The Apalachicola times

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00269

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, May 8, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The 24-year-old Carrabelle woman whose drunk driving led to a crash two years ago that killed one of her passengers was sentenced last week to more than 10 years in state prison. At an emotional hearing April 30 before Circuit Judge George Reynolds, Rebecca Ann Padowitz, 24, was given 125.4 months in state prison, with credit for 432 days spent in the county jail since the April 17, 2012, death of Rona Lavon Hawkins, 28, of Sopchoppy. It was Padowitzs 22nd birthday. Padowitz also received three years probation and was ordered to pay a $2,550 ne and $250 in attorneys fees for the DUI-manslaughter count on which she was convicted March 13 by a jury of four men and two women. Hawkins died at the scene of the one-car crash after his 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee, driven by Padowitz, spun out of control on U.S. 98 about 1.6 miles west of Lake Morality Road and about 0.8 miles east of the city of Carrabelle. Hawkins, son of Sopchoppy mayor Colleen Skipper, was a star linebacker at Lincoln High School, from which he graduated in 2002. Skipper did not attend the sentencing hearing, although a letter she wrote was read aloud to the court by Hawkins sister.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com After a week of rainy weather, the sun came out on Saturday and smiled on the 22nd annual Historic Apalachicola Home and Garden Tour. Organizers said they believe they lost a number of visitors from areas west of Panama City because of the impact of severe storms earlier in the week, including two groups from Pensacola that canceled ticket reservations. All told, about 700 visitors took in this years tour, which organizer Susan Clementson said was in line with the numbers attracted in 2012 and 2013. Almost 250 lunches were served by the ladies of Trinity Episcopal Church, which sponsors the tour. With some yards temporarily converted to lakefront property, tour organizers took a proactive approach to damage control and distributed disposable booties to homeowners to encase damp footwear. Pam Richardson went even further at her Ninth Street cottage and created brick steppingstones the morning of the event to provide guests with a waterless walkway. There was a bright side to the unusually wet spring. Lawns and gardens were sparkling fresh and beautifully green. The temperature was also perfect for walking and biking around town, and stormy days had swept the air clean of seasonal pollen. The Whiteside Wheatley house was the featured home on this years tour. Briana Wheatley, originally from Brownsworth to leave WeemsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Weems Memorial Hospital CEO Ray Brownsworth told county commissioners Tuesday morning he would be leaving his post July 18, as he and his family plan to move back to Iowa. Brownsworth, who stabilized the hospitals often tumultuous fortunes in the 20 months he has been at the helm, said he has accepted the chief executive of cer position at a hospital of comparable size in southeastern Iowa. He said his decision was motivated in part by his familys desire to be closer to his 19and 20-year-old daughters, as well as his wife, Loris, parents. The family circle in Apalachicola also includes daughter Sarah and sons Luke and Adam Hames. 2014Election season starts to heat upBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com With petitions due back in the Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliotts of ce by May 19, a handful of candidates have signaled their intent to run on the Nov. 4 elections. The county commission and school board seats are up for grabs in District 2, the easternmost district encompassing from the portions of Carrabelle, Lanark Village and Alligator Point, and in District 4, which is the westernmost district, mainly the historic district of Apalachicola. Both incumbents in District 2 County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and School Board Member David Hinton have signaled their intent to recapture their seats, a process that enables them to fundraise. In District 4, neither incumbent REBECCA PADOWITZ RONA HAWKINS RAY BROWNSWORTHDrunk driver in fatality given 10 yearsVOL. 129 ISSUE 2 See WEEMS A3 See ELECTION A3 HISTORIC APALACHICOLA HOME AND GARDEN TOURPHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesA grouping of shade tolerant plants adds major curb appeal to the Seventh Street cottage of Gary Joiner and Butch Rowell. Below, the former Ronat Sangaree house has an open feel and loads of light. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . . A11April showers bring home tour owersSee DRIVER A3 See HOME A5Quick on the draw, A2 Butts and Clucks Saturday bene ts WeemsThe annual Butts and Clucks Cook-off by the Bay this Saturday, May 10, sponsored by the Weems Healthcare Foundation, will feature friendly competition among at least eight teams in Battery Park in Apalachicola over who makes the best chicken and pork. Pork dinners and sandwiches go on sale at 11 a.m., and the live auction, conducted by Harry Arnold and Chuck Spicer, will begin at 1 p.m. Seahawks to scrimmage SaturdayThe 2014 Red vs. Black game will be the featured attraction this Saturday, May 10 at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex. Friends and families of the varsity football team are invited to watch the intramural game, meet the coaches and players, eat lunch and support the team. A minimum donation of $5 to attend the days activities includes lunch of a hamburger, hot dog or pulled pork sandwich, drink and chips. Full moon climb at lighthouse WednesdayThe May Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, May 14. The Sunset Climb is 8-9:30 p.m. and includes light hors doeuvres and sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:25 p.m., and the moon will rise at 8:31 p.m. After sunset, people may climb to the top of the lighthouse, at a cost of $10 for the general public and $5 for association members. For more information, call 927-7745.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 CouponExpires:5-30-14CODE:AP00 TRANSPORTATIONPLANNINGMEETING (THEPUBLICISINVITED)Bay,Gulf,Holmes,andWashingtonRegionalTransportationPartnership Monday,May12th,2014at10:00a.m.CDT WashingtonCountyAdministrativeBldg. 1331SouthBlvd.Chipley,FL Memberswill: RearmOcers DiscussTransportationRegionalIncentiveProgram(TRIP) Hearpubliccomment DirectquestionsorcommentstoBrianYoupato at850-332-7976Ext.224,orbrian.youpato@wfrpc.org. Stawillmakereasonableaccommodationsforaccesstomeetingsinaccordancewiththe AmericanswithDisabilitiesActandforlanguagerequirementsotherthanEnglish.Please notifyMs.BrittanyEllersofaccessorlanguagerequirementsat850-332-7976Ext.220 atleast48hoursinadvance. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Eastpoints Millender Park was the scenic ground zero for both budding and seasoned painters Saturday, as the Forgotten Coasts Great Plein Air Paint-Out held its Quickdraw event. Once the horn blew at 10 a.m., 70 competitors, 21 of them invited participants from among the visiting plein air artists, busied themselves with capturing everything from the gnarled stumps that line the water front to the stately trees that grace the park. Two hours later on the sunny and dry morning, the horn sounded again, and the painters placed their easels in a circle in the cen ter of the park. Judge Robert Sten stream, who owns an Ocala gallery specializing in 19th and 20th century Ameri can and European art, then slowly circled the drying works to make his choices for First Place Overall, Best Emerging Artist and three Honorable Mentions. Winning $50 each for be ing among the Honorable Mentions were three of the invited artists: Lori Put nam, from Charlotte, Tenn., Luke Buck, from Nineveh, Ind., and Greg LaRock, from Newport Beach, Calif. Receiving $75 as Best Emerging Artist, selected from among the ranks of the artists who are not part of the plein air paint-out, was Natalia Andreeva, from Tallahassee, who painted the band that performed under the pavilion, Up Close and In Person, fea turing KT and Mexico Joe. Andreeva was a participant in the 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013 Forgotten Coast Great Plein Air Paint-Outs. Taking home First Place Overall, and $100, was in vited artist Leon Holmes, originally from Perth, Aus tralia, and now living in Mu nich, Germany. It has a very painterly quality to it, with good color harmonies, Stenstream said. It sort of pops out. The judge had high praise for the many works he examined. The qual ity of the art is fantastic, he said. Lots of good artists, both invited and non-invited. Stenstream said he paid attention to the combina tion of color, composition, simplicity and design. In some, what gets to be the main factor is Does this come off the canvas and hit you? he said. Overall the work is very good. Winning pieces were moved to a special display area in the Wetroom at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. See www.pleinair.com for schedules and addition al information. PLEIN AIR Pa AINTOUT WRapAPS UpP SSUNDaA Y The Forgotten Coasts Great Plein Air Paint-Out continues through this weekend. On Friday, May 9, an artists roundtable discussion Art As A Window will be from 2-4 p.m. in the wet room at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. From 2-4 p.m. on Friday, May 9, and from 9-11 a.m. on Saturday, May 10, there will be artists demonstrations at Apalachicolas Riverfront Park. On Saturday, May 10, the Grand Patrons Party will be held in the wet room at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art from 6-10 p.m. Meet the artists, view and purchase their works. Debut of Artists Choice painting. $40 per ticket. On Sunday, May 11, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, will be Art In The Afternoon This is the nal exhibit and sale, and will feature family entertainment, childrens art activities and more. pP HOTOS BY DD AVID ID ADLERSTEIN DLERSTEIN | The TimesAt left, Invited plein air artist Mitch Kolbe paints the waterfront. At right, Invited plein air painter Greg LaRock took an Honorable Mention.Millender Parks Quickdraw taps the turpentineInvited plein air artist Leon Holmes took rst place at the Quickdraw. Emerging plein air artist Lynette Miesen, from Niceville, paints what she sees.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, May 8, 2014 HappyGraduation! Happy Graduation! In the letter, Skipper did not refer to Padowitz or express a view on a possible sentence. She wrote that she at rst kept thinking her son had only been injured, but once she learned the terrible news, she has struggled with coping with the devastating loss. She said the family, which includes Hawkins 10-yearold daughter, has searched for answers as to what happened that fateful night, and that though she did not want to endure a trial, Skipper said it has enabled her to nd some solace in learning what happened. Padowitzs attorney, Brian Hill of Port St. Joe, who was assigned the case as conict counsel, had led a motion to have Reynolds apply the non-binding recommendation of ve years in prison and ve years probation that was made by the pre-sentence investigator. Reynolds chose not to go with a downward departure from the lengthier sentence, which was much closer to the maximum of 15 years Padowitz could have received. Informed sources say Padowitz had declined a plea agreement of four years offered by the states attorneys ofce and instead opted to go to trial. In a tearful statement before the judge, she said, I stand here today with the highest respect, your honor, also with faith, faith that God has put in your heart to have mercy on me. One life has tragically been lost, a nightmare that wakes me every day, Padowitz said. I just want to say Im so truly sorry for what happened two years ago, the 17th of April, a day that was a celebration of my life but also a day that took another. I cant change what happened that day, which took my best friends life and almost mine. I miss him so much, and I know that pain will never go away, and now Im faced with losing not only my life, but being a leader, role model and mother for my sweet baby girl, whom I hurt every day by being gone. Words cant explain how much remorse I truly have about the whole situation, she wrote, noting that upon her release, she planned to move to South Florida and live with her aunt, Janice Simpson, who is the twin sister of Padowitzs mother. I realize that Im going to have to work twice as hard to make up the years I wasted making the wrong decisions, she wrote. I want to be someone my daughter can look up to and respect. I plan to start by making the choice to relocate where jobs, schools and public transportation are abundant. Since Ive been incarcerated, Ive had a lot of time to think about who I was, who I am today and who I want to become, although I feel like Ive grown both in terms of humility and my understanding of how my choices affect those around me, Padowitz said. I realize I still have a lot to learn, and now all I can do is beg the courts to please have leniency on my sentencing today. On April 24, Padowitz wrote a letter to Reynolds asking for a 72-hour furlough from county jail so she could visit her 4-yearold daughter and the rest of her family from Michigan and South Florida before going off to state prison, but that request was denied. Simpson wrote Reynolds a March 18 letter of support describing her niece as a very sweet girl that has made some horrible mistakes in her young life. She described her as as young mother who could still be a productive member of society, once she pays her debt to society. Simpson also expressed her pain for the victims family. I can only imagine her (Hawkins mother) suffering, she wrote. I do hope that she is able to nd peace. The judge also received a letter from Jessica Meloche, who described her sister as one of the most generous and loyal people Ive ever met. She loves her friends and family ercely and both completely, oftentimes at her own peril. Meloche said Padowitz is not without faults. She has poor judgment and wasnt properly equipped to face the challenges that come along with adulthood, she wrote. She has so much to offer this world and I feel that justice would be served by giving a good person who did a terrible thing the chance to redeem herself by submitting to Gods will and having her to be a functioning member of society. No good can be done by allowing a young woman with so much potential to be locked away in an environment where that potential can never be realized. Padowitzs father, Glenn, wrote a lengthy April 24 letter to Reynolds, in which he recounted his years living in Franklin County and becoming a rst responder and then after training at Gulf Coast State College, an emergency medical technician with the ambulance service, handling hundreds of calls per year. In seven years with the Carrabelle Fire Department, I have been responsible for saving several lives, and even brought back a few of my neighbors from death, and I returned them to their families, he wrote. Glenn Padowitz said he had worked several motor vehicle accidents in that same place where the accident occurred. It is a dangerous curve with no shoulder and a four-to-six inch drop off the asphalt, causing cars to pull hard off the road, forcing the driver to overcorrect, ending up in the same place Becky died, with cars and trucks overturned. He said his daughter had received two fractured vertebra in her middle back from the crash and fractured her upper bone in her right arm in several places. These are injuries that would continue to give her pain and paralysis for the rest of her life, Padowitzs father wrote. The Padowitzes have been caring for their granddaughter, with whom they share custody with the girls father. He appealed for leniency. Please dont make (the granddaughter), Beckys mother and I live without our loved ones, he wrote. I cant see how the law sees this in (the granddaughters) best interest. I had to evaluate what Im doing with the next 12 years of my life, said Brownsworth, 56. I decided that the investment in my children was the most important thing. We like it down here, he said, We like the area, we like the people, we like the hospital. Its a tough decision thinking about moving back. An Oklahoma native, Brownsworth began as Weems CEO on Oct 8, 2012, after moving here from Sigourney, Iowa, where he had worked as a hospital administrator. Im proud of where the hospital is today, he said in an interview Tuesday afternoon. Were more nancially stable than we were 20 months ago when I rst started, and cash ows better. Brownsworth said he is hoping by the time he leaves in mid-July, Weems will have submitted an application to the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a $10.25 million loan to go toward renovations and additions to the existing hospital, rst built in 1959. Included with that application will be an opinion letter from the BKD consulting rm as to the feasibility of the project, he said. The community can no longer just accept the existing facility, he said. Theyre going to have to have a new, renovated facility for the future, and thats because of changes with regulations as well as changes as to how health care is provided. With almost three-quarters of the hospitals revenues coming from the emergency room and outpatient services, Brownsworth said the revamped facility will be limited to fewer than a dozen beds, half the number there are today. Each will be private, with its own rest room and shower area. Its a balance of new inpatient and outpatient areas, he said. The trend is away from inpatient care, but you need inpatient options locally for those with inpatient needs. Many people dont want to travel 25 miles. At Tuesdays meeting, Brownsworth was anked by the hospitals new chief nancial ofcer, John Graham, who began at his fulltime post April 21. Graham has said he is not interested in the CEO post, Brownsworth said, but has recommended some possible names to put into the mix of candidates to be vetted as possible candidates by Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, which is conducting the search. TMH is assisting in the search, but the decision is made locally, Brownsworth said. Ill assist in any way I can, helping to vet candidates, and the board will make the decision. County Commissioner Smokey Parish and School Board Member Jimmy Gander has formally indicated they plan to seek re-election, although there is plenty of time for them enter the race. The ofcial qualifying period isnt until next month, when it begins at noon June 16 and runs to noon June 20. Sanders, of P.O. Box 641 in Carrabelle, is the lone Democrat to le a letter of intent for the District 2 county commission seat. Two Republicans have led, and if they qualify, they will square off in the Aug. 26 primary. They are Mark Nobles, of 10-5 West Pine St. in Lanark Village, and William Snyder, of 2332 Enabob St., in Carrabelle. Hinton, of 112 Hinton St. in Carrabelle, plans to run for re-election in the nonpartisan race for District 2 school board member. He is being challenged by Wilburn Ray Messer, of P.O. Box 482 in Carrabelle. In his candidate ling, Hinton has loaned his campaign $1,000 with which to fund his campaign. In the District 4 school board race, Stacy Kirvin, of 142 Deer Patch Road in Apalachicola, has led his letter of intent and has listed his own $100 contribution to open his campaign account. No candidates have surfaced in the District 4 county commission race, as of press time. In addition to a list of statewide ballot measures, Franklin County voters will have before them a choice for congressman, between incumbent Republican Steve Southerland and Democratic challenger Gwen Graham. Luther Lee also is running as a write-in candidate, without party afliation. In the race for state representative in District 7, which encompasses all of Franklin County, incumbent Republican Halsey Beshears has signaled his desire to seek re-election, with no challengers having as yet surfaced. Seven incumbent circuit court judges have all led for re-election: Charles Dodson, Kevin J. Carroll, Frank E. Shefeld, John C. Cooper, Martin A. Fitzpatrick, Charles A. Francis and Angela C. Dempsey. Although several Democrats and Republicans are running in the primary, Gov. Rick Scott and Democratic challenger Charlie Crist are expected to breeze through the primary and square off in November. Two Democrats, George H. Sheldon and Perry E. Thurston, are vying in the primary for the right to challenge incumbent Republican attorney general Pam Bondi. Democrat William Rankin is expected to challenge Republican Chief Financial Ofcer Jeff Atwater in the general election, and Democrat Thaddeus Thad Hamilton is running to unseat Republican Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam. To vote in the primary, voters must be registered by July 28. To vote in the Nov. 4 general election, all registrations must be in by Oct. 6. Early voting for the primary runs Aug. 11-23, and for the general election, Oct. 20 to Nov. 1. DRIVER from page A1 WEEMS from page A1 ELECTION from page A1Im proud of where the hospital is today. Were more nancially stable than we were 20 months ago when I rst started, and cash ows better.Ray Brownsworth CEO, Weems Memorial Hospital One life has tragically been lost, a nightmare that wakes me every day. I cant change what happened that day, which took my best friends life and almost mine. I miss him so much, and I know that pain will never go away, and now Im faced with losing not only my life, but being a leader, role model and mother for my sweet baby girl, whom I hurt every day by being gone.Rebecca Ann Padowitz News brBRIEFFrom Staff ReportsPower lines damaged at Kendrick ParkCounty law enforcement and the county department of parks and recreation would like information on a large truck that downed power lines at Kendrick Park over the weekend. Nikki Millender, director of parks and recreation, told county commissioners Tuesday a large truck, possibly a logging truck, pulled through the parking lot at Kendrick Park and completely severed two power lines serving the parking lot lights. A third wire was left hanging low. The damage was discovered on Monday, May 5. Millender said power to the lines has been turned off until they can be repaired. She said the existing lines will have to be replaced and is unsure of the cost of repairing the damage. Parks and recreation will install signs at the entrance to the lot, limiting access to single-axle vehicles only. Commission Chair Cheryl Sanders suggested the height of the supporting poles for the new lines be increased. Millender said she will request used poles from Duke Energy. WWW.APALACHTIIMEES.COM

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This is the rst in a series on the Dying American Middle Class, with this new column Arbor Outlook. The landlord wants his moneythe grocery bill is due. from The High Cost of Living by Tim Ausburn If youre an American, chances are pretty darn good that you own a cellphone. Products like cellphones have almost become staple consumer items, even for American families with lower incomes. But cellphone plans for both Mom and Dad and three kids are not inexpensive. Subtract a typical family monthly cellphone bill from the net income of some middle class Americans, and theres not as much left for lifes other necessities as there once was. For many middle class families, storing up retirement savings and contributing to college education plans for children are no longer realistic goals. Studies show that wages began to stagnate in the late 1970s and have not kept pace with the cost of living since. Union power declined. Jobs were outsourced. Our manufacturing base was decimated. And now robotics, the new challenge to full employment in the modern American economy, is taking jobs away from willing workers. More than at any time in our history, the U.S. is becoming a country of haves and have nots, with fewer families in the middle. Much was made of the recent report that Canada, not the U.S., now has the worlds wealthiest middle class. For now, wed settle for a viable middle class. Because without one, the American economy will suffer, and well all feel the nancial impact. Canada hasnt undergone a housing bubble, and our northern neighbors are also enjoying an energy boom. But theres no denying that American middle class purchasing power is on the wane. A fascinating current documentary features an extensive interview with a bedding manufacturer. The manufacturing plant owner makes $10 million annually. But he is concerned about the middle class. Why? As he says, rich folks only sleep on (and therefore only buy) one or two pillows at a time, just like everybody else. He depends on a more populous and prosperous middle class to purchase his products, as do so many manufacturers of goods and services. When average Americans stopped shopping and spending money in the downturn of 2008, it further escalated our national economic nightmare, because consumer spending traditionally represents 70 percent of GDP. Many things have contributed to Chinas rise as an economic power, but one of the biggest factors was the emergence of a middle class that could purchase products made there. China nally has the consumer component of GDP in place. Henry Ford gured this out in 1914 when he raised employee salaries to $5 a day, primarily so that he could create a home-grown market for folks capable of buying the very cars they were building. Next week: Real Wages and In ation Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a feeonly and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. BIDWELL HAS SERVED WITH INTELLIGENCE, COURAGEEditors Note: The following letter was sent this week to members of the Franklin County School Board. At its April meeting, the school board voted unanimously to table the matter of re-hiring Mr. Bidwell as principal and is expected to take it up again at the May 8 meeting. I am extremely disappointed in your decision not to rehire Eric Bidwell as Franklin County School principal for the coming year. While I am sure your decision must be legal, I believe that you have made that decision based on limited information and opinions. I am also reasonably certain that you made your decision without having access to signi cant student performance data, because the results of our annual testing have not yet been released. Finally, I believe that you made your decision without giving the larger community of Franklin County the opportunity to share its opinions and insights with you, and I think that the input that you missed would have been critical to your making a balanced, constructive decision. I believed that with its selection of Mr. Bidwell as its next principal the district had nally moved toward stability and long-term growth, but I fear that your decision is strong evidence that little has changed, and that we must be prepared for another painful period of transition. Mr. Bidwell has served the school, the district, and its communities with intelligence, clarity, and courage. I wish him well. Sincerely,Charles WilkinsonTeacher, Franklin County SchoolHONORED TO LIVE IN A WONDERFUL PLACEIn September, my wife Katie and I will have lived in this wonderful town for two years. They say, You can observe a lot just by watching. Our observation is, being here is just like living in the 50s. We walk downtown almost every day and visit with as many merchants as we can. Weve dined in almost every eatery available. We have our favorites, but I wont editorialize. My wife always remarks how friendly everyone is, and we try to return this kindness whenever we can. The newspaper is a Thursday morning must for us. The Times is far and away ahead of its time (no pun), and its dizzying in the way the editor and his staff do such a fantastic job of covering the news week-after-week. Their motto should be changed to No sooner done than said, (this isnt original, I know). It is a fantastic read, and Katie and I peruse it from front to back with each issue. My favorite is the Sports section and, again, the paper is second to none. We are both retired Katie was an integral part of the Kennedy Space Center for 20 years and has seen every Shuttle Launch from 1990 to the last one in, I believe, 2010. We cheered with each success and mourned the ones ending in tragedy. Again, we are honored to be part of this wonderful place, and to paraphrase Lao Tzu, We have no complaints.Lathan and Katie HudsonUNSCRUPULOUS REAL ESTATE AGENTS SHOULD BE REPORTEDNext time somebody is arrested or charged in this town, ask how certain real estate agents can lie and charge people for work they have not done. Why isnt this person in jail? Why no license suspension? A different set of rules for them than you and me. Also, remember you people who dont report them, you allow a liar and thief to do it over and over again to other innocent people.Robert TuckerApalachicola Letters to the EDITORBy ZINNIA NEWMANSpecial to the Times Editors note: The following essay, by Franklin County sophomore Zinnia Newman, took second place in the Holocaust Education Resource Councils annual essay contest. Newman, a student of Stephanie Howze-Jones received her award and a $300 cash prize at a ceremony held in conjunction with the Community Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Program April 27 at Congregation Shomrei Torah in Tallahassee. Newman was the only essay contest winner, among the fourth through 12th graders who took part, who was from a mainstream public school, the others coming from the Maclay School, Cornerstone Learning Community and the Florida State University School. Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass, was a series of violent anti-Jewish attacks across Germany, parts of Austria, and other German occupied territories on Nov. 9 and 10, 1938. There were many factors leading up to this event, which had many devastating effects and is considered the start of the Holocaust. This essay will address the causes of Kristallnacht, Kristallnacht itself, the effects of Kristallnacht, and its signi cance. There was a large background of anti-Semitism, or prejudice against Jews, in Germany, especially after Hitlers rise to power. Although only a small percent of the German population was Jewish, the Nazis singled them out and blamed them for Germanys defeat in World War I and the following economic effects. Many laws were passed to suppress German Jews, and concentration camps were built to house those considered a threat to the Nazi regime. In 1933, a law was passed limiting the number of Jewish students in public schools. Jews with rst names of non-Jewish origin were forced to adopt additional names to identify them as Jewish. German Jews passports were declared invalid until they had been marked to identify the person as Jewish. The immediate cause of Kristallnacht was the assassination of Ernst vom Rath, a German diplomat, by Herschel Grynszpan on Nov. 7. Grynszpan was furious about the deportation of his parents a few days prior, which led to his actions. When he was arrested, Grynszpan cried, Being a Jew is not a crime. I am not a dog. I have a right to live and the Jewish people have a right to exist on Earth. Wherever I have been, I have been chased like an animal. The Nazi Party chose to use this event to launch a wave of anti-Semitic attacks. When news of vom Raths death reached the Nazi party, they were enraged. Joseph Goebbels, propaganda minister, delivered a speech blaming the Jews for vom Raths death, and urging the public to lash out against them. Jewish homes, businesses, and synagogues were plundered and destroyed. The rioters were given orders to not harm any non-Jewish German lives or property, and not to harm foreigners. Police were told to arrest as many Jews as possible, especially healthy, young men. We do not give protection to Jews, one police chief stated. Get out with these children or Ill shoot. A total of 267 synagogues were destroyed. Many were burned while re ghters simply watched; only intervening to stop the re from spreading to any non-Jewish buildings. About 7,500 Jewish businesses were destroyed and looted, and many Jewish cemeteries were vandalized and devastated. About 91 Jews died, and as many as 30,000 men were arrested and sent to concentration camps. According to one deportee, Everyone was loaded onto wagons... Crying women and children, heartrending scenes... Women and children fainting, unconscious, incidents of death, faces as yellow as wax... Women and children half-dead. Kristallnacht was a turning point in anti-Semitic politics. Afterwards, anti-Jewish policies increased dramatically. The next day Goebbels stated, We shed not a tear for them. On the subject of the destroyed synagogues, he said, They stood in the way long enough. We can use the space made free more usefully than as Jewish fortresses. Kristallnacht gave the Nazis the opportunity to eradicate Jews from the German public. They stated that the Jews were to blame for the event, and placed a ne on them for the destruction. Insurance payments for businesses were seized, leaving the owners forced to pay off the entire debt. Police reported a high number of rapes and suicides after Kristallnacht. Businesses were later taken from Jews, and they were barred from practicing most professions. Any Jewish children still in school were expelled. Jews could no longer drive or go to German theaters. In his account of the aftermath of the event, Shlomo Wahrman said, The store was boarded up... Our home no longer offered to us...Our family was now scattered in three different locations. More and more Jews were sent to concentration camps afterwards. From an SS journal, the Nazis hoped to accomplish, the actual and nal end of Jewry in Germany, its complete destruction. In conclusion, Kristallnacht was a harrowing and horrible event. It is important to remember, not only in respect for those who died or lost their homes and businesses in the event itself, but for the many, many people that were sent to concentration camps, killed, or worse in the aftermath. Since Kristallnacht is considered the start of the Holocaust, the many horrendous and inhumane events that occurred afterwards owe part of their origin to it. This shows us that prejudice and hatred against another group of people is nothing but destructive, and we should be mindful that such events can, and most likely will, happen if we do not remain attentive and work to stop them. MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor OutlookFLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT | Special to The TimesThis image borrowed from the collection of the Florida Memory Project shows the interior of an Apalachicola drinking establishment circa 1905, with the proprietor listed as B.F. Hall. Can anyone in our audience suggest where the Oriental Saloon was located or offer any further information about this particular watering hole? Chasing Shadows, a new column, is intended to uncover hidden Franklin County history and help complete the captions of pictures in the state collection. If you have information about a picture her, or have a picture to share, please contact The Times at 653-8868 or email lswoboda@star .com. CHASING SHADOWS: THE ORIENTAL SALOON Canadas middle class, cellphones and pillow sales USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, May 8, 2014 APage 4Section Kristallnacht: Broken glass and broken hearts

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, May 8, 2014 Dallas, purchased the house two years ago and moved here in 2013. She said the house, built for George H. Whiteside, owner and op erator of the Apalachicola Ice and Canning Company, in the Gothic Revival Style, circa 1872, had undergone major renovations before the purchase and that her work was largely cosmetic rather than structural. It was more a case of bringing the house back. It had been vacant for a few years, Wheatley said. Of course, she repainted with her own color scheme and redid the garden with help from Bill and Amanda Kollar. The Dodd/Galloway house on Avenue C fea tured a welcoming foyer and wrap-around porch fur nished for comfort as well as style. The removal of a wall created a freestanding brick replace that is the focal point of the kitchen and great room. V.G. Sangarees home, built in 1949 for a local un dertaker , is now home to Francine and Jeff Hun tington, who have traveled extensively during a career in teacher education. They furnished their permanent nest with souvenirs from around the world includ ing a trousseau chest from India, a folding butlers table and artifacts from Af rica and Ireland. Jeff enter tained visitors with stories about the furnishings and their places of origin. An interesting feature of the Huntington home is a detached kitchen/laundry connected to the house by a covered walkway. Fran cine said although there is a modern kitchen in the main house, she uses the outdoor annex, especially in hot weather. V.G. Sangarees brother, Ronat, once lived on 17th Street, and his cottage is now home to Carole and Michael Seibert. The new owners replaced existing ooring with river-recov e red heart pine. Michael Seibert is a sculptor, and examples of his work in painted cypress adorn the home and sur r ounding lawn along with fanciful pieces by other art i sts. He shares his studio with spouse, C arole, who is a painter. The clean, simple lines of the interior are accented with pieces of bright furni t ure, and the couples cats lend a homey touch. Big Red, a yellow tom, acted as greeter at the front door. Antique bedsteads, indirect lighting and simple clean linens create a restful set t ing in the bedrooms. Longtime Apalachicola resident June Dosik gra c iously opened her lovely home to guests this year. The house and grounds are a study in comfort and practicality. The yard fea t ures a screened gazebo and lap pool. Inside, the house is a series of cozy niches for relaxing, dining and contemplation. I t hink its just perfect for one person, said Dosik. Lynn and Bill Spohrer opened their Avenue B Victorian Lynn Haven for the second time on this years tour. The home can best be described as stately with a well-appointed yard and wrap-around porch. The rst oor is designed for entertaining and ex p ansive open sitting areas and a dining room for 10 is accented with museum class antiques and a grand piano. The kitchen testies to Spohrers culinary aptitude. Tucked to one side is a cozy sitting room where the fam i ly can enjoy Sunday morn i ng newspapers and classic movies together. On 10th S treet, the tiny Lauver/Sawyer house was full of surprises. The 800square foot cottage fea t ures painted hardwood oors and lots of eclectic art and artifacts includ i ng two Clyde Butcher photographs. The Richardson/Gallant house, less than two years old, was built to blend with traditional Apalachicola architecture. The Florida cottage has local style but state-of-art xtures, with furnishings that reect the owners New England heri tage. The focal point of the great room is a painting of Richardsons great-greatgreat grandmother. The owners preserved so much of the lush foliage on their lot that visitors during the tour speculated on how equipment used to build the house had accessed the lot. A screened porch at the rear of the home allows residents to enjoy a shady retreat without bugs. One of the most unusual stops on this years tour was the Nancy and Rich ard Dagenhart house on Frederick S. Humphries St. The owners purchased a shotgun house on a halflot intending to restore it but the cottage proved un salvageable. Dagenhart, an architect then designed a replacement that makes good use of every inch of buildable space. The house has a side entrance. The main living area is 10 by 52 but 20-foot ceilings give the great room an expansive feel. High shelves display the Dagenharts collection of snow globes. A sleeping loft maximizes space and a galley kitchen makes the most efcient use of cook ing facilities. To the rear of the home, a cozy reading area and screened porch provide escape and privacy for residents. As a special treat, this year, The Chapman Audito rium, built in 1931, opened its doors for the tour. In 2013, the massive Art Deco structure was listed as one of Floridas 11 most endan gered buildings after the state of the auditorium was analyzed by a masters can didate from Florida State University. The future of the building, which houses the ofces of Dr. Shezad Sanaullah, is currently un der discussion. Two gardens rounded out the dance card for participants in this years tour. The Bond garden se questered in a fenced and gated yard is a cool retreat with quirky containers and ornaments surrounding a comfortable seating area next to a shpond. The Joiner and Rowell garden on Seventh, clustered at the base of a patriarch oak, features massed impatiens, with hostas and a planted container of tropicals as fo cal points for the array. At a debrieng on Mon day morning, organizers of the 2014 tour said they were pleased with the event but glad that another year of planning had come to a successful end. About $30,000 was raised this year. Funds are used to maintain historic Trinity Episcopal Church. VPKRegistrationhasbegun!DeadlineforRegistrationMay15thWhatDoIBring: Child'sBirthCerticate,SocialSecurity Card,RecentPhysical,Shotrecord,proof ofresidency,parentidentication. Alldocumentsmustbesubmittedtobe registeredforthe2014-2015VPKProgram. Ifyouhavequestionscall670-2810ext.4117 JoyTownsorSueSummersatExt4109. BalloonBouquets51MarketSt.,SuiteA ( 850 ) 899-1588 BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 50X150GULFLOT $35,000 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 850.608.6121 D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO D ARUYO 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ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy ecpar suoy aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot aydot HOME from page A1 ABOVE: This screen porch at the Richardson/Gallant house exemplies the marriage of indoor and outdoor environments typical of Apalachicola style. BELOW: Even the kitchen garden is a work of art at Wheatley/Whiteside house.PHOTOS BY LO O IS S SS WOBO OBO DA | The TimesLEFT: This airy space is the main living area of the house designed by owner/architect Richard Dagenhart. RIGHT: This cozy room provides a refuge for visiting granddaughters. It contains two trundle beds to maximize both play space and sleeping capacity. A skilled seamstress who crafted many of the quilts and drapes in her home, Briana Wheatley, owner of the featured Whiteside house, has created a homey feel.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 KITTENS,KITTENSandmoreKITTENS!Wehaveahugenumberofyoung kittensattheshelteratthistime.Everyage,colorandsize.Theonething theyallhaveincommon?....theyneedahome.Weinviteyoutovisitthe nursery,aka,theadoptioncentertomeetthesebabiesandchooseone tobeyourveryown! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofouranimals intotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucanspare wouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCounty HumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogontothe websiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets. FranklinCountyHumaneSociety SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday Flowers-Gis-AntiquesWehaveSilkArrangements,GiftBaskets andGardenDishesforMothersDay SocietySpecial to the TimesOn Saturday, May 3, 25 local artists presented an impromptu display at the Raney Carriage House organized by sculptor Clarice Powell. The show was the brainchild of Lynn Wilson, president of the Artists of Apalachicola Association, and painter Susan Richardson. The show was sponsored by the Artists Association and the Pastel Association of Apalachicola, of which Wilson was a founding member. Were together for creative spirit and camaraderie, said Wilson. We dont want politics. Our goal is to be open to all local artists working in any medium and to be inclusive. We plan to display local art in local venues. Wilson said the artists association hopes to collaborate with Marie and Willoughby Marshall to use the Apalachicola Museum of Art as a site for future shows. Anyone interested in joining the Artists of Apalachicola Association can call Wilson at 305-588-5885. By LOIS SWOBODALocal artists stage one-day show TAMARA CElLEBRAt TES 70t TH BIRt THDAYLOIS IS SS WOB B ODA DA | The TimesOn Saturday evening, May 3, Tamara Suarez, owner of Caf Con Leche, celebrated her 70th birthday surrounded by scores of friends. The party, held at Rivercrest Lodge, was hosted by daughter and son-in-law, Marissa and Danny Itzkovitz. Suarez, in red, is seen here arriving at the festivities aboard the riverboat Lily captained by Gill Autrey. On her left is sister, Chabela Ayoub. Her grandchildren, Alex and Mya, are along for the ride perched on the upper deck. While waiting offshore to make a grand entry, the group encountered an alligator.Special to the Times  The annual Butts and Clucks Cook-off by the Bay this Saturday, M ay 10  has rounded up a ne array of items for their auction. The event, sponsored by the Weems Healthcare Foundation, will feature friendly competition, over who makes the best chicken and pork, between at least eight teams in Battery Park in Apalachicola. Pork dinners and sandwiches go on sale at 11 a.m. and the live auction, conducted by Harry Arnold and Chuck Spicer, will begin at 1 p.m. Some of the spectacular items awaiting bids include a pedicure from Unique Nails, a massage from Day Break Massage, and gift certicates from Doloress Sweet Shoppe, Crooked River Grill, Tamaras Cafe & Tapas bar, Owl Caf, Hole in the Wall, the Blue Parrot, Bayside Burgers, Fathoms Steam Room and Raw Bar, Carrabelle Junction, Eddy Teachs Raw Bar, Millender a nd Sons  Seafood, Lynns Quality Oysters, East Bay Oysters and On the Corner Produce. Also available at the auction are services by Gulf Coast Auto Parts, C & S Service, Carrabelle Beach RVC, Sportsmans Lodge and Journeys of St. George Island; shing opportunities from Capt. Earl Solomon, Capt. Catamaran and Capt. Gill Autrey; artwork by Amy Friedman, Lacye Tifn, Leslie Wallace Coon, Lynn Wilson and Susan Richardson; photography by Richard Bickel, Drew E Brass, Tom Tifn and John B. Spohrer Jr.; delicious creations by Sally Crown, Margie Solomon, Judy Loftus, Jody Fortunas-Wilson and Apalachicola Chocolate; and products and services from the Frame Shop, St. George Island Trading Company, St. James Bay Golf Course, Pro Groom, Downtown Books, Forgotten Coast Used and Out of Print Books, Fishermans Choice, Roses Botanical, Island Adventures, Dr Randolphs Medicine Shoppe, Badcock and More, Ace Hardware, Two Gulls, and lots, lots more. Butts and Clucks Saturday to benet WeemsSpecial to the TimesFranklin County School invites you to their production of Hairspray the musical, at 7 p.m. Friday, May 16 in the Seahawk cafeteria. Under the direction of senior Jathan Martin, coordinated by school media specialist Patty Creamer and involving many of the Seahawk family, students, faculty and staff, this grand show promises to bring a fantastic night of family entertainment to the Franklin County community. There will be singing, dancing and laughing, all woven into a poignant message of humanity. Tickets will be $8 for adults; $5 for students. They will not be sold in advance, but can be purchased at the door one hour before the curtain opens. Concessions will also be available during the evening. Please support this Seahawk event and come to see the performance, which will only be a one-time showing. Martin, Creamer, cast and the entire Seahawk family have worked incredibly hard, devoting countless hours to bring this production to the community, so make sure you come out and share this wonderful experience with them. The theme of the show is all about the realness of life and you want to be sure you are in the audience and see and hear rst-hand this wonderful night of enjoyment. FCHS to present Hairspray JEREMY StST ANlLEY, ElELISA KANE to TO wWED SSAt TURDAY PHoto OTO S LOIS IS SS WOB B ODA DA | The TimesLeft, a hooked wool rug depicting Modiglianis Seated Nude created by Jilly Michaels. Center, Old Soul, a sculpture in sterling silver by Kristen Anderson. Right, African Queen, a mixed media sculpture by Clarice Powell. SS PECIAl L toTO tT HE TIMESDante Stanley would like to announce the wedding of his mommie and daddy, Jeremy Stanley and Elisa Kane, this Saturday, May 10. The wedding will take place at 3 p.m. at the Chapman Botanical Gardens with a reception following at the Holy Family Center. All family and friends are invited to attend.

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The Times | A7Thursday, May 8, 2014 NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH LocalSpecial to the TimesPastor Ron Barks, who has ministered to Carrabelles First Assembly of God church for the past 32 years, will be honored Saturday with a celebrating 50 years of his faithful service in the ministry. Everyone in the community is invited to come to honor Pastor Barks on this special occasion at the churchs fellowship hall this Saturday, May 10 at 2 p.m. Please, no gifts; just your presence is requested. Barks been serving the Lord since 1957, and was called to the ministry in 1960 while a youth. He was licensed by the West Florida District Assemblies of God on May 7, 1964, and while waiting until he became at least age 23, the minimum age for ordination, he began his ministry in the summer of 1964 working with the Indians in North Carolina. In September of the same year, he pioneered a church in Jacksonville, North Carolina as a young married man. Barks was ordained while a member of the North Carolina District Assemblies of God on April 26, 1967. He has pastored several churches from the Outer Banks of North Carolina and throughout North Florida. He moved to Carrabelle with his wife, Wilma Barks, now deceased, and his three girls, Marie, Ellen, and Gwen, all of whom graduated from Carrabelle High School. He is presently married to wife Joyce Barks.Barks to celebrate 50 years in ministry Saturday While waiting until he became at least age 23, the minimum age for ordination, Pastor Barks began his ministry in the summer of 1964 working with the Indians in North Carolina. Its always hard dealing with the loss of a loved one. However, my family and I rejoice in knowing that he went peacefully unto the Lord with a smile on Saturday, May 3, 2014 at 4:48 p.m. Randy Cook was a strong man of God, whose love we will hold within our hearts until the day we are reunited. We couldnt have asked for a better husband, father, or papa. Born Feb. 16, 1957, and a lifelong resident of Apalachicola, Randy was a retired correctional ofcer, and ministered for the Lord through the Pentecostal Holiness Churchs Prison Ministry. Randys love continues to live within: His wife Helen, his parents Eloise and Curtis Cook, his son Duane (Amy) Cook, his daughter Nicole (Ryan) Sandoval, his grandchildren, Breanna, Savannah, Victoria, David, and Ryan; his brothers, Wayne (Lynn) Cook, Johnny (Kelly) Turner, and Tim (Karen) Turner. Also many blessed nieces, nephews and cousins. We know that papa will be awaiting us at the gate with his heavenly song. Until then we will continue to honor his life and love. Funeral services were held at noon on Tuesday, May 6 at the First Pentecostal Church in Apalachicola with interment in Eastpoint Cemetery. Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home.Curtis Randall Cook rRANDY COOKJoseph Philip Square, 77, of Eastpoint, passed away Wednesday, April 30, 2014 at the Bridges of Bay St. Joe in Port St. Joe. He was born June 2, 1936 in Painesville, Ohio to Philip J. and Laura M. Square. He was preceded in death by his parents; brother Roy Skippy Square; sister Laura Square; and granddaughter Akysha Gray. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Helene A. Square; brother Philip W Square, and wife Sandra; sisters Kathleen Justice, and husband Chuck, and Rachel Berger and husband Tom; sons John D. Square and Philip J. Square; daughter Tracy L. Gray, and husband Rick; and grandchildren Christopher, Melissa, Colby, Lindsey and Harley Gray; Timothy and Anthony Marshall; and Joe, Jimmy and Michael Square. A longtime resident of Eastpoint, Mr. Joe retired from the St. George Plantation after 13 years. He loved going outside working in the yard on his tractor. He spent time with the only pet he ever had, his Africa Gray parrot Byrd. A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 24 at 3 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Eastpoint, with Pastor Douglas Boucher officiating. Cremation was handled by Southerland Funeral Home, in Panama City.Joseph Philip Square ObituariesWont have coffee at Chillas Hall until the fall; last Friday, May 2 was the last one for the season. Thank you for your support. Last weekend was gorgeous. Weather-wise, I guess its time to start spring-cleaning. Scrub a dub dub. Hope the weather is nice for this Saturday, May 10. Members of the youth group from St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold their annual car wash at Sacred Heart Church 2653 US 98, here in Lanark Village. Bring your car by between 3 and 5 p.m. That way, the car will be nice and clean when you take your mother out to lunch on Sunday. Suggested donation is $10. Mark you calendars for May 17, your full breakfast will be ready, and one of our faithful volunteers will take your order and bring it to the table. Yum! Yum! Door opens at the Lanark Village Boat Club at 9 a.m. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Later on Saturday, you can enjoy the evening at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and join in the May Birthday Bash. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come through the door. Dont forget about covered dish Sunday, May 18. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 12:30 p.m. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to share, your donation and your growling stomach and enjoy the afternoon with friends and neighbors. Hope you can make it! Be kind to one another, and remember, God gave each of us one mother. Love her and cherish her. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry.Remember Mom with a clean car this Sunday LANArRK NEWsS Jim WelshTheology on Tap at Tapas May 15Theology on Tap will be held on Thursday, May 15 at Tapas Bar at 7 p.m. The topic of conversation will be the role of women in the church. Presenters will be Catholic Sister Jeanne Drea, retired Methodist minister the Rev. Dr. John Sink, and Episcopal vicar Rev. Martha Harris. Food will be available for purchase. Healthy Start Baby Shower June 3Healthy Starts sixth annual Baby Shower will be held Tuesday, June 3 at 4 p.m. at The Centennial Building, 300 Allen Memorial Way, in Port St. Joe. We invite all Franklin and Gulf County pregnant women, new parents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for a special evening. There will be information stations on various topics such as car seat safety, shaken baby, childbirth, safe sleep, community resources and vendors offering merchandise for purchase. Free admission, plus food, fun, games and lots of fabulous door prizes! Special games for Dads! For more information, call 1-800-895-9506 ext. 100. The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion TUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, Closed THURSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion SATURDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference Faith brBRIEFsS Like us on THE APAlLACHICOlLA TIMES AA mMEEtTING schSCHEDUlLE

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By FRANK SARGEANTFrankmako1@outlook.com Flounder arent born at, but they soon get that way. All atsh start life looking rather unassuming as baby sh go until Mother Nature does her sleight of hand. Their eggs hatch into larvae that resemble typically symmetrical sh. The larvae quickly develop into a rounded form with protective spines on the head, over the gills and in the pelvic and pectoral ns. They are born with a swim bladder for buoyancy to make it easier to roam near the surface and feed on plankton, but as they grow they turn into Frankensh. One eye migrates across the top of the head onto the other side of the body, the swim bladder and spines literally disappear, the body coloration on the sightless side turns white, while the other side assumes a darker coloration that provides camouage for lying on the bottom. Thats important because the bottom is where these critters spend the majority of their time, either scavenging for a meal or lying in wait for a hapless sh or crustacean to get too close and wham! For Panhandle anglers, ounder are a favorite target species, not because they are a hard-ghting game sh, but because they are often easy to catch both from nearshore boats and even from area piers and jetties and absolutely great to eat. (Many area small-boat guides target the atsh when other species are hard to come by one who absolutely has ounder dialed in is Captain Mike Parker of Silver King Charters, www. shingdestin.com). But before the eating comes the cleaning, and theres the rub. Yamaha spokesman Martin Peters shes all over America, picking up angling tips where ever he goes. Here are some cleaning tips, with how-to photos, he offers for north Florida shermen. For the best tasting ounder, try bleeding and icing them immediately after landing, says Peters. Lift the gill plate, cut the gill rakers with a scissor or knife, then put the sh in a live well or bucket of water to bleed out. When thats done, put the sh on ice in a cooler to rm up the meat for easier cleaning and to maintain the quality.  After that, youre ready to follow the cleaning steps below: Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May877 71 0% Fri,May976 71 0% Sat,May1076 7040% Sun,May1176 7130% Mon,May1277 7110% Tues,May1378 7110% Wed,May1478 68 0% STEP 1 To get started, all you need is a sh like this fourpound summer ounder and a long, straight, sharp, exible llet knife. The cleaning board with clamp is optional, but if youre cleaning a lot of sh, its a time saver.  STEP 2 Start white side down, and make your rst cut across the tail just forward of the n. STEP 3 Insert the point of the knife into the rst cut and slide it as far forward toward the head as possible running it alongside the spine, represented by the red line. Youll be able to feel it.  STEP 4 With the knife angled just slightly down so the blade is running along the rib bones, slice carefully outward to detach the let. On larger ounder you might have to reinsert the knife to complete the cut all the way to the head.  STEP 5 Repeat the process on the belly side of the sh, but make the slice carefully so the knife doesnt cut into the stomach cavity outlined in red.  STEP 6 This is what it looks like after the two cuts. The llet is only attached directly behind the head.  STEP 7 Detach the llet with a single cut as shown, being careful not to penetrate the stomach cavity and set it aside. STEP 8 Turn the sh over and repeat the process on the bottom (white side) llet. STEP 9 Carefully remove the feathers, the tiny muscles that power the ns around the ounders perimeter.  STEP 10 Lay the llets on the cutting board skin side down, and use your nger tips to hold the very end of the tail section. Make a downward cut to the skin, turn the blade almost horizontal to the table, and carefully push the blade toward the far end using a slicing motion to separate the meat from the skin. STEP 11 When done, you have a single llet from the top and bottom of the sh that can be divided into four smaller llets by slicing down the middle where it is thinnest, (the section that was over the backbone). For smaller sh this is not necessary; for larger sh the split llets are more single-serving friendly. Cleaning Flatsh PHOTOs S SPECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S Captain Mike Parker goes to work on a catch of ounder at the cleaning table on the Destin docks. Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 8 Thursday, May 8, 2014 OUTDoo OO RS www.apalachtimes.comSection A SPONsSORED BY LLocal As we enter the rst full week of May, our local area waters are teaming with life that swims. Good red sh reports from the ICW canal have locals shing all times of the day. Most of the sh are undersized, however, a few keepers are in the mix. Good trout and ounder are back on the ats in St. Joe Bay this week. Most anglers are using live shrimp or Lys to get in on the action. Pompano continue their spring run on Cape San Blas and Crooked Island in great numbers and small jigs tipped with shrimp or Fishbites will be key to a good day on the water!

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CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SPORTs S www.apalachtimes.comThursday, May 8, 2014 ASectionSpecial to the TimesThe 2014 Red vs. Black game will be the featured attraction this Saturday, May 10 at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex. Friends and families alike of the var sity football team are invited to come meet the coaches and players, eat lunch, and purchase your eld sign. A minimum donation of $5 to attend the days activities in cludes lunch of a hamburg er, hotdog, or pulled pork sandwich, drink, and chips. The Fellowship of Christian Athletes will open the pro gram with the pledge and a prayer, followed by athletic competition from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The Pam Nobles Danc ers will perform at 10:30 a.m., followed by an 11:30 a.m. lunch with the team, an 11:50 a.m. introduction of the new cheerleaders; and a 12:15 p.m. welcome to par ents and supporters from Coach Aaron York. The Super Hawk Award will be presented to the elected ofcial with the largest turnout and the most creative nest display, in which members dress in colors, cheer and whoop it up. After an introduction of the coaching staff, the 2014 seasons goals and objec tives will be shared, as well as the ofcial schedule and plans for fundraising and community involvement. FORGOTTENCOAST AmericasGreatPaint-Out CAPTURINGTHECOASTFROMALLIGATORPOINTTOMEXICOBEACHAmericasGreatPaintout.com Page 9 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A 61-year-old Lanark Village man made a powerful athletic statement April 26 on behalf of the use of medical marijuana to help children with seizures. Calvin Hartness ran seventh overall, and best in his 60-64 age group, in the Beach Blast triathlon in Mexico Beach. He was running on behalf of Team Tripp, named for a 5-year-old nephew back in Commerce, Ga., who needs the synthetic medicinal form of cannabis to help him with seizures. I was his baby sitter since he was 1 year old, said Hartness, who together with wife, Lisa, divides his time between Georgia and their home on St. James Island. Hell break your heart. Hes the sweetest thing and to go through all this for no reason its sad. Hartness said theres lot of misinformation about medical marijuana, especially since it is not being used as an intoxicant, but for therapy in limited instances. What he needs is the drug; thats all he needs to have a chance, he said. Theres no other drug available to help him, and 125,000 other kids in Florida. I would have done anything for him, I was all-out, said Hartness. Any time youre an old man and can run seventh overall, its pretty good. The Florida Legislature has passed, and Gov. Scott is expected to sign, the so-called Charlottes Web bill that authorizes doctors to order low-THC cannabis for use by patients suffering from chronic seizures. More than 125,000 children suffer from severe epilepsy in Florida and the bill also allows the specic strains of cannabis to cover cancer and persistent muscle spasms, including Lou Gehrigs disease and other chronic conditions. Tripp was in Colorado this week, starting his treatments in one of the few states where medical marijuana is legal. Hartnesss performance was indeed impressive at the Beach Blast, as he was at least eight years older than any of the six nishers ahead of him. He might have nished even stronger than his 1:17.39 time were it not for the 3.1-mile run portion of the triathlon, which he completed in 26:33, a career worst by two minutes. My run was my worst time ever but I havent been able to run due to hip problems, so I expected that, he said. I was 20th overall, my worst ever. I was stuck in no mans land, running by myself. But I dont make excuses; I just go. Hartness did well in the 15mile bike ride, nishing in a time of 42:08 and fth overall atop a road bike. This came after being fth out of the water following his 0.35-mile swim in just under seven minutes in the Gulf off Mexico Beach. I have done a lot of swimming training for this, he said. Before I didnt have a place.Special to the TimesOn April 26-27, the 14-and-under and 17-and-under Franklin County travel basketball teams played in the Take Charge Breast Cancer Awareness Tourney, their rst tournament of the offseason, at Florida A & M University, taking on squads from North Florida and South Georgia. Players on the 17-and-under team were Kelsey Jones, Kenneth Wilson, Tyler Farmer, Tyler Howard, Marshall Sweet, Sharod Senatus, Nathan Jones, and Josue Barahona. Players on the 14-and-under team were Cash Creamer, Johnny Jones, Jan Lowe, Tyler Pendleton, Tyrell Green, Mikalin Huckeba, Landon Nash, Cam eron Nash, Elijah DeCoursey, Jack Harris, Arric Sowell, Jonathan Jones, and Daijon Penamon. The older team nished in second place, winning its preliminary game 61-30, led by Barahona with 20 points, including six three-point eld goals. Jones, Senatus, and Farmer also shined in this game, each scoring in double digits. The whole team played really great this game defensively and offensively, said Sweatt. We were really condent going into the seminal game after this preliminary game. The Seahawks defeated the South Georgia team 44-40 to earn its way into the championship. KK Wilson really played well in spurts during the game, nishing good around the basket, said Sweatt. Jones and Senatus did a great job distributing the ball. Barahona and Howard hit a couple of big shots late in the game to seal the deal. Senatus ended the game with a posterized dunk which ended it with an exclamation mark. In the nals the Seahawks faced the Tallahassee Timberwolves which in cluded players from Chiles and Maclay high schools.Every player on their team could shoot, even the three bigs they had, said Sweatt. We played solid defense throughout the game. Leading by seven, 38-31, with ve minutes left, Howard caught a cramp and had to come out. He was guarding a really good player and shooter. Mar shall Sweet was also out this game so that hurt us in this crucial situation, said Sweatt. The player hit back-toback three-pointers over the next cou ple minutes which were big shots. They also got a couple of cheap long rebounds and had some leak-out lay-up points in transition. We fought hard regardless and ended the game well but just came up short with a nal of 53-48. They hit their free throws late in the game to seal their victory and our defeat. Sweatt said Farmer hit some big shots throughout the game along with Jones, while Senatus made some great passes throughout the game to set up teammates, and Howard and Jones played great defense. Barahona was selected the Se ahawks representative on the All-Tour nament Team and Senatus was select ed as overall tournament MVP. This was a great start to this offseason, said Sweatt. The younger team fought hard throughout the tournament and im proved with every game, said Sweatt. Johnny Jones, Tyler Pendleton, and Cash Creamer led the way with scoring for the team throughout the tourney, and Jan Lowe controlled the games well at the point guard position. The teams next tournament is May 9-10 in Tallahassee at the Comets Capi tal Challenge. Sweatt offered thanks to sponsors for this rst tournament: Tamaras Cafe, Willis Hardware, Four Kids Minus Four and Beach Pros Realty. If you would like to donate call Sweatt at 670-2800, or con tact Jeremy Williams or Ricky Jones. Special to the TimesTeams are being sought for the upcoming 2014 Franklin County Co-Ed Softball Tournament to benet the countys Dixie Youth teams going to state tournaments this summer. The tourney is slated to start at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 17 at Will Kendrick Sports Complex in Carrabelle. Each team can have up to a 15-person roster, with a minimum of three women on the eld and batting at all times. All players must be 16 years or older. The tournament will be played on +/-200-ft. elds with a limit of ve home runs per game for men and unlimited for women. There may be an enforced co-ed line for women. Batting or der must alternate boy/girl until the women have all batted. One courtesy foul is given with a 1-and-1 count. A net will be provided if that is the pitcher preference. Pitching specications will be 6-10 ft, no faking. There will be a threegame guarantee, with pool play at least two games and then a round robin single elimination tournament. This may change due to number of teams or condi tions on game day. Bats will be inspected prior to game and balls provided by the tourna ment committee at a cost of $5 each. Any bats not inspected and approved by ofcials will not be permit ted. Disqualication will be the result of using unap proved supplies. First and second place teams will receive medal lions and a trophy. There is a $200 entry fee per team, which includes umpire fees. Concession will be open to purchase drinks, lunch, and snacks. Teams need to sign up before Saturday, May 10 or mail in registration in the amount of the tournament fee before this time. We need to know in advance how many teams will be participating in the event, so dont wait to sign up. Make checks payable to the ADYL and mail to 1627 Linden Road, Apalachicola, FL 32320. For more info, call Kim Johnson 653-6887 or Kevin Newell 370-6176.Co-ed softball tourney to benet youthSeahawks open hoop offseason strongSeahawks to play Red-Black game Saturday Hartness runs triathlon for Tripp, THC CALVIN HARt TNESS

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 KimHawkinsDavisCPAHwy98at11thStreet,Suite4 Apalachicola,FL32320850-653-6875 andMuchMorePromptProfessionalPersonalService Trades&Services ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter This is the honor roll for the third nine-weeks grading period at the First Baptist Christian School. KINDERGARTEN AAll AAs: Shaylee Tomes AA/B: Tyler Morrison, Laykn QueenSECOND GRADE AA/B: Caden Allen, Emma White, Brayden McCall, Ethan Kembro TTHIRD GRADE AA/B: Olivia Barineau, Riley ONeal and Skylar LayneFOURTH GRADE AAll AA s: Cameron Nash, Genesis Jones, Sophia Salman AA/B: Carter Kembro FIfFTH GRADE AA/B: Eva StricklandSIXTH GRADE AA/B: Lydia StricklandSEVENTH GRADE AAll AA s: Adria Valenzuela AA/B: Talyn Arnett EEIGHTH GRADE AAll AA s: Jordan Alexander AA/B: Logan Arnett FREsSHMEN AAll AA s: Noah Strickland AA/B: Juliana Gay, Anna Smith, Katie Spann, Xuripha Tiller SENIORsS AA/B: Brandy Parker EE ditors note: The following is a corrected version of the third grade honor roll for the third nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. There were errors in the earlier version that have since been corrected. TT HIRD GRADE W. Martina AA ll A A s: Lucy Neill and River Sheridan AA B: Mitchell Adkins, Faline Everitt, Zach Libby, Arav Patel, Owen Poloronis, Trinity Taylor and Mark Willis TT M M Os S Es S AA ll A A s: Kylah Ross AA /B: Alisha Arroyo, Jonathan Carter, Kendall Hill, Eric Lau, Jayden Nichols, John-Michael Thompson, Colin Wefing and Leah WrenSpecial to The TimesThe Old Carrabelle Hotel has announced it has been accepted as a Gold level GreenLeader in the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders program, which helps travelers plan greener trips by identifying environmentally-friendly accommodations across the U.S. TripAdvisor GreenLeaders have met a set of environmental standards developed by a leading environmental consulting rm, with input from expert partners. The more green practices a hotel has in place, the higher its GreenLeader level, which is shown on the propertys listing on the TripAdvisor site. Innkeepers Kathy and Skip Frink run the inn on a daily basis, with Atlanta partners Will and Debbie Brown visiting when their schedule permits. TripAdvisor seems to have recognized our new on-demand water heating as the item that sent us up from Silver to Gold. We still think its amazing that a 1900s building without insulation can merit such an award, but there are dozens of other qualiers we do meet, Skip Frink said. An example is recycling, using the Franklin County recycle bins on C Avenue and composting of all non-meat food scraps. The compost goes onto the grounds, where plants grow that conserve moisture to shade and cool the building. The Old Carrabelle Hotel was changed by the present owners in 2001 from an antiques shop with rental apartments to the ve-room inn of today. The water heating change has been amazing, Frink said. We inherited stand-up 40gallon gas water heaters, piped together, so we were constantly heating 80 gallons of water on a 24-hour basis. Now, there is no hot water in the house until someone turns on a hot faucet! The TripAdvisor GreenLeaders program was developed in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys Energystar program, the U.S. Green Building Council, and the United Nations Environment Programme. For more information, visit www. tripadvisor.com/GreenLeaders. TripAdvisor GreenLeaders are leading the hospitality industry in making efforts to improve their environmental footprint, said Jenny Rushmore, director of responsible travel at TripAdvisor. We greatly applaud these accommodations and are pleased to share their eco-friendly practices with our online audience of more than 260 million travelers who visit the site each month. Travelers can now search for accommodations that have a GreenLeaders status on the TripAdvisor site and view a detailed list of environmentally-friendly practices that they can expect at each location. TripAdvisor branded sites make up the largest travel community in the world, with more than 260 million unique monthly visitors and more than 125 million reviews and opinions covering more than 3.1 million accommodations, restaurants, and attractions. The sites operate in 34 countries worldwide, including China under daodao.com. LOI OI S SWO O BODA ODA | The TimesAt the May 1 meeting of the Carrabelle city commission, Roberta Clay, left, and Bill and Tammy Owen, center, received recognition from Carrabelle Commissioner Brenda La Paz, right, for their work cleaning up a section of Avenue I in Carrabelle. Through their hard work, they turned a makeshift dump site into a beautiful country road, La Paz said. At the same meeting, La Paz honored Mike and Joe Johnson, owners of the Carrabelle Marina, for their work in community revitalization over the last year. First Baptist C Christian School HHonor RRoll ABC School Honor Roll Arrest REPORT CCARRAbBEllLLE HONORsS CITY bBEAUTIfFIERsS The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. AAPRIlL 29 Shelton D. Hutchins, 31, Port St. Joe, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) AAPRIlL 30 Kuldeep Debsikdar, 34, Alpharetta, Ga., two counts of possession of a controlled substance, two counts of possession of a legend drug without a prescription and possession of cannabis (FCSO) Kayla N. Rogers, 31, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Brody P. Lockett, 36, Eclectic, Ala., violation of probation (FCSO) MMAY 1 Larry S. Warren, 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) MMAY 2 Timothy J. Marshall, 24, Apalachicola, possession of cannabis (APD) MMAY 4 Quinnaland J. Rhodes, Jr., 27, Apalachicola, reckless driving, driving while license suspended or revoked, two counts of resisting ofcer without violence and escape (FCSO) Tonya C. Seamon, 41, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) MMAY 5 Billy D. Dalton, 39, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Gary M. Mitchell, 28, Tallahassee, DUI (FCSO) Charlie P. Painter, 49, Carrabelle, cultivation of marijuana (FCSO) Old Carrabelle Hotel earns GreenLeader Gold status SPECIAl L TO TT HE TT IMEs S

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 8, 2014 The Times | A11 2014 CAREER EXPO 850-872-4340, ext. 177 grayj@careersourcegc.comYOUR JOB IS WAITINGTHURSDAY, MAY 15, 9 AM-1 PM, PANAMA CITY MALL VETERANS ONLY FIRST HOUR: 9-10 AMMeet face-to-face with several local companies, all in one location. Network with employers and workforce professionals. CareerSource Gulf Coast employment representatives will review your resume and give you expert advice. All services are free of charge. Make a strong impression. Dress professionally, and bring several resumes. Be prepared for on-the-spot interviews.NETWORK GET ADVICE INTERVIEW FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL JOB SEEKERSGET THE LATEST ON EMPLOYERS ATTENDING! www.careersourcegc.com QUESTIONS? An equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. An Event for Career Professionals 1122832 4519067850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast 1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo.5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 94870T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19 2012-CA-000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN BRYANT, A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 22, 2014, and entered in 19 2012-CA-000447 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit inj.nd for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007BC4, is the Plaintiff and STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN BRYANT, A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on June 4, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of April, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact; Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-03090 May 1, 8, 2014 94888T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 14000048CAAXMX SUNTRUSTBANK, Plaintiff vs. MICHAELJAMES KREHLA/K/AMICHAELJ. KREHL, et. al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: MICHAELJAMES KREHLA/K/AMICHAELJ. KREHL ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: LOT10 GARWOOD LANDING, CARRA-BELLE, FL32322 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT10, SUNSETISLE 86 YACHTCLUB, ACCORDING TO THAT CERTAIN PLATRECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 14, OFFICALRECORDS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING A SUBDIVISION, LYING IN SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, CITYOF CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: LOT10 GARWOOD LANDING, CARRA-BELLE, FL 32322 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th day of April, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court FRANKLIN County, Florida By: Terry C. Segree Deputy Clerk May 8, 15, 2014 98681T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING & ZONING CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Planning & Zoning will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, May 12, 2014 at 6:00 PM at the Apalachicola Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a special exception request relating to the proposal of a preschool program use of the structure Trinity Episcopal Church Benedict Hall on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and 6Th St (O/R Office Residential; R-1 Residential), more specifically described as Block 16, Lots 6-8 pursuant to the official zoning map of the city. A Regular Meeting will immediately follow. The following special exception request item will be discussed and considered: a) The applicant is interested in implementing a small preschool program within the O/R (Office Residential); R-1 (Residential) zoned areas. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for such use if special exception approval is granted. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey at the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. May 1, 8, 2014 98497T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, THOMAS J. WEBB, JR. or VALENTNA R. WEBB, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1204 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: LOT 6 BLOCK 154 CITY OF APALACHICOLA COUNTY OF FRANKLIN and STATE OF FLORIDA, according to the map or plat of said city in general use. PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0154-00 60 Name is which assessed: CAROLYN S. BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98499T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON & MARJORIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1075 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 9 BLOCK B THE RESERVE AT MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES, UN 1. FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURTS OFFICE. PARCEL NO: 30-08s-06w-1003-000b0090 Name is which assessed: NANCY BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98827T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Coombs House Inn & Suites located at 80 6th Street, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 1st day of May, 2014. CHI Apalach, LLC, a Florida limited liability company May 8, 2014 98687T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Coombs House Inn located at 80 6th Street, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 1st day of May, 2014. CHI Apalach, LLC, a Florida limited liability company May 8, 2014 98865T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 14000025CP Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF HAL EDWARD MCCORD a/k/a HAL E. MCCORD Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HAL EDWARD MCCORD, deceased, whose date of death was January 18, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 8, 2014. Personal Representative: KATHERINE S. MCCORD 618 Mariner Circle Alligator Point, Florida 32346 Attorney for Personal Representative: GEORGE H. GWYNN FL Bar No. 0357537 Williams, Gautier, Gwynn, DeLoach & Sorenson, P.A. 2010 Delta Boulevard Tallahassee, FL 32303 850-386-3300 May 8, 15, 2014 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. AKC Golden Retriever Puppies. Labra-Gold Hybrid See Pictures www.gracefulgoldenreciever@indianpass.com/ or Call 850 227-2185 Text FL88126 to 56654 Apalach: In front of Charter School on 12th St, Saturday, May 10th, 8am-?Retired TeacherYard SaleCrafts, Rubber Stamps, Books, CDs, Easels, Sizzix, Paper Cutters, Craft Paint, Classroom Storage Pieces, and Much More. Rain Date 5/17 Text FL88576 to 56654 Mexico Beach, 42nd St, Saturday Oct,8th 8am-until,4-Family Yard SaleHuge Sale inside and Out! Text FL88536 to 56654 Carrabelle At The Bragdon Home: 1102 Gulf Ave, Friday and Sat. May 9th and 10th 7:30a-?YARD SALECleaning Out 2 Houses Inside and Outside.1977 Ford Pinto 4 Spd 4Cly A/C. 13Ft Ghennoe w/ 2006 4 Stroke Suzuki, Tilt Trailer. Concrete Mixer Powered By Gasoline Honda, Pull Behind Vehicle. Furniture, Antiques, Tools and Lots More. Box Lots for Sale. $5, $10, $15. Look For Signs, Call 545-6548 For More Info. Cancled If RainText FL88529 to 56654 Port St. Joe,1205 Constitution Dr/ Hwy 98 Fir & Sat May 9 & 10 8am -UntilMulti Family Yard Sale/ Moving SaleToo much to list! Rain cancels until following weekend. May 16th & 17th Text FL88521 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL83066 to 56554 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34287911 Mfg/Prod/OpWelderOpportunity available for local, experienced Welders. Apply at Gulf Coast Aggregates, LLC or call 850-697-4669 Web Id 34287510 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Web Id 34287016 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in PORT ST JOE IMMEDIATELY Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Sal 850-227-6691 or Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34288036 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103Text FL86476 to 56654 Eastpoint: Hwy 98, Sea Air RV Park, efficiency apt, w/ vaulted ceiling, gazebo & deck $450/mo 599-5496 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Apalachacola: 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 Carrabelle: Riverfront lot on Crooked River, high & dry, $49k or will trade for open fisherman boat of equal value. 850-599-5496 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Susies Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 BestValuesontheForgottenCoast RealEstatePicks JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250296$269,900St.GeorgeIslandISLANDGETAWAY3BR1-1/2BAhomeinquietareaofIsland,Newmetalroof& deck,BeautifulyardwithmanicuredLiveOaks&LargePine, Oakcabinets&islandinkitchen,furnished,2carunderhouse garage,withworkshop/storagewith825sqftarea!WestPine Avenue 4518728 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250350$64,000St.GeorgeIsland ISLANDLOTFORSALEHigh,dry,walk-ablelotmeasuring90x135,adjacentlotis separatelyforsale,quietareaoftheIslandonEastSawyer AvenuenearendofPorterStreet,shortdistancefromthe GulfofMexicoandApalachicolaBay,listedbyJohnShelby 4518727 4518726 29,000850-899-1000 ronbloodworth@rondevoo.com850-653-7893 melissachandler68@gmail.com Wellbuilthomeon1.30acrelotinaquietandsafe area.3bedrooms2baths1332SFWhisperingPines Subdivision 4518723 29,000 4516490 4516125 4516827 MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,199,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com 4518713 REDUCED ContactThe TimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola AdvertiseHere Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Who described a roc as a bird of prey big enough to grip an elephant? Marco Polo, Magellan, Cook, Columbus 2) If a man has ever been to a tonsorialist who has he been to? Witch doctor, Dentist, Fitness trainer, Barber 3) In 1899, where was the United States rst public parking garage established? Detroit, Boston, Baltimore, Richmond 4) Months that begin on which day will always have a Friday the 13th? Sunday, Monday, Friday, Saturday 5) Of these which is not one of the three traditional primary colors? Red, White, Blue, Yellow 6) Whats the No. 1 state for reported shark attacks? New Jersey, N. Carolina, Florida, California 7) Which of these is not ordinarily found in Three-C slaw? Corn, Celery, Cabbage, Carrot 8) What is gibbous a phase of? Acne, Tuberculosis, Adolescence, Moon 9) When did explorer Ponce de Leon pass away? 1521, 1610, 1701, 1836 10) Which states convention did Patrick Henry address, Give me liberty or give me death? Massachusetts, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland 11) What nickname is traditionally given to the clubhouse bar on a golf course? 10th Hole, Caddyshack, Fore, 19th Hole 12) Magnets got their name from Magnesia, a province in what country? Greece, Canada, Italy, Spain 13) Coptic was the last phase of what language that lasted over 5,000 years? Latin, Hebrew, Egyptian, Slavic 14) What was Frank Sinatras middle name? Alvin, Alton, Artie, Albert ANSWERS 1) Marco Polo. 2) Barber. 3) Boston. 4) Sunday. 5) White. 6) Florida. 7) Corn. 8) Moon. 9) 1521. 10) Virginia. 11) 19th Hole. 12) Greece. 13) Egyptian. 14) Albert. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com From Staff ReportsMandatory seminar available at Shellsh CenterEffective May 5, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Science personnel will show the 20-minute educational seminar at the Shellsh Center in Apalachicola at 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. This means it can be viewed an additional two days more than the current schedule of Tuesday through Thursdays. This seminar is mandatory for anyone dealing in shellsh, oysters and clams, and a must-see in order to get a saltwater products license. For more information, contact Joe Shields III, environmental administrator for FDACSs division of aquaculture, at 653-8317 or joe.shields@ freshfromorida.com.Small business counseling Tuesday at ChamberKeith Bowers from the Small Business Development Center at FAMU will be coming to the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, May 13. He will be available by appointment for one-onone business counseling from noon to 4 p.m. Bowers is very knowledgeable and can help you with your business in a variety of areas. Call 653-9419 to set up an appointment.Full moon climb at lighthouse WednesdayThe May Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, May 14. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will be 8-9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:25 p.m., and the moon will rise at 8:31 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for association members. The Cape St. George Light is in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, call the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Microsoft workshop at Chamber May 15Interested in Microsoft 365 or Windows 8.1? The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce is hosting a workshop on the latest Microsoft products from 4-5 p.m. Thursday, May 15, at the chamber conference room. Email or call 653-9419 to reserve your seat.County renews child support service contractOn April 14, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve a contract between the State Department of Revenue and the county that provides for state-approved payments to the county for service of process in child support cases. When the state les proceedings in child support cases, the sheriffs ofce may be required to serve papers on individuals involved with the cases. The sheriffs ofce usually charges a fee for that service, of either $20 or $70, which is set by law, but they dont collect the monies in these types of cases. With the contract, the county can be reimbursed at a rate of 66 percent, which would help offset the cost of performing this service. The current contract was approved for three years in 2011. The newly approved contract period would run for three years, from July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2017.Joint Business After Hours on May 19A joint Business After Hours at the Indian Pass Raw Bar with the Apalachicola Bay and Gulf County chambers of commerce will be at 5:30 p.m. May 19. Come network with fellow business owners in Gulf and Franklin counties while enjoying food, beverages and live music by the Curry BrothersApalachicola chamber seeks board membersThe Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerces new year begins at the end of June, and it is time to elect board members and ofcers for the 20142015 year. As per the bylaws, President Donna Duncan has named Brenda Ash, Ouida Tartt, Mike Koun, Bud Hayes and Kristin Anderson to the nominating committee and tasked them with developing a slate of candidates for election at the June 4 meeting. If you would be interested in serving on the board or have questions about serving, email info@ apalachiocolabay.org or call 653-9419 by May 14. Chamber board meetings are at 5 p.m. the rst Monday of each month.Annual lighthouse association meeting May 22The 2014 annual meeting of the St. George Lighthouse Association will be at 4 p.m. May 22 in St. George Lighthouse Park. In keeping with longstanding tradition, hot dogs will be served. Please bring your lawn chair.New capabilities at the landllThanks to a new baler recently purchased by the county, the Franklin County landll now can recycle all grades of plastic. Formerly, only certain grades could be recycled. Recyclables will still be hand sorted at the landll so no change to recycling procedures by the public is required. Director of Solid Waste Fonda Davis said the county now can recycle uorescent bulbs thanks to a recently purchased bulb crusher. Bulbs should be taken to the landll for recycling. In the past, the landll accepted bulbs and stored them for transport but they could not be recycled on site. Davis said he plans to bring the bulb crusher to local communities at a future time for bulb amnesty days. Dates have not been set. News bBRIEfsFS



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, May 8, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The 24-year-old Carrabelle woman whose drunk driving led to a crash two years ago that killed one of her passengers was sentenced last week to more than 10 years in state prison. At an emotional hearing April 30 before Circuit Judge George Reynolds, Rebecca Ann Padowitz, 24, was given 125.4 months in state prison, with credit for 432 days spent in the county jail since the April 17, 2012, death of Rona Lavon Hawkins, 28, of Sopchoppy. It was Padowitzs 22nd birthday. Padowitz also received three years probation and was ordered to pay a $2,550 ne and $250 in attorneys fees for the DUI-manslaughter count on which she was convicted March 13 by a jury of four men and two women. Hawkins died at the scene of the one-car crash after his 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee, driven by Padowitz, spun out of control on U.S. 98 about 1.6 miles west of Lake Morality Road and about 0.8 miles east of the city of Carrabelle. Hawkins, son of Sopchoppy mayor Colleen Skipper, was a star linebacker at Lincoln High School, from which he graduated in 2002. Skipper did not attend the sentencing hearing, although a letter she wrote was read aloud to the court by Hawkins sister. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com After a week of rainy weather, the sun came out on Saturday and smiled on the 22nd annual Historic Apalachicola Home and Garden Tour. Organizers said they believe they lost a number of visitors from areas west of Panama City because of the impact of severe storms earlier in the week, including two groups from Pensacola that canceled ticket reservations. All told, about 700 visitors took in this years tour, which organizer Susan Clementson said was in line with the numbers attracted in 2012 and 2013. Almost 250 lunches were served by the ladies of Trinity Episcopal Church, which sponsors the tour. With some yards temporarily converted to lakefront property, tour organizers took a proactive approach to damage control and distributed disposable booties to homeowners to encase damp footwear. Pam Richardson went even further at her Ninth Street cottage and created brick steppingstones the morning of the event to provide guests with a waterless walkway. There was a bright side to the unusually wet spring. Lawns and gardens were sparkling fresh and beautifully green. The temperature was also perfect for walking and biking around town, and stormy days had swept the air clean of seasonal pollen. The Whiteside Wheatley house was the featured home on this years tour. Briana Wheatley, originally from Brownsworth to leave Weems By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Weems Memorial Hospital CEO Ray Brownsworth told county commissioners Tuesday morning he would be leaving his post July 18, as he and his family plan to move back to Iowa. Brownsworth, who stabilized the hospitals often tumultuous fortunes in the 20 months he has been at the helm, said he has accepted the chief executive of cer position at a hospital of comparable size in southeastern Iowa. He said his decision was motivated in part by his familys desire to be closer to his 19and 20-year-old daughters, as well as his wife, Loris, parents. The family circle in Apalachicola also includes daughter Sarah and sons Luke and Adam Hames. 2014 Election season starts to heat up By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com With petitions due back in the Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliotts of ce by May 19, a handful of candidates have signaled their intent to run on the Nov. 4 elections. The county commission and school board seats are up for grabs in District 2, the easternmost district encompassing from the portions of Carrabelle, Lanark Village and Alligator Point, and in District 4, which is the westernmost district, mainly the historic district of Apalachicola. Both incumbents in District 2 County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and School Board Member David Hinton have signaled their intent to recapture their seats, a process that enables them to fundraise. In District 4, neither incumbent REBECCA PADOWITZ RONA HAWKINS RAY BROWNSWORTH Drunk driver in fatality given 10 years VOL. 129 ISSUE 2 See WEEMS A3 See ELECTION A3 HISTORIC APALACHICOLA HOME AND GARDEN TOUR PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times A grouping of shade tolerant plants adds major curb appeal to the Seventh Street cottage of Gary Joiner and Butch Rowell. Below, the former Ronat Sangaree house has an open feel and loads of light. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . . A11 April showers bring home tour owers See DRIVER A3 See HOME A5 Quick on the draw, A2 Butts and Clucks Saturday bene ts Weems The annual Butts and Clucks Cook-off by the Bay this Saturday, May 10, sponsored by the Weems Healthcare Foundation, will feature friendly competition among at least eight teams in Battery Park in Apalachicola over who makes the best chicken and pork. Pork dinners and sandwiches go on sale at 11 a.m., and the live auction, conducted by Harry Arnold and Chuck Spicer, will begin at 1 p.m. Seahawks to scrimmage Saturday The 2014 Red vs. Black game will be the featured attraction this Saturday, May 10 at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex. Friends and families of the varsity football team are invited to watch the intramural game, meet the coaches and players, eat lunch and support the team. A minimum donation of $5 to attend the days activities includes lunch of a hamburger, hot dog or pulled pork sandwich, drink and chips. Full moon climb at lighthouse Wednesday The May Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, May 14. The Sunset Climb is 8-9:30 p.m. and includes light hors doeuvres and sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:25 p.m., and the moon will rise at 8:31 p.m. After sunset, people may climb to the top of the lighthouse, at a cost of $10 for the general public and $5 for association members. For more information, call 927-7745.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 Coupon Expir es: 5-30-14 CODE: AP00 T R A N S P O R T A T I O N P LA N NIN G ME E T IN G ( T H E P U B L I C I S I N V I T E D ) B a y G u l f H o l m e s a n d W a s h i n g t o n R e g i o n a l T r a n s p o r t a t i o n P a r t n e r s h i p M o n d a y M a y 1 2t h 2 0 1 4 a t 1 0 : 0 0 a m C D T W a s h in g t o n C o un t y A d m in i s t r a ti v e B l d g 1 3 3 1 S o u t h B l v d C h i pl e y F L M e m b e r s wi ll : Re a r m O c er s D i s c u s s T r a n s p o r t a t i o n R e g i o n a l I n c e n t i v e P r o g r a m ( T R I P ) H e a r p u bl i c c om m e n t D i r e c t q u e s t i o n s o r c o m m e n t s t o B r i a n Y o u p a t o a t 8 5 0 3 3 2 7 9 7 6 E x t 2 2 4 o r b r i a n y o u p a t o @ w f r p c o r g S t a w i l l m a k e r e a s o n a b l e a c c o m m o d a t i o n s fo r a c c e s s t o m e e t i n g s i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h t h e A m e r i c a n s w i t h D i s a b i l i t i e s A c t a n d fo r l a n g u a g e r e q u i r e m e nt s ot h e r t h a n E n g l i s h P l e a s e n ot i f y M s B r i t t a n y E l l e r s o f a c c e s s o r l a n g u a g e r e q u i r e m e nt s a t 8 5 0 3 3 2 7 9 7 6 E x t 2 2 0 a t l e a s t 4 8 h o u r s i n a d v a n c e By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Eastpoints Millender Park was the scenic ground zero for both budding and seasoned painters Saturday, as the Forgotten Coasts Great Plein Air Paint-Out held its Quickdraw event. Once the horn blew at 10 a.m., 70 competitors, 21 of them invited participants from among the visiting plein air artists, busied themselves with capturing everything from the gnarled stumps that line the water front to the stately trees that grace the park. Two hours later on the sunny and dry morning, the horn sounded again, and the painters placed their easels in a circle in the cen ter of the park. Judge Robert Sten stream, who owns an Ocala gallery specializing in 19th and 20th century Ameri can and European art, then slowly circled the drying works to make his choices for First Place Overall, Best Emerging Artist and three Honorable Mentions. Winning $50 each for be ing among the Honorable Mentions were three of the invited artists: Lori Put nam, from Charlotte, Tenn., Luke Buck, from Nineveh, Ind., and Greg LaRock, from Newport Beach, Calif. Receiving $75 as Best Emerging Artist, selected from among the ranks of the artists who are not part of the plein air paint-out, was Natalia Andreeva, from Tallahassee, who painted the band that performed under the pavilion, Up Close and In Person, fea turing KT and Mexico Joe. Andreeva was a participant in the 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013 Forgotten Coast Great Plein Air Paint-Outs. Taking home First Place Overall, and $100, was in vited artist Leon Holmes, originally from Perth, Aus tralia, and now living in Mu nich, Germany. It has a very painterly quality to it, with good color harmonies, Stenstream said. It sort of pops out. The judge had high praise for the many works he examined. The qual ity of the art is fantastic, he said. Lots of good artists, both invited and non-invited. Stenstream said he paid attention to the combina tion of color, composition, simplicity and design. In some, what gets to be the main factor is Does this come off the canvas and hit you? he said. Overall the work is very good. Winning pieces were moved to a special display area in the Wetroom at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. See www.pleinair.com for schedules and addition al information. PLEIN AIR P AINTOUT WRAPS UP SUNDA Y The Forgotten Coasts Great Plein Air Paint-Out continues through this weekend. On Friday, May 9, an artists roundtable discussion Art As A Window will be from 2-4 p.m. in the wet room at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. From 2-4 p.m. on Friday, May 9, and from 9-11 a.m. on Saturday, May 10, there will be artists demonstrations at Apalachicolas Riverfront Park. On Saturday, May 10, the Grand Patrons Party will be held in the wet room at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art from 6-10 p.m. Meet the artists, view and purchase their works. Debut of Artists Choice painting. $40 per ticket. On Sunday, May 11, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, will be Art In The Afternoon This is the nal exhibit and sale, and will feature family entertainment, childrens art activities and more. P HOTOS BY D AV ID A DLERSTEIN | The Times At left Invited plein air artist Mitch Kolbe paints the waterfront. At right Invited plein air painter Greg LaRock took an Honorable Mention. Millender Parks Quickdraw taps the turpentine Invited plein air artist Leon Holmes took rst place at the Quickdraw. Emerging plein air artist Lynette Miesen, from Niceville, paints what she sees.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, May 8, 2014 Happ y Grad uati on! Happ y Gr adua tion In the letter, Skipper did not refer to Padowitz or ex press a view on a possible sentence. She wrote that she at rst kept thinking her son had only been in jured, but once she learned the terrible news, she has struggled with coping with the devastating loss. She said the family, which in cludes Hawkins 10-yearold daughter, has searched for answers as to what hap pened that fateful night, and that though she did not want to endure a trial, Skipper said it has enabled her to nd some solace in learning what happened. Padowitzs attorney, Bri an Hill of Port St. Joe, who was assigned the case as conict counsel, had led a motion to have Reyn olds apply the non-binding recommendation of ve years in prison and ve years probation that was made by the pre-sentence investigator. Reynolds chose not to go with a downward de parture from the lengthier sentence, which was much closer to the maximum of 15 years Padowitz could have received. Informed sources say Padowitz had declined a plea agreement of four years offered by the states attorneys ofce and in stead opted to go to trial. In a tearful statement before the judge, she said, I stand here today with the highest respect, your honor, also with faith, faith that God has put in your heart to have mercy on me. One life has tragically been lost, a nightmare that wakes me every day, Pa dowitz said. I just want to say Im so truly sorry for what happened two years ago, the 17th of April, a day that was a celebration of my life but also a day that took another. I cant change what happened that day, which took my best friends life and almost mine. I miss him so much, and I know that pain will never go away, and now Im faced with los ing not only my life, but be ing a leader, role model and mother for my sweet baby girl, whom I hurt every day by being gone. Words cant explain how much remorse I truly have about the whole situ ation, she wrote, noting that upon her release, she planned to move to South Florida and live with her aunt, Janice Simpson, who is the twin sister of Padow itzs mother. I realize that Im going to have to work twice as hard to make up the years I wasted making the wrong decisions, she wrote. I want to be someone my daughter can look up to and respect. I plan to start by making the choice to re locate where jobs, schools and public transportation are abundant. Since Ive been incar cerated, Ive had a lot of time to think about who I was, who I am today and who I want to become, al though I feel like Ive grown both in terms of humility and my understanding of how my choices affect those around me, Padowitz said. I realize I still have a lot to learn, and now all I can do is beg the courts to please have leniency on my sen tencing today. On April 24, Padowitz wrote a letter to Reynolds asking for a 72-hour fur lough from county jail so she could visit her 4-yearold daughter and the rest of her family from Michigan and South Florida before going off to state prison, but that request was denied. Simpson wrote Reynolds a March 18 letter of support describing her niece as a very sweet girl that has made some horrible mis takes in her young life. She described her as as young mother who could still be a productive member of soci ety, once she pays her debt to society. Simpson also expressed her pain for the victims family. I can only imagine her (Hawkins mother) suf fering, she wrote. I do hope that she is able to nd peace. The judge also received a letter from Jessica Meloche, who described her sister as one of the most generous and loyal people Ive ever met. She loves her friends and fam ily ercely and both com pletely, oftentimes at her own peril. Meloche said Padowitz is not without faults. She has poor judgment and wasnt properly equipped to face the challenges that come along with adult hood, she wrote. She has so much to offer this world and I feel that justice would be served by giving a good person who did a terrible thing the chance to redeem herself by submitting to Gods will and having her to be a functioning member of society. No good can be done by allowing a young woman with so much po tential to be locked away in an environment where that potential can never be realized. Padowitzs father, Glenn, wrote a lengthy April 24 let ter to Reynolds, in which he recounted his years liv ing in Franklin County and becoming a rst responder and then after training at Gulf Coast State College, an emergency medical techni cian with the ambulance service, handling hundreds of calls per year. In seven years with the Carrabelle Fire Depart ment, I have been respon sible for saving several lives, and even brought back a few of my neighbors from death, and I returned them to their families, he wrote. Glenn Padowitz said he had worked several mo tor vehicle accidents in that same place where the accident occurred. It is a dangerous curve with no shoulder and a four-to-six inch drop off the asphalt, causing cars to pull hard off the road, forcing the driver to overcorrect, ending up in the same place Becky died, with cars and trucks overturned. He said his daughter had received two fractured vertebra in her middle back from the crash and fractured her upper bone in her right arm in several places. These are injuries that would continue to give her pain and paralysis for the rest of her life, Padowitzs father wrote. The Padowitzes have been caring for their grand daughter, with whom they share custody with the girls father. He appealed for leniency. Please dont make (the granddaughter), Beckys mother and I live without our loved ones, he wrote. I cant see how the law sees this in (the grand daughters) best interest. I had to evaluate what Im doing with the next 12 years of my life, said Brownsworth, 56. I decid ed that the investment in my children was the most important thing. We like it down here, he said, We like the area, we like the people, we like the hospital. Its a tough de cision thinking about mov ing back. An Oklahoma native, Brownsworth began as Weems CEO on Oct 8, 2012, after moving here from Si gourney, Iowa, where he had worked as a hospital administrator. Im proud of where the hospital is today, he said in an interview Tuesday after noon. Were more nan cially stable than we were 20 months ago when I rst started, and cash ows better. Brownsworth said he is hoping by the time he leaves in mid-July, Weems will have submitted an ap plication to the U.S. De partment of Agriculture for a $10.25 million loan to go toward renovations and additions to the existing hospital, rst built in 1959. Included with that applica tion will be an opinion let ter from the BKD consult ing rm as to the feasibility of the project, he said. The community can no longer just accept the existing facility, he said. Theyre going to have to have a new, renovated fa cility for the future, and thats because of changes with regulations as well as changes as to how health care is provided. With almost three-quar ters of the hospitals reve nues coming from the emer gency room and outpatient services, Brownsworth said the revamped facility will be limited to fewer than a doz en beds, half the number there are today. Each will be private, with its own rest room and shower area. Its a balance of new inpatient and outpatient areas, he said. The trend is away from inpatient care, but you need inpatient op tions locally for those with inpatient needs. Many peo ple dont want to travel 25 miles. At Tuesdays meeting, Brownsworth was anked by the hospitals new chief nancial ofcer, John Gra ham, who began at his full time post April 21. Graham has said he is not interested in the CEO post, Brownsworth said, but has recommended some possible names to put into the mix of candidates to be vetted as possible candi dates by Tallahassee Me morial Hospital, which is conducting the search. TMH is assisting in the search, but the decision is made locally, Brownsworth said. Ill assist in any way I can, helping to vet candi dates, and the board will make the decision. County Commissioner Smokey Parish and School Board Member Jimmy Gan der has formally indicated they plan to seek re-election, although there is plenty of time for them enter the race. The ofcial qualifying period isnt until next month, when it begins at noon June 16 and runs to noon June 20. Sanders, of P.O. Box 641 in Car rabelle, is the lone Democrat to le a letter of intent for the District 2 county commission seat. Two Republicans have led, and if they qualify, they will square off in the Aug. 26 primary. They are Mark Nobles, of 10-5 West Pine St. in Lanark Village, and William Snyder, of 2332 Enabob St., in Carrabelle. Hinton, of 112 Hinton St. in Carra belle, plans to run for re-election in the nonpartisan race for District 2 school board member. He is being challenged by Wilburn Ray Messer, of P.O. Box 482 in Carrabelle. In his candidate ling, Hinton has loaned his campaign $1,000 with which to fund his campaign. In the District 4 school board race, Stacy Kirvin, of 142 Deer Patch Road in Apalachicola, has led his letter of in tent and has listed his own $100 contri bution to open his campaign account. No candidates have surfaced in the District 4 county commission race, as of press time. In addition to a list of statewide ballot measures, Franklin County vot ers will have before them a choice for congressman, between incumbent Re publican Steve Southerland and Demo cratic challenger Gwen Graham. Lu ther Lee also is running as a write-in candidate, without party afliation. In the race for state representative in District 7, which encompasses all of Franklin County, incumbent Republi can Halsey Beshears has signaled his desire to seek re-election, with no chal lengers having as yet surfaced. Seven incumbent circuit court judg es have all led for re-election: Charles Dodson, Kevin J. Carroll, Frank E. Shefeld, John C. Cooper, Martin A. Fitzpatrick, Charles A. Francis and An gela C. Dempsey. Although several Democrats and Republicans are running in the pri mary, Gov. Rick Scott and Democratic challenger Charlie Crist are expected to breeze through the primary and square off in November. Two Democrats, George H. Sheldon and Perry E. Thurston, are vying in the primary for the right to challenge in cumbent Republican attorney general Pam Bondi. Democrat William Rankin is ex pected to challenge Republican Chief Financial Ofcer Jeff Atwater in the general election, and Democrat Thad deus Thad Hamilton is running to unseat Republican Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam. To vote in the primary, voters must be registered by July 28. To vote in the Nov. 4 general election, all registra tions must be in by Oct. 6. Early voting for the primary runs Aug. 11-23, and for the general election, Oct. 20 to Nov. 1. DRIVER from page A1 WEEMS from page A1 ELECTION from page A1 Im proud of where the hospital is today. Were more nancially stable than we were 20 months ago when I rst started, and cash ows better. Ray Brownsworth CEO, Weems Memorial Hospital One life has tragically been lost, a nightmare that wakes me every day. I cant change what happened that day, which took my best friends life and almost mine. I miss him so much, and I know that pain will never go away, and now Im faced with losing not only my life, but being a leader, role model and mother for my sweet baby girl, whom I hurt every day by being gone. Rebecca Ann Padowitz News BRIEF From Staff Reports Power lines damaged at Kendrick Park County law enforcement and the county department of parks and recreation would like information on a large truck that downed power lines at Kendrick Park over the weekend. Nikki Millender, director of parks and recreation, told county commissioners Tuesday a large truck, possibly a logging truck, pulled through the parking lot at Kendrick Park and completely severed two power lines serving the parking lot lights. A third wire was left hanging low. The damage was discovered on Monday, May 5. Millender said power to the lines has been turned off until they can be repaired. She said the existing lines will have to be replaced and is unsure of the cost of repairing the damage. Parks and recreation will install signs at the entrance to the lot, limiting access to single-axle vehicles only. Commission Chair Cheryl Sanders suggested the height of the supporting poles for the new lines be increased. Millender said she will request used poles from Duke Energy. WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM

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This is the rst in a series on the Dying American Middle Class, with this new column Arbor Outlook. The landlord wants his moneythe grocery bill is due. from The High Cost of Living by Tim Ausburn If youre an American, chances are pretty darn good that you own a cellphone. Products like cellphones have almost become staple consumer items, even for American families with lower incomes. But cellphone plans for both Mom and Dad and three kids are not inexpensive. Subtract a typical family monthly cellphone bill from the net income of some middle class Americans, and theres not as much left for lifes other necessities as there once was. For many middle class families, storing up retirement savings and contributing to college education plans for children are no longer realistic goals. Studies show that wages began to stagnate in the late 1970s and have not kept pace with the cost of living since. Union power declined. Jobs were outsourced. Our manufacturing base was decimated. And now robotics, the new challenge to full employment in the modern American economy, is taking jobs away from willing workers. More than at any time in our history, the U.S. is becoming a country of haves and have nots, with fewer families in the middle. Much was made of the recent report that Canada, not the U.S., now has the worlds wealthiest middle class. For now, wed settle for a viable middle class. Because without one, the American economy will suffer, and well all feel the nancial impact. Canada hasnt undergone a housing bubble, and our northern neighbors are also enjoying an energy boom. But theres no denying that American middle class purchasing power is on the wane. A fascinating current documentary features an extensive interview with a bedding manufacturer. The manufacturing plant owner makes $10 million annually. But he is concerned about the middle class. Why? As he says, rich folks only sleep on (and therefore only buy) one or two pillows at a time, just like everybody else. He depends on a more populous and prosperous middle class to purchase his products, as do so many manufacturers of goods and services. When average Americans stopped shopping and spending money in the downturn of 2008, it further escalated our national economic nightmare, because consumer spending traditionally represents 70 percent of GDP. Many things have contributed to Chinas rise as an economic power, but one of the biggest factors was the emergence of a middle class that could purchase products made there. China nally has the consumer component of GDP in place. Henry Ford gured this out in 1914 when he raised employee salaries to $5 a day, primarily so that he could create a home-grown market for folks capable of buying the very cars they were building. Next week: Real Wages and In ation Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a feeonly and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. BIDWELL HAS SERVED WITH INTELLIGENCE, COURAGE Editors Note: The following letter was sent this week to members of the Franklin County School Board. At its April meeting, the school board voted unanimously to table the matter of re-hiring Mr. Bidwell as principal and is expected to take it up again at the May 8 meeting. I am extremely disappointed in your decision not to rehire Eric Bidwell as Franklin County School principal for the coming year. While I am sure your decision must be legal, I believe that you have made that decision based on limited information and opinions. I am also reasonably certain that you made your decision without having access to signi cant student performance data, because the results of our annual testing have not yet been released. Finally, I believe that you made your decision without giving the larger community of Franklin County the opportunity to share its opinions and insights with you, and I think that the input that you missed would have been critical to your making a balanced, constructive decision. I believed that with its selection of Mr. Bidwell as its next principal the district had nally moved toward stability and long-term growth, but I fear that your decision is strong evidence that little has changed, and that we must be prepared for another painful period of transition. Mr. Bidwell has served the school, the district, and its communities with intelligence, clarity, and courage. I wish him well. Sincerely, Charles Wilkinson Teacher, Franklin County School HONORED TO LIVE IN A WONDERFUL PLACE In September, my wife Katie and I will have lived in this wonderful town for two years. They say, You can observe a lot just by watching. Our observation is, being here is just like living in the 50s. We walk downtown almost every day and visit with as many merchants as we can. Weve dined in almost every eatery available. We have our favorites, but I wont editorialize. My wife always remarks how friendly everyone is, and we try to return this kindness whenever we can. The newspaper is a Thursday morning must for us. The Times is far and away ahead of its time (no pun), and its dizzying in the way the editor and his staff do such a fantastic job of covering the news week-after-week. Their motto should be changed to No sooner done than said, (this isnt original, I know). It is a fantastic read, and Katie and I peruse it from front to back with each issue. My favorite is the Sports section and, again, the paper is second to none. We are both retired Katie was an integral part of the Kennedy Space Center for 20 years and has seen every Shuttle Launch from 1990 to the last one in, I believe, 2010. We cheered with each success and mourned the ones ending in tragedy. Again, we are honored to be part of this wonderful place, and to paraphrase Lao Tzu, We have no complaints. Lathan and Katie Hudson UNSCRUPULOUS REAL ESTATE AGENTS SHOULD BE REPORTED Next time somebody is arrested or charged in this town, ask how certain real estate agents can lie and charge people for work they have not done. Why isnt this person in jail? Why no license suspension? A different set of rules for them than you and me. Also, remember you people who dont report them, you allow a liar and thief to do it over and over again to other innocent people. Robert Tucker Apalachicola Letters to the EDITOR By ZINNIA NEWMAN Special to the Times Editors note: The following essay, by Franklin County sophomore Zinnia Newman, took second place in the Holocaust Education Resource Councils annual essay contest. Newman, a student of Stephanie Howze-Jones received her award and a $300 cash prize at a ceremony held in conjunction with the Community Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance Program April 27 at Congregation Shomrei Torah in Tallahassee. Newman was the only essay contest winner, among the fourth through 12th graders who took part, who was from a mainstream public school, the others coming from the Maclay School, Cornerstone Learning Community and the Florida State University School. Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass, was a series of violent anti-Jewish attacks across Germany, parts of Austria, and other German occupied territories on Nov. 9 and 10, 1938. There were many factors leading up to this event, which had many devastating effects and is considered the start of the Holocaust. This essay will address the causes of Kristallnacht, Kristallnacht itself, the effects of Kristallnacht, and its signi cance. There was a large background of anti-Semitism, or prejudice against Jews, in Germany, especially after Hitlers rise to power. Although only a small percent of the German population was Jewish, the Nazis singled them out and blamed them for Germanys defeat in World War I and the following economic effects. Many laws were passed to suppress German Jews, and concentration camps were built to house those considered a threat to the Nazi regime. In 1933, a law was passed limiting the number of Jewish students in public schools. Jews with rst names of non-Jewish origin were forced to adopt additional names to identify them as Jewish. German Jews passports were declared invalid until they had been marked to identify the person as Jewish. The immediate cause of Kristallnacht was the assassination of Ernst vom Rath, a German diplomat, by Herschel Grynszpan on Nov. 7. Grynszpan was furious about the deportation of his parents a few days prior, which led to his actions. When he was arrested, Grynszpan cried, Being a Jew is not a crime. I am not a dog. I have a right to live and the Jewish people have a right to exist on Earth. Wherever I have been, I have been chased like an animal. The Nazi Party chose to use this event to launch a wave of anti-Semitic attacks. When news of vom Raths death reached the Nazi party, they were enraged. Joseph Goebbels, propaganda minister, delivered a speech blaming the Jews for vom Raths death, and urging the public to lash out against them. Jewish homes, businesses, and synagogues were plundered and destroyed. The rioters were given orders to not harm any non-Jewish German lives or property, and not to harm foreigners. Police were told to arrest as many Jews as possible, especially healthy, young men. We do not give protection to Jews, one police chief stated. Get out with these children or Ill shoot. A total of 267 synagogues were destroyed. Many were burned while re ghters simply watched; only intervening to stop the re from spreading to any non-Jewish buildings. About 7,500 Jewish businesses were destroyed and looted, and many Jewish cemeteries were vandalized and devastated. About 91 Jews died, and as many as 30,000 men were arrested and sent to concentration camps. According to one deportee, Everyone was loaded onto wagons... Crying women and children, heartrending scenes... Women and children fainting, unconscious, incidents of death, faces as yellow as wax... Women and children half-dead. Kristallnacht was a turning point in anti-Semitic politics. Afterwards, anti-Jewish policies increased dramatically. The next day Goebbels stated, We shed not a tear for them. On the subject of the destroyed synagogues, he said, They stood in the way long enough. We can use the space made free more usefully than as Jewish fortresses. Kristallnacht gave the Nazis the opportunity to eradicate Jews from the German public. They stated that the Jews were to blame for the event, and placed a ne on them for the destruction. Insurance payments for businesses were seized, leaving the owners forced to pay off the entire debt. Police reported a high number of rapes and suicides after Kristallnacht. Businesses were later taken from Jews, and they were barred from practicing most professions. Any Jewish children still in school were expelled. Jews could no longer drive or go to German theaters. In his account of the aftermath of the event, Shlomo Wahrman said, The store was boarded up... Our home no longer offered to us...Our family was now scattered in three different locations. More and more Jews were sent to concentration camps afterwards. From an SS journal, the Nazis hoped to accomplish, the actual and nal end of Jewry in Germany, its complete destruction. In conclusion, Kristallnacht was a harrowing and horrible event. It is important to remember, not only in respect for those who died or lost their homes and businesses in the event itself, but for the many, many people that were sent to concentration camps, killed, or worse in the aftermath. Since Kristallnacht is considered the start of the Holocaust, the many horrendous and inhumane events that occurred afterwards owe part of their origin to it. This shows us that prejudice and hatred against another group of people is nothing but destructive, and we should be mindful that such events can, and most likely will, happen if we do not remain attentive and work to stop them. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT | Special to The Times This image borrowed from the collection of the Florida Memory Project shows the interior of an Apalachicola drinking establishment circa 1905, with the proprietor listed as B.F. Hall. Can anyone in our audience suggest where the Oriental Saloon was located or offer any further information about this particular watering hole? Chasing Shadows, a new column, is intended to uncover hidden Franklin County history and help complete the captions of pictures in the state collection. If you have information about a picture her, or have a picture to share, please contact The Times at 653-8868 or email lswoboda@star .com. CHASING SHADOWS: THE ORIENTAL SALOON Canadas middle class, cellphones and pillow sales USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, May 8, 2014 A Page 4 Section Kristallnacht: Broken glass and broken hearts

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, May 8, 2014 Dallas, purchased the house two years ago and moved here in 2013. She said the house, built for George H. Whiteside, owner and op erator of the Apalachicola Ice and Canning Company, in the Gothic Revival Style, circa 1872, had undergone major renovations before the purchase and that her work was largely cosmetic rather than structural. It was more a case of bringing the house back. It had been vacant for a few years, Wheatley said. Of course, she repainted with her own color scheme and redid the garden with help from Bill and Amanda Kollar. The Dodd/Galloway house on Avenue C fea tured a welcoming foyer and wrap-around porch fur nished for comfort as well as style. The removal of a wall created a freestanding brick replace that is the focal point of the kitchen and great room. V.G. Sangarees home, built in 1949 for a local un dertaker, is now home to Francine and Jeff Hun tington, who have traveled extensively during a career in teacher education. They furnished their permanent nest with souvenirs from around the world includ ing a trousseau chest from India, a folding butlers table and artifacts from Af rica and Ireland. Jeff enter tained visitors with stories about the furnishings and their places of origin. An interesting feature of the Huntington home is a detached kitchen/laundry connected to the house by a covered walkway. Fran cine said although there is a modern kitchen in the main house, she uses the outdoor annex, especially in hot weather. V.G. Sangarees brother, Ronat, once lived on 17th Street, and his cottage is now home to Carole and Michael Seibert. The new owners replaced existing ooring with river-recov ered heart pine. Michael Seibert is a sculptor, and examples of his work in painted cypress adorn the home and sur rounding lawn along with fanciful pieces by other art ists. He shares his studio with spouse, Carole, who is a painter. The clean, simple lines of the interior are accented with pieces of bright furni ture, and the couples cats lend a homey touch. Big Red, a yellow tom, acted as greeter at the front door. Antique bedsteads, indirect lighting and simple clean linens create a restful set ting in the bedrooms. Longtime Apalachicola resident June Dosik gra ciously opened her lovely home to guests this year. The house and grounds are a study in comfort and practicality. The yard fea tures a screened gazebo and lap pool. Inside, the house is a series of cozy niches for relaxing, dining and contemplation. I think its just perfect for one person, said Dosik. Lynn and Bill Spohrer opened their Avenue B Victorian Lynn Haven for the second time on this years tour. The home can best be described as stately with a well-appointed yard and wrap-around porch. The rst oor is designed for entertaining and ex pansive open sitting areas and a dining room for 10 is accented with museum class antiques and a grand piano. The kitchen testies to Spohrers culinary aptitude. Tucked to one side is a cozy sitting room where the fam ily can enjoy Sunday morn ing newspapers and classic movies together. On 10th Street, the tiny Lauver/Sawyer house was full of surprises. The 800square foot cottage fea tures painted hardwood oors and lots of eclectic art and artifacts includ ing two Clyde Butcher photographs. The Richardson/Gallant house, less than two years old, was built to blend with traditional Apalachicola architecture. The Florida cottage has local style but state-of-art xtures, with furnishings that reect the owners New England heri tage. The focal point of the great room is a painting of Richardsons great-greatgreat grandmother. The owners preserved so much of the lush foliage on their lot that visitors during the tour speculated on how equipment used to build the house had accessed the lot. A screened porch at the rear of the home allows residents to enjoy a shady retreat without bugs. One of the most unusual stops on this years tour was the Nancy and Rich ard Dagenhart house on Frederick S. Humphries St. The owners purchased a shotgun house on a halflot intending to restore it but the cottage proved un salvageable. Dagenhart, an architect then designed a replacement that makes good use of every inch of buildable space. The house has a side entrance. The main living area is 10 by 52 but 20-foot ceilings give the great room an expansive feel. High shelves display the Dagenharts collection of snow globes. A sleeping loft maximizes space and a galley kitchen makes the most efcient use of cook ing facilities. To the rear of the home, a cozy reading area and screened porch provide escape and privacy for residents. As a special treat, this year, The Chapman Audito rium, built in 1931, opened its doors for the tour. In 2013, the massive Art Deco structure was listed as one of Floridas 11 most endan gered buildings after the state of the auditorium was analyzed by a masters can didate from Florida State University. The future of the building, which houses the ofces of Dr. Shezad Sanaullah, is currently un der discussion. Two gardens rounded out the dance card for participants in this years tour. The Bond garden se questered in a fenced and gated yard is a cool retreat with quirky containers and ornaments surrounding a comfortable seating area next to a shpond. The Joiner and Rowell garden on Seventh, clustered at the base of a patriarch oak, features massed impatiens, with hostas and a planted container of tropicals as fo cal points for the array. At a debrieng on Mon day morning, organizers of the 2014 tour said they were pleased with the event but glad that another year of planning had come to a successful end. About $30,000 was raised this year. Funds are used to maintain historic Trinity Episcopal Church. V P K Re g i s t r a t i o n h a s b e g u n D e a dl i n e f o r R e g i s t r a t i o n M a y 1 5 t h Wh a t D o I Br i n g : C h i l d s B i r t h C e r t i c a t e Soc i a l S e c u r i t y C a r d R e ce n t P h y s i c a l Sh o t r e c o r d pr oo f o f r e sid e nc y p a r e n t id e n t i c a t i on A l l d oc u m e n t s m us t be s u b m i t t e d t o be r e g i s t e r e d f o r t h e 2 0 1 4 2 0 1 5 V P K P r og ram I f y o u h a v e q u e s t i o n s c a l l 6 7 0 2 8 1 0 e x t 4 1 1 7 J o y T o w n s o r S u e S u m m e r s a t E x t 4 1 0 9 Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A ( 850 ) 899-1588 BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400 + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 50 X 150 G U L F L O T $35,000 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 850.608.6121 D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO D A R U YO e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e e b d l ou c e r h e 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o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e v r e s e o r l t l Ca e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y e c pa r s u o y ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t ay d o t HOME from page A1 ABOVE: This screen porch at the Richardson/Gallant house exemplies the marriage of indoor and outdoor environments typical of Apalachicola style. BELOW: Even the kitchen garden is a work of art at Wheatley/Whiteside house.PHOTOS BY L O I S S W OBO DA | The Times LEFT: This airy space is the main living area of the house designed by owner/architect Richard Dagenhart. RIGHT: This cozy room provides a refuge for visiting granddaughters. It contains two trundle beds to maximize both play space and sleeping capacity. A skilled seamstress who crafted many of the quilts and drapes in her home, Briana Wheatley, owner of the featured Whiteside house, has created a homey feel.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 KIT TENS, KIT TENS and mor e KIT TENS! W e ha v e a huge number of y oung k itt ens a t the shelt er a t this time E v er y age c olor and siz e T he one thing they all ha v e in c ommon?....they need a home W e in vit e y ou t o visit the nurser y ak a, the adoption c en t er t o meet these babies and choose one t o be y our v er y o wn! V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets Franklin County Humane Society See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y F l o w e r s G i s A n t i q u e s W e h a v e S i lk A r r a n g e m e n t s G i f t B a s k et s a n d G a r d e n D i s h e s f o r M o t h e r s D a y Society Special to the Times On Saturday, May 3, 25 local artists presented an impromptu display at the Raney Carriage House organized by sculptor Clarice Powell. The show was the brainchild of Lynn Wilson, president of the Artists of Apalachicola Association, and painter Susan Richardson. The show was sponsored by the Artists Association and the Pastel Association of Apalachicola, of which Wilson was a founding member. Were together for creative spirit and camaraderie, said Wilson. We dont want politics. Our goal is to be open to all local artists working in any medium and to be inclusive. We plan to display local art in local venues. Wilson said the artists association hopes to collaborate with Marie and Willoughby Marshall to use the Apalachicola Museum of Art as a site for future shows. Anyone interested in joining the Artists of Apalachicola Association can call Wilson at 305-588-5885. By LOIS SWOBODA Local artists stage one-day show TAMARA CELEBRA TES 70TH BIR THDAYLO IS S WO B O DA | The Times On Saturday evening, May 3, Tamara Suarez, owner of Caf Con Leche, celebrated her 70th birthday surrounded by scores of friends. The party, held at Rivercrest Lodge, was hosted by daughter and son-in-law, Marissa and Danny Itzkovitz. Suarez, in red, is seen here arriving at the festivities aboard the riverboat Lily captained by Gill Autrey. On her left is sister, Chabela Ayoub. Her grandchildren, Alex and Mya, are along for the ride perched on the upper deck. While waiting offshore to make a grand entry, the group encountered an alligator. Special to the Times The annual Butts and Clucks Cook-off by the Bay this Saturday, May 10 has rounded up a ne array of items for their auction. The event, sponsored by the Weems Healthcare Foundation, will feature friendly competition, over who makes the best chicken and pork, between at least eight teams in Battery Park in Apalachicola. Pork dinners and sandwiches go on sale at 11 a.m. and the live auction, conducted by Harry Arnold and Chuck Spicer, will begin at 1 p.m. Some of the spectacular items awaiting bids include a pedicure from Unique Nails, a massage from Day Break Massage, and gift certicates from Doloress Sweet Shoppe, Crooked River Grill, Tamaras Cafe & Tapas bar, Owl Caf, Hole in the Wall, the Blue Parrot, Bayside Burgers, Fathoms Steam Room and Raw Bar, Carrabelle Junction, Eddy Teachs Raw Bar, Millender and Sons Seafood, Lynns Quality Oysters, East Bay Oysters and On the Corner Produce. Also available at the auction are services by Gulf Coast Auto Parts, C & S Service, Carrabelle Beach RVC, Sportsmans Lodge and Journeys of St. George Island; shing opportunities from Capt. Earl Solomon, Capt. Catamaran and Capt. Gill Autrey; artwork by Amy Friedman, Lacye Tifn, Leslie Wallace Coon, Lynn Wilson and Susan Richardson; photography by Richard Bickel, Drew E Brass, Tom Tifn and John B. Spohrer Jr.; delicious creations by Sally Crown, Margie Solomon, Judy Loftus, Jody Fortunas-Wilson and Apalachicola Chocolate; and products and services from the Frame Shop, St. George Island Trading Company, St. James Bay Golf Course, Pro Groom, Downtown Books, Forgotten Coast Used and Out of Print Books, Fishermans Choice, Roses Botanical, Island Adventures, Dr Randolphs Medicine Shoppe, Badcock and More, Ace Hardware, Two Gulls, and lots, lots more. Butts and Clucks Saturday to benet Weems Special to the Times Franklin County School invites you to their production of Hairspray the musical, at 7 p.m. Friday, May 16 in the Seahawk cafeteria. Under the direction of senior Jathan Martin, coordinated by school media specialist Patty Creamer and involving many of the Seahawk family, students, faculty and staff, this grand show promises to bring a fantastic night of family entertainment to the Franklin County community. There will be singing, dancing and laughing, all woven into a poignant message of humanity. Tickets will be $8 for adults; $5 for students. They will not be sold in advance, but can be purchased at the door one hour before the curtain opens. Concessions will also be available during the evening. Please support this Seahawk event and come to see the performance, which will only be a one-time showing. Martin, Creamer, cast and the entire Seahawk family have worked incredibly hard, devoting countless hours to bring this production to the community, so make sure you come out and share this wonderful experience with them. The theme of the show is all about the realness of life and you want to be sure you are in the audience and see and hear rst-hand this wonderful night of enjoyment. FCHS to present Hairspray JEREMY ST ANLEY, ELISA KANE TO WED SA TURDAY PH OTO S LO IS S WO B O DA | The Times Left, a hooked wool rug depicting Modiglianis Seated Nude created by Jilly Michaels. Center, Old Soul, a sculpture in sterling silver by Kristen Anderson. Right, African Queen, a mixed media sculpture by Clarice Powell. S PECIA L TO T HE TIMES Dante Stanley would like to announce the wedding of his mommie and daddy, Jeremy Stanley and Elisa Kane, this Saturday, May 10. The wedding will take place at 3 p.m. at the Chapman Botanical Gardens with a reception following at the Holy Family Center. All family and friends are invited to attend.

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The Times | A7 Thursday, May 8, 2014 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Local Special to the Times Pastor Ron Barks, who has ministered to Carrabelles First Assembly of God church for the past 32 years, will be honored Saturday with a celebrating 50 years of his faithful service in the ministry. Everyone in the community is invited to come to honor Pastor Barks on this special occasion at the churchs fellowship hall this Saturday, May 10 at 2 p.m. Please, no gifts; just your presence is requested. Barks been serving the Lord since 1957, and was called to the ministry in 1960 while a youth. He was licensed by the West Florida District Assemblies of God on May 7, 1964, and while waiting until he became at least age 23, the minimum age for ordination, he began his ministry in the summer of 1964 working with the Indians in North Carolina. In September of the same year, he pioneered a church in Jacksonville, North Carolina as a young married man. Barks was ordained while a member of the North Carolina District Assemblies of God on April 26, 1967. He has pastored several churches from the Outer Banks of North Carolina and throughout North Florida. He moved to Carrabelle with his wife, Wilma Barks, now deceased, and his three girls, Marie, Ellen, and Gwen, all of whom graduated from Carrabelle High School. He is presently married to wife Joyce Barks. Barks to celebrate 50 years in ministry Saturday While waiting until he became at least age 23, the minimum age for ordination, Pastor Barks began his ministry in the summer of 1964 working with the Indians in North Carolina. Its always hard dealing with the loss of a loved one. However, my family and I rejoice in knowing that he went peacefully unto the Lord with a smile on Saturday, May 3, 2014 at 4:48 p.m. Randy Cook was a strong man of God, whose love we will hold within our hearts until the day we are reunited. We couldnt have asked for a better husband, father, or papa. Born Feb. 16, 1957, and a lifelong resident of Apalachicola, Randy was a retired correctional ofcer, and ministered for the Lord through the Pentecostal Holiness Churchs Prison Ministry. Randys love continues to live within: His wife Helen, his parents Eloise and Curtis Cook, his son Duane (Amy) Cook, his daughter Nicole (Ryan) Sandoval, his grandchildren, Breanna, Savannah, Victoria, David, and Ryan; his brothers, Wayne (Lynn) Cook, Johnny (Kelly) Turner, and Tim (Karen) Turner. Also many blessed nieces, nephews and cousins. We know that papa will be awaiting us at the gate with his heavenly song. Until then we will continue to honor his life and love. Funeral services were held at noon on Tuesday, May 6 at the First Pentecostal Church in Apalachicola with interment in Eastpoint Cemetery. Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Curtis Randall Cook RANDY COOK Joseph Philip Square, 77, of Eastpoint, passed away Wednesday, April 30, 2014 at the Bridges of Bay St. Joe in Port St. Joe. He was born June 2, 1936 in Painesville, Ohio to Philip J. and Laura M. Square. He was preceded in death by his parents; brother Roy Skippy Square; sister Laura Square; and granddaughter Akysha Gray. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Helene A. Square; brother Philip W Square, and wife Sandra; sisters Kathleen Justice, and husband Chuck, and Rachel Berger and husband Tom; sons John D. Square and Philip J. Square; daughter Tracy L. Gray, and husband Rick; and grandchildren Christopher, Melissa, Colby, Lindsey and Harley Gray; Timothy and Anthony Marshall; and Joe, Jimmy and Michael Square. A longtime resident of Eastpoint, Mr. Joe retired from the St. George Plantation after 13 years. He loved going outside working in the yard on his tractor. He spent time with the only pet he ever had, his Africa Gray parrot Byrd. A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 24 at 3 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Eastpoint, with Pastor Douglas Boucher officiating. Cremation was handled by Southerland Funeral Home, in Panama City. Joseph Philip Square Obituaries Wont have coffee at Chillas Hall until the fall; last Friday, May 2 was the last one for the season. Thank you for your support. Last weekend was gorgeous. Weather-wise, I guess its time to start spring-cleaning. Scrub a dub dub. Hope the weather is nice for this Saturday, May 10. Members of the youth group from St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold their annual car wash at Sacred Heart Church 2653 US 98, here in Lanark Village. Bring your car by between 3 and 5 p.m. That way, the car will be nice and clean when you take your mother out to lunch on Sunday. Suggested donation is $10. Mark you calendars for May 17, your full breakfast will be ready, and one of our faithful volunteers will take your order and bring it to the table. Yum! Yum! Door opens at the Lanark Village Boat Club at 9 a.m. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Later on Saturday, you can enjoy the evening at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and join in the May Birthday Bash. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come through the door. Dont forget about covered dish Sunday, May 18. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 12:30 p.m. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to share, your donation and your growling stomach and enjoy the afternoon with friends and neighbors. Hope you can make it! Be kind to one another, and remember, God gave each of us one mother. Love her and cherish her. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. Remember Mom with a clean car this Sunday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Theology on Tap at Tapas May 15 Theology on Tap will be held on Thursday, May 15 at Tapas Bar at 7 p.m. The topic of conversation will be the role of women in the church. Presenters will be Catholic Sister Jeanne Drea, retired Methodist minister the Rev. Dr. John Sink, and Episcopal vicar Rev. Martha Harris. Food will be available for purchase. Healthy Start Baby Shower June 3 Healthy Starts sixth annual Baby Shower will be held Tuesday, June 3 at 4 p.m. at The Centennial Building, 300 Allen Memorial Way, in Port St. Joe. We invite all Franklin and Gulf County pregnant women, new parents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for a special evening. There will be information stations on various topics such as car seat safety, shaken baby, childbirth, safe sleep, community resources and vendors offering merchandise for purchase. Free admission, plus food, fun, games and lots of fabulous door prizes! Special games for Dads! For more information, call 1-800-895-9506 ext. 100. The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed Discussion TUESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon1 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street 7:30-8:30 p.m. Big Book/12&12, Open WEDNESDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, Closed THURSDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church Noon-1 p.m. Open Discussion St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion. FRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 5:30-6:30 p.m. Open Discussion Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open Discussion SATURDAY Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion Group Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open SUNDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference Faith BRIEFS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES AA MEETING SCHEDULE

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By FRANK SARGEANT Frankmako1@outlook.com Flounder arent born at, but they soon get that way. All atsh start life looking rather unassuming as baby sh go until Mother Nature does her sleight of hand. Their eggs hatch into larvae that resemble typically symmetrical sh. The larvae quickly develop into a rounded form with protective spines on the head, over the gills and in the pelvic and pectoral ns. They are born with a swim bladder for buoyancy to make it easier to roam near the surface and feed on plankton, but as they grow they turn into Frankensh. One eye migrates across the top of the head onto the other side of the body, the swim bladder and spines literally disappear, the body coloration on the sightless side turns white, while the other side assumes a darker coloration that provides camouage for lying on the bottom. Thats important because the bottom is where these critters spend the majority of their time, either scavenging for a meal or lying in wait for a hapless sh or crustacean to get too close and wham! For Panhandle anglers, ounder are a favorite target species, not because they are a hard-ghting game sh, but because they are often easy to catch both from nearshore boats and even from area piers and jetties and absolutely great to eat. (Many area small-boat guides target the atsh when other species are hard to come by one who absolutely has ounder dialed in is Captain Mike Parker of Silver King Charters, www. shingdestin.com). But before the eating comes the cleaning, and theres the rub. Yamaha spokesman Martin Peters shes all over America, picking up angling tips where ever he goes. Here are some cleaning tips, with how-to photos, he offers for north Florida shermen. For the best tasting ounder, try bleeding and icing them immediately after landing, says Peters. Lift the gill plate, cut the gill rakers with a scissor or knife, then put the sh in a live well or bucket of water to bleed out. When thats done, put the sh on ice in a cooler to rm up the meat for easier cleaning and to maintain the quality. After that, youre ready to follow the cleaning steps below: Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! S h o p o u r h u g e s e l e c t i o n o f b e a c h w a r e s, c h ai r s, a n d t o y s. N e w a r r i v a l s d ai l y o f k a y a k s, P a d d l e b o a r d s, a n d shi n g g e a r w w w .shopb w o .c om WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M a y 8 77 71 0 % F ri, M a y 9 76 71 0 % S a t M a y 10 76 70 40 % Sun, M a y 11 76 71 30 % M on, M a y 12 77 71 10 % T ues M a y 13 78 71 10 % W ed M a y 14 78 68 0 % STEP 1 To get started, all you need is a sh like this fourpound summer ounder and a long, straight, sharp, exible llet knife. The cleaning board with clamp is optional, but if youre cleaning a lot of sh, its a time saver. STEP 2 Start white side down, and make your rst cut across the tail just forward of the n. STEP 3 Insert the point of the knife into the rst cut and slide it as far forward toward the head as possible running it alongside the spine, represented by the red line. Youll be able to feel it. STEP 4 With the knife angled just slightly down so the blade is running along the rib bones, slice carefully outward to detach the let. On larger ounder you might have to reinsert the knife to complete the cut all the way to the head. STEP 5 Repeat the process on the belly side of the sh, but make the slice carefully so the knife doesnt cut into the stomach cavity outlined in red. STEP 6 This is what it looks like after the two cuts. The llet is only attached directly behind the head. STEP 7 Detach the llet with a single cut as shown, being careful not to penetrate the stomach cavity and set it aside. STEP 8 Turn the sh over and repeat the process on the bottom (white side) llet. STEP 9 Carefully remove the feathers, the tiny muscles that power the ns around the ounders perimeter. STEP 10 Lay the llets on the cutting board skin side down, and use your nger tips to hold the very end of the tail section. Make a downward cut to the skin, turn the blade almost horizontal to the table, and carefully push the blade toward the far end using a slicing motion to separate the meat from the skin. STEP 11 When done, you have a single llet from the top and bottom of the sh that can be divided into four smaller llets by slicing down the middle where it is thinnest, (the section that was over the backbone). For smaller sh this is not necessary; for larger sh the split llets are more single-serving friendly. Cleaning Flatsh PHOTO S SPECIAL TO THE T IME S Captain Mike Parker goes to work on a catch of ounder at the cleaning table on the Destin docks. Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 8 Thursday, May 8, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A SPONSORED BY Local As we enter the rst full week of May, our local area waters are teaming with life that swims. Good red sh reports from the ICW canal have locals shing all times of the day. Most of the sh are undersized, however, a few keepers are in the mix. Good trout and ounder are back on the ats in St. Joe Bay this week. Most anglers are using live shrimp or Lys to get in on the action. Pompano continue their spring run on Cape San Blas and Crooked Island in great numbers and small jigs tipped with shrimp or Fishbites will be key to a good day on the water!

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CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SPORT S www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, May 8, 2014 A Section Special to the Times The 2014 Red vs. Black game will be the featured attraction this Saturday, May 10 at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex. Friends and families alike of the var sity football team are invited to come meet the coaches and players, eat lunch, and purchase your eld sign. A minimum donation of $5 to attend the days activities in cludes lunch of a hamburg er, hotdog, or pulled pork sandwich, drink, and chips. The Fellowship of Christian Athletes will open the pro gram with the pledge and a prayer, followed by athletic competition from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The Pam Nobles Danc ers will perform at 10:30 a.m., followed by an 11:30 a.m. lunch with the team, an 11:50 a.m. introduction of the new cheerleaders; and a 12:15 p.m. welcome to par ents and supporters from Coach Aaron York. The Super Hawk Award will be presented to the elected ofcial with the largest turnout and the most creative nest display, in which members dress in colors, cheer and whoop it up. After an introduction of the coaching staff, the 2014 seasons goals and objec tives will be shared, as well as the ofcial schedule and plans for fundraising and community involvement. FORGOTTEN COAST America s Great Paint-Out CAPTURING THE COAST FROM ALLIGATOR POINT TO MEXICO BEACH AmericasGreatPaintout.com Page 9 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A 61-year-old Lanark Village man made a powerful athletic statement April 26 on behalf of the use of medical marijuana to help children with seizures. Calvin Hartness ran seventh overall, and best in his 60-64 age group, in the Beach Blast triathlon in Mexico Beach. He was running on behalf of Team Tripp, named for a 5-year-old nephew back in Commerce, Ga., who needs the synthetic medicinal form of cannabis to help him with seizures. I was his baby sitter since he was 1 year old, said Hartness, who together with wife, Lisa, divides his time between Georgia and their home on St. James Island. Hell break your heart. Hes the sweetest thing and to go through all this for no reason its sad. Hartness said theres lot of misinformation about medical marijuana, especially since it is not being used as an intoxicant, but for therapy in limited instances. What he needs is the drug; thats all he needs to have a chance, he said. Theres no other drug available to help him, and 125,000 other kids in Florida. I would have done anything for him, I was all-out, said Hartness. Any time youre an old man and can run seventh overall, its pretty good. The Florida Legislature has passed, and Gov. Scott is expected to sign, the so-called Charlottes Web bill that authorizes doctors to order low-THC cannabis for use by patients suffering from chronic seizures. More than 125,000 children suffer from severe epilepsy in Florida and the bill also allows the specic strains of cannabis to cover cancer and persistent muscle spasms, including Lou Gehrigs disease and other chronic conditions. Tripp was in Colorado this week, starting his treatments in one of the few states where medical marijuana is legal. Hartnesss performance was indeed impressive at the Beach Blast, as he was at least eight years older than any of the six nishers ahead of him. He might have nished even stronger than his 1:17.39 time were it not for the 3.1-mile run portion of the triathlon, which he completed in 26:33, a career worst by two minutes. My run was my worst time ever but I havent been able to run due to hip problems, so I expected that, he said. I was 20th overall, my worst ever. I was stuck in no mans land, running by myself. But I dont make excuses; I just go. Hartness did well in the 15mile bike ride, nishing in a time of 42:08 and fth overall atop a road bike. This came after being fth out of the water following his 0.35-mile swim in just under seven minutes in the Gulf off Mexico Beach. I have done a lot of swimming training for this, he said. Before I didnt have a place. Special to the Times On April 26-27, the 14-and-under and 17-and-under Franklin County travel basketball teams played in the Take Charge Breast Cancer Awareness Tourney, their rst tournament of the offseason, at Florida A & M University, taking on squads from North Florida and South Georgia. Players on the 17-and-under team were Kelsey Jones, Kenneth Wilson, Tyler Farmer, Tyler Howard, Marshall Sweet, Sharod Senatus, Nathan Jones, and Josue Barahona. Players on the 14-and-under team were Cash Creamer, Johnny Jones, Jan Lowe, Tyler Pendleton, Tyrell Green, Mikalin Huckeba, Landon Nash, Cam eron Nash, Elijah DeCoursey, Jack Harris, Arric Sowell, Jonathan Jones, and Daijon Penamon. The older team nished in second place, winning its preliminary game 61-30, led by Barahona with 20 points, including six three-point eld goals. Jones, Senatus, and Farmer also shined in this game, each scoring in double digits. The whole team played really great this game defensively and offensively, said Sweatt. We were really condent going into the seminal game after this preliminary game. The Seahawks defeated the South Georgia team 44-40 to earn its way into the championship. KK Wilson really played well in spurts during the game, nishing good around the basket, said Sweatt. Jones and Senatus did a great job distributing the ball. Barahona and Howard hit a couple of big shots late in the game to seal the deal. Senatus ended the game with a posterized dunk which ended it with an exclamation mark. In the nals the Seahawks faced the Tallahassee Timberwolves which in cluded players from Chiles and Maclay high schools.Every player on their team could shoot, even the three bigs they had, said Sweatt. We played solid defense throughout the game. Leading by seven, 38-31, with ve minutes left, Howard caught a cramp and had to come out. He was guarding a really good player and shooter. Mar shall Sweet was also out this game so that hurt us in this crucial situation, said Sweatt. The player hit back-toback three-pointers over the next cou ple minutes which were big shots. They also got a couple of cheap long rebounds and had some leak-out lay-up points in transition. We fought hard regardless and ended the game well but just came up short with a nal of 53-48. They hit their free throws late in the game to seal their victory and our defeat. Sweatt said Farmer hit some big shots throughout the game along with Jones, while Senatus made some great passes throughout the game to set up teammates, and Howard and Jones played great defense. Barahona was selected the Se ahawks representative on the All-Tour nament Team and Senatus was select ed as overall tournament MVP. This was a great start to this offseason, said Sweatt. The younger team fought hard throughout the tournament and im proved with every game, said Sweatt. Johnny Jones, Tyler Pendleton, and Cash Creamer led the way with scoring for the team throughout the tourney, and Jan Lowe controlled the games well at the point guard position. The teams next tournament is May 9-10 in Tallahassee at the Comets Capi tal Challenge. Sweatt offered thanks to sponsors for this rst tournament: Tamaras Cafe, Willis Hardware, Four Kids Minus Four and Beach Pros Realty. If you would like to donate call Sweatt at 670-2800, or con tact Jeremy Williams or Ricky Jones. Special to the Times Teams are being sought for the upcoming 2014 Franklin County Co-Ed Softball Tournament to benet the countys Dixie Youth teams going to state tournaments this summer. The tourney is slated to start at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 17 at Will Kendrick Sports Complex in Carrabelle. Each team can have up to a 15-person roster, with a minimum of three women on the eld and batting at all times. All players must be 16 years or older. The tournament will be played on +/-200-ft. elds with a limit of ve home runs per game for men and unlimited for women. There may be an enforced co-ed line for women. Batting or der must alternate boy/girl until the women have all batted. One courtesy foul is given with a 1-and-1 count. A net will be provided if that is the pitcher preference. Pitching specications will be 6-10 ft, no faking. There will be a threegame guarantee, with pool play at least two games and then a round robin single elimination tournament. This may change due to number of teams or condi tions on game day. Bats will be inspected prior to game and balls provided by the tourna ment committee at a cost of $5 each. Any bats not inspected and approved by ofcials will not be permit ted. Disqualication will be the result of using unap proved supplies. First and second place teams will receive medal lions and a trophy. There is a $200 entry fee per team, which includes umpire fees. Concession will be open to purchase drinks, lunch, and snacks. Teams need to sign up before Saturday, May 10 or mail in registration in the amount of the tournament fee before this time. We need to know in advance how many teams will be participating in the event, so dont wait to sign up. Make checks payable to the ADYL and mail to 1627 Linden Road, Apalachicola, FL 32320. For more info, call Kim Johnson 653-6887 or Kevin Newell 370-6176. Co-ed softball tourney to benet youth Seahawks open hoop offseason strong Seahawks to play Red-Black game Saturday Hartness runs triathlon for Tripp, THC CALVIN HAR TNESS

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center This is the honor roll for the third nine-weeks grading period at the First Baptist Christian School. KINDERGARTEN All As: Shaylee Tomes A/B: Tyler Morrison, Laykn Queen SECOND GRADE A/B: Caden Allen, Emma White, Brayden McCall, Ethan Kembro THIRD GRADE A/B: Olivia Barineau, Riley ONeal and Skylar Layne FOURTH GRADE All A s: Cameron Nash, Genesis Jones, Sophia Salman A/B: Carter Kembro FIFTH GRADE A/B: Eva Strickland SIXTH GRADE A/B: Lydia Strickland SEVENTH GRADE All A s: Adria Valenzuela A/B: Talyn Arnett EIGHTH GRADE All A s: Jordan Alexander A/B: Logan Arnett FRESHMEN All A s: Noah Strickland A/B: Juliana Gay, Anna Smith, Katie Spann, Xuripha Tiller SENIORS A/B: Brandy Parker E ditors note: The following is a corrected version of the third grade honor roll for the third nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. There were errors in the earlier version that have since been corrected. T HIRD GRADE W. Martina A ll A s: Lucy Neill and River Sheridan A B: Mitchell Adkins, Faline Everitt, Zach Libby, Arav Patel, Owen Poloronis, Trinity Taylor and Mark Willis T M O S E S A ll A s: Kylah Ross A /B: Alisha Arroyo, Jonathan Carter, Kendall Hill, Eric Lau, Jayden Nichols, John-Michael Thompson, Colin Wefing and Leah Wren Special to The Times The Old Carrabelle Hotel has announced it has been accepted as a Gold level GreenLeader in the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders program, which helps travelers plan greener trips by identifying environmentally-friendly accommodations across the U.S. TripAdvisor GreenLeaders have met a set of environmental standards developed by a leading environmental consulting rm, with input from expert partners. The more green practices a hotel has in place, the higher its GreenLeader level, which is shown on the propertys listing on the TripAdvisor site. Innkeepers Kathy and Skip Frink run the inn on a daily basis, with Atlanta partners Will and Debbie Brown visiting when their schedule permits. TripAdvisor seems to have recognized our new on-demand water heating as the item that sent us up from Silver to Gold. We still think its amazing that a 1900s building without insulation can merit such an award, but there are dozens of other qualiers we do meet, Skip Frink said. An example is recycling, using the Franklin County recycle bins on C Avenue and composting of all non-meat food scraps. The compost goes onto the grounds, where plants grow that conserve moisture to shade and cool the building. The Old Carrabelle Hotel was changed by the present owners in 2001 from an antiques shop with rental apartments to the ve-room inn of today. The water heating change has been amazing, Frink said. We inherited stand-up 40gallon gas water heaters, piped together, so we were constantly heating 80 gallons of water on a 24-hour basis. Now, there is no hot water in the house until someone turns on a hot faucet! The TripAdvisor GreenLeaders program was developed in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys Energystar program, the U.S. Green Building Council, and the United Nations Environment Programme. For more information, visit www. tripadvisor.com/GreenLeaders. TripAdvisor GreenLeaders are leading the hospitality industry in making efforts to improve their environmental footprint, said Jenny Rushmore, director of responsible travel at TripAdvisor. We greatly applaud these accommodations and are pleased to share their eco-friendly practices with our online audience of more than 260 million travelers who visit the site each month. Travelers can now search for accommodations that have a GreenLeaders status on the TripAdvisor site and view a detailed list of environmentally-friendly practices that they can expect at each location. TripAdvisor branded sites make up the largest travel community in the world, with more than 260 million unique monthly visitors and more than 125 million reviews and opinions covering more than 3.1 million accommodations, restaurants, and attractions. The sites operate in 34 countries worldwide, including China under daodao.com. L OI S SW O B ODA | The Times At the May 1 meeting of the Carrabelle city commission, Roberta Clay, left, and Bill and Tammy Owen, center, received recognition from Carrabelle Commissioner Brenda La Paz, right, for their work cleaning up a section of Avenue I in Carrabelle. Through their hard work, they turned a makeshift dump site into a beautiful country road, La Paz said. At the same meeting, La Paz honored Mike and Joe Johnson, owners of the Carrabelle Marina, for their work in community revitalization over the last year. First Baptist Christian School Honor Roll ABC School Honor Roll Arrest REPORT CARRABELLE HONORS CITY BEAUTIFIERS The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. APRIL 29 Shelton D. Hutchins, 31, Port St. Joe, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) APRIL 30 Kuldeep Debsikdar, 34, Alpharetta, Ga., two counts of possession of a controlled substance, two counts of possession of a legend drug without a prescription and possession of cannabis (FCSO) Kayla N. Rogers, 31, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Brody P. Lockett, 36, Eclectic, Ala., violation of probation (FCSO) MAY 1 Larry S. Warren, 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) MAY 2 Timothy J. Marshall, 24, Apalachicola, possession of cannabis (APD) MAY 4 Quinnaland J. Rhodes, Jr., 27, Apalachicola, reckless driving, driving while license suspended or revoked, two counts of resisting ofcer without violence and escape (FCSO) Tonya C. Seamon, 41, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) MAY 5 Billy D. Dalton, 39, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Gary M. Mitchell, 28, Tallahassee, DUI (FCSO) Charlie P. Painter, 49, Carrabelle, cultivation of marijuana (FCSO) Old Carrabelle Hotel earns GreenLeader Gold status SPECIA L TO T HE T IME S

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 8, 2014 The Times | A11 2014 CAREER EXPO 850-872-4340, ext. 177 grayj@careersourcegc.comYOUR JOB IS WAITINGTHURSDAY, MAY 15, 9 AM-1 PM, PANAMA CITY MALL VETERANS ONLY FIRST HOUR: 9-10 AMMeet face-to-face with several local companies, all in one location. Network with employers and workforce professionals. CareerSource Gulf Coast employment representatives will review your resume and give you expert advice. All services are free of charge. Make a strong impression. Dress professionally, and bring several resumes. Be prepared for on-the-spot interviews.NETWORK GET ADVICE INTERVIEW FREE ADMISSION FOR ALL JOB SEEKERSGET THE LATEST ON EMPLOYERS ATTENDING! www.careersourcegc.com QUESTIONS? An equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. An Event for Career Professionals 1122832 4519067850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast 1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo.5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 94870T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19 2012-CA-000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN BRYANT, A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 22, 2014, and entered in 19 2012-CA-000447 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit inj.nd for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007BC4, is the Plaintiff and STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN BRYANT, A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on June 4, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of April, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact; Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-03090 May 1, 8, 2014 94888T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION CASE NO.: 14000048CAAXMX SUNTRUSTBANK, Plaintiff vs. MICHAELJAMES KREHLA/K/AMICHAELJ. KREHL, et. al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO: MICHAELJAMES KREHLA/K/AMICHAELJ. KREHL ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUTWHOSE LASTKNOWN ADDRESS IS: LOT10 GARWOOD LANDING, CARRA-BELLE, FL32322 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT10, SUNSETISLE 86 YACHTCLUB, ACCORDING TO THAT CERTAIN PLATRECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 14, OFFICALRECORDS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING A SUBDIVISION, LYING IN SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, CITYOF CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: LOT10 GARWOOD LANDING, CARRA-BELLE, FL 32322 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff’s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 16th day of April, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court FRANKLIN County, Florida By: Terry C. Segree Deputy Clerk May 8, 15, 2014 98681T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING & ZONING CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Planning & Zoning will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, May 12, 2014 at 6:00 PM at the Apalachicola Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a special exception request relating to the proposal of a preschool program use of the structure Trinity Episcopal Church Benedict Hall on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and 6Th St (O/R Office Residential; R-1 Residential), more specifically described as Block 16, Lots 6-8 pursuant to the official zoning map of the city. A Regular Meeting will immediately follow. The following special exception request item will be discussed and considered: a) The applicant is interested in implementing a small preschool program within the O/R (Office Residential); R-1 (Residential) zoned areas. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for such use if special exception approval is granted. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey at the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. May 1, 8, 2014 98497T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, THOMAS J. WEBB, JR. or VALENTNA R. WEBB, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1204 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: LOT 6 BLOCK 154 CITY OF APALACHICOLA COUNTY OF FRANKLIN and STATE OF FLORIDA, according to the map or plat of said city in general use. PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0154-00 60 Name is which assessed: CAROLYN S. BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98499T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON & MARJORIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1075 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 9 BLOCK B THE RESERVE AT MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES, UN 1. FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE. PARCEL NO: 30-08s-06w-1003-000b0090 Name is which assessed: NANCY BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98827T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Coombs House Inn & Suites located at 80 6th Street, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 1st day of May, 2014. CHI Apalach, LLC, a Florida limited liability company May 8, 2014 98687T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Coombs House Inn located at 80 6th Street, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 1st day of May, 2014. CHI Apalach, LLC, a Florida limited liability company May 8, 2014 98865T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 14000025CP Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF HAL EDWARD MCCORD a/k/a HAL E. MCCORD Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HAL EDWARD MCCORD, deceased, whose date of death was January 18, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 8, 2014. Personal Representative: KATHERINE S. MCCORD 618 Mariner Circle Alligator Point, Florida 32346 Attorney for Personal Representative: GEORGE H. GWYNN FL Bar No. 0357537 Williams, Gautier, Gwynn, DeLoach & Sorenson, P.A. 2010 Delta Boulevard Tallahassee, FL 32303 850-386-3300 May 8, 15, 2014 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. AKC Golden Retriever Puppies. Labra-Gold Hybrid See Pictures www.gracefulgoldenreciever@indianpass.com/ or Call 850 227-2185 Text FL88126 to 56654 Apalach: In front of Charter School on 12th St, Saturday, May 10th, 8am-?Retired TeacherYard SaleCrafts, Rubber Stamps, Books, CD’s, Easels, Sizzix, Paper Cutters, Craft Paint, Classroom Storage Pieces, and Much More. Rain Date 5/17 Text FL88576 to 56654 Mexico Beach 42nd St, Saturday Oct,8th 8am-until,4-Family Yard SaleHuge Sale inside and Out! Text FL88536 to 56654 Carrabelle At The Bragdon Home: 1102 Gulf Ave, Friday and Sat. May 9th and 10th 7:30a-?YARD SALECleaning Out 2 Houses Inside and Outside.1977 Ford Pinto 4 Spd 4Cly A/C. 13Ft Ghennoe w/ 2006 4 Stroke Suzuki, Tilt Trailer. Concrete Mixer Powered By Gasoline Honda, Pull Behind Vehicle. Furniture, Antiques, Tools and Lots More. Box Lots for Sale. $5, $10, $15. Look For Signs, Call 545-6548 For More Info. Cancled If RainText FL88529 to 56654 Port St. Joe ,1205 Constitution Dr/ Hwy 98 Fir & Sat May 9 & 10 8am -UntilMulti Family Yard Sale/ Moving SaleToo much to list! Rain cancels until following weekend. May 16th & 17th Text FL88521 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleFri., & Sat 10am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL83066 to 56554 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34287911 Mfg/Prod/OpWelderOpportunity available for local, experienced Welders. Apply at Gulf Coast Aggregates, LLC or call 850-697-4669 Web Id 34287510 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34287016 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in PORT ST JOE IMMEDIATELY Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Sal 850-227-6691 or Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34288036 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103Text FL86476 to 56654 Eastpoint : Hwy 98, Sea Air RV Park, efficiency apt, w/ vaulted ceiling, gazebo & deck $450/mo 599-5496 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Apalachacola : 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 Carrabelle: Riverfront lot on Crooked River, high & dry, $49k or will trade for open fisherman boat of equal value. 850-599-5496 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Susie’s Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, May 8, 2014 Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast R eal E sta t e P icks John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com M L S # 2 5 0 2 9 6 $ 2 6 9 9 0 0 St G e or g e I s la n d I S L AND G E T A W A Y 3 B R 1 1 / 2 B A h o m e i n q u i e t a r e a o f I s l a n d N e w m e t a l ro o f & d e c k B e a u t i f u l y a r d w i t h m a n i c u r e d L i ve O a k s & L a r g e P i n e O a k c a b i n e t s & i s l a n d i n k i t c h e n f u r n i s h e d 2 c a r u n d e r h o u s e g a r a g e w i t h w o r k s h o p / s t o r a g e w i t h 8 2 5 s q f t a r e a W e s t P i n e A v en ue 4518728 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250350 $64,000 St. George Island I S L A N D L O T FO R S A L E H i g h d r y w a l k a b l e l o t m e a s u r i ng 9 0 x 1 3 5 a d j a c e n t l o t i s s e p a r at e l y f o r s a l e q u i e t a r e a o f t h e I s l a n d o n E a s t S a w y e r A ve n u e n e a r e n d o f P o r t e r S t r e e t s h o r t d i s t a n c e f ro m t h e G u l f o f M e x i c o a n d A p a l a c h i c o l a B a y l i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y 4 51 8 7 2 7 4 51 8 7 2 6 29,000 850-899-1000 r o nb l o o dwo r th@ r o ndev o o .co m 850-653-7893 mel is s achandl er 68@ g mail .co m W e l l b u i l t h o m e o n 1 3 0 a c r e l o t i n a q u i e t a n d sa f e a r e a 3 b e d r o o m s 2 b a t h s 1 3 3 2 S F W h i s p e r i n g Pi n es S u b di v i s i o n 4518723 29,000 4516490 4516125 4516827 MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 P ositiv e S pace Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the den c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com 4518713 REDUCED Contact The Times T oday (850) 653-8868 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola Advertise Her e Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Who described a roc as a bird of prey big enough to grip an elephant? Marco Polo, Magellan, Cook, Columbus 2) If a man has ever been to a tonsorialist who has he been to? Witch doctor, Dentist, Fitness trainer, Barber 3) In 1899, where was the United States rst public parking garage established? Detroit, Boston, Baltimore, Richmond 4) Months that begin on which day will always have a Friday the 13th? Sunday, Monday, Friday, Saturday 5) Of these which is not one of the three traditional primary colors? Red, White, Blue, Yellow 6) Whats the No. 1 state for reported shark attacks? New Jersey, N. Carolina, Florida, California 7) Which of these is not ordinarily found in Three-C slaw? Corn, Celery, Cabbage, Carrot 8) What is gibbous a phase of? Acne, Tuberculosis, Adolescence, Moon 9) When did explorer Ponce de Leon pass away? 1521, 1610, 1701, 1836 10) Which states convention did Patrick Henry address, Give me liberty or give me death? Massachusetts, Virginia, Delaware, Maryland 11) What nickname is traditionally given to the clubhouse bar on a golf course? 10th Hole, Caddyshack, Fore, 19th Hole 12) Magnets got their name from Magnesia, a province in what country? Greece, Canada, Italy, Spain 13) Coptic was the last phase of what language that lasted over 5,000 years? Latin, Hebrew, Egyptian, Slavic 14) What was Frank Sinatras middle name? Alvin, Alton, Artie, Albert ANSWERS 1) Marco Polo. 2) Barber. 3) Boston. 4) Sunday. 5) White. 6) Florida. 7) Corn. 8) Moon. 9) 1521. 10) Virginia. 11) 19th Hole. 12) Greece. 13) Egyptian. 14) Albert. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com From Staff Reports Mandatory seminar available at Shellsh Center Effective May 5, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Science personnel will show the 20-minute educational seminar at the Shellsh Center in Apalachicola at 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. This means it can be viewed an additional two days more than the current schedule of Tuesday through Thursdays. This seminar is mandatory for anyone dealing in shellsh, oysters and clams, and a must-see in order to get a saltwater products license. For more information, contact Joe Shields III, environmental administrator for FDACSs division of aquaculture, at 653-8317 or joe.shields@ freshfromorida.com. Small business counseling Tuesday at Chamber Keith Bowers from the Small Business Development Center at FAMU will be coming to the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, May 13. He will be available by appointment for one-onone business counseling from noon to 4 p.m. Bowers is very knowledgeable and can help you with your business in a variety of areas. Call 653-9419 to set up an appointment. Full moon climb at lighthouse Wednesday The May Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, May 14. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will be 8-9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:25 p.m., and the moon will rise at 8:31 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for association members. The Cape St. George Light is in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, call the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Microsoft workshop at Chamber May 15 Interested in Microsoft 365 or Windows 8.1? The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce is hosting a workshop on the latest Microsoft products from 4-5 p.m. Thursday, May 15, at the chamber conference room. Email or call 653-9419 to reserve your seat. County renews child support service contract On April 14, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve a contract between the State Department of Revenue and the county that provides for state-approved payments to the county for service of process in child support cases. When the state les proceedings in child support cases, the sheriffs ofce may be required to serve papers on individuals involved with the cases. The sheriffs ofce usually charges a fee for that service, of either $20 or $70, which is set by law, but they dont collect the monies in these types of cases. With the contract, the county can be reimbursed at a rate of 66 percent, which would help offset the cost of performing this service. The current contract was approved for three years in 2011. The newly approved contract period would run for three years, from July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2017. Joint Business After Hours on May 19 A joint Business After Hours at the Indian Pass Raw Bar with the Apalachicola Bay and Gulf County chambers of commerce will be at 5:30 p.m. May 19. Come network with fellow business owners in Gulf and Franklin counties while enjoying food, beverages and live music by the Curry Brothers Apalachicola chamber seeks board members The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerces new year begins at the end of June, and it is time to elect board members and ofcers for the 20142015 year. As per the bylaws, President Donna Duncan has named Brenda Ash, Ouida Tartt, Mike Koun, Bud Hayes and Kristin Anderson to the nominating committee and tasked them with developing a slate of candidates for election at the June 4 meeting. If you would be interested in serving on the board or have questions about serving, email info@ apalachiocolabay.org or call 653-9419 by May 14. Chamber board meetings are at 5 p.m. the rst Monday of each month. Annual lighthouse association meeting May 22 The 2014 annual meeting of the St. George Lighthouse Association will be at 4 p.m. May 22 in St. George Lighthouse Park. In keeping with longstanding tradition, hot dogs will be served. Please bring your lawn chair. New capabilities at the landll Thanks to a new baler recently purchased by the county, the Franklin County landll now can recycle all grades of plastic. Formerly, only certain grades could be recycled. Recyclables will still be hand sorted at the landll so no change to recycling procedures by the public is required. Director of Solid Waste Fonda Davis said the county now can recycle uorescent bulbs thanks to a recently purchased bulb crusher. Bulbs should be taken to the landll for recycling. In the past, the landll accepted bulbs and stored them for transport but they could not be recycled on site. Davis said he plans to bring the bulb crusher to local communities at a future time for bulb amnesty days. Dates have not been set. News BRIEFS