The Apalachicola times

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00271

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, May 22, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Q&A surveys costs, bene ts of hiring school chiefBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The simmering debate over whether the county schools should end direct election of the superintendent, in favor of having the school board hire him or her, began to bubble last week, with the exploration of details of what such a change would entail. The Town Hall meeting May 13 at Franklin County High School was attended by a cross-section of parents from around the county, concerned taxpayers, interested school district employees and all ve school board members, who are expected to decide next month whether to place a binding referendum on the November ballot to switch over in 2016 to an appointed superintendent. Dr. Wayne Blanton, executive director of the Florida School Boards Association for the past 29 years, offered a PowerPoint presentation on how such a change would affect the interplay among the school board, the superintendent and the school system. Im not here to sell you on elected or appointed, he said. I have seen elected and Ive seen appointed superintendents. I can tell you there are pros and cons on both sides. Blanton outlined the relative scarcity of school districts DR. WAYNE BLANTONDetails aired on superintendent proposal McKissack residents seek end to beach drivingBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Residents of McKissack Beach say automobile traf c is destroying their sheltering dunes. In April, residents of the beach community, founded in 1930, had a no trespassing sign posted on Gulf Beach Drive, which runs south off U.S. 98 just west of the Carrabelle city limits. After complaints that the road was public property, county workers moved the sign. Residents of McKissack Beach say they dont want to deny access Fire consumes Carrabelle familys homeBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Last week, a Carrabelle family lost everything to a house re. On May 15, Bridgette Morrow was planning a wedding for her best friend, Crystal Bennett, and Bennetts anc, Harvey Barrack. Morrow and the bride had gone to the Boardwalk Boutique to pick up their dresses. Morrow noticed smoke on leaving the store, and when she and Bennett passed the IGA, she realized it was coming from her home at 206 NW 10th St. By the time the women reached the re, some neighbors had arrived on the scene. Someone kicked the front door By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com If you didnt see the production of the musical Hairspray at the high school Friday night, you missed more than a great show. You missed a turning point in the young history of the consolidated Franklin County School, a bend in the river that ows toward a growing desire for the creation of a robust drama program. Staging of the Broadway musical, with music by Marc Shaiman, lyrics by him and Scott Wittman and book by Mark ODonnell and Thomas Meehan, was the brainchild of senior Jathan Martin, who came to librarian Patty Creamer at the end of 2013 to pitch her the idea. A skilled musician with an ample familiarity with musical theater, Martin convinced Creamer to back the idea of his staging and directing the comic masterpiece, with a bevy of spirited actors, singers and dancers, despite the school lacking a drama program at the school. Creamer was four-square behind the talents of Martin, choreographer LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesBridgette Morrow, center, with daughter Marjorie, 14, and son Brandon, 17, lost her home to a re May 15.H i p H i p H a i r s p r a y , Student musical wows the audienceSee FIRE A7 See BEACH DRIVING A7 See SUPERINTENDENT A9 PHOTOS BY DANA WHALEY | Special to the TimesFROM TOP: The dancers on the The Corny Collins Show ank the host. Link Larkin (Logan McLeod) sings to Tracy Turnblad (Cynthia Duncan). Motormouth Maybelle (Elinor Mount-Simmons) sits behind bars after a civil rights demonstration. Adam Hames portrays Harriman Spritzer. See HAIRSPRAY A9VOL. 129 ISSUE 4Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Classi eds . . . A18-A19Historical society to meet todayThe Apalachicola Area Historical Society will have its annual meeting at 5:30 p.m. today, May 22, at the Raney House Carriage House. The membership will be asked to vote on changes to the bylaws and a slate of of cers. If you have not paid your annual $10 dues, please plan to pay at the meeting. The societys Spring Ghost Walk has been rescheduled to 7-9 p.m. May 31. Guides will take you around the cemetery to meet some of the historical characters who will share their stories. To participate, contact Delores Roux. For more information, call 296-6952.Flagpole dedication at lighthouse MondayMemorial Day 2014 will be commemorated at the Cape St. George Light with a special ceremony Monday, May 26, to dedicate a new agpole and honor those who died in defense of our country. The day begins with raising of the U.S. ag to half-mast at 8 a.m. A salute of 21 minute-guns will begin at noon. One shot will be red every minute until 12:20 p.m. from a rotation of three small cannons. The high school band will play, and Commissioner Pinki Jackel will speak. Bring a lawn chair. For more information, call the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Memorial Day breakfast, ceremonyApalachicola American Legion Post 106 will have a Memorial Day ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Plaza at 10 a.m. Monday, May 26. The Legion will start the day with a pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m. at the Legion Hall, 801 U.S. 98. Everybody is invited to both events. A paddling spectacular, A8

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 ApalachicolaAreaHistoricalSocietyPresents By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is seeking volunteers to join the discussion on how to manage bears in this portion of the Panhandle. On Thursday, May 15, 15 local residents met with an equal number of FWC employees to talk about bears. On entering the meeting, attendees were asked to complete a form indicating whether they would serve on a regional Black Bear Stakeholder Committee. Although organizers were proactive in warning participants to keep voices low and strong emotions under control, most attendees were, basically, probear and the discussion remained calm. Kaitlin OConnell, FWCs black bear stakeholder coordinator, opened the meeting with a general introduction to Florida bears. Since being listed as endangered in 1974, Florida black bears made such a remarkable recovery they were delisted in 2012, which was the peak year for calls about human/ bear interactions, she said. FWC received 975 calls, with an unknown number elded by law enforcement, animal control and other local agencies. That same year, FWC passed a 10-year bear management plan that created seven Bear Management Units (BMU). The Central Unit is the largest with just over 1,000 bears. Franklin County lies within the East Panhandle Unit, which has proposed population of 570 bears. OConnell told attendees the meeting was an effort to understand area residents attitude towards bears. She said each of the seven BMUs is different and residents of each view bear interactions differently. We want to make sure you enjoy the bears as much as the bears enjoy being in Florida, she said. Different attendees gave different reasons for a coming to the meeting. Jim Halpin who recently moved to Carrabelle said he came out of curiosity. Ive had to pick up my trash twice, he said. Patrick Dwyer of Sopchoppy is a hunter, who said most of his contact with bears had been neutral. I hunt over in Taylor County on a lease and weve been having a lot of interaction with bears, he said. Im interested in hearing what (FWC) has to say. We are allowed to bait for hogs and the bears have been damaging our feeders but weve got that gured out. John Hitron, of Carrabelle, was even more positive about living with bears. I have 10 years of experience living with brown bears on the west coast, and 20 years of experience with black bears. If I speak out at all, it will be on behalf of the bears, he said. David Butler, of Lanark Village, called the bear population an ecotourism opportunity and encouraged cooperation. He suggested establishing a bear viewing station for tourists. Until we can get everybody working with the plan, we wont be able to recreate this barrier between bear and humans he said. After the initial introduction, attendees split into two small groups to discuss the role of bears in Florida, the role of FWC and what everyone can do to coexist comfortably with bears. Several recurrent themes emerged during the conversations. Trash service should be mandatory and, in bear hot spots, bear-proof trashcans ought to be mandatory, said Kathy Swaggerty, of Lanark Village. Once we got a bear-proof can, we never have a bear to get in our garbage anymore. She asked what sanctions can be brought against people who feed bears. Bear biologist David Telesco said there is a law against feeding bears and raccoons but law enforcement of cers and court ofcials are slow to enforce it. He said bear-proof trash containers reduce foraging by 95 percent and most bearproof container failures he investigated were the result of user error. Telesco said interactions involving bears passing through a yard or treed in a residential area are often the result of bears traveling to garbage they know is unsecured at an adjacent property. Several members of the audience asked why euthanized bears were not sold for meat and pelts, and were told it was against FWC policy. Halpin asked about controlling populations with birth control. OConnell said the technique has been investigated but is not yet economically viable. Telesco said that, in light of increased interaction, there has been increased talk about sanctions on feeding or luring bears and about the possibility of bringing charges against individuals who feed or lure bears that are later implicated in negative interactions with humans. Education is better than legislation, he said. FWC representatives said they would reevaluate the size of the bear population next year. Telesco said a discussion of hunting may be back on the table after that is completed. He said people need to understand that, while bears normally seek to avoid humans, they are large animals that can hurt you, even unintentionally. OConnell said she hopes to form the stakeholder committee for the eastern Panhandle by the end of July. She said the group would likely meet four times a year, for two to three hours. If you are interested in serving on this committee, please contact Kaitlin OConnell at BEARPLAN @MYFWC.com.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesMorgan Wilber, standing left, and Sarah Barrett, standing right, lead a discussion on the role of FWC in bear management. Inset: Almost half of all complaints to the FWC involve bears attracted to garbage.Stakeholders sought for bear management

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, May 22, 2014 ARRHMATEY!Young&Old, ePirateCruiseTMhasSomethingforEveryone!CruiseAwayintotheFantasyWorldofFriendlySwashbucklers&Pirates! 2-HourCruisesDolphinSightingsGreatMusicColdBeerFunforallages! 5325NorthLagoonDrive,PanamaCity,Florida32408LocatedatLighthouseMarinaNexttoBoatyardRestaurant 850.234.7400 !YETA MARRH THEGREATESTSIGHTSEEINGADVENTURE...EVER! $1.00OffAdultTicket SeaDragonPirateCruiseLocatedatLighthouseMarinaonGrandLagoon SeaDragonPirateCruise discount.Presentcouponbeforepurchase. LocatedatLighthouseMarinaNexttoBud&Alley's HappyGraduation! Happy Graduation! By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Don MacLean of Carrabelle and Mary Britz of Lanark Village experienced the trip of a lifetime when Honor Flight of Tallahassee ew them to Washington DC for a day to visit the World War II Memorial. The Honor Flight Network, a non-pro t organization created solely to honor Americas veterans for all their sacri ces, transports veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit and re ect at their memorials. Top priority is given to World War II survivors, along with other veterans who may be terminally ill. The inaugural Honor Flight Tour took place in May of 2005. Six small planes ew out of Springeld, Ohio taking twelve World War II veterans on a visit to the memorial in Washington, DC. The Honor Flight Network program was conceived by Earl Morse, a physician assistant and retired Air Force captain employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Britz and MacLean, both World War II veterans, were part of a group of 77 vets who went to Washington April 26. Each was accompanied by a guardian. A doctor, seven emergency technicians and two nurses traveled with them on a Boeing 757 provided by Miami Air. While the veterans travel free, the guardians and medical staff pay for their own ight. Because Honor Flight trips start early, Britz and MacLean decided to spend the night of April 25 in Tallahassee. They stayed at Homewood Suites on Apalachee Parkway. Preston Scott on WFLAFM announced during a broadcast that they were looking for accommodations. J. H. Leale, president of Ricky Carmichael Racing was one of about 20 people who offered to pay for their rooms. He made the reservations but, when hotel General Manager Ashley Schneider found out who the rooms were for, she refused payment. Meals were also donated for the happy travelers. MacLean said the day began at 5 a.m. when the party gathered for breakfast at the millionaire hanger at Tallahassee Airport. Participants were given tshirts, gold for veterans, blue for guardians and red for medical personnel. Veterans also received goody bags. MacLean and Britz praised organizer Mack Kemp. Mack deserves a pile of credit. He spent a year getting ready for the ight, said MacLean. Everything went so smooth, it was unbelievable, Britz said, The group departed Tallahassee at 7 a.m. They landed in Baltimore and were divided into three groups, red, white and blue. MacLean was in the red group, and Mary in the blue, and they traveled by color-coded bus with a police escort. I think we traveled through Baltimore going about 80 miles per hour, MacLean said, Each veteran was provided with a wheel chair. All told, ve planeloads of Honor Flight travelers visited Washington that day. In addition to placing a wreath at the World War II Memorial, the group visited the National Mall and Arlington Cemetery where they watched the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Britz said the cherry trees were in bloom at Arlington, which made the burial ground particularly lovely. She said the World War II Memorial was so immense, we could have spent the whole day there. They dined on box lunches while traveling between sights. It was a second trip to the nations capital for both travelers. Britz and her husband attended the dedication of the Womens Memorial there in 1978. MacLean took a school trip to the Smithsonian when he was 10 years old. MacLean said everywhere they went on the Honor Flight trip, they were welcomed by throngs of people including many children. Groups represented included the Shriners, Boy and Girl Scouts, Knights of Columbus, Patriot Guard and military honor guards. During the trip, Britz reconnected with a friend from long ago. She began talking to former Marine Bud Ledson seated next to her on the plane. After comparing notes, they realized Mary had nursed Bud in San Diego when he was sent home wounded from the Paci c Theatre. They spoke for the rst time in 69 years even thought they have been living only 60 miles apart. Ledson, who resides in Tallahassee, is the author of US Marines Wings over the Paci c. Britzs daughter, Cheryl, said the pair is now speaking on the phone every day. On arriving home in Tallahassee at the end of their 20-hour journey, the veterans were greeted by Governor Rick Scott who presented each with a gold medal expressing the appreciation of Floridas citizens for their sacrices and patriotism. This has really been a great, great honor and privilege, Britz said. Im just thrilled to death with it. It was a very nostalgic trip. I dont think there were too many dry eyes when we visited Arlington. I couldnt believe it. All this attention for doing something we all wanted to do at the time. For more information about Honor Flight or to register a veteran for the program, visit www. honor ight.org .World War II vets honored with DC visitWorld War II veteran Don MacLean, center right, accompanied by honor ight guardian Jim Barineau is greeted in Washington by young volunteers. Veteran nurse Mary Britz shares a thought with Bud Ledson, a soldier she treated in San Diego 69 years ago. SALLY DAVIS | Special to the TimesHonor Flight veterans at the World War II Memorial. Inset: Changing of the Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINIo O N www.apalachtimes.comThursday, May 22, 2014 ASection Letter to the EDITOR GRRASII opponents should consider optionsThe Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), completed by Eglin Air Force Base, military exercises proposed for Tates Hell under terms of the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI) meets / exceeds all requisites, and will not have a negative impact on plants, animals or the environment. Recognize that it is the American military that protects people all round the world from the dangers of totalitarian regimes, human rights violations, and the subjugation of peoples. Keep in mind it is also the American military that provides for the freedom many in America take for granted. The freedoms provided by those sacred documents: The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Do you suppose that those veterans returning to America after laying their lives on the line, losing limbs and even giving the ultimate sacrice would complain about training in an insect-infested swamp riddled with vipers, black water, and dangerous animals? Or, would they do so in order to protect the rights of American citizens to enjoy their freedoms? It would now seem appropriate that those folks who do not support the training or mission of the American military might now consider moving to another country. Iraq and Iran are suggested as possible destinations.John HitronCarrabelle I dont go for all that wine and dine, With that ray ban, fake tan, never mind I I Want a Cowboy by R R eba McEntire I read recently about several prominent investors who were taken on a seven-day trip to the NCAA championship football game last January in California by their nancial advisor. The clients played golf at several upscale courses and dined each evening in a trendy restaurant. Apparently the advisor footed the bill for everything. During the ve working days when markets were open and the advisor was entertaining the entourage, who was monitoring his clients accounts? Probably the same person who normally monitors those accounts. In other words, someone other than the advisor. This advisors role appears to be more of a relationship manager, one who is charged with entertaining afuent investors and attending social functions. And thats ne, as long as the client understands that when he sits down to discuss his accounts, he is not visiting with the person who is actually making investment decisions. Say the Dow drops 500 points on the day of the championship game, 2008-style. Who would have been in charge of making changes in the portfolio to minimize losses? Or, say the market hit an all-time high that day. Who was at the controls, possibly taking gains off the table and considering the tax consequences for the client? Perhaps the advisor actually manages these accounts, but believes in a buy and hold investment style. The thinking here is that the market always rebounds, so no need to react to market vagaries, because there may be upturns as well as downturns. Thus, week-long football vacations dont really interfere with the advisors portfolio management activity. This investment philosophy works ne during steady uptrending markets, like those the late 1990s provided. However, investors nearing or in retirement risk damaging their portfolios signicantly if they suffer large downturns like we witnessed in 2008. Set it and forget it may not work well for this demographic, especially in volatile or choppy markets. Additionally, the investor/client is probably paying for the trip one way or another. The advisor may have funded the football journey, but the money to nance those activities most likely came from the investor in the form of management fees, trading fees, and commissions. Ultimately, Its not show friends, its show business. Peoples retirement and life savings are at stake, and wealth preservation for someone nearing or in retirement is paramount. You may want to ask yourself: Do you want a football host? Or do you want someone who is in the ofce every day monitoring your accounts? Markets dont care how many games your advisor invites you to. The investment world is a meritocracy. It doesnt play favorites. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850608-6121~www.arborwealth. net), a Fee-Only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. MaARgaGAReET RR. Mc DDOweWELL Arbor OutlookNoles, War Eagle and a football week in PasadenaBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Franklin Countys unemploy ment rate dropped by one-half of 1 percent in April, but even with that improvement, it was the only county in the state not to see bet ter numbers than one year ago. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate for April shrunk from 5.8 to 5.3 percent, a drop of two-tenths of 1 percent, from March. The unemployment rolls shed 21 people in April, shrinking from 304 to 283 people in search of work. This decrease in jobless ness occurred as the workforce grew by 116 people, from 5,233 to 5,349. The current work force has 56 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,405 workers and the jobless rate was the same, at 5.3 percent. The April jobless picture tied the county with Sarasota, Orange and Gilchrist counties, for 24th best among Floridas 67 coun ties. Franklin was worse for unemployment than Manatee, Bay, Nassau, Union, Jackson, Santa Rosa, Broward, Clay, Seminole, Holmes, Collier, Baker, Leon, Jefferson, Liberty, Wakulla, St. Johns, Sumter, Alachua, Okaloosa, Monroe and Walton, the states best at 3.2 percent. Franklin was the one of Flor idas 67 counties to not post a decrease in unemployment over April 2013 numbers. Were seeing the ongoing effects of a changing economy in Franklin County, said Kim Bodine, executive director of Ca reerSource Gulf Coast (GCSC). As we have noted, the Apala chicola area community suffered a harsh blow with the sheries failure. For generations, countless families relied on that industry for their livelihood. It remains chief among our goals to support and assist employers and job seekers in Franklin County as the funds become available. A recently announced federal grant extension will assist a lim ited number of displaced oyster men in the area, providing train ing and retraining in careers such as correctional ofcer, heat ing and air conditioning, welding, and auto service technicians. CareerSource Gulf Coast will be heavily involved in facilitating the program. A U.S. Department of Commerce grant is also in the nal stages of being released which will support training and shelling of the Apalachicola Bay. The CSGC region as a whole experienced a measurable de cline in unemployment, and nar rowly outpaced the state, with all three counties comprising the region Bay, Franklin, and Gulf posting declines. The unemployment rate in the region was 5.2 percent, 1.2 per centage points lower than the re gions year ago rate of 6.4 percent, while half of 1 percentage point below the April 2014 state rate of 5.7 percent. Out of labor force of 103,412, there were 5,356 unem ployed Gulf Coast residents. The April 2014 unemployment rate in Bay County dipped to 5.1 percent, while Gulf County fell to 5.8 percent. In general, we are pleased to see continued upward movement as a region, Bodine said. We are working as hard as ever to bring more employers to the table, to give them the support they both want and require. Our success ful Career Expo this week is just one sign of our unyielding com mitment to bring employers and qualied job seekers together. While there were more em ployment opportunities locally, the growth in opportunities is slow. In April 2014, there were 75,800 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama City-Lynn HavenPanama City Beach metro area (Bay County), up 800 jobs over the year. The Panama City-Lynn Haven-Panama City Beach metro areas annual rate of job growth was 1.1 percent, while the state increased at a rate of 3.2 percent.County jobless rate same as one year ago SHARRE YOOURR OOPIINIOIONS Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star.com TT elephone: 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. By MilenILENKO MartinARTINOvichVICH Special to the Times Getting the kids to go easy on the chocolate bunnies this year could be simple as sitting them down Easter morning and making them watch Old Yeller. University of Florida marketing professor Chris Janiszewski and co-researchers Anthony Salerno and Juliano Laran from the Uni versity of Miami found evidence to support that theory. In a study scheduled to appear in the June issue of the Journal of Consumer Research, the researchers dis covered that sadness encourages people to identify behaviors that are potentially harmful to their long-term tness. Janiszewski and his colleagues investigated how emotions modify the behavior of people who plan to indulge. To create a desire to in dulge, 120 students were asked to make a list of their favorite indul gent activities. A second group of 119 students was asked to list ac tivities they performed on a typical day. These students were less likely to plan to indulge as a consequence of completing their task. Then, each of group of students was asked to engage in one of four emotional activities: a sad task (they imagined breaking-up with a signicant other), an angry task (they imagined having problems with their computer), a frighten ing task (they imagined being on a turbulent ight), or a neutral task (they imagined cleaning their apartment). Afterward, the students watched a video on how to make origami while snacking on M&Ms. When the students had previously made a list of activities performed on a typical day, students who experienced the negative emotions ate more M&Ms than the students that had engaged in the neutral task. This shows how a negative emotion encourages the consumption of comfort food. When the students had previously listed their favorite indulgent activities, the sad students ate fewer M&Ms than the students who did not expe rience an emotion or the students who were angry or afraid. This shows how sadness discourages the pursuit of indulgent activities by people who plan to indulge. Anytime you feel sad, you try to avoid pursuing goals that lead to outcomes that could induce fur ther harm, Janiszewski said. Dur ing the pursuit of an indulgence goal, An experience of sadness should increase a persons sensitiv ity to the potentially harmful conse quences of indulgent consumption, which, in turn, should decrease the desire to indulge. One way the ndings could be useful is in curbing indulgent be havior. For instance, public policy makers could encourage the airing of sad movies such as Titanic or Marley and Me in spring break party locations. This would be a way to encourage college students to be more responsible without di rectly asking them to restrict their behavior. While the researchers acknowl edge it would be nave to suggest that policy makers should actively seek out ways to make citizens feel sad, feelings of sadness could prove to be valuable in situ ations that are characterized by indulgence. Milenko Martinovich, an editor for the Warrington College of Busi ness Administration at the Univer sity of Florida, can be reached at milenko.martinovich@warrington. u.eduResearch links sadness with avoiding indulgences Anytime you feel sad, you try to avoid pursuing goals that lead to outcomes that could induce further harm. (During the pursuit of an indulgence goal), an experience of sadness should increase a persons sensitivity to the potentially harmful consequences of indulgent consumption, which, in turn, should decrease the desire to indulge. Chris Janiszewski University of Florida marketing professorPage 4

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evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa evreseo rl tlCa ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot Law EnforcementSpecial to the TimesBetween April 21 and May 6, the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce received 15 complaints of home and vehicle burglaries. Items stolen during the burglaries were cash, jewelry, rearms, electronics and shing equipment. While conducting a traf c stop, deputies recovered a camera that had been stolen from the Alligator Point area. This investigation led to the arrest of two Carrabelle men, Darin W. Cruson II, 26, and Aaron S. Massey, 22. During the course of the investigation, detectives received information that some of the stolen items may be located in two separate apartments in Lanark Village. Detectives, along with the assistance of deputies, executed search warrants on the apartments and recovered rearms, shing equipment, jewelry and electronics linked to the burglaries. In all, detectives and deputies were able to recover seven stolen rearms, approximately $60,000 worth of jewelry, $10,000 worth of electronics and approximately $5000 worth of shing equipment. On May 12, the two men were booked at the county jail, and each charged with burglary of a structure, and grand theft. On May 13, each was charged with additional counts of burglary of a dwelling, burglary of a conveyance, grand theft of a rearm and grand theft over $300. The Sheriffs Of ce would like to remind the citizens to lock your home and vehicle doors at night and during the day when youre not around. This simple act could prevent a crime and loss of property.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Friday, May 16, a Carrabelle couple was killed when a car struck their motorcycle in New Hope, Alabama. Gregory Binkley, 61, and his wife, Barbara, 57, were exiting a parking lot adjacent to US 431 at around 1:45 p.m. when the accident occurred. Witnesses said the victims pulled out on the southbound side of U.S. 431 when a car heading south struck their motorcycle. Huntsville resident Tyler Daniel pulled up on the wreck scene moments after impact. It was the worst thing I have ever seen, I wouldnt wish seeing that on anyone, Daniel told a reporter at the scene. Witnesses say the woman driver of the car collapsed on the road after the accident. Moments later, her car caught re, but re ghters arrived and extinguished the blaze. Highway 431 was closed for more than two hours as investigators collected evidence. The speed limit along this stretch of highway is 55 mph according to police, but it is not clear if speed played a factor. The Binkleys owned a home on Buckeye Road north of Carrabelle. An avid sailor, Gregory Binkley worked as a tugboat captain on the Mississippi River. He is remembered by many Carrabelle residents as a talented guitarist and songwriter who specialized in traveling songs about boats and trains. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests listed were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.MAY 12Brandon L. Hill, 22, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Kenneth J. Pontones, 27, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 46, Apalachicola, two counts of sale of a controlled substance (FCSO)MAY 13June M. Davis, 30, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Marvin D. Braswell, 53, Carrabelle, Holmes County warrant (FCSO) Rachel L. Bateman, 28, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Gary D. Nichols, Jr., 40, Olive Branch, Miss., battery, violation of a domestic violence injunction and violation of probation (FCSO)MAY 15Michael T. Allen, 18, Apalachicola, assault on a school employee (FCSO)MAY 16Joseph C. Cogburn, 33, Alford, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing (FCSO) Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, operating a tattoo establishment without a license (FCSO)MAY 19Jessica M. Opie, 27, Eastpoint, domestic battery and failure to appear (FCSO) Catherine N. Millender, 36, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Between May 9 and 15, of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission enforced several oyster harvesting violations. While conducting park patrol within the Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, Of cer Nelson performed an oyster size tolerance inspection on a commercial oyster harvester who was returning to the vessel ramp from Apalachicola Bay. The inspection revealed the harvester was in possession of 52 percent undersized oysters in the bag that was inspected. Nelson issued the harvester a misdemeanor citation for the violation and 246 oysters were seized and returned to the water alive. Of cer Allen was patrolling Bald Point State Park when he noticed two vehicles in the parking lot, one of them not displaying an entry pass. Allen went down to the beach and made contact with the owners of the vehicle. When one of the individuals reached into a bag for some money to pay for the entrance fee, Allen noticed a small bag of what appeared to be marijuana. The individual tried to quickly hide the contents, but when asked later about its contents, said it was weed. After consent was given to search the bag, Allen found two small bags of marijuana. The individual then gave up a marijuana cigarette. The individual was charged with possession of less than 20 grams. Of cers Allen and Harrison were working in Apalachicola Bay when they noticed a vessel harvesting oysters in an area closed to shell sh harvest. There were two people harvesting oysters from the vessel, one of whom was a juvenile. Harrison issued the adult a citation for harvesting oysters in a temporarily closed area. Of cers Allen and Harrison noticed a vessel with three people harvesting oysters near St. George Island. An inspection of the vessels revealed eight bags of oysters. During a size tolerance inspection of one bag, it was found to contain 52.6 percent undersized oysters. Each person was issued a citation for possession of undersized oysters. One individual did not possess a valid Apalachicola Bay Oyster License and was issued a citation for the violation. Of cers Allen, Anderson, and Harrison were on patrol in Apalachicola Bay when they noticed several people shing under the Highway 98 Bridge near Eastpoint. They noticed one individual carry an ice chest up the bank and then return to shing. The of cers conducted a resource inspection and found the individual in possession of 13 undersized red sh. Anderson issued the individual a citation for over the bag limit of red sh. The sh were seized as evidence. Of cer Anderson was on patrol in Eastpoint near the Highway 98 Bridge when he noticed an individual shing from the shore. A resource inspection found the individual in possession of 13 undersized red sh and one undersized sea trout. Anderson issued the individual a citation for over the bag limit of red sh and undersized red sh. A warning was issued for the undersized sea trout. Of cers Anderson, Mallow, Harrison, and Allen were on land patrol in Eastpoint near the Patton Drive boat ramp when they observed a commercial oyster vessel with four people on board returning to the ramp. Anderson conducted a boating safety and resource inspection of the vessel and found six bags of oysters on board. A size tolerance inspection of one bag of oysters showed 69.6 percent undersized and unculled. Each occupant of the vessel was charged with possession of undersized and unculled oysters. The six bags of oysters were returned to the water alive. One of the individuals had an active warrant out of Gulf County and was booked into the Franklin County Jail. FWC REPORTAt their May 1 city meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to make Albert Dasher a fulltime police of cer. Chief Craig Kincaid made the request, saying a fulltime of cer was needed to replace Eddie Pace who retired. Kincaid also secured commissioners approval to employ two to four part-time of cers. He said that during celebrations like Camp Gordon Johnston Days, six of cers are needed to control traf c. Chief Kincaid knows what we need and can afford, said Police Commissioner Olivia Massey. Dasher, who received law enforcement training at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in Havana in 2008, has worked in law enforcement in both Georgia and Florida. He has also worked as a paralegal. Kincaid told commissioners Dasher has completed more than 400 hours of additional police training on his own including courses in human traf cking, search and interrogation DASHER FULLTIME OFFICER Arrest REPORTCarrabelle men linked to burglaries AARON MASSEY DARIN CRUSON Carrabelle couple dies in motorcycle wreckAL.COM | Eric SchultzA view of the accident scene on Friday afternoon in New Hope, Alabama THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us onLOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 CouponExpires:6-15-14CODE:AP00 BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 50X150GULFLOT $35,000 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Special to the TimesIn late March, the St. George Lighthouse Association sponsored a eld trip for Franklin County Middle Schools photo literacy students. The middle school shutterbugs were treated with a tour of the Lighthouse Museum and a free climb up the lighthouse. The highlight of the trip, for the young photographers, was taking pictures of the amazing view from the top of the lighthouse. After their trip, the students created poetry and mono prints of the lighthouse. Below are two ne examples of the poems, the rst one an acrostic, where the rst letter of each line spells out the word Lighthouse.Upcoming 2014 ballot takes shapeBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Unless more candidates step forward next month with a willingness to pay the fee, the slate of candidates in the primary and general elections is pretty much set. The deadline to submit petitions was noon Monday. If candidates want to jump in the race now, their only option to do so is by paying a fee $996 for school board ofces and $1,558 for county commission seats during the ofcial qualifying period from noon, June 16 to noon, June 20. The county commission and school board seats are up for grabs in District 2, the easternmost district encompassing from portions of Carrabelle, Lanark Village and Alligator Point, and in District 4, the westernmost district, mainly the historic district of Apalachicola. Both incumbents in District 2 County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and School Board Member David Hinton gathered the required dozen signatures to run to recapture their seats. In District 4, where 16 signatures were required, incumbent County Commissioner Smokey Parish has drawn an opponent in the Aug. 26 Democratic primary. School Board Member Jimmy Gander has announced he will not seek re-election, and just one candidate has stepped forward to try to claim the seat in the non-partisan election. Sanders, of P.O. Box 641 in Carrabelle, is the lone Democrat to le a letter of intent for the District 2 county commission seat. Two Republicans have led, and if they qualify, will square off in the Aug. 26 primary. They are Mark Nobles, of 10-5 West Pine St. in Lanark Village, and William Snyder, of 2332 Enabob Street, in Carrabelle. Hinton, of 112 Hinton St. in Carrabelle, plans to run for re-election in the non-partisan race for District 2 school board member. He is being challenged by Pam Marshall, P.O. Box 839, Carrabelle, and Wilburn Ray Messer, P.O. Box 482, Carrabelle. In his candidate ling, Hinton has loaned his campaign $1,000 with which to fund his campaign. In the District 4 school board race, Stacy Kirvin, of 142 Deer Patch Rd. in Apalachicola, has led his letter of intent and has listed his own $100 contribution to open his campaign account. Parrish, of 104 Long Road, Apalachicola, has led to seek reelection to the District 4 county commissioner job, with a challenge coming from Royce S. Rolstad III, 119 Hicks Lane, Apalachicola. In addition to a list of statewide ballot measures, Franklin County voters will have before them a choice for congressman, between incumbent Republican Steve Southerland and Democratic challenger Gwen Graham. Luther Lee is also running as a write-in candidate, without party afliation. In the race for state representative in District 7, which encompasses all of Franklin County, incumbent Republican Halsey Beshears has signaled his desire to seek reelection, with no challengers having as yet surfaced. Seven incumbent circuit court judges have all led for reelection. They include Charles Dodson, Kevin J. Carroll, Frank E. Shefeld, John C. Cooper, Martin A. Fitzpatrick, Charles A. Francis, and Angela C. Dempsey. Although several Democrats and Republicans are running in the primary, Gov. Rick Scott and Democratic challenger Charlie Crist are expected to breeze through the primary and square off in November. Two Democrats, George H. Sheldon and Perry E. Thurston, are vying in the primary for the right to challenge incumbent Republican attorney general Pam Bondi. Democrat William Rankin is expected to challenge Republican Chief Financial Ofcer Jeff Atwater in the general election, and Democrat Thaddeus Thad Hamilton is running to unseat Republican Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam. In order to vote in the primary, voters must be registered by July 28. To vote in the Nov. 4 general election, all registrations must be in by Oct. 6. Early voting for the primary runs from Aug. 11 to 23, and for the general election, from Oct. 20 to Nov. 1. 2014Lighthouse inspires poetic visionsLighting the way for ships and boats Imagining the history in this place Great heights with wonderful views Home of the Keeper and family Thick walls of ancient bricks Helping sailors see Obviously a necessity Undergoing all weather, yet still shining Stairs, 92 of them Exquisite pieces of the past BY JESSICA RUDD 1-2-3-4 Counting until I skip a step I guess 27, but really 25 Climbing to the top I see the clouds as if they were in a meadow The wind whistles Ocean calls I am in my state of mind No boundaries There once was and always will be the light that shines upon the water to guide the lost world to freedom BY KIANA FOLEY CONCONTRACACTOORSS DEDEPOOT CLOSECLOSE-OUOUT SALESALE48 Island Drive Eastpoint. 670 1100Open Monday-Friday 8.30 to 2pmThe items listed below are for sale at reduced prices. Stainless Fasteners Nails, Deck Screws, Self drilling screws, Hex bolts, Carriage Bolts, Lag Bolts, Hinges. Tapcons, Joist Hangers, Collated guns nails and screws Pest Control Supplies Ants, Fleas, Roaches, Mosquitoes, Flies, Bedbugs and Termites. Zapper Bulbs & parts. Pumps for gardens and homes Little Giant Pumps Submersible Pumps. Fountain Pumps, Pool cover pumps, Etc. Ofce Equipment Desking, Rolling Ofce chairs, Macintosh desktop Computers, Printers and Fax machines. Filing trays, Under desk cupboards. Filing cabinets, Desk Fans/heaters, Stationary items, Various tables, Waste Baskets, Warehouse Equipment Fork lift, Heavy duty shelving, hand dollies, scales, heavy duty wall mount shredder, Two Tier stainless cart, Packing materials and at packed boxes. Kitchen items 2 Refrigerators, Counter Microwave. Counter oven, Exercise equipmentPalates, Bowex, Situp, Treadmill.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, May 22, 2014 $2500EXECUTIVE BeastFromtheEastSound Production CityofApalachicola TaylorsBuildingSupply $1500PLATINUM ClotheslineImprinted Sportswear FloridaSeafoodFestival FranklinCountyTDC $1000GOLD ApalachicolaMaritime Museum ApexProductions,Sound CatesElectric FUMCofApalachicola JourneysofSGI SGIUnitedMethodistChurch WaterStreetHotel&Marina TheTinShed $500SILVER AlohaBugsPestManagement ApalachicolaBayChamber ApalachicolaSeafoodGrillTHANKYOUTO2014SPONSORS(asof5-18-14) $500SILVER(continued)BackstreetTradingCompany BarbersSeafood BayMedia Dr.ZoesBack&NeckCarePlus ExecutiveOfceSupply FlynnstoneOutdoorAdvertising George&PamMahr Jerry&KarenThompson JoeBayArialPhotography Debbie&JohnHooper JollyRogerBeachShopSGI RWConstruction,Inc ScipioCreekMarina.INC SignDeSign SportsAuthority TamarasCaf $250BRONZE BlueParrotOceanfrontCaf Century21Reality&Collins VacationRentals,Inc. DeniseD.Butler,Owner/Agent, ButlerAgencyLLC Garlick&Associates ResortVacationPropertiesSGI RotaryClubofApalachicola $250BRONZE(continued)WaterStreetSeafood WombatSoundMusic $100-ASSOCIATEPARTNERS 2KWebgroup ApalachicolaAceHardware ApalachicolaPigglyWiggly BestWestern CentennialBank CoastalAnglerMagazine EnjoyApalachicolaLLC Frank&FrancisCook GallowayConstruction IslandEmporium KimHawkinsDavisCPA SometimesItsHotterSeasoning Company SuncoastVacationRentals CafConLeche&Tamaras Boutique UpTheCreekRawBar UpTheStairsFineDinning WithoutAPaddleGiftShop $50DONORS AuntEbbysIceCreamShop GibsonInn open, allowing three dogs and two cats to escape the conagration. A v isitor from Islamora d a attempted to extinguish the re with the hose from Barracks washing machine but was unsuccessful. He later told Morrow the re seemed to have originated from the left front eye of the stove. M orrow said she had used the stove shortly be f ore leaving the house but had heated water on the right front eye. A spokesperson for the state re marshals ofce said the re is still under investigation, but at this time, the origin is thought to be accidental. She said the blaze appears to have started i n the stove. Inves t igators said the house was a total loss, and the esti m ated cost of the damage was $50,000. Final determi n ation of the cost of the loss comes from the insurance company. M orrow said she and her children had been ex p eriencing problems with the electrical system in the house for some time. She said she had told her landlord he needed to have an electrician come to the house. M orrow and son Bran d on both said they had been shocked by the refrigerator. Light bulbs started blowing for no reason, and you couldnt touch the re f rigerator, stove or water faucet for a half h our after the oor was mopped with o ut getting shocked, she said. M orrow and family are currently staying at the home of newlyweds Crystal and Harvey Barrack. Morrow said she plans to return home to Alabama as soon as she can raise money to make the trip. Unemployed and ling for disability, she was widowed in 2010. An account is be ing set up at Centennial Bank in her name to accept donations. F our of her animals dis appeared during the re. Two are dogs: a red female Chihuahua named Scrappy with a scar on her left hip and an elderly female Jack Russell/Chihuahua mix that is missing four front teeth and is blind in her left eye. The second dog has a peanut-shaped mark on her back and is red and white. Her name is Daisy May. Both dogs have been spot ted in the area of Three Riv ers Road. Also missing are two cats, Smokey, a brown and gray Maine coon, and Tigger, a large yellow tabby male who Brandon Morrow described as looking like Gareld. I f you spot any of the animals or have retrieved them, or would like to help the Morrow family, call 205-393-9198. M orrow said she wishes to thank everyone who has h elped during this crisis. She said Carolines Thrift Shop in Eastpoint has opened its clothing sec t ion to her and her children. The Methodist Church in Carrabelle also has opened its clothing pantry and pro v ided the Morrows with food. She said Carl and Dana Whaley provided the fam i ly with personal hygiene products the night after the re. She also offered spe c ial thanks to Nikki Mock, Keisha Messer, Darius May, and Crystal and Har v ey Barrack. Morrow said to counter any incorrect information that has circulated since the blaze, copies of the sheriff s report and the re marshals ndings would be posted in the C arrabelle Post Ofce when they be c ome available. to a public beach, but do want to protect the dunes from automobile trafc. In a telephone interview Monday, Sue Reed said she and her neighbors are concerned about the constant traf c on the beach despite posted signs stating beach driving is illegal. She said based on license tags, much of the traf c appears to be people from outside the county. I dont know how they nd it, she said. County Attorney Michael Shuler said McKissack Beach residents have no right to bar people from the beach or Gulf Beach Road. He said the road origi nally was constr ucted by the McKissack Beach developer and acquired by the county through maintenance and im provements over time. Reed said only the paved half of the road is county property; the unpaved portion adjacent to the beach is prop erty of the Florida Department of Envi ronmental Protection. She said the resi dents of McKissack Beach have written to DEP requesting automobile trafc be barred from their property. Assistant County Planner Mark Curenton said he believes Reed is cor rect. He said the county road does not provide direct access to the beach and that it is illegal to drive on any beach anywhere in the county, with the excep tion of emergency vehicles. The debate over the road and auto mobiles on the beach became a hot but ton topic at Tuesdays county commis sion meeting during the public comment portion of the agenda. First, Sue Aiken of Carrabelle Beach thanked commissioners for removing no trespassing signs from Gulf Beach Road. Its a beautiful beach. Thank you for keeping it open to the public, she said. Several McKissack Beach residents also spoke at the meeting. Sue Hendrix, who described herself as a part-time resident of the develop ment, said automobile trafc on the beach is increasing. This morning, there were three campres on beach, Hendrix said. You are xing to have a real problem there with people driving their cars over the dunes. There have been cars on the beach all weekend, and it seems to be getting worse. County Planner Alan Pierce told her campres are allowed, but driving on the beach is illegal. McKissack Beach resident Bo May was critical of the sheriffs ofce, who he said has failed to enforce the beach driving law. At what point do we clarify how much trafc can be inside the dunes? he asked. (The end of Gulf Beach Drive) is marked no driving. There is a ne listed, but the law is never enforced. There is a big problem at the end of the road. (Drivers) have destroyed the whole dune structure at the end of the road. Commissioner William Massey said Gulf Beach Road traditionally has been used by mullet shermen to launch their boats. He said it has been in regular use since 1938 and that the road was paved up to the dunes until a storm destroyed the southern end in 1962. May disagreed. Mullet shermen rarely if ever sh off McKissack Beach anymore, he said. If they do, they are individuals throw ing cast nets. If mullet shermen were the only ones that used it, that wouldnt be a problem, but its used all weekend, willy-nilly. What is a process to get a res olution to this situation? Massey replied, I cant stop them from driving. Im not the law. Chairman Cheryl Sanders agreed. You need to contact the sheriffs ofce. We are not the enforcement arm of the county, she said. Reed also attended the meeting, tell ing commissioners the state is very con cer ned about the dunes. They were out there, on Friday, investigating the loss. The 5-foot dunes are gone. The water can come up the road now and destroy our homes. It happened in 2005. Some of the older houses are on the ground; only the newer ones are on stilts. Even the state of Florida said there is no road anymore, she said. If the state owns it they need to close it off, Massey said. When I was a boy, 50 years ago, it was paved to the end. In a separate interview, Pierce said debate over the beach and the road has been ongoing for at least 30 years. Carrabelle City Administrator Court n ey Millender said the beach is public and that the city leases it from DEP. She said the city h as no jurisdiction over Gulf Beach Road because it is outside the city limits. On Sunday morning, a handful of cars were parked along the unpaved portion of Gulf Beach Road including two parked directly on what remains of the dunes. The dunes appear to have been attened for the entire width of the road. A sign next to the attened area states that driving on the dunes and beach is illegal. Reed said automobiles have attened the 5-foot barrier of dunes. She said she has seen tourists chasing bears with vehicles on McKissack Beachs private roads and even along the beach. M cKissack Beach neighborhoods entryway is now clearly posted No Trespassing. Reed said her community is in the process of organizing a neigh b orhood watch. Lesley Cox, with Carrabelles Wa t erfront Partnership, said because the beach is public, DEP requires the city have a management plan for the facility. S he said the Waterfront Partnership began work on a draft in 2010 and then asked the city to complete the docu m ent. She said the city has completed the draft. City Clerk Keisha Messer said City Attorney Dan Hartman has submitted the document to the state. Cox said there would be at least two additional public meetings before t he manage m ent plan is nalized. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe remains of the Morrow home at 206 NW 10th St. in Carrabelle. FIRE from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesCars are parked directly on the remains of the dunes next to a sign stating that driving on the dunes is prohibited. BEACH DRIVING from page A1At what point do we clarify how much trafc can be inside the dunes? (The end of Gulf Beach Drive) is marked no driving. There is a ne listed, but the law is never enforced. There is a big problem at the end of the road. (Drivers) have destroyed the whole dune structure at the end of the road.Bo May, residentThe state is very concerned about the dunes. They were out there, on Friday, investigating the loss. The 5-foot dunes are gone. The water can come up the road now and destroy our homes. It happened in 2005. Some of the older houses are on the ground; only the newer ones are on stilts. Even the state of Florida said there is no road anymore.Sue Reed, resident

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LocalA8 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com While it fell short of the world record, Saturdays rst ever Paddle Jam is being hailed by participants and organizers as a wonderful and uplifting experience. We may not have the world record, but we had world-class volunteers, sponsors, participants and support, said the Rev. Themo Patriotis, who conceived of and organized the three-day event. We set a world record for Southern hospitality. For a rst time attempt, this was a tremendous success. The goal of Paddle Jam was to set the worlds record for the largest kayak raft. To do this, 2,100 kayakers would have had to paddle. Best estimate is that 333 participated in the raft on Saturday afternoon. Staging area for the event was Battery Park. Paddlers began to arrive in town on Friday night and there was music in the park until about 9 p.m. The city fenced off the area with the same chain link used during Florida Seafood Festival. Patriotis said this proved to be a wise move since visitors felt secure about leaving their boats at the launch site while they ate, checked in to lodgings and got a good nights sleep before the paddle. Hotels reported the jam put some heads on beds. People came from as far away as Montana and Colorado specically to paddle. A team of 13 from Tennessee and Alabama called themselves the Yakkin Dogs and another groups identied themselves as Team Jellysh. Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes complimented participants on Friday afternoon. The crowd is very laid back, he said. This is the way I like it. On Saturday morning, about a dozen vendors had set up in the park offering food, clothing and art. Sports Authority of Panama City gave away free tickets for a chance to win a shing kayak donated by the Lifetime Kayaks. The winner was Valerie Jackson, of Apalachicola. Rental kayaks were available onsite from Journeys of St. George Island; the Apalachicola Maritime Museum had boats available. Patriotis said 333 paddlers registered but he also said there were late arrivals who may not have registered. Dayle Flynt, owner of Journeys of St. George Island, said she rented about 60 kayaks to participants, some of which were tandems seating two people. It may not have been a world record but it was denitely an Eastpoint record, said Wayne Thomas of Eastpoint. The rst paddlers put in the water at about noon. It took an hour to get everyone on the water and form a raft with every boat in contact with at least one other. While rafting up, paddlers amused themselves by blowing bubbles and tossing a pink beach ball. Two rafters donned realistic horse head masks. Debbie Hooper of JoeBay Aerial Photography circled overhead in a small plane capturing images of the kayaks traveling from the marina to a spoil Island and rafting up. Patriotis arrived on the scene in a support boat and waved a blue satin ag for attention. He said all of the kayaks needed to raft up when the Coast Guard vessel sounded a horn as a signal. Patriotis said there were nine privately-owned support boats and several wave runners on site as well as boats from the Coast Guard, Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce and St. George Island Water Rescue. One man had to be towed ashore when he experienced back pain. Two paddlers left their boats and entered the water. In both cases, the water was shallow enough to stand and the two were restored to their kayaks with a helping hand from other paddlers. The weather was perfect for an event on the water with a light breeze and temperatures in the 70s. After rafting up for an aerial photo, the happy participants made there orderly way back to shore and participating boats were quickly removed and carried to vehicles with the help of volunteers. On Sunday morning, the event climaxed with Stand Up Paddleboard (SUP) Day at Regatta Park on St. George Island. After a service before the majestic waters of the bay, there was yoga, racing and SUP demonstrations. The theme of the sermon was unconditional love. Patriotis said, Paddle Jam has brought together people from all kinds of philosophical, religious and political backgrounds. This is not an attempt to change anybody. Were going to be the mass of humanity that God so loved, he sent his only son. Love to paddle, paddle to love. Patriotis praised everyone who provided support for the event and said the Coast Guard was on board from day one. A follow-up meeting is planned to review Paddle Jam and begin planning for next year. Proceeds from the event go towards helping at risk children, youth and families in need through the Outreach Ministries of the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish, where Patriotis pastors. Paddle Jam a unifying spectacleSpecial to the TimesContractors Depot in Eastpoint is closing down after 20 years in business in Franklin County. The business was started by British owners Dave and Margaret Tuplin, initially in Apalachicola, as an equipment rental center and hardware store. After a couple of years they opened a second store on St. George Island. They developed their rst web site in 1997 which sold pest control supplies. It was an instant success so over the next few years they published further websites selling the items they carried in their hardware stores. In 2000, their son David Tuplin Jr. came over from England to help with the design and development of more e-commerce web sites. In 2002 they built the ofce and warehouse on Island Drive and sold their other stores. Through the next eight years they were extremely successful and had a staff of 14 people shipping contractors supplies and equipment throughout the US and worldwide. However, competition grew on the internet with all the major manufacturers publishing their own websites and supplying contractors direct. Websites such as Amazon, Overstock and others grew, which also reduced prot margins to unsustainable levels, said the senior Tuplin. Revenue began to decline and the closing of the business soon became inevitable. The Eastpoint location will be completely closed in June and is now for sale. They have some of their internet inventory remaining and are selling it locally at low prices, everything from fasteners, to pest control supplies, pumps, and exercise equipment. All the ofce furniture and equipment is also for sale to the local public. The younger David and his wife Dawn returned in 2012 to Europe, where he now writes computer applications for Barclays Bank UK. Dave and Margaret are selling their home in Crawfordville and also planning to return to their homeland in Europe in the next few months. The senior Tuplin said he and his wife are sad to be leaving behind their American friends and faithful customers, after enjoying 24 years in the USA. But, with nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren in the UK, they are looking forward to seeing them more frequently.Contractors Depot closing downSp P ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S DA A VI I S MAMA GEE EE | Special to The TimesDavis Magee of Apalachicola snapped this photo of himself during the raft formation, when paddlers raised paddles to signify the raft was motionless.DA A VI I D AA DLE LE RSTEI TEI N | The TimesThe Rev. Themo Patriotis exhorts kayakers to begin their departure. DE E BBIE IE HOOHOO PE E R | Special to The TimesAn aerial photograph of the kayak raft. DA A VI I D AA DLE LE RSTEI TEI N | The TimesThis kayaker managed to display balance and poise during the jam.

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LocalThe Times | A9Thursday, May 22, 2014 nationwide that elect superint endents, as they are conned to Florida, Alabama and Mississippi, and are only in 142 school districts out of just over 13,500 districts in America, or about 1 percent. In Florida, superintendents are elected in 41 of 67 districts, mostly in the smaller and mid-sized dis t ricts. He said while large districts tend to have appointed superin t endents, Lake, Polk, Okeechobee and Flagler counties are among the medium-sized districts to opt for an appointed school chief. Blanton said Florida is one of only six states where both school board members and superinten d ents have constitutional ofcer status. He outlined provisions of the F lorida constitution, and within statute, that govern who oversees a school district, noting that whether hired or appointed, a superintendent manages and su p ervises district operations, while the school board sets policy and approves the budget. The local superintendent runs the school system, manages the people, recommends for hiring, he said. They have to run the school system the same way. The superintendent executes school board policy. To be elected as superinten d ent, an individual need only be a registered voter within the county, but an appointed superintendent must meet standards of educa t ion, training and experience set forth by the school board, Blanton said. M ore t han half of the states 26 appointed superintendents have doctorate degrees; fewer than half of 1 percent in those where they are elected have such a degree. Ive never known a district that hired somebody with less than a masters degree, he said. Your pool is small (in Franklin County) when you really get down to it, Blanton said. You would have the ability to draw from a very large pool on a national basis. I f the school board opts for a binding referendum, county com m issioners would be obligated to place it in the November ballot, Blanton said. If then passed by m ajority vote, the school board would have the responsibility of searching for and nding a super i ntendent to begin when Marks current term expires in October 2016. I n his many years at the FSBA, Blanton has been part of 83 su p erintendent searches, on behalf of counties throughout the state. Though Franklin County is not a member of the FSBA, opting over the past few years to save the roughly $5,000 in annual member s hip dues, the school board could turn to FSBA to conduct a nation w ide search, lasting about four to six months, at an estimated cost of about $10,000 to $15,000.Citizens committee would assist selectionTo assist in the selection from what Blanton said could be as many as 50 applicants, including individuals from within the coun t y, a citizens committee could be created by the school board, made up of a cross-section of citizens. Ive never had a board turn down a citizens committees rec o mmendation, Blanton said. You need to work through the process so the community is comfortable. H e said one advantage to hav i ng an appointed superintendent is that the community can nd a candidate who has the training and experience to meet specic goals, whether to improve public relations, bolster vocational edu c ation or whatever the priorities may b e. What you look at is the com m unitys needs, Blanton said. Neither superman or superwom a n is available. But you go out and nd that superintendent with that track record. Your qualications and what you come to is very, very important. It is important that the school board and superintendent have good communication. He said electing a superin t endent from among local can d idates has advantages as well. Youre going to elect somebody you know; youre going to elect somebody from your community, whos going to know the needs of this community, he said. (With an appointed superintendent), theres going to be a little learning curve. Blanton said though he or she does not face re-election and serves only at the pleasure of the school board, an appointed superintendent is shielded from election politics, but that does not mean politics is removed com p letely from the school district. All elections affecting the school district tend to draw em p loyees into the politics of the election, he said. Blanton said terms of a con t ract between the school board and the superintendent are ne g otiated and generally run three years, with provisions for termi n ation, buyout, sick leave and such. He said though candidates from within Florida may seek ways to remain on the s tate re t irement system, those from out of state generally will negotiate an annuity or some other retirement option. O verall, the cost of an appoint e d superintendent is expected to run more than that of an elected one, depending on education and experience, Blanton said. Asked about the effect of a switch from elected to appointed on academic performance, Blan t on said he has not seen a pat t ern. I thought I could nd a dif f erence, and I have not been able to nd a signicant difference whether student test scores dif f er between elected and appoint e d, he said, noting that Florida scores tend to outpace those i n the other two states that still elect superintendents. Blanton said he knew of only one Florida district to have switched back to an elected su p erintendent. Lake County went from elected to appointed, then back to elected, and six years ago went back to appointed. Its the only one I know of in 39 years, he said. SUPERINTENDENT from page A1Morgan Martin and an extracurricular cast and crew, but was not familiar with all the details of the script, which focuses gen tly on the turmoil when the civil rights movement rst came alive 50 years ago, as seen through the prism of an American Bandstand type live dance party tele vision show in Baltimore, Md. The show addresses issues of how society has loosened its strictly held views on everything from interracial dating to puber ty to obesity. The dialogue is not without its spicy lan guage, some of which gave Creamer ts, and some of which she nixed, or so the actors say. But as it turned out, the large audience that took in the show Friday leaped to its feet with a standing ovation, after a show that can best be described as memorable. Star ring in the role made famous on Broad way by Harvey Fierstein, and in the lm by John Travolta, senior Alex Cau sey played the drag ver sion of Edna Turnblad, a role whose girth calls for a male actor. Causey reveled in the opportunity, sashay ing around with his ample bosom for maximum comic effect. His soft shoe with husband Wilbur Turnblad (Christian Jones), to the warm and cheery love song Timeless to Me, was a glowing tribute to how beauty is truly in the eyes of the beholder. The show revolves around the ambition of the Turnblads daughter, Tracy, (Cynthia Duncan) to secure a coveted spot in the dance troupe of The Corny Collins Show. As it turns out, Tracy, who is not very gently chided for her weight by a snotty rival Amber Van Tussle (Ursula Countryman), manages to be picked for the show. She brings to the TV show not only a sassy alternative to the rail-thin other girls, but an outspoken advocacy for expanding Negro Day from once a month, even, heaven forbid, allowing for an integrated dance oor! Van Tussles mom, Vel m a (high school teacher Stephanie Howze-Jones) not only directs The Corny Collins Show, and is bigot e d to boot, but is willing to even cheat if it means her daughter will win the Miss Hairspray crown. After Tracy sings Good Morning Baltimore, a tes t imony to her optimism, the show switches to the set of The Corny Collins Show, where Austin Carter played the slick host. Called in to play the part with just a few weeks to spare, Carter was one of the only actors to lip sync, as he m anaged the acting assignment suavely, with superb charm. By shows end, this allwhite dance crew has come together with the all-black youth. With choreogra p hy by experienced danc e r Morgan Martin, who played both Little Inez and Judine, these group scenes were among the best in the show, proving Seahawks know how to scoot in sync along the dance oor. Among those young peo p le were Gilbert (Kelsey Jones), Stooie (Maliek Rhodes), Cindy Watkins (Bria Walker), Tammy (Me g an Collins), Brad (Chan d ler White), Fender (Gabby Bond), Brenda (Deborah Dempsey), Sketch (Cam e ron White), Shelley (Mad i son Newell), IQ (Shane Bellew), LouAnn (Brook Pittman), Lorraine (Aali y ah West), Kamilah ( Sha m eika Lake) and Shayna (Beyla Walker). With her goofy, geeky best friend Penny Pingle t on (Raven Carr) as her sidekick, Tracy sets out on an adventure that takes her to the Negro side of town, where she discovers the meaning of freedom and equality by an involve m ent with a civil rights demonstration that leads to her jailing. Performing one of the high points of the show, in a magnicent tribute to the joy of eating and of selflove, high school teacher Elinor Mount-Simmons, as Motormouth Maybelle, brought down the house with her rendition of Big, Blonde and Beautiful. The show gave all the a ctors a chance to pro v ide an energetic, un a bashed, free-wheeling performance, and each took advantage. As the heartthrob Link Larkin, Logan McLeod had the slick gestures down as he crooned It Takes Two to a pie-eyed, giggly Tracy. As Seaweed Stubbs, Ja t han Martin set a standard for the cast to emulate as he danced and sang Run and Tell That together with Little Inez and the Dynamites, a tribute to the Supremes and other 60s female soul-pop trios, played by Morgan Martin, Shameika Lake and Beyla Walker, in elegant gowns and satin gloves. Luke Hames, as Harri m an Spritzer, was a comic presence i n his role as pro p rietor of a plus-size linger ie store beloved by Edna Turnblad. High school teacher Jennifer Edwards, who also stage managed the show together with Roderick Robinson and An d rea Cupid, and para-pro f essional Louise Chipman added their acting talents to the show, which was as s isted by lots of school and community support. Richie Herrington served as technical di r ector, Dana Whaley took photos and Creamers husband, Earl, helped to design and create props, as W.K. Sanders carpentry class handled construction of the set. The list of backers continues, including Ace Hardware, Pennys Worth, Anthony Cooley from PAEC, Dolores Croom, Deborah Huckeba, Nina M arks, Scott Shiver, Lee Venable, Cathy Wood and many more. It was a labor of love, a tribute to gumption and perseverance and a pow e rful, musical blast for the renewal of an effort to ex p and the theater opportu n ities at the school. HAIRSPRAY from page A1 PHOTOS BY DANA WH H ALEY Y | Special to the TimesHairspray director Jathan Martin sings as Seaweed J. Stubbs. Raven Carr was comic as Penny Pingleton, harassed by her mother for her rebellious ways. Alex Causey as Edna Turnblad, and Christian Jones as husband Wilbur, were a delightful pair. LEFT: The Dynamites, from left Shameika Lake, Morgan Martin and Beyla Walker, perform Welcome to the s. Lots of dancing punctuated Hairspray. Maddie Newell, as Shelley, was among the dancers. LEFT: Stephanie Howze-Jones, as Velma Von Tussle, sings Miss Baltimore Crabs.

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A10 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 Wehave2littersofLabandLabmixpuppies.Therearetwofemalesinonelitter and3malesintheother.Onegroupis10weeksold,theother8weeksold.All havebeenspayedandneutered,vaccinatedandarereadyfortheirforeverhome. Summertimeistheperfecttimetoadoptafamilypet.Thekidsarehomefrom schooltoplaywithandhelpcareforthenewpuppy! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofouranimalsintotheir hometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatly appreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCountyHumane Societyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogontothewebsiteatwww. forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets. FranklinCountyHumaneSociety SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday Special to The Times The Philaco Womens Club held its annual installation of ofcers at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 17. The meeting took place at Benedict Hall at Trinity Episcopal Church. A special guest Jan Gainer, Florida recording secretary for the General Federation of Womens Clubs (GFWC), installed the incoming ofcers. The new president is Ginny Griner. Maxine Creamer and Clarice Powell are rst and second vice presidents. Kate Aguiar will continue to serve as treasurer. Corresponding secretary is Sandi Hengle. Barbara Iman will serve as recording secretary and attorney Rachel Chesnut will take on the duties of parliamentarian. At the same meeting, winners of the annual $1,000 scholarships were announced. Franklin County High School senior Brook Pittman was present to receive her award; the other recipient, senior Jathan Martin, was not in attendance. Philaco also gave contributions to the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library; Patrons of the Apalachicola Municipal Library; and the Food Pantry at the Saturday meeting. Beverly Kelly was honored for her 40-year membership in Philaco with a corsage and a 40year pin. Fun facts from 1974, the year she joined, were read. Club committees were also presented with state level recognition from the Florida chapter of GFWC. Education received a statewide rst, Conservation a second and Public Issues a third. SocietyBrittany Creamer, Charles Johnson to wedThe parents of Brittany Noel Creamer and Charles Joseph Johnson are pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of their children. Brittany is the daughter of Ray and Sharon Creamer, and Mike and Terry Pridgen, all of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Quention and Tillie Creamer, and the late Bobby Varnes, of Apalachicola; and Shirley Creamer and the late Arvin Creamer, of Apalachicola. Charles is the son of Mickey and Cara Johnson, of White City. Paternal grandparents are Lola Fambro and the late Joe Fambro, of Port St. Joe; and Glady Johnson and the late Andrew Johnson, of Carrabelle. The wedding will be held Saturday, May 24 at 4 p.m. at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church in Apalachicola. Reception to follow at the Fort Coombs Armory in Apalachicola. Friends and family are invited to attend. ADELE COLSTON | Special to The TimesGlynda Ratliff, left, accepts an award on behalf of the conservation committee from outgoing Philaco President Jackie Bell, with incoming president Ginny Griner seated at right.Philaco installs new ofcers WeddingBy ELINOR MOUNtT -SImmMMONsS Special to The Times The Franklin County School Class of 2014 is preparing to close out their high school years, take ight for a brand new world, and soar off to seek their destiny. To ofcially bring to an end these formative years, as well as to end their 2013-14 school year, the Seahawk Graduation Committee invites the Franklin County community to attend two very special traditional senior class events: Senior recognition night and the graduation ceremony. The fth annual Senior Recognition Night will be this Friday, May 23. This special event kicks off the school-sponsored graduation activities for the Class of 2014 and will be held in the schools cafetorium beginning at 6 p.m. Scholarships and monetary awards will be presented from over 30 donors to members of the graduating class. Although not formally a part of the schools weeklong graduation activities, the annual baccalaureate service will be held Sunday, May 25 at 4 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God. The graduation committee is also pleased to announce the seventh annual commencement for the 64 graduating Seahawk seniors. This memorable ceremony will be Thursday, May 29 at 7 p.m. in the gymnasium. Doors open at 6 p.m. In preparation for the night, reserved seating selection for the graduates families will be Thursday, May 29 at noon, with graduation practice immediately following. Students are required to attend both of these activities. Parents are encouraged to attend the seating selection and assist with this task. To capture memories for these two special times, videos can be purchased for $40 through pre-orders only. The ordering period runs through May 29. Students and/or parents can see Mrs. Carla Bankston in the front ofce with their order. During the graduation ceremony, LifeTouch Photography will take pictures of all graduates at no cost and will e-mail graduates the ordering information, which will be done from their website. The Seahawk Graduation Committee Carla Bankston, Dolores Croom, Karyl Gavigan, Leigh Smith, and coordinator Elinor Mount-Simmons are working diligently, planning these special occasions for the seniors and are exciting about bringing forth another memorable experience. Please join them, Senior Class Advisors Croom and Kassi Malcolm, and the entire Seahawk family as they help the Class of 2014 create lasting memories of their graduation activities by attending the 2014 graduation events. Any questions concerning senior recognition night or commencement can be directed to MountSimmons at 670-2800, ext. 2111 or at emountsimmons@franklin.k12. .usClass of 2014 to take a bow The Franklin County High School band had a busy week last week. On Thursday, May 15, they presented their annual Spring Concert, under the direction of Karl Lester. The rst half of the concert was performed by the middle school band. In the second half, the high school students performed Brighton Camp by Randall Standridge; portions of Hansel and Gretel by Engelbert Humperdinck; Polly Oliver by Thomas Root; Blue Ridge Reel and Among the Clouds by Brian Balmages; Beauty and the Beast by Alan Menken; The Lion King by Paul Lavender; Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by Paul Jennings; and Gangnam Style by Michael Brown. On Sunday afternoon, at Lafayette Park, those selections formed the content of the closing concert in the Ilse Newell Series for the Performing Arts, sponsored by the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Instrumentalists include utes Samantha Marxsen, Ursula Countryman, Josie Kriss, Jessica Rudd, Casey Riley and Aracely Gallegos; clarinets Jackson Copley, Cayce Daniels, Fisher Edwards, Beyla Walker, Makenzie Schumann, Abbie Pace, and Taylor Messer; bass clarinet Morgan Anderson; alto saxophone Thomas Copley and Ana Aguilar; tenor saxophone Acaleah Wallace; trumpets Melody Hateld, Charles Petty and Jessica Schmidt; French horns Mercedes Rice and Rory Countryman; trombones Morgan Martin, Colby Boatwright and Mitchell Sand; euphonium Ann Reeder; tuba Hunter Kelley; and percussion Bryan Boyd, Kitana Peralta and Jonathan Whitcomb. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN On May 6, Ray Brownsworth, CEO of Weems Memorial Hospital, introduced the hospitals new chief nancial ofcer, John Graham, to the county commission. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked Graham for his opinion of the hospital. What are your priorities? she asked. Graham said that while the hospital staff is good, the facility can always use more providers. I will give you my best efforts to make the nancials good and bring you the news whether it is bad or good, he said. This is a people business and I like working with people. The basic bottom line is to provide service to the community. By LOIS SWOBODA PHotos OTOS bB Y DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesBand director Karl Lester directs the middle school band during the rst half of the May 15 spring concert.FCHS band wraps up busy week John Graham new CFO at WeemsLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesJohn Graham, left, with Ray Brownsworth. Hunter Kelley plays the tuba.

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The Times | A11Thursday, May 22, 2014 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService OBITUARIESSurrounded by family, Exie Reba Gilbert (Granny) went to be with our Lord on Saturday, May 17, 2014, at her home. Originally, from Inman, South Carolina, she had resided in Carrabelle the last 40 years. Exie had been married to her sweetheart, John, for 74 years. Exie is preceded in death by her parents, Paul and Tennessee Abernathy, along with two infant sons, Leon and Johnny, as well as four brothers. In addition to her husband, John, she is survived by ve daughters: Gwen Suddeth (Troy), Wilma Thompson (Dale), Zenith Barnett (Ed), Lorraine Shiver (Ronnie, deceased), and Rita Massey; and one brother, Dean Abernathy. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, 15 greatgrandchildren, ve greatgreat-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Exie worked alongside her husband in carpentry on many homes and businesses in Carrabelle. She was a loving and devoted wife, mother and granny. We will always remember her homemade biscuits, quilts, playing her guitar and most of all her precious love. Services were Tuesday afternoon, May 20 at First Assembly of God in Carrabelle, preceded by visitation.Exie GilbertMr. Carlton Henry Padgett, 82, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Thursday, May 15, 2014, at his home. He was born Dec. 2, 1931 in Holmes County to the late George Walker Padgett and Mattie Elsie Padgett. In addition to his parents, Mr. Padgett was preceded in death by his wife, Joy Padgett; two brothers, Randall Padgett and Donnie Padgett; and one sister, Dessie Bell. Mr. Padgett served in the United States Air Force from 1951-1955. Mr. Padgett is survived by his son, Kevin Hedman, of Niceville; two grandchildren, Cassandra Worley of Chipley, and Carlton Hedman of Troy, Ala.; two greatgrandchildren, Bryndon Matthew Carroll and Broox Auburn Worley; one sister, Wilma Niel, of Carrabelle. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, May 19 at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church with Rev. Ernie Grey of ciating. Interment will follow with military honors in the Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church Cemetery. Family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday at Peel Funeral Home.Carlton Henry Padgett FaithBARFIELD FAMILYThe family of Florida Vause Bar eld offers their sincere thanks to each of you for your many acts of kindness during the passing of our beloved mother. Your kind words, warm embraces, prayers, and words of comfort will always be remembered. We want to especially thank Pastor Roach for the lovely service and the sweet ladies of the church for the delicious food their sweet kindness and warm words brought comfort to our family. All these genuine expressions of love are so appreciated. Our sincere thanks and may you be blessed.THE REGISTER FAMILYDear Family and Friends of Rev. Lawrence J. Register: Words are never enough to express our sincere gratitude to all of the ones who expressed their love and grieved with us at the passing of such a wonderful man as our Dad. We were overwhelmed by your expressions of love and all the beautiful owers and food presented by those who cared so much for him. A heartfelt thanks to the Apalachicola Pentecostal Holiness Church for the wonderful meals, owers, prayers, the ramp the men of the church built, and too many other things to put in writing but God saw and we appreciate them all. One other thanks is due to the Big Bend Hospice for their help in the last days of Daddys life, Mrs. Carolyn, and Mrs. Tammy were angels sent to help us get Daddy to the other side of Jordan.Thanks to the family for doing what families always do in time of crisis: you all pitched in and were there for us whenever we needed you. Thank you and God richly bless, The Register Family CARDS OF THANKSMissed seeing you at lunch last Thursday. Sarge had xed red sh for us and Stacey prepared the sides. Maybe you can make it this afternoon. Chow line forms at noon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Pat or Ed will take your donation of $5 at the desk. Be watchin for ya! We had a full house at the pancake brunch last Saturday at the Lanark Village Boat Club. I enjoyed my French toast with bacon, eggs, coffee and juice. I just know you enjoyed your breakfast too. See you June 21, same time, same station. Last Sunday was covered dish at Chillas Hall. When I got there at 12:20 p.m., there was only Dot Bless and me. About 12:50 p.m., here come the crowd. We all had a ne meal and good time, but were missing two of our faithful helpers. Wally Law and Shirley Cox were both having health problems. Pray for their recovery. When you sauntered over to the dessert table, did you look up and see the frame and painted owers and heavy verse? You can thank Jacki Cicly. She did the painting. Dont forget we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday night and pizza on Sunday at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Orders taken after 6 p.m. both nights. Eat in or take out available. Hamburger and chips requires a donation of $6. Pizza, by the slice is $1 donation. Bet you cant eat just one slice. Enjoy a whole pizza in the lounge for a donation of $8 or a pizza on the run requires a donation of $10. Call in an order by dialing 697-9998. Enjoy. Monday, May 26, is Memorial Day. Please take time for a moment of prayer for those who gave their lives to save our freedom. The Memorial Day service will be held at 1 p.m. at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. We will also have the retiring of old ags, followed by a lunch of nger food. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember, smile, Jesus loves you. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry.Memorial Day service Monday afternoon LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Market Days at Messer Pavilion May 31Carrabelle United Methodist Church and Gods Ministry for the Needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering, on Saturday, May 31, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then. eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink! Music will be provided by local talent. Thank you all for visiting us at the Riverfront Festival last month. We are looking forward to seeing you again! Remember God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing.Healthy Start Baby Shower June 3Healthy Starts sixth annual Baby Shower will be held Tuesday, June 3 at 4 p.m. at The Centennial Building, 300 Allen Memorial Way, in Port St. Joe. We invite all Franklin and Gulf County pregnant women, new parents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for a special evening. There will be information stations on various topics such as car seat safety, shaken baby, childbirth, safe sleep, community resources and vendors offering merchandise for purchase. Free admission, plus food, fun, games and lots of fabulous door prizes! Special games for Dads! For more information, call 1-800-895-9506 ext. 100. Faith BRIEFS The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000.MONDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed DiscussionTUESDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, OpenWEDNESDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, ClosedTHURSDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion.FRIDAYApalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open DiscussionSATURDAYAlligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, OpenSUNDAYEastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference AA MEETINGS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Please take time for a moment of prayer for those who gave their lives to save our freedom.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, May 22, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LO W CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May1576 5960% Fri,May1677 6220% Sat,May1777 6610% Sun,May1878 6610% Mon,May1979 680% Tues,May2079 700% Wed,May2180 710% JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVAL ALSOCLEANGUTTERSAND IRRIGATIONINSTALLATION, PLANTINGANDBEDDING AVAILABLE CALLJOE@850-323-0741 ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM SPONSORED BY Local area water are producing great inshore and now some offshore catches as the weather has finally settled down. We are expecting great turnouts of visitors this weekend, so get to your favorite spot early. Red fish continue to be caught in the ICW canal and out in the Windmark location this week. Flounder and trout are in shallow water at the head of the bay, but not in vast numbers yet. Pompano and whiting continue to run the beaches along the Gulf side of Cape San Blas and further east down the coast. Offshore red snapper will open this Saturday in state waters to a much anticipated crowd of anglers. Many good sized red snapper are holding in 60-80ft of water and they will be big this weekend.Page 12By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Gulf County Commissioners on April 22 entered the fray to maintain full public access to St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. The board unanimously approved for a letter to be sent to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lending BOCC support to efforts to preserve what remains of the skeletal management of St. Vincent. Landy Luther, with the Supporters of St. Vincent Island, brought a plea to the board, urging commissioners to participate in the letter-writing campaign currently underway. Two months ago, Luther said, the Supporters were noti ed that USFWS was undergoing an analysis of staf ng and funding for national wildlife refuges. The information we got was really negative toward St. Vincent, Luther said. What information has been made available indicates the USFWS is considering further staf ng and funding cuts at St. Vincent. And while the refuge will not be closed that would require congressional action, Luther said public uses and access to the island could possibly be restricted, Luther said. That is bad news because over the last ve years the island has been severely understaffed and under-budgeted, Luther said. We as supporters are opposed to any status change that would result in staf ng and funding cuts. The island staff has already been cut in recent years with a biologist position eliminated and management staff reduced to one. Funding for the island is now funneled through St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and the island no longer has leased of ce space in Apalachicola after the city declined to renew the lease. That has conspired to put a highly-successful red wolf breeding program at risk and resulted in actions such as moving the annual meeting of the Supporters from a weekend to a weekday event due to staf ng reductions. The island is considered an environmental jewel. The late Dr. Joe Collins, a world-renowned herpetologist from the University of Kansas, spent nearly a decade surveying the wildlife on the island. He wrote several papers in addition to a pocket book on the snakes of the island. As a barrier island that is essentially undisturbed from 100 years ago, St. Vincent was, Collins repeatedly said, a unique environment worth keeping pristine and natural. The island has also become a growing tourist attraction, said Marie Romanelli, who with her husband operates a shuttle service from the Indian Pass boat ramp to the island. The island is becoming a major tourist attraction as well as wildlife sanctuary, Romanelli said, noting that during a typical spring week she will eld four or ve dozen calls from those interested in exploring the island. Most people access the island from the boat ramp from Indian Pass even though it is in Franklin County. Those people also patronized businesses and restaurants in Gulf County, Romanelli said, meaning the island carries an economic impact for the county. St. Vincent is a gem, said Commissioner Warren Yeager. There will be an economic impact if they move forward with restricting access. A lot of people go out there. Businesses rely on this. And, Yeager said, the island is public land and should remain fully open to the public that pays the price tag for management. We dont need to lose the eco-tourism that has developed out there, said resident Pat Hardman. The Supporters group gathered over 800 signatures on a petition urging the UWFWS to leave the island alone and submitted that petition. Luther said the next step was a letter-writing campaign commissioners agreed to join. Time is of the essence, Romanelli said. The expectation is that the USFWS will complete its staf ng/ budgeting exercise in the next 15-20 days and the impacts of any decision to reduce public access would likely come this year. It is a treasure, Yeager said. Meanwhile, there is a possibility that the St. Vincent Island refuge will remain in Apalachicola, and may relocate into the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce building on Commerce Street. Chamber Director Anita Grove told city commissioners May 6 that she is in negotiations with refuge representatives to possible lease space to them. She said the refuge would need about a half-dozen designated parking spaces, and the commissioners gave unanimous approval to designate the unpaved lot across Commerce Street as parking in the event it is needed.TIM ROSS | Special to the TimesThis red wolf was photographed in March 2007 as a captive specimen at Parks at Chehaw in Albany, Georgia.Gulf County commission backs access to St. Vincent CAPT. EARL SOLOMON | Special to the TimesAtlantas Ray Solomon took home a pair of rstplace recreational nishes, worth $500 each, at the sixth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament April 27-28 in Panacea. In the ounder division, Solomon landed a 2-pound, 8-ounce sh, with Carrabelles Marilyn Lawhon nishing second, and winning $200, for her 2-pound, 7-ounce catch. In the red sh division, Solomon reeled in an 8-pound, 1-ounce sh to take rst. SOLOMONS ROCK THE DOCK

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, May 22, 2014 ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com An unprecedented seven Seahawk seniors signed on the dotted line May 7 as they committed to college scholarships to play in their respective sports. Added to the two football players who signed last month, this total of nine Seahawks committed to college sports marked a new pinnacle in the schools sevenyear sports program. The Seahawks who signed at the afternoon rally in the gym were a collection of four soccer players, two softball players and one basketball player. Former girls soccer coach Kelli Maggio Wright, now a physical education teacher and assistant coach at Arnold High School in Panama City, was on hand as current girls soccer coach Joe Shields introduced the two girl soccer stars he helped develop Gracyn Kirvin and Adriana Reeder who are both on their way to play for the Faulkner University Eagles, a private Christian school in Montgomery, Alabama. The boys coach, Ramon Valenzuela, helped to introduce the Seahawk boys soccer stars James Harris and Graham Kirvin who have committed to play for the Thomas University Night Hawks, a private liberal arts school in Thomasville, Georgia. Lady Seahawk coach Scott Collins introduced the two players Ashley Carroll and Ally Millender who have committed to playing for the Wallace Community College Lady Govs, at the two-year institution of higher learning, formerly known as George C. Wallace State Community College, in located in Dothan, Alabama. Wallaces interim head softball coach Ronny Lunsford was on hand for the signing. The lone basketball player to sign was senior Cameron White, who will dress for the Trinity Baptist College Eagles, at a private university in Jacksonville. His future coach, John D. Jones, attended the signing ceremony. After an introduction from Athletic Director Mike Sweatt, Shields took the stage before a boisterous audience of high school students in the gym. Shields praised both Gracyn Kirvin and Reeder, who he has known for years while they grew up playing soccer. She has soccer in her blood, he said of Kirvin. It makes sense she wanted to pursue soccer as a college coach. Shields described Reeder as quite possibly the hardest working girl he has coached, who has withstood legal but harsh hits, and bounced back. Maggio Wright did not speak, but sat in the bleachers, beaming at her players success. Boys coach Ramon Valenzuela introduced Graham Kirvin and Harris, stressing that this is the rst time the soccer program has sent four of its alumni on to athletic scholarships. Girls coach Scott Collins introduced Millender and Carroll. Former Lady Seahawk coach Lisa Sweatt did not speak, but stood, happily, in back, proud of both girls. Mike Sweatt introduced White, noting that in his years as a coach I have never seen somebody make the gains hes made. Sweatt said White added 11 inches to his 22 vertical leap, as he invested countless hours working towards his goal. White echoed the feelings of all the athletes in his remarks, stressing that performance in the classroom was top priority. You have to get it done there rst, before you can get it done on the court or in the eld, he said. Dont let anyone tell you you cant. He then quoted from Philippians 4:13 which reads I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Mike Sweatt told the audience about need for good grades, usually better than a 3.0 grade point average, plus decent test scores. You have to have coaches that will back you up, he said. Moms and dads, aunts and uncles, people that will help you in the process too. And the nal thing you got to do is you got to work. ST.JOSEPHBAYGOLFCLUB SPECIALS JUNIORGOLFERS(17ANDUNDER)PLAYFREEWITHANADULTPAYING GOLFER-FRANKLIN&GULFCOUNTIESONLY SINGLEANDFAMILYMEMBERSHIPS-NOINITIATIONFEE&FIRSTMONTH DUESFREEWITHA12MONTHCOMMITMENT(MUSTPAYBALANCEBYCASH, CHECK,ORCREDITCARDATTIMEOFSIGNUP) CALLTHEPROSHOPTODAYFORMOREINFORMATIONORSTOPBY 850-227-1751. CALLTHEPROSHOPFORINFORMATIONONFREEGOLFLESSONSFOR CHILDRENEACHFRIDAYINJUNE. 700COUNTRYCLUBROAD. PORTST.JOE,FL32456 Page 13Seven Seahawks sign for scholarshipsAccompany Adriana Reeder at her signing are, seated from left, brother Josh and mom Teri, and standing from left, Lady Seahawk coach Joe Shields and former coach Kelli Maggio Wright.PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Ward and Christey Kirvin ank their daughter, Gracyn, as she signs her soccer scholarship. Stacy and Elizabeth Kirvin sit with son Graham as he signs soccer scholarship. Jamie Millender watches her daughter Ally sign a softball scholarship, as Wallace Community College coach Ronny Lunsford sits at left, and Lady Seahawk coach Scott Collins stands. Not pictured, but on hand, were dad, Allen, and brother Garyson. Link Carroll watches her daughter Ashley sign a softball scholarship, as Wallace Community College coach Ronny Lunsford sits at left, and Lady Seahawk coach Scott Collins stands. Attending Cameron Whites signing are, seated from left, dad Michael, Trinity Baptist Coach John Jones, Cameron and mom Sherry. Standing from left are brother Chance, Seahawk coach Mike Sweatt and brother Chandler. Accompanying James Harris at his signing are, seated from left dad Michael Gilbert and sister Marissa, James and mom Angie. Standing, from left, are brothers Jack and Billy Harris.

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 By JOHN H H ENTZ Special to the Times ( Editors note: This is the rst of a series on the memories of the Apalachicola River by the late Panama City native John Hentz. These were transcribed by Beverly Mount Douds.) It is interesting to note that during the steamboat years that a big part of the cargo the steamboats were carrying was oranges. During certain seasons of the year a lot of the boats would have from 150 to 200 boxes of oranges on them. I was one of the main cash crops of our ancestors. Ive heard that the freeze of 1898 just about wiped them out. There is a community about 18 miles south of Bristol in Liberty County named Orange. During my boyhood days there was a U.S. Post Ofce there; it was operated by Mrs. Wilder. After the Civil War, most of the people who lived up the river made a living cutting and rafting cypress timber down the river to the big sawmills in Apalachicola. They would catch a ride on the steamboat back to their camps up the river. Back in those days most of the people who lived up the river worked in timber. They established their camps in the area where they were cutting at the time and where they lived. Some of the names I remember that my father camped and worked with was Alex Turner, Broze Ramsey, Jim White, Uncle Calvin Durham, his brothers, Frank and Dink (James T.) Hentz, Jake Harrell, a Mr. Kirkland, Mr. Jeter, a boy who came to their camp, they never knew from where, who said his name was John. Thats all he would tell them, but he worked with them for years. Dan Minton, Manny Howard, John Parrish, Mr. Hathcock, my grandfather William Hentz, Mr. Will Gunn, Tom and Sid Johnson, Isiah Rewells, Tense Dugger, Rob Hentz, Will Durham, and many more. The boy who they found in camp would only tell them that, they didnt give poor folks but one name where he came from, years later when he had grown up and got married he took the name, Kirkland. Nobody ever knew whether that was his real name or not. He lived in the little village of Sumatra for many years. My father always said he was a good boy. Back in logging days on the Apalachicola River, timber crews cut on government claims issued by the boundaries, etc. My uncle Frank Hentz was a surveyor and Ive heard it said that he knew where every section corner in Liberty County was located. The holder of the claim could dell with other crew operators to do the cutting. My father and his brothers worked with Mr. W.H. Gunn who was the son of my grandfathers oldest sister. There was a man named Rish from Wewahitchka who had a timber crew in the area and he was always dissatised with something and causing trouble. They got by without any serious trouble, but I heard of two different occasions when they had to have an understanding with him at the end of a Winchester. The center of the river is the line between counties on opposite sides of the river, and back in steamboat days, when a crime was committed on a steamboat it always posted a problem to determine which county had jurisdiction. It depended on which side of the river the boat was on at the time of the crime was committed. Sometimes a steamboat would pick up a dead body oating in the river. It would usually be in a condition that it had to be buried immediately. They would send a crew in a small boat to the river bank and bury it. They would than COURTe E SY OF Be E Ve E RLY MOUNT DOUd D S | Special to The TimesThe Jim Woodruff Dam in Blountstown shortly after construction MEmMORIES OF THE Apalachicola RiverA steamboat carries cotton down the Apalachicola RiverThe Times takes a look back at rivers historySee memMEMORIeES A15

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LocalThe Times | A15Thursday, May 22, 2014 nail up half of a wooden barrel head on a tree or post it at the head of the grave. Back in the rafting days, some of the people who operated up the Chipola River had a rough reputation and our people on the river kept an eye on them. They didnt trust those people too far. They used to tell a story about an old man who rafted down the Chipola, who the other loggers in the area accused of stealing their timber and putting it into his raft. One time they were chasing after him and found him with his raft tied up at Douglas Landing on the Chipola River about 3 miles from where the river ows into the Apalachicola. He was sitting there on the bank of the river smoking his pipe. They cursed him out and accused him of stealing their timber and said that they would shoot him if he moved that raft. He sat there and smoked his pipe and when he got through he just knocked the ashes out of his pipe, got and started untying the raft. They threw their guns on him and swore theyd shoot him. He untied the raft, pushed out into the river and as he went down the river he holler back at them. Well boys, talk is cheap, It takes money to buy liquor. Nobody shot him. He went on to Apalachicola and sold the timber.More using mapsThe following are transcriptions of four pages of maps and notes by Mr. Hentz, transcribed by Beverly Mount-Douds.PAGE1(Yellow Fever) On Sept. 14th 1878, the steamboat Mary Elizabeth arrived in Apalach, the Federal Authorities boarded it and found no sick persons, but decided ____________ ____________ for 20 days in harbor but Capt. Comrick said his boat couldnt stand the conditions in the harbor that long. He proposed to go up into Lake Wemico, they refused, and so he headed up into Saul Creek. They __________ shot at his boat 40 or 50 times. Apalachicola was make a port in 1820 during the Admiration of President James Monroe, but did not ofcially belong to the US until 1821. It shipped its rst cotton in 1828, 317 bales, by 1836 it exceeded 51,000 annually. From 1828 until the Civil War started in 1861, more than 300 steamboats ran the river. By 1847 the port of Apalachicola was exporting 160,000 bales of cotton annually. In 1847, the trend started reversing when the big cotton mills were built at Columbus and cotton started going up river. The US Customs Ofce opened in Apalachicola in 1823. During its heydays of cotton exports, Apalachicola had two cotton presses that pressed the bales of cotton into smaller size for shipping our seas. One was docilely operated, the other was steam operated. Capt. Wing set another milestone on Monday, Oct. 25 when he completed his 10,600th round trip, the Crescent City from Apalachicola to Carrabelle, without a mishap, a record never equated. The years 1920 1927.PAGE 2The Pinhook is in the middle where Jackson River and Sauls Creek Cutoff is at the Apalachicola River mile marker 5.7 (G.I.W. 345.7). At this point the IntraCoastal Canal joins the Apalachicola River system. The Pinhook, the last bend in the Apalachicola River before it just empties into the Jackson River about 5 miles above Apalachicola is where the current ran for the log rafts .At this point the saw mill would send Tug Boat to bring the logs to the mill. In the mid April 1847 the U.S. Mail boat Augusta and the Eufaula collided, the Augusta sank. The Five-Mile trestle on the Apalachicola River Northern Rail Road always aspersed me from the time I was a little boy I did not see how on earth men were to build it. Four Tree Cut-off just below the sh camps on the west bend of the river was a short cut for shermen, but got to be dangerous because of high speed boats running towards it. It is narrow, curved, and had high grass eight feet tall on both sides. Chipley Creek is somewhere in the area-ANRR-between Grassy Creek and Acorn Creek. The Five-Mile trestle on it was from River Junction to Port St. Joe, the ANRR crossed the Apalachicola River system just about 4.5 miles north of Apalachicola on its way down from the NE, it rst crosses East River, the big St. Marks and the main Apalachicola River and all the sloughs and swamps between.PAGE 3Anthony Apiary-heading north on the Big Excursion days our kin folks from Greensboro would come down on the train and we would meet them at Hosford or Telozia. On an Excursion about the 1918 or 1919, we were crossing the 5mile trestle and my cousin from Greensboro, Wright Johnson and I saw a big alligator from the window of the couch swimming up the East River. The new year 1852 on Oct. 9 the steamboat Alabama hit a snag on the river and was lost. Columbus (maybe snag boat) sank in Hurricane Reach one mile below St. Marks River. Visible at low water, built at Bainbridge in 1904. The A.N.R.R. was completed from River Junction to Apalachicola in the year 1907. In April of 1907 the 1st passenger train locomotive chugged into PSJ during the early years of its operation the Rail Road have Excursions at a cut rate fare to PSJ that was a big deal with people who lived inland up the railroad to go to PSJ for a day of picnicking and swimming in the bay. The old St. Joe Hotel was headquarters. Before Highway 98 was built between the hotel and the bay. There was a boardwalk all the way from the front of the hotel to the bay. I once saw a one-legged man who had put on his bathing suit in the hotel and hop on one leg all the way down the walkway to the bay.PAGE 4(North to Howard Creek, Berrisman Slough, Harrison Creek-left, right is Bloody Bluff Island) In the late 1940s Merle Bishop drowned in the lower Brothers (1948, I am kin to this man). In these days the International Paper Company furnished a recreation camp down on the West Bank of the Big Brothers with all the comfort of home for their employees. Merle Bishop was personnel ofcer for the company, he and two other company employers were on their way to camp on Saturday night, when Merle felled overboard and drowned. Here at the mouth of the Brothers, my father and his brother, who were teenagers at the time had been trading timber in the swamps. They had nished their job and hailed the steamboat for a ride up the river. They were standing on a small dock when the steamboat sung into it and knocked the deck out from under them. One of them had a bed roll and a rie in his hand and the others had a suit case and a rie, a deck hand caught my uncle by the leg, my father was knocked into the river. He dodged behind a tree to keep the steamboat from crushing him. They lost the bedrolls and the suit cases, but both of them held onto their ries. BLOODY BLUFF ISLAND-LANDi I NG This is where Mr. Richards of Wewahitchka and his party caught up with the Indians after they had killed all of his family except one little boy named Jehu who managed to escape and hide out in the swamps on the Dead Lakes. Mr. Richards and his party delivered such re power on those Indians until the river was red with blood for a great distance downstream. The Cypress Creek sawmill MEMORIES from page A14The steamer Calhoun sails along the Apalachicola

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014Heavy rains expected to affect tupelo honey yieldBrian Bertonneau looks over a jar of honey. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE | The News Herald Brian Bertonneau checks on a colony of bees. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. WEAKENED HARVESTThe industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees dont want to stay alive.Don Smiley, former apiary owner By CHRIS OLWELL747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA Lovers of tupelo honey might have spent a little extra for a dab of the famous stuff during the Tupelo Honey Festival May 17; this seasons harvest is projected to be less than sweet. The white tupelo gum tree blossoms that provide the bees with the nectar to create the honey only last about three weeks in the best years, said Brian Bertonneau, owner of Smiley Apiaries. Wet weather this year cut deeply into blooming period, and Bertonneau expects tupelo yields to be about 50 to 70 percent lower. Its not going to be a good year, Bertonneau said. Bees have to visit 2 million blossoms to gather a pound of honey. Its been ve or six years since the last hearty yield, he said. The precarious tupelo honey industry is also threatened by a mysterious phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder or CCD, which emerged about 10 years ago and has the potential to impact not just honey producers but food consumers the world over. Bees pollinate more than 90 percent of the owering crops on earth, according to the Associated Press. Just about all agriculture depends on some kind of insect pollination, said Don Smiley, who created Smiley Apiaries in 1989 and lost a whole harvest season when he was rst affected by CCD in the mid-2000s. Smiley sold his company to Bertonneau a few years ago. I wasnt seeing dead bees, Smiley said. I was just seeing weaker and weaker hives. There are several theories about what is leading to CCD, which causes bees to suddenly and inexplicably abandon their hives and die, although a Harvard study published this month blames pesticides that are already restricted in Europe. One of every four honeybee colonies died over the winter this year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture study, a decrease from the previous few years. The industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees dont want to stay alive, Smiley said. Smiley thinks beekeepers need federal disaster relief in the same way farmers of other crops needed relief after the heavy rains this spring. Bertonneau considers himself a hobbyist when it comes to beekeeping; he keeps two hives at his bottling plant and buys honey by the drum from partners with many more hives. Colony loss has been less of a problem in recent years as beekeepers split hives twice a year, he said. And heres some good news: Its trees and not the bees that give tupelo honey the distinctive sweetness Van Morrison sang about, Bertonneau said. The might be less honey, but the honey that remains is as sweet as it ever was. Wewahitchka and the Apalachicola river basin that runs behind Bertonneaus plant are home to some of the highest concentrations of white tupelo gum trees in the world, and the Tupelo Honey Festival draws hundreds of vendors and thousands of visitors to Wewa each year, said Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. Tourism is up here in Gulf Countyand tupelo honey is a part of it, Jenkins said. The TDC wants to emphasize tupelo honey production in its marketing of Gulf County as an alternative to the busier, more developed counties to its west, she said. Jenkins said the TDC is in the early stages of forming partnerships with apiaries like Smiley to promote and market the area, and the world-famous honey, to potential visitors.

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LocalThe Times | A17Thursday, May 22, 2014 KimHawkinsDavisCPAHwy98at11thStreet,Suite4 Apalachicola,FL32320850-653-6875 andMuchMorePromptProfessionalPersonalService Trades&Services ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines LICENSEDANDINSURED 20YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O.Box439 Carrabelle,FL32322 697-2783orMobile566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter F.W.C.FloridaWindowCoveringCompanyfactorydirectwindowtreatments ResidentialandcommercialShutters,Shades,Blinds Security&SunControl,WindowTints StormShutters Colonial,Accordian,RollDown,BahamaGUARANTEEDLOWESTCOMPETITVEPRICES INNORTHFLORIDA FREEIn-HomeEstimate*FREEInstallation ForAllYourWindowCoveringNeedsCALL Fl oridaWindowCoveringCompany 850-697-3066or850-528-9355 amsrohrs@fairpoint.net ADVERTISEHERE TODAY227-7847 Special to the TimesThe Northwest Florida Water Management District Governing Board last week approved up to $462,000 in grant funding for Carrabelle to implement a storm water retrot project that will improve water quality in the Apalachicola Bay watershed. The Marine Street Stormwater Retrot project will treat storm water that discharges into the Carrabelle River and ultimately into St. George Sound, part of the Apalachicola Bay system. The district continues to partner with local governments to improve water quality throughout the Apalachicola Bay system, said Executive Director Jon Steverson. The district remains committed to working to protect the environment and ultimately the economy of the Apalachicola region. The storm water retrot project consists of two primary components storm water conveyance improvements and a bioretention system designed to improve storm water quality before it discharges into the Carrabelle River. The project will reduce storm water runoff pollutants using a treatment train approach, which consists of pre-treatment to remove solid and larger pollutants followed by bioretention treatment to further remove dissolved pollutants and nutrients. The project will also help improve drainage along Marine Street, a waterfront boardwalk area important to local tourism and economic development, which is currently served by inadequate drainage facilities. The district continues to work with local governments, state and federal agencies and other partners toward the restoration of the Apalachicola River and Bay. The Districts 2013-14 budget includes a total of $4.7 million for Apalachicola River and Bay watershed protection and restoration, including $3 million proposed by Gov. Rick Scott and approved by the Florida Legislature as part of the states scal year 2013-14 budget. The funding for the Marine Street Stormwater Retrot Project is allocated by the district through its Surface Water Improvement and Management program. Courtney Millender, Carrabelle city administrator, said the project would alleviate ponding at the Carrabelle Boat Ramp on Marine Street. As a partial match, the city will provide staff hours for the project support including project administration grant management, and future operation and maintenance of the drainage network and treatment facilities.Special to the TimesProject Impact, the city of Apalachicolas afterschool and summer camp program, was recently recognized by the Florida Department of Education (DOE) as an exemplary program and will be featured in a national report to the federal Department of Education. Funded as a 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC), Project Impact serves the needs of students and families at two sites in Apalachicola: the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and the Community Municipal Complex Project Impact was visited by a DOE administrative team last summer and was selected from 139 actively participating Florida 21st CCLC programs. The City of Apalachicola Project Impact program was recommended as exemplary for its overall implementation of an effective and impactful 21st CCLC program, with special attention given to the programs Project Based Learning (PBL) component and partnerships including student boat building with the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, and the Summer Reading Program in collaboration with the Apalachicola Municipal Library. Constant communication, enthusiastic and compassionate employees, close community ties and a clear-cut focus on student needs are among the key elements making City of Apalachicola Project Impact an exemplary 21st CCLC program spotlighted by the State of Florida, the report stated. This 21st CCLC program structure is an impactful one as it is tailored specically to t the resources and capabilities of its location. Students are learning through this program that their small coastal town has a lot to offer, as will they in their budding futures. Program staff and members of the community, business and city ofcials alike, all come together and work well as a cohesive unit to provide the best for the children living in Apalachicola. The Project Impact family stands as a shining example to other programs with the attitude if there is a will, there is a way, a best practice that can be shared by all aspiring programs.Time for summer camp registration!Enrollment for Project Impact Camp Funshine: Fizz, Boom, Splash is open. Students from pre-K to eighth grade will be served at the ABC site and pre-K to 12th grade at the city site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program is Fizz, Boom, READ and was developed by the 2014 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. The focus this year will be on STEM subjects, (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) with other summer highlights including pottery program, art & crafts, science experiments, computer technology, chess tournament, sports and several eld trips. The second year of Boats Rock! was launched during the April antique boat show. A special basketball and leadership camp will also be offered. The summer performing arts program will feature video production with a lm premiere at the end of the summer. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 9 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week. Credit recovery classes will be offered at the City Site Monday to Thursday during program hours. Enrollment may be limited. The summer program is provided free of charge. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Families may enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 370-0145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola.Bay Community School hosts art show FridayBay Community School, a community based pre-school in Apalachicola, is hosting its Art Show and Silent Auction this Friday, May 23 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts Center, on Water Street. All the artwork is done by the children. Come and have dinner prepared by Tamaras Caf and have fun while supporting a great cause. Tickets are $20/person for dinner and drinks. Bay Community School is also looking for community sponsors to help supplement the cost for the event. Individual and/or business sponsorships are $100 and include a dinner ticket and you will be recognized at the event and on our website, www.baycommunityschool.com. Founded in 1996, Bay Community School has provided quality childcare and pre-school services to children ages 2 to 5. Located at 269 Fred Meyer St. in Apalachicola, it is not-for-prot center that meets the needs of a diverse population of families in Franklin County. Proceeds from this event help cover the basic costs of running the school.Putt-Masters tourney set for May 31May 31 marks the fourth annual Putt-Masters Tournament, the signature fundraiser that benets the Franklin County Public Library. Some 20 plus businesses, groups, and individuals sponsor four-person teams, which tee off at noon and play throughout the afternoon. After the tourney ends at 5 p.m., there will be a ceremony to see who will take home Green Champ caps and a beautiful trophy. The competition is serious for some. Many returning teams have improved their putt over the years. Others just play for fun and enjoy good food, drink, and the company of friends. The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar in Eastpoint hosts the event, where owners Shirley and Jimmy Sapp provide a beautiful 18-hole course with a water feature for an entire afternoon of putting fun! Players, fans, and library supporters can quench their thirst and enjoy delicious food while having fun and raising money for our library. Various levels of sponsorship are available. If you would like to participate or volunteer, contact your library branch to reach a Friend of the Franklin County Public Library. In Carrabelle call 697-2366 or in Eastpoint call 670-8151, or contact Anna Carmichael, (850) 273-1174, anna. carmichael@yahoo.com The library is a vital county resource. The services provided are free, but funding is limited. The Friends of Franklin County Public Library is proud to help fund both the Carrabelle and Eastpoint branches of our public library system. Without help from businesses and individuals throughout the community and their participation in our efforts, this would not be possible. Books, e-books, games, CDs, DVDs, audio-books, free Wi-Fi, computers and computer classes, youth programs are just a few of the services you will nd at your public library. Go visit your local branch to see whats happening, you will be proud as well.Guardian Ad Litem ofces moving In a recent meeting Debra Moore, Guardian Ad Litem circuit director, informed Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce that the supervision for the Guardian Ad Litem (GAL) program will be switching to Panama City from Tallahassee. She also said GAL would comply with the county commissions request for a 2 percent reduction in its budget request. News BRIEFSProject Impact featured in national reportNWFWMD OKs funds for Marine Street retrotPHOt T O cCOUrtes RTES Y Cit IT Y Of F Carrabelle ARRABELLEPonding of storm water is a problem at the south end of Marine Street in Carrabelle.

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A18| The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 94742T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2012-CA-00248 DIVISION: GENERAL SFR VENTURE 2011-1 REO, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MYDDELTON/PARKER BUILDERS, L.L.C., et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of Court of FRANKLIN County, will on the 4th day of June, 2014, at 11:00 A.M. EST on the 2nd Floor Lobby which faces Highway 98 at The Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in FRANKLIN, Florida: LOT 142 SUMMERCAMP WEST PHASE 1 A & B, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 26 THROUGH 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Case No. 2012-CA-00248 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, the style of which is indicated above. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on April 8, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act** If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850)577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 15, 22, 2014 94962T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2013-CA-000243 PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, PLAINTIFF vs. MELANIE B. STAGGS, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELANIE B. STAGGS, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, TENANT #1 AND TENANT #2, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS.HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 29, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA000243 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Melanie B. Staggs and The Unknown Spouse of Melanie B. Staggs aka Travis ONeal, are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 on the 17th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 57, UNIT I LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 471.89 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 738.17 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 470.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 1033.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY 295.64 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ANOTHER 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 20.08 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 267.75 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 121.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 234.26 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 214.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS A 2003 MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS CMHGA4210229271A AND GMHGA4210229271B AND TITLE NUMBERS 0087016192 AND 0087016380. A/K/A 1900 BEACON ST CARRABELLE FL 32322-3061 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 1st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC -018517F01 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. May 15, 22, 2014 95018T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2010-CA-000403 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD M. WILLIAMS, ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AND ANY SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, INTEREST OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC.;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed July 3, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000403 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 12th day of June, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 19, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of April, 2014. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court Terry Segree Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. May 22, 29, 2014 98917T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-000355-CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN E. SYSKA, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRIAN E. SYSKA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRIAN E. SYSKA Whose residence(s) is/are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 213, THE RESIDENCES AT ST. JAMES BAY CONDO-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 22, 2014 The Times | A19 850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518778 1124924 Associate Director of Resource Development / Grant WriterThe primary function of this position will be to research grant opportunities through various mediums and be able to successfully write grants and implement new programs identifying potential public and private funding sources to support institutional priorities. Incumbent will be responsible for coordinating the work of proposal development teams, preparing and submitting proposals, and communicating with funding agencies by the targeted grants. Incumbent must have strong grant writing experience, excellent oral and written communication skills, computer skills, and have the ability to work exible hours, including coverage demands due to training periods and equipment problems. Incumbent must also be able to demonstrate strong organizational, planning, and budgeting skills, and be able to travel both locally, and out of town on College business and training. Minimum Quali cations: Master's Degree in related eld Salary range begins at: $46,818.00 **Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.eduAdditional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. 1124922 Respiratory Therapy Program Coordinator IIIThe Coordinator of the Respiratory Care program is responsible for all aspects of the program, including the organization, administration, continuous review, planning, development, and general e ectiveness of the program.Minimum Quali cations: Bachelors degree required; must be credentialed as a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) eligible for FL license; 4 years teaching experience in an accredited program; 5 years acute care experience as a Respiratory Therapist. Salary: Commensurate with education and experience Deadline to apply: Open until lled**Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resource s, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. Susies Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! MINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 889, PAGE 227, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 336191328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at FRANKLIN County this 25th day of March, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Michele Maxwell By: Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 15, 22, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98977T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000420-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual; unknown spouse of SID GRAY a/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY; SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to that certain Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 29, 2014, and entered in Case No. 12-000420CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B SKIPPER ROAD REALESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on June 12, 2014, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIP TION PARCELNO. 1 COMMENCE ATA CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE NORTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST1208.45 FEET THE EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST1208.45 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 2553.48 FEETTO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST590.12 FEET TO AROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST76.20 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST580.27 FEETTO APOST MARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST1250.72 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 63 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST94.17 FEET, THENCE NORTH 47 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST55.41 FEET, THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST51.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST47.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST52.04 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST150.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST242.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST294.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST484.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST77.51 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND ALSO: PARCELNO. 2: BEGIN ATA4 X 4 CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WESTFRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH (BEAR-ING BASE ASSUMED) ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF THE SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER 1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1304.44 FEET TO EASTERLYEDGE OR SHORE LINE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY, SOUTHERLYAND SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER THE FOLLOWING COURSES, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST18.52 FEET, SOUTH 21 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST189.35 FEET, SOUTH 04 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 61.96 FEET, SOUTH 42 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST69.88 FEET, SOUTH 47 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST113.83 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 168.42 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST77.36 FEET, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST99.67 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 123.55 FEET, SOUTH 38 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST130.25 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST118.68 FEET, SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 172.84 FEETTO AN OLD CAR AXLE MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER AND THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EASTALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 854.04 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCELNO. 2 MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED BYARECENTSURVEYPRODUCED BYEDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY22, 2002 BEARING JOB NO. 02-009 (PSC 20867), AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATA POSTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST135.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVERS EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (NOTE: THE PLATOF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, NOW COVERS APORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS 1 AND 2. THE PLAT WAS CONSENTED TO BYTHE FORECLOSING LENDER. LOTS 1, 5 AND 6 HAVE BEEN CONVEYED TO SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, A FLORIDALIMITED LIABILITYCOMPANY BYVIRTUE OF (3) QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 962, PAGES 693, 695 AND 697, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THESE 3 LOTS HAVE NOTBEEN RELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED.) LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 753, PAGE 364, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDAS, TO WIT: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVERS EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 854, PAGE 786, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 3 AND 8, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 966, PAGE 436, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 2, 4 AND 7, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCOR-DING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE(S) RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1100, PAGE(S) 547 AND 550, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEETTHENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MIN-UTES 38 SECONDS EAST 121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVERS EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER FOR THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL3: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS SOLD BYVIRTUE OF QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 941, PAGE 109 AND QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 984, PAGE 154, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND LIES WITHIN PARCELS 1 AND 2 ABOVE. THIS LAND WAS NOTRELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED. THIS LAND WAS CONVEYED TO CENTENNIALBANK BYVIRTUE OF A DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 1044, PAGE 99. SAID DEED DOES NOTNECESSARILY CONSTITUTE A MERGER OF TITLE: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF LOT3 OF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 ATPAGE 30 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST322.93 FEETTO APOINTLYING ON THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 70.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF RIVER RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST399.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 60 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST41.34 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST103.74 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH Borrowersinterest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses, benefits and proceeds of Borrowersinterest therein. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 9th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL& ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNLCenter II, 7th Floor Orlando, Florida 32801 Phone: 407-896-2224 Fax: 407-835-3596 May 22, 29, 2014 ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish. 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. East Point Corner of Hickory Dip and 184 Daisey St. Sat. May 24th 8a-12pEstate SaleCamo Bedroom Suite, Dining Room Table, and Lots Of Household Items! Text FL89784 to 56654 Port St. Joe 306 Reid Ave Sat. May 24th 8a-UntilOver Stock SaleBay Breeze Antiques Come Get Some Bargains Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL83066 to 56554 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34287911 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Web Id 34287017 Install/Maint/RepairCleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sundays. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL84167 to 56654 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL89857 to 56654 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 Chevy Celebrity 1986, 4 door, Gray, 70k mi, 1 Owner, $2200, 850-653-2577 Mako 258WAC FG Hard Top, Cobia Tower, Alum. Trailer, No Motor, $7000 850-832-7995 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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LocalA20 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 Ourlocalrealestate expertshaveidentiedwhat theyfeelarethebestvalues aroundandareoffering themtoyouin RealEstatePicks! Discoverthebestreal estatevaluesinMexico Beach,PortSt.Joe, Apalachicola,CapeSan Blas,St.GeorgeIsland, Carrabelleandsurrounding areas. BestValuesontheForgottenCoastContactThe TimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola AdvertiseHere RealEstatePicks MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,199,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com REDUCED 29,000 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#251282$1,150,000St.GeorgeIsland PLANTATIONBEACHFRONTCustomhomeinTheBluffsprotectedbydunesbutstill GreatGulfview,kitchenwithreplace,decksgalore,3BR, 3BA,dumbwaiter,2ndlivingarea,screenporch,sh cleaningsink,outdoorshower,communityPOOLinapark likesetting,CanopyLane JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250738$139,000St.GeorgeIslandINCREDIBLEGULFVIEWLOTLookingover&aroundsmallgroundlevelhousestoward thesoutheastistheGULF,1/3acre,2ndtierlot,additional lldirtnotrequired,recentcomparablesaleat$136,000, rightonthebikepath,quickaccesstothebeachboardwalk, WestGulfBeachDrive 4518798 ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com 29,000 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose mom used to send letters to army superiors saying her son should be a general? Eisenhower, Pershing, MacArthur, Westmoreland 2) Statistically what are the most dangerous animals/creatues in the U.S. as to causing human deaths? Deer, Bees, Snakes, Dogs 3) Who explained to Jefferson, We pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it? Washington, Franklin, Hancock, Webster 4) In 2007 who became the rst female Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives? Johnson, Walsh, Byrd, Pelosi 5) The worlds oldest sheep died in England (1989) a week before its which birthday? 17th, 23rd, 29th, 32nd 6) What is Jacqueline Gagne famed for hitting? Paparazzi, Softball homeruns, Hole-in-ones, 3-pointers 7) Which state has had the only Congressman (Matthew Lyon) to be jailed for criticizing the president? Georgia, Maine, Ohio, Vermont 8) Who acted under the name of Ariztid Olt during his careers early days? Bela Lugosi, Johnny Depp, George Clooney, Will Smith 9) Whose president was the rst person to drive over the speed limit in a hydrogen powered car? France, Iceland, Germany, USA 10) Which has no blood supply and takes its oxygen directly from the air? Eardrum, Finger/toe nails, Cornea, Eyebrow 11) About what percentage of Americas pet dogs are overweight? 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% 12) BMW, famous for its cars, started out making what in 1923? Watches, Guns, Soaps, Motorcycles 13) When did Elvis Presley buy his Graceland estate? 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963 14) What is Taipei 101? Car, Fish, Building, Stadium ANSWERS 1) MacArthur. 2) Deer. 3) Washington. 4) Pelosi. 5) 29th. 6) Hole-in-ones. 7) Vermont. 8) Bela Lugosi. 9) Iceland. 10) Cornea. 11) 40%. 12) Motorcycles. 13) 1957. 14) Building.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Rescue mission for island cat castawaysThere will be an organizational meeting for the St. George Island Cat Allies Trap/Neuter/Release Group on Saturday, May 31 at 3 p.m. at the St. George Island Methodist Church, 201 East Gulf Beach Drive. For more information, call Helen Gore at 323-0123.Commission orders maintenance for SGI shing pierAt Tuesdays meeting, county commissioners unanimously voted to earmark up to $6,000 for the re-staining and maintenance of the handicap entrance ramp to the St. George Island Fishing Pier, and up to $6,000 for the staining and maintenance of the recently re-constructed section of shing pier. Both projects will come out of the St. George Island Bridge Maintenance Fund.. County Planner Alan Pierce said the projects are necessary to maintain the wooden structures exposed to the sun and salt air. He said the newly constructed portion would be refurbished rst. He said that work on the pier had been postponed due to wet weather.Simpler Built wins visitor center bidAt Tuesdays meeting, county commissioners voted to award a bid for renovation of the old state highway patrol building in Eastpoint to Simpler Built of Tallahassee for their bid of $65,657. Commissioner Noah Lockley opposed the decision. R.W. Thomas Construction of Eastpoint submitted a bid of $75,000. Lockley asked if the county had approached R.W. Thomas to negotiate his fee. The commissioner said he would prefer a local contractor do the work. Chairman Cheryl Sanders said the county needed to observe normal business practices when processing bids to avoid the appearance of unfairness.Benson awarded HVAC contractAt the recommendation of architect Warren Emo, on Tuesday, county commissioners voted unanimously to award a contract to replace the north HVAC unit on the main courthouse to Bensons Heating and Air Conditioning Inc., of Tallahassee. The replacement will be paid for out of the courthouse maintenance fund. NEWsS briBRIEfsFS



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, May 22, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Q&A surveys costs, bene ts of hiring school chief By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The simmering debate over whether the county schools should end direct election of the superintendent, in favor of having the school board hire him or her, began to bubble last week, with the exploration of details of what such a change would entail. The Town Hall meeting May 13 at Franklin County High School was attended by a cross-section of parents from around the county, concerned taxpayers, interested school district employees and all ve school board members, who are expected to decide next month whether to place a binding referendum on the November ballot to switch over in 2016 to an appointed superintendent. Dr. Wayne Blanton, executive director of the Florida School Boards Association for the past 29 years, offered a PowerPoint presentation on how such a change would affect the interplay among the school board, the superintendent and the school system. “I’m not here to sell you on elected or appointed,” he said. “I have seen elected and I’ve seen appointed superintendents. I can tell you there are pros and cons on both sides.” Blanton outlined the relative scarcity of school districts DR. WAYNE BLANTON Details aired on superintendent proposal McKissack residents seek end to beach driving By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Residents of McKissack Beach say automobile traf c is destroying their sheltering dunes. In April, residents of the beach community, founded in 1930, had a “no trespassing” sign posted on Gulf Beach Drive, which runs south off U.S. 98 just west of the Carrabelle city limits. After complaints that the road was public property, county workers moved the sign. Residents of McKissack Beach say they don’t want to deny access Fire consumes Carrabelle family’s home By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Last week, a Carrabelle family lost everything to a house re. On May 15, Bridgette Morrow was planning a wedding for her best friend, Crystal Bennett, and Bennett’s anc, Harvey Barrack. Morrow and the bride had gone to the Boardwalk Boutique to pick up their dresses. Morrow noticed smoke on leaving the store, and when she and Bennett passed the IGA, she realized it was coming from her home at 206 NW 10th St. By the time the women reached the re, some neighbors had arrived on the scene. Someone kicked the front door By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com If you didn’t see the production of the musical “Hairspray” at the high school Friday night, you missed more than a great show. You missed a turning point in the young history of the consolidated Franklin County School, a bend in the river that ows toward a growing desire for the creation of a robust drama program. Staging of the Broadway musical, with music by Marc Shaiman, lyrics by him and Scott Wittman and book by Mark O’Donnell and Thomas Meehan, was the brainchild of senior Jathan Martin, who came to librarian Patty Creamer at the end of 2013 to pitch her the idea. A skilled musician with an ample familiarity with musical theater, Martin convinced Creamer to back the idea of his staging and directing the comic masterpiece, with a bevy of spirited actors, singers and dancers, despite the school lacking a drama program at the school. Creamer was four-square behind the talents of Martin, choreographer LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Bridgette Morrow, center, with daughter Marjorie, 14, and son Brandon, 17, lost her home to a re May 15. H i p H i p H a i r s p r a y , Student musical wows the audience See FIRE A7 See BEACH DRIVING A7 See SUPERINTENDENT A9 PHOTOS BY DANA WHALEY | Special to the Times FROM TOP: The dancers on the “The Corny Collins Show” ank the host. Link Larkin (Logan McLeod) sings to Tracy Turnblad (Cynthia Duncan). Motormouth Maybelle (Elinor Mount-Simmons) sits behind bars after a civil rights demonstration. Adam Hames portrays Harriman Spritzer. See ‘HAIRSPRAY’ A9 VOL. 129 ISSUE 4 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Classi eds . . . A18-A19 Historical society to meet today The Apalachicola Area Historical Society will have its annual meeting at 5:30 p.m. today, May 22, at the Raney House Carriage House. The membership will be asked to vote on changes to the bylaws and a slate of of cers. If you have not paid your annual $10 dues, please plan to pay at the meeting. The society’s Spring Ghost Walk has been rescheduled to 7-9 p.m. May 31. Guides will take you around the cemetery to meet some of the historical characters who will share their stories. To participate, contact Delores Roux. For more information, call 296-6952. Flagpole dedication at lighthouse Monday Memorial Day 2014 will be commemorated at the Cape St. George Light with a special ceremony Monday, May 26, to dedicate a new agpole and honor those who died in defense of our country. The day begins with raising of the U.S. ag to half-mast at 8 a.m. A salute of 21 minute-guns will begin at noon. One shot will be red every minute until 12:20 p.m. from a rotation of three small cannons. The high school band will play, and Commissioner Pinki Jackel will speak. Bring a lawn chair. For more information, call the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Memorial Day breakfast, ceremony Apalachicola American Legion Post 106 will have a Memorial Day ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Plaza at 10 a.m. Monday, May 26. The Legion will start the day with a pancake breakfast at 7:30 a.m. at the Legion Hall, 801 U.S. 98. Everybody is invited to both events. A paddling spectacular A8

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On Thursday, May 15, 15 local residents met with an equal number of FWC employees to talk about bears. On entering the meeting, attendees were asked to complete a form indicating whether they would serve on a regional Black Bear Stakeholder Committee. Although organizers were proactive in warning participants to keep voices low and strong emotions under control, most attendees were, basically, probear and the discussion remained calm. Kaitlin O’Connell, FWC’s black bear stakeholder coordinator, opened the meeting with a general introduction to Florida bears. Since being listed as endangered in 1974, Florida black bears made such a remarkable recovery they were delisted in 2012, which was the peak year for calls about human/ bear interactions, she said. FWC received 975 calls, with an unknown number elded by law enforcement, animal control and other local agencies. That same year, FWC passed a 10-year bear management plan that created seven Bear Management Units (BMU). The Central Unit is the largest with just over 1,000 bears. Franklin County lies within the East Panhandle Unit, which has proposed population of 570 bears. O’Connell told attendees the meeting was an effort to understand area residents’ attitude towards bears. She said each of the seven BMUs is different and residents of each view bear interactions differently. “We want to make sure you enjoy the bears as much as the bears enjoy being in Florida,” she said. Different attendees gave different reasons for a coming to the meeting. Jim Halpin who recently moved to Carrabelle said he came out of curiosity. “I’ve had to pick up my trash twice,” he said. Patrick Dwyer of Sopchoppy is a hunter, who said most of his contact with bears had been neutral. “I hunt over in Taylor County on a lease and we’ve been having a lot of interaction with bears,” he said. “I’m interested in hearing what (FWC) has to say. We are allowed to bait for hogs and the bears have been damaging our feeders but we’ve got that gured out.” John Hitron, of Carrabelle, was even more positive about living with bears. “I have 10 years of experience living with brown bears on the west coast, and 20 years of experience with black bears. If I speak out at all, it will be on behalf of the bears,” he said. David Butler, of Lanark Village, called the bear population an ecotourism opportunity and encouraged cooperation. He suggested establishing a bear viewing station for tourists. “Until we can get everybody working with the plan, we won’t be able to recreate this barrier” between bear and humans he said. After the initial introduction, attendees split into two small groups to discuss the role of bears in Florida, the role of FWC and what everyone can do to coexist comfortably with bears. Several recurrent themes emerged during the conversations. “Trash service should be mandatory and, in bear hot spots, bear-proof trashcans ought to be mandatory,” said Kathy Swaggerty, of Lanark Village. “Once we got a bear-proof can, we never have a bear to get in our garbage anymore.” She asked what sanctions can be brought against people who feed bears. Bear biologist David Telesco said there is a law against feeding bears and raccoons but law enforcement of cers and court ofcials are slow to enforce it. He said bear-proof trash containers reduce foraging by 95 percent and most bearproof container failures he investigated were the result of user error. Telesco said interactions involving bears passing through a yard or treed in a residential area are often the result of bears traveling to garbage they know is unsecured at an adjacent property. Several members of the audience asked why euthanized bears were not sold for meat and pelts, and were told it was against FWC policy. Halpin asked about controlling populations with birth control. O’Connell said the technique has been investigated but is not yet economically viable. Telesco said that, in light of increased interaction, there has been increased talk about sanctions on feeding or luring bears and about the possibility of bringing charges against individuals who feed or lure bears that are later implicated in negative interactions with humans. “Education is better than legislation,” he said. FWC representatives said they would reevaluate the size of the bear population next year. Telesco said a discussion of hunting may be back on the table after that is completed. He said people need to understand that, while bears normally seek to avoid humans, they are large animals that can hurt you, even unintentionally. O’Connell said she hopes to form the stakeholder committee for the eastern Panhandle by the end of July. She said the group would likely meet four times a year, for two to three hours. If you are interested in serving on this committee, please contact Kaitlin O’Connell at BEARPLAN @MYFWC.com. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Morgan Wilber, standing left, and Sarah Barrett, standing right, lead a discussion on the role of FWC in bear management. Inset: Almost half of all complaints to the FWC involve bears attracted to garbage. Stakeholders sought for bear management

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, May 22, 2014 ARRH M A T E Y Y ou n g & Old e P i r a t e C r u ise TM h a s S o met h i n g fo r E v e r yo ne C r u ise A w a y i n t o t he F a n t a s y W o r ld of F r ie nd ly S w a shbuck le rs & P i r a t es 2H ou r C r u ises D o l p h in S i g h t ing s Gr ea t M u sic Co ld B e e r F u n fo r a l l a g es 5325 N o r t h La g o o n D r iv e, P a n a m a C it y F lo r id a 32408 L o c a t e d a t L ig h t hou se M a r i n a N ex t t o B o a t y a r d R es t a u r a n t 850.234.7400 Y E T A M ARRH T H E G R E A T E S T S I G H TS E E I N G A DV E N T U R E ... E V E R $1.00 Off Adult T ick et Se a Dr ag on Pir a t e Cr uise Located at Lighthouse Marina on Grand Lagoon % $# "% &(&( Sea Dragon Pirate Cruise # # !% ) #% %'% ( # ) )% discount. Present coupon before purchase. L o c a t e d a t L ig h t h o u s e M a r in a N ext t o B ud & A l le y's n ¢ k Ž¨Ž ¦ Ž x ¢¦ m£ ‚ˆŽ J¢  ‚ˆj ¢¦m£ ‚ˆŽ J¢  ‚ˆj Žx Ž¨Ž ¦ ¢k n Happ y Grad uati on! d‹– †y‘ ‘n{ y |y y ‰ z–„„ t‹„‹ AŠ Š Happ y Gr adua tion ;Šˆz Žm “• ƒm “~Šˆ p ™  ‹ ‹ ¦ d‹– †y‘ ‘n{ y |y y ‰ z–„„ t‹„‹ Š AŠ Š G‹ Ž¦ ”¨”   M Ž‚‹ š” Ž ”¨ £œ ¢  ]‚ ¦ ‹ m‚œ£ šŽ G‹¨ N‚ˆ‘ Ž‚¦ Ž £† š”¨‘ ‘ Ž £‘ ¢¢¨ ¢ ‘ Ž mŽ  ”¢¦ ¨ ‚ ‹ ¢¦ ‚‹ ”šš †Ž £š‚ˆŽ ‹  ‹ Ž¦ ‘ Ž¨Ž £‘ ¢¢¨Q \t…t ŸŠ G•t} t›†  =• Œ£ Ÿ†‹‹ x Rt £ . ‰ By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m Don MacLean of Carrabelle and Mary Britz of Lanark Village experienced the trip of a lifetime when Honor Flight of Tallahassee ew them to Washington DC for a day to visit the World War II Memorial. The Honor Flight Network, a non-pro t organization created solely to honor America’s veterans for all their sacri ces, transports veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit and re ect at their memorials. Top priority is given to World War II survivors, along with other veterans who may be terminally ill. The inaugural Honor Flight Tour took place in May of 2005. Six small planes ew out of Springeld, Ohio taking twelve World War II veterans on a visit to the memorial in Washington, DC. The Honor Flight Network program was conceived by Earl Morse, a physician assistant and retired Air Force captain employed by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs. Britz and MacLean, both World War II veterans, were part of a group of 77 vets who went to Washington April 26. Each was accompanied by a guardian. A doctor, seven emergency technicians and two nurses traveled with them on a Boeing 757 provided by Miami Air. While the veterans travel free, the guardians and medical staff pay for their own ight. Because Honor Flight trips start early, Britz and MacLean decided to spend the night of April 25 in Tallahassee. They stayed at Homewood Suites on Apalachee Parkway. Preston Scott on WFLAFM announced during a broadcast that they were looking for accommodations. J. H. Leale, president of Ricky Carmichael Racing was one of about 20 people who offered to pay for their rooms. He made the reservations but, when hotel General Manager Ashley Schneider found out who the rooms were for, she refused payment. Meals were also donated for the happy travelers. MacLean said the day began at 5 a.m. when the party gathered for breakfast at the “millionaire hanger” at Tallahassee Airport. Participants were given tshirts, gold for veterans, blue for guardians and red for medical personnel. Veterans also received goody bags. MacLean and Britz praised organizer Mack Kemp. “Mack deserves a pile of credit. He spent a year getting ready for the ight,” said MacLean. “Everything went so smooth, it was unbelievable,” Britz said, The group departed Tallahassee at 7 a.m. They landed in Baltimore and were divided into three groups, red, white and blue. MacLean was in the red group, and Mary in the blue, and they traveled by color-coded bus with a police escort. “I think we traveled through Baltimore going about 80 miles per hour,” MacLean said, Each veteran was provided with a wheel chair. All told, ve planeloads of Honor Flight travelers visited Washington that day. In addition to placing a wreath at the World War II Memorial, the group visited the National Mall and Arlington Cemetery where they watched the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Britz said the cherry trees were in bloom at Arlington, which made the burial ground particularly lovely. She said the World War II Memorial was “so immense, we could have spent the whole day there.” They dined on box lunches while traveling between sights. It was a second trip to the nation’s capital for both travelers. Britz and her husband attended the dedication of the Women’s Memorial there in 1978. MacLean took a school trip to the Smithsonian when he was 10 years old. MacLean said everywhere they went on the Honor Flight trip, they were welcomed by throngs of people including many children. Groups represented included the Shriners, Boy and Girl Scouts, Knights of Columbus, Patriot Guard and military honor guards. During the trip, Britz reconnected with a friend from long ago. She began talking to former Marine Bud Ledson seated next to her on the plane. After comparing notes, they realized Mary had nursed Bud in San Diego when he was sent home wounded from the Paci c Theatre. They spoke for the rst time in 69 years even thought they have been living only 60 miles apart. Ledson, who resides in Tallahassee, is the author of “US Marines Wings over the Paci c.” Britz’s daughter, Cheryl, said the pair is now speaking on the phone every day. On arriving home in Tallahassee at the end of their 20-hour journey, the veterans were greeted by Governor Rick Scott who presented each with a gold medal expressing the appreciation of Florida’s citizens for their sacrices and patriotism. “This has really been a great, great honor and privilege,” Britz said. “I’m just thrilled to death with it. It was a very nostalgic trip. I don’t think there were too many dry eyes when we visited Arlington. I couldn’t believe it. All this attention for doing something we all wanted to do at the time.” For more information about Honor Flight or to register a veteran for the program, visit www. honor ight.or g World War II vets honored with DC visit World War II veteran Don MacLean, center right, accompanied by honor ight guardian Jim Barineau is greeted in Washington by young volunteers. Veteran nurse Mary Britz shares a thought with Bud Ledson, a soldier she treated in San Diego 69 years ago. SALLY DAVIS | Special to the Times Honor Flight veterans at the World War II Memorial. Inset: Changing of the Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINIo O N www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, May 22, 2014 A Section Letter to the EDITOR G RR AS II opponents should consider options The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), completed by Eglin Air Force Base, military exercises proposed for Tate’s Hell under terms of the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI) meets / exceeds all requisites, and will not have a negative impact on plants, animals or the environment. Recognize that it is the American military that protects people all round the world from the dangers of totalitarian regimes, human rights violations, and the subjugation of peoples. Keep in mind it is also the American military that provides for the freedom many in America take for granted. The freedoms provided by those sacred documents: The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Do you suppose that those veterans returning to America after laying their lives on the line, losing limbs and even giving the ultimate sacrice would complain about training in an insect-infested swamp riddled with vipers, black water, and dangerous animals? Or, would they do so in order to protect the rights of American citizens to enjoy their freedoms? It would now seem appropriate that those folks who do not support the training or mission of the American military might now consider moving to another country. Iraq and Iran are suggested as possible destinations. John Hitron Carrabelle “I don’t go for all that wine and dine, With that ray ban, fake tan, never mind…” — “I I Want a Cowboy” by R R eba McEntire I read recently about several prominent investors who were taken on a seven-day trip to the NCAA championship football game last January in California by their nancial advisor. The clients played golf at several upscale courses and dined each evening in a trendy restaurant. Apparently the advisor footed the bill for everything. During the ve working days when markets were open and the advisor was entertaining the entourage, who was monitoring his clients’ accounts? Probably the same person who normally monitors those accounts. In other words, someone other than the advisor. This advisor’s role appears to be more of a relationship manager, one who is charged with entertaining afuent investors and attending social functions. And that’s ne, as long as the client understands that when he sits down to discuss his accounts, he is not visiting with the person who is actually making investment decisions. Say the Dow drops 500 points on the day of the championship game, 2008-style. Who would have been in charge of making changes in the portfolio to minimize losses? Or, say the market hit an all-time high that day. Who was at the controls, possibly taking gains off the table and considering the tax consequences for the client? Perhaps the advisor actually manages these accounts, but believes in a “buy and hold” investment style. The thinking here is that “the market always rebounds,” so no need to react to market vagaries, because there may be upturns as well as downturns. Thus, week-long football vacations don’t really interfere with the advisor’s portfolio management activity. This investment philosophy works ne during steady uptrending markets, like those the late 1990’s provided. However, investors nearing or in retirement risk damaging their portfolios signicantly if they suffer large downturns like we witnessed in 2008. “Set it and forget it” may not work well for this demographic, especially in volatile or choppy markets. Additionally, the investor/client is probably paying for the trip one way or another. The advisor may have funded the football journey, but the money to nance those activities most likely came from the investor in the form of management fees, trading fees, and commissions. Ultimately, “It’s not show friends, it’s show business.” People’s retirement and life savings are at stake, and wealth preservation for someone nearing or in retirement is paramount. You may want to ask yourself: Do you want a football host? Or do you want someone who is in the ofce every day monitoring your accounts? Markets don’t care how many games your advisor invites you to. The investment world is a meritocracy. It doesn’t play favorites. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850608-6121~www.arborwealth. net), a “Fee-Only” and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. M aA R gaGA R eE T RR M c DD O weWE LL Arbor Outlook Noles, War Eagle and a football week in Pasadena By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Franklin County’s unemploy ment rate dropped by one-half of 1 percent in April, but even with that improvement, it was the only county in the state not to see bet ter numbers than one year ago. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the county’s jobless rate for April shrunk from 5.8 to 5.3 percent, a drop of two-tenths of 1 percent, from March. The unemployment rolls shed 21 people in April, shrinking from 304 to 283 people in search of work. This decrease in jobless ness occurred as the workforce grew by 116 people, from 5,233 to 5,349. The current work force has 56 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,405 workers and the jobless rate was the same, at 5.3 percent. The April jobless picture tied the county with Sarasota, Orange and Gilchrist counties, for 24th best among Florida’s 67 coun ties. Franklin was worse for un employment than Manatee, Bay, Nassau, Union, Jackson, Santa Rosa, Broward, Clay, Seminole, Holmes, Collier, Baker, Leon, Jefferson, Liberty, Wakulla, St. Johns, Sumter, Alachua, Oka loosa, Monroe and Walton, the state’s best at 3.2 percent. Franklin was the one of Flor ida’s 67 counties to not post a decrease in unemployment over April 2013 numbers. “We’re seeing the ongoing effects of a changing economy in Franklin County,” said Kim Bodine, executive director of Ca reerSource Gulf Coast (GCSC). “As we have noted, the Apala chicola area community suffered a harsh blow with the sheries failure. For generations, count less families relied on that indus try for their livelihood. It remains chief among our goals to support and assist employers and job seekers in Franklin County as the funds become available.” A recently announced federal grant extension will assist a lim ited number of displaced oyster men in the area, providing train ing and retraining in careers such as correctional ofcer, heat ing and air conditioning, welding, and auto service technicians. CareerSource Gulf Coast will be heavily involved in facilitating the program. A U.S. Department of Commerce grant is also in the nal stages of being released which will support training and shelling of the Apalachicola Bay. The CSGC region as a whole experienced a measurable de cline in unemployment, and nar rowly outpaced the state, with all three counties comprising the region Bay, Franklin, and Gulf posting declines. The unemployment rate in the region was 5.2 percent, 1.2 per centage points lower than the re gion’s year ago rate of 6.4 percent, while half of 1 percentage point below the April 2014 state rate of 5.7 percent. Out of labor force of 103,412, there were 5,356 unem ployed Gulf Coast residents. The April 2014 unemployment rate in Bay County dipped to 5.1 percent, while Gulf County fell to 5.8 percent. “In general, we are pleased to see continued upward movement as a region,” Bodine said. “We are working as hard as ever to bring more employers to the table, to give them the support they both want and require. Our success ful Career Expo this week is just one sign of our unyielding com mitment to bring employers and qualied job seekers together.” While there were more em ployment opportunities locally, the growth in opportunities is slow. In April 2014, there were 75,800 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama City-Lynn HavenPanama City Beach metro area (Bay County), up 800 jobs over the year. The Panama City-Lynn Haven-Panama City Beach metro area’s annual rate of job growth was 1.1 percent, while the state increased at a rate of 3.2 percent. County jobless rate same as one year ago SHA RR E Y OO U RR OO P II N IOIO NS Send your letters to: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Email: dadlerstein@star.com TT elephone: 850-653-8894 Fax: 850-653-8893 Comments from readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. The Times’ editorial page is intended as a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged freely. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. This street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Times reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. By M ilenILEN KO M artinARTINO vichVICH Special to the Times Getting the kids to go easy on the chocolate bunnies this year could be simple as sitting them down Easter morning and making them watch “Old Yeller.” University of Florida marketing professor Chris Janiszewski and co-researchers Anthony Salerno and Juliano Laran from the Uni versity of Miami found evidence to support that theory. In a study scheduled to appear in the June issue of the Journal of Consumer Research, “the researchers dis covered that sadness “encourages people to identify behaviors that are potentially harmful to their long-term tness.” Janiszewski and his colleagues investigated how emotions modify the behavior of people who plan to indulge. To create a desire to in dulge, 120 students were asked to make a list of their favorite indul gent activities. A second group of 119 students was asked to list ac tivities they performed on a typical day. These students were less likely to plan to indulge as a consequence of completing their task. Then, each of group of students was asked to engage in one of four emotional activities: a sad task (they imagined breaking-up with a signicant other), an angry task (they imagined having problems with their computer), a frighten ing task (they imagined being on a turbulent ight), or a neutral task (they imagined cleaning their apartment). Afterward, the students watched a video on how to make origami while snacking on M&Ms. When the students had previously made a list of activities performed on a typical day, students who experienced the negative emotions ate more M&Ms than the students that had engaged in the neutral task. This shows how a negative emotion encourages the consumption of comfort food. When the students had previously listed their favorite indulgent activities, the sad students ate fewer M&Ms than the students who did not expe rience an emotion or the students who were angry or afraid. This shows how sadness discourages the pursuit of indulgent activities by people who plan to indulge. “Anytime you feel sad, you try to avoid pursuing goals that lead to outcomes that could induce fur ther harm,” Janiszewski said. Dur ing the pursuit of an indulgence goal, “…An experience of sadness should increase a person’s sensitiv ity to the potentially harmful conse quences of indulgent consumption, which, in turn, should decrease the desire to indulge.” One way the ndings could be useful is in curbing indulgent be havior. For instance, public policy makers could encourage the airing of sad movies such as “Titanic” or “Marley and Me” in spring break party locations. This would be a way to encourage college students to be more responsible without di rectly asking them to restrict their behavior. While the researchers acknowl edge “it would be nave to suggest that policy makers should actively seek out ways to make citizens feel sad,” feelings of sadness could prove to be valuable in situ ations that are characterized by indulgence. Milenko Martinovich, an editor for the Warrington College of Busi ness Administration at the Univer sity of Florida, can be reached at milenko.martinovich@warrington. u.edu Research links sadness with avoiding indulgences “Anytime you feel sad, you try to avoid pursuing goals that lead to outcomes that could induce further harm. (During the pursuit of an indulgence goal), an experience of sadness should increase a person’s sensitivity to the potentially harmful consequences of indulgent consumption, which, in turn, should decrease the desire to indulge.” Chris Janiszewski University of Florida marketing professor Page 4

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The Times | A5 Thursday, May 22, 2014 D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c 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Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t + + 1 0 *)0' 2 ,10 1 +'+ )'11 && 2102+' 1'0 '( + '1/+ $ )2+ '* / '+.0+ + (+ 0+* 0 + 0/ # 2 + 0 +'(1+ '+ $ " Law Enforcement Special to the Times Between April 21 and May 6, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce received 15 complaints of home and vehicle burglaries. Items stolen during the burglaries were cash, jewelry, rearms, electronics and shing equipment. While conducting a traf c stop, deputies recovered a camera that had been stolen from the Alligator Point area. This investigation led to the arrest of two Carrabelle men, Darin W. Cruson II, 26, and Aaron S. Massey, 22. During the course of the investigation, detectives received information that some of the stolen items may be located in two separate apartments in Lanark Village. Detectives, along with the assistance of deputies, executed search warrants on the apartments and recovered rearms, shing equipment, jewelry and electronics linked to the burglaries. In all, detectives and deputies were able to recover seven stolen rearms, approximately $60,000 worth of jewelry, $10,000 worth of electronics and approximately $5000 worth of shing equipment. On May 12, the two men were booked at the county jail, and each charged with burglary of a structure, and grand theft. On May 13, each was charged with additional counts of burglary of a dwelling, burglary of a conveyance, grand theft of a rearm and grand theft over $300. The Sheriff’s Of ce would like to remind the citizens to lock your home and vehicle doors at night and during the day when you’re not around. This simple act could prevent a crime and loss of property. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Friday, May 16, a Carrabelle couple was killed when a car struck their motorcycle in New Hope, Alabama. Gregory Binkley, 61, and his wife, Barbara, 57, were exiting a parking lot adjacent to US 431 at around 1:45 p.m. when the accident occurred. Witnesses said the victims pulled out on the southbound side of U.S. 431 when a car heading south struck their motorcycle. Huntsville resident Tyler Daniel pulled up on the wreck scene moments after impact. “It was the worst thing I have ever seen, I wouldn’t wish seeing that on anyone,” Daniel told a reporter at the scene. Witnesses say the woman driver of the car collapsed on the road after the accident. Moments later, her car caught re, but re ghters arrived and extinguished the blaze. Highway 431 was closed for more than two hours as investigators collected evidence. The speed limit along this stretch of highway is 55 mph according to police, but it is not clear if speed played a factor. The Binkleys owned a home on Buckeye Road north of Carrabelle. An avid sailor, Gregory Binkley worked as a tugboat captain on the Mississippi River. He is remembered by many Carrabelle residents as a talented guitarist and songwriter who specialized in traveling songs about boats and trains. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. Arrests listed were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. MAY 12 Brandon L. Hill, 22, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Kenneth J. Pontones, 27, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 46, Apalachicola, two counts of sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) MAY 13 June M. Davis, 30, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Marvin D. Braswell, 53, Carrabelle, Holmes County warrant (FCSO) Rachel L. Bateman, 28, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Gary D. Nichols, Jr., 40, Olive Branch, Miss., battery, violation of a domestic violence injunction and violation of probation (FCSO) MAY 15 Michael T. Allen, 18, Apalachicola, assault on a school employee (FCSO) MAY 16 Joseph C. Cogburn, 33, Alford, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing (FCSO) Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, operating a tattoo establishment without a license (FCSO) MAY 19 Jessica M. Opie, 27, Eastpoint, domestic battery and failure to appear (FCSO) Catherine N. Millender, 36, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Between May 9 and 15, of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission enforced several oyster harvesting violations. While conducting park patrol within the Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, Of cer Nelson performed an oyster size tolerance inspection on a commercial oyster harvester who was returning to the vessel ramp from Apalachicola Bay. The inspection revealed the harvester was in possession of 52 percent undersized oysters in the bag that was inspected. Nelson issued the harvester a misdemeanor citation for the violation and 246 oysters were seized and returned to the water alive. Of cer Allen was patrolling Bald Point State Park when he noticed two vehicles in the parking lot, one of them not displaying an entry pass. Allen went down to the beach and made contact with the owners of the vehicle. When one of the individuals reached into a bag for some money to pay for the entrance fee, Allen noticed a small bag of what appeared to be marijuana. The individual tried to quickly hide the contents, but when asked later about its contents, said it was “weed.” After consent was given to search the bag, Allen found two small bags of marijuana. The individual then gave up a marijuana cigarette. The individual was charged with possession of less than 20 grams. Of cers Allen and Harrison were working in Apalachicola Bay when they noticed a vessel harvesting oysters in an area closed to shell sh harvest. There were two people harvesting oysters from the vessel, one of whom was a juvenile. Harrison issued the adult a citation for harvesting oysters in a temporarily closed area. Of cers Allen and Harrison noticed a vessel with three people harvesting oysters near St. George Island. An inspection of the vessels revealed eight bags of oysters. During a size tolerance inspection of one bag, it was found to contain 52.6 percent undersized oysters. Each person was issued a citation for possession of undersized oysters. One individual did not possess a valid Apalachicola Bay Oyster License and was issued a citation for the violation. Of cers Allen, Anderson, and Harrison were on patrol in Apalachicola Bay when they noticed several people shing under the Highway 98 Bridge near Eastpoint. They noticed one individual carry an ice chest up the bank and then return to shing. The of cers conducted a resource inspection and found the individual in possession of 13 undersized red sh. Anderson issued the individual a citation for over the bag limit of red sh. The sh were seized as evidence. Of cer Anderson was on patrol in Eastpoint near the Highway 98 Bridge when he noticed an individual shing from the shore. A resource inspection found the individual in possession of 13 undersized red sh and one undersized sea trout. Anderson issued the individual a citation for over the bag limit of red sh and undersized red sh. A warning was issued for the undersized sea trout. Of cers Anderson, Mallow, Harrison, and Allen were on land patrol in Eastpoint near the Patton Drive boat ramp when they observed a commercial oyster vessel with four people on board returning to the ramp. Anderson conducted a boating safety and resource inspection of the vessel and found six bags of oysters on board. A size tolerance inspection of one bag of oysters showed 69.6 percent undersized and unculled. Each occupant of the vessel was charged with possession of undersized and unculled oysters. The six bags of oysters were returned to the water alive. One of the individuals had an active warrant out of Gulf County and was booked into the Franklin County Jail. FWC REPORT At their May 1 city meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to make Albert Dasher a fulltime police of cer. Chief Craig Kincaid made the request, saying a fulltime of cer was needed to replace Eddie Pace who retired. Kincaid also secured commissioners’ approval to employ two to four part-time of cers. He said that during celebrations like Camp Gordon Johnston Days, six of cers are needed to control traf c. “Chief Kincaid knows what we need and can afford,” said Police Commissioner Olivia Massey. Dasher, who received law enforcement training at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in Havana in 2008, has worked in law enforcement in both Georgia and Florida. He has also worked as a paralegal. Kincaid told commissioners Dasher has completed more than 400 hours of additional police training on his own including courses in human traf cking, search and interrogation DASHER FULLTIME OFFICER Arrest REPORT Carrabelle men linked to burglaries AARON MASSEY DARIN CRUSON Carrabelle couple dies in motorcycle wreck AL.COM | Eric Schultz A view of the accident scene on Friday afternoon in New Hope, Alabama THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 Coupon Expir es: 6-15-14 CODE: AP00 ) $!)+*,' #&" ) &' # $!)+*)& )# ) &) $!)+*) & !!) & ( BILL MILLER REAL TY 850 6 97 3 751 3 310 570 0 658 $1,0 0 0 DO WN EA CH 2 U. S. 98 CO MM LO TS 5 LO TS LA NARK BEA CH 40 0’ + CO MM U. S. 98 & GULF ADJ TO LA NARK MA RINA 850 K 1.27 AC LO TBCH AC CESS $80,000 50 X 150 GUL F LO T $35,000 C/ B HOME 311 2 CO R.L OT S CIT Y $49, 500 4 CI TY LO TS OFF HW Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR LO TS BLK. $ ST ORE REDUCED $3 9,5 00 2 AC A T RIVER UTIL IN $ 39, 500 Special to the Times In late March, the St. George Lighthouse Association sponsored a eld trip for Franklin County Middle School’s photo literacy students. The middle school shutterbugs were treated with a tour of the Lighthouse Museum and a free climb up the lighthouse. The highlight of the trip, for the young photographers, was taking pictures of the amazing view from the top of the lighthouse. After their trip, the students created poetry and mono prints of the lighthouse. Below are two ne examples of the poems, the rst one an acrostic, where the rst letter of each line spells out the word “Lighthouse.” Upcoming 2014 ballot takes shape By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Unless more candi dates step forward next month with a willingness to pay the fee, the slate of can didates in the primary and general elections is pretty much set. The deadline to submit petitions was noon Monday. If candidates want to jump in the race now, their only option to do so is by paying a fee $996 for school board ofces and $1,558 for county commission seats – dur ing the ofcial qualifying period from noon, June 16 to noon, June 20. The county commission and school board seats are up for grabs in District 2, the easternmost district en compassing from portions of Carrabelle, Lanark Village and Alligator Point, and in District 4, the westernmost district, mainly the historic district of Apalachicola. Both incumbents in District 2 County Commis sioner Cheryl Sanders and School Board Member Da vid Hinton – gathered the required dozen signatures to run to recapture their seats. In District 4, where 16 signatures were required, incumbent County Commissioner Smokey Parish has drawn an opponent in the Aug. 26 Democratic primary. School Board Member Jimmy Gander has announced he will not seek re-election, and just one candidate has stepped forward to try to claim the seat in the non-par tisan election. Sanders, of P.O. Box 641 in Carrabelle, is the lone Democrat to le a letter of intent for the District 2 county commission seat. Two Republicans have led, and if they qualify, will square off in the Aug. 26 primary. They are Mark Nobles, of 10-5 West Pine St. in Lanark Village, and William Snyder, of 2332 Enabob Street, in Carrabelle. Hinton, of 112 Hinton St. in Carrabelle, plans to run for re-election in the non-partisan race for District 2 school board member. He is being challenged by Pam Marshall, P.O. Box 839, Carrabelle, and Wilburn “Ray” Messer, P.O. Box 482, Carrabelle. In his candidate ling, Hinton has loaned his campaign $1,000 with which to fund his campaign. In the District 4 school board race, Stacy Kirvin, of 142 Deer Patch Rd. in Apalachicola, has led his letter of intent and has listed his own $100 contribution to open his campaign account. Parrish, of 104 Long Road, Apalachicola, has led to seek reelection to the District 4 county commissioner job, with a challenge coming from Royce S. Rolstad III, 119 Hicks Lane, Apalachicola. In addition to a list of statewide ballot measures, Franklin County voters will have before them a choice for congressman, between incumbent Republican Steve Southerland and Democratic challenger Gwen Graham. Luther Lee is also running as a write-in can didate, without party afliation. In the race for state representative in District 7, which encompasses all of Franklin County, incumbent Repub lican Halsey Beshears has signaled his desire to seek reelection, with no challengers having as yet surfaced. Seven incumbent circuit court judges have all led for reelection. They include Charles Dodson, Kevin J. Car roll, Frank E. Shefeld, John C. Cooper, Martin A. Fitz patrick, Charles A. Francis, and Angela C. Dempsey. Although several Democrats and Republicans are running in the primary, Gov. Rick Scott and Demo cratic challenger Charlie Crist are expected to breeze through the primary and square off in November. Two Democrats, George H. Sheldon and Perry E. Thurston, are vying in the primary for the right to chal lenge incumbent Republican attorney general Pam Bondi. Democrat William Rankin is expected to challenge Republican Chief Financial Ofcer Jeff Atwater in the general election, and Democrat Thaddeus “Thad” Hamilton is running to unseat Republican Commis sioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam. In order to vote in the primary, voters must be regis tered by July 28. To vote in the Nov. 4 general election, all registrations must be in by Oct. 6. Early voting for the primary runs from Aug. 11 to 23, and for the general election, from Oct. 20 to Nov. 1. 2014 Lighthouse inspires poetic visions Lighting the way for ships and boats Imagining the history in this place Great heights with wonderful views Home of the Keeper and family Thick walls of ancient bricks Helping sailors see Obviously a necessity Undergoing all weather, yet still shining Stairs, 92 of them Exquisite pieces of the past BY JESSICA RUDD 1-2-3-4… Counting until I skip a step I guess 27, but really 25 Climbing to the top I see the clouds as if they were in a meadow The wind whistles Ocean calls I am in my state of mind No boundaries There once was and always will be the light that shines upon the water to guide the lost world to freedom BY KIANA FOLEY CONCON TR ACAC T OO R SS DEDE P OO T CLOSECLOSE OUOU T SALESALE 48 Island Drive Eastpoint. 670 1100 Open Monday-Friday 8.30 to 2pm The items listed below are for sale at reduced prices. Stainless Fasteners Nails, Deck Screws, Self drilling screws, Hex bolts, Carriage Bolts, Lag Bolts, Hinges. Tapcons, Joist Hangers, Collated guns nails and screws Pest Control Supplies – Ants, Fleas, Roaches, Mosquitoes, Flies, Bedbugs and Termites. Zapper Bulbs & parts. Pumps for gardens and homes – Little Giant Pumps – Submersible Pumps. Fountain Pumps, Pool cover pumps, Etc. Ofce Equipment – Desking, Rolling Ofce chairs, Macintosh desktop Computers, Printers and Fax machines. Filing trays, Under desk cupboards. Filing cabinets, Desk Fans/heaters, Stationary items, Various tables, Waste Baskets, Warehouse Equipment – Fork lift, Heavy duty shelving, hand dollies, scales, heavy duty wall mount shredder, Two Tier stainless cart, Packing materials and at packed boxes. Kitchen items – 2 Refrigerators, Counter Microwave. Counter oven, Exercise equipment Palates, Bowex, Situp, Treadmill.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, May 22, 2014 $2500 – EXECUTIVE Beast From the East Sound Production City of Apalachicola Ta ylor’ s Building Supply $1500 – PLA TINUM Clothesline Imprinted Sportswear Florida Seafood Festival Franklin County TDC $1000 – GOLD Apalachicola Maritime Museum Apex Productions, Sound Cates Electric FUMC of Apalachicola Journey’ s of SGI SGI United Methodist Church Wa ter Street Hotel & Marina The Ti n Shed $500 – SIL VER Aloha Bugs Pest Management Apalachicola Bay Chamber Apalachicola Seafood Grill THANK YOU TO 2014 SPONSORS (as of 5-18-14) $500 – SIL VER (continued) Backstreet Tr ading Company Barbers Seafood Bay Media Dr Zoe’ s Back & Neck Care Plus Executive Ofce Supply Flynnstone Outdoor Advertising George & Pam Mahr Jerry & Karen Thompson JoeBay Arial Photography Debbie & John Hooper Jolly Roger Beach Shop SGI RW Construction, Inc Scipio Creek Marina. INC Sign DeSign Sports Authority Ta mara’ s Caf $250 – BRONZE Blue Parrot Oceanfront Caf Century 21 Reality & Collins Va cation Rentals, Inc. Denise D. Butler Owner/Agent, Butler Agency LLC Garlick & Associates Resort Va cation Properties SGI Rotary Club of Apalachicola $250 – BRONZE (continued) Wa ter Street Seafood Wo mbat Sound Music $100 ASSOCIA TE PA RT NERS 2K We bgroup Apalachicola Ace Hardware Apalachicola Piggly Wiggly Best We stern Centennial Bank Coastal Angler Magazine Enjoy Apalachicola LLC Frank & Francis Cook Galloway Construction Island Emporium Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Sometimes It’ s Hotter Seasoning Company Suncoast Va cation Rentals Caf Con Leche & Ta mara’ s Boutique Up The Creek Raw Bar Up The Stairs Fine Dinning Without A Paddle Gift Shop $50 – DONORS Aunt Ebby’ s Ice Cream Shop Gibson Inn open, allowing three dogs and two cats to escape the conagration. A visitor from Islamora da attempted to extinguish the re with the hose from Barrack’s washing machine but was unsuccessful. He later told Morrow the re seemed to have originated from the left front eye of the stove. Morrow said she had used the stove shortly be fore leaving the house but had heated water on the right front eye. A spokesperson for the state re marshal’s ofce said the re is still under investigation, but at this time, the origin is thought to be accidental. She said the blaze appears to have started in the stove. Inves tigators said the house was a total loss, and the esti mated cost of the damage was $50,000. Final determi nation of the cost of the loss comes from the insurance company. Morrow said she and her children had been ex periencing problems with the electrical system in the house for some time. She said she had told her landlord he needed to have an electrician come to the house. Morrow and son Bran don both said they had been shocked by the refrigerator. “Light bulbs started blowing for no reason, and you couldn’t touch the re frigerator, stove or water faucet for a half hour after the oor was mopped with out getting shocked,” she said. Morrow and family are currently staying at the home of newlyweds Crystal and Harvey Barrack. Morrow said she plans to return home to Alabama as soon as she can raise money to make the trip. Unemployed and ling for disability, she was widowed in 2010. An account is be ing set up at Centennial Bank in her name to accept donations. Four of her animals dis appeared during the re. Two are dogs: a red female Chihuahua named Scrappy with a scar on her left hip and an elderly female Jack Russell/Chihuahua mix that is missing four front teeth and is blind in her left eye. The second dog has a peanut-shaped mark on her back and is red and white. Her name is Daisy May. Both dogs have been spot ted in the area of Three Riv ers Road. Also missing are two cats, Smokey, a brown and gray Maine coon, and Tigger, a large yellow tabby male who Brandon Morrow described as looking like Gareld. If you spot any of the animals or have retrieved them, or would like to help the Morrow family, call 205-393-9198. Morrow said she wishes to thank everyone who has helped during this crisis. She said Caroline’s Thrift Shop in Eastpoint has opened its clothing sec tion to her and her children. The Methodist Church in Carrabelle also has opened its clothing pantry and pro vided the Morrows with food. She said Carl and Dana Whaley provided the fam ily with personal hygiene products the night after the re. She also offered spe cial thanks to Nikki Mock, Keisha Messer, Darius May, and Crystal and Har vey Barrack. Morrow said to counter any incorrect information that has circulated since the blaze, copies of the sheriff ’s report and the re marshal’s ndings would be posted in the Carrabelle Post Ofce when they be come available. to a public beach, but do want to protect the dunes from automobile trafc. In a telephone interview Monday, Sue Reed said she and her neighbors are concerned about the constant traf c on the beach despite posted signs stating beach driving is illegal. She said based on license tags, much of the traf c appears to be people from outside the county. “I don’t know how they nd it,” she said. County Attorney Michael Shuler said McKissack Beach residents have no right to bar people from the beach or Gulf Beach Road. He said the road origi nally was constructed by the McKissack Beach developer and acquired by the county through maintenance and im provements over time. Reed said only the paved half of the road is county property; the unpaved portion adjacent to the beach is prop erty of the Florida Department of Envi ronmental Protection. She said the resi dents of McKissack Beach have written to DEP requesting automobile trafc be barred from their property. Assistant County Planner Mark Curenton said he believes Reed is cor rect. He said the county road does not provide direct access to the beach and that it is illegal to drive on any beach anywhere in the county, with the excep tion of emergency vehicles. The debate over the road and auto mobiles on the beach became a hot but ton topic at Tuesday’s county commis sion meeting during the public comment portion of the agenda. First, Sue Aiken of Carrabelle Beach thanked commissioners for removing “no trespassing” signs from Gulf Beach Road. “It’s a beautiful beach. Thank you for keeping it open to the public,” she said. Several McKissack Beach residents also spoke at the meeting. Sue Hendrix, who described herself as a part-time resident of the develop ment, said automobile trafc on the beach is increasing. “This morning, there were three campres on beach,” Hendrix said. “You are xing to have a real problem there with people driving their cars over the dunes. There have been cars on the beach all weekend, and it seems to be getting worse.” County Planner Alan Pierce told her campres are allowed, but driving on the beach is illegal. McKissack Beach resident Bo May was critical of the sheriff’s ofce, who he said has failed to enforce the beach driving law. “At what point do we clarify how much trafc can be inside the dunes?” he asked. “(The end of Gulf Beach Drive) is marked ‘no driving.’ There is a ne listed, but the law is never enforced. There is a big problem at the end of the road. (Drivers) have destroyed the whole dune structure at the end of the road.” Commissioner William Massey said Gulf Beach Road traditionally has been used by mullet shermen to launch their boats. He said it has been in regular use since 1938 and that the road was paved up to the dunes until a storm destroyed the southern end in 1962. May disagreed. “Mullet shermen rarely if ever sh off McKissack Beach anymore,” he said. “If they do, they are individuals throw ing cast nets. If mullet shermen were the only ones that used it, that wouldn’t be a problem, but it’s used all weekend, willy-nilly. What is a process to get a res olution to this situation?” Massey replied, “I can’t stop them from driving. I’m not the law.” Chairman Cheryl Sanders agreed. “You need to contact the sheriff’s ofce. We are not the enforcement arm of the county,” she said. Reed also attended the meeting, tell ing commissioners “the state is very con cerned about the dunes. They were out there, on Friday, investigating the loss. The 5-foot dunes are gone. The water can come up the road now and destroy our homes. It happened in 2005. Some of the older houses are on the ground; only the newer ones are on stilts. “Even the state of Florida said there is no road anymore,” she said. “If the state owns it they need to close it off,” Massey said. “When I was a boy, 50 years ago, it was paved to the end.” In a separate interview, Pierce said debate over the beach and the road has been ongoing for at least 30 years. Carrabelle City Administrator Court ney Millender said the beach is public and that the city leases it from DEP. She said the city has no jurisdiction over Gulf Beach Road because it is outside the city limits. On Sunday morning, a handful of cars were parked along the unpaved portion of Gulf Beach Road including two parked directly on what remains of the dunes. The dunes appear to have been attened for the entire width of the road. A sign next to the attened area states that driving on the dunes and beach is illegal. Reed said automobiles have attened the 5-foot barrier of dunes. She said she has seen tourists chasing bears with vehicles on McKissack Beach’s private roads and even along the beach. McKissack Beach neighborhood’s entryway is now clearly posted “No Trespassing.” Reed said her community is in the process of organizing a neigh borhood watch. Lesley Cox, with Carrabelle’s Wa terfront Partnership, said because the beach is public, DEP requires the city have a management plan for the facility. She said the Waterfront Partnership began work on a draft in 2010 and then asked the city to complete the docu ment. She said the city has completed the draft. City Clerk Keisha Messer said City Attorney Dan Hartman has submitted the document to the state. Cox said there would be at least two additional public meetings before the manage ment plan is nalized. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The remains of the Morrow home at 206 NW 10th St. in Carrabelle. FIRE from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Cars are parked directly on the remains of the dunes next to a sign stating that driving on the dunes is prohibited. BEACH DRIVING from page A1 “At what point do we clarify how much trafc can be inside the dunes? (The end of Gulf Beach Drive) is marked ‘no driving.’ There is a ne listed, but the law is never enforced. There is a big problem at the end of the road. (Drivers) have destroyed the whole dune structure at the end of the road.” Bo May, resident “The state is very concerned about the dunes. They were out there, on Friday, investigating the loss. The 5-foot dunes are gone. The water can come up the road now and destroy our homes. It happened in 2005. Some of the older houses are on the ground; only the newer ones are on stilts. Even the state of Florida said there is no road anymore.” Sue Reed, resident

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Local A8 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com While it fell short of the world record, Saturday’s rst ever Paddle Jam is being hailed by participants and organizers as a wonderful and uplifting experience. “We may not have the world record, but we had world-class volunteers, sponsors, partici pants and support,” said the Rev. Themo Patriotis, who conceived of and organized the three-day event. “We set a world record for Southern hospitality. For a rst time attempt, this was a tremen dous success.” The goal of Paddle Jam was to set the world’s record for the largest kayak raft. To do this, 2,100 kayakers would have had to paddle. Best estimate is that 333 participated in the raft on Saturday afternoon. Staging area for the event was Battery Park. Paddlers be gan to arrive in town on Friday night and there was music in the park until about 9 p.m. The city fenced off the area with the same chain link used during Florida Seafood Festival. Patriotis said this proved to be a wise move since visitors felt secure about leaving their boats at the launch site while they ate, checked in to lodgings and got a good night’s sleep before the paddle. Hotels reported the jam put some heads on beds. People came from as far away as Mon tana and Colorado specically to paddle. A team of 13 from Tennessee and Alabama called themselves the “Yakkin’ Dogs” and another groups identied themselves as Team Jellysh. Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes complimented participants on Friday afternoon. “The crowd is very laid back,” he said. This is the way I like it.” On Saturday morning, about a dozen vendors had set up in the park offering food, clothing and art. Sports Authority of Panama City gave away free tickets for a chance to win a shing kayak donated by the Lifetime Kayaks. The winner was Valerie Jackson, of Apalachicola. Rental kayaks were avail able onsite from Journeys of St. George Island; the Apalachicola Maritime Museum had boats available. Patriotis said 333 paddlers registered but he also said there were late arrivals who may not have registered. Dayle Flynt, owner of Jour ney’s of St. George Island, said she rented about 60 kayaks to participants, some of which were tandems seating two people. “It may not have been a world record but it was denitely an Eastpoint record,” said Wayne Thomas of Eastpoint. The rst paddlers put in the water at about noon. It took an hour to get everyone on the wa ter and form a raft with every boat in contact with at least one other. While rafting up, paddlers amused themselves by blowing bubbles and tossing a pink beach ball. Two rafters donned realistic horse head masks. Debbie Hooper of JoeBay Aerial Photography circled over head in a small plane capturing images of the kayaks traveling from the marina to a spoil Island and rafting up. Patriotis arrived on the scene in a support boat and waved a blue satin ag for attention. He said all of the kayaks needed to raft up when the Coast Guard vessel sounded a horn as a signal. Patriotis said there were nine privately-owned support boats and several wave runners on site as well as boats from the Coast Guard, Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce and St. George Island Water Rescue. One man had to be towed ashore when he experienced back pain. Two paddlers left their boats and entered the wa ter. In both cases, the water was shallow enough to stand and the two were restored to their kay aks with a helping hand from other paddlers. The weather was perfect for an event on the water with a light breeze and temperatures in the 70s. After rafting up for an aerial photo, the happy partici pants made there orderly way back to shore and participating boats were quickly removed and carried to vehicles with the help of volunteers. On Sunday morning, the event climaxed with Stand Up Paddleboard (SUP) Day at Regatta Park on St. George Island. After a service before the majestic waters of the bay, there was yoga, racing and SUP demonstrations. The theme of the sermon was unconditional love. Patriotis said, “Paddle Jam has brought together people from all kinds of philosophical, religious and po litical backgrounds. This is not an attempt to change anybody. We’re going to be the mass of humanity that God so loved, he sent his only son. Love to paddle, paddle to love.” Patriotis praised everyone who provided support for the event and said the Coast Guard was on board from day one. A follow-up meeting is planned to review Paddle Jam and begin planning for next year. Proceeds from the event go towards helping “at risk” chil dren, youth and families in need through the Outreach Ministries of the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish, where Patriotis pastors. Paddle Jam a unifying spectacle Special to the Times Contractors Depot in Eastpoint is closing down after 20 years in business in Franklin County. The business was start ed by British owners Dave and Margaret Tuplin, ini tially in Apalachicola, as an equipment rental center and hardware store. After a couple of years they opened a second store on St. George Island. They developed their rst web site in 1997 which sold pest control supplies. It was an instant success so over the next few years they pub lished further websites sell ing the items they carried in their hardware stores. In 2000, their son David Tuplin Jr. came over from England to help with the design and development of more e-commerce web sites. In 2002 they built the ofce and warehouse on Island Drive and sold their other stores. Through the next eight years they were extremely successful and had a staff of 14 people shipping con tractors supplies and equip ment throughout the US and worldwide. However, competition grew on the internet with all the major manufacturers publishing their own websites and sup plying contractors direct. Websites such as Ama zon, Overstock and others grew, which also reduced prot margins to unsustain able levels, said the senior Tuplin. Revenue began to decline and the closing of the business soon became inevitable. The Eastpoint location will be completely closed in June and is now for sale. They have some of their in ternet inventory remaining and are selling it locally at low prices, everything from fasteners, to pest control supplies, pumps, and ex ercise equipment. All the ofce furniture and equip ment is also for sale to the local public. The younger David and his wife Dawn returned in 2012 to Europe, where he now writes computer appli cations for Barclays Bank UK. Dave and Margaret are selling their home in Craw fordville and also planning to return to their homeland in Europe in the next few months. The senior Tuplin said he and his wife are sad to be leaving behind their Ameri can friends and faithful customers, after enjoying 24 years in the USA. But, with nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren in the UK, they are look ing forward to seeing them more frequently. Contractors Depot closing downS p P ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S D A A V I I S MAMA G EE EE | Special to The Times Davis Magee of Apalachicola snapped this photo of himself during the raft formation, when paddlers raised paddles to signify the raft was motionless. D A A V I I D AA D LE LE RSTEI TEI N | The Times The Rev. Themo Patriotis exhorts kayakers to begin their departure. D E E BBIE IE HOOHOO P E E R | Special to The Times An aerial photograph of the kayak raft. D A A V I I D AA D LE LE RSTEI TEI N | The Times This kayaker managed to display balance and poise during the jam.

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, May 22, 2014 nationwide that elect superin tendents, as they are conned to Florida, Alabama and Mississippi, and are only in 142 school districts out of just over 13,500 districts in America, or about 1 percent. In Florida, superintendents are elected in 41 of 67 districts, mostly in the smaller and mid-sized dis tricts. He said while large districts tend to have appointed superin tendents, Lake, Polk, Okeechobee and Flagler counties are among the medium-sized districts to opt for an appointed school chief. Blanton said Florida is one of only six states where both school board members and superinten dents have constitutional ofcer status. He outlined provisions of the Florida constitution, and within statute, that govern who oversees a school district, noting that whether hired or appointed, a superintendent manages and su pervises district operations, while the school board sets policy and approves the budget. “The local superintendent runs the school system, manages the people, recommends for hiring,” he said. “They have to run the school system the same way. The superintendent executes school board policy.” To be elected as superinten dent, an individual need only be a registered voter within the county, but an appointed superintendent must meet standards of educa tion, training and experience set forth by the school board, Blanton said. More than half of the state’s 26 appointed superintendents have doctorate degrees; fewer than half of 1 percent in those where they are elected have such a degree. “I’ve never known a district that hired somebody with less than a master’s degree,” he said. “Your pool is small (in Franklin County) when you really get down to it,” Blanton said. “You would have the ability to draw from a very large pool on a national basis.” If the school board opts for a binding referendum, county com missioners would be obligated to place it in the November ballot, Blanton said. If then passed by majority vote, the school board would have the responsibility of searching for and nding a super intendent to begin when Marks’ current term expires in October 2016. In his many years at the FSBA, Blanton has been part of 83 su perintendent searches, on behalf of counties throughout the state. Though Franklin County is not a member of the FSBA, opting over the past few years to save the roughly $5,000 in annual member ship dues, the school board could turn to FSBA to conduct a nation wide search, lasting about four to six months, at an estimated cost of about $10,000 to $15,000. Citizens committee would assist selectionTo assist in the selection from what Blanton said could be as many as 50 applicants, including individuals from within the coun ty, a citizens committee could be created by the school board, made up of a cross-section of citizens. “I’ve never had a board turn down a citizens committee’s rec ommendation,” Blanton said. “You need to work through the process so the community is comfortable.” He said one advantage to hav ing an appointed superintendent is that the community can nd a candidate who has the training and experience to meet specic goals, whether to improve public relations, bolster vocational edu cation or whatever the priorities may be. “What you look at is the com munity’s needs,” Blanton said. “Neither superman or superwom an is available. But you go out and nd that superintendent with that track record. Your qualications and what you come to is very, very important. It is important that the school board and superintendent have good communication.” He said electing a superin tendent from among local can didates has advantages as well. “You’re going to elect somebody you know; you’re going to elect somebody from your community, who’s going to know the needs of this community,” he said. “(With an appointed superintendent), there’s going to be a little learning curve.” Blanton said though he or she does not face re-election and serves only at the pleasure of the school board, an appointed superintendent is shielded from election politics, but that does not mean politics is removed com pletely from the school district. “All elections affecting the school district tend to draw em ployees into the politics of the election,” he said. Blanton said terms of a con tract between the school board and the superintendent are ne gotiated and generally run three years, with provisions for termi nation, buyout, sick leave and such. He said though candidates from within Florida may seek ways to remain on the state re tirement system, those from out of state generally will negotiate an annuity or some other retirement option. Overall, the cost of an appoint ed superintendent is expected to run more than that of an elected one, depending on education and experience, Blanton said. Asked about the effect of a switch from elected to appointed on academic performance, Blan ton said he has not seen a pat tern. “I thought I could nd a dif ference, and I have not been able to nd a signicant difference whether student test scores dif fer between elected and appoint ed,” he said, noting that Florida scores tend to outpace those in the other two states that still elect superintendents. Blanton said he knew of only one Florida district to have switched back to an elected su perintendent. Lake County went from elected to appointed, then back to elected, and six years ago went back to appointed. “It’s the only one I know of in 39 years,” he said. SUPERINTENDENT from page A1 Morgan Martin and an extracurricular cast and crew, but was not familiar with all the details of the script, which focuses gen tly on the turmoil when the civil rights movement rst came alive 50 years ago, as seen through the prism of an “American Bandstand” type live dance party tele vision show in Baltimore, Md. The show addresses issues of how society has loosened its strictly held views on everything from interracial dating to puber ty to obesity. The dialogue is not without its spicy lan guage, some of which gave Creamer ts, and some of which she nixed, or so the actors say. But as it turned out, the large audience that took in the show Friday leaped to its feet with a standing ovation, after a show that can best be described as memorable. Starring in the role made famous on Broad way by Harvey Fierstein, and in the lm by John Travolta, senior Alex Cau sey played the drag ver sion of Edna Turnblad, a role whose girth calls for a male actor. Causey reveled in the opportunity, sashay ing around with his ample bosom for maximum comic effect. His soft shoe with husband Wilbur Turnblad (Christian Jones), to the warm and cheery love song “Timeless to Me,” was a glowing tribute to how beauty is truly “in the eyes of the beholder.” The show revolves around the ambition of the Turnblads’ daughter, Tracy, (Cynthia Duncan) to secure a coveted spot in the dance troupe of “The Corny Collins Show.” As it turns out, Tracy, who is not very gently chided for her weight by a snotty rival Amber Van Tussle (Ursula Countryman), manages to be picked for the show. She brings to the TV show not only a sassy alternative to the rail-thin other girls, but an outspoken advocacy for expanding “Negro Day” from once a month, even, heaven forbid, allowing for an integrated dance oor! Van Tussle’s mom, Vel ma (high school teacher Stephanie Howze-Jones) not only directs “The Corny Collins Show,” and is bigot ed to boot, but is willing to even cheat if it means her daughter will win the Miss Hairspray crown. After Tracy sings “Good Morning Baltimore,” a tes timony to her optimism, the show switches to the set of “The Corny Collins Show,” where Austin Carter played the slick host. Called in to play the part with just a few weeks to spare, Carter was one of the only actors to lip sync, as he managed the acting assignment suavely, with superb charm. By show’s end, this allwhite dance crew has come together with the all-black youth. With choreogra phy by experienced danc er Morgan Martin, who played both Little Inez and Judine, these group scenes were among the best in the show, proving Seahawks know how to scoot in sync along the dance oor. Among those young peo ple were Gilbert (Kelsey Jones), Stooie (Maliek Rhodes), Cindy Watkins (Bria Walker), Tammy (Me gan Collins), Brad (Chan dler White), Fender (Gabby Bond), Brenda (Deborah Dempsey), Sketch (Cam eron White), Shelley (Mad ison Newell), IQ (Shane Bellew), LouAnn (Brook Pittman), Lorraine (Aali yah West), Kamilah (Sha meika Lake) and Shayna (Beyla Walker). With her goofy, geeky best friend Penny Pingle ton (Raven Carr) as her sidekick, Tracy sets out on an adventure that takes her to the “Negro” side of town, where she discovers the meaning of freedom and equality by an involve ment with a civil rights demonstration that leads to her jailing. Performing one of the high points of the show, in a magnicent tribute to the joy of eating and of selflove, high school teacher Elinor Mount-Simmons, as Motormouth Maybelle, brought down the house with her rendition of “Big, Blonde and Beautiful.” The show gave all the actors a chance to pro vide an energetic, un abashed, free-wheeling performance, and each took advantage. As the heartthrob Link Larkin, Logan McLeod had the slick gestures down as he crooned “It Takes Two” to a pie-eyed, giggly Tracy. As Seaweed Stubbs, Ja than Martin set a standard for the cast to emulate as he danced and sang “Run and Tell That” together with Little Inez and the Dynamites, a tribute to the Supremes and other ’60s female soul-pop trios, played by Morgan Martin, Shameika Lake and Beyla Walker, in elegant gowns and satin gloves. Luke Hames, as Harri man Spritzer, was a comic presence in his role as pro prietor of a plus-size linge rie store beloved by Edna Turnblad. High school teacher Jennifer Edwards, who also stage managed the show together with Roderick Robinson and An drea Cupid, and para-pro fessional Louise Chipman added their acting talents to the show, which was as sisted by lots of school and community support. Richie Herrington served as technical di rector, Dana Whaley took photos and Creamer’s husband, Earl, helped to design and create props, as W.K. Sanders’ carpentry class handled construction of the set. The list of backers continues, including Ace Hardware, Penny’s Worth, Anthony Cooley from PAEC, Dolores Croom, Deborah Huckeba, Nina Marks, Scott Shiver, Lee Venable, Cathy Wood and many more. It was a labor of love, a tribute to gumption and perseverance and a pow erful, musical blast for the renewal of an effort to ex pand the theater opportu nities at the school. ‘HAIRSPRAY’ from page A1 PHOTOS BY DANA WH H ALEY Y | Special to the Times “Hairspray” director Jathan Martin sings as Seaweed J. Stubbs. Raven Carr was comic as Penny Pingleton, harassed by her mother for her rebellious ways. Alex Causey as Edna Turnblad, and Christian Jones as husband Wilbur, were a delightful pair. LEFT: The Dynamites, from left Shameika Lake, Morgan Martin and Beyla Walker, perform “Welcome to the ’60s.” Lots of dancing punctuated “Hairspray.” Maddie Newell, as Shelley, was among the dancers. LEFT: Stephanie Howze-Jones, as Velma Von Tussle, sings “Miss Baltimore Crabs.”

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A10 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 We ha ve 2 litt ers of Lab and Lab mix puppies Th er e ar e tw o fe males in one litt er and 3 males in the other On e gr oup is 10 we eks old the other 8 we eks old Al l ha ve be e n spa ye d and neut er ed va cc ina te d and ar e re ady fo r their fo re ve r home Summer time is the per fe ct time to adopt a family pet Th e ki ds ar e home fr om school to pla y with and help car e fo r the new pupp y! Vo lun te ers ar e desper ate ly needed to socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts We ar e alw ay s look ing fo r people willing to bring one of our animals in to their home to be fo st er ed fo r va rious needs An ytime yo u can spar e wo uld be gr ea tly appr ecia te d. Ca ll Ka re n at 670-8417 fo r mor e details or visit the Fr ank lin Co un ty Hu m a ne So ciet y at 244 St ate Ro ad 65 in Eastpoin t. Yo u ma y logon to the we bsit e at www fo rg ott enpets .or g to see mor e of our adoptable pets Franklin County Humane Society See Yo ur Business Name and Inf o Her e fo r ONL Y $1 5 per we ek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call To da y Special to The Times The Philaco Women’s Club held its annual installation of ofcers at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 17. The meeting took place at Benedict Hall at Trinity Episcopal Church. A special guest Jan Gainer, Florida recording secretary for the General Federation of Women’s Clubs (GFWC), installed the incoming ofcers. The new president is Ginny Griner. Maxine Creamer and Clarice Powell are rst and second vice presidents. Kate Aguiar will continue to serve as treasurer. Corresponding secretary is Sandi Hengle. Barbara Iman will serve as recording secretary and attorney Rachel Chesnut will take on the duties of parliamentarian. At the same meeting, winners of the annual $1,000 scholarships were announced. Franklin County High School senior Brook Pittman was present to receive her award; the other recipient, senior Jathan Martin, was not in attendance. Philaco also gave contributions to the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library; Patrons of the Apalachicola Municipal Library; and the Food Pantry at the Saturday meeting. Beverly Kelly was honored for her 40-year membership in Philaco with a corsage and a 40year pin. Fun facts from 1974, the year she joined, were read. Club committees were also presented with state level recognition from the Florida chapter of GFWC. Education received a statewide rst, Conservation a second and Public Issues a third. Society Brittany Creamer, Charles Johnson to wed The parents of Brittany Noel Creamer and Charles Joseph Johnson are pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of their children. Brittany is the daughter of Ray and Sharon Creamer, and Mike and Terry Pridgen, all of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Quention and Tillie Creamer, and the late Bobby Varnes, of Apalachicola; and Shirley Creamer and the late Arvin Creamer, of Apalachicola. Charles is the son of Mickey and Cara Johnson, of White City. Paternal grandparents are Lola Fambro and the late Joe Fambro, of Port St. Joe; and Glady Johnson and the late Andrew Johnson, of Carrabelle. The wedding will be held Saturday, May 24 at 4 p.m. at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church in Apalachicola. Reception to follow at the Fort Coombs Armory in Apalachicola. Friends and family are invited to attend. ADELE COLSTON | Special to The Times Glynda Ratliff, left, accepts an award on behalf of the conservation committee from outgoing Philaco President Jackie Bell, with incoming president Ginny Griner seated at right. Philaco installs new ofcers Wedding By ELINOR MOUN tT -SI mmMM ON sS Special to The Times The Franklin County School Class of 2014 is preparing to close out their high school years, take ight for a brand new world, and soar off to seek their destiny. To ofcially bring to an end these formative years, as well as to end their 2013-14 school year, the Seahawk Graduation Committee invites the Franklin County community to attend two very special traditional senior class events: Senior recognition night and the graduation ceremony. The fth annual Senior Recognition Night will be this Friday, May 23. This special event kicks off the school-sponsored graduation activities for the Class of 2014 and will be held in the school’s cafetorium beginning at 6 p.m. Scholarships and monetary awards will be presented from over 30 donors to members of the graduating class. Although not formally a part of the school’s weeklong graduation activities, the annual baccalaureate service will be held Sunday, May 25 at 4 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God. The graduation committee is also pleased to announce the seventh annual commencement for the 64 graduating Seahawk seniors. This memorable ceremony will be Thursday, May 29 at 7 p.m. in the gymnasium. Doors open at 6 p.m. In preparation for the night, reserved seating selection for the graduate’s families will be Thursday, May 29 at noon, with graduation practice immediately following. Students are required to attend both of these activities. Parents are encouraged to attend the seating selection and assist with this task. To capture memories for these two special times, videos can be purchased for $40 through pre-orders only. The ordering period runs through May 29. Students and/or parents can see Mrs. Carla Bankston in the front ofce with their order. During the graduation ceremony, LifeTouch Photography will take pictures of all graduates at no cost and will e-mail graduates the ordering information, which will be done from their website. The Seahawk Graduation Committee Carla Bankston, Dolores Croom, Karyl Gavigan, Leigh Smith, and coordinator Elinor Mount-Simmons are working diligently, planning these special occasions for the seniors and are exciting about bringing forth another memorable experience. Please join them, Senior Class Advisors Croom and Kassi Malcolm, and the entire Seahawk family as they help the Class of 2014 create lasting memories of their graduation activities by attending the 2014 graduation events. Any questions concerning senior recognition night or commencement can be directed to MountSimmons at 670-2800, ext. 2111 or at emountsimmons@franklin.k12. .us Class of 2014 to take a bow The Franklin County High School band had a busy week last week. On Thursday, May 15, they presented their annual Spring Concert, under the direction of Karl Lester. The rst half of the concert was performed by the middle school band. In the second half, the high school students performed “Brighton Camp” by Randall Standridge; portions of “Hansel and Gretel” by Engelbert Humperdinck; “Polly Oliver” by Thomas Root; “Blue Ridge Reel” and “Among the Clouds” by Brian Balmages; “Beauty and the Beast” by Alan Menken; “The Lion King” by Paul Lavender; “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame” by Paul Jennings; and “Gangnam Style” by Michael Brown. On Sunday afternoon, at Lafayette Park, those selections formed the content of the closing concert in the Ilse Newell Series for the Performing Arts, sponsored by the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Instrumentalists include utes Samantha Marxsen, Ursula Countryman, Josie Kriss, Jessica Rudd, Casey Riley and Aracely Gallegos; clarinets Jackson Copley, Cayce Daniels, Fisher Edwards, Beyla Walker, Makenzie Schumann, Abbie Pace, and Taylor Messer; bass clarinet Morgan Anderson; alto saxophone Thomas Copley and Ana Aguilar; tenor saxophone Acaleah Wallace; trumpets Melody Hateld, Charles Petty and Jessica Schmidt; French horns Mercedes Rice and Rory Countryman; trombones Morgan Martin, Colby Boatwright and Mitchell Sand; euphonium Ann Reeder; tuba Hunter Kelley; and percussion Bryan Boyd, Kitana Peralta and Jonathan Whitcomb. — By DAVID ADLERSTEIN On May 6, Ray Brownsworth, CEO of Weems Memorial Hospital, introduced the hospital’s new chief nancial ofcer, John Graham, to the county commission. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked Graham for his opinion of the hospital. “What are your priorities?” she asked. Graham said that while the hospital staff is good, the facility can always use more providers. “I will give you my best efforts to make the nancials good and bring you the news whether it is bad or good,” he said. “This is a people business and I like working with people. The basic bottom line is to provide service to the community.” — By LOIS SWOBODA PHotos OTOS bB Y DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Band director Karl Lester directs the middle school band during the rst half of the May 15 spring concert. FCHS band wraps up busy week John Graham new CFO at Weems LOIS SWOBODA | The Times John Graham, left, with Ray Brownsworth. Hunter Kelley plays the tuba.

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The Times | A11 Thursday, May 22, 2014 Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{ ~” …—” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 OBITUARIES Surrounded by family, Exie Reba Gilbert (Granny) went to be with our Lord on Saturday, May 17, 2014, at her home. Originally, from Inman, South Carolina, she had resided in Carrabelle the last 40 years. Exie had been married to her sweetheart, John, for 74 years. Exie is preceded in death by her parents, Paul and Tennessee Abernathy, along with two infant sons, Leon and Johnny, as well as four brothers. In addition to her husband, John, she is survived by ve daughters: Gwen Suddeth (Troy), Wilma Thompson (Dale), Zenith Barnett (Ed), Lorraine Shiver (Ronnie, deceased), and Rita Massey; and one brother, Dean Abernathy. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, 15 greatgrandchildren, ve greatgreat-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Exie worked alongside her husband in carpentry on many homes and businesses in Carrabelle. She was a loving and devoted wife, mother and granny. We will always remember her homemade biscuits, quilts, playing her guitar and most of all her precious love. Services were Tuesday afternoon, May 20 at First Assembly of God in Carrabelle, preceded by visitation. Exie Gilbert Mr. Carlton Henry Padgett, 82, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Thursday, May 15, 2014, at his home. He was born Dec. 2, 1931 in Holmes County to the late George Walker Padgett and Mattie Elsie Padgett. In addition to his parents, Mr. Padgett was preceded in death by his wife, Joy Padgett; two brothers, Randall Padgett and Donnie Padgett; and one sister, Dessie Bell. Mr. Padgett served in the United States Air Force from 1951-1955. Mr. Padgett is survived by his son, Kevin Hedman, of Niceville; two grandchildren, Cassandra Worley of Chipley, and Carlton Hedman of Troy, Ala.; two greatgrandchildren, Bryndon Matthew Carroll and Broox Auburn Worley; one sister, Wilma Niel, of Carrabelle. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, May 19 at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church with Rev. Ernie Grey of ciating. Interment will follow with military honors in the Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church Cemetery. Family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday at Peel Funeral Home. Carlton Henry Padgett Faith BARFIELD FAMILY The family of Florida Vause Bar eld offers their sincere thanks to each of you for your many acts of kindness during the passing of our beloved mother. Your kind words, warm embraces, prayers, and words of comfort will always be remembered. We want to especially thank Pastor Roach for the lovely service and the sweet ladies of the church for the delicious food — their sweet kindness and warm words brought comfort to our family. All these genuine expressions of love are so appreciated. Our sincere thanks and may you be blessed. THE REGISTER FAMILY Dear Family and Friends of Rev. Lawrence J. Register: Words are never enough to express our sincere gratitude to all of the ones who expressed their love and grieved with us at the passing of such a wonderful man as our Dad. We were overwhelmed by your expressions of love and all the beautiful owers and food presented by those who cared so much for him. A heartfelt thanks to the Apalachicola Pentecostal Holiness Church for the wonderful meals, owers, prayers, the ramp the men of the church built, and too many other things to put in writing… but God saw and we appreciate them all. One other thanks is due to the Big Bend Hospice for their help in the last days of Daddy’s life, Mrs. Carolyn, and Mrs. Tammy were angels sent to help us get Daddy to the “other side of Jordan.”Thanks to the family for doing what families always do in time of crisis: you all pitched in and were there for us whenever we needed you. Thank you and God richly bless, The Register Family CARDS OF THANKS Missed seeing you at lunch last Thursday. Sarge had xed red sh for us and Stacey prepared the sides. Maybe you can make it this afternoon. Chow line forms at noon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Pat or Ed will take your donation of $5 at the desk. Be watchin’ for ya! We had a full house at the pancake brunch last Saturday at the Lanark Village Boat Club. I enjoyed my French toast with bacon, eggs, coffee and juice. I just know you enjoyed your breakfast too. See you June 21, same time, same station. Last Sunday was covered dish at Chillas Hall. When I got there at 12:20 p.m., there was only Dot Bless and me. About 12:50 p.m., here come the crowd. We all had a ne meal and good time, but we’re missing two of our faithful helpers. Wally Law and Shirley Cox were both having health problems. Pray for their recovery. When you sauntered over to the dessert table, did you look up and see the frame and painted owers and heavy verse? You can thank Jacki Cicly. She did the painting. Don’t forget we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday night and pizza on Sunday at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Orders taken after 6 p.m. both nights. Eat in or take out available. Hamburger and chips requires a donation of $6. Pizza, by the slice is $1 donation. Bet you can’t eat just one slice. Enjoy a whole pizza in the lounge for a donation of $8 or a pizza on the run requires a donation of $10. Call in an order by dialing 697-9998. Enjoy. Monday, May 26, is Memorial Day. Please take time for a moment of prayer for those who gave their lives to save our freedom. The Memorial Day service will be held at 1 p.m. at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. We will also have the retiring of old ags, followed by a lunch of nger food. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember, smile, Jesus loves you. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. Memorial Day service Monday afternoon LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Market Days at Messer Pavilion May 31 Carrabelle United Methodist Church and “God’s Ministry” for the Needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering, on Saturday, May 31, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop ‘till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then…. eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink! Music will be provided by local talent. Thank you all for visiting us at the Riverfront Festival last month. We are looking forward to seeing you again! Remember God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing. Healthy Start Baby Shower June 3 Healthy Start’s sixth annual Baby Shower will be held Tuesday, June 3 at 4 p.m. at The Centennial Building, 300 Allen Memorial Way, in Port St. Joe. We invite all Franklin and Gulf County pregnant women, new parents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for a special evening. There will be information stations on various topics such as car seat safety, shaken baby, childbirth, safe sleep, community resources and vendors offering merchandise for purchase. Free admission, plus food, fun, games and lots of fabulous door prizes! Special games for Dads! For more information, call 1-800-895-9506 ext. 100. Faith BRIEFS The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion TUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Women’s AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Men’s AA, Closed THURSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion SATURDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference AA MEETINGS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Please take time for a moment of prayer for those who gave their lives to save our freedom.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, May 22, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C AP AL AC HIC OL A CA RR ABELLE TIDE TA BLES MONTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om the se gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nus 0:40 Mi nus 1: 17 East Pa ss Mi nus 0:27 Mi nus 0: 27 To nd th e tides of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELL E: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nus 9:16 Mi nus 0: 03 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Ma y 15 76 59 60 % Fr i, Ma y 16 77 62 20 % Sa t, Ma y 17 77 66 10 % Sun, Ma y 18 78 66 10 % Mo n, Ma y 19 79 68 0 % Tu es Ma y 20 79 70 0 % We d, Ma y 21 80 71 0 % JOE’S LA WN CA RE IF IT’S IN YO UR YA RD LET JOE TA KE CA RE OF IT • FULL LA WN SERV IC ES • TREE TRIM MIN GA ND RE MOV AL • ALSO CLEAN GU TTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTIN GA ND BED DING AVA ILABLE CALL JOE @8 50-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM SPONSORED BY Local area water are producing great inshore and now some offshore catches as the weather has finally settled down. We are expecting great turnouts of visitors this weekend, so get to your favorite spot early. Red fish continue to be caught in the ICW canal and out in the Windmark location this week. Flounder and trout are in shallow water at the head of the bay, but not in vast numbers yet. Pompano and whiting continue to run the beaches along the Gulf side of Cape San Blas and further east down the coast. Offshore red snapper will open this Saturday in state waters to a much anticipated crowd of anglers. Many good sized red snapper are holding in 60-80ft of water and they will be big this weekend. Page 12 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Gulf County Commissioners on April 22 entered the fray to maintain full public access to St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. The board unanimously approved for a letter to be sent to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lending BOCC support to efforts to preserve what remains of the skeletal management of St. Vincent. Landy Luther, with the Supporters of St. Vincent Island, brought a plea to the board, urging commissioners to participate in the letter-writing campaign currently underway. Two months ago, Luther said, the Supporters were noti ed that USFWS was undergoing an analysis of staf ng and funding for national wildlife refuges. “The information we got was really negative toward St. Vincent,” Luther said. What information has been made available indicates the USFWS is considering further staf ng and funding cuts at St. Vincent. And while the refuge will not be closed – that would require congressional action, Luther said – “public uses and access to the island could possibly be restricted,” Luther said. “That is bad news because over the last ve years the island has been severely understaffed and under-budgeted,” Luther said. “We as supporters are opposed to any status change that would result in staf ng and funding cuts.” The island staff has already been cut in recent years with a biologist position eliminated and management staff reduced to one. Funding for the island is now funneled through St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and the island no longer has leased of ce space in Apalachicola after the city declined to renew the lease. That has conspired to put a highly-successful red wolf breeding program at risk and resulted in actions such as moving the annual meeting of the Supporters from a weekend to a weekday event due to staf ng reductions. The island is considered an environmental jewel. The late Dr. Joe Collins, a world-renowned herpetologist from the University of Kansas, spent nearly a decade surveying the wildlife on the island. He wrote several papers in addition to a pocket book on the snakes of the island. As a barrier island that is essentially undisturbed from 100 years ago, St. Vincent was, Collins repeatedly said, a “unique” environment worth keeping pristine and natural. The island has also become a growing tourist attraction, said Marie Romanelli, who with her husband operates a shuttle service from the Indian Pass boat ramp to the island. “The island is becoming a major tourist attraction as well as wildlife sanctuary,” Romanelli said, noting that during a typical spring week she will eld four or ve dozen calls from those interested in exploring the island. “Most people access the island from the boat ramp from Indian Pass even though it is in Franklin County.” Those people also patronized businesses and restaurants in Gulf County, Romanelli said, meaning the island carries an economic impact for the county. “St. Vincent is a gem,” said Commissioner Warren Yeager. “There will be an economic impact if they move forward with restricting access. A lot of people go out there. Businesses rely on this.” And, Yeager said, the island is public land and should remain fully open to the public that pays the price tag for management. “We don’t need to lose the eco-tourism that has developed out there,” said resident Pat Hardman. The Supporters group gathered over 800 signatures on a petition urging the UWFWS to leave the island alone and submitted that petition. Luther said the next step was a letter-writing campaign commissioners agreed to join. Time is of the essence, Romanelli said. The expectation is that the USFWS will complete its staf ng/ budgeting exercise in the next 15-20 days and the impacts of any decision to reduce public access would likely come this year. “It is a treasure,” Yeager said. Meanwhile, there is a possibility that the St. Vincent Island refuge will remain in Apalachicola, and may relocate into the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce building on Commerce Street. Chamber Director Anita Grove told city commissioners May 6 that she is in negotiations with refuge representatives to possible lease space to them. She said the refuge would need about a half-dozen designated parking spaces, and the commissioners gave unanimous approval to designate the unpaved lot across Commerce Street as parking in the event it is needed. TIM ROSS | Special to the Times This red wolf was photographed in March 2007 as a captive specimen at “Parks at Chehaw” in Albany, Georgia. Gulf County commission backs access to St. Vincent CAPT. EARL SOLOMON | Special to the Times Atlanta’s Ray Solomon took home a pair of rstplace recreational nishes, worth $500 each, at the sixth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament April 27-28 in Panacea. In the ounder division, Solomon landed a 2-pound, 8-ounce sh, with Carrabelle’s Marilyn Lawhon nishing second, and winning $200, for her 2-pound, 7-ounce catch. In the red sh division, Solomon reeled in an 8-pound, 1-ounce sh to take rst. SOLOMONS ROCK THE DOCK

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, May 22, 2014 A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com An unprecedented seven Seahawk seniors signed on the dotted line May 7 as they committed to college scholarships to play in their respective sports. Added to the two football players who signed last month, this total of nine Seahawks committed to college sports marked a new pinnacle in the school’s sevenyear sports program. The Seahawks who signed at the afternoon rally in the gym were a collection of four soccer players, two softball players and one basketball player. Former girls soccer coach Kelli Maggio Wright, now a physical education teacher and assistant coach at Arnold High School in Panama City, was on hand as current girls soccer coach Joe Shields introduced the two girl soccer stars he helped develop Gracyn Kirvin and Adriana Reeder — who are both on their way to play for the Faulkner University Eagles, a private Christian school in Montgomery, Alabama. The boys coach, Ramon Valenzuela, helped to introduce the Seahawk boys soccer stars — James Harris and Graham Kirvin — who have committed to play for the Thomas University Night Hawks, a private liberal arts school in Thomasville, Georgia. Lady Seahawk coach Scott Collins introduced the two players Ashley Carroll and Ally Millender – who have committed to playing for the Wallace Community College Lady Govs, at the two-year institution of higher learning, formerly known as George C. Wallace State Community College, in located in Dothan, Alabama. Wallace’s interim head softball coach Ronny Lunsford was on hand for the signing. The lone basketball player to sign was senior Cameron White, who will dress for the Trinity Baptist College Eagles, at a private university in Jacksonville. His future coach, John D. Jones, attended the signing ceremony. After an introduction from Athletic Director Mike Sweatt, Shields took the stage before a boisterous audience of high school students in the gym. Shields praised both Gracyn Kirvin and Reeder, who he has known for years while they grew up playing soccer. “She has soccer in her blood,” he said of Kirvin. “It makes sense she wanted to pursue soccer as a college coach. Shields described Reeder as “quite possibly the hardest working girl” he has coached, who has withstood legal but harsh hits, and bounced back. Maggio Wright did not speak, but sat in the bleachers, beaming at her players’ success. Boys coach Ramon Valenzuela introduced Graham Kirvin and Harris, stressing that this is the rst time the soccer program has sent four of its alumni on to athletic scholarships. Girls coach Scott Collins introduced Millender and Carroll. Former Lady Seahawk coach Lisa Sweatt did not speak, but stood, happily, in back, proud of both girls. Mike Sweatt introduced White, noting that in his years as a coach “I have never seen somebody make the gains he’s made.” Sweatt said White added 11 inches to his 22” vertical leap, as he invested countless hours working towards his goal. White echoed the feelings of all the athletes in his remarks, stressing that performance in the classroom was top priority. “You have to get it done there rst, before you can get it done on the court or in the eld,” he said. “Don’t let anyone tell you you can’t.” He then quoted from Philippians 4:13 which reads “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Mike Sweatt told the audience about need for good grades, usually better than a 3.0 grade point average, plus decent test scores. “You have to have coaches that will back you up,” he said. “Moms and dads, aunts and uncles, people that will help you in the process too. And the nal thing you got to do is you got to work.” \› M [ ›9‹‹ ; }› \›• ›> W •› \› M Ž—D }} •c ‚• Œ›… M U~” s‘‘Š…~— ŽŠ¢ š —…Ž‚Š~”~z~…‘š ’œsŠ…¢…Ž‚ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ 8 ‘”‹ ~~ …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| sŽ| …ŽzŠœ|~| …Ž š„~ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ ~’œsŠ š s ” ‘œ”z„s—~—  s=’’’ ” ‹”~‡ T ‹Žš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| Ž ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ …ŽzŠœ|…Ž‚ ”~Šsš~| ‘”‹ ~~: sŽ| ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš— s”~ ”~’œ…”~| ~’œsŠ š ‡s1b  …Ž…š…sŠ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ s‹œŽš œŽš…Š ‘”‹ …— ‘s…| …Ž œŠŠ‡ \„~ ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš …ŠŠ w~ ”œŽ|~| š š„~ Ž~¡š „…‚„~—š „Š~ |ŠŠs” sŽ| ‹s¢ w~ „…‚„~” š„sŽ š„~ ‹…Ž…‹œ‹ ‘s¢‹~Žš š„sš œŠ| w~ ”~’œ…”~| … š„~ ‘œ”z„s—~ s— s ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~‡ Z~‚œŠs” szzœŽš š~”‹— s‘‘Š¢ š ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ C” Ž~ szzœŽš—4 Vœ”z„s—~ 8VZ …— ‡--bq Q…Ž…‹œ‹ QŽš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š <„s”‚~ …— ‡ A¡…—š…Ž‚ zs”|„Š|~”— —„œŠ| —~~ š„~…” z”~|…š zs”| s‚”~~‹~Žš ” š„~…” s‘‘Š…zswŠ~ š~”‹—‡ [œw‡~zš š z”~|…š s‘‘”sŠ‡ ST JOS EP H BA Y GO LF CL UB SP EC IAL S JUN IOR GO LFE RS (1 7 AND UN DE R) PL AY FR EE WI TH AN AD UL T PA YI NG GO LF ER FR ANKL IN & GU LF CO UN TI ES ON LY SI NG LE AND FA MI LY ME MBE RS HI PS NO IN ITI AT ION FE E & FI RS T MO NTH DU ES FR EE WI TH A 12 MON TH CO MMI TM EN T (M US T PA Y BA LA NC E BY CA SH CH EC K, OR CR ED IT CA RD AT TI ME OF SI GN UP ) CA LL TH E PR O SH OP TO DA Y FO R MO R E INF ORM AT ION OR ST OP BY 850 -2 27 -1 75 1. CA LL TH E PR O SH OP FO R IN FO RM AT ION ON FR EE GO LF LE SS ON S FO R C HIL DR EN EA CH FR ID AY IN JUN E. 70 0 CO UN TR Y CL UB RO AD PO RT ST JO E, FL 32 456 Page 13 Seven Seahawks sign for scholarships Accompany Adriana Reeder at her signing are, seated from left, brother Josh and mom Teri, and standing from left, Lady Seahawk coach Joe Shields and former coach Kelli Maggio Wright. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Ward and Christey Kirvin ank their daughter, Gracyn, as she signs her soccer scholarship. Stacy and Elizabeth Kirvin sit with son Graham as he signs soccer scholarship. Jamie Millender watches her daughter Ally sign a softball scholarship, as Wallace Community College coach Ronny Lunsford sits at left, and Lady Seahawk coach Scott Collins stands. Not pictured, but on hand, were dad, Allen, and brother Garyson. Link Carroll watches her daughter Ashley sign a softball scholarship, as Wallace Community College coach Ronny Lunsford sits at left, and Lady Seahawk coach Scott Collins stands. Attending Cameron White’s signing are, seated from left, dad Michael, Trinity Baptist Coach John Jones, Cameron and mom Sherry. Standing from left are brother Chance, Seahawk coach Mike Sweatt and brother Chandler. Accompanying James Harris at his signing are, seated from left dad Michael Gilbert and sister Marissa, James and mom Angie. Standing, from left, are brothers Jack and Billy Harris.

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 By JOHN H H ENTZ Special to the Times ( Editor‘s note: This is the rst of a series on the memories of the Apalachicola River by the late Panama City native John Hentz. These were transcribed by Beverly Mount Douds.) It is interesting to note that during the steamboat years that a big part of the cargo the steamboats were carrying was oranges. During certain seasons of the year a lot of the boats would have from 150 to 200 boxes of oranges on them. I was one of the main cash crops of our ancestors. I‘ve heard that the freeze of 1898 just about wiped them out. There is a community about 18 miles south of Bristol in Liberty County named “Orange.“ During my boyhood days there was a U.S. Post Ofce there; it was operated by Mrs. Wilder. After the Civil War, most of the people who lived up the river made a living cutting and rafting cypress timber down the river to the big sawmills in Apalachicola. They would catch a ride on the steamboat back to their camps up the river. Back in those days most of the people who lived up the river worked in timber. They established their camps in the area where they were cutting at the time and where they lived. Some of the names I remember that my father camped and worked with was Alex Turner, “Broze“ Ramsey, Jim White, Uncle Calvin Durham, his brothers, Frank and Dink (James T.) Hentz, Jake Harrell, a Mr. Kirkland, Mr. Jeter, a boy who came to their camp, they never knew from where, who said his name was “John.“ That‘s all he would tell them, but he worked with them for years. Dan Minton, Manny Howard, John Parrish, Mr. Hathcock, my grandfather William Hentz, Mr. Will Gunn, Tom and Sid Johnson, Isiah Rewells, Tense Dugger, Rob Hentz, Will Durham, and many more. The boy who they found in camp would only tell them that, “they didn‘t give poor folks but one name where he came from,“ years later when he had grown up and got married he took the name, Kirkland. Nobody ever knew whether that was his real name or not. He lived in the little village of Sumatra for many years. My father always said he was a good boy. Back in logging days on the Apalachicola River, timber crews cut on government claims issued by the boundaries, etc. My uncle Frank Hentz was a surveyor and I‘ve heard it said that he knew where every section corner in Liberty County was located. The holder of the claim could dell with other crew operators to do the cutting. My father and his brothers worked with Mr. W.H. Gunn who was the son of my grandfather‘s oldest sister. There was a man named Rish from Wewahitchka who had a timber crew in the area and he was always dissatised with something and causing trouble. They got by without any serious trouble, but I heard of two different occasions when they had to have an understanding with him at the end of a Winchester. The center of the river is the line between counties on opposite sides of the river, and back in steamboat days, when a crime was committed on a steamboat it always posted a problem to determine which county had jurisdiction. It depended on which side of the river the boat was on at the time of the crime was committed. Sometimes a steamboat would pick up a dead body oating in the river. It would usually be in a condition that it had to be buried immediately. They would send a crew in a small boat to the river bank and bury it. They would than COURTe E SY OF Be E V e E RLY MOUNT DOUd D S | Special to The Times The Jim Woodruff Dam in Blountstown shortly after construction M E mM ORIES OF THE Apalachicola River A steamboat carries cotton down the Apalachicola River The Times takes a look back at river’s history See memMEM ORI eE S A15

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Local The Times | A15 Thursday, May 22, 2014 nail up half of a wooden barrel head on a tree or post it at the head of the grave. Back in the rafting days, some of the people who operated up the Chipola River had a rough reputation and our people on the river kept an eye on them. They didn‘t trust those people too far. They used to tell a story about an old man who rafted down the Chipola, who the other loggers in the area accused of stealing their timber and putting it into his raft. One time they were chasing after him and found him with his raft tied up at Douglas Landing on the Chipola River about 3 miles from where the river ows into the Apalachicola. He was sitting there on the bank of the river smoking his pipe. They cursed him out and accused him of stealing their timber and said that they would shoot him if he moved that raft. He sat there and smoked his pipe and when he got through he just knocked the ashes out of his pipe, got and started untying the raft. They threw their guns on him and swore they‘d shoot him. He untied the raft, pushed out into the river and as he went down the river he holler back at them. “Well boys, talk is cheap, It takes money to buy liquor“. Nobody shot him. He went on to Apalachicola and sold the timber. More using maps The following are transcriptions of four pages of maps and notes by Mr. Hentz, transcribed by Beverly Mount-Douds. PAGE1 (Yellow Fever) On Sept. 14th 1878, the steamboat “Mary Elizabeth“ arrived in Apalach, the Federal Authorities boarded it and found no sick persons, but decided ____________ ____________ for 20 days in harbor but Capt. Comrick said his boat couldn‘t stand the conditions in the harbor that long. He proposed to go up into Lake Wemico, they refused, and so he headed up into Saul Creek. They __________ shot at his boat 40 or 50 times. Apalachicola was make a port in 1820 during the Admiration of President James Monroe, but did not ofcially belong to the US until 1821. It shipped its rst cotton in 1828, 317 bales, by 1836 it exceeded 51,000 annually. From 1828 until the Civil War started in 1861, more than 300 steamboats ran the river. By 1847 the port of Apalachicola was exporting 160,000 bales of cotton annually. In 1847, the trend started reversing when the big cotton mills were built at Columbus and cotton started going up river. The US Customs Ofce opened in Apalachicola in 1823. During its heydays of cotton exports, Apalachicola had two cotton presses that pressed the bales of cotton into smaller size for shipping our seas. One was docilely operated, the other was steam operated. Capt. Wing set another milestone on Monday, Oct. 25 when he completed his 10,600th round trip, the “Crescent City“ from Apalachicola to Carrabelle, without a mishap, a record never equated. The years 1920 – 1927. PAGE 2 The Pinhook is in the middle where Jackson River and Sauls Creek Cutoff is at the Apalachicola River mile marker 5.7 (G.I.W. 345.7). At this point the IntraCoastal Canal joins the Apalachicola River system. The Pinhook, the last bend in the Apalachicola River before it just empties into the Jackson River about 5 miles above Apalachicola is where the current ran for the log rafts .At this point the saw mill would send “Tug Boat“ to bring the logs to the mill. In the mid April 1847 the U.S. Mail boat “Augusta“ and the “Eufaula“ collided, the “Augusta“ sank. The Five-Mile trestle on the Apalachicola River Northern Rail Road always aspersed me from the time I was a little boy I did not see how on earth men were to build it. Four Tree Cut-off just below the sh camps on the west bend of the river was a short cut for shermen, but got to be dangerous because of high speed boats running towards it. It is narrow, curved, and had high grass eight feet tall on both sides. Chipley Creek is somewhere in the area-ANRR-between Grassy Creek and Acorn Creek. The Five-Mile trestle on it was from River Junction to Port St. Joe, the ANRR crossed the Apalachicola River system just about 4.5 miles north of Apalachicola on its way down from the NE, it rst crosses East River, the big St. Marks and the main Apalachicola River and all the sloughs and swamps between. PAGE 3 Anthony Apiary-heading north on the Big Excursion days our kin folks from Greensboro would come down on the train and we would meet them at Hosford or Telozia. On an “Excursion“ about the 1918 or 1919, we were crossing the 5mile trestle and my cousin from Greensboro, Wright Johnson and I saw a big alligator from the window of the couch swimming up the East River. The new year 1852 on Oct. 9 the steamboat “Alabama“ hit a snag on the river and was lost. “Columbus“ (maybe snag boat) sank in Hurricane Reach one mile below St. Marks River. Visible at low water, built at Bainbridge in 1904. The A.N.R.R. was completed from River Junction to Apalachicola in the year 1907. In April of 1907 the 1st passenger train locomotive chugged into PSJ during the early years of its operation the Rail Road have “Excursions“ at a cut rate fare to PSJ that was a big deal with people who lived inland up the railroad to go to PSJ for a day of picnicking and swimming in the bay. The old St. Joe Hotel was headquarters. Before Highway 98 was built between the hotel and the bay. There was a boardwalk all the way from the front of the hotel to the bay. I once saw a one-legged man who had put on his bathing suit in the hotel and hop on one leg all the way down the walkway to the bay. PAGE 4 (North to Howard Creek, Berrisman Slough, Harrison Creek-left, right is Bloody Bluff Island) In the late 1940s Merle Bishop drowned in the lower Brothers (1948, I am kin to this man). In these days the International Paper Company furnished a recreation camp down on the West Bank of the Big Brothers with all the comfort of home for their employees. Merle Bishop was personnel ofcer for the company, he and two other company employers were on their way to camp on Saturday night, when Merle felled overboard and drowned. Here at the mouth of the Brothers, my father and his brother, who were teenagers at the time had been trading timber in the swamps. They had nished their job and hailed the steamboat for a ride up the river. They were standing on a small dock when the steamboat sung into it and knocked the deck out from under them. One of them had a bed roll and a rie in his hand and the others had a suit case and a rie, a deck hand caught my uncle by the leg, my father was knocked into the river. He dodged behind a tree to keep the steamboat from crushing him. They lost the bedrolls and the suit cases, but both of them held onto their ries. BLOODY BLUFF ISLAND-LANDi I NG This is where Mr. Richards of Wewahitchka and his party caught up with the Indians after they had killed all of his family except one little boy named Jehu who managed to escape and hide out in the swamps on the Dead Lakes. Mr. Richards and his party delivered such re power on those Indians until the river was red with blood for a great distance downstream. The Cypress Creek sawmill MEMORIES from page A14 The steamer Calhoun sails along the Apalachicola

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 Heavy rains expected to affect tupelo honey yield Brian Bertonneau looks over a jar of honey. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE | The News Herald Brian Bertonneau checks on a colony of bees. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. WEAKENED HARVEST “The industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees don’t want to stay alive.” Don Smiley, former apiary owner By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA — Lovers of tupelo honey might have spent a little extra for a dab of the famous stuff during the Tupelo Honey Festival May 17; this season’s harvest is projected to be less than sweet. The white tupelo gum tree blossoms that provide the bees with the nectar to create the honey only last about three weeks in the best years, said Brian Bertonneau, owner of Smiley Apiaries. Wet weather this year cut deeply into blooming period, and Bertonneau expects tupelo yields to be about 50 to 70 percent lower. “It’s not going to be a good year,” Bertonneau said. “Bees have to visit 2 million blossoms to gather a pound of honey.” It’s been ve or six years since the last hearty yield, he said. The precarious tupelo honey industry is also threatened by a mysterious phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder or CCD, which emerged about 10 years ago and has the potential to impact not just honey producers but food consumers the world over. Bees pollinate more than 90 percent of the owering crops on earth, according to the Associated Press. “Just about all agriculture depends on some kind of insect pollination,” said Don Smiley, who created Smiley Apiaries in 1989 and lost a whole harvest season when he was rst affected by CCD in the mid-2000s. Smiley sold his company to Bertonneau a few years ago. “I wasn’t seeing dead bees,” Smiley said. “I was just seeing weaker and weaker hives.” There are several theories about what is leading to CCD, which causes bees to suddenly and inexplicably abandon their hives and die, although a Harvard study published this month blames pesticides that are already restricted in Europe. One of every four honeybee colonies died over the winter this year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture study, a decrease from the previous few years. “The industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees don’t want to stay alive,” Smiley said. Smiley thinks beekeepers need federal disaster relief in the same way farmers of other crops needed relief after the heavy rains this spring. Bertonneau considers himself a hobbyist when it comes to beekeeping; he keeps two hives at his bottling plant and buys honey by the drum from partners with many more hives. Colony loss has been less of a problem in recent years as beekeepers split hives twice a year, he said. And here’s some good news: It’s trees and not the bees that give tupelo honey the distinctive sweetness Van Morrison sang about, Bertonneau said. The might be less honey, but the honey that remains is as sweet as it ever was. Wewahitchka and the Apalachicola river basin that runs behind Bertonneau’s plant are home to some of the highest concentrations of white tupelo gum trees in the world, and the Tupelo Honey Festival draws hundreds of vendors and thousands of visitors to Wewa each year, said Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. “Tourism is up here in Gulf County…and tupelo honey is a part of it,” Jenkins said. The TDC wants to emphasize tupelo honey production in its marketing of Gulf County as an alternative to the busier, more developed counties to its west, she said. Jenkins said the TDC is in the early stages of forming partnerships with apiaries like Smiley to promote and market the area, and the world-famous honey, to potential visitors.

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Local The Times | A17 Thursday, May 22, 2014 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mo re Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service Tr ades & Ser vi ces RO BER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR -A LL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado wL ane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager ,D MD Monica Bontrager ,D MD 12761 Pea Ridge Road -B ristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHON E( 850) 643 -5417 DEN TURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L ICE NS ED AN D I NS URED • 20 Y EAR S E XP ERIENCE P. O. Bo x4 39 Car ra belle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 00 66499 RG 00 65255 Visa, Disco ve r, and Amer ican Expr ess Honor ed at Pa rtici pat ing Ace Stor es Build ing Supplies &A uto Rep air Carrabel le 697-3 333 We Deli ve rA ny wher e Hardware and Paint Center F. W. C. Fl ori da Wi nd ow Co ve ri ng Com pa ny fa ct or yd ir ect win do wt re at ment s Re si den ti al and com me rc ia l Sh ut te rs ,S had es, Bl in ds Se cu rit y& Su nC ont rol ,W indo wT in ts St orm Sh ut te rs Co lon ial ,A cc or dian, Ro ll Do wn ,B aham a GU AR AN TE ED LO WES TC OM PET IT VE PR IC ES IN NO RT HF LO RI DA FRE EI nHo me Es ti mat e* FRE EI ns ta llat io n Fo rA ll Yo ur Win do wC ove ring Ne ed s CA LL Fl ori da Windo wC ov er in gC om pa ny 850 -6 97 -3 066 or 850 -5 28 -9 355 ams rohr s@ fa irp oi nt .n et AD VERTISE HERE TO DA Y 227-7847 Special to the Times The Northwest Florida Water Management Dis trict Governing Board last week approved up to $462,000 in grant funding for Carrabelle to imple ment a storm water retrot project that will improve water quality in the Apala chicola Bay watershed. The Marine Street Stormwater Retrot proj ect will treat storm water that discharges into the Carrabelle River and ul timately into St. George Sound, part of the Apala chicola Bay system. “The district continues to partner with local gov ernments to improve wa ter quality throughout the Apalachicola Bay system,” said Executive Director Jon Steverson. “The dis trict remains committed to working to protect the en vironment and ultimately the economy of the Apala chicola region.” The storm water retrot project consists of two pri mary components — storm water conveyance improve ments and a bioretention system — designed to im prove storm water quality before it discharges into the Carrabelle River. The project will reduce storm water runoff pollutants us ing a “treatment train” ap proach, which consists of pre-treatment to remove solid and larger pollutants followed by bioretention treatment to further re move dissolved pollutants and nutrients. The project will also help improve drainage along Marine Street, a waterfront boardwalk area important to local tourism and eco nomic development, which is currently served by inad equate drainage facilities. The district continues to work with local govern ments, state and federal agencies and other part ners toward the restoration of the Apalachicola River and Bay. The District’s 2013-14 budget includes a total of $4.7 million for Apalachicola River and Bay watershed protection and restoration, including $3 million proposed by Gov. Rick Scott and approved by the Florida Legislature as part of the state’s s cal year 2013-14 budget. The funding for the Marine Street Stormwater Retrot Project is allocated by the district through its Surface Water Improvement and Management program. Courtney Millender, Carrabelle city administra tor, said the project would alleviate ponding at the Carrabelle Boat Ramp on Marine Street. As a partial match, the city will provide staff hours for the project support including project administration grant man agement, and future op eration and maintenance of the drainage network and treatment facilities. Special to the Times Project Impact, the city of Apala chicola’s afterschool and summer camp program, was recently recog nized by the Florida Department of Education (DOE) as an exemplary program and will be featured in a national report to the federal Depart ment of Education. Funded as a 21st Century Com munity Learning Center (CCLC), Project Impact serves the needs of students and families at two sites in Apalachicola: the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and the Community Municipal Complex Project Impact was visited by a DOE administrative team last summer and was selected from 139 actively participating Flori da 21st CCLC programs. The City of Apalachicola Project Impact program was recommended as exemplary for its overall imple mentation of an effective and impact ful 21st CCLC program, with special attention given to the program’s Project Based Learning (PBL) com ponent and partnerships including student boat building with the Apala chicola Maritime Museum, and the Summer Reading Program in col laboration with the Apalachicola Mu nicipal Library. “Constant communication, en thusiastic and compassionate em ployees, close community ties and a clear-cut focus on student needs are among the key elements making City of Apalachicola Project Impact an exemplary 21st CCLC program spot lighted by the State of Florida,” the report stated. “This 21st CCLC pro gram structure is an impactful one as it is tailored specically to t the resources and capabilities of its loca tion. Students are learning through this program that their small coastal town has a lot to offer, as will they in their budding futures. Program staff and members of the community, busi ness and city ofcials alike, all come together and work well as a cohesive unit to provide the best for the chil dren living in Apalachicola. The Proj ect Impact family stands as a shin ing example to other programs with the attitude ‘if there is a will, there is a way,’ a best practice that can be shared by all aspiring programs.” Time for summer camp registration! Enrollment for Project Impact Camp Funshine: Fizz, Boom, Splash is open. Students from pre-K to eighth grade will be served at the ABC site and pre-K to 12th grade at the city site. The theme of the Summer Read ing Program is “Fizz, Boom, READ” and was developed by the 2014 Sum mer Collaborative Reading Pro gram and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. The focus this year will be on STEM subjects, (Science, Technol ogy, Engineering & Math) with other summer highlights including pottery program, art & crafts, science experi ments, computer technology, chess tournament, sports and several eld trips. The second year of “Boats Rock!” was launched during the April antique boat show. A special basketball and leadership camp will also be offered. The sum mer performing arts program will feature video production with a lm premiere at the end of the summer. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays begin ning June 9 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week. Credit recovery classes will be offered at the City Site Monday to Thursday during program hours. Enrollment may be limited. The summer program is provided free of charge. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Families may enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city sites or online at pro jectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 370-0145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learn ing Centers grant program spon sored by the City of Apalachicola. Bay Community School hosts art show Friday Bay Community School, a community based pre-school in Apalachicola, is hosting its Art Show and Silent Auction this Friday, May 23 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts Center, on Water Street. All the artwork is done by the children. Come and have dinner prepared by Tamara’s Caf and have fun while supporting a great cause. Tickets are $20/person for dinner and drinks. Bay Community School is also looking for community sponsors to help supplement the cost for the event. Individual and/or business sponsorships are $100 and include a dinner ticket and you will be recognized at the event and on our website, www.baycommunityschool.com Founded in 1996, Bay Community School has provided quality childcare and pre-school services to children ages 2 to 5. Located at 269 Fred Meyer St. in Apalachicola, it is not-for-prot center that meets the needs of a diverse population of families in Franklin County. Proceeds from this event help cover the basic costs of running the school. Putt-Masters tourney set for May 31 May 31 marks the fourth annual Putt-Masters Tournament, the signature fundraiser that benets the Franklin County Public Library. Some 20 plus businesses, groups, and individuals sponsor four-person teams, which tee off at noon and play throughout the afternoon. After the tourney ends at 5 p.m., there will be a ceremony to see who will take home Green Champ caps and a beautiful trophy. The competition is serious for some. Many returning teams have improved their “putt” over the years. Others just play for fun and enjoy good food, drink, and the company of friends. The Red Pirate Family Grill and Oyster Bar in Eastpoint hosts the event, where owners Shirley and Jimmy Sapp provide a beautiful 18-hole course with a water feature for an entire afternoon of putting fun! Players, fans, and library supporters can quench their thirst and enjoy delicious food while having fun and raising money for our library. Various levels of sponsorship are available. If you would like to participate or volunteer, contact your library branch to reach a Friend of the Franklin County Public Library. In Carrabelle call 697-2366 or in Eastpoint call 670-8151, or contact Anna Carmichael, (850) 273-1174, anna. carmichael@yahoo.com The library is a vital county resource. The services provided are free, but funding is limited. The Friends of Franklin County Public Library is proud to help fund both the Carrabelle and Eastpoint branches of our public library system. Without help from businesses and individuals throughout the community and their participation in our efforts, this would not be possible. Books, e-books, games, CDs, DVDs, audio-books, free Wi-Fi, computers and computer classes, youth programs are just a few of the services you will nd at your public library. Go visit your local branch to see what’s happening, you will be proud as well. Guardian Ad Litem ofces moving In a recent meeting Debra Moore, Guardian Ad Litem circuit director, informed Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce that the supervision for the Guardian Ad Litem (GAL) program will be switching to Panama City from Tallahassee. She also said GAL would comply with the county commission’s request for a 2 percent reduction in its budget request. News BRIEFS Project Impact featured in national report NWFWMD OKs funds for Marine Street retrotPHOt T O cC OUrtes RTES Y C it IT Y O f F C arrabelle ARRABELLE Ponding of storm water is a problem at the south end of Marine Street in Carrabelle.

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A18 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 94742T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2012-CA-00248 DIVISION: GENERAL SFR VENTURE 2011-1 REO, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MYDDELTON/PARKER BUILDERS, L.L.C., et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of Court of FRANKLIN County, will on the 4th day of June, 2014, at 11:00 A.M. EST on the 2nd Floor Lobby which faces Highway 98 at The Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in FRANKLIN, Florida: LOT 142 SUMMERCAMP WEST PHASE 1 A & B, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 26 THROUGH 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Case No. 2012-CA-00248 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, the style of which is indicated above. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on April 8, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act** If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850)577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 15, 22, 2014 94962T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2013-CA-000243 PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, PLAINTIFF vs. MELANIE B. STAGGS, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELANIE B. STAGGS, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, TENANT #1 AND TENANT #2, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS.HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 29, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA000243 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Melanie B. Staggs and The Unknown Spouse of Melanie B. Staggs aka Travis O’Neal, are Defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 on the 17th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 57, UNIT I LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 471.89 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 738.17 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 470.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 1033.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY 295.64 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ANOTHER 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 20.08 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 267.75 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 121.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 234.26 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 214.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS A 2003 MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS CMHGA4210229271A AND GMHGA4210229271B AND TITLE NUMBERS 0087016192 AND 0087016380. A/K/A 1900 BEACON ST CARRABELLE FL 32322-3061 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 1st day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com AC -018517F01 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850) 6539339. May 15, 22, 2014 95018T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2010-CA-000403 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD M. WILLIAMS, ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AND ANY SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, INTEREST OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC.;, GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed July 3, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000403 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 12th day of June, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 19, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of April, 2014. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court Terry Segree Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. May 22, 29, 2014 98917T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-000355-CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN E. SYSKA, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRIAN E. SYSKA; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRIAN E. SYSKA Whose residence(s) is/are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 213, THE RESIDENCES AT ST. JAMES BAY CONDO-

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Times | A19 850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518778 1124924 Associate Director of Resource Development / Grant WriterThe primary function of this position will be to research grant opportunities through various mediums and be able to successfully write grants and implement new programs identifying potential public and private funding sources to support institutional priorities. Incumbent will be responsible for coordinating the work of proposal development teams, preparing and submitting proposals, and communicating with funding agencies by the targeted grants. Incumbent must have strong grant writing experience, excellent oral and written communication skills, computer skills, and have the ability to work exible hours, including coverage demands due to training periods and equipment problems. Incumbent must also be able to demonstrate strong organizational, planning, and budgeting skills, and be able to travel both locally, and out of town on College business and training. Minimum Quali cations: Master's Degree in related eld Salary range begins at: $46,818.00 **Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.eduAdditional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. 1124922 Respiratory Therapy Program Coordinator IIIThe Coordinator of the Respiratory Care program is responsible for all aspects of the program, including the organization, administration, continuous review, planning, development, and general e ectiveness of the program.Minimum Quali cations: Bachelors degree required; must be credentialed as a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) eligible for FL license; 4 years teaching experience in an accredited program; 5 years acute care experience as a Respiratory Therapist. Salary: Commensurate with education and experience Deadline to apply: Open until lled**Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resource s, 5230 W. U.S. Hig hway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the perso n to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. Susie’s Cleaning Service 20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! MINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 889, PAGE 227, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 336191328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at FRANKLIN County this 25th day of March, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Michele Maxwell By: Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 15, 22, 2014 98949T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, APALACHICOLA OYSTER WORKS, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 436 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: Lot 6 Block 5 Carrabelle River Sub. Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 24-07s05w018000050 060 Name is which assessed: James Capagna All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98947T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON OR MARGIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 51 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: Tract 36 Being 1.01 AC Tarpon Shores Unit 3 Full Legal Description can be viewed in the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 19-08s-06w-6400-00000360 Name is which assessed: Stephen & Ivy Nall All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JULY 2014, which is the 7th day of JULY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 9th day of MAY, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 2014 98977T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000420-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual; unknown spouse of SID GRAY a/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY; SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to that certain Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 29, 2014, and entered in Case No. 12-000420CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B SKIPPER ROAD REALESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and SID GRAYa/k/a SIDNEYE. GRAY, an individual, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on June 12, 2014, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: EXHIBIT “A ” LEGAL DESCRIP TION PARCELNO. 1 COMMENCE ATA CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE NORTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST1208.45 FEET THE EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER FOR THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINTOF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST1208.45 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 2553.48 FEETTO A ROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST590.12 FEET TO AROD AND CAP, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST76.20 FEETTO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST580.27 FEETTO APOST MARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST1250.72 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVER’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 63 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST94.17 FEET, THENCE NORTH 47 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST55.41 FEET, THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST51.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST47.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST52.04 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST150.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST242.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST294.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST484.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST77.51 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND ALSO: PARCELNO. 2: BEGIN ATA4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WESTFRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH (BEAR-ING BASE ASSUMED) ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARYOF THE SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER 1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1304.44 FEET TO EASTERLYEDGE OR SHORE LINE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY, SOUTHERLYAND SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER THE FOLLOWING COURSES, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST18.52 FEET, SOUTH 21 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST189.35 FEET, SOUTH 04 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 61.96 FEET, SOUTH 42 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST69.88 FEET, SOUTH 47 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST113.83 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 168.42 FEET, SOUTH 26 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST77.36 FEET, SOUTH 13 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST99.67 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 123.55 FEET, SOUTH 38 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST130.25 FEET, SOUTH 31 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST118.68 FEET, SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 172.84 FEETTO AN OLD CAR AXLE MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLYEDGE OF SAID CROOKED RIVER AND THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EASTALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 854.04 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCELNO. 2 MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED BYARECENTSURVEYPRODUCED BYEDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY22, 2002 BEARING JOB NO. 02-009 (PSC 20867), AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE ATA POSTMARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST1175.72 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVER’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST135.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVER’S EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. (NOTE: THE PLATOF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, NOW COVERS APORTION OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS 1 AND 2. THE PLAT WAS CONSENTED TO BYTHE FORECLOSING LENDER. LOTS 1, 5 AND 6 HAVE BEEN CONVEYED TO SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, A FLORIDALIMITED LIABILITYCOMPANY BYVIRTUE OF (3) QUIT-CLAIM DEEDS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 962, PAGES 693, 695 AND 697, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THESE 3 LOTS HAVE NOTBEEN RELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED.) LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 753, PAGE 364, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDAS, TO WIT: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVER’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVER’S EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 854, PAGE 786, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 3 AND 8, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 966, PAGE 436, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: LOTS 2, 4 AND 7, CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ACCOR-DING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: LANDS IN PARTIAL RELEASE OF MORTGAGE(S) RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1100, PAGE(S) 547 AND 550, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO WIT: COMMENCE ATTHE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST85.59 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 448.90 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1329.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST715.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST1294.83 FEETTO THE EASTERLYEDGE OF CROOKED RIVER, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIVER’S EDGE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 22 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST134.25 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST101.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST21.31 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST26.90 FEETTHENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST136.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST86.52 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST176.46 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 24 MIN-UTES 38 SECONDS EAST 121.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST64.71 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST266.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST97.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST113.40 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVER’S EDGE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST852.62 FEETTO THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER FOR THE SOUTHWESTQUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST580.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 07 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST76.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST590.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST149.77 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL3: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LANDS SOLD BYVIRTUE OF QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 941, PAGE 109 AND QUIT-CLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 984, PAGE 154, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THIS LAND LIES WITHIN PARCELS 1 AND 2 ABOVE. THIS LAND WAS NOTRELEASED FROM THE LIEN OF THE MORTGAGE TO BE FORECLOSED. THIS LAND WAS CONVEYED TO CENTENNIALBANK BYVIRTUE OF A DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 1044, PAGE 99. SAID DEED DOES NOTNECESSARILY CONSTITUTE A MERGER OF TITLE: BEGIN ATTHE NORTHWESTCORNER OF LOT3 OF CROOKED RIVER PLANTATION, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 ATPAGE 30 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST322.93 FEETTO APOINTLYING ON THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF CROOKED RIVER NORTH 31 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 70.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE EDGE OF RIVER RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST399.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 60 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST41.34 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST103.74 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH Borrowers’interest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses, benefits and proceeds of Borrowers’interest therein. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 9th day of May, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL& ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNLCenter II, 7th Floor Orlando, Florida 32801 Phone: 407-896-2224 Fax: 407-835-3596 May 22, 29, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish.j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. East Point Corner of Hickory Dip and 184 Daisey St. Sat. May 24th 8a-12p Estate Sale Camo Bedroom Suite, Dining Room Table, and Lots Of Household Items! Text FL89784 to 56654 Port St. Joe 306 Reid Ave Sat. May 24th 8a-Until Over Stock Sale Bay Breeze Antiques Come Get Some Bargains Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL83066 to 56554 Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34287911 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers Bussers BLUE PARROT NOW HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34287017 Install/Maint/Repair Cleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sunday’s. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL84167 to 56654 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL89857 to 56654 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 Chevy Celebrity 1986, 4 door, Gray, 70k mi, 1 Owner, $2200, 850-653-2577 Mako 258WAC FG Hard Top, Cobia Tower, Alum. Trailer, No Motor, $7000 850-832-7995 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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Local A20 | The Times Thursday, May 22, 2014 Ou r lo ca l re al es ta te ex pe rt s ha ve id en ti ed wh at th ey fe el ar e th e bes t va lu es ar ou nd an d ar e of fe ri ng th em to yo u in Re al Es ta te Pi ck s! Di sc ov er th e bes t re al es ta te va lu es in Me xi co Be ac h, Po rt St Jo e, Ap al ac hi co la Ca pe Sa n Bl as St Ge or ge Is la nd Ca rr ab el le an d su rr ou nd in g ar ea s. Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times To day (850) 653 -8868 YO UR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 12 0 YEARS YO UR HOMET OWN NEW SP APER FOR MORE THAN 1 20 YEARS TH E T IME S & C arrabelle A palachic ola Advertise Her e Re al Es ta te Pi cks MLS 248897 ST .G EORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 “P ositiv eS pace ” -I mmac ula te ly main tained cu st om home designed by ar chit ec tL ar ry Bu rk eo n ao ne acr el andsc aped lot in pr estigious St .G eor ge Pl an ta tion! Th is one ow ner home is beautifully furnished and fe at ur es Gu lf views acr oss the en tir es outhern wa ll of the house .T he sp ac io us mas te r suit et ota ll yo cc upies the 2nd oor with easy ac ce ss to the laundr yr oo mf ro mt he bedr oom. Bo th guest bedr ooms ha ve priv ate ba ths and the “d en ”c an ser ve as a4 th be dr oo mw ith ah alf ba th or oc e / cr af tr oom .B eautiful full por ches for easy en te rt aining and enjo ying the Gu lf view .T hi sh ome also has ag as r eplac ea nd oak oors thr oughout the living/din ing ar eas .S qua re foo tage ,a cr eage and lot dimensions ar et ak en fr om Co un ty Pr oper ty Ap pr aiser ’s we bsit e. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-1 971 ww w. st ev esisland .com www .P o si t iv eS paceH ome .com REDUCED 29,000 $ ))" %1 .'( &2 $ "$ ) 2(1/ $&.$'1( -2$/1& 2 % !( 11 % /1 2 ( $ & (1 / $ /( $ $* ( $ ($ % (' 2 % $ !. / ( / / ( %' / / / Joh nS he lby ,B roker 80 0-3 44-757 0 85 0-9 27-477 7 ww w. sg ireal ty .c om MLS# 251282 $1,150,000 St. George Island PL AN TAT IO NB EA CH FR ON T Cu st om ho me in Th eB lu ff sp ro te ct ed by du ne sb ut st ill Gr ea tG ul fv ie w, ki tc he nw it h re pl ac e, de ck sg al or e, 3B R, 3 BA ,d um bw ai te r, 2nd li vin ga re a, scr ee np or ch sh cle an in gs ink ,o ut do or sh ow er ,c om mu ni ty POO Li na pa rk li ke se tt in g, Ca no py La ne Joh nS he lby ,B roker 80 0-3 44-757 0 85 0-9 27-477 7 ww w. sg ireal ty .c om ML S# 25 07 38 $13 9, 000 St .G eo rg eI sl an d IN CR ED IB LE GU LF VIE WL OT Lo ok in go ve r&a ro un ds ma ll gr ou nd le ve lh ou ses to wa rd th es ou th ea st is th eG UL F, 1/ 3a cr e, 2n dt ie rl ot ,a dd it io na l l ld ir tn ot re qu ir ed ,r ec en tc om pa ra bl es al ea t$ 13 6, 000 ri gh to nt he bi ke pa th ,q ui ck ac ce ss to th eb ea ch bo ar dw al k, We st Gu lf Bea ch Dr iv e 4518798 Th is cu st om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia Ba yg at ed co mmunit y. Su nr oom, scr eened &o pen por ches ,h ot tub o MBR suit e, lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho we ra nd gar den tub detached gar age ,g as r eplac e, gr anit ec oun te rt ops ,s tainless ki tc hen, wine co oler ,b uilt-in co rner ca binets .A menities include co mmunit y dock ,p ool ,t ennis co ur ts .M ain living ar ea &m ast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs fo rp riv ac yw /p riv ate por ch. Sh immering Sa nds Re alty STE VE HARRIS Ce ll: 850-890-19 71 st ev e@st ev esisland .com www .288m agnol iaba yd r. com ww w. st ev esislan d. com 29,000 $ ))" ,# ) ) & $ $ 1 ( $1/ & 2 #! / -( / 2( / $2 (( 2 .( / ( $ &. / (& ( (% ($ $ 0/ / ( / .$ / $ 11 ( $ ( / &1 ($ & 0 ( '$ $ /( ($ $ 1$ &. /& 1 $ $ $ 1$ 2 ( & 1 '( & 2 1/ -. / % /1 / % 0& $ ( / &$ ( ( $ $ $ '( &0 $ 11 1$' & $ (' $& ( “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose mom used to send letters to army superiors saying her son should be a general? Eisenhower, Pershing, MacArthur, Westmoreland 2) Statistically what are the most dangerous animals/creatues in the U.S. as to causing human deaths? Deer, Bees, Snakes, Dogs 3) Who explained to Jefferson, “We pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it”? Washington, Franklin, Hancock, Webster 4) In 2007 who became the rst female Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives? Johnson, Walsh, Byrd, Pelosi 5) The world’s oldest sheep died in England (1989) a week before its which birthday? 17th, 23rd, 29th, 32nd 6) What is Jacqueline Gagne famed for hitting? Paparazzi, Softball homeruns, Hole-in-ones, 3-pointers 7) Which state has had the only Congressman (Matthew Lyon) to be jailed for criticizing the president? Georgia, Maine, Ohio, Vermont 8) Who acted under the name of Ariztid Olt during his career’s early days? Bela Lugosi, Johnny Depp, George Clooney, Will Smith 9) Whose president was the rst person to drive over the speed limit in a hydrogen powered car? France, Iceland, Germany, USA 10) Which has no blood supply and takes its oxygen directly from the air? Eardrum, Finger/toe nails, Cornea, Eyebrow 11) About what percentage of America’s pet dogs are overweight? 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% 12) BMW, famous for its cars, started out making what in 1923? Watches, Guns, Soaps, Motorcycles 13) When did Elvis Presley buy his Graceland estate? 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963 14) What is Taipei 101? Car, Fish, Building, Stadium ANSWERS 1) MacArthur. 2) Deer. 3) Washington. 4) Pelosi. 5) 29th. 6) Hole-in-ones. 7) Vermont. 8) Bela Lugosi. 9) Iceland. 10) Cornea. 11) 40%. 12) Motorcycles. 13) 1957. 14) Building. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Rescue mission for island cat castaways There will be an organizational meeting for the St. George Island Cat Allies Trap/Neuter/Release Group on Saturday, May 31 at 3 p.m. at the St. George Island Methodist Church, 201 East Gulf Beach Drive. For more information, call Helen Gore at 323-0123. Commission orders maintenance for SGI shing pier At Tuesday’s meeting, county commissioners unanimously voted to earmark up to $6,000 for the re-staining and maintenance of the handicap entrance ramp to the St. George Island Fishing Pier, and up to $6,000 for the staining and maintenance of the recently re-constructed section of shing pier. Both projects will come out of the St. George Island Bridge Maintenance Fund.. County Planner Alan Pierce said the projects are necessary to maintain the wooden structures exposed to the sun and salt air. He said the newly constructed portion would be refurbished rst. He said that work on the pier had been postponed due to wet weather. Simpler Built wins visitor center bid At Tuesday’s meeting, county commissioners voted to award a bid for renovation of the old state highway patrol building in Eastpoint to Simpler Built of Tallahassee for their bid of $65,657. Commissioner Noah Lockley opposed the decision. R.W. Thomas Construction of Eastpoint submitted a bid of $75,000. Lockley asked if the county had approached R.W. Thomas to negotiate his fee. The commissioner said he would prefer a local contractor do the work. Chairman Cheryl Sanders said the county needed to observe normal business practices when processing bids to avoid the appearance of unfairness. Benson awarded HVAC contract At the recommendation of architect Warren Emo, on Tuesday, county commissioners voted unanimously to award a contract to replace the north HVAC unit on the main courthouse to Benson’s Heating and Air Conditioning Inc., of Tallahassee. The replacement will be paid for out of the courthouse maintenance fund. NEW sS briBRI E fsFS