augustus Bowles was an Indian Agent, he went back to the Bahamas before Andrew Jackson came to this area, he was Lucky. In the year 1839 on May 15 th or 20 th the Creek Indians attacked the settlement of Roberts at Stiffnulgee and John and Nathan Smith home at Rico’s Bluff. At Stiffnulgee the Indians burned the Roberts home and killed a little boy. Robert’s was wounded but he his wife, and a man named Aldrich and four children escaped. At the Smiths’ home at Rico’s Bluff, Smith (Nathan), three children, a Mrs. Richards and her ve children and a man named White were all murdered. Smith, his wife, another woman, and two men escaped. Some 15 of the refugees came down river on the mail boat Commerce. They saw Indians on the bank of the river when the Commerce threaded through the narrows seven miles north of Fort Gadsden. (South at mile marker #60 is Muscogee Landing on the Liberty County side) When I was a little boy m father and I cut board timber out of this area. Here at Muscogee Bluff in the early 1800’s, William Augustus Bowles, an English trader and adventurer tried to create an independent “Indian State”. He appeared to have the unofcial approval of the British. It was supposed to be an independent sovengin state with him at the head of it. His adventure failed. (Estiffanulga Landing, between mile marker #63 & 64). This bluff is between 30 to 40 feet high, it is between Apalachicola and Bristol. There used to be a big turpentine operation here. It had several different operators over the years, I remember Mr. Reddish, and Mr. Mizell. One night, in the 1920’s Claude Bateman, my father, and I went cat shing with ___? On the outside of the lake, today very little water goes down it, since the U.S. Engineers cut out the bend in the river at Point Poloway and stopped it up. PAGE 16 North, is Bakers Landing (mile marker # 70). On May 11, 1838, the steamboat Irwinton was on the way down river with 200 bales of cotton when it caught are. All but 50 bales were thrown overboard. It sank in 13 feet of water and was later raised and ran the river for many more years. This happened a few miles south of Blountstown. The crew and passengers got ashore safely and were carried home by the Commerce. This happened at Points Poloway. In the early days the Johnson family had a steamboat Landing here at Points Poloway. (right side of river (Liberty Co. side) on the left is Outside Lake, to your upper right is another little lake, unnamed. This must be the Johnson sh lake. It was one of my favorite shing holes, when I was a little boy. Sometime about the year 1919, Mr. Theo Ford accidentally shot his hand off with a shotgun here at Point Poloway. His father in-law, Jule Michaux was with him at the time. They had to go home in a horse and wagon. Mr. Tom Johnson butcher beef and sent it to Apalachicola on the steamboat. He had a “catch dog” that went with him all the time. Once Mr. Johnson met the boat at the landing and got off of it and went home, but the dog stayed on the boat and went to Apalachicola. He caught the boat on it’s return trip and when home. The boat crew put a sign in his collar that said “I am Tom Johnson’s dog, who’s dog are you? PAGE 17 North now is at Sheppards Landing (mile marker #77), left is West Wynnton on the Calhoun County side of the river, and to the right in Liberty County is Wind Lake, south is Baker Lake and Poloway cut-off. On Friday afternoon in the fall of 1928, Mr. Will Fields was shot and killed in the river swamps on the Calhoun County side. Outside Lake runs down the outside of the swamp a distance of about 6 miles and back into the river at Estifangula. This used to be the worst bend in the river, timber rafters had to pole their rafts away from the bank all the way around this bend. Poloway Cutoff= “The US Engineers cut this bend out of the river and allowed it to stop up. Capt. E.L. Maquder was Captain on the Big Callahan about the year 1919 and later. I remember him. In 1915 the “W.C. Bradley” and the “City of Eufaula” were two of the main stays on the river and had electric lights. The Callahan line also had electric lights. (north left side) Old River (Calhoun Co, side) My Uncle James Hentz and his partner, H.B. Gaskin owned this swamp on Old River for many years. The steamboat “Commerce” built in Albany, Ga. In 1836, exploded in 1840, with ve lives lost. In 1838 a white family’s home opposable of Blountstown on the river was destroyed by Indians. There were about 30 in the party, but this was just a part of a large group of 80 to 100 more Indians. In 1842, Gen. Ethan Allen Hitchcock conducted, just about the last act of Indian removals of the 2 nd Seminoles Indian Wars. He boarded the Chattahoochee’s in the mid December with 80 men and ofcers and set after a band of Creeks “Pascofa”, they had completed despoliations up and down the river. He __________ them and per------them to take passage from O clock Bay to Cuba. This was accomplished in 1843. This pretty much nished the Indians troubles along the river. PAGE 18 North (m. m. #82) right side of the river is Ramsey’s Landing. Left side is “The Bayou”. On Sunday, November 1 st 1839 at 2 p.m. the boiler of the steamboat “LeRoy” blew up two miles north of Blountstown. The pilot Halloman was thrown 100 yards up the river still holding on to the wheel in his hands. He swam to safety. The mail was returned by Slade Sutton and put on the steamboat “Louisa”. Six people were killed. The bridge between Calhoun and liberty counties was opened up about 1937, and Highway 20 was paved about the same time. (Hwy 20 and the Blountstown Bridge here on this page is located between mile markers #79/80). Pryor to that time we went down to the bank of the river at Bristal Landing and traveled down the west bank a distance of about four miles to the old Charley Cayson ferry and crossed over the river on a at pushed by a launch. The little wooden bridge across the sloughs were tied to the trees with wire to keep them from oating off during high water. The steamboat “Apalachicola” was built here at Blountstown. It was lost at King’s Rock, Alabama on May 16, 1848. On December 18, 1916 here at Blountstown, a distant relative died, she was Ellen Gaskin, she was the daughter of my grandfathers older sister. My father and older sister was going to the funeral of a friend, a dock boy (the rest of this story I could not make it out to nish telling you). An old Indian mound is here, possibility at Albert Cayson’s Place, and also here at Charly Cayson’s ferry. Sometime in the 1920s, Mr. Jim White had a mail contract to carry the mail back and forth from Bristol to Blountstown. He brought a new launch to do the runs with. The launch was tied up at Bristol and the steamboat (unnamed) ran down on it and it’s paddles chopped the launch into. The steamboat “John C. Calhoun” was built in Brownsville, Pa. In 1859, it’s boilers exploded at 6 a.m. April 28, 1860 here at Bristol, killing eight people, another reported 12 killed. One of them was Leander M. Crawford, it’s Captain. PAGE 19 North is a natural gas submarine pipeline crossing (at mile marker #87) Right side of river (Liberty Co.) is Beaver Dam & Little Sweetwater, Left side of river (Calhoun Co.) half way down is Hollis Landing. Indians trouble lasted up and down the river until the early 1840s, my grandmothers peoples’ home along the banks of the river were raided many times. They would hide out in the swamps from the Indians and would have to put handkerchiefs in the children’s’ mouths so that the Indians couldn’t hear them crying. The Indians would break up all their chinaware, cut up their feather beds, eat up every thing they could not steal of their livestock and poultry. No area of the State was more of a reason for the US to take Florida from Spain than our Apalachicola Valley area. There were constant troubles up and down our southern borders. The Indians could raid and kill our properties, then dodge back into Spanish Fla. And Spain did nothing about it. The massacre of the people on the Army boat one mile south of Chattahoochee by Himolle Micca and his band was the last straw. That happened in 1817. Negro Fort on the Apalachicola River was Jackson’s base of operation. Old Chief John Blount (SORRY the rest of this page is cut, and I couldn’t complete the story….. BMD) South, right side of river is Kelley Branch. Uncle Joe Kelleys’ real name was James Archibald Kelley. “Joe” was a nickname I think his wife used, her name was Bellona Mae Grifn, Kelley. Kelley Branch was named for old Uncle Joe Kelly’s family. He owned property at Rock Buff, Bristol, and Kennedy Creek. PAGE 20 North (m.m. #91) at Akins Landing (left side of River)and Wayside Landing right of river). South, Porters Landing (Calhoun Co, side) In the late October 1840 Capt. Smith of the “Louisa” reported seeing a raft along the river here that a band of Indians had used to cross the river. Sometime between Friday and Sunday, Colonel Mapes of the US Army examined it and decided it to have been built by whites. I have wondered if this was the same band of Indians that massacred the McClaine (or McLaine) family just a few miles to the north at Sycanore. (*note by John Hentz)=I am sure that the name Himolle Micco was the position held by the Indian chief in the Indian ____ by and was old Chief Nemanthla from Fowltown that led the massacre of the two river boat loads of solders on the Apalachicola River on November 21, 1817. Nemanthila’s Village had been destroyed about nine days earlier by US solders. PAGE 21 North is (m.m. #94) left is Johnson Landing, just below this is Ocheese Landing, and on the right side is Coopers Landing and Torreya State Park. One of the two places where the trees grow that built Noah’s Ark is near by here. Rock Buff, in the mid 1800s this way was probably the main town in Liberty County, my grandmother and her brother were raised by an old Great grand Aunt, we called Grandma Kelley. There were Louise and Calvin Durham, they were left orphaned in Apalach when they were small. I think their parents died about the same time in the yellow fever epidemic in 1849. Rock Buff, during the Civil War a parade was held in Rock Buff by a unit of the 2 nd Fla. Calvary and my grandfather William Hentz was the Commanding Ofcer. The speech was given and the ag was given and was presented by Lou Durham. Years later when my grandfathers’ wife died he went back to Rock Buff and married Lou Durham. The ag she presented to his troops that day is in the State Archives in the State Capital today. The old Jason Gregory mansion stood here (on the right side of the river) on the Calhoun County side since before the Civil War, when Torreya State Park was established, the old mansion was moved across the river to the Park. Rock Buff Landing – The carnage sugar plantation was somewhere in this area, Old Great Uncle James A. Kelley was overseer. PAGE 22 North and to the right (Gadsden County) side of the river is Aspalaga Landing (m.m. #98) to the left side of the river is Blue Springs and Hickory Landing (Jackson County) to the south is still Calhoun and Liberty Counties. In the early days of steam boating on the Apalachicola River the boats were attached by the Indians. In some instances they were shot at from both side of the river. The steam boats would have to put up barricades along the decks to catch the bullets and arrows. Sometimes people were killed while being on the boats. The US Governor passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830 and the Indians problems were pretty much saved by the Spring of 1843. Here in the year 1840 a bunch of renegade Indians massacred almost all of the McLaine families. They are buried here in Sycamore graveyard. The local churches made a monument to the family and a plaque recovered the incident. The plaque reads: “McLane, In memory on April 10 th 1840, Mrs. Nancy McLane, age 40 was shot, Catherine, age 13 was shot and scalded by Indians, 2 small children was killed by pine knots. John McLane killed the chiefs’ son, this occurred close to Telogia Creek”. PAGE 23 North is Sampson Landing at (m.m. #102) Jackson Co, side. The steamboat “W.C. Bradley” sank at Aspalaga sometime in 1919. At Coe’s Landing in the year 1845 in early February on a Monday, the boiler of the steamboat “Siren” blew up killing 10 people, all were employees of the steamboat crew. Capt. Sharples was blown 50 foot through the air. He landed in the water and swam to safety. A lady passenger was rescued from the water by the engineer, one person was saved by clinging to a bale of cotton oating. The boat was carrying 200 bales of cotton and was a complete lost. Pryor to the Civil War, my grandfather William Hentz had a cotton plantation, cotton gin, and a Negro slaves on the river in this area. He was make a free dealer by Special Act of the Fla. Legislature before he was 21 years old. PAGE 24 A BUSY PAGE HERE! The City of Marianna on our right (mile marker #105) and the Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, also Highway 90 and the Victory Bridge. We also have the Louisville & Nashville Railroad on the right side of the river and on our left is the DcLiff Mat’ls, south is the Farrel Landing and the Gulf Power steam plant. On July 22, 1922 the Victory Bridge was opened on the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. In the year of 1840, on June 12 th the steamboat “Barbara Hunt” was lost at the site of Victory on the Apalachicola River MEMORIES from page A17 See MEMORIES A24 FLORIDA MM EMORY PROJECT Passengers posing on the Steamboat Osceola circa 1870.

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Local The Times | A19 Thursday, May 29, 2014 By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland and challenger Gwen Graham kicked off grass-roots campaigns last week with calls for help in one of the most hotly con tested congressional races in the country this year. The Women for Southerland Coalition turned out in the morn ing with about 100 people for a brunch on the roof of the Gulf Coast State College Advanced Technology Center. Graham and about 60 sup porters celebrated the opening of her Panama City campaign headquarters on Jenks Avenue in the afternoon. “We’re going to need all of your support to elect Gwen to Congress and bring an indepen dent voice back to north Florida,” said Julia Woodward, Graham’s campaign manager. Graham and Southerland brought friends to sound a call to action. Former Congressman J.R. Middlemas described Graham, who has never run for politi cal ofce, as smart, poised and compassionate, with a knack for building consensus. Rep. Kristi Noem, R-S.D., said Southerland was a family man and an advocate who sup ports women, and will help the middle class by opposing indus try regulations that will force energy and food producers to pass on their additional costs to consumers. Graham spoke out against tax breaks for the wealthy at the expense of the middle class, and courted women with her support for equal pay for equal work. “First and foremost, we need to get our nancial house in or der,” she said. Graham’s remarks were brief and general. Southerland and Noem, on the other hand, spent more than an hour detailing how people can support South erland, including organized let ter-writing and social media campaigns. Southerland said his oppo nents are organized and already are campaigning against him in both areas. “If you go to my Facebook page, they are beating the tar out of me,” Southerland said. “It would be nice to have some friends.” Southerland played up his ev eryman appeal and painted Gra ham as an outsider. National Democratic groups see him as vulnerable, which Southerland has embraced. “If you’re not taking ak, you’re not over the target,” Southerland said. “We’re over the target.” He said he expects to spend $2.5 million on this campaign — compared to $1.8 million in 2012 — to fend off attacks from outside groups who hope to “de stroy the Steve Southerland you know.” “This district will see the darnedest congressional race ever seen,” he predicted. Southerland and Graham stressed the importance of Bay County to their success in the November election. Graham is the daughter of Bob Graham, the former gover nor and senator. Although she is a Democrat, she said she is a moderate who would eschew partisanship in favor of reason able solutions. She recalled childhood days spent playing with Middlemas’ children in Bay County and spoke of her family’s roots in North Florida. She said she was not recruit ed to run for Southerland’s seat, and she dinged him as an insid er in a dysfunctional Congress whose support of the govern ment shutdown was disastrous. “This is Graham country. It is,” Graham said. “It’s Graham country. It’s the part of Florida that knows my family, that knows what we stand for.” Graham, Southerland kick off campaigns “If you’re not taking ak, you’re not over the target. We’re over the target.” Steve Southerland “First and foremost, we need to get our nancial house in order.” Gwen Graham PHOt T O s S B y Y HH E at AT HER LEip IP H a A R t T | The News Herald Rep. Steve Southerland greets supporters at a brunch with the Women for Southerland Coalition, while Gwen Graham speaks recently at the opening of her Panama City campaign headquarters.

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Local A20 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mo re Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service Tr ades & Ser vi ces RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager ,D MD Monica Bontrager ,D MD 12761 Pea Ridge Road -B ristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHON E( 850) 643 -5417 DEN TURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L ICE NS ED AN D I NS URED • 20 Y EAR S E XP ERIENCE P. O. Bo x4 39 Car ra belle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 00 66499 RG 00 65255 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Build ing Supplies &A uto Rep air Carrabel le 697-3 333 We Deli ve rA ny wher e Hardware and Paint Center F. W. C. Fl ori da Wi nd ow Co ve ri ng Com pa ny fa ct or yd ir ect win do wt re at ment s Re si den ti al and com me rc ia l Sh ut te rs ,S had es, Bl in ds Se cu rit y& Su nC ont rol ,W indo wT in ts St orm Sh ut te rs Co lon ial ,A cc or dian, Ro ll Do wn ,B aham a GU AR AN TE ED LO WES TC OM PET IT VE PR IC ES IN NO RT HF LO RI DA FRE EI nHo me Es ti mat e* FRE EI ns ta llat io n Fo rA ll Yo ur Win do wC ove ring Ne ed s CA LL Fl ori da Windo wC ov er in gC om pa ny 850 -6 97 -3 066 or 850 -5 28 -9 355 ams rohr s@ fa irp oi nt .n et AD VERTISE HERE TO DA Y 227-7847 Special to the Times The fifth annual St. George Island Plantation’s 2014 photo contest, to be held from June 2 through Aug. 29, has grown in participation and in talent each year. Entrants may submit up to two photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or other locations within Franklin County. With their submission, entrants will need to sign a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners’ Association permission to publish the photos, a release form signed by any identifiable person in the photographs; and a parental consent form for any minor pictured. Applicable forms may be found at www.sgpoa.com under the Forms tab; 2014 Photo Contest Rules and Guidelines. Please include the $10 per photo entry fee along with submission. Include the following information on a label affixed to the back of the photograph or disc that is provided: Name, address, telephone number, email address, and titles of the photographs entered. Entries may be emailed in .pdf or .jpeg format of less than five MBs; mailed in on a disc; or professionally printed on 8x10 photo paper. Entries must be mailed or emailed to the following addresses by 5 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 29: llittle@ sgpoa.com or to the Plantation Photo Contest 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328. Again, entrants may submit up to two photos per entry, with a $10 per photo entry fee. Please make check payable to SGPOA. First place prize is $150, second place $100, and third place and People’s Choice prizes $50 each. Two Honorable Mention ribbons will also be awarded this year. Winners will be notified by Sept. 15. All photos will be on display in the Clubhouse until October, with winning entries framed and hung as part of the art collection. CHIP SANDERS | Special to the Times Last year’s winning photo was an action shot taken from the water Plantation announces annual photo contest Special to the Times Apalachicola’s Indepen dence Day celebration is just around the corner and Main Street Apalachicola is getting ready for the big day. One new element this year is the addition of Inde pendence Day royalty, Uncle Sam and Lady Liberty. The idea came about as a way to raise funds for Main Street Apalachicola, which works for the preservation and beautication of the downtown district. Jim Bachrach, president of Main Street Apalachicola, said he is thrilled to add this new element to the Inde pendence Day Celebration. “What fun it is going to be to have our own ‘Royalty’,” said Bachrach. “I hope lots of people sign up to do this. The great part is, there are no rules, just plain fun.” Becoming Uncle Sam or Lady Liberty is quite simple. There are NO rules. Who ever raises the most money in either the Uncle Sam or Lady Liberty categories wins. Every dollar raised is a vote for you. Call up your friends for money, get a busi ness to sponsor you, or have an old-fashioned car wash this summer. Be creative. Each winner will reign over the day’s activities, which starts at noon Thurs day, July 3. Winners will also receive a gift basket full of goodies including gift cer ticates to local restaurants and more. Anyone can sign up to participate in this event from toddlers on up. Download a form at www.historicapala chicola.com or call Royce Rolstad at 653-5586. Deadline to raise money is Friday, June 27 at 4 p.m. Winners will be announced the following week Main Street Apalachicola seeks royalty for Independence Day “I hope lots of people sign up to do this. The great part is, there are no rules, just plain fun.” Jim Bachrach president of Main Street Apalachicola News brieBRIE F sS From staff reports Putt-Masters tourney set for Saturday May 31 marks the fourth annual PuttMasters Tournament, the signature fundraiser that benets the Franklin County Public Library. Some 20 plus businesses, groups, and individuals sponsor four-person teams, which tee off at noon and play throughout the afternoon. After the tourney ends at 5 p.m., there will be a ceremony to see who will take home Green Champ caps and a beautiful trophy. The competition is serious for some. Many returning teams have improved their putt throughout the years. Others just play for fun and enjoy good food, drink and the company of friends. The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar in Eastpoint hosts the event, where owners Shirley and Jimmy Sapp provide a beautiful 18-hole course with a water feature for an entire afternoon of putting fun! Players, fans, and library supporters can quench their thirst and enjoy delicious food while having fun and raising money for our library. Various levels of sponsorship are available. If you would like to participate or volunteer, contact your library branch to reach a Friend of the Franklin County Public Library. In Carrabelle, call 6972366 or in Eastpoint call 670-8151, or contact Anna Carmichael, 850-273-1174, anna.carmichael@yahoo.com The library is a vital county resource. The services provided are free, but funding is limited. The Friends of Franklin County Public Library is proud to help fund both the Carrabelle and Eastpoint branches of our public library system. Without help from businesses and individuals throughout the community and their participation in our efforts, this would not be possible. Books, e-books, games, CDs, DVDs, audio-books, free Wi-Fi, computers and computer classes, youth programs and community meeting rooms complete with a smart board, are just a few of the services you will nd at your public library. Go visit your local branch to see what’s happening, you will be proud as well. Island summer bingo starts Tuesday Summer Bingo on St. George Island will begin on Tuesday, June 3. It will be at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave., beginning at 7 p.m. The cost will be 50 cents per card. Dr. Sanaullah’s lease renewed At its May 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to renew cardiologist Shezad Sanaullah’s lease for the ofces adjacent to the Chapman Auditorium. Sanaullah currently pays $1,961 per month, which includes $1,833 plus tax. His bill will be reduced by $100 monthly because he has installed a separate water meter and will pay his own water bill. The new lease is for three years with a six-month cancellation for both parties.. Sanaullah has the right to half of the parking spaces in the lot adjacent to the building. ‘Midway’ at museum Saturday The lm “Midway” chronicles the See brieBRIE F sS aA 21

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Local The Times | A21 Thursday, May 29, 2014 Special to The Times The Governor Stone, a national historic landmark built in 1877, began a new chapter in her history on Monday. The Friends of the Governor Stone are dedicated to preserving the vessel and continuing to share her history and beauty with the communities of the northern Gulf Coast. In order to do this, the Governor Stone traveled by tow to Diberville, Miss., for additional restoration work by Master Boat Builder Bill Holland, who has done work on the Governor Stone in the past and was a valuable consultant for just completed restoration project. “The Governor Stone is a national treasure, a living museum that must be preserved and maintained for future generations,” Friends of the Governor Stone President Katie Cherry said. “The tours and opportunities to sail on this vessel return us to a time in history hat can only be appreciated by actually experiencing the wind in the sails.” The trip to Mississippi will cover 193 nautical miles in at least four days with overnight stops at The Landing in Fort Walton Beach, Pensacola Yacht Club and Gulf Shores Marina along the way. Once Holland completes repairs at his boatyard, the Governor Stone will sail back to her homeport of St. Andrews. The 136-year-old Gulf Coast Bay Schooner underwent an eight-month historical restoration that was completed in March at the Bay County Boatyard in Panama City. The restoration work was completed by local craftsmen and volunteers and restored her appearance to a more accurate representation of her look when she was built in Pascagoula, Miss. The Governor Stone is owned and supported by the Friends of the Governor Stone Inc. a 501(c)(3) nonprot volunteer organization. Visit governorstone. org or the Facebook page Governor Stone CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 29, 2014 The Times | A21 95018T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2010-CA-000403 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD M. WILLIAMS, ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AND ANY SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, INTEREST OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC.;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed July 3, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000403 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 12th day of June, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 19, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of April, 2014. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court Terry Segree Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. May 22, 29, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98977T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000420-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual; unknown spouse of SID GRAY a/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY; SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to that certain Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 29, 2014, and entered in Case No. 12-000420CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B SKIPPER ROAD REALESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on June 12, 2014, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: EXHIBIT $ LEGAL DESCRIP TION PARCELNO. 1 COMMENCE ATA CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE NORTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST1208.45 FEET THE EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST1208.45 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 2553.48 FEETTO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST590.12 FEET TO AROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST76.20 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST580.27 FEETTO APOST MARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST1250.72 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG 6$,'5,9(56('*( AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 63 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST94.17 FEET, THENCE NORTH 47 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST55.41 FEET, THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST51.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST47.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST52.04 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST150.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST242.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST294.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST484.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST77.51 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND ALSO: PARCELNO. 2: %(*,1$7$; CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WESTFRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH (BEAR-ING BASE ASSUMED) ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF THE SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER 1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1304.44 FEET TO EASTERLYEDGE OR SHORE LINE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY, SOUTHERLYAND SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER THE FOLLOWING COURSES, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST18.52 FEET, SOUTH 21 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST189.35 FEET, SOUTH 04 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 61.96 FEET, SOUTH 42 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST69.88 FEET, SOUTH 47 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST113.83 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 168.42 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST77.36 FEET, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST99.67 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 123.55 FEET, SOUTH 38 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST130.25 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST118.68 FEET, SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 172.84 FEETTO AN 2/'&$5$;/( MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER AND THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EASTALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 854.04 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCELNO. 2 MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED BYARECENTSURVEYPRODUCED BYEDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY22, 2002 BEARING JOB NO. 02-009 (PSC 20867), AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATA POSTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG 6$,'5,9(56('*( AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST135.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID 5,9(56('*(581 NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (NOTE: THE PLATOF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, NOW COVERS APORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS 1 AND 2. THE PLAT WAS CONSENTED TO BYTHE FORECLOSING LENDER. LOTS 1, 5 AND 6 HAVE BEEN CONVEYED TO SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, A FLORIDALIMITED LIABILITYCOMPANY BYVIRTUE OF (3) QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 962, PAGES 693, 695 AND 697, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THESE 3 LOTS HAVE NOTBEEN RELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED.) /(66$1'(;&(37 LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 753, PAGE 364, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDAS, TO WIT: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG 6$,'5,9(56('*( AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID 5,9(56('*(581 NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO /(66$1'(;&(37 LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 854, PAGE 786, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 3 AND 8, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO /(66$1'(;&(37 LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 966, PAGE 436, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 2, 4 AND 7, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCOR-DING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO /(66$1'(;&(37 LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE(S) RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1100, PAGE(S) 547 AND 550, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: BRIEFS from page A20 Battle of Midway, a turning point in World War II in the Pacic. The Imperial Japanese Navy had been undefeated until that time and outnumbered the American naval forces by four to one. It depicts the creation of a complicated battle plan. Unknown to the Japanese, American signals intelligence has broken the Japanese Naval encryption codes and know ahead of time that the ambush will take place at Midway Island which includes tricking the Japanese into conrming it. The lm will be shown at 1015 hours on Saturday, May 31, at Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. Free popcorn will be available. Entry by donation and appreciated Time for summer camp registration! Enrollment for Project Impact Camp Funshine: Fizz, Boom, Splash is open. Students from pre-K to eighth grade will be served at the ABC site and pre-K to 12th grade at the city site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program is “Fizz, Boom, READ” and was developed by the 2014 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. The focus this year will be on STEM subjects, (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) with other summer highlights including pottery program, art & crafts, science experiments, computer technology, chess tournament, sports and several eld trips. The second year of “Boats Rock!” was launched during the April antique boat show. A special basketball and leadership camp will also be offered. The summer performing arts program will feature video production with a lm premiere at the end of the summer. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 9 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week. Credit recovery classes will be offered at the City Site Monday to Thursday during program hours. Enrollment may be limited. The summer program is provided free of charge. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Families can enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 370-0145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola. Funds sought for online county map At the May 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to re-apply for a technical assistance grant from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for $25,000 to create an online county GIS map to assist in the public accessing the ood insurance maps, and other planning layers. The county applied for the project last year and was not chosen for funding. Transform your yard into a haven for wildlife Back by popular demand, “Planting a Refuge for Wildlife” is now available to property owners eager to increase the number and variety of animals in their yard. The 40-page booklet, revised and updated, encourages property owners to help wildlife by creating habitat that provides the food, water and shelter they need to survive. Photos and original artwork, tables of native plants and plant zones, and lists of common bird species and their food preferences create an easy-to-use resource. The booklet will help people evaluate their current landscape and create a habitat plan, select the appropriate native plants, and design a wildlife habitat, such as a bird, buttery or pollinator garden. As homeowners discover the joys of wildlife viewing close to home, they also will be part of a larger movement to restore wildlife habitat in their communities. Produced through a grant from the Wildlife Foundation of Florida, “Planting a Refuge for Wildlife”is available for $4.99 a copy (plus shipping and sales tax). Order copies from the Wildlife Foundation of Florida at WildlifeFlorida.com/ PARFW. For 10 or more copies or for wholesale inquiries, contact PlantingaRefuge@MyFWC.com.  Visit MyFWC.com/Viewing/ to learn more about creating wildlife habitat at home. Franklin is ‘Purple Heart County’ At the May 20 county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to recognize Franklin County as a “Purple Heart County” in honor of the large number of decorated veterans living in Franklin County. Chairman Cheryl Sanders suggested the county invite all residents who have won a Purple Heart to visit a commission meeting. Lake Morality contracts awarded At Tuesday’s county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to award the contract to add signage and re-mark Lake Morality Road to Southern States Pavement Markings, Inc. of St. Augustine. The cost of the work is $58,557. Southern States was the only company that bid on the project. Commissioners also voted unanimously to award Preble-Rish Engineers of Port St. Joe the contract for construction, engineering and inspection on the Lake Morality project. All fees will be paid out of Florida Department of Transportation funds. Governor Stone to get more restoration GOVERNOR S tT ONE

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A22| The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVER’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEETTHENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MIN-UTES 38 SECONDS EAST 121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVER’S EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER FOR THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL3: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS SOLD BYVIRTUE OF QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 941, PAGE 109 AND QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 984, PAGE 154, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND LIES WITHIN PARCELS 1 AND 2 ABOVE. THIS LAND WAS NOTRELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED. THIS LAND WAS CONVEYED TO CENTENNIALBANK BYVIRTUE OF A DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 1044, PAGE 99. SAID DEED DOES NOTNECESSARILY CONSTITUTE A MERGER OF TITLE: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF LOT3 OF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 ATPAGE 30 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST322.93 FEETTO APOINTLYING ON THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 70.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF RIVER RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST399.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 60 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST41.34 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST103.74 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH Borrowers’interest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses, benefits and proceeds of Borrowers’interest therein. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 9th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL& ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNLCenter II, 7th Floor Orlando, Florida 32801 Phone: 407-896-2224 Fax: 407-835-3596 May 22, 29, 2014 99013T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 28, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000342CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 9th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of May, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Terry Segree As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99047T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000128 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. DARYL THOMAS WALLACE, ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 1, 2014, in the above-styled cause, The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on June 12, 2014 at 8:00 am the following described property: LOT 16 AND 17, BLOCK 257, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: LOT 16 & 17 BLOCK 257, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand on this 22nd day of May, 2014. Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99045T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE THE FOLLOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY OF G.J. GRACE, LLC OR ITS ASSIGNS WILL ON JUNE 13, 2014 AT 9:00 A.M. EASTERN TIME AT 25 BEGONIA STREET, EASTPOINT, FLORIDA BE SOLD BY CENTENNIAL BANK FOR CASH IN ACCORDANCE WITH §715.109, FLORIDA STATUTES (2013): Metal interior display racks Window panes and frames of varying sizes A-framed wood storage device Outside metal storage shelves, desk chairs with plastic armrests Assorted metal movable shelving Varying types of wood planks, moldings and other millworks Wooden pallets Office desk Telephone VCR and tube TV 4-drawer file cabinet For additional information contact Monica Lemieux at (850) 6538805. DATED THIS 21ST DAY OF MAY 2014. Pub Dates: May 29, June 5, 2014 99063T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000277 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1; Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA K. KENNISTON; FRANCIS W. KENNISTON;ET AL Defendants RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated January 15, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000277 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1, Plaintiff and SANDRA K. KENNISTON, Et Al; are defendant(s). The Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT http://www. franklinclerk.com/ IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES, AT 11:00 AM, June 12, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: SOUTHEAST 45 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 17 OF CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 92 5TH ST, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 22nd day of May, 2014. By: Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99079T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000130 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Diane Dodgen; Unknown Spouse of Diane Dodgen; United States of America; United States of America, Department of Treasury; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000130 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Diane Dodgen are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 12, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE EASTERLYONEHALF (BEING 100 FEETIN WIDTH BY THE FULLLENGTH THEREOF), OF THE FOLLOWING TRACT OR PARCELOF LAND: APARCELOF LAND IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH, 978.5 FEET, TO ACONCRETE MARKER; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.8 FEET, TO APOINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST169 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, WHICH SAID LAST POINTIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 219 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF THE 100FOOTRIGHT-OFWAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 30; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE MEANDERING SAID SHORE LINE OF SAID SOUND, IN AN EASTERLYDIRECTION, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCELOF LAND FRONTING 200 FEET ON STATE ROAD NO. 30, AND EXTENDING THE SAME WIDTH TO ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH, 978.50 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.80 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 204.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 254.00 FEET, TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY, 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 256.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER OF SAID ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE, 100.02 FEET, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-199999 FC02 WCC May 29, June 5, 2014 99081T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000130 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Diane Dodgen; Unknown Spouse of Diane Dodgen; United States of America; United States of America, Department of Treasury; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000130 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Diane Dodgen are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 12, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: 1124556 Franklin County May 2014 1 ** 2013 DELINQUENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ROLL ** 2013NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR THE TAX YEAR 2013 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF EIGHTEEN (18%) PERCENT PER YEAR. UNLESS THE AMOUNTS SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW IS PAID, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED THEREON PURSUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTES CHAPTER 197.413 AND THE TAX COLLECTOR WILL APPLY TO THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR AN ORDER DIRECTING LEVY UP AND SEIZURE OF THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE TAX PAYER FOR UNPAID TAXES. JAMES A. HARRIS, JR., CFC FRANKLIN COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR 1 P-0000600 $1,214.90 00096-000 BOSS OYSTER, INC RICK BLOODWORTH 125 WATER STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 2 P-0003400 $697.09 00420-000 RANCHO INN 240 HWY 98 W APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 3 P-0004100 $760.89 00542-000 RED RABBIT FOODS, INC. 130 AVE E APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 4 P-0004700 $1,442.97 00556-000 SEAGRAPE ENTERPRISES OF APALACHICOLA, INC. 125 WATER STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 5 P-0007700 $432.41 00715-000 PAPA JOE'S PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX 15 BIG OAKS RD APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 6 P-0010400 $319.33 00763-000 VERANDAS AT RIVER MARK, INC 76 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 7 P-0012400 $147.71 00803-000 FORGOTTEN COAST TV, INC JOHN SPOHRER PO BOX 848 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 8 P-0022700 $2,796.82 01492-000 SUMMIT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING INC 1626 CRAWFORDVILL HIGHWAY UNIT B CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 9 P-0023500 $487.98 01508-000 ESKIMO ICE LLC JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS BLVD STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 10 P-0033200 $43.06 02474-000 THE HUT RESTAURANT G LEE L, INC PO BOX 866 APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 11 P-0035100 $1,714.74 03015-000 ANCHOR REALTY & MORTGAGE CO. 119 FRANKLIN BLVD. ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 12 P-0036600 $387.23 03171-000 COLLINS CONSTRUCTION OF SGI,IN 60 EAST GULF BEACH DRIVE ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 13 P-0040800 $580.34 03605-000 CHUCKS MARKET PLACE CHARLES CAROTHERS FKA/FULMERS MARKET PLACE, INC 244 FRANKLIN BLVD ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 14 P-0049000 $11.22 03841-000 FLYNNSTONE OUTDOOR INC 6605 SPICEWOOD LANE TALLAHASSEE, FL 32312 15 P-0056600 $187.58 03951-000 APALACHICOLA BAY SEAFOOD INC PO BOX 186 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 16 P-0057700 $623.56 03962-000 ST GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS' ASSOC 1712 MAGNOLIA RD ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 29, 2014 The Times | A23 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1123147ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 WebID#:34284633 1125221 NursePractitionerpositionavailableforbusyinternal medicinepractice.Onlyexperienced needapply.PleaseincludeCVand references.Sendresumesto BlindBox3618c/oTheNewsHerald, P.O.Box1940,PanamaCity,FL32402 112316025DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546 WebID34284625 1124944ServicePlumber2YearsVeriableService/Repair Exp.ValidDriversLicense. OTorOn-CallwillbeRequired. KnowledgeofSouthWaltonArea PleaseApplyat AJ'sPlumbingInc. 998BayDrive, SantaRosaBeach,FL. WebID#:34289477 1125201 NursePractitionerorPA Wantedforbusyfamily practice.Benetsavail.Send resumetoBlindBox3611co TheNewsHerald,P.O.Box 1940,PanamaCityFL32402 1124950 Nowtakingapplicationsfor new KFC inCallaway. Applyat jobs.kfc.com or faxresumeto 334-702-0302 WebID34289468 TextFL89468to56654 ShiftManagers &TeamMembers 1125211WoundCareNurseMusthavelongtermcareexperience.Scheduler1yearmedicalexperience, homehealthpreferred.Sendresumeto hr.baystjoe@signaturehealthcarellc.com 1122743 Servers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers Bussers BLUEPARROT NOWHIRING Pleaseapplyinperson between9a-5pm7daysaweek @BlueParrotSt.George'sIsland 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519140 4519136 Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking a seasonalpart-time, entry-level Housekeeping Inspector / Laundry Assistant Some experience is preferred but not required. Must be energetic, detailed oriented and possess great customer service skills. Weekends are required and must be able to start immediately. $12 per hour with paid training. Drug Screen & Background Check required. Please apply in person at 112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 4519175HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAIALBLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. THE EASTERLYONEHALF (BEING 100 FEETIN WIDTH BY THE FULLLENGTH THEREOF), OF THE FOLLOWING TRACT OR PARCELOF LAND: APARCELOF LAND IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH, 978.5 FEET, TO ACONCRETE MARKER; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.8 FEET, TO APOINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST169 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, WHICH SAID LAST POINTIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 219 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF THE 100FOOTRIGHT-OFWAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 30; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE MEANDERING SAID SHORE LINE OF SAID SOUND, IN AN EASTERLYDIRECTION, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCELOF LAND FRONTING 200 FEET ON STATE ROAD NO. 30, AND EXTENDING THE SAME WIDTH TO ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH, 978.50 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.80 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 204.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 254.00 FEET, TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY, 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 256.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER OF SAID ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE, 100.02 FEET, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-199999 FC02 WCC May 29, June 5, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish.j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. PSJ 511 7th St Fri May 30th 11a-Until Sat. May 31st From 8a-UntilYard SaleLost Of Misc. Something For Everyone! Text FL90427 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL90403 to 56554 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7 th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572) General Admission $6 850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Administrative/Clerical Administrative Assistant For guest services. Happy and energetic person, good communication and computer skills. Ability to read and follow instructions. Come by and pick up application or email to visitorcentermanager@ammfl. org Apalachicola Maritime Museum 103 Water St, 850-653-2500 Web ID 34290443 Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair Cleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sunday’s. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in PORT ST JOE IMMEDIATELY Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Sal 850-227-6691 or Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34290225 Office BuildingFor Lease: 514 Florida Ave Space is plumbed for a medical/dental office but can be used for a variety of business types. Apprx. 2,184SF. Call For Details (850) 896-0609 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL84167 to 56654 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL89857 to 56654 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich 502/649-1520 Mako 258WAC FG Hard Top, Cobia Tower, Alum. Trailer, No Motor, Reduced to $6500 850-832-7995 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Susie’s Cleaning Service 20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Classifieds work! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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Local A24 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 at Chattahoochee. In the year 1842 near River Junction, the steamboat “Chamas” exploded on Oct 31 st lives were lost. Fright on the Apalachicola River during the year 1911 (the year I was born) was valued at $15,784,029.00 which included 13,842 bales of cotton, 50,194 barrels of naval (stock/stores) and 1,200.000 packages of merchandise. The two steamboats that were most proment were the “Queen City” and the “ W.C. Bradley” both of them ran the river for many years. The Indian chief Himolle Micco also know as NeMarthla. He was later executed at Fort Marks by Andrew Jackson. The woman who survived the massacre was Mrs. Stuart, she was later rescuered in Fla. And married John Dill and lived in Fort Gaines. In late November 1817 an open Army boat being propelled by hand oars with 20 able bodied solders some sick solders of woman who were solder wife’s and four children were massacred here by several hundred Indians, one woman and six men escaped. PAGE 25 (LAST PAGE) North is Lake Simimole, (mile markers all start over, this is at m.m. 2 ) Georgia state line. The right side here is all water and Decatur County, and to the left is the Aplachee Correctional Institutional……………John’s last memories……. Somewhere about here was located the Indian Village of Fowltown in 1817. It was the home of Seminole Chief Semthla and his band (Ne-marthla). *note= Fowltown was farther to the N.E. Beginnings — about the year 1828, steamboats became the movers of people and fright, they opened the interior of the county, towns and communities sprang up all along thr interior waterways. Towns, and families had their steamboat landings along the waterways, the entire County depended on steamboats for their transportation, people even went shopping on the boats. Snags and rocks in the river were a peril to the steamboat, cleaning them out was a big job. It was nothing uncommon for groups of citizens from town along the waterways to go to Washington D.C., begging the Federal Government for help to clean them out. The US Army Corps of Engineers were to assigned the job of cleaning out and maintaining the waterways for trafc and have done a wonderful job of it for many years. The haydays of the steamboats lasted about 100 years, 1828 to 1928, a lot of old steamboat landings along the river still bear the old family names. Ou r lo ca l re al es ta te ex pe rt s ha ve id en ti ed wh at th ey fe el ar e th e bes t va lu es ar ou nd an d ar e of fe ri ng th em to yo u in Re al Es ta te Pi ck s! Di sc ov er th e bes t re al es ta te va lu es in Me xi co Be ac h, Po rt St Jo e, Ap al ac hi co la Ca pe Sa n Bl as St Ge or ge Is la nd Ca rr ab el le an d su rr ou nd in g ar ea s. Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times To day (850) 653 -8868 YO UR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 12 0 YEARS YO UR HOMET OWN NEW SP APER FOR MORE THAN 1 20 YEARS TH E T IME S & C arrabelle A palachic ola Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks Joh nS he lby ,B roker 80 0-3 44-757 0 85 0-9 27-477 7 ww w. sg ireal ty .c om ML S# 25 08 25 $2 79 ,9 00 St .G eo rg eI sl an d 1 ST TI ER PL AN TA TI ON Gr ea tG ul fV ie ws !P an or am ic vi ew st ot he ea st &n or th At te nt io np il ot s! ne ar th eP la nt at io na ir po rt ;O ne ac re lo t, Ad ja ce nt to bo ar dw al kt oG ul f, On eo ft he hi gh es tl ot s on th eI sl an d, am en it ie si ncl ude Ne wC lub ho us e&P oo l. Seas id eD ri ve ,N ic k’ sH ol e. 4518799 Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. Su nr oom, scr eened &o pen por ches ,h ot tub o MBR suit e, lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho we ra nd gar den tub detached gar age ,g as r eplac e, gr anit ec oun te rt ops ,s tainless ki tc hen, wine co oler ,b uilt-in co rner ca binets .A menities include co mmunit y dock ,p ool ,t ennis co ur ts .M ain living ar ea &m ast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs fo rp riv ac yw /p riv ate por ch. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-1971 st ev e@st ev esisla nd .com ww w. 288m agnoliaba yd r. com www .st ev esis land .com Joh nS he lby ,B roker 80 0-3 44-757 0 85 0-9 27-477 7 ww w. sg ireal ty .c om MLS# 250987 $389,000 St. George Island AP AL AC HI CO LA BA YV IE W 4B R, 5B A, re no va te di n2 00 2, gr ou nd le ve lh as LR wi th r ep la ce ,D R, ki tc he n, ma st er be dr oo m, scr ee ne dp or ch, la un dr y&p an tr ya re a, 2nd o or ha s2 nd LR wi th r ep la ce &k it ch et te ,b al co ny ov er lo ok in gt he ba y, co rn er lo t, ow ne r n an ci ng ,M cC lo ud Av e. 29,000 5*5 *+ 2 * /91-983/: $ ( ) " $ % )8 7 98 91 11 8: :8 6 7 1 81 8 99 .1 -:8 6 / 10 8 81 1 86 7. :8 91 : 8 7 1-/ /1 9 3& 7 8 6 )8 7 -9 8 9 11 8 7 8 9 0. 1 71 1 3 1/ 9/1 /99 7 :1 78 1 8 .1 8 6 9 08 MLS 250905 ST .G EORGE ISLAND $538,000 Th is cu st om built home in the Plan ta tion, nestled among na tiv eI sland ve geta tion and just as hor t wa lk to the Gu lf of Me xic o, fe at ur es as pacious living/dinin g/k it chen ar ea with ag as r eplac eo n the rst lev el as we ll as tw ob edr ooms and ba ths .S ec ond oor is af ull mast er bedr oom and ba th with jett ed tub and huge wa lk -in closet .T he re is al of ts itting ar ea with sleeper sofa tha tc ou ld be oc eo rc ra ft sr oom .T his home wa sd esigned fo ro ut door living with por ches and sitting ar eas to enjo yt he beautiful views of the Gu lf .Al ar ge ,p riv ate, hea te dp ool adds to the out door enjo ymen t. Plan ta tion clubhouse ,t enn is co ur ts ,a nd pool just one str eet away .B oth tile and ca rpet thr oughout house and tiled ba thr ooms .D im en si ons we re tak en fr om Co un ty Pr oper ty Ap pr aiser ’s we bsit e. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-1 971 ww w. st ev esisland .com ww w. souther ncharm sgi.com 29,000 22* .9 0 7 01 /: !2! :198-/7-0 916:-89/ : )1 99 89 7 : 1 / 19 8 81 0 -3 1 1!. 10 : 7 *! % )7 8 1 8 6 #8 1 % .0 8 8 8 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) “A Tisket, ATasket” was whose rst major hit song in 1938? Artie Shaw, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Billie Holiday 2) What “blood” would a nurse measure with a sphygmomanometer? Sugar, Alcohol, Pressure, Count 3) John P. Holland is credited with the invention of the modern? Submarine, Refrigerator, Guitar, Padlock 4) What’s the youngest age one can become President of the United States? 32, 35, 40, 42 5) Which stone did early man primarily use for starting res? Slate, Marble, Quartz, Flint 6) Whose “nest” is the lookout platform on sailing ships? Boar’s, Eagle’s, Bird’s, Crow’s 7) What is the smallest area country in the United Kingdom? Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, England 8) Refried beans are primarily made of what type of cooked beans? Garbanzo, Black, Kidney, Pinto 9) What name did blues singer McKinley Morganeld adopt? Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, B. B. King, Fats Domino 10) Which city opened the rst aquarium in 1893? Boston, Chicago, Baltimore, Richmond 11) If you’re astraphobic what are you afraid of? Lightning, Astroturf, Stars, Mountains 12) What white creature is Ursus Maritimus? Owl, Whale, Polar bear, Bunny 13) Of these battery types which is largest in size? AA, AAA, C, D 14) A semenier chest ordinarily has how many drawers? 5, 6, 7, 8 ANSWERS 1) Ella Fitzgerald. 2) Pressure. 3) Submarine. 4) 35. 5) Flint. 6) Crow’s. 7) Northern Ireland. 8) Muddy Waters. 9) Pinto. 10) Chicago. 11) Lightning. 12) Polar bear. 13) D. 14) 7. TT rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com MEMORIES from page A18



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, May 29, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index 3rd-grade FCATs upFranklin County students show hefty gainsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Paced by a double-digit increase in the percentage of students performing at grade level or better, Franklin County School third-graders performed the best they have in the last four years in both reading and math. In doing so, the Franklin County students narrowed the gap that had emerged since 2011 between it and the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. The ABC School saw a decline FCHS to graduate 64 tonightGallegos, Walker top the classBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High School will present diplomas to 64 graduates at 7 p.m. today, led by two young ladies both of whom posted perfect 4.0 grade point averages. Leading the Class of 2014 will be two valedictorians, Laura Yasmin Gallegos, daughter of Antonio and Angelica Gallegos of Eastpoint, and Bria Delia Walker, daughter of David and Harolyn Walker of Apalachicola. Gallegos is headed to the University of Florida and Walker to Florida A&M University. The class salutatorian is Jathan Aniah Martin, son of Sheila and Anthony Martin of Apalachicola. He also will be attending FAMU on an academic scholarship. Also receiving highest honors, for a grade point average of between 3.75 and 4.0, By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com An unusually large crowd of about 60 people gathered for remembrance and fellowship on Memorial Day at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. The ceremony was brief, highlighted by an original prayer composed by Chaplain Barbara Cook. Founding member Bill Miller welcomed everybody except the yellow ies to the post. He read the poem Freedom by John Alton Robinson to the assembly. After the Pledge of Allegiance, Cook read her prayer for the day, written in a moment of inspiration. A mockingbird trilled in accompaniment to the solemn thoughts of those present. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In a moving tribute to heroism and hospitality, St. George Island welcomed scores of residents and visitors alike to share Monday in the dedication of a new agpole at the lighthouse. Twenty-one volleys from miniature cannons opened the Memorial Day ceremony, overseen by Jim Kemp, By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In a brief ceremony Monday morning, about two dozen people gathered at veterans Memorial Plaza in Apalachicola to commemorate Memorial Day. In his remarks, Al Mirabella, the new commander of American Legion Post 106, reminded the gathering of the price of freedom and recounted examples of courage and sacri ce made by solders in Iraq, as well as those who stormed the beaches of Co-Valedictorian Laura Gallegos Co-Valedictorian Bria Walker Salutatorian Jathan Martin DISTRICTWIDE GROWTHThe chart below shows the percentage of the roughly 100 third-graders district-wide who scored at an achievement level of 3 or better, considered satisfactory performance. Year Reading Mathematics 2011 50 39 2012 45 31 2013 46 40 2014 49 50 See FCAT A11 See FCHS A10MEMORIAL DAY 2014DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAmerican Legion Post 106 Commander Al Mirabella speaks to the gathering at Veterans Memorial Plaza in Apalachicola on Memorial Day.We are here; you are welcomeDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesU.S. Marine Joe Garrity res one of the cannons in the 21-gun salute.God, the commander of heavens armiesLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesOf cers of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 stand with heads bowed in prayer during the Memorial Day ceremony. From left are Chaplain Barbara Cook, Ladies Auxiliary President Fran Weeks, Sons of the American Legion Adjutant and Treasurer Bill Miller, Post Commander Tommy Larson, Third Vice Commander Bob Ochala and Post Adjutant Greg Kristofferson.Please be proud of meSee ST. GEORGE ISLAND A10 See CARRABELLE A11 See APALACHICOLA A11Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A12 Faith . . . . . . A13 Outdoors . . . . . A14 Tide Chart . . . . A14 Sports . . . . . . A15 Classi eds . . . A22-A23VOL. 129 ISSUE 5Congratulations, Class of 2014, A7 Putt-Masters tourney set for SaturdaySaturday, May 31, marks the fourth annual PuttMasters Tournament, the signature fundraiser that bene ts the Franklin County Public Library. Businesses, groups and individuals sponsor four-person teams, which tee off at noon. At 5 p.m. will be a ceremony to see who will take home Green Champ caps and trophy. The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar in Eastpoint hosts the event. For more info, contact Anna Carmichael at 2731174 or anna.carmichael@ yahoo.com.Market Days in Carrabelle SaturdayCarrabelle United Methodist Church and Gods Ministry for the Needy will host Market Days May Gathering from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 31, at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3. Music will be provided by local talent.Midway movie at museum SaturdayThe lm Midway, which chronicles the Battle of Midway, a turning point in World War II in the Paci c, will be shown at 10:15 a.m. Saturday, May 31, at Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. Free popcorn will be available. Entry is by donation and appreciated.Island summer bingo starts TuesdaySummer Bingo on St. George Island will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave. The cost will be 50 cents per card.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 ApalachicolaAreaHistoricalSocietyPresents HEALTHYSTARTSBABYSHOWER Tuesday,June3,2014 4:00PMEST TheCentennialBuilding 300AllenMemorialWay PortSt.Joe,FLFREEADMISSIONFood,Fun,GamesandLOTSOFDOORPRIZESHealthyStarts6thAnnualBabyShowerWeinviteallFranklinandGulfCounty pregnantwomen,newparentswhohavehad ababywithinthelastsixmonths,andtheir familiestojoinusfor:Therewillbeinformationstationsonvarioustopics suchas:CarSeatSafety,SmokingCessation, Childbirth,SafeSleep,CommunityResources andvendorsofferingmerchandiseforpurchase.Pluslotsoffabulousdoorprizes! EverybabydeservesaHealthyStart! ForMoreInformation,Call1-800-895-9506 Bay,Franklin,&GulfCounties Special to the TimesSt. George Islands Julian G. Bruce State Park has again been voted one of the Top 10 Beaches in the U.S. for the fourth year. Dr. Stephen Leatherman (Dr. Beach) announced the annual ranking of beaches last week. The 2014 ranking maintains the SGI beach in its #3 position that it reached in 2013. This is the fourth year that the ninemile beach park located at the east end of St. George Island has made Dr. Beachs list. The continued Top 10 ranking is good news for Josh Hodson, St. George Island State Park manager. This is a testament to our great beaches and also to the staff and volunteers here. According to Hodson, park attendance has increased by approximately 10 percent each year since the island park has made Dr. Beachs list. The list takes into consideration such factors as beach width at low tide, beach material (from cobbles to fine sand), beach conditions (from erosional to depositional), sand softness, water and air temperatures, number of sunny days, amount of rain, wind speeds, size of breaking waves, number of waves (width of breaker zone), beach slope underwater(from steeply sloping bottom to gently sloping bottom), longshore current, rip currents, color of sand, from gray to white/pink, tidal range, beach shape, bathing area bottom conditions, turbidity, water color, floating or suspended human material, algae in water amount, red tide, smell, wildlife, pests, presence of sewarage/runoff, outfall lines on/ across the beach, seaweed/jellyfish on the beach, trash and litter, oil and tar balls, glass and rubble, views and vistas, buildings/Urbanism, access, misfits, vegetation, well-kept grounds, amenities, lifeguards, safety record, domestic animals, noise, presence of seawalls, riprap, concrete, intensity of beach use, off-road vehicles, floatables in water (garbage, toilet paper), public safety (eg, pickpockets, crime), and competition for free use of beach (eg, fishermen, boaters, water-skiers). Leatherman is professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at Florida International University. He received his Ph.D. in environmental (coastal) sciences from the University of Virginia, and completed his undergraduate degree in geosciences at North Carolina State University. He has authored or edited 16 books, including Sea Level Rise: Causes and Consequences; Barrier Island Handbook; Overwash Processes; Cape Cod: From Glaciers to Beaches; and Americas Best Beaches. He has also authored over 200 journal articles and technical reports, including articles in both Science and Nature. Leatherman has provided expert testimony multiple times for the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives. He was also the onscreen host and co-producer of the 1992 film Vanishing Lands, winner of three international film awards, including the Golden Eagle.Island beach named to Top Ten List 2014 TOP 10The complete top 10 for 2014 is as follows: 1. Duke Kahanamoku Beach, Waikiki, Oahu, Hawaii 2. Barefoot Beach Bonita Springs, Florida 3. St. George Island State Park 4. Waimanalo Bay Beach Park Oahu, Hawaii 5. Hamoa Beach, Maui, Hawaii 6. Cape Hatteras, Outer Banks of North Carolina 7. Cape Florida State Park Key Biscayne, Florida 8. Coast Guard Beach Cape Cod, Massachusetts 9. Beachwalker Park Kiawah Island, South Carolina 10. Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, Naples, Florida LO O IS SWO O BO O DA | The TimesWildowers on St. George Island

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I remember the day I realized that I had PTSD. It was during group therapy in 1999 at the VA Hospital three years after I had been diagnosed with it and awarded disability. One of the guys was talking about his feelings after coming home from Vietnam through Travis Air Force Base in 1970. When he described what it was like for him it nally hit me. I understood. Up until that moment I had felt like a con man. Somehow, I had snuck one past the Veterans Administration, the psychologists, the doctors, and the Vietnam Veterans of America. Despite 10 years of ashbacks, and nightmares, with the smell of burning feces, blood, and the red clay of Nam coating the back of my throat with a smell that I still taste, I didnt believe I was damaged. They did, however, and thats all that counted. I no longer had to worry about being homeless, feeding my sons or educating them because I was now a ward of the VA. Im told that one of the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder is memory loss. My experience wasnt loss of memory; it was more like being unable to decipher if the memory was true or just something I conjured up. Until that day in group therapy, my memories had no other witnesses, but here was someone else who had shared that spell cast at the gates of Travis Air Base in 1970. It was an epiphany that rocked me. That understanding began a gradual peeling away of the hard crust I had built up around myself to keep from feeling. After 30 years of successfully stuf ng feelings, like a noxious odor, they began to ooze through the cracks and I had to nally deal with them. Is it possible that you never heard the story of how the young men called to duty in Vietnam, were greeted by their fellow citizens on the day they returned home? My children couldnt believe it. From the rst to the last day, every trooper in Nam ticked off the days remaining until the magic number approached to go home. They were Short Timers. When asked how long they had left, they answered with cutesy sayings like; Im so short I have to look up to see an ants ass. Cute, but their eyes were redrimmed, crowded with fear because in The Nam we all knew, anything could happen until you landed safely stateside. Ultimately, the lucky short-timers found themselves sitting on the tarmac with 200 others, hoping, but afraid to believe until nally that freedom bird started rolling. Inching along, then gathering speed until, nose up, we felt wheels up and we were airborne. At that very moment there was a huge collective roar of relief as we all realized we had made it. We were going home. When we touched down at Travis Air Force Base, we were ushered into a huge warehouse where we spent about 24 hours processing out. Here they got us showers, new uniforms, haircuts, medical exams, everything we needed. In one door and out the other, the next day I found myself on the loading dock getting into a cab, one of many waiting to take us wherever we wanted. With my ticket in hand, I shouted to my driver, Airport! No one warned us. I dont know what I would have done if they had, but it still amazes me that no one had warned us. It was an ambush. As we pulled out of the gate I was greeted by a mob of war protesters. They were pounding the windows and hood of the cab, carrying signs that called me a murderer, screaming baby killer. As my cabby pulled away quickly, we were barraged with fruits and vegetables. I wasnt just wounded. I was gutted. I was 22 years old. I had done everything I was asked to do for my country. I had seen horri c things that would remain with me for a lifetime, but I had done nothing to be so reviled. Why had my country turned on me? I cant tell you why, but I exchanged my ticket and went to Denver instead of heading home. It took me two weeks to go home. I later discovered that a lot of guys did similar things. Some never went home. Then there are those who came back but are still gone. I often wonder if those people who met all those returning planes tell their children and friends what they actually did to protest that unjust war. Perhaps they have since joined that religious group that protests at the funerals of the dead boys coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan. Maybe they became politicians and went to Congress. This Memorial Day, the news is full of the problems at the veterans hospitals. Our politicians are pointing ngers, threatening hearings, investigations, all ghting for press time so they can say what needs to be done. The Congress is drawing sides, salivating at the opportunity afforded just before mid-term elections. All this energy, time and money being spewed forth, all for one purpose: How does it translate into votes? This should sound familiar. Our politicians want to divide us so they can point to the others as being different and wrong-minded, when they ask for our donations. With enough money they can ght those on the other side of the aisle. Listen to them. Democrat or Republican, deep down we know they just want money. It reminds me of that big radio station down in Del Rio, Texas back in the s. Remember the one that asked for your donation, and in return they would send you a genuine autographed picture of Jesus Christ? Their promise may strike an emotional chord with you, but deep down you know what they want. If we want the answer to the VA mess we really dont have to pay some bloviator congressman $180,000 a year for the answer. Simply, we know how to x the problem. We do it every day by honoring our own commitments in our daily lives. Congress should do the same. They should honor the commitment they made to Americas military when they sent us to war by simply paying the bill, no matter the amount. We paid with our blood, no matter the amount. Apalachicola resident Michael Ortiz y Pino is a veteran of the U.S. Army 1967-70. USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, May 29, 2014 APage 4Section42 years of living within your means LETTERS TO THE EDITORUSAF beware of dangers in Tates HellAlthough I cant condone violence, the residents of Franklin County should give Bobby Bullock a reward and a thank you, write off the expenses Norman B. Williams cost US ALL and warn the U.S. Air Force that Tates Hell may be more dangerous for training than they think if Franklin County Corrections continues to parole guys like Williams into a SWAMP! Martin CapronMullet shing part of McKissack BeachIt has been brought to my attention that I misspoke at the recent county commission meeting regarding the amount of mullet shing off McKissack Beach. I stand corrected. There has been, and I hope always will be, mullet shing off McKissack Beach. I love mullet. Bo MayPolitical advice from Cus and Sand CrabI read in your sister paper, the Panama City News Herald, that the Democratic candidate for Congress from Floridas 2nd Congressional District has opened her campaign by issuing a position statement on the economy. It appears that she has a plan for the middle class and the small business person. Does that sound familiar like in Obama? What happened to the candidate that declared to represent all the people? It was about here that my computer died but I would bet my collection of political buttons that she failed to mention that in her working years that she has never bought a paper clip, rubber band or produced a payroll. Im sure she explained that she acquired her political savvy through osmosis. You see, her daddy had some political notoriety in his time. I promise, the NSA didnt help in my intercepting a communication a few days ago from two old friends, Cus and Sand Crab. Its attached for you and your readers to digest. Enjoy and have a nice day. Dear Cus, Some say the little woman running against Congressman Steve Southerland is a very re ned lady. They say that she been a keeping company in high society circles in Miami, Washington, D.C. and Tallahassee all of her life. Why shes even lived in the Governors Mansion. Yep, Im told she can hold one of those itty-bitty tea cups with the best of em. The little lady wants to represent you and me in the Congress of the United States cause she says shes one of us. How can that be? Ill bet shes never ever cleaned a mullet, treed a raccoon, tasted squirrel head stew and I really doubt shes a member of the NRA. She may have a problem convincing folks in this area of the state that she knows whats best for what we want. That aint the only problem the little lady faces. My uncle Skeeter is real smart. Why he even keeps his food stamps in his 401(k), whatever that is. Anyhow, Uncle Skeeter says that a vote for the little lady is a vote for Nancy Pelosi to return as Speaker of the House of Representatives and nobody wants that! Ive had my say. So long for now. Your friend, Sand Crab Willie Norred St. George Island Who is gonna make it? Well nd out in the long run from The Long Run by Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Bob Seger Please allow me to introduce you to David and Rose, who have been married for 42 years. Like many young couples, David and Rose began their married lives with virtually no assets. Throughout their marriage, however, they lived on 80 percent of their combined salaries. The other 20 percent was invested, saved and tithed. As young adults, the couple used part of their savings as a down payment and bought the least expensive home in a nice neighborhood. Each month, they paid extra toward principal and eventually paid off the mortgage in 20 years. They still make their residence there. David earned more than $100,000 annually only in the latter part of his career and Roses pay grade never reached that level. The couple raised three children, took an annual family vacation, and paid for braces for two children. All three children attended college, but they all worked during school. David drove an older, dependable car, a mid-size sedan and the odometer eventually passed 300,000 miles. While he kept his auto spotless, it was surrounded in his of ce parking lot by more attractive, newer models, and his af nity for his older car became a subject of mirth for his co-workers. David, who wore a coat and tie to work, always bought his suits on sale. Rose and David also bought needed household items on sale throughout their marriage. Whats the point? The couple now enjoys an investment account with a value of well over $1 million dollars. And they have no debt. When Rose retired, David asked her if she wanted anything special to celebrate that milestone. Rose asked for a trip to Ireland. The couple spent four weeks touring Europe, returned exhausted but ful lled, then resumed their relatively frugal lifestyle. Its a happy habit they cant seem to break. Im still a coupon clipper at heart, Rose said. I cant stand wastefulness. David bought a new BMW convertible recently, but only takes it out on weekends. Rose says he really prefers driving his old, dependable sedan, the one with 300,000 miles. The couple are the prototypical millionaires next door, and while they are completely ctional, their story rings true. In fact, you may recognize parts or all of your own lifestyle and history in this ctional portrayal. You would never recognize them as millionaires while waiting in line at Wal-Mart, where they did much of their shopping. Rose and David never attempted to emulate the lifestyles of those whose wealth seemed more obvious. The importance of saving and investing wisely can only be evaluated over time. Its not fancy, but it still works. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a FeeOnly and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor Outlook SHARE YOUR OPINIONSSend your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star .com Telephone 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste. The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. Memorial Day stirs a veterans memories MICHAEL ORTIZ Y PINOGuest Column Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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The Times | A5Thursday, May 29, 2014Special to The TimesOn May 21, investigators with the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce arrested John nie R. Davis, 45, and Tiffany M. Davis, 33, of Eastpoint, for drug-related offenses. A press release from the sheriffs ofce said an inves tigation revealed Johnnie Davis was actively engag ing in the manufacturing of methamphetamine. A search was conducted of the Davis residence in Eastpoint, dur ing which deputies located signicant items believed to be used in the production of methamphetamine. Cannabis and prescription pills were also located. Johnnie Davis was charged with possession of listed pre cursor chemicals, manufac ture of methamphetamines, possession of methamphet amine, and four counts of pos session of paraphernalia. Tif fany Davis was charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance, for meth amphetamine and Klonopin.Two busted for meth in EastpointThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.MAY 12Brandon L. Hill, 22, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Kenneth J. Pontones, 27, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 46, Apalachicola, two counts of sale of a controlled substance (FCSO)MAY 13June M. Davis, 30, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Marvin D. Braswell, 53, Carrabelle, Holmes County warrant (FCSO) Rachel L. Bateman, 28, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Gary D. Nichols, Jr., 40, Olive Branch, Miss., battery, violation of a domestic violence injunction and violation of probation (FCSO)MAY 15Michael T. Allen, 18, Apalachicola, assault on a school employee (FCSO)MAY 16Joseph C. Cogburn, 33, Alford, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing (FCSO) Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, operating a tattoo establishment without a license (FCSO)MAY 19Jessica M. Opie, 27, Eastpoint, domestic battery and failure to appear (FCSO) Catherine N. Millender, 36, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Arrest REPORTBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com A Port St. Joe man has been formally charged with murder in the death of his mother in their Cape San Blas residence. Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, already in custody on arson charges stemming from incidents in 2012, was charged with an open count of murder Friday in the slaying of his mother, Renee Gail Coffey, 58. Slick was rst appeared in the murder charge Fri day morning and is being held without bond in the Gulf County Jail. Investigators responding to a 9-1-1 call from Slick the afternoon of May 18 found Coffey unconscious and unresponsive in her home at 7525 Cape San Blas Road. Slick told dispatch ers in the emergency call that his mother had been assaulted, according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Coffey died of her inju ries at the scene. Slick was subsequently interviewed by deputies and later by investigators, Harrison said. Slick, a suspect in ar sons of the Masonic Lodge in Port St. Joe in 2012, and who was out on bond secured by Coffey, quickly became the prime suspect and was taken into cus tody on the arson charges, for which he faces up to 30 years in prison. A home security system indicated Slick and Coffey were the lone occupants of the Cape San Blas home at the time of the incident, in vestigators learned. The system also revealed no indication of a breach of the house or any other person in or around the house during the time frame of the incident. Slick told investigators he and his mother left the residence earlier in the day and made several stops in Callaway before returning home, which were con rmed through receipts and in-store video. Upon returning home, Slick told investigators, he went into the backyard to tend the family dog, re maining there for 30 min utes before going inside. He said he found his mother with her throat slit and her head bashed in, but I didnt know she was going to die, according to the ar resting afdavit. The home security system, however, showed Slick going inside the residence upon returning home and Coffey following roughly one minute later, according to investigators. Slick sent a text message to his brother about bring ing home a grocery item a few minutes later and is seen leaving the residence, phone in hand appearing to be in conversation, roughly three minutes prior to the 9-1-1 call. The system showed no other individual present. Investigators found what appeared to be blood spatters on Slicks shoes. JARROD SLICK RRENEE CCOFFEY Suspect arrested in Cape San Blas murder JOHNNIE RR. DDAVIsS TTIFFANY M. DDAVIsS By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A golf cart stolen Sunday night from 126 Avenue D in Apalachicola cost a local vet eran a measure of his free dom this Memorial Day. City residents are familiar with the sight of Russ Boyd cruising around town in a bright blue golf cart with his yellow Labrador retrievers, Laverne and Abby. The former pilot suffers from macular degeneration and cannot drive. The cart is his only means of transporta tion but he gets by just ne. Or he did until someone stole the cart. At around 5 a.m. Sunday, Boyd was awakened by La verne and Abby barking at the door. He went to see what was wrong but found nothing. Even if there had been someone at the cart, Im not sure I could have seen them at that distance, he said. On Sunday morning, he herded his dogs outside, plan ning to ride downtown for brunch, but to his surprise, his golf cart was gone. He called the Apalachic ola police who promised to search for the cart. But with wife Kay out of town, Boyds holiday weekend had taken a downturn. After speaking with neigh bors, Boyd learned a new grill was stolen from an adjacent yard about two weeks ago. I think its a shame that someone like my father, a veteran who gave so much for other peoples freedom, should have his taken away by a thief, said his daughter Kristie. I dont guess you can shame someone like that but shame on them anyway. Boyd said the loss of the cart, an 1 2003 Club Car, is es pecially upsetting because it has sentimental attachments. He has owned the blue cart for nine years. The dogs and cart were spotted by a Sports Illustrated photographer and appeared in the 2013 swimsuit issue, part of which was pho tographed in Apalachicola. It just has a lot of happy memories tied up in it, he said. Ah la Carte golf cart rent als has provided Boyd with a temporary replacement free of charge. Boyd said he would pay a reward for information lead ing to the return of the cart. If you can help, please con tact the Apalachicola Police Department or contact Boyd directly at 653-8573.Special to The TimesA 15-year-old Apalachicola male, who es caped custody while on a transport May 19 to the juvenile detention center in Tallahas see, was arrested in Apalachicola the follow ing day, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel. The juvenile was being transported to ju venile detention by a Franklin County deputy when he asked to use the restroom at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The juvenile escaped from custody by running from the deputy. Wakulla assisted the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce in locating the juvenile who was reported missing by Franklin County at 5:38 p.m. The search included the Wakulla County Correctional Institution K-9 Unit, Franklin County Correctional Institution K9 Unit, Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and both the Wakulla and Franklin County sher iffs ofces. Ofcers continued the search until 11:10 p.m. before calling it off for the night. Helicop ters in the area at the time of the search were not part of the law enforcement operation. On May 20, Franklin County deputies ar rested the escaped teenager at his home. He was transported back to the Wakulla County Jail where he was booked on the escape charge, and released back to the custody of the Franklin Sheriffs Ofce. The juvenile is facing charges of burglary, dealing in stolen property and grand theft in Franklin County. Deputy Will Hudson, Lt. Brent Sanders, Sgt. Ryan Muse, Deputy Gibby Gibson, Capt. Chris Savary and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated from the WCSO.Special to The TimesAn Apalachicola man who acciden tally shot himself in the leg caused a urry of concern Wednesday morning, May 21, including the brief lockdown of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. According to the sheriffs ofce, around 10:50 a.m. Na thaniel W. Lee, 25, 145 Sixth Street, was on the porch of his mothers house on Ninth Street, near Sylvester Wil liams Park, when he was putting a handgun back in his pants and shot himself in the leg, causing a nonlife-threatening esh wound. Because he had several outstanding warrants, he didnt want to get the law involved, he didnt want to go to the hospital, said Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes. Instead, he left his moth ers house, and was hiding in a nearby house when sher iffs deputies apprehended him within the hour. After being cleared by Weems Memorial Hospi tal, Lee was transported to the county jail, where he was booked on warrants connected to drug-related activities. Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce Capt. Chester Cream er said Lee was charged with resisting ofcer with violence, possession of can nabis, battery, criminal mis chief and possession of a rearm by a convicted felon. The city may charge him with discharging the weapon in city limits, he said. Lt. Kevin Newell, the school resource ofcer at the ABC School, took the precaution of ensuring that no students went outside until the man was caught. The guy was on foot, still had a bicycle, and we didnt know if he had a weapon on him, said Creamer. For safety reasons, they didnt want any kids out on the playground. Varnes said the inci dent ultimately made law enforcements job easier. We had been trying to nd him anyway, he said. I guess you could say that this helped us. NNATHANIEL W. LLEE Franklin County juvenile captured after escape Law Enforcement Gun accident in Apalachicola leads to lockdown SPECIAL TO TT HE TT Im M Es S The missing golf cartGolf cart stolen from local veteran

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evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar 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suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot Announcement Parentsitistimetoregisteryourchildforthe2014 -2015SchoolYear.Pleasepickuparegistration packetattheFranklinCountySchoolonHwy98, DistrictSchoolBoardOfceat85SchoolRoad, Eastpointorgoonlineatfranklincountyschools.org anddownloadtheregistration packet.Onceyouhavecompletedthepacketand havealltherequireddocumentsturnthepacketinto theschoolofce,yourchildsteacherorthedistrict ofce. Acompleteregistrationpacketisrequiredforyour childtoberegisteredandreceiveclassassignments forthenextyear,sopleasecompletethepacketand returnittotheschoolordistrictofceassoonas possiblesoyourchildsschedulewillbereadyforthe 2014-2015schoolyear. IfyouareregisteringforthePKprogramandwould liketobeconsideredforwraparoundservicesforthe afternoonPKprogramyouwillalsoneedtocomplete anapplicationforHeadStart.Theseformsare availableatvariouslocationsintheCountyandatthe DistrictSchoolBoardOfce. Registernowforthe20142015schoolyear. Who knows Gorrie chairs.In the rst two Chasing Shadows columns, we asked questions about photographs from the Florida Memory Project collection. This week our historical mystery is a little different. Montez Davis of Apalachicola would like to know the origin of a chair purchased by her father-inlaws sister, Patricia Smith, who lives in Mississippi. Smith, an avid yard sale attendee, purchased a chair for her brother at an out-of-state sale. What caught her eye was a stamp on the underside of the seat. The chair was manufactured by the Gorrie Furniture Company of Apalachicola. A search of the Internet provided no information about the company, but perhaps a search of local memories would prove more fruitful. Do you remember the Gorrie Furniture Company? If you have any information about the company, please contact The Times at 653-8868 or contact Lois Swoboda at lswoboda@star.com. SHADOWs S CastingBy LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ AApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is investigating an abandoned derelict vessel that sank while moored in Carrabelle. On April 30, Janice Marois, a cruiser who was living on her own boat, the Seaweed, noticed the unnamed boat was in serious trouble. I looked up and noticed that the boat was listing dangerously and appeared almost ready to sink, she wrote, in a blog. This was about 6 p.m. and it looked like her aft quarter was only about 6 inches or so above the water. Indeed, within a half hour shed overturned and sunk. Carrabelle received an inch of rain the day the boat sank and precipitation was, at times, torrential. Marois said no fuel was released when the boat capsized and sank. She had been watching the abandoned vessel for weeks. She said she believed a man and woman living on the unnamed craft didnt know how to anchor the vessel. Marois watched the boat drift around the harbor with every incom ing and outgoing tide until it nally wound up tied to a dock wedged between two abandoned shrimp boats. She said the boats oc cupants seemed uncon cerned about the situation and frequently left the craft to go to onshore bars and eateries. Marois said the boat remained docked there two weeks, and then was anchored away from the dock and the occupants appeared to have left. The vessel continued to drift with the tides until she sank. Marois said, at the time the boat sank, it did not dis play current registration numbers. An employee of Fathoms, a Carrabelle raw bar, said she spoke to the boats occupants, and they had told her they did not own the boat but planned to buy it. She said the boat had been in Carrabelle for sev eral years, both on a trailer and in the water. The capsized boat had a black bottom and was ini tially difcult to see until someone marked it with two red buoys. In a telephone interview May 23, FWC Lt. Charlie Wood said FWC is in the process of investigating the boat and has obtained the name of the owner. He said the owner was arranging to raise the vessel. Wood said that because the boat is not in the main channel, it is not a hazard to navigation.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesWords stamped on the underside of the chair. At left, the chair probably had an upholstered back at one time. Flo LO Rida IDA MEmo MO RY PRo O JECT and who is this girl?This picture we ran earlier was taken around 1965 by state photographer Karl Holland. The classroom is at Chapman High School. The man in the picture is biology teacher Orlis Burton. The girl with him is unidentied. Do you know her? Where is she now? By LOIS SWOBODA Like us on THE APAlLACHICOlLA TIMES JaJA NET Ma A Rois OIS | Special to The TimesThe derelict vessel, before it sank.Abandoned vessel sinks in Carrabelle Harbor

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, May 29, 2014 Weareso proudofyou! Yourfamily Congratulations Mason, 451818361AveE.,Apalachicola,FL(850)653-2161 AMBER EELIZaABETH ADKINS BBRITTa ANEY Fa AITH ASHLEY MMORGaAN RR Ya AN BaBABB DDIXIE HHOPE BaBACK JaAMES RROY BaBAILEY PaPAUL JOSEPH BBENTON IIIIII KKRISTINaA JEWELL BBOYD TTHaADaAEISHaA SaSA KERIaA CaCARR ASHLEY MMORGaAN CaCARROLL ALEX JUSTIN CaCAUSEY VICTORIaA LLEIGH CCOLEMaAN SavaSAVANNaAH NNICOLE CCOOK CCHaAD FRaANKLIN CCOULTER ANTONIO BBRaANDON CCROOM ALv VIaAUNaA FELICE CCUMMINGS ANDREaA LL YNN CCUPID BBOBBY JOHN CCURRY MaMA TTHEW HHOGaAN DavDAVIS MMYEL CCHaANELLE DDECOURCEY DDEBORaAH RROSE DDEMPSEY SSTEfaFAN WWILSON DDEVa AUGHN CCYNTHIaA MaMARIE DDUNCaAN SaSAMaANTHaA DaDA WN EvEVERSON SSHaANNON NNICOLE FULLER TTORRIaANTO LavLAVON FULLER LaLAURaA YaYASMIN GaGALLEGOS JaAMES DDEMETRICE GGORDON, JR. JaAMES RRICHaARD HaHARRIS AUSTIN KKYLE HaHA THCOX KKEvVIN LLOUIS HHEaA TH HHEaA THER LLEIGH HHOLTON CCHRISTIaAN WaWA YNE JONES GGRaACYN WWHITNEY KKIRv VIN GGRaAHaAM ADRON KKIRv VIN MaMARLYN SSHaAE LLEE CCODY WaWA YNE LL YSTON JaA THaAN ANIaAH MaMARTIN AUSTIN KKYLE MaMARTINaA SSTEvVEN SSIDNEY MMCANaALLY LLOGaAN KKIRK MMCLLEOD BBRaAXTON ALEXaANDRIaA MMILLENDER HaHALEIGH JaASON MMING MMORGaAN BBROOKE MMOCK JaAMES LOUIS NNEWELL WWESLEY CCOLE NNORRED TTEvVIS EEMILY PaPAGE MaMALaACHI VICTOR PaPARKER BBROOK MaMARIE PPITTMaAN KKRISTEN LaLABETH PPUTNaAL MaMASON KKYLE RaRA Y ADRIaANaA MaMARIE RREEDER CaCAULIN DaDA YNE SSHERIDaAN JESSICaA MaMARIE SSHIELDS TTRISTa AN DaDALLaAS SSHIvVER KKYLE DDOUGLaAS SSMITH JUSTIN EEMORY SSPa ANN MMICHaAEL MaMA TTHEW SSTEvVENS JENNIfFER LL YNN SSTRaA TTON JOSIE ANN TTURNER LLEaA DaDA WN VENaABLE BBRIaA DDELIaA WaWALKER LLEONaARD Fa ARRIEW WaWARD CaCAMERON CCHaASE WWHITE MMERCURY JaAMES WWYNN Franklin C County H High S School CLASS OF 2014 CONGRATS GGRADS!

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A8 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com The Franklin County High School Class of 2014 harvested about $650,000 in academic and athletic scholarships Friday night. After Stefan DeVaughn, vice president of the class, led the Pledge of Allegiance, Ashley Carroll, a member of the Class of 2014, offered a stirring rendition of the National Anthem. Deborah Dempsey, class secretary, led the invoca tion, followed by a welcome from Jathan Martin, the class president. Superintendent Nina Marks offered greetings in the form of the Ten Commandments of Good Manners. Bria Walker, the class treasurer, read the class tribute poem she had writ ten. Principal Eric Bidwell, School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander and Roderick Robinson, the high school guidance counselor, then presented medals to Walker as well as Laura Gallegos, who share valedictorian honors. Several scholarships were then presented, fol lowed by a passing of the torch through a candle lighting ceremony between class ofcers of 2014 and 2015. The evening closed with class tribute song by Logan McLeod, and acknowledgments by Principal Eric Bidwell. The following is a list of the scholarships, the name of the presenter and the recipients: Apalachicola Masonic Lodge (Carl Duncan) $500 scholarships to Cynthia Duncan and Logan McLeod Apalachicola Bay Char ter School (Chimene John son) two $250 scholarships to Gracyn Kirvin and Gra ham Kirvin Apalachicola Bay Ro tary School (Alan Pierce) $1,000 scholarship to Bria Walker Barbara Massey Memo rial (Roderick Robinson) $500 scholarship to Jathan Martin Carr Memorial (Dr. Lois Catlin) two $750 scholar ships Bria Walker and Lau ra Gallegos Centennial Bank (Brenda Ash) two $500 scholar ships to Cameron White and Jathan Martin College for Every Student (Eric Bidwell) $3,000 scholarship to Lea Venable Dixie Youth Softball (Roderick Robinson) $1,500 scholarship to Marlyn Lee Eastpoint Church of God (Scott Shiver) $1,000 scholarships to Cameron White and Alex Causey Edwin Ruge Scholar ships (Roderick Robinson) two $1,000 scholarships to Gracyn Kirvin and Jathan Martin; and two $750 schol arships to Alex Causey and Ashley Carroll FairPoint Communications (Cookie Dearinger) $750 scholarship to Ally Millender Florida Seafood Festival (Carl Whaley) Four $500 scholarships to Ally Millender, Brook Pittman, Jathan Martin and Ashley Carroll Forgotten Coast Builders Association (Roderick Robinson) two $1,500 schol arships to Ally Millender and Brook Pittman Franklin County School Nutrition Association (April Dalton), $500 scholarship to Cameron White Franklin County School Trust (Roderick Robinson) two $1,000 scholarships to Brook Pittman and Lea Venable Franklin County School Board (Jimmy Gander and Teresa Ann Martin) four $1,000 scholarships to Lenny Ward, Lea Venable, Brook Pittman and Tevis Page Franklin County Sher iffs Ofce (Lt. Allen Ham) $500 scholarship to James Harris Franklin County Teachers Association (Jamie Duhart) ve $50 scholar ships to Christina Boyd, Deborah Dempsey, Stefan DeVaughn, Haleigh Ming and Bria Walker Franklin Educational Support Personnel (Delores Croom) $50 schol arship to Cody Lyston Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association (An nada Faircloth) $500 schol arship to Cameron White Friends of the Reserve (Heidi Montgomery) two $500 scholarships to Brook Pittman and Bria Walker Franklin County Edu cation Foundation (Lois Catlin) $250 scholarships to Laura Gallegos, Bria Walk er, and Jathan Martin; and $250 scholarships in name of retiring educations Eddie Joseph to Myel DeCourcey and James Bailey, and $250 scholarships in the name fo retiring education Sharon Browning Tevis Page and Laura Gallegos HCOLA (Brenda Ash) two $250 scholarships to Bria Walker and Jathan Martin Loretta Taylor Memo rial (Roderick Robinson) two $500 scholarships to Cameron White and Ashley Carroll Love & Worship Center School of Arts (Damien Davis) $500 scholarships to Andrea Cupid and Jathan Martin Love & Worship Center Daniel White Memorial (Damien Davis) $500 schol arship to Jathan Martin Mamie Humphries Me morial (Roderick Robinson) four-year, $12,000 scholar ship to Jathan Martin Montgomery Foundation (Roderick Robinson) ve $800 scholarships to Malachi Parker, Andrea Cupid, Cameron White, Logan McLeod and James Bailey Phoenix Family (Lois Catlin) a $250 scholarship to Deborah Dempsey and Andrea Cupid Philaco Womens Club (Ginny Griner) two $1,000 scholarship to Brook Pittman and Jathan Martin Project HOPE (Myrtice Wynn) $300 scholarships to Deborah Dempsey, Andrea Cupid and Ashley Carroll Seahawk Boosters (Carl Whaley) four $500 scholar ships to Ally Millender, Gra cyn Kirvin, Logan McLeod and Cameron White. SWAT (Delores Croom) gave $700 in total gifts to Bria Walker, Jatrhan Mar tin and Andrea Cupid, who had been members since eighth grade; to Myel De Courcey, who joined in the 10th grade; and to Laura Gae4llgos and Deborah Dempsey, who joined this year. Take Stock in Children (Lois Catlin) multi-year scholarships worth nearly $25,000 annually to James Bailey, Jathan Martin, Myel DeCourcey, Deborah Dempsey, Andrea Cupid and Tevis Page, with honorary awards to Laura Gallegos and Bria Walker Tyler Eddy Memorial (Jennifer Edwards), named for a young man, an active athlete and hunter, a future member of the Class of 2014, who died while still a boy. Two scholarships, each worth $500 to James Harris and Graham Kirvin Willie Speed Memorial (Allyson Speed) two $250 scholarships to Brook Pittman and Bria Walker Yent Family Memorial (Jim Hastings) $500 schol arships to Bria Walker and Laura Gallegos BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 50X150GULFLOT $35,000 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 FranklinCountySchoolDistrictdoes notdiscriminatebasedonrace,color, religion,sex,nationalorigin,age, handicap,ormaritalstatusoragainst anygroupofciallywiththeBoyScouts ofAmericaoranyotheryouthgroup listedintitle36oftheUnitedStates Codeasapatrioticsociety.(Semi-annualnondiscriminationannouncement) LocalDavis reminds graduates you are equipped with greatnessBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com Sunday afternoons bac calaureate at the Eastpoint Church of God was a handson affair for all involved. From Lenny Wards stir ring piano solo, to Cam eron Whites strumming of his guitar, to the personal words of eight pastors who embraced in prayer all who came forward to receive, it was an inspiring afternoon. I have someone greater living on the inside of me, said Pastor Damien Davis, a 2010 Franklin High School graduate who received spir ited applause from the Class of 2014 who attended, nearly all 64 of the senior class. Davis, who was raised in the Love and Worship Cen ter and became licensed in Jan 2010, and now serves as youth pastor, studied at the Southeastern University seminary in Lakeland. He graduated from Gulf Coast State College with an asso ciates degree in business administration, and is now completing his senior year at Florida State University. Displaying polished ora torical skills, Davis began by reminding the class that in closing this chapter of their ABOVE: Ashley Carroll sings the National Anthem. RIGHT: The Franklin County School Nutrition Associations April Dalton presnts a check to Cameron White. Class of 2014 reaps academic rewards PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The TimesLEFT: Ella Speed poses with recipients Bria Walker, left, and Brook Pittman, recipients of the award given in the name of her late husband, Willie Speed. CENTER: The Florida Seafood Festivals Carl Whaley stands with scholarship winners, from left, Ashley Carroll, Jathan Martin, Brook Pittman and Ally Millender. RIGHT: Take Stock in Childrens Lois Catlin, center, stands with scholarship winners, from left, Tevis Page, James Bailey, Myel DeCourcey, Jathan Martin, Deborah Dempsey, Andrea Cupid and honorary winners Laura Gallegos and Bria Walker. Pastors pray with students at baccalaureate PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The TimesLEFT: Pastor Don Carroll prays with James Harris. CENTER: Pastor Damien Davis. RIGHT: Lenny Ward. Pastors Scott Shiver, left, and Gene McLeod pray with students.See BaACCalaALAUreaREA TeE A9

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LocalThe Times | A9Thursday, May 29, 2014 CouponExpires:6-15-14CODE:AP00 WATER SAFETY INVESTIGATION ATTENTION: ApalachicolaWaterCustomersInMay2013,theCityofApalachicolaWaterSystemnotiedresidents thattheirwaterfailedtomeetstandardssetbytheFloridaDepartment ofEnvironmentalProtectionandtheEPA. Duringroutinesafetytesting,theCityofApalachicolafoundlevels oftrihalomethanes(THMs)morethan50%higherthanestablished maximumcontaminantlevelsfordrinkingwater. THMscanalsobeinhaledandabsorbedthroughtheskin.Researchers discoveredthatbloodconcentrationsofTHMsrose5-to15-foldfollowing suchroutineactivitiesasshowering,bathingandhandwashing. Oftenfoundinindustrialsolventsandrefrigerants,THMsare consideredcarcinogenicandhavebeenlinkedtonumerouslifethreateninghealtheffects: LiverorKidneyFailure LiverorKidneyCancer ColonorRectalCancer BladderCancer AdversePregnancyOutcomes SeriousCentralNervousSystemDamage Ifyouoralovedonehasreceivedsuchadiagnosis,orafamilymember hasdiedfromoneoftheseconditions,andifyourwaterisprovidedby theCityofApalachicola,pleasecontactourrmforafreeconsultation. PANAMACITY1-800-800-8539 walborsky.comSources:U.S.EnvironmentalProtectionAgency,SafeDrinkingWaterInformationSystem(SDWIS)ViolationReport,CityofApalachicola,reportcreated 4/22/2014basedondataextractedon2/10/2014;NationalInstitutesofHealth,TapWaterandTrihalomethanes:FlowofConcernsContinues,Environmental HealthPerspectives,July2005,113(7):A474;TrihalomethanesinDrinking-water,WHOGuidelinesforDrinking-waterQuality,WHO/SDE/WSH/03.04/64 lives, theyre closer to be ing something great. Your hard work has paid off, and you are to be celebrated for your accom plishment, he said. Your cap and gown signies ac ademic accomplishment, and your endurance. There may have been times in your life you did not feel like going to school, said Davis. Its not about how you start. Its how you nish. He quoted Proverbs 3:6, In all your ways acknowl edge Him, and he will make straight your paths, and said that would lead to exercising good judgment. Always have God in view, to see him as an ever-present help, said Davis. Dont take a step without his advice. Consult his word, and dont forget to observe the footsteps of his providence. Davis urged the stu dents to nd their great ness by discovering their own passions in life. Greatness is not in one special place, or one special person, he said. Greatness has no gen der, has no economic class, and doesnt ever require you have a per fect track record. Dont let anyone cheat you out of greatness. He told the senior class I am equipped with great ness. I have greatness in side of me and had them recite together that they can accomplish with the help of the Lord. The service opened with a welcome from sa lutatorian Jathan Martin, and an occasion on the history of baccalaureate from class vice president Stefan DeVaughn. Alex Causey offered a prayer, followed by a reading from Proverbs 3:6 from Logan McLeod. Later in the service, McLeod sang to guitar accompaniment from Cameron White; both young men long active in the Fellowship of Chris tian Athletes. Savannah Cook offered a song, in which she re minded the gathering that I want to do something that matters/ I want to do something better, with the time Ive been given. Lenny Ward played Amazing Grace on the piano, to generous ap plause. After a slideshow presentation, eight clergy men stepped forward, and each prayed individually with students in groups of eight. Pastors included Ron nie Luke and Scott Shiver, from the Eastpoint Church of God; Damien Davis and Robert Davis from the Love Center; Gene McLeod and Don Carroll, from the Carrabelle Chris tian Center; David Walker from Covenant Word; and Bobby Shiver, from the United Baptist Church. Valedictorian Bria Walker closed the service with remarks. BACCALAUREATE from page A8 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The Times ABOVE: Savannah Cook. RIGHT: Pastor David Walker prays with James Bailey.

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 are Deborah Rose Dempsey and Brook Marie Pittman. Students earning High Honors, for a GPA of 3.5-3.75, are Andrea Lynn Cupid, Jessica Marie Shields, Stefan Wilson DeVaughn, Amber Elizabeth Adkins, Braxton Alexandria Millender and Gracyn Whitney Kirvin. A diploma with Honors, for a GPA between 3.0 and 3.5 will be Jennifer Lynn Stratton, Cameron Chase White, Adriana Marie Reeder, Logan Kirk McLeod, Josie Ann Turner, Morgan Ryan Babb, Alex Justin Causey, Shannon Nicole Fuller, Samantha Dawn Everson, Lea Dawn Venable, Tevis Emily Page, Malachi Victor Parker, James Roy Bailey and Graham Adron Kirvin. Receiving standard high school diplomas will be Brittaney Faith Ashley, Dixie Hope Back, Paul Joseph Benton III, Kristina Jewell Boyd, Thadaeisha Sakeria Carr, Ashley Morgan Carroll, Victoria Leigh Coleman, Savannah Nicole Cook, Chad Franklin Coulter, Antonio Brandon Croom, Alviauna Felice Cummings, Bobby John Curry, Matthew Hogan Davis, Myel Chanelle Decourcey, Cynthia Marie Duncan, Torrianto Lavon Fuller, James Demetrice Gordon, Jr., James Richard Harris, Austin Kyle Hathcox, Kevin Louis Heath, Heather Leigh Holton, Marlyn Shae Lee, Cody Wayne Lyston, Austin Kyle Martina, Steven Sidney McAnally, Haleigh Jason Ming, Morgan Brooke Mock, James Louis Newell, Wesley Cole Norred, Kristen Labeth Putnal, Mason Kyle Ray, Caulin Dayne Sheridan, Tristan Dallas Shiver, Kyle Douglas Smith, Justin Emory Spann, Michael Matthew Stevens, Leonard Farriew Ward and Mercury James Wynn. On Friday, at senior recognition night ( See Page A8 ), the students celebrated their commitment to learning. Dream what you dare to dream, go where you want to go, be what you want to be live, an anonymous quote is the class motto. The class color is blue, the class ower the lily and the song Its Time. Parents traditionally receive a ower from their son or daughter after each has received their diploma in the high school gymnasium Friday. INSIDEFranklin County High School graduates, A7 Senior Recognition Night and Baccalaureate, A8 FCHS from page A1 ST. GEORgGE IsSLAND from page A1 PHOTOs S BY DAVID ADLERST T EIN | The TimesAt left, Rhonda Lambert casts her eyes on the plaque dedicated in her late husbands honor. At right is Retired Coast Guard Chief Petty Ofcer Mark Vail. From left are Josh and Karina Hollingsworth singing the National Anthem, County Commissioner Pinki Jackel and Alex Hinson.with the St. George Lighthouse Association. Musical selections from the Franklin County High School Band, directed by Karl Lester, offered stirring and at times somber accompaniment as the gathering commemorated the sacrice of thousands of American lives, given as the ultimate contribution to the nations freedom and endurance. Dennis Barnell, a Navy veteran who was among the early, dedicated proponents of rebuilding the lighthouse after it was shattered into pieces by Hurricane Dennis, introduced the 21cannon salute. Later, he joined fellow Navy vet Fred Stanley, Marine Joe Garrity and John Ficklen III in setting off the guns. Navy veteran Fred Lambert Sr. raised the ag from where it had stood at half-mast since sunrise. He did so in honor of a central theme of the occasion, the dedication of this maritime agpole donated by his late son, Jimmy Lambert, who died in May 2013 after a battle with colon cancer An avid sailor, boater and sherman, Lambert and his wife, Rhonda, had a house on the island for almost four decades. Friends and family wanted to donate to honor his memory in Lighthouse Park, and a maritime agpole was chosen. Jimmys widow was on hand to unveil the plaque at the base of the pole. He was a patriotic American who loved his country and his ag, Lamberts friend Alex Hinson said. Let this be a symbol of hospitality and friendship. He said his friend always had a ready smile and a ready hug. You would not meet a nicer person; you could not have a better friend. Hinson said when the Lamberts would arrive at the island, they would put out the ag at their Plantation home, which said to all We are here; you are welcome; come see us. Hinson said he hoped the same is now being said to visitors to the island as they arrive at the lighthouse, its centerpiece. This is a tting tribute, he said. The Lamberts niece and nephew, Josh and Karina Hollingsworth, sang the National Anthem, followed by an invocation from Rev. Themo Patriotis, of the St. George Island United Methodist Church. The men and women we honor today have shown great love, not just for friends but for strangers, he said. For those they never met. Were praying for those who are alive today. Theyre giving their lives right now so that we may pray. County Commissioner Pinki Jackel followed with the keynote remarks. We are reminded as those solemn shots rang out of those we have known and loved, those that we have admired and respected, and those that we will never forget making the ultimate sacrice one can make for the preservation of our freedom. Jackel, whose district includes the entire island, outlined a brief history of Memorial Day and of the more than 1 million lives lost on the battleeld in U.S. wars. Our nation is currently at war, and today we should take the time to say a prayer for our active troops and their families and to thank a veteran for their service to our country and for our freedom. The commissioner told of her father-in-law, a decorated World War II veteran who received two Purple Hearts and a Silver Star during his service in Europe. She told of his book The Lucky Infantryman, which got its name because he was lucky to have served and lucky to call himself a veteran. Jackel closed with a thankyou to all who have labored long hours to create and expand a rebuilt lighthouse, to the Lambert family and for everyones wonderful display of the importance of family and love for each other and your community. Retired Coast Guard Chief Petty Ofcer Mark Vail read the poem My Name is Old Glory, and the afternoon closed with more selections by the high school band.

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LocalThe Times | A11Thursday, May 29, 2014 in grade level or better performance of almost 20 percentage points in reading and nine in math, to where both subjects are now at the 53-54 percent level, almost identical to 2011. In the last two years, the ABC School had reached to almost three-quarters of its student body at grade level or better in reading, and almost two-thirds in math. Franklin School is now 6 percentage points behind, at 47 percent at grade level or better in both reading and math. This is considerably better than last years math scores, where just 29 percent of third-graders were at grade level or better. In fact, since the FCAT 2.0 was instituted in 2011, the third-grade math scores are 16 percentage points better than theyve ever been. In reading, the improvement was 14 percentage points better than last years 33 percent. The 47 percent of students at pace with their learning is about the same as in 2011, when it was 48 percent. We were pleased to receive some reports of growth, a direct reflection of teachers teaching the standards required for mastery, Superintendent Nina Marks said. As the data is studied and the strengths and weaknesses evaluated, decisions on the direction of the pre-K-12 school will be made. Thank you to the teachers, parents and community volunteers who have been involved with creating a well-rounded education for the students of Franklin County, she said. ABC Principal Chimene Johnson said she was proud of the hard work of the schools third-graders and staff. Student proficiency in reading and math was just below state average. We had several new students in our third grade and both teachers developed intervention plans to meet the needs of all students. This year, schools across the state were initially mandated to implement Common Core standards. Our teachers used Common Core curriculum as well as merging the FCAT 2.0 Florida standards. They did a wonderful job of tracking our student progress through progress monitoring three times a year and analyzing the data to drive their instruction.Franklin math scores on the riseA breakdown of the data for the 59 Franklin third-graders in mathematics shows that in all ve categories from the lowest performing 1s to the highest performing 5s the move was in a positive direction. The largest drop was in the number of 1s, who are students who fail to show any mastery of the test questions and appear to be at least a year behind, if not more, in learning gains. The number of 1s dropped considerably, from 45 down to 19 percent. The growth at level 2s was at 34 percent, 9 percentage points better than last year. At level 3s, which is grade level, it was at 34 percent, 13 points better than last year. Level 4s roughly doubled, from 5 to 10 percent; and Level 5s remained at 3 percent of the third-graders. At ABC, level 1s and level 2s in math both grew, to where 46 percent of the schools 37 thirdgraders have a level of achievement below passing. Level 3s in math dropped from 37 to 30 percent, while level 4s and 5s were both pretty constant, from 20 to 19 percent of 4s, and 6 to 5 percent of 5s. At ABC, level 5s in reading shrank by a tiny amount, from 11 to 8 percent, while level 4s contracted considerably, from 40 to 25 percent of third-graders. The largest growth was in level 2s, considered behind grade level, which expanded from 9 percent of third-graders to fully one-third. Level 1s also shrank by only a little, from 17 to 14 percent. At Franklin, level 5s in reading were at 20 percent, the lowest that performance level has been since 2011. Level 2s are at 32 percent, almost identical to last year. The percentage of level 3s was at 22 percent, the best its been in four years and twice the percentage it was last year, albeit for a smaller number of third-graders, with 16 fewer tested than the 75 in 2013. Level 4s at Franklin went from 21 to 17 percent, while level 5s were at 8 percent, much better than the 1 percent last year. FCAT from page A1 Dear Heavenly Father, O Holy One, Thank you for this beautiful day. Please bless and protect everyone who is here today. God, you are the commander of heavens armies. Lord, I would like to think that more than 1 million men and women who have lost their lives are now in heaven under your command. Lord, please bless and comfort all the families who have lost loved ones in wars. There will always be wars and rumors of wars until our Lord returns to Earth again. Please bless and protect our servicemen and women who are serving throughout the world due to the war on terrorism. May we now have a moment of silence and honor our veterans who lost their lives defending our nation. There was a moment of silence for those who have fallen in defense of America and to preserve freedom. Miller then was presented with a plaque commemorating a Lifetime Service Award from the Legion post. It also was announced that Franklin County High School senior Stephan DeVaughn is recipient of the Posts School Medal Award for History and Patriotism. Legion member Dan Cox offered special thanks to Greg Kristofferson for placing ags at the grave of veterans to mark Memorial Day and Veteran Day The group then adjourned to a covered dish lunch, followed by the retirement of American ags. Normandy and perished there. These are the champions who helped free a continent, President Ronald Reagan said in a 1984 dedication ceremony. These are the heroes who helped end a war. Mirabella told of other soldiers who gave their lives and were honored by presidents with the Medal of Honor. We dont just honor those with the highest medals or even those who participated in the most hellacious re ghts, he said. We honor the more than 1 million men and women who lost their lives defending America in wars from the Revolution to the global war on terrorism. Mirabella told of Pvt. First Class Jesse Givens, who wrote a letter to his 6-year-old daughter Dakota before he left for Iraq, with instructions for his family to open it only if he died there. Never be afraid to be yourself, he wrote his daughter. I will always be there in our park, when you dream, so we can play. I love you, and hope someday you will understand why I didnt come home. Please be proud of me. The ceremony featured a joint singing of God Bless America and the laying of a wreath at the Three Servicemen Statue Detail, by Navy veteran Frank Cook. APALACHICOLA from page A1 FREEDOMBy John Alton RobinsonLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe empty chair is a reminder of and memorial to those who gave all ghting for freedom. CARRABELLE from page A1From the tomb of the Unknown Soldier To the silver-haired crowns of our fathers, From the shores of Tripoli To the Paci cs pearl-green waters, I wish to give a tribute, A four-starred salute today, For those who fought so bravely For our freedom and American way. We take our rights for granted, But they were earned in blue-red blood And courage beyond the call of duty In Frances cold, wet mud. Beginning with the Revolution Through the Saudi Arabian sands Men have fought and suffered And died on foreign lands. So salute this Memorial Day And many more to come. Through blood and guts and glory, Our freedom has been won. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesChaplain Charles Scott offers a closing prayer. At top is the laying of the wreath at the Three Servicemen Statue Detail.

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A12 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 KITTENS!Justlookatthisbeautifullitterofkittens.We havedozensofgorgeouskittensjustwaiting tobeadopted.Theyhavebeentested, vaccinatedandspayedandneutered.They willmakegreatfamilypetsand/orcompanions forpeoplelivingalone.Wehavereducedour adoptionfeefrom$90.00to$75.00duetothe sheernumberswearetryingtohome. Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocialize allofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingto bringoneofouranimalsintotheirhometobe fosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucan sparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisit theFranklinCountyHumaneSocietyat244 StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogonto thewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtosee moreofouradoptablepets. Kaci Brooke Harrell, daughter of Dona and Casey Harrell of Eastpoint, celebrated her 4th birthday on Sunday, May 25, with a Frozen themed party at her home with family and friends. Maternal grandparents are Connie and DeWitt Polous of Eastpoint. Greatgrandparents are Ruby Dykes and the late GW. Dykes of Apalachicola and Mary and James Polous of Eastpoint. Paternal grandmother is Deneen Crum Harrell of Eastpoint. Great-grandparents are James and Barbara Crum of Eastpoint. SocietySpecial to the TimesM.W. Gordons new murder mystery, Gill Net Games, features Apalachicola and the Gulf Coast both as crime scenes and as ground zero for recent controversial changes to Floridas gill net ban. Dead bodies entangled in gill net are popping up in the Gulf, and near law professorturnedy shing guide McDuff Brooks Montana cabin. Someone is seeking revenge for the passage of the ban, which pits commercial shermen against recreational anglers, Florida Fish and Wildlife, and animal rights activists. The author presumably knows whereof he writes. He is a University of Florida College of Law professor emeritus and a Montana y sherman. Join him at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St. in Apalachicola, for an afternoon of lively conversation and book signing from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, May 31.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A new art exhibit on display at the Plantation Clubhouse features four local artists with distinctively different styles. At an open house Sunday, May 25, art lovers were treated to a glimpse of works by four Franklin County residents who work in a wide variety of media. Each artist was given a wall of the Plantation Room to ll, and the artists more than ful lled the mission. Katherine Neill, occupying the east wall, describes herself as a self-taught artist. A resident of Franklin County since 1990, she paints in watercolor, oil and acrylic, and draws using charcoal and ink. She creates her pieces en plein air. Her paintings on display at the clubhouse include portraits and landscapes. Much of Neills work is minimalistic, and her creations have an airy, Impressionistic feel. Subjects on display include Dog Island, East Pass and three haunting winter beach scenes. Neills works can also be viewed at the Oystercatcher on U.S. 98 in Apalachicola. On the southern wall are oils by 40-year resident Joyce Estes of Eastpoint., who also has painted silks on display. Her realistic oils include beach scenes in cool inviting colors with sugary sand and huge cloudy skies. Other landscapes are cool and green like Live Oak and Quiet Marsh, both rendered in oil. Her silks depict local wildlife, plants and landscapes. Estes is the president of Silk Painters International. Her work is also on display at Sea Oats Gallery on St. George Island. On the east wall is a display of sculptures and assemblies by Ken Richardson, who moved to the Plantation from Missouri two years ago. His works are fanciful animals created from junk. Richardson said when he rst began to dabble in art, he sometimes purchased material but eventually resolved to use only found objects. A fearfully large mosquito is built around an old aluminum pitcher. Two charming no seeums are created from a pair of salt and pepper shakers provided by a friend. Several of his sh have wristwatch eyes created from broken wristwatches that once belonged to his late father. Richardson said his father was the inspiration for his style of sculpture. He always made things from nothing, he said. His current exhibit is composed of animals fashioned mainly from wood and aluminum. He also experimented with clay, welding and is an accomplished musician. On the north wall hangs a body of work by Lynn Wilson, who has owned a home in Franklin County since 1985 and resides in Apalachicola. Wilsons works, often done en plein air, are realistic landscapes built around the working waterfront, historic local structures and the natural beauty of the barrier islands, beach and swamp. While she has painted for many years, Wilson recently embraced her artistic ambitions and threw herself into painting full time after selling the Coombs House Inn. She is a founding member of the Apalachicola Pastel Association and founding president of the Artists of Apalachicola. Bunny Ison, chair of the Plantation Arts Committee, said the show would run until Labor Day. She said in planning the show, her goal was to display the work of artists who reside here full-time. The exhibition is open to Plantation homeowners and guests, and visitors renting a home in the Plantation. For security reasons, the Plantation Room remains locked when no event is in progress, but for the duration of the summer art show, it will be opened from 5-7 p.m. Thursdays. A number of works sold during Sundays premiere. Ison said all four artists have committed to providing replacements for pieces sold throughout the duration of the exhibit, so the walls of the Plantation Room will remain full the entire summer. KELLEHER TO COMMAND LANARK LEGION POST Happy BIRTHDAYKaci Harrell turns 4M.W. GORDONGill net mystery author to sign book THE APALACHICOLA TIMESPlantation summer art focuses on county artistsA school of fanciful sh from the exhibit of works by Ken Richardson. Many of Katherine Neills paintings, like December here, are airy and minimalistic. Garden Gate by Lynn Wilson is an inviting landscape. Beach Path by Joyce Estes is rendered in painted silk.PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesFrom left, a familiar Apalachicola landmark is painted plein air by Lynn Wilson. Blue Parrot by Katherine Neill has an Impressionistic feel. No Seeum by Ken Richardson was assembled from discarded metal. Live Oak is an oil painting by Joyce Estes.LOIS SWOBODA | The Times On July 1, Tim Kelleher takes the helm at Camp Gordon Johnston Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village. His training begins June 2. Kelleher achieved the rank of sergeant during his service as a Marine from 1973 to 1979. A resident of Lanark Village, he replaces Commander Tommy Larsen, also of Lanark.

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The Times | A13Thursday, May 29, 2014 The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000.MONDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed DiscussionTUESDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, OpenWEDNESDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, ClosedTHURSDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion.FRIDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open DiscussionSATURDAYAlligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, OpenSUNDAYEastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference SacredHeartofJesusCatholicChurch-YourChurchontheCoast-2653Highway98East P.O.Box729,LanarkVillage,Fl32323Pastor:FatherEddieJones MassSchedule:Saturday:(Vigil)5:00PM Sunday:7:30AM(850)697-3669 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService Jennifer Rhodes McClainSunrise: Feb. 6, 1961Sunset: June 1, 2013 Dear Mama It seems like it was only yesterday that you were here with us and today makes a year that the Lord called you home. There are no words to express how much we LOVE & MISS you & Molly. So today we ask an Angel to give you lots of HUGS & KISSES from your family & friends. So while youre sleeping, your legacy lives on through your family & friends who knew you the best. Thinking of you on this beautiful day.Love Always,Your family A memorial service for Michel James Amaltano, beloved husband of Deb and beloved father of Taylor, will be Tuesday evening. June 3, 2014. Born July 15, 1962, Michel left us in body on Dec. 8, 2013, but not in spirit or love. There will be a small gathering at Carrabelle Beach on Tuesday at dusk, around 8:30 or 8:45 p.m. Weather permitting, we will be sending sky lanterns to heaven in celebration of Michel and his life. Those who knew and loved him are welcome to attend.Michel James AmaltanoGregory Carl Binkley of Carrabelle passed away Friday, May 16, 2014, along with his wife, Barbara Dean Binkley. Funeral services were Friday afternoon, May 23, at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel in Dothan, Ala. He was born June 11, 1952, in Louisville, Ky. He was preceded in death by his parents, John G. Binkley and Blanche Lois Nair. Survivors include his sister, Sharon (Bill) Lone, Mountville, S.C.; his brothers, James Binkley, S.C., and Ronald (Judy) Binkley, Leavenworth, Ind.; his best friend, Tim Murray; and numerous nieces, nephews and friends. Flowers will be accepted and contributions can be made to The Wounded Warriors Project Association, Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675.Gregory Binkley Barbara Dean Binkley of Carrabelle passed away Friday, May 16, 2014, along with her husband, Gregory Carl Binkley. Funeral services were Friday afternoon, May 23, at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel in Dothan, Ala. She was born March 19, 1957, in Marion, Ala. She was preceded in death by her parents, Royce L. Grant and Marie Skinner Grant; her sister, Helen Harielson, and her grandson Grant Waring Reed. Survivors include her children, Kristy Jenkins Reed and anc, Taylor Barbaree, of Dothan; Henry Hauenstein of Quincy; and David Hauenstein of Bonifay; her grandchildren Jordis and Judson Reed, and Gracelyn Hauenstein; her brothers and sisters, Lamar and Joann Grant of Bonifay, Lisa and Wayne Stephens of Ponce de Leon, Lynn and John Archer of Baker and Tanessa and Ricky Byrd of Ponce de Leon; and numerous nieces, nephews and friends. Flowers will be accepted, or contributions can be made to the American Red Cross.Barbara Binkley Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola would like to invite friends and family to join us on Sunday, June 8, at 11:45 a.m., following our church service, for a memorial reception in memory of Ruby Maddox-Radebaugh. Radebaugh, 92, passed away at her Apalachicola home Saturday afternoon, May 24, 2014.Ruby Maddox-RadebaughHope you can join us for lunch this afternoon. This will be the last Thursday lunch until the fall. We will, however, have a Fathers Day lunch on Thursday, June 12, and a lunch on Thursday, July 4. June 7 will be the monthly, Over 50 Dance. All you need to bring is a snack to share, your favorite beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. Jim the DJ will start off at 7 p.m. Both the lunch and dance are at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center in Carrabelle. Put your left foot out and bring it back. Didnt get to the Legion on Monday. The Memorial Day ceremonies were always moving, and Im sure this one was, too. Called Nick Dadona, and the picnic lunch at the boat club was very well attended. He said to thank you all again for your support. Did you catch the article last week in the Times about the trip to Washington, D.C.? It was great. Our friends and neighbors, Mary Britz and Don MacLean, had a wonderful time. Congratulations to you both! Got word that Colleen Holden had passed away. She was the woman that made the beautiful porcelain dolls. We were very good friends for many years. Pray for her eternal rest and for strength and comfort for Mike and the family. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember, friends are like stars in the sky. We dont always see them, but we know theyre there. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry.Eula RochelleI would like to thank the Lord, for his guardian angels for building my ramp for me, where I can go in and out of my house. May God bless you all with love,Eula RochelleI would like to recognize Franklin County School senior Jessica Shields for the amazing job she did creating and painting the sets for the play Hairspray recently presented at Franklin County School. I sincerely regret that her name was inadvertently omitted from the plays program. Jessica is one of our most talented seniors, and we are so grateful for the time and effort she put into the play. She devoted countless hours painting the backdrops for Mr. Pinkys Hefty Hideaway and the bedroom scene. Her help meant so much to us. We could not have presented this play without her. With sincere regrets,Patty CreamerMedia specialist Franklin County School Obituaries In Loving MemoryEMORY Thursday lunches wrap up today until fallSpecial to The TimesRevival in Eastpoint through SundayTherell be faith in action this week in Eastpoint, with a tent revival daily through Sunday, June 1, next to Taylors Building Supply, 268 U.S. 98. The theme is How to Stand in Difcult Times Keeping Your Faith. Evening services start at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 31, for Youth Night, with hot dogs and drinks served at 5:30 p.m. Sunday morning breakfast will be served at the tent at 8 a.m., with Sunday morning services at 9:30 a.m.Market Days at Messer Pavilion SaturdayCarrabelle United Methodist Church and Gods Ministry for the needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 31, at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink. Music will be provided by local talent. Thank you all for visiting us at the Riverfront Festival last month. We are looking forward to seeing you again. Remember, God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing.Healthy Start Baby Shower TuesdayHealthy Starts sixth annual Baby Shower will be at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, at The Centennial Building, 300 Allen Memorial Way in Port St. Joe. We invite all Franklin and Gulf County pregnant women, new parents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for a special evening. There will be information stations on various topics such as car seat safety, shaken baby, childbirth, safe sleep, community resources and vendors offering merchandise for purchase. Free admission, plus food, fun, games and lots of fabulous door prizes! Special games for Dads! For more information, call 800-8959506, ext. 100. Faith BriefsRIEFS AA Meeting ScheduCHEDULeE Cards of ThanHANKsSJessica Shields LanarLANARK newsNEWSJim Welsh Faith

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, May 29, 2014www.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com A colony of rare plants is being marked for preservation by Duke Energy. A routine environmental survey along the Duke Power transmission lines between Eastpoint and Carrabelle has revealed something highly unusual. Telephus spurge, Euphorbia telephiodes, isnt much to look at but it is quite rare. This relative of familiar plants like poinsettia, crown of thorns, and pencil cactus, is found only in Bay, Gulf and Franklin Counties within 4 miles of the Gulf of Mexico. Biologists Annie Doyle and Lee Walton of Flatwoods Consulting Group, an environmental consulting rm employed by the energy giant, were surveying along transmission lines in Gulf and Franklin Counties prior to pole replacement when they discovered a colony containing about 1,500 of the rare spurge plants. Walton said Dr. Vivian Negrn-Ortiz, at the Panama City of ce of US Fish and Wildlife (USFW), was excited about the discovery. It is an important nd because telephus spurge habitat is usually in con ict with development, so management they will be providing is important, she said. Negrn-Ortiz, who is the recovery lead for 10 listed plant species in the Panhandle, has written extensively of telephus spurge. She said the plant is unusual in that it exhibits tremendous genetic variation, which might indicate it was once common in its current range. Surveys conducted between 1988 and 2007 indicate fewer than 20,000 remain. Telephus spurge is protected under Florida law. It is illegal to dig, damage, transport or sell this perennial herb, which the USFW lists as a threatened species. Telephus spurge is threatened due to development and wild re suppression. The plant thrives in disturbed areas like power line easements and in pine forest with an open canopy. Populations tend to appear after a wild re or a disturbance like mowing, and dwindle as taller plants increase in number. The newly discovered group of plants is located in an area of scrub adjacent to a wetland. Walton and Doyle said this is not the only unknown colony of telephus spurge they have found during their power easement survey, but is by far the largest, and possibly the second largest known colony in existence. Populations are also known to exist in Box R. The spurge was rst described by famed Apalachicola botanist Alvan Chapman in 1860. It has a male and female form and a large tuberous root that allows it to persist in times of drought. It can grow to be 12 inches tall. It has several stems and waxy foliage with cuplike reddish-green owers that appear from April through August. Negrn-Ortiz praised Duke Power for its cooperative attitude in managing the rare plant. According to a ve-year status review for telephus spurge prepared by Negron-Ortiz, the species has a high potential for recovery. But in a telephone interview, she said global climate change could negatively affect telephus spurge because of its limited range. Wayne Richardson, environmental specialist for Duke Power, said the area would be marked with cardboard signs until metal signs can be installed. He said measures would be taken to protect the plants from routine mowing. Negrn-Ortiz said the power easement is an ideal area for managing the rare plant since there is no tree canopy. Richardson said the colony would be monitored for two years after the new poles are installed. Negrn-Ortiz said a new survey of known populations of telephus spurge is planned for next year. Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LO W CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May2981 7430% Fri,May3081 7230% Sat,May3183 7430% Sun,June182 7530% Mon,June281 7430% Tues,June382 7430% Wed,June482 7510% JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVAL ALSOCLEANGUTTERSAND IRRIGATIONINSTALLATION, PLANTINGANDBEDDING AVAILABLE CALLJOE@850-323-0741 ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM www.apalachtimes.com OUTDOORSPage 14Beginning in late April, intrepid wild ower enthusiasts can track down threadleaf sundew in our area and this rare beauty is well worth the effort needed to nd it. Threadleaf sundew or Drosera liformis is also commonly known as dew-thread. Some consider the variety found in Florida to be a separated species, D. Tracyi. Other experts believe all threadlead sundews are a single species and this is supported by the fact that widely separated populations can interbreed and produce fertile offspring. This plant occurs naturally only in wetlands. While populations are found from Nova Scotia south to Florida and along the states coastal plain, it is considered imperiled throughout its range. It is listed as an endangered species in Florida and is believed extinct in Rhode Island. Like its small common cousin the sundew, threadleaf sundew is a carnivore. During the winter, the foliage shrinks back to a at rosette but when warm weather arrives, new leaves appear. The leaves are stem-like and unroll like the ddleheads of ferns. They are covered in tentacles coated with mucilage that ensnare insects, which are then digested. Protein obtained from feeding is stored in large roots. The leaves may be green or red and are especially beautiful when backlit, as the mucilage glistens like crystal. In our area threadleaf sundew can ower from May through October. The ve-petaled owers are pink to pale lavender and borne on tall lea ess stems. Like most sundews, this plant is easily propagated from leaf cuttings. It can be purchased from many sources but remember, it is illegal to collect this plant in the wild. To root leaf cuttings, oat them in distilled water in a small jar wrapped in plastic. These plants prefer full sun and nutrient-free sandy soil. Never fertilize carnivorous plants.Threadleaf sundew a rare beauty BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda Measures taken to protect rare plant SPONSORED BY As we enter the last week of May, most schools will be letting out for the summer and the crowds of anglers will soon arrive. Fishing is great now from the surf and from shore as well. Good inshore species such as trout and red fish are returning in good numbers to the head of St. Joe Bay. Surf fishing on the Cape has been producing great pompano and whiting catches with the occasional shark in the mix. State water red snapper opened last weekend to great success and many anglers took advantage of the good weather to bring in some great fish. Our state season is short this year, so get out when can.MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are loaded with red snapper and most are higher in the water than you think, so lighten up your tackle and bring plenty of chum. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesBiologists Annie Doyle, left, and Lee Walton, center, discovered the colony of spurge. They are contractors who work closely with Wayne Richardson, right, an environmental specialist for Duke Energy. Below is a Telephus spurge.

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CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SPORTs S www.apalachtimes.comThursday, May 29, 2014 ASection Special to The Times Two teams from Wewahitch ka, populated by players from Franklin County, were the big winners in the co-ed softball tournament played at DW Wil son Field on May 17. Sis teams took part, with all proceeds going to help send Dixie Youth League teams to state tournaments. Participating were the Sharks, sponsored by Shaun Donahoe Real Estate; the Panthers, sponsored by Carrabelle Christian Center; Jerrys Logging from Wewa; Tauntons Family, from Wewa; Liberty County; and the Finch team. The winners, shown at top, were Jerrys Logging, with play ers, from left, Leigh Wray, Jerry Taunton Kim McMillion, Lloyd Alford, Amy Boone, Jamie Par rish, Timmy Poloronis, Caleb Kembro, Steve Bass, Tyler Polo ronis, Jodie Parrish, Willie McNair and David Barber. The runners-up, shown at bottom, were Tauntons of Wewa, and featured, from left, Jeremy Summers, Kim Johnson, Hunter Hysmith, Ashleigh Price, Jerry Taunton, Wesley Taunton, Mary Taunton Luke Taunton, Tim Taunton and Jay Shiver.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com EASTPOINT By and large, Franklin County High School coach Aaron York was pleased with his teams play in the spring jamboree May 20. That is, until the last 3:30 in the game, when a fum ble, and a pair of intercep tions, led to 19 unanswered points, and a 31-14 Temple Christian victory over the Seahawks. In all, the Soldiers picked off ve of sophomore quarterback Matt Murrays passes, and scooped up a pair of fumbles, to come back from a 14-0 decit ear ly in the second quarter. We always want some body to throw the ball, said Billy Reese, coach of the Class 2A Jackson ville school for the past six years. Our bread-and-butter is pass defense. Reese had eighth grade quarterback Reynard Grif n briey open the game briey in place of sopho more starting quarterback Aaron Cabrera-Steel, but that led to a fumble and interception that the Seahawks were able to capi talize on. After back-to-back catches by junior wide receiver Cole Wheeler, freshman running back Marshall Sweet was able to run it in from the 2 with 2:10 left in the rst quarter. Sophomore kicker Walker DeVaughn booted the extra point for a 7-0 lead. About three minutes later, Sweet ran it in from the 24yard line, and sopho more kicker Josue Baraho na booted the extra point, for a 14-0 lead. With 7:06 left in the half, Temple Christian eighth grader Jahveon Nicholson intercepted the ball and ran it into Seahawk terri tory. Three plays later, with 5:00 left, Cabrera-Steele hit Nicholson with a 9-yard pass and the Solders were on the scoreboard. With 38 seconds left in the half, Nicholson again picked off a Murray pass, and this time CabreraSteele followed suit by running the ball in from 12 yards out. The Seahawks kept their lead at 14-12 through the entire third quarter, and most of the fourth be fore sophomore fullback Trenton Lee coughed up the ball on a fourth-and-one dive, with 3:30 left to play. About two minutes later, Cabrera-Steele hit junior Isaiah Carpenter on a short curl for a 25-yard touch down score to go ahead 18-14. Ten seconds later, Joe Kapral picked off a pass at the Seahawk 35 yard line, and galloped in for a 24-14 bulge. Carpenter ended the scoring with a pick-6 in from the 40-yard-line, fol lowed by a Nicholson kick, for a 31-14 score. We turned the ball over way too much, said York, who dressed 41 players for the spring outing. We just cant turn the ball over and be successful. SEAHAWK FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Va ARsitSITY 2014 Friday, Aug. 22 Wewahitchka (Fall Classic) Away 8 Friday, Aug. 29 Evangelical Christian Academy (Fort Meyers) Away 7 Friday, Sept. 5 Red Level High School, Alabama Home 7 Friday, Sept. 12 Sneads Home 8 Friday, Sept. 19 Liberty (District) Away 7:30 Friday, Sept. 26 Aucilla Christian Away 7:30 Friday, Oct. 3 Port St. Joe (District) Home 7:30 Friday, Oct. 10 Open Friday, Oct.17 West Gadsden (District) Homecoming Home 7:30 Thursday, Oct. 30 Wewa (Seafood Festival) Home 7:30 Friday, Nov. 7 Vernon Away 8 Friday, Nov. 14 1st Round State Playoffs TBA Photos HOTOS couCOU Rtes TES Y ofOF Ki I M Johnson OHNSON | Special to The TimesWewa teams win co-ed tourney Page 15LEFT: Seahawk sophomore linebacker Jake Robinson tackles Soldier quarterback Aaron Cabrera-Steel. RIGHT: Seahawk sophomore kicker Walker DeVaughn kicks an extra point.Turnovers plague Hawks in spring game Photos HOTOS bB Y DAVID ADLER R STEIN | The TimesSeahawk sophomore quarterback Matt Murray prepares a handoff.

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A16 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 Local By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com This weekend, Franklin County was visited by 32 energetic activists. For the third consecutive year, Bike and Build wheeled in on US 98 and made an overnight stop at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola. Sister Jeanne Drea said she received the rst inquiry from the group by telephone in 2011. They called and asked, Do you have showers? and I said No, but we have a hose, she said. On Sunday evening, the cyclists were treated to a lowcountry boil for supper and slept on mats on the oor of the parish hall. Since 2003, Bike and Build has contributed around $5 million to housing groups to fund affordable housing projects planned and executed by almost 1,500 young adults. Riders alternate days of riding and construction. Riders on the southern route start in Jacksonville and wind up in Monterey, California. On travel days, the group bikes around 60 miles. The bikers traveled from here to Panama City and then to Defuniak Springs. The group will be on the road for two-and-a-half months. Beginning in 2006, following Hurricane Katrina, the southern route was moved to skirt the Gulf Coast from the Panhandle to New Orleans and build days have focused on restoring communities damaged by the 2005 storm. The group will spend June 2 through 7 doing construction in New Orleans, and then travel to Baton Rouge where they will spend another day working as builders before taking off for North Texas. Riders are accompanied by a support van but they still travel light. Each biker has a hydration pack to make sure they have plenty to drink in hot weather. They carry oor mats for sleeping and quick drying microber towels. Many of the riders also carry video cameras on their handlebars. Although they have days off built into the trip, they stop riding only for dangerous weather like lightning. Participants need not have previous building or cycling experience, or even a bicycle; Bike and Build provides the bicycle, which participants are allowed to keep upon completion of the trip. Bicycles are manufactured by Giant Bikes, USA of Newbury Park, California and are provided to Bike and Build at a discount. Riders are required to complete 10 hours of  sweat equity  working with affordable housing groups before beginning the trip, and are required to ride at least 500 miles in training before their summer begins. Group leader Gregory Powell said the group works closely with Habitat for Humanity. Each group of riders has four team leaders. For most participants, who stopped here, this was their rst crosscountry ride. Leaders arrange for lodgings on the trip and take turns driving the support vehicle. There were 32 cyclists ranging in age from 18 to 25 in the group that biked through the county this year. The majority of Bike and Build participants are college students. Each rider must earn at least $4,500 to win the right to participate in a cross-country adventure. Participants come from 47 states and Canada. Part of the money is used to support construction projects during the trip and the rest is donated to affordable housing projects chosen by the riders. Each rider can send $500 to the project or community of their choice. According to Wikipedia, Bike and Build was spun off from the  Yale  Habitat Bicycle Challenge, and was founded by Marc Bush, a Yale alumnus. He was also the director of Bike and Build from 2003-05. Chris Webber, a trip leader on the northern U.S. route in 2005, was hired as Bike and Builds rst program director in 2006. He was hit and killed in a pedestrian accident in New York City in March 2007. Bike and Build maintains a memorial fund in his honor, and raises money for the fund with an alumni-only ride that takes place in Florida each winter. To learn more about Bike and Build visit http:// bikeandbuild.org/cms/ .Activists ride for affordable housing LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesBike and Build riders setting off at 8:30 a.m. on Memorial Day are, from left, Gaurang Garg, Wyandotte, Mich.; Kristin Heinrich, Andover, Mass; Morgan Durand, Charlotte, N.C.; Molly McLaughlin, Kalamazoo, Mich.; Elle Martin, Fort Worth, Texas; and Dan Kaminsky, Brooklyn, N.Y.Special to The TimesSacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf is expanding its services once again in Franklin County. Beginning Wednesday, June 4, Sacred Heart Rehabilitation will accept patients for physical and occupational therapy in Apalachicola. Speech therapy will be added in the coming weeks. The clinic will offer assessment and treatment of orthopedic, neurologic and movement disorders caused by pain, illness, as well as speech and language disorders. Patients will be treated one-on-one by a licensed therapist. Staff at Sacred Heart Rehabilitation in Apalachicola will include physical therapists Joe Saniesteban, PhD, and Anne Kenny for physical therapy services. Anne and Joe are current residents of Apalachicola and are excited to be serving the Franklin County area. Licensed occupational therapist Chrystal Cox, MS, will be providing occupational therapy. She currently resides in Port St. Joe with her husband, Phil. If you are interested in these services, you may visit the new location at 76 Market Street or call 3701780 for more information. You may also ask your doctor for a referral and have it faxed to 370-1781.Special to the TimesThis year continues to be a big year for author Michael Lister. In 2014, hes celebrating his 20th anniversary as a writer with the re lease of his third Jimmy Soldier Ri ley noir novel, The Big Hello. This follows 2011s The Big Goodbye and 2013s The Big Beyond. The Big Hello is the conclusion of the thrilling noir trilogy set in the Panhandle of the 1940s. Find out Soldier and Laurens fate in the thrilling conclusion to Listers landmark Big noir series. Walk the mean streets of wartime Panama City with Jimmy Soldier Riley, a wound ed, woman-haunted knight errant in Listers resonant new noir series Publishers Weekly calls a promising private detective series set in 1940s Florida, and Library Journal says peppered with snappy dialog, this hard-boiled mystery by award winner Lister is a swell read. John Dufresne said Lister has the world of Florida Panhandle noir all to himself. Tough, violent, and hard-boiled, this novel of obsession and suspense will remind you of Ray mond Chandler, Graham Greene, and why you started reading crime novels in the rst place. Lister plans to celebrate the re lease of The Big Hello with a book release reception and signing at No Name Caf, at 306 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. this Sat urday, May 31. Lister will read from the book and sign copies. Then, the following weekend, the novel will come alive in the form of an old-time radio show on stage in front of an audience. Performances will be 7 p.m. June 6 and 7 at Sarzin Hall, Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Tickets can be ordered at MichaelLister.com or purchased at the No Name signing. Lister said it has been an amaz ing experience to see The Big Hel lo come off the page and onto the stage. Some of the most rewarding and interesting projects hes been involved with in recent years have been GCSC stage adaptations of his novels Double Exposure and The Big Goodbye. I love that these are presenta tions of the book more than just typi cal stage adaptations, which means the audience doesnt lose anything from the books, Lister said. Our ap proach with all three is an enhanced experience of the book. But its even more so this time, since were do ing the play as an old-time 40s radio show on the stage. Shakespeare wrote that the play is the thing, but for me the book is the thing, Lister said. Its all about the book bringing the book to life for the audience, who I still view as readers, and collaborating with the cast and crew to give the audience the best reading experience possible. The Big Hello stars for the sec ond time Allen Walker as the main character, private detective Jimmy Soldier Riley. Walker originally played Riley in GCSCs production of The Big Goodbye, and has per formed all three audio books in the series. Each $20 ticket to the live perfor mance includes a copy of the new novel. Listers ultimate goal with the play is to encourage people to read the book. In the play we will be stopping short of presenting the entire book so that the audience can read the nal few chapters on their own but with the voices of the actors and the expe rience of the play still fresh in their minds, Lister said. Its going to be a unique and fascinating experience. SPECial IAL To O THE TiTI MEs S Bob and Rhonda Parker of Lanark Village are trying to locate Jack, a black-and-white rat terrier that disappeared on Sunday, May 25. Jack was last seen near Oak Street west of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. He was wearing an American ag collar. If you have information about Jack, please call 464-8809 or 929-2370.Lister celebrates release of The Big HelloSacred Heart expands RaA T TErriRRIErR losLOST iIN LaANarARK

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LocalThe Times | A17Thursday, May 29, 2014 By John Hentz Special to the Times (Editors note: This is the second of a series on the memories of the Apalachicola River by the late Panama City native John Hentz. These were transcribed by Beverly Mount Douds.)PAGE 5(South is Bloody Bluff North is Fort Gadsden Creek, near Smith Creek) At mile 18 site of the trading post owned the English rm of Panton & Leslie and Etc. A large chain, later taken over by Forbes. The had 1200 cows here at one time. In the early history of Florida, there was a frontier trading post on the East Bank of the river at about mile marker #18, known as Prepress Bluff. One time the trading company had over 1200 cattle here. Part of the land credit to Panton, Leslie and company, a British Trading Post by the Indians in payment in debts owed by the Indians. It was called the Forbes Purchase and was as far as St. Marks. Steamboat Cuba snagged and sank 3miles above Bloody Bluff in March 1839, it was a side wheeler.PAGE 6(Heading north is Owl Creek, entering Liberty County. South was Ft. Gadsden State Park, Forbes Island, and Harding Landing) Willis Landing on the upper Brothers with paved access out to Hwy 71. I have shed this area for many years. There is one BIG Gator that lives in the upper end of this swift water. The upper part of Brickyard-cut off slough next to the Apalachicola River was stopped up with logs and known as Log Jam. It was not accessible for many years until the U.S. Engineers cleared it out. One night back in 1940 before the road was paved from Willis Landing on the Brothers out to Hwy 71, a friend of mine was coming out from Willis Landing and was meeting a car. Before they met the other car came to a curve in the road and ran across the ditch and into the woods and hit a tree. My friend stopped his car and ran out and hollered, my friend, what happened? By that time the man had gotten out of his car and was staggering around and he says I stopped up there at that lling station and asked the man which way to Willis Landing and he says, you see this here straight road, and it went straight. In Spanish Florida, Fort Gadsden was built by the British on Spanish about 1814. It harbored runaway Negro slaves and hostile Indians and was known as a Negro Fort. It was from July 27, 1816 in orders from Andrew Jackson. There were 320 people in the fort at the time and 270 of them were killed and most of them wounded. The fort was later rebuilt by Capt. James Gadsden and named for him. He was General Jacksons engineer, it was rebuilt in 1817. North on Owl Creek is partly Franklin County and partly Liberty County. Its accessible by road on the Liberty County side and has a public camp and boat ramp. Ive seen some awful big gators on this creek.PAGE 7(North is Kennedy Creek, Hentz, Simmons and Larkins Landings) (South of the page is Owl Creek in Franklin/ Liberty County). In 1846 the steamboat Oconie sunk at the west bank of the river about 150/200 yards near Brushy Creek. It collided with the steamboat Osceola. The old steamboat boiler and pistons are on display at Fort Gadsden State Park and are probably off the Oconie instead of the train as stated on the sign. In the 1800s Grandma Kelley saw one of the Hathcocks kill a man on deck of the steamboat here with a hatchet near Brushy and Neals Landing in Liberty County. When Tom Scott was killed, he had taken my fathers place as head of a Timber cutting crew for Cypress Lumber Company in Apalachicola. He was shot from the bushes at his camp one night. The case was not salved.PAGE 8(North is mile marker 30, near Camp House, between the Chipola Cut/off and Apalachicola Rivers. South is Kennedy Creek at Upper Elbow). The William Hentz family lived for more than 20 years on the upper Reaches of Kennedy. They moved from here in 1889 when he was 16 years old. Battle Bend, the U S Engineers cut out this bend and stopped it up. (Middle of the page/map is Camp House at mile marker #28. There used to be a wharf here and a lot of turbulence. (Left side the river is now in Gulf County, and the right side is in Liberty, just at where the Brothers River begins).(Also known as Three Rivers. That includes Brothers, Chipola, and Apalachicola Rivers) Heading north near Douglas LandingBefore the Chipola Cut/off was dug in 1916 steamboats serving the area up down river including Wewa, & Vacincty had to turn around and go back down to the Junction. Of the Chipola and Apalach rivers to proceed up the Apalachicola River. Digging the Chipola Cut/off was a mighty big aid to the steamboat men. The Chipola Cut/off is mighty0000000000000000 crooked so I suspect there was a slough that ran through the cut and the cut/off fall _____ ______ it?PAGE 9(North, Camp House, near mile marker #33. Left side of river shows Upper Piney Reach Dikes). The swiftest areas on the river is at Double Points. (Middle of page on Liberty County side.) The 3rd steamboat Chipola was built in Apalachicola in 1911. It was snagged and lost in the Chipola River in 1923. I remember this boat. In the early 1950s, my father John Hentz Sr., nephew Jimmy Carmore (?) John L. Hentz, my son and I camped on the east of the river. I hunted the Liberty County side, the river was high and Jimmy got lost in the back water and almost froze to death, Big Piney Reach called Lower Piney Reach today used to be considered the swiftest part of the river. Back in logging days people had to paddle their boats up and down it. My father said once he heard an old Negro logging hand, swear under oath that it was 2 miles down river and four miles up the river. This happened in Federal Court. PAGE 10Top left side of page is the Gulf County side, mile marker 38. In the year 1886 on May 2nd, the steamboat Lee was lost in Moccasin slough. It was a stern wheeler, 121 ft. long, 21 ft wide. I dont see how it got in there, that slough must have been a lot larger, back then than it is today. The steamboat Elizabeth a paddle wheeler was built in 1842 in Marietta, Ohio, it sunk about 200 yards above Styx. My people and the men that worked with them used to run logs through the Virginia Cut. Note: written in the middle of the map at Judges Camp and River Styx under Louis Bend on Moccasin Slough. In the 1950s Judge Mercer Spear and I saw 13 wild turkeys around 1 p.m. in the day How in the world did the steamboat Bertha Lee get in here? (on the right side of the river near River Styx). On Jan 4th 1844, the steamboat Fanny Elssler burned at mile marker #35 in the narrows. The re started in the wood supply. She was run ashore, and all the people escaped. My Grandfathers family build on the upper end of Kennedy Creek until the year 1889. River Styx, this was Bill Larkins and familys stamping grounds. This area is known as The Briar Patch, its bounded on the east by Kennedy Creek and on the south by Sheppard Slough. Sheppards Lake and River Styx and on the west by a River Swamp.PAGE 11Top of the page is Iola Landing, mile marker #45, bottom (south) is Gator Slough and Lanier Apiary, near mile marker #39. (right side rst) In the 1800 there was a post ofce and hotel here at Iola, in 1837 a railroad was built from St. Joe to here a distance of 28 miles. It was abandoned about 1839/40. The 2nd steamboat Chipola was built here in 1886, it was a stern wheeler. The Chipola Cut-off was completed in 1916 In the year 1899 on June 29, the steamboat Apalachee, a stern wheeler was snagged in the Chipola-Cut-off and at last, one killed. The John W. Callahan Jr. struck a snag about 2 miles south of Wewahitchka and was sunk. One life was lost, and the Captain was Roy Connell, this was on 3/25/23, if so, it was raised because it was still in operation in 1927. Lucille White says it was 1923 when the Callahan Jr. cut her fathers launch in two at the Bristol Landing. People used to tell me that they could see the wreckage of the Callahan until a few years ago. In 1841 the term ??? of the railroad Iola was described as located upon a beautiful bluff of the Apalachicola River (m#45) connected with the steamer running Tri-weekly. Mr. Davidson is the post master and overseer of a ne orange grove as did S.S. Alderman, J.W. Keyes, and J.A. Donaldson. It was the site of a friendly Indians Settlement in 1823 occupied by John Blount. He was a friend and guide of General Andy Jackson. He later moved to Blountstown. The U.S. post ofce at Iola See MEMORIES A18FLORIDA MM EMORY PROJECTSteamboat Chipola moored at Iola in 1922. The River Styx. MEmMORIES OF THEApalachicola River NorthFloridaMedicalCenters,Inc.MEDICALCENTER Eastpoint Acceptingmostinsurance(includingCapitalHealthPlan),Medicare, Medicaid,andslidingfeeavailabletoqualifyingpatientsastpointMedicalCenterwouldliketocelebrateSheilaAllen, ARNPforheryearsinFranklinCountyprovidinghealthcare tothecommunityonbehalfofNorthFloridaMedicalCenters. PleasefeelfreetostopbyandprovideMs.Allenyourwell wishesassheembracesanewchallengewithIndianHealth ServicestoimprovethehealthofNativeAmericans. AlthoughEastpointMedicalCenterwillhavechanges,high qualityhealthcareatEastpointMedicalCenterwillcontinue. AnnRubin,PAandAngelCortes, MDwillbeavailableforhealth careservicesatEastpointMedical Center,includingwellwomens services. Toscheduleanappointment, pleasecall850-670-8585. ST.JOSEPHBAYGOLFCLUB SPECIALS JUNIORGOLFERS(17ANDUNDER)PLAYFREEWITHANADULTPAYING GOLFER-FRANKLIN&GULFCOUNTIESONLY SINGLEANDFAMILYMEMBERSHIPS-NOINITIATIONFEE&FIRSTMONTH DUESFREEWITHA12MONTHCOMMITMENT(MUSTPAYBALANCEBYCASH, CHECK,ORCREDITCARDATTIMEOFSIGNUP) CALLTHEPROSHOPTODAYFORMOREINFORMATIONORSTOPBY 850-227-1751. CALLTHEPROSHOPFORINFORMATIONONFREEGOLFLESSONSFOR CHILDRENEACHFRIDAYINJUNE. 700COUNTRYCLUBROAD. PORTST.JOE,FL32456

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LocalA18 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 was established in 1838, and was discontinued in 1845. The site of Iola was originally owned by the Kentucky Deaf and Dumb Asylum. PAGE 12North (top of the page) is Porter Landing in Calhoun County. During the 1980s on a Sunday afternoon, a boy named Ronnie Taylor struck something and was throw from his boat and drowned at upper end of Porter Reach. A big alligator lays out here on the west bank of the river at the lower end of this slough (mile marker #47). South (bottom of page) at mile marker #46 is the road to Iola Landing and the right side of the river is in Liberty County, also the Florida River is below Green Back Lake. One early Monday morning in October 1920, my father John Hentz Sr. and his cousin Will Durham and I came down to the old Lindsey place on the Florida River to go hunting and shing. We intended to go to Green Back Lake but got lost and wound up on Dog Slough. (top right side of page, on the Liberty County side) We killed 2 turkeys and caught all the sh we could carry. I was only nine years old at the time.PAGE 13North is Coons Landing (mile marker #55) left side of river is Calhoun County, right side is Liberty. South is Dog Slough, Queen City Lake, and Dicks Point. The steamboat Queen City was one of the most -----fun?-boats that ran the river. It operated on the river for many years. It must have sunk here on Queen City Point, but I have not found a record of it. If it sank here it had to have been raised and put back into service. The records said that it was built in Columbus and dismantled there. About the year 1900 Charles B. Wingate was one of the pilots on the Queen City One cold morning about 1950, I shot a squirrel on the west bank of Queen city Lake and the biggest buck I ever saw jumped in the lake right behind me and was all the way across the middle of the lake splashing water at least 40 feet in every direction. The lake was about belly deep on him. I just stood there with my little shot in my gun and watched him go. That was some sight with the sun glistering off the water. (Middle of the map/page at mile marker #52 is Equiloxic, Liberty Co. side). I have hunted this Equiloxic Creek and Florida River swamp all my life. I have memories of hunting and shing trips in the area. (Red Hill and Double Bridges founded listed here. When Capt. Wingate blew that whistle it scared those Indians to death. Some ran to the deck and jumped in the river, and all that could ran down the gang plank.PAGE 15North is Lundy Lake (right side of river) at mile marker #65. Calhoun County is on the left side. William Augustus Bowles was an Indian Agent, he went back to the Bahamas before Andrew Jackson came to this area, he was Lucky. In the year 1839 on May 15th or 20th, the Creek Indians attacked the settlement of Roberts at Stiffnulgee and John and Nathan Smith home at Ricos Bluff. At Stiffnulgee the Indians burned the Roberts home and killed a little boy. Roberts was wounded but he his wife, and a man named Aldrich and four children escaped. At the Smiths home at Ricos Bluff, Smith (Nathan), three children, a Mrs. Richards and her ve children and a man named White were all murdered. Smith, his wife, another woman, and two men escaped. Some 15 of the refugees came down river on the mail boat Commerce. They saw Indians on the bank of the river when the Commerce threaded through the narrows seven miles north of Fort Gadsden. (South at mile marker #60 is Muscogee Landing on the Liberty County side) When I was a little boy m father and I cut board timber out of this area. Here at Muscogee Bluff in the early 1800s, William Augustus Bowles, an English trader and adventurer tried to create an independent Indian State. He appeared to have the unofcial approval of the British. It was supposed to be an independent sovengin state with him at the head of it. His adventure failed. (Estiffanulga Landing, between mile marker #63 & 64). This bluff is between 30 to 40 feet high, it is between Apalachicola and Bristol. There used to be a big turpentine operation here. It had several different operators over the years, I remember Mr. Reddish, and Mr. Mizell. One night, in the 1920s Claude Bateman, my father, and I went cat shing with ___? On the outside of the lake, today very little water goes down it, since the U.S. Engineers cut out the bend in the river at Point Poloway and stopped it up.PAGE 16North, is Bakers Landing (mile marker # 70). On May 11, 1838, the steamboat Irwinton was on the way down river with 200 bales of cotton when it caught are. All but 50 bales were thrown overboard. It sank in 13 feet of water and was later raised and ran the river for many more years. This happened a few miles south of Blountstown. The crew and passengers got ashore safely and were carried home by the Commerce. This happened at Points Poloway. In the early days the Johnson family had a steamboat Landing here at Points Poloway. (right side of river (Liberty Co. side) on the left is Outside Lake, to your upper right is another little lake, unnamed. This must be the Johnson sh lake. It was one of my favorite shing holes, when I was a little boy. Sometime about the year 1919, Mr. Theo Ford accidentally shot his hand off with a shotgun here at Point Poloway. His father in-law, Jule Michaux was with him at the time. They had to go home in a horse and wagon. Mr. Tom Johnson butcher beef and sent it to Apalachicola on the steamboat. He had a catch dog that went with him all the time. Once Mr. Johnson met the boat at the landing and got off of it and went home, but the dog stayed on the boat and went to Apalachicola. He caught the boat on its return trip and when home. The boat crew put a sign in his collar that said I am Tom Johnsons dog, whos dog are you?PAGE 17North now is at Sheppards Landing (mile marker #77), left is West Wynnton on the Calhoun County side of the river, and to the right in Liberty County is Wind Lake, south is Baker Lake and Poloway cut-off. On Friday afternoon in the fall of 1928, Mr. Will Fields was shot and killed in the river swamps on the Calhoun County side. Outside Lake runs down the outside of the swamp a distance of about 6 miles and back into the river at Estifangula. This used to be the worst bend in the river, timber rafters had to pole their rafts away from the bank all the way around this bend. Poloway Cutoff= The US Engineers cut this bend out of the river and allowed it to stop up. Capt. E.L. Maquder was Captain on the Big Callahan about the year 1919 and later. I remember him. In 1915 the W.C. Bradley and the City of Eufaula were two of the main stays on the river and had electric lights. The Callahan line also had electric lights. (north left side) Old River (Calhoun Co, side) My Uncle James Hentz and his partner, H.B. Gaskin owned this swamp on Old River for many years. The steamboat Commerce built in Albany, Ga. In 1836, exploded in 1840, with ve lives lost. In 1838 a white familys home opposable of Blountstown on the river was destroyed by Indians. There were about 30 in the party, but this was just a part of a large group of 80 to 100 more Indians. In 1842, Gen. Ethan Allen Hitchcock conducted, just about the last act of Indian removals of the 2nd Seminoles Indian Wars. He boarded the Chattahoochees in the mid December with 80 men and ofcers and set after a band of Creeks Pascofa, they had completed despoliations up and down the river. He __________ them and per------them to take passage from O clock Bay to Cuba. This was accomplished in 1843. This pretty much nished the Indians troubles along the river.PAGE 18North (m. m. #82) right side of the river is Ramseys Landing. Left side is The Bayou. On Sunday, November 1st 1839 at 2 p.m. the boiler of the steamboat LeRoy blew up two miles north of Blountstown. The pilot Halloman was thrown 100 yards up the river still holding on to the wheel in his hands. He swam to safety. The mail was returned by Slade Sutton and put on the steamboat Louisa. Six people were killed. The bridge between Calhoun and liberty counties was opened up about 1937, and Highway 20 was paved about the same time. (Hwy 20 and the Blountstown Bridge here on this page is located between mile markers #79/80). Pryor to that time we went down to the bank of the river at Bristal Landing and traveled down the west bank a distance of about four miles to the old Charley Cayson ferry and crossed over the river on a at pushed by a launch. The little wooden bridge across the sloughs were tied to the trees with wire to keep them from oating off during high water. The steamboat Apalachicola was built here at Blountstown. It was lost at Kings Rock, Alabama on May 16, 1848. On December 18, 1916 here at Blountstown, a distant relative died, she was Ellen Gaskin, she was the daughter of my grandfathers older sister. My father and older sister was going to the funeral of a friend, a dock boy (the rest of this story I could not make it out to nish telling you). An old Indian mound is here, possibility at Albert Caysons Place, and also here at Charly Caysons ferry. Sometime in the 1920s, Mr. Jim White had a mail contract to carry the mail back and forth from Bristol to Blountstown. He brought a new launch to do the runs with. The launch was tied up at Bristol and the steamboat (unnamed) ran down on it and its paddles chopped the launch into. The steamboat John C. Calhoun was built in Brownsville, Pa. In 1859, its boilers exploded at 6 a.m. April 28, 1860 here at Bristol, killing eight people, another reported 12 killed. One of them was Leander M. Crawford, its Captain.PAGE 19North is a natural gas submarine pipeline crossing (at mile marker #87) Right side of river (Liberty Co.) is Beaver Dam & Little Sweetwater, Left side of river (Calhoun Co.) half way down is Hollis Landing. Indians trouble lasted up and down the river until the early 1840s, my grandmothers peoples home along the banks of the river were raided many times. They would hide out in the swamps from the Indians and would have to put handkerchiefs in the childrens mouths so that the Indians couldnt hear them crying. The Indians would break up all their chinaware, cut up their feather beds, eat up every thing they could not steal of their livestock and poultry. No area of the State was more of a reason for the US to take Florida from Spain than our Apalachicola Valley area. There were constant troubles up and down our southern borders. The Indians could raid and kill our properties, then dodge back into Spanish Fla. And Spain did nothing about it. The massacre of the people on the Army boat one mile south of Chattahoochee by Himolle Micca and his band was the last straw. That happened in 1817. Negro Fort on the Apalachicola River was Jacksons base of operation. Old Chief John Blount (SORRY the rest of this page is cut, and I couldnt complete the story.. BMD) South, right side of river is Kelley Branch. Uncle Joe Kelleys real name was James Archibald Kelley. Joe was a nickname I think his wife used, her name was Bellona Mae Grifn, Kelley. Kelley Branch was named for old Uncle Joe Kellys family. He owned property at Rock Buff, Bristol, and Kennedy Creek. PAGE 20North (m.m. #91) at Akins Landing (left side of River)and Wayside Landing right of river). South, Porters Landing (Calhoun Co, side) In the late October 1840 Capt. Smith of the Louisa reported seeing a raft along the river here that a band of Indians had used to cross the river. Sometime between Friday and Sunday, Colonel Mapes of the US Army examined it and decided it to have been built by whites. I have wondered if this was the same band of Indians that massacred the McClaine (or McLaine) family just a few miles to the north at Sycanore. (*note by John Hentz)=I am sure that the name Himolle Micco was the position held by the Indian chief in the Indian ____ by and was old Chief Nemanthla from Fowltown that led the massacre of the two river boat loads of solders on the Apalachicola River on November 21, 1817. Nemanthilas Village had been destroyed about nine days earlier by US solders.PAGE 21North is (m.m. #94) left is Johnson Landing, just below this is Ocheese Landing, and on the right side is Coopers Landing and Torreya State Park. One of the two places where the trees grow that built Noahs Ark is near by here. Rock Buff, in the mid 1800s this way was probably the main town in Liberty County, my grandmother and her brother were raised by an old Great grand Aunt, we called Grandma Kelley. There were Louise and Calvin Durham, they were left orphaned in Apalach when they were small. I think their parents died about the same time in the yellow fever epidemic in 1849. Rock Buff, during the Civil War a parade was held in Rock Buff by a unit of the 2nd Fla. Calvary and my grandfather William Hentz was the Commanding Ofcer. The speech was given and the ag was given and was presented by Lou Durham. Years later when my grandfathers wife died he went back to Rock Buff and married Lou Durham. The ag she presented to his troops that day is in the State Archives in the State Capital today. The old Jason Gregory mansion stood here (on the right side of the river) on the Calhoun County side since before the Civil War, when Torreya State Park was established, the old mansion was moved across the river to the Park. Rock Buff Landing The carnage sugar plantation was somewhere in this area, Old Great Uncle James A. Kelley was overseer.PAGE 22North and to the right (Gadsden County) side of the river is Aspalaga Landing (m.m. #98) to the left side of the river is Blue Springs and Hickory Landing (Jackson County) to the south is still Calhoun and Liberty Counties. In the early days of steam boating on the Apalachicola River the boats were attached by the Indians. In some instances they were shot at from both side of the river. The steam boats would have to put up barricades along the decks to catch the bullets and arrows. Sometimes people were killed while being on the boats. The US Governor passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830 and the Indians problems were pretty much saved by the Spring of 1843. Here in the year 1840 a bunch of renegade Indians massacred almost all of the McLaine families. They are buried here in Sycamore graveyard. The local churches made a monument to the family and a plaque recovered the incident. The plaque reads: McLane, In memory on April 10th 1840, Mrs. Nancy McLane, age 40 was shot, Catherine, age 13 was shot and scalded by Indians, 2 small children was killed by pine knots. John McLane killed the chiefs son, this occurred close to Telogia Creek.PAGE 23North is Sampson Landing at (m.m. #102) Jackson Co, side. The steamboat W.C. Bradley sank at Aspalaga sometime in 1919. At Coes Landing in the year 1845 in early February on a Monday, the boiler of the steamboat Siren blew up killing 10 people, all were employees of the steamboat crew. Capt. Sharples was blown 50 foot through the air. He landed in the water and swam to safety. A lady passenger was rescued from the water by the engineer, one person was saved by clinging to a bale of cotton oating. The boat was carrying 200 bales of cotton and was a complete lost. Pryor to the Civil War, my grandfather William Hentz had a cotton plantation, cotton gin, and a Negro slaves on the river in this area. He was make a free dealer by Special Act of the Fla. Legislature before he was 21 years old.PAGE 24A BUSY PAGE HERE! The City of Marianna on our right (mile marker #105) and the Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, also Highway 90 and the Victory Bridge. We also have the Louisville & Nashville Railroad on the right side of the river and on our left is the DcLiff Matls, south is the Farrel Landing and the Gulf Power steam plant. On July 22, 1922 the Victory Bridge was opened on the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. In the year of 1840, on June 12th the steamboat Barbara Hunt was lost at the site of Victory on the Apalachicola River MEMORIES from page A17See MEMORIES A24FLORIDA MM EMORY PROJECTPassengers posing on the Steamboat Osceola circa 1870.

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LocalThe Times | A19Thursday, May 29, 2014 By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland and challenger Gwen Graham kicked off grass-roots campaigns last week with calls for help in one of the most hotly con tested congressional races in the country this year. The Women for Southerland Coalition turned out in the morn ing with about 100 people for a brunch on the roof of the Gulf Coast State College Advanced Technology Center. Graham and about 60 sup porters celebrated the opening of her Panama City campaign headquarters on Jenks Avenue in the afternoon. Were going to need all of your support to elect Gwen to Congress and bring an indepen dent voice back to north Florida, said Julia Woodward, Grahams campaign manager. Graham and Southerland brought friends to sound a call to action. Former Congressman J.R. Middlemas described Graham, who has never run for politi cal ofce, as smart, poised and compassionate, with a knack for building consensus. Rep. Kristi Noem, R-S.D., said Southerland was a family man and an advocate who sup ports women, and will help the middle class by opposing indus try regulations that will force energy and food producers to pass on their additional costs to consumers. Graham spoke out against tax breaks for the wealthy at the expense of the middle class, and courted women with her support for equal pay for equal work. First and foremost, we need to get our nancial house in or der, she said. Grahams remarks were brief and general. Southerland and Noem, on the other hand, spent more than an hour detailing how people can support South erland, including organized let ter-writing and social media campaigns. Southerland said his oppo nents are organized and already are campaigning against him in both areas. If you go to my Facebook page, they are beating the tar out of me, Southerland said. It would be nice to have some friends. Southerland played up his ev eryman appeal and painted Gra ham as an outsider. National Democratic groups see him as vulnerable, which Southerland has embraced. If youre not taking ak, youre not over the target, Southerland said. Were over the target. He said he expects to spend $2.5 million on this campaign compared to $1.8 million in 2012 to fend off attacks from outside groups who hope to de stroy the Steve Southerland you know. This district will see the darnedest congressional race ever seen, he predicted. Southerland and Graham stressed the importance of Bay County to their success in the November election. Graham is the daughter of Bob Graham, the former gover nor and senator. Although she is a Democrat, she said she is a moderate who would eschew partisanship in favor of reason able solutions. She recalled childhood days spent playing with Middlemas children in Bay County and spoke of her familys roots in North Florida. She said she was not recruit ed to run for Southerlands seat, and she dinged him as an insid er in a dysfunctional Congress whose support of the govern ment shutdown was disastrous. This is Graham country. It is, Graham said. Its Graham country. Its the part of Florida that knows my family, that knows what we stand for. Graham, Southerland kick off campaignsIf youre not taking ak, youre not over the target. Were over the target.Steve SoutherlandFirst and foremost, we need to get our nancial house in order. Gwen Graham PHOt T Os S By Y HH Eat AT HER LEip IP Ha A Rt T | The News HeraldRep. Steve Southerland greets supporters at a brunch with the Women for Southerland Coalition, while Gwen Graham speaks recently at the opening of her Panama City campaign headquarters.

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LocalA20 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 KimHawkinsDavisCPAHwy98at11thStreet,Suite4 Apalachicola,FL32320850-653-6875 andMuchMorePromptProfessionalPersonalService Trades&Services ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines LICENSEDANDINSURED 20YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O.Box439 Carrabelle,FL32322 697-2783orMobile566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter F.W.C.FloridaWindowCoveringCompanyfactorydirectwindowtreatments ResidentialandcommercialShutters,Shades,Blinds Security&SunControl,WindowTints StormShutters Colonial,Accordian,RollDown,BahamaGUARANTEEDLOWESTCOMPETITVEPRICES INNORTHFLORIDA FREEIn-HomeEstimate*FREEInstallation ForAllYourWindowCoveringNeedsCALL Fl oridaWindowCoveringCompany 850-697-3066or850-528-9355 amsrohrs@fairpoint.net ADVERTISEHERE TODAY227-7847 Special to the Times The fifth annual St. George Island Plantations 2014 photo contest, to be held from June 2 through Aug. 29, has grown in participation and in talent each year. Entrants may submit up to two photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or other locations within Franklin County. With their submission, entrants will need to sign a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish the photos, a release form signed by any identifiable person in the photographs; and a parental consent form for any minor pictured. Applicable forms may be found at www.sgpoa.com under the Forms tab; 2014 Photo Contest Rules and Guidelines. Please include the $10 per photo entry fee along with submission. Include the following information on a label affixed to the back of the photograph or disc that is provided: Name, address, telephone number, email address, and titles of the photographs entered. Entries may be emailed in .pdf or .jpeg format of less than five MBs; mailed in on a disc; or professionally printed on 8x10 photo paper. Entries must be mailed or emailed to the following addresses by 5 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 29: llittle@ sgpoa.com or to the Plantation Photo Contest 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328. Again, entrants may submit up to two photos per entry, with a $10 per photo entry fee. Please make check payable to SGPOA. First place prize is $150, second place $100, and third place and Peoples Choice prizes $50 each. Two Honorable Mention ribbons will also be awarded this year. Winners will be notified by Sept. 15. All photos will be on display in the Clubhouse until October, with winning entries framed and hung as part of the art collection. CHIP SANDERS | Special to the TimesLast years winning photo was an action shot taken from the waterPlantation announces annual photo contest Special to the TimesApalachicolas Indepen dence Day celebration is just around the corner and Main Street Apalachicola is getting ready for the big day. One new element this year is the addition of Inde pendence Day royalty, Uncle Sam and Lady Liberty. The idea came about as a way to raise funds for Main Street Apalachicola, which works for the preservation and beautication of the downtown district. Jim Bachrach, president of Main Street Apalachicola, said he is thrilled to add this new element to the Inde pendence Day Celebration. What fun it is going to be to have our own Royalty, said Bachrach. I hope lots of people sign up to do this. The great part is, there are no rules, just plain fun. Becoming Uncle Sam or Lady Liberty is quite simple. There are NO rules. Who ever raises the most money in either the Uncle Sam or Lady Liberty categories wins. Every dollar raised is a vote for you. Call up your friends for money, get a busi ness to sponsor you, or have an old-fashioned car wash this summer. Be creative. Each winner will reign over the days activities, which starts at noon Thurs day, July 3. Winners will also receive a gift basket full of goodies including gift cer ticates to local restaurants and more. Anyone can sign up to participate in this event from toddlers on up. Download a form at www.historicapala chicola.com or call Royce Rolstad at 653-5586. Deadline to raise money is Friday, June 27 at 4 p.m. Winners will be announced the following weekMain Street Apalachicola seeks royalty for Independence Day I hope lots of people sign up to do this. The great part is, there are no rules, just plain fun.Jim Bachrach president of Main Street Apalachicola News brieBRIEFsS From staff reportsPutt-Masters tourney set for SaturdayMay 31 marks the fourth annual PuttMasters Tournament, the signature fundraiser that benets the Franklin County Public Library. Some 20 plus businesses, groups, and individuals sponsor four-person teams, which tee off at noon and play throughout the afternoon. After the tourney ends at 5 p.m., there will be a ceremony to see who will take home Green Champ caps and a beautiful trophy. The competition is serious for some. Many returning teams have improved their putt throughout the years. Others just play for fun and enjoy good food, drink and the company of friends. The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar in Eastpoint hosts the event, where owners Shirley and Jimmy Sapp provide a beautiful 18-hole course with a water feature for an entire afternoon of putting fun! Players, fans, and library supporters can quench their thirst and enjoy delicious food while having fun and raising money for our library. Various levels of sponsorship are available. If you would like to participate or volunteer, contact your library branch to reach a Friend of the Franklin County Public Library. In Carrabelle, call 6972366 or in Eastpoint call 670-8151, or contact Anna Carmichael, 850-273-1174, anna.carmichael@yahoo.com The library is a vital county resource. The services provided are free, but funding is limited. The Friends of Franklin County Public Library is proud to help fund both the Carrabelle and Eastpoint branches of our public library system. Without help from businesses and individuals throughout the community and their participation in our efforts, this would not be possible. Books, e-books, games, CDs, DVDs, audio-books, free Wi-Fi, computers and computer classes, youth programs and community meeting rooms complete with a smart board, are just a few of the services you will nd at your public library. Go visit your local branch to see whats happening, you will be proud as well.Island summer bingo starts TuesdaySummer Bingo on St. George Island will begin on Tuesday, June 3. It will be at the St. George Island Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave., beginning at 7 p.m. The cost will be 50 cents per card.Dr. Sanaullahs lease renewedAt its May 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to renew cardiologist Shezad Sanaullahs lease for the ofces adjacent to the Chapman Auditorium. Sanaullah currently pays $1,961 per month, which includes $1,833 plus tax. His bill will be reduced by $100 monthly because he has installed a separate water meter and will pay his own water bill. The new lease is for three years with a six-month cancellation for both parties.. Sanaullah has the right to half of the parking spaces in the lot adjacent to the building. Midway at museum SaturdayThe lm Midway chronicles the See brieBRIEFsS aA21

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LocalThe Times | A21Thursday, May 29, 2014 Special to The Times The Governor Stone, a national historic landmark built in 1877, began a new chapter in her history on Monday. The Friends of the Governor Stone are dedicated to preserving the vessel and continuing to share her history and beauty with the communities of the northern Gulf Coast. In order to do this, the Governor Stone traveled by tow to Diberville, Miss., for additional restoration work by Master Boat Builder Bill Holland, who has done work on the Governor Stone in the past and was a valuable consultant for just completed restoration project. The Governor Stone is a national treasure, a living museum that must be preserved and maintained for future generations, Friends of the Governor Stone President Katie Cherry said. The tours and opportunities to sail on this vessel return us to a time in history hat can only be appreciated by actually experiencing the wind in the sails. The trip to Mississippi will cover 193 nautical miles in at least four days with overnight stops at The Landing in Fort Walton Beach, Pensacola Yacht Club and Gulf Shores Marina along the way. Once Holland completes repairs at his boatyard, the Governor Stone will sail back to her homeport of St. Andrews. The 136-year-old Gulf Coast Bay Schooner underwent an eight-month historical restoration that was completed in March at the Bay County Boatyard in Panama City. The restoration work was completed by local craftsmen and volunteers and restored her appearance to a more accurate representation of her look when she was built in Pascagoula, Miss. The Governor Stone is owned and supported by the Friends of the Governor Stone Inc. a 501(c)(3) nonprot volunteer organization. Visit governorstone. org or the Facebook page Governor Stone CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 29, 2014 The Times | A21 95018T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2010-CA-000403 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD M. WILLIAMS, ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AND ANY SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, INTEREST OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC.;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed July 3, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000403 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 12th day of June, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 19, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of April, 2014. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court Terry Segree Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. May 22, 29, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98977T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000420-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual; unknown spouse of SID GRAY a/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY; SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to that certain Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 29, 2014, and entered in Case No. 12-000420CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B SKIPPER ROAD REALESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on June 12, 2014, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: EXHIBIT LEGAL DESCRIP TION PARCELNO. 1 COMMENCE ATA CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE NORTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST1208.45 FEET THE EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST1208.45 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 2553.48 FEETTO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST590.12 FEET TO AROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST76.20 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST580.27 FEETTO APOST MARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE R UN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST1250.72 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 63 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST94.17 FEET, THENCE NORTH 47 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST55.41 FEET, THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST51.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST47.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST52.04 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST150.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST242.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST294.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST484.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST77.51 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND ALSO: PARCELNO. 2: CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WESTFRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH (BEAR-ING BASE ASSUMED) ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF THE SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER 1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1304.44 FEET TO EASTERLYEDGE OR SHORE LINE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE R UN SOUTHWESTERLY, SOUTHERLYAND SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER THE FOLLOWING COURSES, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST18.52 FEET, SOUTH 21 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST189.35 FEET, SOUTH 04 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 61.96 FEET, SOUTH 42 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST69.88 FEET, SOUTH 47 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST113.83 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 168.42 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST77.36 FEET, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST99.67 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 123.55 FEET, SOUTH 38 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST130.25 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST118.68 FEET, SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 172.84 FEETTO AN MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER AND THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EASTALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 854.04 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCELNO. 2 MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED BYARECENTSURVEYPRODUCED BYEDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY22, 2002 BEARING JOB NO. 02-009 (PSC 20867), AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATA POSTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST135.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (NOTE: THE PLATOF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, NOW COVERS APORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS 1 AND 2. THE PLAT WAS CONSENTED TO BYTHE FORECLOSING LENDER. LOTS 1, 5 AND 6 HAVE BEEN CONVEYED TO SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, A FLORIDALIMITED LIABILITYCOMPANY BYVIRTUE OF (3) QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 962, PAGES 693, 695 AND 697, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THESE 3 LOTS HAVE NOTBEEN RELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED.) LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 753, PAGE 364, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDAS, TO WIT: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE R UN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE R UN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE R UN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 580.27 F EET, THENCE R UN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 854, PAGE 786, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 3 AND 8, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 966, PAGE 436, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 2, 4 AND 7, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCOR-DING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE O F MORTGAGE(S) RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1100, PAGE(S) 547 AND 550, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: BRIEFS from page A20Battle of Midway, a turning point in World War II in the Pacic. The Imperial Japanese Navy had been undefeated until that time and outnumbered the American naval forces by four to one. It depicts the creation of a complicated battle plan. Unknown to the Japanese, American signals intelligence has broken the Japanese Naval encryption codes and know ahead of time that the ambush will take place at Midway Island which includes tricking the Japanese into conrming it. The lm will be shown at 1015 hours on Saturday, May 31, at Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. Free popcorn will be available. Entry by donation and appreciatedTime for summer camp registration!Enrollment for Project Impact Camp Funshine: Fizz, Boom, Splash is open. Students from pre-K to eighth grade will be served at the ABC site and pre-K to 12th grade at the city site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program is Fizz, Boom, READ and was developed by the 2014 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. The focus this year will be on STEM subjects, (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) with other summer highlights including pottery program, art & crafts, science experiments, computer technology, chess tournament, sports and several eld trips. The second year of Boats Rock! was launched during the April antique boat show. A special basketball and leadership camp will also be offered. The summer performing arts program will feature video production with a lm premiere at the end of the summer. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 9 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week. Credit recovery classes will be offered at the City Site Monday to Thursday during program hours. Enrollment may be limited. The summer program is provided free of charge. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Families can enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 370-0145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola.Funds sought for online county mapAt the May 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to re-apply for a technical assistance grant from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity for $25,000 to create an online county GIS map to assist in the public accessing the ood insurance maps, and other planning layers. The county applied for the project last year and was not chosen for funding.Transform your yard into a haven for wildlifeBack by popular demand, Planting a Refuge for Wildlife is now available to property owners eager to increase the number and variety of animals in their yard. The 40-page booklet, revised and updated, encourages property owners to help wildlife by creating habitat that provides the food, water and shelter they need to survive. Photos and original artwork, tables of native plants and plant zones, and lists of common bird species and their food preferences create an easy-to-use resource. The booklet will help people evaluate their current landscape and create a habitat plan, select the appropriate native plants, and design a wildlife habitat, such as a bird, buttery or pollinator garden. As homeowners discover the joys of wildlife viewing close to home, they also will be part of a larger movement to restore wildlife habitat in their communities. Produced through a grant from the Wildlife Foundation of Florida, Planting a Refuge for Wildlifeis available for $4.99 a copy (plus shipping and sales tax). Order copies from the Wildlife Foundation of Florida at WildlifeFlorida.com/ PARFW. For 10 or more copies or for wholesale inquiries, contact PlantingaRefuge@MyFWC.com.  Visit MyFWC.com/Viewing/ to learn more about creating wildlife habitat at home.Franklin is Purple Heart CountyAt the May 20 county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to recognize Franklin County as a Purple Heart County in honor of the large number of decorated veterans living in Franklin County. Chairman Cheryl Sanders suggested the county invite all residents who have won a Purple Heart to visit a commission meeting.Lake Morality contracts awardedAt Tuesdays county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to award the contract to add signage and re-mark Lake Morality Road to Southern States Pavement Markings, Inc. of St. Augustine. The cost of the work is $58,557. Southern States was the only company that bid on the project. Commissioners also voted unanimously to award Preble-Rish Engineers of Port St. Joe the contract for construction, engineering and inspection on the Lake Morality project. All fees will be paid out of Florida Department of Transportation funds. Governor Stone to get more restoration GOVERNOR StTONE

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A22| The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEETTHENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MIN-UTES 38 SECONDS EAST 121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVERS EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER FOR THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL3: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS SOLD BYVIRTUE OF QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 941, PAGE 109 AND QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 984, PAGE 154, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND LIES WITHIN PARCELS 1 AND 2 ABOVE. THIS LAND WAS NOTRELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED. THIS LAND WAS CONVEYED TO CENTENNIALBANK BYVIRTUE OF A DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 1044, PAGE 99. SAID DEED DOES NOTNECESSARILY CONSTITUTE A MERGER OF TITLE: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF LOT3 OF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 ATPAGE 30 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST322.93 FEETTO APOINTLYING ON THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 70.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF RIVER RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST399.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 60 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST41.34 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST103.74 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH Borrowersinterest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses, benefits and proceeds of Borrowersinterest therein. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 9th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL& ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNLCenter II, 7th Floor Orlando, Florida 32801 Phone: 407-896-2224 Fax: 407-835-3596 May 22, 29, 2014 99013T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 28, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000342CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 9th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of May, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Terry Segree As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99047T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000128 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. DARYL THOMAS WALLACE, ET.AL; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 1, 2014, in the above-styled cause, The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Clerks Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on June 12, 2014 at 8:00 am the following described property: LOT 16 AND 17, BLOCK 257, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: LOT 16 & 17 BLOCK 257, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand on this 22nd day of May, 2014. Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99045T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE THE FOLLOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY OF G.J. GRACE, LLC OR ITS ASSIGNS WILL ON JUNE 13, 2014 AT 9:00 A.M. EASTERN TIME AT 25 BEGONIA STREET, EASTPOINT, FLORIDA BE SOLD BY CENTENNIAL BANK FOR CASH IN ACCORDANCE WITH .109, FLORIDA STATUTES (2013): Metal interior display racks Window panes and frames of varying sizes A-framed wood storage device Outside metal storage shelves, desk chairs with plastic armrests Assorted metal movable shelving Varying types of wood planks, moldings and other millworks Wooden pallets Office desk Telephone VCR and tube TV 4-drawer file cabinet For additional information contact Monica Lemieux at (850) 6538805. DATED THIS 21ST DAY OF MAY 2014. Pub Dates: May 29, June 5, 2014 99063T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000277 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1; Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA K. KENNISTON; FRANCIS W. KENNISTON;ET AL Defendants RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated January 15, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000277 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1, Plaintiff and SANDRA K. KENNISTON, Et Al; are defendant(s). The Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT http://www. franklinclerk.com/ IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES, AT 11:00 AM, June 12, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: SOUTHEAST 45 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 17 OF CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 92 5TH ST, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 22nd day of May, 2014. By: Jessica M. Aldeguer, Esq. FL Bar No. 100678 Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)-644-8704; Fax (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlgdefaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlgdefaultlaw.com May 29, June 5, 2014 99079T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000130 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Diane Dodgen; Unknown Spouse of Diane Dodgen; United States of America; United States of America, Department of Treasury; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000130 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Diane Dodgen are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 12, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE EASTERLYONEHALF (BEING 100 FEETIN WIDTH BY THE FULLLENGTH THEREOF), OF THE FOLLOWING TRACT OR PARCELOF LAND: APARCELOF LAND IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH, 978.5 FEET, TO ACONCRETE MARKER; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.8 FEET, TO APOINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST169 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, WHICH SAID LAST POINTIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 219 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF THE 100FOOTRIGHT-OFWAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 30; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE MEANDERING SAID SHORE LINE OF SAID SOUND, IN AN EASTERLYDIRECTION, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCELOF LAND FRONTING 200 FEET ON STATE ROAD NO. 30, AND EXTENDING THE SAME WIDTH TO ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH, 978.50 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.80 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 204.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 254.00 FEET, TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY, 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 256.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER OF SAID ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE, 100.02 FEET, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-199999 FC02 WCC May 29, June 5, 2014 99081T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000130 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Diane Dodgen; Unknown Spouse of Diane Dodgen; United States of America; United States of America, Department of Treasury; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000130 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Diane Dodgen are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT11:00 A.M. on June 12, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: 1124556 Franklin County May 2014 1 ** 2013 DELINQUENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ROLL ** 2013NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR THE TAX YEAR 2013 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF EIGHTEEN (18%) PERCENT PER YEAR. UNLESS THE AMOUNTS SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW IS PAID, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED THEREON PURSUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTES CHAPTER 197.413 AND THE TAX COLLECTOR WILL APPLY TO THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR AN ORDER DIRECTING LEVY UP AND SEIZURE OF THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE TAX PAYER FOR UNPAID TAXES. JAMES A. HARRIS, JR., CFC FRANKLIN COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR 1 P-0000600 $1,214.90 00096-000 BOSS OYSTER, INC RICK BLOODWORTH 125 WATER STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 2 P-0003400 $697.09 00420-000 RANCHO INN 240 HWY 98 W APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 3 P-0004100 $760.89 00542-000 RED RABBIT FOODS, INC. 130 AVE E APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 4 P-0004700 $1,442.97 00556-000 SEAGRAPE ENTERPRISES OF APALACHICOLA, INC. 125 WATER STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 5 P-0007700 $432.41 00715-000 PAPA JOE'S PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX 15 BIG OAKS RD APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 6 P-0010400 $319.33 00763-000 VERANDAS AT RIVER MARK, INC 76 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 7 P-0012400 $147.71 00803-000 FORGOTTEN COAST TV, INC JOHN SPOHRER PO BOX 848 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 8 P-0022700 $2,796.82 01492-000 SUMMIT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING INC 1626 CRAWFORDVILL HIGHWAY UNIT B CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 9 P-0023500 $487.98 01508-000 ESKIMO ICE LLC JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS BLVD STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 10 P-0033200 $43.06 02474-000 THE HUT RESTAURANT G LEE L, INC PO BOX 866 APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 11 P-0035100 $1,714.74 03015-000 ANCHOR REALTY & MORTGAGE CO. 119 FRANKLIN BLVD. ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 12 P-0036600 $387.23 03171-000 COLLINS CONSTRUCTION OF SGI,IN 60 EAST GULF BEACH DRIVE ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 13 P-0040800 $580.34 03605-000 CHUCKS MARKET PLACE CHARLES CAROTHERS FKA/FULMERS MARKET PLACE, INC 244 FRANKLIN BLVD ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 14 P-0049000 $11.22 03841-000 FLYNNSTONE OUTDOOR INC 6605 SPICEWOOD LANE TALLAHASSEE, FL 32312 15 P-0056600 $187.58 03951-000 APALACHICOLA BAY SEAFOOD INC PO BOX 186 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 16 P-0057700 $623.56 03962-000 ST GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS' ASSOC 1712 MAGNOLIA RD ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 29, 2014 The Times | A23 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1123147ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 WebID#:34284633 1125221 NursePractitionerpositionavailableforbusyinternal medicinepractice.Onlyexperienced needapply.PleaseincludeCVand references.Sendresumesto BlindBox3618c/oTheNewsHerald, P.O.Box1940,PanamaCity,FL32402 112316025DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546WebID34284625 1124944ServicePlumber2YearsVeriableService/Repair Exp.ValidDriversLicense. OTorOn-CallwillbeRequired. KnowledgeofSouthWaltonArea PleaseApplyat AJ'sPlumbingInc. 998BayDrive, SantaRosaBeach,FL. WebID#:34289477 1125201 NursePractitionerorPAWantedforbusyfamily practice.Benetsavail.Send resumetoBlindBox3611co TheNewsHerald,P.O.Box 1940,PanamaCityFL32402 1124950Nowtakingapplicationsfor new KFC inCallaway. Applyat jobs.kfc.com or faxresumeto 334-702-0302 WebID34289468 TextFL89468to56654 ShiftManagers &TeamMembers 1125211WoundCareNurseMusthavelongtermcareexperience.Scheduler1yearmedicalexperience, homehealthpreferred.Sendresumeto hr.baystjoe@signaturehealthcarellc.com 1122743 Servers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUEPARROTNOWHIRINGPleaseapplyinperson between9a-5pm7daysaweek @BlueParrotSt.George'sIsland 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519140 4519136 Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking a seasonalpart-time, entry-level Housekeeping Inspector / Laundry Assistant Some experience is preferred but not required. Must be energetic, detailed oriented and possess great customer service skills. Weekends are required and must be able to start immediately. $12 per hour with paid training. Drug Screen & Background Check required. Please apply in person at 112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 4519175HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAIALBLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. THE EASTERLYONEHALF (BEING 100 FEETIN WIDTH BY THE FULLLENGTH THEREOF), OF THE FOLLOWING TRACT OR PARCELOF LAND: APARCELOF LAND IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH, 978.5 FEET, TO ACONCRETE MARKER; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.8 FEET, TO APOINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST169 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, WHICH SAID LAST POINTIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 219 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF THE 100FOOTRIGHT-OFWAYOF STATE ROAD NO. 30; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 200 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE HIGHWATER MARK OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE MEANDERING SAID SHORE LINE OF SAID SOUND, IN AN EASTERLYDIRECTION, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCELOF LAND FRONTING 200 FEET ON STATE ROAD NO. 30, AND EXTENDING THE SAME WIDTH TO ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONALSECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATTHE NORTHEASTCORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH, 978.50 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, 843.80 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 204.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES WEST, 254.00 FEET, TO THE SOUTHERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34 MINUTES WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARY, 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST, 256.00 FEET, TO THE MEAN HIGHWATER OF SAID ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE, 100.02 FEET, TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-199999 FC02 WCC May 29, June 5, 2014 ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish. 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. PSJ 511 7th St Fri May 30th 11a-Until Sat. May 31st From 8a-UntilYard SaleLost Of Misc. Something For Everyone! Text FL90427 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL90403 to 56554 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Administrative/ClericalAdministrative AssistantFor guest services. Happy and energetic person, good communication and computer skills. Ability to read and follow instructions. Come by and pick up application or email to visitorcentermanager@ammfl. org Apalachicola Maritime Museum 103 Water St, 850-653-2500 Web ID 34290443 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairCleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sundays. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in PORT ST JOE IMMEDIATELY Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Sal 850-227-6691 or Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34290225 Office BuildingFor Lease: 514 Florida Ave Space is plumbed for a medical/dental office but can be used for a variety of business types. Apprx. 2,184SF. Call For Details (850) 896-0609 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL84167 to 56654 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL89857 to 56654 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich 502/649-1520 Mako 258WAC FG Hard Top, Cobia Tower, Alum. Trailer, No Motor, Reduced to $6500 850-832-7995 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Susies Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Turn to classifieds Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! Classifieds work! If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.

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LocalA24 | The Times Thursday, May 29, 2014at Chattahoochee. In the year 1842 near River Junction, the steamboat Chamas exploded on Oct 31st, lives were lost. Fright on the Apalachicola River during the year 1911 (the year I was born) was valued at $15,784,029.00 which included 13,842 bales of cotton, 50,194 barrels of naval (stock/stores) and 1,200.000 packages of merchandise. The two steamboats that were most proment were the Queen City and the W.C. Bradley both of them ran the river for many years. The Indian chief Himolle Micco also know as NeMarthla. He was later executed at Fort Marks by Andrew Jackson. The woman who survived the massacre was Mrs. Stuart, she was later rescuered in Fla. And married John Dill and lived in Fort Gaines. In late November 1817 an open Army boat being propelled by hand oars with 20 able bodied solders some sick solders of woman who were solder wifes and four children were massacred here by several hundred Indians, one woman and six men escaped.PAGE 25 (LAST PAGE)North is Lake Simimole, (mile markers all start over, this is at m.m. 2 ) Georgia state line. The right side here is all water and Decatur County, and to the left is the Aplachee Correctional InstitutionalJohns last memories. Somewhere about here was located the Indian Village of Fowltown in 1817. It was the home of Seminole Chief Semthla and his band (Ne-marthla). *note= Fowltown was farther to the N.E. Beginnings about the year 1828, steamboats became the movers of people and fright, they opened the interior of the county, towns and communities sprang up all along thr interior waterways. Towns, and families had their steamboat landings along the waterways, the entire County depended on steamboats for their transportation, people even went shopping on the boats. Snags and rocks in the river were a peril to the steamboat, cleaning them out was a big job. It was nothing uncommon for groups of citizens from town along the waterways to go to Washington D.C., begging the Federal Government for help to clean them out. The US Army Corps of Engineers were to assigned the job of cleaning out and maintaining the waterways for trafc and have done a wonderful job of it for many years. The haydays of the steamboats lasted about 100 years, 1828 to 1928, a lot of old steamboat landings along the river still bear the old family names. Ourlocalrealestate expertshaveidentiedwhat theyfeelarethebestvalues aroundandareoffering themtoyouin RealEstatePicks! Discoverthebestreal estatevaluesinMexico Beach,PortSt.Joe, Apalachicola,CapeSan Blas,St.GeorgeIsland, Carrabelleandsurrounding areas. BestValuesontheForgottenCoastContactThe TimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola AdvertiseHere RealEstatePicks JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250825$279,900St.GeorgeIsland1STTIERPLANTATIONGreatGulfViews!Panoramicviewstotheeast&north, Attentionpilots!nearthePlantationairport;Oneacrelot, AdjacenttoboardwalktoGulf,Oneofthehighestlots ontheIsland,amenitiesincludeNewClubhouse&Pool. SeasideDrive,NicksHole. 4518799 ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250987$389,000St.GeorgeIsland APALACHICOLABAYVIEW4BR,5BA,renovatedin2002,groundlevelhasLRwith replace,DR,kitchen,masterbedroom,screenedporch, laundry&pantryarea,2ndoorhas2ndLRwithreplace &kitchette,balconyoverlookingthebay,cornerlot,owner nancing,McCloudAve. 29,000 MLS250905ST.GEORGEISLAND$538,000 ThiscustombuilthomeinthePlantation,nestledamongnativeIslandvegetationandjustashort walktotheGulfofMexico,featuresaspaciousliving/dining/kitchenareawithagasreplaceon therstlevelaswellastwobedroomsandbaths.Secondoorisafullmasterbedroomandbath withjettedtubandhugewalk-incloset.Thereisaloftsittingareawithsleepersofathatcouldbe oceorcraftsroom.Thishomewasdesignedforoutdoorlivingwithporchesandsittingareasto enjoythebeautifulviewsoftheGulf.Alarge,private,heatedpooladdstotheoutdoorenjoyment. Plantationclubhouse,tenniscourts,andpooljustonestreetaway.Bothtileandcarpetthroughout houseandtiledbathrooms.DimensionsweretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.southerncharmsgi.com 29,000 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) A Tisket, ATasket was whose rst major hit song in 1938? Artie Shaw, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Billie Holiday 2) What blood would a nurse measure with a sphygmomanometer? Sugar, Alcohol, Pressure, Count 3) John P. Holland is credited with the invention of the modern? Submarine, Refrigerator, Guitar, Padlock 4) Whats the youngest age one can become President of the United States? 32, 35, 40, 42 5) Which stone did early man primarily use for starting res? Slate, Marble, Quartz, Flint 6) Whose nest is the lookout platform on sailing ships? Boars, Eagles, Birds, Crows 7) What is the smallest area country in the United Kingdom? Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, England 8) Refried beans are primarily made of what type of cooked beans? Garbanzo, Black, Kidney, Pinto 9) What name did blues singer McKinley Morganeld adopt? Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, B. B. King, Fats Domino 10) Which city opened the rst aquarium in 1893? Boston, Chicago, Baltimore, Richmond 11) If youre astraphobic what are you afraid of? Lightning, Astroturf, Stars, Mountains 12) What white creature is Ursus Maritimus? Owl, Whale, Polar bear, Bunny 13) Of these battery types which is largest in size? AA, AAA, C, D 14) A semenier chest ordinarily has how many drawers? 5, 6, 7, 8 ANSWERS 1) Ella Fitzgerald. 2) Pressure. 3) Submarine. 4) 35. 5) Flint. 6) Crows. 7) Northern Ireland. 8) Muddy Waters. 9) Pinto. 10) Chicago. 11) Lightning. 12) Polar bear. 13) D. 14) 7. TT rivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com MEMORIES from page A18