The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00267

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxxThursday, April 24, 2014 50DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Out to see xxxxx xxxxxWWW.APALACHTIMES.COMOpinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-13 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com More than $2 million is on its way to help train and transfer oystermen into careers off the water. The federal government nally released the National Emergency Grant money after months of back and forth with the states WorkForce people, gathering greater speci cs on how the retraining of 94 oystermen would be carried out. This grant is on top of $2.9 million the county received in 2012 through the Federal Emergency Management Agencys Public Assistance Program as a result of Tropical Storm Debby. That money served close to 250 people, nearly all of them as part of a shelling program to replenish the oyster bars of the Apalachicola Bay. At that time, they (the federal government) wouldnt allow us to provide training, it was only a temporary job grant, said Kim FUTURE CAREERSThe following is a breakdown on what has been allocated to cover the average cost of retraining, including tuition and course materials. Correctional of cer: 10 participants @ $2,000 each Auto service technicians: 10 participants @ $6,315 each Heavy equipment mechanics: 10 participants @ $5,376 each Heating and air conditioning: 2 participants @ $5,642 each Commercial truck driver: 12 participants @$2,504 each Welders: Five participants @$6,810 each Misc. training, such as licensed practical nurse, commercial cook: 15 participants @ $5,500 eachMoney coming for job retrainingSee RETRAINING A9By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com C hilly weather didnt daunt classic boat and automobile fans last Saturday. Organizer Anita Grove said, with more than 50 entries, and booths featuring local artists, this was perhaps the best turnout ever for the 16th annual Apalachicola Antique and Classic Boat Show. Grove said there were entries from as far away as California. One of the most popular boats, appearing for the rst time in the boat show was the Justines Dream, a mini-tugboat with a pilothouse created by Justin Julian of Port St. Joe for his daughter, Justine. Julian said he built the boat from scratch and it is the sixth he has constructed. He said he began work on the little red BOAT SHOW WINNERSBest In Show Overall: James Doherty, Oxford, Ga. for a 14 6 sailboat built in 2011. Best In Show Antique Boat: David Soule, Roseland for Carib II, a 1924 sailboat 52 designed by Ralph Monroe. Best In Show Classic Boat: Charles and Lisa Savage, Fairhope Ala. for a 1946 Garwood Ensign. Best In Show Locally Built Boat: Gary Reynolds for a 16 Fans bundle up for boat showSee BOAT WINNERS A3See BOAT SHOW A3 THE LAST NOELCity fells local landmark; residents perplexedBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com An Apalachicola landmark vanished recently and some people are wondering why. On Tuesday morning, April 8, workers with chainsaws leveled the community Christmas tree and by lunchtime, the tree was gone. Jim Bachrach, Main Street president and a member of Planning and Zoning, was on site and fronted questions during the removal. Bachrach said the tree was removed because it interfered with the in-ground irrigation system and an electrical box located within the trees canopy was creating a re hazard. He said a better tree would be installed to replace it. In his blog, Mayor Van Johnson wrote on the subject, and said at close inspection it was revealed the tree was diseased and its large shallow root system was beginning to undermine the newly installed reuse irrigation system that services the park. The mayor noted that in the citys ordinance 201101, cedar trees are not patriarch nor protected trees and this particular one de nitely was not historic. In fact, its removal followed the procedure as outlined in the ordinance for a danger/safety situation. According to Samuel Hand Jr., an associate professor of agricultural sciences at Florida A & M University, the tree was a native juniper, probably Juniperus Virginia which is sometimes colloquially referred to as a cedar. The city ordinance lists junipers as a protected native species. On the request for removal, Code Enforcement Of cer Wilbur Bellew identi ed the tree as cedar or some similar type of Christmas tree. It is unknown whether the tree was a patriarch, which is de ned under the ordinance as any tree with a diameter of at least 35 inches at 4 feet above the ground, which is considered chest height. The Christmas tree was not measured to determine its status prior to removal. Bellew wrote that dead limbs were falling out of the tree, that the tree was a re safety issue in power lines and that the tree was interfering with the reuse irrigation system. In his blog, Johnson further criticized the trees appearance. To me the tree no longer resembled a Christmas tree, it looked more like one of those fried blooming onions that you get from food vendors at the annual Florida Seafood Festival, but thats just my opinion and See TREE A5VOL. 128 ISSUE 52 LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe Christmas tree at the 2012 Black Friday celebration. JIM BACHRACHRiverfront Festival this weekendCarrabelle CARES and the City of Carrabelle invite everyone to attend the 24th annual Carrabelle Riverfront Festival on Friday, April 25 and Saturday, April 26 for Pirates of the Carrabellean 2014 The Treasure of Gullets Cove. Sponsored by Sea Crest Realty and Sandy Beach Properties, the new Homestyle food court named Gullets Cove will feature fresh seafood, caught and prepared by local buccaneers and scallywags. Hours of the festival are 4 to 8 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Festival admission is free.Anglo-American writers gather FridayOn Friday, April 25, from 6 to 9 p.m. come to Caf Con Leche. Bring paper, pen and poetry or other writing to read and share. Special guest is Sylvia from the United Kingdom. The get-together will be hosted by Frederick Kahler. For more information, call 653-CAF. Light refreshments provided.Patriots Day picnic SaturdayThe third annual Patriots Day celebration in Franklin County will take place Saturday, April 26 at 11 a.m. at Veterans Memorial Plaza, on Market Street in Apalachicola. A Cajun lunch will be served at noon. Cost of the meal is $7 for adults and all children eat free.In Harms Way shown Saturday The classic World War II lm In Harms Way will be screened at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 26. Donations appreciated. For information, call 697-8575. Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 xxxxx Contact Us Index Senior Seahawks honored A9

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Torrential rains over the last few weeks led to some changes Saturday in this years Easter celebration at the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. For years, Franklin Countys nest has sponsored an Easter egg hunt for county children on the Saturday before Easter. The race for the eggs normally takes place on a large open eld just north of the sheriffs ofce on State Route 65. After a shotgun start from the big bunny, youngsters race to retrieve colored eggs including a precious few that are hollow and contain a ticket to win a prize. This year, due to heavy winter rains, the eld was ankle deep in water and kiddies arrived, with baskets in hand, to nd the normal venue for the hunt sealed in yellow crime scene tape. The men of the sheriffs ofce are nothing if not resourceful, though, so they made lemonade when the weather handed them lemons. This year, each child received a half-dozen beautiful Easter eggs neatly crated and a rafe ticket. As youngsters and oldsters alike enjoyed free soda pop and hotdogs provided by the sheriffs ofce, names were drawn to award a number of great prizes including the worlds largest Easter bunny.Rain cant dampen Easter fun CouponExpires:5-15-14CODE:AP00 FORGOTTENCOAST AmericasGreatPaint-Out CAPTURINGTHECOASTFROMALLIGATORPOINTTOMEXICOBEACHAmericasGreatPaintout.com ApalachicolaAreaHistoricalSocietyPresents LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesJosh and mom Lena Allen make some Easter memories at the annual Easter egg hunt. James Carden of Eastpoint brought son Jayce to the Easter egg hunt. Ellie Dash Dot Sawyer of Germantown, Tenn. gets a ride to grab her eggs from dad Rob. The Sawyer family was visiting the new Coastline RV Resort in Eastpoint. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesEnjoying the search for a gumball in a cup are, from left, sophomore Alexis Jones, junior Lloyd Smith, and sophomores Weston Harris and Spencer Strickland. On April 10, to take a break from their school work and to prepare for the standardized tests, the First Baptist Christian School hosted a Fun Day with all kinds of zany games. Kindergarten teacher Kayle Mears directed the eld day and snacks, for all students from kindergarten through 12th grade. The program was sponsored by SWAT, Students Working against Tobacco. FieldIELD DaA Y fFUnN Eating mud pies are, from left, seniors Ashley Moore, Brandy Parker and Ashley Butler. From left, freshmen Anna Smith, Katy Spann and Brianna Parker try to gulp the fastest. Freshman Noah Strickland tries his feet at icy toes.

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LocalThe Times | A3 Thursday, April 24, 2014 Glen L design skiff built in 2012. Best in Show Restoration: Gerald Dake, Jacksonville for a 1947 22 Chris Craft Odyssey. Best in Show Runabout: Bill Hancock, Jacksonville for a 1959 19 Sebino from Italy. Best In Show Skiff: Mark Mize, Santa Rosa, 18 a Flats Boat built in 2014. Best In Show Sailboat: J. Brian Bryson, Monticello for a 19 Sharpie Sailboat, an Ohio Pond Net Boat built in 2007. Best In Show Home Built Boat: Jody Walthall, Tallahassee for a home built sailing dinghy. Best in Show Steam Powered Boat: Apalachicola Maritime Museum, The Eagle, a 26 vessel built of walnut, ash and mahogany. Best In Show Paddlecraft: Martin BenBaruch of Martin Marine Wooden Boatworks, Carrabelle for a 20 Kayak. Best In Show Aluminum Classic: Bud Harris, Talbottom, Ga. for a 1949 12 Feathercraft. Best In Show Fiberglass Classic: John Chille, California for a 1969 Poher sailboat. Best In Show Antique Motors: Ray and Steve Maloney, Tallahassee. Best In Show Antique Boat and Car: Cletus and Peg Heaps, Port St Joe, 1956 Studebaker Power Hawk with 1946 Thompson with a 1955 18-hp Mercury motor. Best In Show Antique Car: Dale Boyette, Gulf Port, Miss. for 1946 Chevrolet Truck. Best In Show Classic Car: Glenn and Jackie Hayes, 1962 Studebaker GT Hawk. Best In Show Modied Car: Dan Ostman for an Avanti. Peoples Choice Antique Car: Earl and Sally Ice, Foley AL for a 1937 Cadillac LaSalle. Peoples Choice Boat: Justine Julian, Port St Joe for a 12 6 mini tug boat with pilot house built in 2010. BOAT SHOW from page A1tugboat after he purchased jet skies for himself and his son. He asked Justine if she wanted a jet ski and, to his surprise, she said she was more interested in tugboats. Julian said he began searching the internet for plans and when he came on a hull design that appealed to him, he set to work. The tug took a year to construct and includes details like hand-tied rope bumpers. In the face of chilly weather, participants bundled up and crowded local restaurants and shops. In addition to many private entries, the Apalachicola Maritime M useum brought the  L. Francis Herreshoffdesigned 58-foot wooden ketch, Heritage, which took the ribbon for Best in Show among large sailing vessels. The museum also brought two classic wooden steam-powered vessels, and a group of model skiffs which were constructed by the students of Project Impact, an after-school program run through the city of Apalachicola. BOAT SHOW from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesJustines Dream, a 12 6 mini-tugboat with pilothouse won the Peoples Choice award for boats.

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, April 24, 2014 ASectionSpecial to the TimesACF Stakeholders Inc. has asked its consultants to begin drafting a Sustainable Water Management Plan that has been the organizations goal since its creation almost ve years ago. The action was taken by the Technical Oversight and Coordination Work Group, which is responsible for developing the draft, in a closed session immediately preceding the regularly called ACFS governing board meeting on April 9 in Apalachicola. The governing board meeting concluded the following day. Since 2010, ACFS, a grassroots organization that represents the spectrum of water interests throughout the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint river basin, has been working toward a Sustainable Water Management Plan based on science, good data and consensus. The group has raised more than $1.5 million to accumulate and model the data necessary to develop a consensusdriven plan. Consultants from Black & Veatch will draft the plan, relying on data produced by the Georgia Water Resources Institute at Georgia Tech and Atkins Global. The draft plan is due this summer, with the goal of nalizing the plan by fall. After four years of research, modeling and study, we are looking forward to beginning the process of writing a Sustainable Water Management Plan for the ACF river basin, Board Chairman Jim McClatchey said. Our priorities remain focused on balancing the needs of all the basins stakeholders in a sustainable and equitable way while also creating a framework for adapting the plan as needs change over time. To that end, the governing board also asked The University Collaborative to recommend a structure for a transboundary water management institute that could coordinate information, resolve con icts and advise the three states on a drought management plan. The collaborative is a consortium of universities hired in 2011 to research water management mechanisms. Transboundary water management institutes have successfully guided management of shared water resources in the U.S. since the 1960s, notably overseeing water management programs in the Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico and the countrys major river basins. These interstate commissions take different forms and have different powers but share the goal of promoting sustainable water management for all stakeholders. ACF Stakeholders Inc. is a group of water users in the ACF river basin of Alabama, Florida and Georgia who are working together for sustainable water management. The governing board comprises 56 individuals representing all aspects of the river basins economic, agricultural, aquacultural, recreational and environmental concerns. Membership on the board is divided equally among the four ACF subbasins and includes membership from Alabama, Florida and Georgia. A unique Christmas tree, gone without warningDoes a Christmas tree have to be a perfect cone? Does it have to look like any other Christmas tree anywhere? Apalachicola had a unique, living tree that served as the downtown Christmas tree for more than a quarter century. It was part of Apalachicolas special character. Suddenly, without warning or discussion, it is gone. Perhaps there were some problems with this tree. Was it really diseased? Was it interfering with the irrigation system? Was it in danger of starting a re at the electrical box? Was it too large to decorate? Whatever evidence there may have been for any of these claims is gone. The tree was transplanted by Mr. Joyner. Back in the mid-1980s, he and his wife had a small plant nursery on the corner of Fifth Street and Avenue G, across from where Johnsons Store used to be. There is a house built there now. He was a gifted gardener. He could make anything grow, even transplant a mature tree. It seems important to me that we remember and honor those who have gone before especially humble people like Mr. Joyner. It is interesting for me to have reached the time in life when those who have come after set about destroying the accomplishments of those who have gone before. I hope there will be a new tree planted, that lives and develops its own unique shape, to become as special as the old one was. It is true that change is one thing upon which we can absolutely depend in this life. I just hope that Apalachicola does not change into Anywhere, USA.Kristin AndersonThank you for sensitive, beautiful outreachMy wife and I returned on Sunday to Apalachicola after spending the Passover holiday in Atlanta with my oldest son and his family and enjoying the second seder with our old friends at our old synagogue in Asheville. While we were away, we had seen the picture of my grandchildren and son Danny from the Apalachicola Times celebrating the Passover seder with the Trinity Episcopal Church congregation. I was happy that the picture was in the Times, and I looked forward to reading the article by Jennifer Shef eld, which I was surprised to see on the front page. Having worked with Alex and Maya on The Four Questions during the weeks before our trip, I was happy to hear from Danny that they had done well, and everyone was proud of their contribution. It was so gratifying to know that they had been able to celebrate the holiday in Apalachicola thanks to the decision by Trinity Episcopal to have a seder and open it to the community. In recent years, many churches have begun having seders, and there are a great many formats being used. Many are celebrations of the Last Supper and are usually during Holy Week, observing the cruci xion of Jesus and the Easter Rejoicing. Few churches have decided to do a Jewish Passover seder commemorating the exodus of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, to freedom eventually in the land of Canaan, and the giving of the Ten Commandments on Mt. Sinai, and the cementing of a holy covenant between the Israelites and their God while wandering 40 years in the desert. Trinity Episcopals decision to do a Jewish seder is signi cant and greatly appreciated. Jews living in small communities, as a tiny minority, often struggle to maintain their Jewish identity and holiday observances. Religious observance is a community thing. We travel to Panama City regularly to join their small congregation in Sabbath and holiday observances, and to connect with other Jews. Obviously this is inconvenient and sometimes burdensome, but it is our need to maintain our Jewish identity. Trinity Episcopals Passover seder done in a Jewish way was welcoming and heartwarming allowing Jews who chose to participate the opportunity to be with local friends and to feel a real sense of acceptance and community. If we had known more about the seder we would have considered staying in Apalachicola instead of going to Atlanta and Asheville. I want to express my sincere appreciation to the members of Trinity Episcopal for the beautiful and sensitive outreach to local Jews, few in number, but appreciative of the gesture. My grandchildren were able to experience their rst seder and to have a role usually given to children to ask the questions that set the stage for the retelling of the exodus story. Sincerely,Chuck ItzkovitzFather of Danny and grandfather of Maya and Alex I want you to consider doing two things this month for your betterment and the betterment of the environment. The rst involves a behavior change for every shopping excursion. The second is a 10minute job that could save you and the environment money, time and paper. Every time I go to any grocery, hardware or drug store, I cringe when I witness how many plastic bags are still in use. I fully realize that some of them will be used again for trash or carrying things back and forth to school and work. But I also know how many will be picked up by trash collectors and are ultimately taken to the land ll. I used to serve on the Wakulla County Board of County Commissions Task Force called Keeping Wakulla County Clean. Do you know that one of the committees suggestions was that plastic bags be banned from use in this neighboring county? We did not get that initiative passed, but be aware that many countries in the world and several states in the United States have done so. Until that happens, I would like you to consider two options. One is that you make an effort to return your extra bags to collection sites in stores. When you return them for recycling, they are shredded and then pelletized. According to the Society for the Plastics Industry, they can then be made into new products, such as industrial trashcan liners, owerpots, drainpipes and, of course, new plastic bags. Remember, this cant happen unless you return them to the collection points. I love the way the retailers have gotten into the reuse scene. The reusable grocery bags that are now available are so classy; I dont know why anyone would want to settle for less by using paper or plastic from the store. Get yourself some of those bags and make it a practice to take them with you on every shopping trip. Some people report that they cant remember to bring them from home or car. Return them immediately to your vehicle after utilizing them. I had to park my shopping buggy at the service counter and go to my car to retrieve mine twice before I vowed that that would not happen again, and it hasnt. Picking up my reusable bags is as familiar to me now that it is as natural as picking up my purse. Think of the petroleum, used in the production of plastic, that would be saved if everyone in Franklin County would make one of these two changes. I challenge you to make one of these changes during the month of May; your habit will stick, and we will be miles ahead in our walk to a better environment. The second resolution I would like you to consider is that you take 10 minutes, one sheet of paper, a pen, an envelope and a stamp to reduce, the rst action for waste management. Write to request that your name and address be removed from mailing lists by sending a note to Mail Preference Service, Direct Marketing Association, P.O. Box 9008, Farmingdale, NY 11735. You can also do this on line at the site of Direct Marketing Associations website. At this site you can also remove your name from 1,500 catalogs. You will have an even greater success by contacting the catalog companies direct. Their contact information is in the catalog itself and often includes a toll-free number. And you thought May was just about May Day and graduation?! I have added two important tasks. We will all pro t from your making these resolutions and following through with them. Shelley Swenson is the UF/IFAS Franklin/ Wakulla extension agent for food and consumer services. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys unemployment rate dropped under 6 percent in March and is now at the same level it was one year ago. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate for March stood at 5.9 percent, a drop of two-tenths of 1 percent, from 6.1 percent in February. The unemployment rolls shed four people in March, shrinking from 313 to 309 people in search of work. This decrease in joblessness occurred as the workforce grew by 148 people, from 5,092 to 5.240. The current workforce has 119 more workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,121 workers and the jobless rate was the same, at 5.9 percent. The March jobless picture tied the county with Orange County, for 24th best among Floridas 67 counties. Franklin was worse for unemployment than Bay, Union, Sarasota, Jackson, Clay, Holmes, Nassau, Jefferson, Baker, Collier, Seminole, Broward, Bradford, Leon, Wakulla, Liberty, St. Johns, Sumter, Alachua, Okaloosa, Walton and Monroe, the states best at 3.8 percent. The CareerSource Gulf Coast had a positive month in March with a measurable drop in the unemployment rate, according to the data. Individually, Bay and Franklin Counties both posted declines. However, Gulf County remained unchanged from February. The unemployment rate in the CSGC region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 5.9 percent in March, a rate 1.0 percentage points lower than the regions year-ago rate of 6.9 percent and one-half of a percentage point below the February 2014 regional rate of 6.4. It also outpaces the entire state, which posted a March 2014 unemployment rate of 6.4. Out of a labor force of 104,065, there were 6,095 unemployed CSGC residents, almost 400 less than the previous month. While we are pleased to see positive indicators in some areas, we know that our rural counties continue to face challenges in bringing new jobs into their communities, said Kim Bodine, executive director of CSGC. Franklin County has been impacted negatively by the sheries failure, which is hard to detect with the methods used in determining the unemployment rate and is not usually re ected accurately in these numbers. Gulf County is working hard to attract more jobs, but it is a challenge. There are many signs of continued economic recovery, but we need to see wages make a stronger post-recession gain. Wage gains drive consumer spending, which helps drive hiring. SHELLEY SWENSONSpecial to the TimesMay a good month for environmental resolutions Page 4Tri-state group to draft water management plan County jobless rate drops below 6 percent Letters to the EDITOR

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, April 24, 2014 certainly as demonstrated not the only opinion, he wrote. By the way, the tree couldnt be trimmed either or shaped to look like a Christmas tree without turning it into a barelooking stick protruding out of the ground. In a telephone interview, Johnson later said that the tree had not been inspected by a qualied tree expert to determine if it was diseased.Professor disputes safety issuesGeoff Hewell, chair of the tree committee, and City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb both said an arborist had not been consulted. Hand, interviewed after the tree had been taken down, reviewed the tree removal application and accompanying photographs. He disagreed that the tree was a safety hazard and could not have been pruned. Professor Hand, a registered consulting arborist with the American Society of Consulting Arborists and an International Society of Arboriculture Certied Arborist, said the reasons given for removal of the tree were inadequate and the situation was not an emergency. According to Hand, if the irrigation system and electrical box are being properly maintained, the tree should not have interfered with either. The threat of dead limbs could have been resolved by pruning the tree, he said. Trees are trimmed away from power lines all the time. I dont know if there was some reason why this tree could not be properly pruned to give safe clearance, if needed. (Neither) the photographs, nor the literature, indicate that pruning was not possible. Hand said that a properly maintained electrical box, not in direct contact with the tree, should not present a re hazard. If contact with lines was an issue, relocating the lines or appropriate clearance pruning might have been an option to removal, he said. Unless there was a short in the box or wiring, the location next to the tree would not normally be an issue as we up light trees all the time as well as string lights in them. He said he was unclear as to what the problem was with the irrigation system. If a root were pressing on a line, you could possibly have pruned the root if it were not a main structural root, Hand said. If the water lines are not cracked, and are in good sound condition, roots will not enter them and cause stoppage. The irrigation system is only a couple years old, and is designed and maintained by the city to distribute re-used water. Apalachicolas Christmas tree was planted in 1987 as an adult tree, and was featured on the front page of the Apalachicola Times on December 3 of that year. It was moved from 13th Street to the end of Avenue E under the supervision of a Mr. Joyner, who owned a nursery on Fifth Street. Kristen Anderson remembers he root-pruned the tree over a period of a year and oversaw its placement and early care. The tree had to be moved or be destroyed. We decided to move it., she said. (Mr. Joyner) nurtured and watered it and it took hold. Everyone was so thrilled to have a living tree so we didnt have to cut one down every year. It was our own special Christmas tree; nobody else had one like it. The Christmas tree became the centerpiece for the Downtown Improvement Associations Christmas Extravaganza, when carolers paraded at night through the streets with ashlights in a Parade of Lights. The procession ended at the tree and climaxed with a tree lighting ceremony. Joyce Estes said the tree was used as a fundraiser as part of the effort to restore Chapman Auditorium. People could buy a light for $5 and businesses could purchase a point of the star on top for $100. Estes said the restoration movement in the beginning purchased commercial lights for the tree, but they were either lost or stolen after several years.A distinct focal point for parkIn 2008, at the invitation of the city, graduate students in urban design from the University of Georgia made visits to Apalachicola as a part of the Riverway South program to develop project design ideas for enhancement of rural tourism and community enjoyment. They viewed the Christmas tree as an important community resource. In their nal report, the students wrote, (Riverfront Park) is Apalachicolas central park; situated on the water between Avenues D and E, it is the closest open space to the citys commercial core. A single round Christmas tree is the most prominent vegetation on site, providing shade while maintaining views is the challenge we faced. By placing small trees in two groups, the rst between Avenue D and the Parking lot, and the second between Avenue E and the parking lot, we felt we could meet both needs. We explored three different options for the sites design, focusing on the idea of ow, mimicking the Apalachicola River. In all the plans, the Christmas tree remains as a distinct focal point. The shade trees envisioned were never planted. Although signs designating Apalachicola as a Tree City USA are still on display, a call to the Arbor Day Foundation on April 8 revealed the designation was not in effect for 2014 because the city failed to le paperwork. Bill Spohrer, who has played a pivotal role in the restoration of Apalachicolas business district, bemoaned the loss of the tree. I consider it to be a tragedy especially for the children and for the community, he said. It was the heart of our Christmas celebration. Its something we give to the children every year. Im sure the intentions were good, but the sadness is that there probably should have been more discussion and communication before arbitrarily destroying a signicant part of our towns annual holiday celebration. According to documents provided by the city, the tree will be replaced with a 14-foot Christmas tree from Quincy Tree Farm. The same documents indicate that Tommy Ward of Thirteen Mile Seafood and Bachrach will oversee planting the new tree. City documents said the Main Street Design Committee has agreed to water and care for the new tree. Tree committee member Caroline Weiler said Tommy Ward; owner of Thirteen Mile Seafood will pay for the replacement tree. Jody Rosenbaum, who serves on the board of Main Street, said she was unaware of any discussion related to caring for the new tree. Weiler appears to be the only member of the tree committee who realized the tree was about to be destroyed. She said she trusted the documentation presented by Bellew that the trees removal was warranted. She said Bellew may not have had the expertise but had the authority to order the tree removed. To me this seemed practical. It just makes sense.Removed from P & Z agendaAccording to Apalachicolas 2011 tree ordinance, any tree on city property to be removed, relocated or substantially altered, requires a permit application be submitted to Planning and Zoning, which then makes a recommendation to the city commission, who will make the nal decision as to approval or denial. P & Z Members Robin Vroegop and Lynn Spohrer said the tree was never discussed at a meeting. Vroegop said the removal of the tree was on the original agenda for the Dec. 9 P&Z meeting but was removed. The trees removal was also never discussed by the city commission although in a telephone interview, City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb said Bellew consulted each city commissioner individually. As designee for the city under the tree ordinance, Bellew has the authority to order a tree removed if there is a safety issue. Due process can be circumvented in the case of an emergency, but Hand, the only expert known to have been consulted about the tree, said no emergency existed. I would have to know more to understand why it needed to come out for safety reasons, said Hand, noting that he had shared the tree removal application and supporting photographs with Stan Rosenthal, University of Florida/ Leon County Extension Forester, and the two had agreed. At the most recent P&Z meeting on April 14, about 10 angry Apalachicola residents wanted to discuss the fate of the Christmas tree. On the ground outside of the meeting room, a dozen protest signs lay on the grass greeting P&Z members as they arrived. Vroegop asked for a special meeting to discuss the tree. Chair Tom Daly said he would rather not hold a meeting to discuss a single topic. I have questions as a member of the tree committee about how that happened because that was a patriarch tree clearly and it never came before the board, Vroegop said. I think it is urgent. Since there are so many questions about the process and how this happened, I think we ought to have a special workshop on it. Theres a process thats supposed to be followed and to my knowledge it wasnt followed. P&Z member Bachrach said he thought its a good idea to have somebody here who can explain why the tree was taken down. Tree committee member Beth Wright also questioned the process that led to the tree being cut down. If something went wrong, we need to discuss how to x it. There are nes and tree replacement requirements in the ordinance, she said. A member of the audience asked Webb, Why dont you explain since you are the one who did it? Webb said she was not prepared to comment. Vroegops motion for a special meeting failed. Lynn Spohrer then moved to discuss the tree and the tree committee at the next regular meeting of the P&Z. That motion passed. My problem is this was the communitys Christmas tree and they should have been brought together to discuss this, said Bruce Hall, also on the tree committee. It was the only tree in that park. I think a community Christmas tree that you have celebrated around for years is important. TREE from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 Gingerisa1-2yrold Chiwienie.Sheisaectionate andlovesattentionbut shouldntgotoahomewith smallchildren.Shedoesnt likerestraintandachilds hugcouldbemisconstrued andshecouldnip. Sheisheartwormnegative, spayedandreadyforher foreverhome. Volunteersaredesperately neededtosocializeallofour dogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingfor peoplewillingtobringone ofouranimalsintotheir hometobefosteredfor variousneeds.Anytimeyou cansparewouldbegreatly appreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCountyHumane Societyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogontothewebsiteat www.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets. FranklinCountyHumaneSociety SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday BalloonBouquets51MarketSt.,SuiteA ( 850 ) 899-1588 PUBLICNOTICEApublicmeetingwillbeheldat5:00p.m.on Tuesday,April29,2014,atthecourthouseannexin Apalachicolatosolicitpublicinputonthe managementplanfortheEastpointWorking WaterfrontpropertyalongPattonDriveinEastpoint. Thepublicisinvitedtoprovideideasorcommentson theproposedmanagementplan. Formoreinformation,call653-9783,ext.160. Happy rst birthday, Zara!Cecillia and Joe Carter, of Carrabelle, would like to wish their daughter, Zara Elaina Carter, a happy rst birthday. Zara was born at 5:19 p.m. CT on April 4, 2013. She weighed eight pounds, 14.2 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Zara now weighs 24 pounds, seven ounces and is 30 inches tall. Maternal grandparents are Betty and Greg Sasnett, and Steve and Frances James, of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandparents are Victoria Jones and Mary Eddy, and the late Sue and Adrian James of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Jestin and Samantha Carter, of Venice, and the late Treza Carter, of Carrabelle. Paternal great-grandparents are Matilda and the late Joe Williamson, of Carrabelle, and Gloria and Greg Anderson, of Punta Gorda. Zaras aunts and uncles include Kayla Carter, Lucas Sasnett, Steven James, Colby Sasnett, and Brian Lolley. Zara celebrated her rst birthday on Saturday, April 5 with friends and family. We would like to thank everyone who came out to help us celebrate our monkeys special day! Its a girl!There will be a baby shower for Morgan Thompson this Saturday, April 26 at 2 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God, 379 Avenue A. Thompson and her husband Jason are expecting a daughter, Molly Beth. They are registered at Babies R Us, and WalMart. Special to the TimesDonna Merediths watery Florida crime caper has it all: Science for sale, regulators on the take, and a lawmaker set to seriously embarrass his wife. Readers will be rooting for Merediths principled young scientist to save Floridas water AND get the guy. Cynthia Barnett, author of Blue Revolution and Mirage Impoverished graduate student Summer Cassidy just wants to complete her masters degree in hydrogeology. That and hustle some foosball, chase a Frisbee, and drink some brewskis. Two months before graduation, a ruthless corporations efforts to suppress her research into groundwater contaminants upend her world. But nothing will prevent her from pursuing the truth not the loss of her scholarship, not the thugs out to get her, not even the enigmatic Ty Franceschi, even if he is as hot as Florida in August. Donna Meredith is a member of the Tallahassee Writers Association. Join her at Downtown Books on Saturday, April 26 from 1 to 3 p.m. A portion of proceeds from sales of Wet Work will be donated to the Wakulla Springs Alliance. For more information, call Downtown Books at 653-1290. What an afternoon! Chillas Hall was packed out. Ann Brown won the rod and reel. Good for you, Peaches! Along with the friends and neighbors who were there, I looked up and in came my longtime friend and neighbor, Jesse Yur. It was really good to see her out and about again. We all enjoyed the food and the friendship. Our thrift shop in Lanark Plaza will open at 8:30 a.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Bette and Mary will close up at noon. The proceeds from the sales will be divided between the Lanark Village Association, the Womens Christian Circle and the Ladies Guild. They appreciate your clean, resalable items but please bring them during business hours. Thank you for your support. Well, its here folks. The big weekend. The yard sale on our beautiful golf course will open at 8 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. Friday, April 25 and Saturday, April 26. Stop by and look around, and one of the members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be nearby to help you. See ya there! On Saturday afternoon is the Kentucky Derby. I told you not to put that hat too far back in the closet because you would need it again soon. Heres hoping you enjoy your mint julep. Meantime, in beautiful downtown Carrabelle, the annual Riverfront Festival will be held Friday and Saturday. All along Marine Street will be arts and crafts booths, food booths and other interesting things. You can also purchase a duck ticket, or two, for the annual Duck Race on the Carrabelle River. Proceeds from the race go toward purchasing new uniforms for the high school band. Tickets require a donation of $5 per duck, and winner will receive $500 prize money. I am sure you wont want to miss out on that. When you entered Chillas Hall, did you happen to see the picture and deep saying on the west wall? It was painted by our very own Jaki Cichy. Jake and her husband, Eric, are in charge of house and grounds. Thanks a lot. You bet we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday night, and pizza on Sunday; however, orders taken after 6 p.m. both nights, instead of 5 p.m. To order you togo orders, call the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Just dial 697-9998. Come on down and enjoy the evening with your friends and neighbors. Lots to do and enjoy. Saturday, May 3, is breakfast at Chillas Hall. Door opens at 8:30 a.m. and closes at 11 a.m. Come and enjoy a good full breakfast and good service. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be glad to take your order and deliver it to you at the table. See ya there! Later on that Saturday evening, you can dance the night away with music by deejay Jim. Just come on down to the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center. Door opens at 7 p.m. bring a snack to share, your beverage of choice, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze, and dance the night away. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, God is watching us from a distance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry.Millender Park hosts Quickdraw May 3Special to the TimesThe hosts of this years Americas Great Plein Art Paint-Out along the Forgotten Coast of Florida are excited to announce the time and place for the Plein Air Quickdraw event. On Saturday May 3 at 10 a.m. the Quickdraw competition will begin at Millender Park in Eastpoint. The staging area will be at the pavilion; judging is at noon. All artists, professional and amateur, are invited to capture Eastpoints waterfront in the plein air tradition. In addition to the novelty of watching the artists at work, there will be music, childrens art projects and the opportunity to be the rst to purchase a unique piece of art. The very de nition of Plein Air painting, from the French meaning open air, limits artists to the changes in atmosphere which makes for a perfect quickdraw platform. The Quickdraw is a prestigious opportunity for budding, accomplished and seasoned artists to put their talents to the test. Artists are required to register on-line at www.pleinair .com where the $10 entry fee can be paid, or the fee can be collected the day of the event. The deadline for online registration is Friday, May 2. On May 3, artist check-in at the pavilion runs from 9 to 9:45 a.m. At 10 a.m., the horn will start competition, which will run until noon, when the horn will sound and competition will be nished. Judging will begin at 12:30 p.m. with awards at 1:30 p.m. Come join the fun, look over the shoulders of the artists as they capture the Plein Air process faster than usual, and enjoy all that Eastpoint waterfront has to offer in unique beauty. Prizes of cash and certi cates will be awarded on-site. Original artwork will be available for purchase on the spot and winning pieces will be moved to a special display area in the Wetroom at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. See www.pleinair .com for schedules and additional information. Author to sign Wet Work Saturday DONNA MEREDITH Riverfront Festival highlights big weekend LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Society Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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The Times | A7Thursday, April 24, 2014 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService NationalDayofPrayerursday,May1,2014 FranklinCountyCourthouseSponsoredby:LoveCenterChurch Coordinator:AlmaPugh850.370.6465 eusthouroy Ctunolin CknarF "OneVoice UnitedinPrayer" Approximateeventtime: 11:45-12:15PM SacredHeartofJesusCatholicChurch-YourChurchontheCoast-2653Highway98East P.O.Box729,LanarkVillage,Fl32323Pastor:FatherEddieJones MassSchedule:Saturday:(Vigil)5:00PM Sunday:7:30AM(850)697-3669 Fasbenner familyThanks to everybody who came by during our time of need and sent cards, brought food and helped with the sh fry! All donations were greatly appreciated. God Bless All!The family of Bubba Fasbenner FaithRichards familyThe family of Mary Sue Richards would like to thank everyone for their acts of kindness. The food, the owers, the visiting and the prayers got us through during the loss of our sweet sister. She will always be missed! Again, thank you all. May you be blessed.The family of Mary Sue RichardsAgnes Geraldine Jerry Campbell was born April 30, 1944, in Apalachicola to the now late William and Annie Ruth Millender. She passed away Tuesday, April 8, 2014, in Carrabelle at the age of 69. Jerry was a homemaker and a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. She leaves behind a daughter, Lacey Campbell; sisters, Mary Griner (LaVerne), Gayle Mathes (Riley) and Jewel Johnson; special friends, Debra Manning, Brandi Manning, Tullos Peavy and Jasmine Carde; numerous nieces and nephews; and a host of other family and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jack Campbell, and son, Robert Campbell. Funeral services were held April 11 at Assembly of God with burial in Evergreen Cemetery. The Rev. Ron Barks and the Rev. Rudd of ciated the services. In lieu of owers, a memorial account has been established at Centennial Bank to assist with nal expenses. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family in making arrangements.Agnes Geraldine CampbellCharles Jefferson Little Boggie Sowell was born Feb. 19, 1963, in Apalachicola. He passed away Friday, April 18, 2014, in Panama City at the age of 51 surrounded by his family. Jeff was a lifelong resident of Franklin County. He worked as a commercial sherman. He leaves to cherish his memories a son, Justin Sowell (Brenda); parents, Charles Boggie Sowell and Bernice Miller (and her husband, Jim); sisters, Terena Tyrell and Laura DiClemente; brother, Dwayne Sowell; grandkids, Bentley Martin and Sadie Sowell; aunts, Merle Marshall, Janice McLeod (Lucky) and Carolyn Varnes; uncles, Red Davis (Billie Faye) and Ronnie Davis (Dollie); and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and other family and friends. He was preceded in death by his wife, Liz Sowell. Memorial services were April 21 at Deliverance Tabernacle. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family in handling arrangements.Jeff SowellMary Joetta Jones was born Jan. 18, 1942, in Levy County. She passed away surrounded by her family April 10, 2014, in Port St. Joe at the age of 72. Mary was a homemaker and a lifelong resident of Franklin County. She is survived by her children, Chris Howard (and wife, Teresa), Patricia Rickards (and husband, Joe), Sarah Estelle Smith (and husband, Bobby) and Xuripha Bunky Jones (and spouse, Gerry); siblings, Bill Lolley (and wife, Joy), Frances Gainer (and husband, Chris), Lassiefene Boatwright (and husband, Roy) and Zula Young (and husband, Holly); nine grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. Mary was preceded in death by her husband, Bufford Jones; daughter, Mary Frances Creamer; and grandchildren, Joshua Cody and Kenneth Ray Howard. Funeral services were April 14 at United Baptist Church with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. The Rev. Bobby Shiver and the Rev Ray Creamer of ciated the services. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family in handling arrangements.Mary JonesMargaret Anna Zuberbuehler was born April 15, 1933, in Philadelphia, Pa. She passed away at home in Carrabelle on Monday, April 14, 2014, at the age of 80 with her children by her side. Margaret worked in the hospitality eld for numerous years. She lived in New York for many years and summered at the Jersey Shore with her family before moving to Carrabelle Beach in 1984. She leaves behind her children, Robert George Soderholm (and his wife, Debbie) and Sharon Soderholm; grandchildren, Nichola Soderholm (Kristie), Chelsea Soderholm and Ryan Dobson; and greatgrandchildren, Kaylee Soderholm and Tyler Soderholm. She was preceded in death by James Howard Soderholm, James Spencer Soderholm and Edward Zuberbuehler. No services are planned at this time. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family with all arrangements. Margaret ZuberbuehlerRonald Dale Herndon of St. George Island passed away suddenly on Sunday, April 13, 2014, at his home. He was born in Apalachicola on Feb. 5, 1953. He was preceded in death by his parents, Quentin and Clara Herndon. He leaves behind his wife, Donna Jo Herndon; one son, Dana Herndon (his wife, DeAna) of Tallahassee; two daughters, Brittney Herndon of Tallahassee and Shannon Jo Martin (her husband, Michael) of Wewahitchka; one brother, Gary Herndon of Crawfordville; four grandsons, Quen and Kasen Herndon, Dylan Grif n, and Riley Hicks; two granddaughters, Annabelle and Marlee Martin; one nephew, Gary Lynn Herndon; and niece, Christina Herndon. Memorial services were Friday morning, April 18, at First Baptist Church on St. George Island. In lieu of owers, please make memorial contributions to St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department (in care of Donna Jo Herndon, 508 E. Bayshore Drive, St. George Island, FL 32328). Arrangements under the care of Kelley Funeral Home.Ronald Dale Herndon RONALD DALE HERNDONFrom Staff ReportsLove Center to observe Day of PrayerThe Love Center Church will observe the National Day of Prayer from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on May 1 on the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse. This years theme, One Voice United in Prayer, coordinated by Anne Graham Lotz, the honorary chairman of the National Day of Prayer Task Force, encourages people to come together and pray as a nation under God. We invite you to be part of some of the most interesting conversations on earth, said Alma Pugh, evangelist and associate pastor of the Love Center Church. For more information, call Pugh at 370-6465. Cards of THANKS Faith BRIEF Obituaries Simmons familyThe family of Dorothy Simmons offers their heartfelt thanks to each of you who took time from your busy lives to extend to us your outpourings of love during the passing of our beloved mother. So many of you provided solace in so many ways as we mourned her loss, and we deeply appreciate every token of love given. Our mother was all about love and family, and it blessed our souls that you so generously gave to her family what she had given to you for so many years. Your visits, food, strong shoulders, warm embraces, prayers, comforting words all were genuine expressions of love that will forever be cherished by all of us. We are incredibly grateful for all your kindnesses and thank you all very much.The family of Dorothy Simmons Paula HarmonI would like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to all my friends and neighbors here in Apalachicola for thinking of me during my dear sisters illness and passing in Kentuckiana. I am grateful to have been with her this past month leading up to her death. It was a bittersweet time lots of laughter and lots of tears Mary Beth loved Apalachicola and St. George Island, and we spent our last month together reminiscing about our times together here when she would visit. On her last visit, she adopted one of our street kitties that she named Kismet, who is happy and healthy and a reminder of better times. Special thanks to The Salty Dog Krewe for their donation, in Marys name, to our animal shelter. Your acts of kindness and your words of encouragement during this time are greatly appreciated. Thank you.Paula Harmon Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, April 24, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By FRANK SARGEANTSpecial to The Times The king sh are in at Tampa! Thats big news for Panhandle anglers, because it means the run of the big mackerel has nally started to move north, after stalling for some time off Fort Myers this year because of a wave of late cold fronts. Water temperatures in the Panhandle still are at about 65 degrees, and thats too cold for any signi cant number of kings, but all it will take is a week of warm, sunny weather to make things right. When the water hits 68 degrees, the bait will move, and with it will come the kings to say nothing of the Spanish, the cobia, the bonito and a bit of everything else. Scientists with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute have learned that most of the kings that summer in Northwest Florida spend winters off the Florida Keys and in the Atlantic as far north as Palm Beach, but as soon as the waters begin to warm in spring, the sh move back into the Gulf and head north. They usually arrive in strength in the Panhandle shortly after April 15, with May through October offering steady action. When the big schools of cigar minnows and herring arrive, the kings will be with them, anywhere from a half-mile off the beach to the wrecks 15 miles out and farther. A lot of sh also typically run the breaks offshore at 80 and at 160 feet. Kings are members of the tuna family, but are for the most part found on the coastal shelf; they are green water sh rather than the true pelagics of the open sea. Theyre caught with some regularity from Panhandle piers. School kings, aka snakes, are slender speedsters that average 7 to 10 pounds; they make up the bulk of the king sh schools. But there are also plenty of smokers in the mix, sh of 20 pounds and up, which literally are capable of making a misty smoke y from a reel as they scream line off at 30 miles an hour. Kings reach lengths approaching 6 feet and weights more than 90 pounds in a lifespan maxing out close to 20 years. The current IGFA all-tackle record is 93 pounds, caught in Puerto Rico in 1999. Fish of 50 pounds are caught occasionally in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but most of the line class records come in winter around the Florida Keys. Catching school kings is fairly straightforward; most anglers nd the sh by watching for diving birds or for other boats already on the school and proceed to troll a 5inch Clark or Drone spoon weighted with a trolling lead of a couple ounces around the outer edges of the school, or around arti cial or natural reefs and current breaks. Pulling the spoon behind a No. 2 or 3 planer also is highly effective, and during the dawn bite when the sh are often on top, they can be caught on unweighted spoons and jigs and even occasionally on a big topwater lure worked very fast. Kings can also be caught on a number of big lures including the Yo-Zuri Crystal Minnow Magnum, the Manns Stretch 25 and Stretch 30 and Mirrolure 113MR, which can be trolled at speeds to 9 knots without broaching its a great locator lure. Some also do well with a large chrome Rat-L-Trap, a vibrating slab lure. Another Panhandle favorite for these schoolers is a cigar minnow on a feather-duster rig the tubular body of the cigar minnow trolls true while many at-sided bait species tend to spin. Trolling speed is typically 4 to 6 knots. You can catch a lot of kings by just pulling a rigged minnow at sunrise while everybody else is trying to catch live bait. Frozen cigar minnows are available at all Panhandle bait shops. For the larger kings, live bait is generally best bet; a large blue-runner or thread herring (aka greenback) on a stinger rig is the ticket. Most anglers use No. 6 copper-color wire as leader to prevent cutoffs on the razor-like teeth of the mackerels. One small triple-X strong treble goes through the nostrils, and a second dangles along the sides about 6 inches back. The rig prevents kings chomping off the bait sh tail without getting hooked, as they frequently do otherwise. The baits often can be caught around channel markers on a sabiki rig, a chain of small ies. These channel markers also often hold both kings and Spanish never pass one up if youre hunting sh. The live baits are eased along at walking speed, considerably slower than rigged baits or spoons. Some anglers like to lay down a scent trail by dragging a chum bag chopped bait sh, dogfood and menhaden oil is a popular mix as they troll a circular pattern around a reef or hard bottom area, or simply circle bait sh schools. A favorite trick of tournament anglers is to sh a live bait down the color break line that makes up outside the larger inlets on strong outgoing tides on the outside of this line is clear water, pale green, while on the inside the water is black from the tanninstained bays. Theres usually a lot of grass oating down the line, and lots of crabs and other edibles in the eddies. The anglers slowly work the live baits down the green side of this line. Either way, once the migration arrives, the action is near certain.KING MACKEREL REGULATIONSThe limit on king sh is two daily, with the size limit 24 inches to the fork. Note that the fork is the center of the tail, not the tips. Fish must remain whole until brought to shore. For more on how and where to catch kings in spring, visit http:// surelurecharters.com or call Capt. Don Dineen at 376-8399.GEARING UP FOR KINGSSchool kings can be handled by skilled anglers with typical inshore gear, a 3000-size spinning reel loaded with 15-pound-test micro ber and a stout 7foot rod. The problem is you never know when a smoker is going to crash the party; a 30-pounder can readily spool such a rig, so most anglers gear up a bit, going to 20to 30-pound tackle with conventional spool rigs and heavy boat rods, just in case. Heavy spinning gear also does the job and can handle ber lines to 50 pounds and more. For pier shing, an 8-foot rod is a common choice, mounting a 4/0 reel with 30-pound-test mono or heavier braid. Many anglers use a balloon oat to get their baits out to the sh from piers, particularly when tide or wind is headed seaward. Secure the balloon to your leader rmly so it doesnt oat away on the strike researchers say these balloons often wind up in the stomach of sea turtles looking for a jelly sh meal when cast adrift. Whatever the rig, a length of steel leader is essential terminal tackle; kings have razor-like teeth that will instantly shear any sort of mono or uorocarbon leader, so wire is a must. Loop the wire through a small swivel, and tie your running line to the swivel.A DISH FIT FOR A KINGThere are better-eating sh in the sea than king mackerel, but properly cleaned and cooked, they are excellent table fare. My personal favorite is grilled king sh medallions. Basically, with the body cavity cleaned out, the sh is steaked into slabs about 1.5 inches thick. Use a large, heavy knife to section straight down through the backbone. Remove the skin, and then cut away the tenderloins, which form four almost round medallions of meat around the backbone; with this trim, you get rid of the rib bones and more importantly the red lateral line, which can give any sh a cod-liver-oil taste. Now you have four chunks of meat each about the size of a silver dollar, from the average 15 pound or larger king sh. Drizzle a little Teriyaki sauce on them, give them a spray of non-stick cooking oil, and put in a grilling basket, or even better a grilling skillet a Te on-coated skillet drilled with dozens of holes to let grease out, grill heat in. Cook over a very hot re until the llets just begin to brown. Kings are also good slow-smoked over an orange-wood re, or baked in a casserole with Italian-seasoned tomatoes and parmesan cheese in all cases, remove the skin and red line for best taste. About the only way that kings are not tasty is friedthey are naturally oily, and frying intensi es that oily taste grilling or baking works better. King sh can be lleted as with other sh, and thats the best route for sh smaller than 10 pounds. They can be frozen, but its essential to immerse the llets in water inside sealed plastic bags before putting them in the freezer; otherwise, they will become inedible before long.TO RELEASE A KINGFISHKings dont survive catch-and-release well; the species has to keep swimming from birth until death just to breath and when you take them out of the water, the shock and the lack of oxygen quickly kills them. However, since you are only allowed two per day, it makes sense to learn how to release them without fatalities. First, debarb your hooks; that step alone goes a long way toward allowing a quick, injury-free release; the sh sometimes can be ipped off the hook without even being brought into the boat if a single debarbed hook is used. Secondly, never gaff a sh you intend to release. Even a gaff in the jaw adds greatly to mortality, biologists say; best to grab the sh by the tail, swing it aboard onto a towel, and then get the hooks out with a long-handled hook remover that keeps your hands a safe distance away from those vicious choppers. Third, when you release a king, throw it overboard head down, like a javelin the spear-like dive into the water often gets their motor running and they will swim off, while if you toss them over at-sided, they might simply sink into the depths and die or be eaten by the sharks that are never far away from the schools. The king is back in townSPECIAL TO THE TIMES WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Apr.2471 64 0% Fri,Apr.2572 64 0% Sat,Apr.2672 6410% Sun,Apr.2772 67 0% Mon,Apr.2874 69 0% Tues,Apr.2973 6760% Wed,Apr.3071 5860% Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com Page 8 SPONSORED BY April showers have set in for our local area waters, reaching near flood levels in some spots. This will have an effect on fishing as the waters will be muddy for several days, depending on the tides. Good surf fishing from the beaches has produced pompano, whiting and some big bull reds. Many anglers are looking for cobia this week, but with the rain and muddy water, these fish will be hard to spot. Trout have moved back on the flats in St. Joe Bay and are heading to the usual summer spots this month, getting used to the warmer water. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, April 24, 2014 ASectionSpecial to the TimesOn Saturday, the senior Seahawks for both the boys and girls varsity soccer teams were honored, in a friendly match at the Franklin County High Schools Mikel Clark complex. The nal home game of the soccer season had been called off; on account of inclement weather and so the seniors had not been given a proper send-off. This game allowed the seniors to show off their skills while at the same time give them one more run on the pitch. Seniors Deborah Dempsey, Gracyn Kirvin, Ally Millender, Brook Pittman, Adriana Reeder and Jessica Shields from the girls team; and James Bailey, Alex Causey, Stefan DeVaughn, James Harris, Graham Kirvin and James Newell from the boys team, comprised a single co-ed team that faced off against their co-ed underclassman teammates. Wearing their signature black jerseys, the team comprised of seniors jumped all over the underclassmen and led 4-0 at the half. For this season, Gracyn Kirvin, Millender and Shields were selected as First Team All-District; while Reeder was selected as Second Team, AllDistrict. Additionally, Graham Kirvin was selected as First Team All-District; Harris was selected as Second Team, All-District; and Newell was selected Honorable Mention All-District. At halftime, the seniors were honored. Each had their soccer biography read while they stood with their parents at mideld. Flowers were given to the girls; while framed pictures of their entire team were given to the boys. All seniors received a soccer ball, signed by their respective teammates. The rain held off long enough for everyone to get pictures marking the event and the Senior team went on to add two more goals in the second half, winning the game going away, 6-0. Bodine, executive director of CareerSource Gulf Coast (CSGC), the new name for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. A lot of times, with negotiations, we would put them in temporary jobs, and after they ended, we could use funds to retrain them for a different eld if necessary. Bodine said that when that money ran out, CSGC began negotiations with the state, which administers the federal grant. They surveyed the roughly 234 oystermen who took part in the shelling program and a plan was worked up to nd training in the various choices. We didnt believe all of them would want to go into vocational training so we wrote a budget and proposal for 94 people, she said. This can only be used for those who participated in the earlier Tropical Storm Debby grant. That was the feds decision. This is an extension of that earlier grant, not a new grant, said Bodine. The biggest chunk of the money, $930,600, will be spent on an average of 36 weeks of needs based payments to those who take part, at $275 per week. This is paid out only during the training and licensure period, which varies depending on occupational choice. A little more than $143,000, or 8 percent of the total, will be spent on funding non-personnel administrative costs. The hiring of a project supervisor, and two case managers, will take out $230,000 for 24 months, and when bene ts are added in, will cost $310,500. About 62 participants, or twothirds of the total, are expected to enroll in training that includes correctional of cers, auto technicians, commercial truck drivers, welders, and heavy equipment mechanics, among others (see sidebar). The remaining third is targeted for enrollment in a combined GED-work experience program, which will enable them to receive their high school diploma as s step towards further training. This will cost the grant an average of $1,800 each, and include ca work experience component. Adult education cant be a standalone activity, said Jennifer German, deputy director of CSGC. It must be paired with something else. The grant includes an on-the-job training wage supplementation for 15 participants at $7,500 each. This is paid directly to the employer to subsidize part of the workers pay. There are a number of other lesser expenditures to assist in the training, such as $44,820 for passenger vans to Lively Vocational Tech in Tallahassee; lodging costs in Marianna for 12 truck driver trainees, which as $200 a week for hotel will run $19,200; and supportive service costs, for gas cards and the like, which run on average $200 per participant, of about $18,800. We have 24 months to work with, said German. Some training is 18 months and we need to pad in for testing or retakes for state licensure. Bodine said that the grant process to secure the funds took longer than is typical. Ive never really quite been needled on a proposal like this one, she said. They wanted more and more detail but we dont have a crystal ball. Bodine said the federal government has invested millions of dollars in projects around the nation related to fishery failures, and they are concerned the money is spent wisely. What theyve seen is people will go to training but then do everything they do to stay in the same occupation, she said. It has to be something they can get a job in. German said that while she is waiting on a notice of funds availability, to arrive shortly, my staff is sitting on go and is already started contacting the people. She said her staff will do what it can to assist in successful completion of the vocational training, including providing an academic lab at the Van Johnson municipal complex, where the administration arm of the program will be housed. We do what we can within reason to help, she said, but stressed it takes commitment on the part of participants. If you dont attend classes, theres no point in us giving you the money. In his announcement Monday, Scott said we will continue training workers and expanding the Apalachicola Bay economy with these funds. With this $2.1 million investment we will work to get this community back on its feet. Were working tirelessly to support the natural treasures families in the area rely on, he said. Diversi cation is a key element of a strong economy, said Department of Economic Opportunity Executive Director Jesse Panuccio. We look forward to continuing to work with this community to ensure a thriving Apalachicola Bay economy that supports multiple industries and jobs for Florida families. U.S. Representative Steve Southerland said that while we may be a long way from restoring Apalachicola Bays oyster shery, these additional funds help move us one step closer to the goal of restoring peace of mind for this proud, but struggling community. RETRAINING from page A1Page 9By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks nished their season by losing to South Walton in the district tournament on Wednesday, April 16 by a score of 8-2. Freshman Megan Collins was the losing pitcher, throwing a complete game and giving up nine hits and one walk. Junior Madison Newell led the Seahawks offensively going 2-for-2 with a walk. Senior Ally Millender was 1-for-3 with a triple and two RBIs. Seventh grader Melanie Collins was 1-for-3 with a run scored. Senior Morgan Mock scored the only other Seahawk run. South Walton took a rst inning lead on an error and added three more in the fourth inning, one of which came on another error. They scored their last three in the sixth inning. The Lady Seahawks made two errors on the night, but they led to three runs. The girls were disappointed, but you have to give credit to the South Walton pitcher. She worked ahead in the count all night and her rise ball was very effective, said head coach Scott Collins. The Lady Seahawks ended the season with 19 wins and seven losses and return nine out of 12 players next year including juniors Madison Newell and Calli Westbrook, sophomore Krista Martina, freshmen Scout Segree, Allie Kirvin, Megan Collins, and Adriana Butler, and seventh graders Melanie Collins and Sophia Kirvin. Our seniors (Mock, Millender, Ashley Carroll) will be missed and there is no way to replace some of their production, but we have a lot of young talent returning on both our varsity and junior varsity teams and the future looks bright, said Collins. PLAYER OF THE WEEKSenior Ally Millender was 1-for-3 with a triple and two RBIs in last weeks Lady Seahawks softball playoff game against South Walton in the districts. Ally had a great senior season and her leadership was a big part of our success, said head coach Scott Collins. Lady Seahawks close out at 19-7Seniors will be missed ALLY MILLENDERSPECIAL TO THE TIMESHonored before the Senior Night game were, from left, seniors Morgan Mock, Ashley Carroll and Ally Millender. Soccer seniors honored at Saturday Classic Moving forwardPhotos by GINA TARANTO | Special to the TimesPictured with daughter Jessica are, from left, Karen and soccer coach Joe Shields. Below, pictured with assistant coach Stacy Kirvin, center, are, from left, seniors Graham Kirvin, James Harris, Alex Causey, James Bailey, James Newell and Stefan DeVaughn. Bottom, among the senior Lady Seahawks honored were, from left, Gracyn Kirvin, Adriana Reeder, Deborah Dempsey and Ally Millender.

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Franklin County a Blueway communityAt its April 15 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to accept a Florida Paddling Trails Association designation as a Blueway Community. The designation was supported by the Tourist Development Council. The Florida Paddling Trails Association (FPTA), a 501(c)(3) organization, established the Blueway Community Program to help communities develop locations of interest to both in-state paddlers and outof-state tourists. FPTA de nes a Blueway as a water path or trail with launch points, camping and picnic locations and points of interest for paddlers. Blueways are typically developed to encourage recreation, education and community development. To qualify as a Blueway community, a county or municipality must be in proximity to a Florida paddling trail or Blueway and have available accommodations, restaurants and additional recreational opportunities like hiking trails, museums and shopping. According to FPTA, Florida has more than 40 designated paddling trails on various rivers and streams in addition to the 1,515-mile Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail. As a Blueway community, Franklin County will be featured on the FPTA website and in associated advertising. Other Blueway communities include Cedar Key, Yankeetown, New Port Richey, Desoto County, Zolfo Springs, Boca Grande, Live Oak, White Springs, Estero and Suwannee. KimHawkinsDavisCPAHwy98at11thStreet,Suite4 Apalachicola,FL32320850-653-6875 andMuchMorePromptProfessionalPersonalService Trades&Services ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDSFranklinCountywillreceivedsealedbidsfromanyqualiedcontractor toperformrenovationstoanexisting1230squarefootconcreteblock buildingat731USHwy98,Eastpoint,Florida.Thebuildingwas originallybuiltasaFloridaHighwayPatrolsubstationandinrecent yearshasbeenusedbytheFranklinCountySchoolBoard.Bidsshall includeallcostsforlabor,equipment,materials,warrantiesandsubcontractorsnecessaryfortherenovations. Ingeneraltheprojectincludes:anewADArestroom;anewelectrical closet;afuturebreakroom,newooring,ceilings,paintandnishes, demolitionoftheexistingfaadebrickandbrickcolumnonthe frontentryandreplacementwithastructuralreinforcementtothe entrycanopy,demolitionoftheexistingradioandelectricalrooms, demolitionandreplacementofwestfacingsidewalkwithnew sidewalkandADAparking.Therenovationsincludetheinstallationof anew3tonHVAC,newsupplyandreturnductwork,programmable thermostat,andassociatedcomponents. BidsshouldbeinasealedenvelopeandbeclearlymarkedEastpoint VisitorCenter.Bidswillbereceiveduntil4:30PMatMay5,2014. attheFranklinCountyClerksOfce,FranklinCountyCourthouse, 33MarketSt,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida32320-2317,andwill beopenedandreadaloudonTuesday,May6,2014,attheregularly scheduledCountyCommissionmeetingwhichbeginsat9AMat 34ForbesSt.,Apalachicola,Florida.Proposalsreceivedafterthe designatedtimewillnotbeconsidered. PlansandspecicationscanbeobtainedfromtheCountyBuilding Departmentat34ForbesSt.,Apalachicola,Florida,32320,(850)6539783.Completiondateforthisprojectwillbe120daysfromthedate oftheNoticeToProceedpresentedtothesuccessfulbidder. TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttowaive informalitiesinanybid,toacceptand/orrejectanyorallbids,and toacceptthebidthatintheirjudgmentwillbeinthebestinterestof FranklinCounty. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecallAlanPierceat850-653-9783, ext.161. PatriotsDayPicnicethirdannualPatriotsDaycelebration inFranklinCountywilltakeplaceon Saturday,April26at VeteransMemorialPlaza, onMarketStreetinApalachicola.MemorialCeremony beginsat11a.m. ACajunlunchwillbe servedatnoon. Costofthemealis $7foradultsand allchildreneatfree. Everyoneiswelcome.Allproceedsgotothesupport ofVeteransMemorialPlaza andThreeSoldiers DetailSouth. BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 50X150GULFLOT $35,000 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Law EnforcementA10 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 Arrest REPORTS The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department, Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. April 16 Krista R. Whiddon, 26, Port St. Joe, aggravated battery on a pregnant victim (FCSO) Justin D. Massey, 23, Carrabelle, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) April 17 Joey E. Sanders, 35, Hosford, Bay County warrant (FWC) April 18 James A. Seaman, 55, Panama City, Bay County warrant for violation of probation (FWC) April 19 Kathy D. Ekorn, 60, Crawfordville, DUI (CPD) Brett L. Davis, 41, St. George Island, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) April 21 Daniel Stepp, 46, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Clifton R. Galloway, 25, Carrabelle, possession of cannabis, uttering, forgery, and attempted burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Jece Hat eld, 18, Clarksville, possession of a legend drug without a prescription (FCSO) Emily M. Hat eld, 19, Apalachicola, possession of a legend drug without a prescription (FCSO) The Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce Investigations Division has initiated an investigation into the increase of counterfeit money in circulation locally.Detectives have uncovered at least one counterfeit printing operation that has been active at several locations in Franklin County. Detectives have seized printing equipment, software, ink and more than $1,400 in counterfeit bills. Sheriff Mike Mock said multiple arrests and charges are pending the conclusion of this investigation. If you believe you have been a victim of counterfeiting, you are asked to call the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce at 670-8500. News BRIEF Bogus bill arrests loom THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on

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The Times | A11Thursday, April 24, 2014 CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 24, 2014 The Times | A11 94740T THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA-000238 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. CHANCE R. MOORE, GINA MOORE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered October 28, 2013, in Civil Case No. 19-2013-CA-000238 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CHANCE R. MOORE, GINA MOORE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of May, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 48, Whispering Pines Subdivision, Phases 3 and 4, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of March, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 5774444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-9558771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. April 24, May 1, 2014 94756T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-000311-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DIANE S. WHIDDON, AQUA FINANCE INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT; ROBERT A. WHIDDON; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of March, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13-000311-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and DIANE S. WHIDDON AQUA FINANCE INC. ROBERT A. WHIDDON UNKNOWN TENANT; and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, 2nd Floor Lobby OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA. A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, AND FURHTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT 626 FEET SOUTH, AND 44 FEET EAST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER (CON. MON.) OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4; RUN THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF THE PROPOSED 88 FOOT GARDENIA STREET, 125 FEET; THENCE WEST TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT SOUTH BAY SHORE DRIVE (STATE S-65); THENCE NORTHWESTERLY, CURVING ALONG THE SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF BAY SHORE DRIVE 125 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT (CON. MON.) DUE WEST OF THE BEGINNING POINT; THENCE 616 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PROVIDIING A MATCHING 44 FOOT STRIP ALONG THE ABC SchoolThe following is the honor roll for the third nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. FIRs S T GRa A DERR R R amsdell, All As: Shlok Patel, Gracyn Paul, Jazmyn Pavon, Olivia Poloronis, Evie-Morgan Price, Promise Suddeth and Mabry Wallace. A/B: Josh Dykes, Addyson Kent, Desiree Messer, Ryan Mills, Joel Taylor and Josalyn Ward H. Baroody, All As: Breahna Fleming, Zariah Harvey, Mya Huckeba, Khali McNair, Issy Nations and Krista Varnes A/B: Ben Butler, Taylen Kendrick, Shaylee Martina and Micahlyn ONealSEc C OND GRa A DES. Herrington, All As: Peyton Blackburn, Nathaniel Bolinger, CJ Conway, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Taylor Mallon, Weston Taranto and Jostyn Tipton A/B: Hannah Grace Abel, Cody Abercrombie, Charlie Ramsdell, and Aubrie Thompson. J. Mallon, All As: Reece Juno, Taylor Pendleton and Kiana Weeks A/B: Trinity Creamer, William Luberto, Alexcia McNair, Isabella Price, Aniyah Rivera, Cassandra Robertson and Emma RowlandThTH IRD GRa A DEW. Martina, All As: Lucy Neill and River Sheridan A/B: Mitchell Adkins, Faline Everitt, Zach Libby, Arav Patel, Owen Poloronis, Trinity Taylor and Mark WillisT T Moses, All As: Kylah Ross A/B: Alisha Arroyo, Jonathan Carter, Kendall Hill, Eric Lau, JohnMichael Thompson, Colin Weng and Leah WrenFOURThH GRaADEL. Bockelman, All As: Meredith Alford, Dylan Griffin, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Myia Maxwell, Brooklyn ONeal, Rory Ramsdell, John Sanders and and Nico Valenzuela A/B: Carson Davis, Severyn Everitt and Gracie Smith M. Lee, All As: Weston Bockelman and Lauren Conway A/B: Lanie Allen, Colin Amison, Ella Friedman, Andrew Monod andGenevieve MontgomeryFIf F Th H GRa A DEJ. Ammons, All As: Camille Davis, Alex Joanos and Livia Monod A/B: Devin Daniels, Kaylee Hicks, Skye Huber and Kiersten Prince L. Poloronis, All As: Brycin Huckeba, Abby Johnson, and Jack Vail A/B: Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clinton Rester, Madalyn Thompson, Caden Turrell and Jarvis TurrellSIXTh H GRa A DEKaren Ward, All As: Cade Juno and Nash Ramsdell A/B: Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Jake Norred, Allison Register, Sophia Robertson, and Hannah Sweet Brant Banks, All As: Alyssa Robinson, Drake Stanley and Camille Williams A/B: Tanner Amison and Janacia BunyonSEVENTh H GRa A DETT anya Joanos, All As: Kevin Flores-Perez, Mikalin Huckeba, Alexus Johnson, Sophia Kirvin and Jack Ramsdell A/B: Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Bryce Kent, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott and Ethan Vonier Anna Keel, All As: Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McL emore, Conner Messer and Becca WillisEEIGhHThH GRaADEMelanie Copeland, A/B: Mia Cummings, Joseph Martinez and Sallie Rose PaulT T a ra Ward, All As: Christian Amison, Faith Sapp, Lucas Sasnett and Savannah Montgomery A/B: Michaela Cassidy, Simon Hodgson, Nick Joanos, Brooke Martina, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Madison Smith and Allie ZingarelliFranklin County E E lementaryThe following is the Honor Roll for the third nine-week grading period at Franklin County Elementary.FIRsST GRaADEAll As: Christopher Creek, Josiah Friddle, Sarah Ham, Bradley Page, Nathan Rotella, Dexton Teat A/B: Jordan Barber, Dalton Barrack, Sy Bartlett, Preston Butler, Loghan Carver, Serenity Cassell, Christian Daughtry, Nyashia Davis, Raegan Dempsey, Kassidy Denney, Ayla Derico, Layla Dixon, Dominic Durbin, Robert Estes, Cammie Gilbert, Daylen Gilbert, Jasmine Gray, Mahalah Griggs, Michael Hill, Jerzy Jackson, Christian Johns, Lilianna Joiner, Esteban Juan, Charity Larkin, Daniel Lively, Harmony Malone, Emmanuel Marcum, Adrionna Martin, Ajaylen McNair, Madison Wagner, Lester Owens, Asya Owens, Rosa Juan, Jesus Lopez, Estela Virbes, Reshard Robinson, Christopher Russell, Dezmonae Sanders, Michelle Weisz and Mckenna Young.SEcCOND GRaADEAll As: Jada Allen, Logan Bentley, Imani Ison, Emily Patterson, Onamae Millender, Corbin Pritchard, Evan Ogden, Kylie Proctor A/B: Laelah Carranza, William Chipman, Aryauna Benjamin, Marcus Clayton, Dillon Evans, Natalie Gibbens, Charles Glass, Bradlynn Hutchins, Bricyn Kennedy, Kirsten Martina, Brian Millender, Reid Nix, Mason Pace, Cole Polous, Terry Proctor, Chandler Sanders, Alonah Segree, Gavin Shelley, Anthony Stulsky, Christian Wilson, Austin Chapman, Ansley Savage, Jesse Whitted, Erick Romero, Corbin Pritchard, Austin Millender, Rebecca Mahon, Kayleigh Leonard, Hannah Creamer, Denim Chastain, Aryauna BenjaminThTH IRD GRa A DEAll As: Grace Carroll, Lucy Edwards, OMarion Kelley, Kylie Rudd, Emaleigh Segree A/B: Ellis Bilingsley, Sarai Crumbliss, Dylan Culver, Kyla Culver, Don Davis, Emily Fichera, September Ferrell, Emily Fichera, Emily Giddens, Marissa Gilbert, Trott Ivey, Alondra Jimenez, Sara Johnsen, Tariah Jones, Tashawn Jones, Autumn Loesch, Cloey Malone, Kelsey Martina, Parker Martina, Shalyn Massey, Jesse MockFOURTh H GRa A DEAll As: Savannah Brannan, Steven Cook, Casandra Gibbens, Rachel Rudd, Maddison Whitten A/B: Ariel Andrews, Mary Bareld, Trinity Barron, Briana Caldwell, Christain Custer, Bryce Gilbert, Merrideth Kiernan, Michael Melton, Robert Nessly, Marina ONeal, Grace Patterson, Brendon Polous, Brantly Richards, Anthony Roberts, Sarah Segree, Rebecca Shiver, Sydney Shuman, Annie Smith, Kristen Stancil, JachobEarl Thompson, Larry WinchesterFIf F Th H GRa A DEAll As: Martina Granger, William Gray, Katie Newman A/B: Tiauana Benjamin, Capri Cargill, Layla Chisholm, Tressie Edwards, Camron Evans, Kerry Garner, Francisco Juan, Hollie Larkin, Stephen Malone, Patrick Millender, Shayden Pearson, Shirah Pelt, Destanie Proctor, Colson Shelley, Makayla Varner, Lorne Whaley, Charlee WinchesterFranklin County Middle SchoolThe following is the honor roll for the third nine-week grading period at Franklin County Middle School.SIXTh H GRa A DEAll As: Brandon Farr, Kt Nessly A/B: Chasity Ard, Nicolas Hutchins, Jacob ShirleySEVENTh H GRa A DEAll As: Jessica Rudd A/B: Colby Boatwright, Charles Cassell, Melanie Collins, Preston Edwards, Kiana Foley, Hannah Hogan, Tanya Harris, Casey Riley, Kirsten Robinson, Mitchell Sand, Tonnor Segree, Makenzie Shuman, Beyla WalkerEE IGh H Th H GRa A DEAll As: Josie Kriss A/B: Ana Aguilar, Morgan Anderson, Tylyn Gillikin, Jesse Page, Jake Paterson, Leah Reeder, Dalyn Sheridan, Sawyer Stultz, Chance WhiteFranklin County High SchoolThe following is the Honor Roll for the third nine-week grading period at Franklin County High SchoolFREshm SHM ENAll As: Tessa Carlisle, Emily Crosby, Melody Hateld, Kacey Howard, Allie Kirvin, Zachary May, Astrid Ramirez, Landa Reeder, Mallorie Shiver, Jackson Subbarao, Thomas Subbarao, Tyanna Townsend A/B: Jayla Alley, Adriana Butler, Holly Chambers, Christopher Creamer, Tia Cummings, Logan Crosby, Maxwell Davis, Jill Diestelhorst, Bianca Huber, Jaylon Gainer, Myranda McLeod, Chelsea Register, Mercedes Rice, Natasia Robinson, Scout Segree, Alexis Segree, Bianca Huber, Vanessa Simmons, Marshall SweetSOph PH Om M OREs SAll As: Adam Hames, Quinnaland Rhodes, John White A/B: Amelia Newman, Anna Riley, Hollie Shiver, Nathan WandersJUNIORs SAll As: Austin Carter, Whitney Frye-Amison, Julie Diestelhorst, Macey Hunt, Samantha Marxsen, Payton Smith, Chaseon Taranto, Aaliyah West A/B: Amanda Anthony, Tressie Buffkin, Myesha Campbell, Sasha Carr, Johnnie Daniels, Zoie Lance, Chandler White, Curtis Gordie, Dexter HarrisSENIORs SAll As: Amber Adkins, Alex Causey, Myel DeCourcey, Austin Martina, Tevis Page, Malachi Parker, Brook Pittman, Josie Turner, Bria Walker A/B: Thadaeisha Carr, Ashley Carroll, Cynthia Duncan, Logan McLeod, James Newell, Jennifer Stratton, Cameron White Honor Rolls

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A12| The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519007850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast 1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519051 JOBANNOUNCEMENTPreschool and Substitute Teachers Calhoun and Gulf Counties NFCD is seeking quali ed applicants for Preschool and Substitute Teacher positions at our centers in Calhoun and Gulf Counties. Requirements include an High School Diplolma; some experience teaching in early childhood setting, and training courses and certi cations mandated by DCF. NFCD offers an attractive bene t package (health, dental, life, disability, sick leave, 401k, etc.) Contact: Send resumes to Sebrina McGill at smcgill@ oridachildren.org, fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE 4519012BADCOCK'S IS HIRING in Eastpoint! We are needing delivery and warehouse help. Please apply at store. Must have a valid Florida License.CALL 850-670-4333 4518084The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for possible teaching positions in preschool through 8th grade for 2014-15 school year: Classroom teachers must be eligible forFloridateachercertication. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer.Pleasesendresumesto: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12thStreet,Apalachicola,FL32320. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW EAST BOUNDARY OF THE PARCEL JUST DESCRIBED FOR THE 88 FOOT RIGHT-OFWAY OF SAID GARDENIA STREET, THIS PARCEL BEING A PORTION OF THE PARCEL RECORDED IN VOL. 103, PAGE 464, OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA. MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A RECENT SURVEY DATED APRIL 03, 1996, BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES INC., BEARING JOB NUMBER 96-200 (PSC NO. 13019), AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN EAST 44.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 626.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 124.86 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 598.68 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SOUTH BAY SHORE DRIVE, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1410.93 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 127.85 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 127.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 616.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 44.00 FEET THEREOF. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 25th day of March, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. P.O. Box 9908 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-9908 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 09-78569 April 24, May 1, 2014 94758T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 13-000201 CAAXMX WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC., Plaintiff, vs. EDDIE JOSEPH III; WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR FOR WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL BANK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE FOR EDDIE JOSEPH III; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of March, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13-000201 CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. is the Plaintiff and EDDIE JOSEPH III WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL BANK UNKNOWN SPOUSE FOR EDDIE JOSEPH III N/K/A GWEN JOSEPH UNKNOWN TENANT; and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgement to wit: LOT 7 AND 8, OF BLOCK 153, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN GENERAL USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to particiate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of March, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 11-22534 April 24, May 1, 2014 98383T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE: 14-00090-CA ESTATE OF ALICE MCINTOSH WALKER a/k/a ALICE M. WALKER, DECEASED. Plaintiff, vs. Ollie M. Pender, and all unknown persons claiming interests by, through, under or against Ollie M. Pender, whether as spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors or other individuals, agents, corporation, associates, partners, beneficiaries, or otherwise, and all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against any known or unknown person who is dead or is not known to be either alive or dead, together with any and all unknown assigns, successors in interests, trustees, of such parties. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: Ollie M. Pender, and all unknown persons claiming interests by, through, under or against Ollie M. Pender, whether as spouse, heirs, grantees, creditors or other individuals, agents, corporations, associates, partners, beneficiaries or otherwise, whose last known residence was 199-13th Street, Apalachicola, Florida and whose present residence, address and whereabouts are unknown, and all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against any known or unknown person who is dead or is not known to be either alive or dead, together with any and all unknown assigns, successors in interests, trustees, of such parties. YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT AN ACTION TO QUIET TITLE ON THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA HAS BEEN FILED: Lots 6 & 7, Block 147, Apalachicola, Florida. You are required to serve a copy of written defenses, if any, to it on Thomas M. Shuler, Esquire, Plaintiffs Attorney, of The Law Offices of Thomas M. Shuler, P.A., whose address is 40-4th Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on or before May 8, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default shall be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: March 28, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michael Moron As Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98497T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, THOMAS J. WEBB, JR. or VALENTNA R. WEBB, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1204 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: LOT 6 BLOCK 154 CITY OF APALACHICOLA COUNTY OF FRANKLIN and STATE OF FLORIDA, according to the map or plat of said city in general use. PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0154-00 60 Name is which assessed: CAROLYN S. BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98489T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2013-CA-000239 Division CENLAR FSB, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS S. DALY AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on March 27, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: LOT NINE (9), OF BLOCK ONE HUNDRED FIVE (105) OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR SAID CITY IN COMMON USE. and commonly known 107 17TH ST., APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the higher and best bidder, for cash, at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Courthouse, at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Florida, on August 6, 2014 at 11:00 AM EST. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of March, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2014 98559T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000077CAAXMX PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS, et al Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE RE-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed March 31, 2014, and entered in Case No. 192012CA 000077CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, wherein PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 22 day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: LOTS 25, 26, AND 27, BLOCK 246, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, this 4th day of April, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2014 98499T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON & MARJORIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1075 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 9 BLOCK B THE RESERVE AT MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES, UN 1. FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURTS OFFICE. PARCEL NO: 30-08s-06w-1003-000b0090 Name is which assessed: NANCY BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98607T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000312CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KAYLA M. BARBER A/K/A KAYLA MARTINA BARBER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE KAYLA M. BARBER A/K/A KAYLA MARTINA BARBER; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; FRANKLIN COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA; DAVID E. BARBER II A/K/A DAVID ELLIS BARBER II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 22nd day of May, 2014, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida. LOT 46, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION, PHASES 3 AND 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 2nd day of April, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H#: 316772 April 24, May 1, 2014 ADOPTION: Actress, Former, yearns to be Future At-Home-Mom. Financially Secure & Very Loving. Trish 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com East Point 93 S Bayshore Dr April 25th and 26thYard SaleKitchen Items, Appliances, Lots of Misc. Text FL86895 to 56654 Mexico Bch: 412 La Siesta Dr. (off 15th St) Sat April 26th, 7a-4pYard SaleElectric Golf Cart, Golf Clubs, Decor, Furniture, Lamps, Fishing Supplies, Misc. Text FL87187 to 56654 Port St. Joe 506 8th St Fri-Sat April 25th and 26th. 9a-4pYard SaleAntique Coffee Table, Cedar Chest, Collectible Glass Ware, Elvis Doll And Mem. And Lots More. Text FL86684 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleThurs, Fri., & Sat 9am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL83066 to 56554 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow Taking Applications for ALL POSITIONS at our new location. Apply in person only 45 Avenue D, Apalachicola Web Id 34287208 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Web Id 34287016 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34285183 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34285183 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL86476 to 56654 Eastpoint: Hwy 98, Sea Air RV Park, efficiency apt, w/ vaulted ceiling, gazebo & deck $450/mo 599-5496 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL84527 to 56654 Located in Port St. Joe 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office, sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 Apalachacola: 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. $159,500 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. Carrabelle: Riverfront lot on Crooked River, high & dry, $49k or will trade for boat of equal value. 850-599-5496 Susies Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 24, 2014 The Times | A13 1122710 1123119 Jos.A.BankJobFairinDestin,FL Wed,April16th 10:00AMto6:00PM TheJos.A.Bankstore DestinCommons 4106LegendaryDrive. WeAreHiring -SalesAssociates -Keyholders FullandPart-Time positionsavailable! Bringyourresumeanddressto impress-on-siteinterviews willbeheld! Questions?Call850-650-6850 Seeallavailablejobsathttps://jobs.josbank.com/ad/de-EOEM/F/D/V Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1122729GulfCoastStateCollegehasAdjunctpositions availablefortheFall2014semesterinthefollowing areas:Thesepositionswillberequiredtoteachpart-timeclasses, maintainaccurateclassattendancerecords,meetdeadlinesfor submittinggrades,giveassistancetostudentswhoneedhelp outsideofclasstime,&abidebythesyllabi&text.Requirements:Mastersdegreewith18graduate hoursinsubjectmatter Salary:$636.00/percredithour Deadlinetoapply:Openuntillled ApplywithrespectivedivisionsatGCSC, 5230W.U.S.Highway98PanamaCity,FL ***Additionalinformation:gulfcoast.edu/hr/employment.htmGulfCoastStateCollegedoesnotdiscriminateagainstanypersononthebasis ofrace,color,nationalorigin,ethnicity,sex,age,maritalstatus,ordisabilityin itsprograms,activitiesoremployment.RobertaMackey,ExecutiveDirectorof HumanResources,850-872-3866,hasbeendesignatedasthepersontohandle allinquiriesregardingnondiscriminationpolicies.*Hospitality&TourismManagement *Accounting *CertiedSurgicalFirstAssistant *Chemistry *Economics *Music *PhysicalTherapistAssistant *Religion *Physics *Biology *ComputerProgramming *History *MusicProductionTechnology *PoliticalScience *Sociology *Engineering(Mechatronics/Mechanical/Electrical) *ComputerScience(DatabaseManagement,WebDesign/DigitalMedia, DigitalForensics&Investigations,Cybersecurity,CompTIAA+hardware& software,Linuxoperatingsystems,EthicalHacking,Networking) YouSeek. WeFind.CareerSourceGulfCoastisapowerfulnetwork ofworkforceprofessionalswhoarereadyto connectyouwiththeskilledtalentyouseek.With ourstatewidereachandlocalroots,weprovide employeerecruitmentandtrainingresourcestohelp yourbusinessthrive.Letushelpyoundyournext staremployee.Contactustoday!FranklinCounty 192CoachWagonerBlvd.,Apalachicola Phone: 850.653.4981 Email:customerservice@careersourcegc.com OntheWeb: careersourcegc.com Anequalopportunityemployer/program.Auxiliaryaidsandservices areavailableuponrequesttoindividualswithdisabilities.Allvoice telephonenumbersonthisdocumentmaybereachedby personsusingTTY/TDDequipmentviatheFloridaRelayServiceat711. GulfCounty 401PetersStreet,PortSt.Joe 850.229.1641 BayCounty 625Highway231,PanamaCity 850.872.4340 AdditionalLocations Recruiting Employees? 1122830 1122629 EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLETheEastpointWaterand SewerDistrictisseekingapplicationsforaeldposition inoperationsandmaintenance.ApplicationsareavailableattheEastpointWater andSewerDistrictOfce,40 IslandDrive,Eastpoint,FL 32328duringnormalbusinesshours,MondaythruFriday8:30am-4:30pmEST.TheEastpointWaterand SewerDistrictisanequal opportunityemployerandis adrugfreeworkplace. 1123104ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 WebID#:34284633 1122603 Biller/CoderPartTime/FullTime. Sendresumesto BlindBox3611c/o TheNewsHerald,P.O. Box1940,Panama City,FL32402 1122630 LPN/CNA MedicalOfceseeking FullTimeLPN/CNA. SendresumetoPO2052, LynnHaven,FL32444or Emailto: emcoffmgr@yahoo.com 1122714YOUNGQUESTBROTHERS WELLDRILLINGNowHiringDrillers&FloorHands atPanamaCitylocation.Mustpassdrugtest.Emailresumesto asspencer2@hotmail.com or 239-229-8064 1122633CNA's,HomeHealthAides& Companion/Homemakersneededforinhomepatientcare. Parttime&Fulltime.24/7. Backgroundcheckrequired. VisitHopewellHomeHealthcareat: www.hopewellcare.com foranapplicationor call850-386-5552 1122632Isnowhiringforthefollowingpositions:EMT RN Paramedic FloorTechnician Applicationsareavailableat: www.weemsmemorial.com &maybesubmittedtoGinnyGriner,WMHHRDirector, ggriner@weemsmemorial.comBymailto:POBox580,Apalachicola,FL32320, or FAXEDto(850)653-1879Dietary RevenueCycleManager Housekeeping

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 ContactThe TimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250893$34,900ApalachicolaHISTORICNORTHSIDETwo-lotParcelontheCORNERof5th&AveK!Just3blocks awayfromtheApalachicolaRiver&shoppingandrestaurants, high&dry,wonderfulliveoaks&palms,Plentyofroomforbldg onthisDOUBLElot.ListedbyJanieBurke 4519034 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#251618$549,000St.GeorgeIsland BAYFRONTLIVINGDeepwateratendofDock!SpectacularSunsetView!3BR, 2BA,gourmetkitchen,tiledoors,furnished,largescreen room,HOTTUB,pilings&electricityinplacefor2boat lifts,riprap,park-likesetting,goodrentalincome,Marks Street,listedbyJohnShelby MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,199,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com REDUCED 29,000 29,000 850-566-6761or850-385-6363 www.tlgproperty.com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose last publicly-performed song was Bridge Over Troubled Water? Beatles, Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Elvis Presley 2) Which king in a suit of playing cards sticks his sword through/behind his head? Clubs, Spades, Hearts, Diamonds 3) The Mall of America in Bloomington, Minn., is large enough to t about how many NY Yankee stadiums inside it? 3, 5, 7, 9 4) In Tamarack, Idaho, what cant you buy after dark without a special permit from the sheriff? Buttermilk, Wine, Bullets, Onions 5) Whats the most popular sport played in American nudist camps? Basketball, Volleyball, Flag football, Soccer 6) In legal jargon what does a codicil supplement? Lease, Escrow, Will, Equity 7) Yearly in the U.S., which of these sells more units than the other three combined? Frisbees, Baseballs, Basketballs, Footballs 8) As assigned by the United Nations whats the numerical code for the United States? 333, 520, 732, 840 9) Who regularly played Scrabble in the White House? FDR, Eisenhower, JFK, Nixon 10) Statistically, how many men out of ve propose marriage on one knee? 1, 2, 3, 4 11) Whats a sunken panel in a ceiling called? Abutment, Pendentive, Coffer, Spire 12) The British Medical Journal estimates that smoking one cigarette takes how many minutes off the average persons life? 2, 6, 11, 20 13) Whats the largest city in the United States with a one-syllable name? Ames, Iowa; Flint, Mich.; Rye, N.H.,; York, Pa. 14) Over 200 new varieties of what product have been introduced since 2001? Potato chips, Coffee, Pepper, Vodka ANSWERS 1) Elvis Presley. 2) Hearts. 3) 7. 4) Onions. 5) Volleyball. 6) Will. 7) Frisbees. 8) 840. 9) Nixon. 10) 1. 11) Coffer. 12) 11. 13) Flint, Mich. 14) Vodka.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Special to the TimesYour chance to spend a summer at the lake comes to the Dixie Theatre this weekend, with The Panhandle Players production of On Golden Pond, by Ernest Thompson. Performances will be Friday and Saturday, April 25 and 26, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, April 27, at 3 p.m. With humor and poignancy, themes of mortality, family relationships, marriage, and generational differences all play out at Norman and Ethel Thayers small lake house in Maine beside Golden Pond, where 48 years of vacation memories have accumulated like the photographs clustered on every at surface. Through clashes and reconciliation, the play explores the often turbulent relationships of growing up and the difculties faced by a couple in the twilight years of a long marriage. With all the years of acrimony, recriminations, wounded feelings, distrust, heart palpitations, and mosquitoes, will this nally be the summer of healing? Featuring Royce Hodge as Norman Thayer, Liz Sisung as Ethel Thayer, Gary Niblack as Charlie Martin, Judy Loftus as Chelsea Thayer, Mikel Register as Billy Ray, and Phillip Carroll as Bill Ray, the play is directed by Pam Vest, with the adroit stage management of Bob Inguagiato. Tickets are $15 and will be available at the door on performance dates. Tickets may also be purchased in advance at Downtown Books in Apalachicola, The Butler Agency in Eastpoint, Carrabelle Junction, No Name Cafe Books & More in Port St. Joe, and Caribbean Coffee in Mexico Beach. On Golden Pond is produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., and funded in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council.On Golden Pond plays at the DixiePAM VEST | Special to the Times In On Golden Pond rehearsals, Norman Thayer, Jr. (Royce Hodge), left, reminds his young shing buddy Billy Ray (Mikel Register) that Billy has to catch one more biggie to match the shing prowess of the old man of the sea. Left the cast of this weekends Panhandle Players production of On Golden Pond, are, from left, are Gary Niblack, Mikel Register, Royce Hodge, Liz Sisung, Phillip Carroll, and Judy Loftus.



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xxxxx Thursday, April 24, 2014 50 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Out to see xxxxx xxxxx WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-13 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com More than $2 million is on its way to help train and transfer oystermen into careers off the water. The federal government nally released the National Emergency Grant money after months of back and forth with the states WorkForce people, gathering greater speci cs on how the retraining of 94 oystermen would be carried out. This grant is on top of $2.9 million the county received in 2012 through the Federal Emergency Management Agencys Public Assistance Program as a result of Tropical Storm Debby. That money served close to 250 people, nearly all of them as part of a shelling program to replenish the oyster bars of the Apalachicola Bay. At that time, they (the federal government) wouldnt allow us to provide training, it was only a temporary job grant, said Kim FUTURE CAREERS The following is a breakdown on what has been allocated to cover the average cost of retraining, including tuition and course materials. Correctional of cer: 10 participants @ $2,000 each Auto service technicians: 10 participants @ $6,315 each Heavy equipment mechanics: 10 participants @ $5,376 each Heating and air conditioning: 2 participants @ $5,642 each Commercial truck driver: 12 participants @$2,504 each Welders: Five participants @$6,810 each Misc. training, such as licensed practical nurse, commercial cook: 15 participants @ $5,500 each Money coming for job retraining See RETRAINING A9 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com C hilly weather didnt daunt classic boat and automobile fans last Saturday. Organizer Anita Grove said, with more than 50 entries, and booths featuring local artists, this was perhaps the best turnout ever for the 16th annual Apalachicola Antique and Classic Boat Show. Grove said there were entries from as far away as California. One of the most popular boats, appearing for the rst time in the boat show was the Justines Dream, a mini-tugboat with a pilothouse created by Justin Julian of Port St. Joe for his daughter, Justine. Julian said he built the boat from scratch and it is the sixth he has constructed. He said he began work on the little red BOAT SHOW WINNERS Best In Show Overall: James Doherty, Oxford, Ga. for a 14 6 sailboat built in 2011. Best In Show Antique Boat: David Soule, Roseland for Carib II, a 1924 sailboat 52 designed by Ralph Monroe. Best In Show Classic Boat: Charles and Lisa Savage, Fairhope Ala. for a 1946 Garwood Ensign. Best In Show Locally Built Boat: Gary Reynolds for a 16 Fans bundle up for boat show See BOAT WINNERS A3 See BOAT SHOW A3 THE LAST NOEL City fells local landmark; residents perplexed By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com An Apalachicola landmark vanished recently and some people are wondering why. On Tuesday morning, April 8, workers with chainsaws leveled the community Christmas tree and by lunchtime, the tree was gone. Jim Bachrach, Main Street president and a member of Planning and Zoning, was on site and fronted questions during the removal. Bachrach said the tree was removed because it interfered with the in-ground irrigation system and an electrical box located within the trees canopy was creating a re hazard. He said a better tree would be installed to replace it. In his blog, Mayor Van Johnson wrote on the subject, and said at close inspection it was revealed the tree was diseased and its large shallow root system was beginning to undermine the newly installed reuse irrigation system that services the park. The mayor noted that in the citys ordinance 201101, cedar trees are not patriarch nor protected trees and this particular one de nitely was not historic. In fact, its removal followed the procedure as outlined in the ordinance for a danger/safety situation. According to Samuel Hand Jr., an associate professor of agricultural sciences at Florida A & M University, the tree was a native juniper, probably Juniperus Virginia which is sometimes colloquially referred to as a cedar. The city ordinance lists junipers as a protected native species. On the request for removal, Code Enforcement Of cer Wilbur Bellew identi ed the tree as cedar or some similar type of Christmas tree. It is unknown whether the tree was a patriarch, which is de ned under the ordinance as any tree with a diameter of at least 35 inches at 4 feet above the ground, which is considered chest height. The Christmas tree was not measured to determine its status prior to removal. Bellew wrote that dead limbs were falling out of the tree, that the tree was a re safety issue in power lines and that the tree was interfering with the reuse irrigation system. In his blog, Johnson further criticized the trees appearance. To me the tree no longer resembled a Christmas tree, it looked more like one of those fried blooming onions that you get from food vendors at the annual Florida Seafood Festival, but thats just my opinion and See TREE A5 VOL. 128 ISSUE 52 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The Christmas tree at the 2012 Black Friday celebration. JIM BACHRACH Riverfront Festival this weekend Carrabelle CARES and the City of Carrabelle invite everyone to attend the 24th annual Carrabelle Riverfront Festival on Friday, April 25 and Saturday, April 26 for Pirates of the Carrabellean 2014 The Treasure of Gullets Cove. Sponsored by Sea Crest Realty and Sandy Beach Properties, the new Homestyle food court named Gullets Cove will feature fresh seafood, caught and prepared by local buccaneers and scallywags. Hours of the festival are 4 to 8 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Festival admission is free. Anglo-American writers gather Friday On Friday, April 25, from 6 to 9 p.m. come to Caf Con Leche. Bring paper, pen and poetry or other writing to read and share. Special guest is Sylvia from the United Kingdom. The get-together will be hosted by Frederick Kahler. For more information, call 653-CAF. Light refreshments provided. Patriots Day picnic Saturday The third annual Patriots Day celebration in Franklin County will take place Saturday, April 26 at 11 a.m. at Veterans Memorial Plaza, on Market Street in Apalachicola. A Cajun lunch will be served at noon. Cost of the meal is $7 for adults and all children eat free. In Harms Way shown Saturday The classic World War II lm In Harms Way will be screened at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 26. Donations appreciated. For information, call 697-8575. Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 xxxxx Contact Us Index Senior Seahawks honored A9

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m Torrential rains over the last few weeks led to some changes Saturday in this years Easter celebration at the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. For years, Franklin Countys nest has sponsored an Easter egg hunt for county children on the Saturday before Easter. The race for the eggs normally takes place on a large open eld just north of the sheriffs ofce on State Route 65. After a shotgun start from the big bunny, youngsters race to retrieve colored eggs including a precious few that are hollow and contain a ticket to win a prize. This year, due to heavy winter rains, the eld was ankle deep in water and kiddies arrived, with baskets in hand, to nd the normal venue for the hunt sealed in yellow crime scene tape. The men of the sheriffs ofce are nothing if not resourceful, though, so they made lemonade when the weather handed them lemons. This year, each child received a half-dozen beautiful Easter eggs neatly crated and a rafe ticket. As youngsters and oldsters alike enjoyed free soda pop and hotdogs provided by the sheriffs ofce, names were drawn to award a number of great prizes including the worlds largest Easter bunny. Rain cant dampen Easter fun Coupon Expir es: 5-15-14 CODE: AP00 FORGOTTEN COAST America s Great Paint-Out CAPTURING THE COAST FROM ALLIGA TOR POINT TO MEXICO BEACH AmericasGreatPaintout.com Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Josh and mom Lena Allen make some Easter memories at the annual Easter egg hunt. James Carden of Eastpoint brought son Jayce to the Easter egg hunt. Ellie Dash Dot Sawyer of Germantown, Tenn. gets a ride to grab her eggs from dad Rob. The Sawyer family was visiting the new Coastline RV Resort in Eastpoint. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Enjoying the search for a gumball in a cup are, from left, sophomore Alexis Jones, junior Lloyd Smith, and sophomores Weston Harris and Spencer Strickland. On April 10, to take a break from their school work and to prepare for the standardized tests, the First Baptist Christian School hosted a Fun Day with all kinds of zany games. Kindergarten teacher Kayle Mears directed the eld day and snacks, for all students from kindergarten through 12th grade. The program was sponsored by SWAT, Students Working against Tobacco. FIELD DA Y FUN Eating mud pies are, from left, seniors Ashley Moore, Brandy Parker and Ashley Butler. From left, freshmen Anna Smith, Katy Spann and Brianna Parker try to gulp the fastest. Freshman Noah Strickland tries his feet at icy toes.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, April 24, 2014 Glen L design skiff built in 2012. Best in Show Restoration: Gerald Dake, Jacksonville for a 1947 22 Chris Craft Odyssey. Best in Show Runabout: Bill Hancock, Jacksonville for a 1959 19 Sebino from Italy. Best In Show Skiff: Mark Mize, Santa Rosa, 18 a Flats Boat built in 2014. Best In Show Sailboat: J. Brian Bryson, Monticello for a 19 Sharpie Sailboat, an Ohio Pond Net Boat built in 2007. Best In Show Home Built Boat: Jody Walthall, Tallahassee for a home built sailing dinghy. Best in Show Steam Powered Boat: Apalachicola Maritime Museum, The Eagle, a 26 vessel built of walnut, ash and mahogany. Best In Show Paddlecraft: Martin BenBaruch of Martin Marine Wooden Boatworks, Carrabelle for a 20 Kayak. Best In Show Aluminum Classic: Bud Harris, Talbottom, Ga. for a 1949 12 Feathercraft. Best In Show Fiberglass Classic: John Chille, California for a 1969 Poher sailboat. Best In Show Antique Motors: Ray and Steve Maloney, Tallahassee. Best In Show Antique Boat and Car: Cletus and Peg Heaps, Port St Joe, 1956 Studebaker Power Hawk with 1946 Thompson with a 1955 18-hp Mercury motor. Best In Show Antique Car: Dale Boyette, Gulf Port, Miss. for 1946 Chevrolet Truck. Best In Show Classic Car: Glenn and Jackie Hayes, 1962 Studebaker GT Hawk. Best In Show Modied Car: Dan Ostman for an Avanti. Peoples Choice Antique Car: Earl and Sally Ice, Foley AL for a 1937 Cadillac LaSalle. Peoples Choice Boat: Justine Julian, Port St Joe for a 12 6 mini tug boat with pilot house built in 2010. BOAT SHOW from page A1 tugboat after he purchased jet skies for himself and his son. He asked Justine if she wanted a jet ski and, to his surprise, she said she was more interested in tugboats. Julian said he began searching the internet for plans and when he came on a hull design that appealed to him, he set to work. The tug took a year to construct and includes details like hand-tied rope bumpers. In the face of chilly weather, participants bundled up and crowded local restaurants and shops. In addition to many private entries, the Apalachicola Maritime Museum brought the L. Francis Herreshoffdesigned 58-foot wooden ketch, Heritage, which took the ribbon for Best in Show among large sailing vessels. The museum also brought two classic wooden steam-powered vessels, and a group of model skiffs which were constructed by the students of Project Impact, an after-school program run through the city of Apalachicola. BOAT SHOW from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Justines Dream, a 12 6 mini-tugboat with pilothouse won the Peoples Choice award for boats.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, April 24, 2014 A Section Special to the Times ACF Stakeholders Inc. has asked its consultants to begin drafting a Sustainable Water Management Plan that has been the organizations goal since its creation almost ve years ago. The action was taken by the Technical Oversight and Coordination Work Group, which is responsible for developing the draft, in a closed session immediately preceding the regularly called ACFS governing board meeting on April 9 in Apalachicola. The governing board meeting concluded the following day. Since 2010, ACFS, a grassroots organization that represents the spectrum of water interests throughout the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint river basin, has been working toward a Sustainable Water Management Plan based on science, good data and consensus. The group has raised more than $1.5 million to accumulate and model the data necessary to develop a consensusdriven plan. Consultants from Black & Veatch will draft the plan, relying on data produced by the Georgia Water Resources Institute at Georgia Tech and Atkins Global. The draft plan is due this summer, with the goal of nalizing the plan by fall. After four years of research, modeling and study, we are looking forward to beginning the process of writing a Sustainable Water Management Plan for the ACF river basin, Board Chairman Jim McClatchey said. Our priorities remain focused on balancing the needs of all the basins stakeholders in a sustainable and equitable way while also creating a framework for adapting the plan as needs change over time. To that end, the governing board also asked The University Collaborative to recommend a structure for a transboundary water management institute that could coordinate information, resolve con icts and advise the three states on a drought management plan. The collaborative is a consortium of universities hired in 2011 to research water management mechanisms. Transboundary water management institutes have successfully guided management of shared water resources in the U.S. since the 1960s, notably overseeing water management programs in the Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico and the countrys major river basins. These interstate commissions take different forms and have different powers but share the goal of promoting sustainable water management for all stakeholders. ACF Stakeholders Inc. is a group of water users in the ACF river basin of Alabama, Florida and Georgia who are working together for sustainable water management. The governing board comprises 56 individuals representing all aspects of the river basins economic, agricultural, aquacultural, recreational and environmental concerns. Membership on the board is divided equally among the four ACF subbasins and includes membership from Alabama, Florida and Georgia. A unique Christmas tree, gone without warning Does a Christmas tree have to be a perfect cone? Does it have to look like any other Christmas tree anywhere? Apalachicola had a unique, living tree that served as the downtown Christmas tree for more than a quarter century. It was part of Apalachicolas special character. Suddenly, without warning or discussion, it is gone. Perhaps there were some problems with this tree. Was it really diseased? Was it interfering with the irrigation system? Was it in danger of starting a re at the electrical box? Was it too large to decorate? Whatever evidence there may have been for any of these claims is gone. The tree was transplanted by Mr. Joyner. Back in the mid-1980s, he and his wife had a small plant nursery on the corner of Fifth Street and Avenue G, across from where Johnsons Store used to be. There is a house built there now. He was a gifted gardener. He could make anything grow, even transplant a mature tree. It seems important to me that we remember and honor those who have gone before especially humble people like Mr. Joyner. It is interesting for me to have reached the time in life when those who have come after set about destroying the accomplishments of those who have gone before. I hope there will be a new tree planted, that lives and develops its own unique shape, to become as special as the old one was. It is true that change is one thing upon which we can absolutely depend in this life. I just hope that Apalachicola does not change into Anywhere, USA. Kristin Anderson Thank you for sensitive, beautiful outreach My wife and I returned on Sunday to Apalachicola after spending the Passover holiday in Atlanta with my oldest son and his family and enjoying the second seder with our old friends at our old synagogue in Asheville. While we were away, we had seen the picture of my grandchildren and son Danny from the Apalachicola Times celebrating the Passover seder with the Trinity Episcopal Church congregation. I was happy that the picture was in the Times, and I looked forward to reading the article by Jennifer Shef eld, which I was surprised to see on the front page. Having worked with Alex and Maya on The Four Questions during the weeks before our trip, I was happy to hear from Danny that they had done well, and everyone was proud of their contribution. It was so gratifying to know that they had been able to celebrate the holiday in Apalachicola thanks to the decision by Trinity Episcopal to have a seder and open it to the community. In recent years, many churches have begun having seders, and there are a great many formats being used. Many are celebrations of the Last Supper and are usually during Holy Week, observing the cruci xion of Jesus and the Easter Rejoicing. Few churches have decided to do a Jewish Passover seder commemorating the exodus of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, to freedom eventually in the land of Canaan, and the giving of the Ten Commandments on Mt. Sinai, and the cementing of a holy covenant between the Israelites and their God while wandering 40 years in the desert. Trinity Episcopals decision to do a Jewish seder is signi cant and greatly appreciated. Jews living in small communities, as a tiny minority, often struggle to maintain their Jewish identity and holiday observances. Religious observance is a community thing. We travel to Panama City regularly to join their small congregation in Sabbath and holiday observances, and to connect with other Jews. Obviously this is inconvenient and sometimes burdensome, but it is our need to maintain our Jewish identity. Trinity Episcopals Passover seder done in a Jewish way was welcoming and heartwarming allowing Jews who chose to participate the opportunity to be with local friends and to feel a real sense of acceptance and community. If we had known more about the seder we would have considered staying in Apalachicola instead of going to Atlanta and Asheville. I want to express my sincere appreciation to the members of Trinity Episcopal for the beautiful and sensitive outreach to local Jews, few in number, but appreciative of the gesture. My grandchildren were able to experience their rst seder and to have a role usually given to children to ask the questions that set the stage for the retelling of the exodus story. Sincerely, Chuck Itzkovitz Father of Danny and grandfather of Maya and Alex I want you to consider doing two things this month for your betterment and the betterment of the environment. The rst involves a behavior change for every shopping excursion. The second is a 10minute job that could save you and the environment money, time and paper. Every time I go to any grocery, hardware or drug store, I cringe when I witness how many plastic bags are still in use. I fully realize that some of them will be used again for trash or carrying things back and forth to school and work. But I also know how many will be picked up by trash collectors and are ultimately taken to the land ll. I used to serve on the Wakulla County Board of County Commissions Task Force called Keeping Wakulla County Clean. Do you know that one of the committees suggestions was that plastic bags be banned from use in this neighboring county? We did not get that initiative passed, but be aware that many countries in the world and several states in the United States have done so. Until that happens, I would like you to consider two options. One is that you make an effort to return your extra bags to collection sites in stores. When you return them for recycling, they are shredded and then pelletized. According to the Society for the Plastics Industry, they can then be made into new products, such as industrial trashcan liners, owerpots, drainpipes and, of course, new plastic bags. Remember, this cant happen unless you return them to the collection points. I love the way the retailers have gotten into the reuse scene. The reusable grocery bags that are now available are so classy; I dont know why anyone would want to settle for less by using paper or plastic from the store. Get yourself some of those bags and make it a practice to take them with you on every shopping trip. Some people report that they cant remember to bring them from home or car. Return them immediately to your vehicle after utilizing them. I had to park my shopping buggy at the service counter and go to my car to retrieve mine twice before I vowed that that would not happen again, and it hasnt. Picking up my reusable bags is as familiar to me now that it is as natural as picking up my purse. Think of the petroleum, used in the production of plastic, that would be saved if everyone in Franklin County would make one of these two changes. I challenge you to make one of these changes during the month of May; your habit will stick, and we will be miles ahead in our walk to a better environment. The second resolution I would like you to consider is that you take 10 minutes, one sheet of paper, a pen, an envelope and a stamp to reduce, the rst action for waste management. Write to request that your name and address be removed from mailing lists by sending a note to Mail Preference Service, Direct Marketing Association, P.O. Box 9008, Farmingdale, NY 11735. You can also do this on line at the site of Direct Marketing Associations website. At this site you can also remove your name from 1,500 catalogs. You will have an even greater success by contacting the catalog companies direct. Their contact information is in the catalog itself and often includes a toll-free number. And you thought May was just about May Day and graduation?! I have added two important tasks. We will all pro t from your making these resolutions and following through with them. Shelley Swenson is the UF/IFAS Franklin/ Wakulla extension agent for food and consumer services. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys unemployment rate dropped under 6 percent in March and is now at the same level it was one year ago. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate for March stood at 5.9 percent, a drop of two-tenths of 1 percent, from 6.1 percent in February. The unemployment rolls shed four people in March, shrinking from 313 to 309 people in search of work. This decrease in joblessness occurred as the workforce grew by 148 people, from 5,092 to 5.240. The current workforce has 119 more workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,121 workers and the jobless rate was the same, at 5.9 percent. The March jobless picture tied the county with Orange County, for 24th best among Floridas 67 counties. Franklin was worse for unemployment than Bay, Union, Sarasota, Jackson, Clay, Holmes, Nassau, Jefferson, Baker, Collier, Seminole, Broward, Bradford, Leon, Wakulla, Liberty, St. Johns, Sumter, Alachua, Okaloosa, Walton and Monroe, the states best at 3.8 percent. The CareerSource Gulf Coast had a positive month in March with a measurable drop in the unemployment rate, according to the data. Individually, Bay and Franklin Counties both posted declines. However, Gulf County remained unchanged from February. The unemployment rate in the CSGC region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 5.9 percent in March, a rate 1.0 percentage points lower than the regions year-ago rate of 6.9 percent and one-half of a percentage point below the February 2014 regional rate of 6.4. It also outpaces the entire state, which posted a March 2014 unemployment rate of 6.4. Out of a labor force of 104,065, there were 6,095 unemployed CSGC residents, almost 400 less than the previous month. While we are pleased to see positive indicators in some areas, we know that our rural counties continue to face challenges in bringing new jobs into their communities, said Kim Bodine, executive director of CSGC. Franklin County has been impacted negatively by the sheries failure, which is hard to detect with the methods used in determining the unemployment rate and is not usually re ected accurately in these numbers. Gulf County is working hard to attract more jobs, but it is a challenge. There are many signs of continued economic recovery, but we need to see wages make a stronger post-recession gain. Wage gains drive consumer spending, which helps drive hiring. SHELLEY SWENSON Special to the Times May a good month for environmental resolutions Page 4 Tri-state group to draft water management plan County jobless rate drops below 6 percent Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, April 24, 2014 certainly as demonstrated not the only opinion, he wrote. By the way, the tree couldnt be trimmed either or shaped to look like a Christmas tree without turning it into a barelooking stick protruding out of the ground. In a telephone interview, Johnson later said that the tree had not been inspected by a qualied tree expert to determine if it was diseased. Professor disputes safety issues Geoff Hewell, chair of the tree committee, and City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb both said an arborist had not been consulted. Hand, interviewed after the tree had been taken down, reviewed the tree removal application and accompanying photographs. He disagreed that the tree was a safety hazard and could not have been pruned. Professor Hand, a registered consulting arborist with the American Society of Consulting Arborists and an International Society of Arboriculture Certied Arborist, said the reasons given for removal of the tree were inadequate and the situation was not an emergency. According to Hand, if the irrigation system and electrical box are being properly maintained, the tree should not have interfered with either. The threat of dead limbs could have been resolved by pruning the tree, he said. Trees are trimmed away from power lines all the time. I dont know if there was some reason why this tree could not be properly pruned to give safe clearance, if needed. (Neither) the photographs, nor the literature, indicate that pruning was not possible. Hand said that a properly maintained electrical box, not in direct contact with the tree, should not present a re hazard. If contact with lines was an issue, relocating the lines or appropriate clearance pruning might have been an option to removal, he said. Unless there was a short in the box or wiring, the location next to the tree would not normally be an issue as we up light trees all the time as well as string lights in them. He said he was unclear as to what the problem was with the irrigation system. If a root were pressing on a line, you could possibly have pruned the root if it were not a main structural root, Hand said. If the water lines are not cracked, and are in good sound condition, roots will not enter them and cause stoppage. The irrigation system is only a couple years old, and is designed and maintained by the city to distribute re-used water. Apalachicolas Christmas tree was planted in 1987 as an adult tree, and was featured on the front page of the Apalachicola Times on December 3 of that year. It was moved from 13 th Street to the end of Avenue E under the supervision of a Mr. Joyner, who owned a nursery on Fifth Street. Kristen Anderson remembers he root-pruned the tree over a period of a year and oversaw its placement and early care. The tree had to be moved or be destroyed. We decided to move it., she said. (Mr. Joyner) nurtured and watered it and it took hold. Everyone was so thrilled to have a living tree so we didnt have to cut one down every year. It was our own special Christmas tree; nobody else had one like it. The Christmas tree became the centerpiece for the Downtown Improvement Associations Christmas Extravaganza, when carolers paraded at night through the streets with ashlights in a Parade of Lights. The procession ended at the tree and climaxed with a tree lighting ceremony. Joyce Estes said the tree was used as a fundraiser as part of the effort to restore Chapman Auditorium. People could buy a light for $5 and businesses could purchase a point of the star on top for $100. Estes said the restoration movement in the beginning purchased commercial lights for the tree, but they were either lost or stolen after several years. A distinct focal point for park In 2008, at the invitation of the city, graduate students in urban design from the University of Georgia made visits to Apalachicola as a part of the Riverway South program to develop project design ideas for enhancement of rural tourism and community enjoyment. They viewed the Christmas tree as an important community resource. In their nal report, the students wrote, (Riverfront Park) is Apalachicolas central park; situated on the water between Avenues D and E, it is the closest open space to the citys commercial core. A single round Christmas tree is the most prominent vegetation on site, providing shade while maintaining views is the challenge we faced. By placing small trees in two groups, the rst between Avenue D and the Parking lot, and the second between Avenue E and the parking lot, we felt we could meet both needs. We explored three different options for the sites design, focusing on the idea of ow, mimicking the Apalachicola River. In all the plans, the Christmas tree remains as a distinct focal point. The shade trees envisioned were never planted. Although signs designating Apalachicola as a Tree City USA are still on display, a call to the Arbor Day Foundation on April 8 revealed the designation was not in effect for 2014 because the city failed to le paperwork. Bill Spohrer, who has played a pivotal role in the restoration of Apalachicolas business district, bemoaned the loss of the tree. I consider it to be a tragedy especially for the children and for the community, he said. It was the heart of our Christmas celebration. Its something we give to the children every year. Im sure the intentions were good, but the sadness is that there probably should have been more discussion and communication before arbitrarily destroying a signicant part of our towns annual holiday celebration. According to documents provided by the city, the tree will be replaced with a 14-foot Christmas tree from Quincy Tree Farm. The same documents indicate that Tommy Ward of Thirteen Mile Seafood and Bachrach will oversee planting the new tree. City documents said the Main Street Design Committee has agreed to water and care for the new tree. Tree committee member Caroline Weiler said Tommy Ward; owner of Thirteen Mile Seafood will pay for the replacement tree. Jody Rosenbaum, who serves on the board of Main Street, said she was unaware of any discussion related to caring for the new tree. Weiler appears to be the only member of the tree committee who realized the tree was about to be destroyed. She said she trusted the documentation presented by Bellew that the trees removal was warranted. She said Bellew may not have had the expertise but had the authority to order the tree removed. To me this seemed practical. It just makes sense. Removed from P & Z agenda According to Apalachicolas 2011 tree ordinance, any tree on city property to be removed, relocated or substantially altered, requires a permit application be submitted to Planning and Zoning, which then makes a recommendation to the city commission, who will make the nal decision as to approval or denial. P & Z Members Robin Vroegop and Lynn Spohrer said the tree was never discussed at a meeting. Vroegop said the removal of the tree was on the original agenda for the Dec. 9 P&Z meeting but was removed. The trees removal was also never discussed by the city commission although in a telephone interview, City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb said Bellew consulted each city commissioner individually. As designee for the city under the tree ordinance, Bellew has the authority to order a tree removed if there is a safety issue. Due process can be circumvented in the case of an emergency, but Hand, the only expert known to have been consulted about the tree, said no emergency existed. I would have to know more to understand why it needed to come out for safety reasons, said Hand, noting that he had shared the tree removal application and supporting photographs with Stan Rosenthal, University of Florida/ Leon County Extension Forester, and the two had agreed. At the most recent P&Z meeting on April 14, about 10 angry Apalachicola residents wanted to discuss the fate of the Christmas tree. On the ground outside of the meeting room, a dozen protest signs lay on the grass greeting P&Z members as they arrived. Vroegop asked for a special meeting to discuss the tree. Chair Tom Daly said he would rather not hold a meeting to discuss a single topic. I have questions as a member of the tree committee about how that happened because that was a patriarch tree clearly and it never came before the board, Vroegop said. I think it is urgent. Since there are so many questions about the process and how this happened, I think we ought to have a special workshop on it. Theres a process thats supposed to be followed and to my knowledge it wasnt followed. P&Z member Bachrach said he thought its a good idea to have somebody here who can explain why the tree was taken down. Tree committee member Beth Wright also questioned the process that led to the tree being cut down. If something went wrong, we need to discuss how to x it. There are nes and tree replacement requirements in the ordinance, she said. A member of the audience asked Webb, Why dont you explain since you are the one who did it? Webb said she was not prepared to comment. Vroegops motion for a special meeting failed. Lynn Spohrer then moved to discuss the tree and the tree committee at the next regular meeting of the P&Z. That motion passed. My problem is this was the communitys Christmas tree and they should have been brought together to discuss this, said Bruce Hall, also on the tree committee. It was the only tree in that park. I think a community Christmas tree that you have celebrated around for years is important. TREE from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 Ginger is a 1-2 yr old Chiwienie She is a ec tiona t e and lo v es a tt en tion but shouldn t go t o a home with small childr en. She doesn t lik e r estr ain t and a child s hug c ould be misc onstrued and she c ould nip She is hear t w orm nega tiv e spa y ed and r eady f or her f or ev er home V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets Franklin County Humane Society See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A ( 850 ) 899-1588 PUBLIC NOTICE A public meeting will be held a t 5:00 p.m. on T uesday A pril 29, 2014, a t the courthouse annex in A palachicola to solicit public input on the mana gement plan for the Eastpoint W orking W a terfront property along P a tton Drive in Eastpoint. The public is invited to provide ideas or comments on the proposed mana gement plan. For more information, call 653-9783, e xt. 160. Happy rst birthday, Zara! Cecillia and Joe Carter, of Carrabelle, would like to wish their daughter, Zara Elaina Carter, a happy rst birthday. Zara was born at 5:19 p.m. CT on April 4, 2013. She weighed eight pounds, 14.2 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Zara now weighs 24 pounds, seven ounces and is 30 inches tall. Maternal grandparents are Betty and Greg Sasnett, and Steve and Frances James, of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandparents are Victoria Jones and Mary Eddy, and the late Sue and Adrian James of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Jestin and Samantha Carter, of Venice, and the late Treza Carter, of Carrabelle. Paternal great-grandparents are Matilda and the late Joe Williamson, of Carrabelle, and Gloria and Greg Anderson, of Punta Gorda. Zaras aunts and uncles include Kayla Carter, Lucas Sasnett, Steven James, Colby Sasnett, and Brian Lolley. Zara celebrated her rst birthday on Saturday, April 5 with friends and family. We would like to thank everyone who came out to help us celebrate our monkeys special day! Its a girl! There will be a baby shower for Morgan Thompson this Saturday, April 26 at 2 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God, 379 Avenue A. Thompson and her husband Jason are expecting a daughter, Molly Beth. They are registered at Babies R Us, and WalMart. Special to the Times Donna Merediths watery Florida crime caper has it all: Science for sale, regulators on the take, and a lawmaker set to seriously embarrass his wife. Readers will be rooting for Merediths principled young scientist to save Floridas water AND get the guy. Cynthia Barnett, author of Blue Revolution and Mirage Impoverished graduate student Summer Cassidy just wants to complete her masters degree in hydrogeology. That and hustle some foosball, chase a Frisbee, and drink some brewskis. Two months before graduation, a ruthless corporations efforts to suppress her research into groundwater contaminants upend her world. But nothing will prevent her from pursuing the truth not the loss of her scholarship, not the thugs out to get her, not even the enigmatic Ty Franceschi, even if he is as hot as Florida in August. Donna Meredith is a member of the Tallahassee Writers Association. Join her at Downtown Books on Saturday, April 26 from 1 to 3 p.m. A portion of proceeds from sales of Wet Work will be donated to the Wakulla Springs Alliance. For more information, call Downtown Books at 653-1290. What an afternoon! Chillas Hall was packed out. Ann Brown won the rod and reel. Good for you, Peaches! Along with the friends and neighbors who were there, I looked up and in came my longtime friend and neighbor, Jesse Yur. It was really good to see her out and about again. We all enjoyed the food and the friendship. Our thrift shop in Lanark Plaza will open at 8:30 a.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Bette and Mary will close up at noon. The proceeds from the sales will be divided between the Lanark Village Association, the Womens Christian Circle and the Ladies Guild. They appreciate your clean, resalable items but please bring them during business hours. Thank you for your support. Well, its here folks. The big weekend. The yard sale on our beautiful golf course will open at 8 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. Friday, April 25 and Saturday, April 26. Stop by and look around, and one of the members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be nearby to help you. See ya there! On Saturday afternoon is the Kentucky Derby. I told you not to put that hat too far back in the closet because you would need it again soon. Heres hoping you enjoy your mint julep. Meantime, in beautiful downtown Carrabelle, the annual Riverfront Festival will be held Friday and Saturday. All along Marine Street will be arts and crafts booths, food booths and other interesting things. You can also purchase a duck ticket, or two, for the annual Duck Race on the Carrabelle River. Proceeds from the race go toward purchasing new uniforms for the high school band. Tickets require a donation of $5 per duck, and winner will receive $500 prize money. I am sure you wont want to miss out on that. When you entered Chillas Hall, did you happen to see the picture and deep saying on the west wall? It was painted by our very own Jaki Cichy. Jake and her husband, Eric, are in charge of house and grounds. Thanks a lot. You bet we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday night, and pizza on Sunday; however, orders taken after 6 p.m. both nights, instead of 5 p.m. To order you togo orders, call the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Just dial 697-9998. Come on down and enjoy the evening with your friends and neighbors. Lots to do and enjoy. Saturday, May 3, is breakfast at Chillas Hall. Door opens at 8:30 a.m. and closes at 11 a.m. Come and enjoy a good full breakfast and good service. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be glad to take your order and deliver it to you at the table. See ya there! Later on that Saturday evening, you can dance the night away with music by deejay Jim. Just come on down to the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center. Door opens at 7 p.m. bring a snack to share, your beverage of choice, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze, and dance the night away. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, God is watching us from a distance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. Millender Park hosts Quickdraw May 3 Special to the Times The hosts of this years Americas Great Plein Art Paint-Out along the Forgotten Coast of Florida are excited to announce the time and place for the Plein Air Quickdraw event. On Saturday May 3 at 10 a.m. the Quickdraw competition will begin at Millender Park in Eastpoint. The staging area will be at the pavilion; judging is at noon. All artists, professional and amateur, are invited to capture Eastpoints waterfront in the plein air tradition. In addition to the novelty of watching the artists at work, there will be music, childrens art projects and the opportunity to be the rst to purchase a unique piece of art. The very de nition of Plein Air painting, from the French meaning open air, limits artists to the changes in atmosphere which makes for a perfect quickdraw platform. The Quickdraw is a prestigious opportunity for budding, accomplished and seasoned artists to put their talents to the test. Artists are required to register on-line at www.pleinair .com where the $10 entry fee can be paid, or the fee can be collected the day of the event. The deadline for online registration is Friday, May 2. On May 3, artist check-in at the pavilion runs from 9 to 9:45 a.m. At 10 a.m., the horn will start competition, which will run until noon, when the horn will sound and competition will be nished. Judging will begin at 12:30 p.m. with awards at 1:30 p.m. Come join the fun, look over the shoulders of the artists as they capture the Plein Air process faster than usual, and enjoy all that Eastpoint waterfront has to offer in unique beauty. Prizes of cash and certi cates will be awarded on-site. Original artwork will be available for purchase on the spot and winning pieces will be moved to a special display area in the Wetroom at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. See www.pleinair .com for schedules and additional information. Author to sign Wet Work Saturday DONNA MEREDITH Riverfront Festival highlights big weekend LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Society Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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The Times | A7 Thursday, April 24, 2014 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice N a t i o na l D a y o f P r a y e r urs d a y M a y 1, 2014 F r a n k lin C o un t y C o ur tho us e S p o ns o r e d b y : L o v e C e n t e r C h ur ch C o o r dina t o r : Alma Pug h 850.370.6465 e us tho ur o y C t un o lin C k n a r F "O n e V oice U n i t ed i n Pr a y e r" A p p r o xima t e e v e n t t ime: 11:45 12:15PM Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur c h -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P .O Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 Fasbenner family Thanks to everybody who came by during our time of need and sent cards, brought food and helped with the sh fry! All donations were greatly appreciated. God Bless All! The family of Bubba Fasbenner Faith Richards family The family of Mary Sue Richards would like to thank everyone for their acts of kindness. The food, the owers, the visiting and the prayers got us through during the loss of our sweet sister. She will always be missed! Again, thank you all. May you be blessed. The family of Mary Sue Richards Agnes Geraldine Jerry Campbell was born April 30, 1944, in Apalachicola to the now late William and Annie Ruth Millender. She passed away Tuesday, April 8, 2014, in Carrabelle at the age of 69. Jerry was a homemaker and a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. She leaves behind a daughter, Lacey Campbell; sisters, Mary Griner (LaVerne), Gayle Mathes (Riley) and Jewel Johnson; special friends, Debra Manning, Brandi Manning, Tullos Peavy and Jasmine Carde; numerous nieces and nephews; and a host of other family and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jack Campbell, and son, Robert Campbell. Funeral services were held April 11 at Assembly of God with burial in Evergreen Cemetery. The Rev. Ron Barks and the Rev. Rudd of ciated the services. In lieu of owers, a memorial account has been established at Centennial Bank to assist with nal expenses. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family in making arrangements. Agnes Geraldine Campbell Charles Jefferson Little Boggie Sowell was born Feb. 19, 1963, in Apalachicola. He passed away Friday, April 18, 2014, in Panama City at the age of 51 surrounded by his family. Jeff was a lifelong resident of Franklin County. He worked as a commercial sherman. He leaves to cherish his memories a son, Justin Sowell (Brenda); parents, Charles Boggie Sowell and Bernice Miller (and her husband, Jim); sisters, Terena Tyrell and Laura DiClemente; brother, Dwayne Sowell; grandkids, Bentley Martin and Sadie Sowell; aunts, Merle Marshall, Janice McLeod (Lucky) and Carolyn Varnes; uncles, Red Davis (Billie Faye) and Ronnie Davis (Dollie); and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and other family and friends. He was preceded in death by his wife, Liz Sowell. Memorial services were April 21 at Deliverance Tabernacle. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family in handling arrangements. Jeff Sowell Mary Joetta Jones was born Jan. 18, 1942, in Levy County. She passed away surrounded by her family April 10, 2014, in Port St. Joe at the age of 72. Mary was a homemaker and a lifelong resident of Franklin County. She is survived by her children, Chris Howard (and wife, Teresa), Patricia Rickards (and husband, Joe), Sarah Estelle Smith (and husband, Bobby) and Xuripha Bunky Jones (and spouse, Gerry); siblings, Bill Lolley (and wife, Joy), Frances Gainer (and husband, Chris), Lassiefene Boatwright (and husband, Roy) and Zula Young (and husband, Holly); nine grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. Mary was preceded in death by her husband, Bufford Jones; daughter, Mary Frances Creamer; and grandchildren, Joshua Cody and Kenneth Ray Howard. Funeral services were April 14 at United Baptist Church with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. The Rev. Bobby Shiver and the Rev Ray Creamer of ciated the services. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family in handling arrangements. Mary Jones Margaret Anna Zuberbuehler was born April 15, 1933, in Philadelphia, Pa. She passed away at home in Carrabelle on Monday, April 14, 2014, at the age of 80 with her children by her side. Margaret worked in the hospitality eld for numerous years. She lived in New York for many years and summered at the Jersey Shore with her family before moving to Carrabelle Beach in 1984. She leaves behind her children, Robert George Soderholm (and his wife, Debbie) and Sharon Soderholm; grandchildren, Nichola Soderholm (Kristie), Chelsea Soderholm and Ryan Dobson; and greatgrandchildren, Kaylee Soderholm and Tyler Soderholm. She was preceded in death by James Howard Soderholm, James Spencer Soderholm and Edward Zuberbuehler. No services are planned at this time. Kelley Funeral Home assisted the family with all arrangements. Margaret Zuberbuehler Ronald Dale Herndon of St. George Island passed away suddenly on Sunday, April 13, 2014, at his home. He was born in Apalachicola on Feb. 5, 1953. He was preceded in death by his parents, Quentin and Clara Herndon. He leaves behind his wife, Donna Jo Herndon; one son, Dana Herndon (his wife, DeAna) of Tallahassee; two daughters, Brittney Herndon of Tallahassee and Shannon Jo Martin (her husband, Michael) of Wewahitchka; one brother, Gary Herndon of Crawfordville; four grandsons, Quen and Kasen Herndon, Dylan Grif n, and Riley Hicks; two granddaughters, Annabelle and Marlee Martin; one nephew, Gary Lynn Herndon; and niece, Christina Herndon. Memorial services were Friday morning, April 18, at First Baptist Church on St. George Island. In lieu of owers, please make memorial contributions to St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department (in care of Donna Jo Herndon, 508 E. Bayshore Drive, St. George Island, FL 32328). Arrangements under the care of Kelley Funeral Home. Ronald Dale Herndon RONALD DALE HERNDON From Staff Reports Love Center to observe Day of Prayer The Love Center Church will observe the National Day of Prayer from 11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on May 1 on the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse. This years theme, One Voice United in Prayer, coordinated by Anne Graham Lotz, the honorary chairman of the National Day of Prayer Task Force, encourages people to come together and pray as a nation under God. We invite you to be part of some of the most interesting conversations on earth, said Alma Pugh, evangelist and associate pastor of the Love Center Church. For more information, call Pugh at 370-6465. Cards of THANKS Faith BRIEF Obituaries Simmons family The family of Dorothy Simmons offers their heartfelt thanks to each of you who took time from your busy lives to extend to us your outpourings of love during the passing of our beloved mother. So many of you provided solace in so many ways as we mourned her loss, and we deeply appreciate every token of love given. Our mother was all about love and family, and it blessed our souls that you so generously gave to her family what she had given to you for so many years. Your visits, food, strong shoulders, warm embraces, prayers, comforting words all were genuine expressions of love that will forever be cherished by all of us. We are incredibly grateful for all your kindnesses and thank you all very much. The family of Dorothy Simmons Paula Harmon I would like to extend my heartfelt gratitude to all my friends and neighbors here in Apalachicola for thinking of me during my dear sisters illness and passing in Kentuckiana. I am grateful to have been with her this past month leading up to her death. It was a bittersweet time lots of laughter and lots of tears Mary Beth loved Apalachicola and St. George Island, and we spent our last month together reminiscing about our times together here when she would visit. On her last visit, she adopted one of our street kitties that she named Kismet, who is happy and healthy and a reminder of better times. Special thanks to The Salty Dog Krewe for their donation, in Marys name, to our animal shelter. Your acts of kindness and your words of encouragement during this time are greatly appreciated. Thank you. Paula Harmon Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, April 24, 2014 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By FRANK SARGEANT Special to The Times The king sh are in at Tampa! Thats big news for Panhandle anglers, because it means the run of the big mackerel has nally started to move north, after stalling for some time off Fort Myers this year because of a wave of late cold fronts. Water temperatures in the Panhandle still are at about 65 degrees, and thats too cold for any signi cant number of kings, but all it will take is a week of warm, sunny weather to make things right. When the water hits 68 degrees, the bait will move, and with it will come the kings to say nothing of the Spanish, the cobia, the bonito and a bit of everything else. Scientists with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute have learned that most of the kings that summer in Northwest Florida spend winters off the Florida Keys and in the Atlantic as far north as Palm Beach, but as soon as the waters begin to warm in spring, the sh move back into the Gulf and head north. They usually arrive in strength in the Panhandle shortly after April 15, with May through October offering steady action. When the big schools of cigar minnows and herring arrive, the kings will be with them, anywhere from a half-mile off the beach to the wrecks 15 miles out and farther. A lot of sh also typically run the breaks offshore at 80 and at 160 feet. Kings are members of the tuna family, but are for the most part found on the coastal shelf; they are green water sh rather than the true pelagics of the open sea. Theyre caught with some regularity from Panhandle piers. School kings, aka snakes, are slender speedsters that average 7 to 10 pounds; they make up the bulk of the king sh schools. But there are also plenty of smokers in the mix, sh of 20 pounds and up, which literally are capable of making a misty smoke y from a reel as they scream line off at 30 miles an hour. Kings reach lengths approaching 6 feet and weights more than 90 pounds in a lifespan maxing out close to 20 years. The current IGFA all-tackle record is 93 pounds, caught in Puerto Rico in 1999. Fish of 50 pounds are caught occasionally in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but most of the line class records come in winter around the Florida Keys. Catching school kings is fairly straightforward; most anglers nd the sh by watching for diving birds or for other boats already on the school and proceed to troll a 5inch Clark or Drone spoon weighted with a trolling lead of a couple ounces around the outer edges of the school, or around arti cial or natural reefs and current breaks. Pulling the spoon behind a No. 2 or 3 planer also is highly effective, and during the dawn bite when the sh are often on top, they can be caught on unweighted spoons and jigs and even occasionally on a big topwater lure worked very fast. Kings can also be caught on a number of big lures including the Yo-Zuri Crystal Minnow Magnum, the Manns Stretch 25 and Stretch 30 and Mirrolure 113MR, which can be trolled at speeds to 9 knots without broaching its a great locator lure. Some also do well with a large chrome Rat-L-Trap, a vibrating slab lure. Another Panhandle favorite for these schoolers is a cigar minnow on a feather-duster rig the tubular body of the cigar minnow trolls true while many at-sided bait species tend to spin. Trolling speed is typically 4 to 6 knots. You can catch a lot of kings by just pulling a rigged minnow at sunrise while everybody else is trying to catch live bait. Frozen cigar minnows are available at all Panhandle bait shops. For the larger kings, live bait is generally best bet; a large blue-runner or thread herring (aka greenback) on a stinger rig is the ticket. Most anglers use No. 6 copper-color wire as leader to prevent cutoffs on the razor-like teeth of the mackerels. One small triple-X strong treble goes through the nostrils, and a second dangles along the sides about 6 inches back. The rig prevents kings chomping off the bait sh tail without getting hooked, as they frequently do otherwise. The baits often can be caught around channel markers on a sabiki rig, a chain of small ies. These channel markers also often hold both kings and Spanish never pass one up if youre hunting sh. The live baits are eased along at walking speed, considerably slower than rigged baits or spoons. Some anglers like to lay down a scent trail by dragging a chum bag chopped bait sh, dogfood and menhaden oil is a popular mix as they troll a circular pattern around a reef or hard bottom area, or simply circle bait sh schools. A favorite trick of tournament anglers is to sh a live bait down the color break line that makes up outside the larger inlets on strong outgoing tides on the outside of this line is clear water, pale green, while on the inside the water is black from the tanninstained bays. Theres usually a lot of grass oating down the line, and lots of crabs and other edibles in the eddies. The anglers slowly work the live baits down the green side of this line. Either way, once the migration arrives, the action is near certain. KING MACKEREL REGULATIONS The limit on king sh is two daily, with the size limit 24 inches to the fork. Note that the fork is the center of the tail, not the tips. Fish must remain whole until brought to shore. For more on how and where to catch kings in spring, visit http:// surelurecharters.com or call Capt. Don Dineen at 376-8399. GEARING UP FOR KINGS School kings can be handled by skilled anglers with typical inshore gear, a 3000-size spinning reel loaded with 15-pound-test micro ber and a stout 7foot rod. The problem is you never know when a smoker is going to crash the party; a 30-pounder can readily spool such a rig, so most anglers gear up a bit, going to 20to 30-pound tackle with conventional spool rigs and heavy boat rods, just in case. Heavy spinning gear also does the job and can handle ber lines to 50 pounds and more. For pier shing, an 8-foot rod is a common choice, mounting a 4/0 reel with 30-pound-test mono or heavier braid. Many anglers use a balloon oat to get their baits out to the sh from piers, particularly when tide or wind is headed seaward. Secure the balloon to your leader rmly so it doesnt oat away on the strike researchers say these balloons often wind up in the stomach of sea turtles looking for a jelly sh meal when cast adrift. Whatever the rig, a length of steel leader is essential terminal tackle; kings have razor-like teeth that will instantly shear any sort of mono or uorocarbon leader, so wire is a must. Loop the wire through a small swivel, and tie your running line to the swivel. A DISH FIT FOR A KING There are better-eating sh in the sea than king mackerel, but properly cleaned and cooked, they are excellent table fare. My personal favorite is grilled king sh medallions. Basically, with the body cavity cleaned out, the sh is steaked into slabs about 1.5 inches thick. Use a large, heavy knife to section straight down through the backbone. Remove the skin, and then cut away the tenderloins, which form four almost round medallions of meat around the backbone; with this trim, you get rid of the rib bones and more importantly the red lateral line, which can give any sh a cod-liver-oil taste. Now you have four chunks of meat each about the size of a silver dollar, from the average 15 pound or larger king sh. Drizzle a little Teriyaki sauce on them, give them a spray of non-stick cooking oil, and put in a grilling basket, or even better a grilling skillet a Te on-coated skillet drilled with dozens of holes to let grease out, grill heat in. Cook over a very hot re until the llets just begin to brown. Kings are also good slow-smoked over an orange-wood re, or baked in a casserole with Italian-seasoned tomatoes and parmesan cheese in all cases, remove the skin and red line for best taste. About the only way that kings are not tasty is friedthey are naturally oily, and frying intensi es that oily taste grilling or baking works better. King sh can be lleted as with other sh, and thats the best route for sh smaller than 10 pounds. They can be frozen, but its essential to immerse the llets in water inside sealed plastic bags before putting them in the freezer; otherwise, they will become inedible before long. TO RELEASE A KINGFISH Kings dont survive catch-and-release well; the species has to keep swimming from birth until death just to breath and when you take them out of the water, the shock and the lack of oxygen quickly kills them. However, since you are only allowed two per day, it makes sense to learn how to release them without fatalities. First, debarb your hooks; that step alone goes a long way toward allowing a quick, injury-free release; the sh sometimes can be ipped off the hook without even being brought into the boat if a single debarbed hook is used. Secondly, never gaff a sh you intend to release. Even a gaff in the jaw adds greatly to mortality, biologists say; best to grab the sh by the tail, swing it aboard onto a towel, and then get the hooks out with a long-handled hook remover that keeps your hands a safe distance away from those vicious choppers. Third, when you release a king, throw it overboard head down, like a javelin the spear-like dive into the water often gets their motor running and they will swim off, while if you toss them over at-sided, they might simply sink into the depths and die or be eaten by the sharks that are never far away from the schools. The king is back in town SPECIAL TO THE TIMES WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu A pr 24 71 64 0 % F ri, A pr 25 72 64 0 % S a t A pr 26 72 64 10 % Sun, A pr 27 72 67 0 % M on, A pr 28 74 69 0 % T ues A pr 29 73 67 60 % W ed A pr 30 71 58 60 % Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! S h o p o u r h u g e s e l e c t i o n o f b e a c h w a r e s, c h ai r s, a n d t o y s. N e w a r r i v a l s d ai l y o f k a y a k s, P a d d l e b o a r d s, a n d shi n g g e a r w w w .shopb w o .c om Page 8 SPONSORED BY April showers have set in for our local area waters, reaching near flood levels in some spots. This will have an effect on fishing as the waters will be muddy for several days, depending on the tides. Good surf fishing from the beaches has produced pompano, whiting and some big bull reds. Many anglers are looking for cobia this week, but with the rain and muddy water, these fish will be hard to spot. Trout have moved back on the flats in St. Joe Bay and are heading to the usual summer spots this month, getting used to the warmer water. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, April 24, 2014 A Section Special to the Times On Saturday, the senior Seahawks for both the boys and girls varsity soccer teams were honored, in a friendly match at the Franklin County High Schools Mikel Clark complex. The nal home game of the soccer season had been called off; on account of inclement weather and so the seniors had not been given a proper send-off. This game allowed the seniors to show off their skills while at the same time give them one more run on the pitch. Seniors Deborah Dempsey, Gracyn Kirvin, Ally Millender, Brook Pittman, Adriana Reeder and Jessica Shields from the girls team; and James Bailey, Alex Causey, Stefan DeVaughn, James Harris, Graham Kirvin and James Newell from the boys team, comprised a single co-ed team that faced off against their co-ed underclassman teammates. Wearing their signature black jerseys, the team comprised of seniors jumped all over the underclassmen and led 4-0 at the half. For this season, Gracyn Kirvin, Millender and Shields were selected as First Team All-District; while Reeder was selected as Second Team, AllDistrict. Additionally, Graham Kirvin was selected as First Team All-District; Harris was selected as Second Team, All-District; and Newell was selected Honorable Mention All-District. At halftime, the seniors were honored. Each had their soccer biography read while they stood with their parents at mideld. Flowers were given to the girls; while framed pictures of their entire team were given to the boys. All seniors received a soccer ball, signed by their respective teammates. The rain held off long enough for everyone to get pictures marking the event and the Senior team went on to add two more goals in the second half, winning the game going away, 6-0. Bodine, executive director of CareerSource Gulf Coast (CSGC), the new name for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. A lot of times, with negotiations, we would put them in temporary jobs, and after they ended, we could use funds to retrain them for a different eld if necessary. Bodine said that when that money ran out, CSGC began negotiations with the state, which administers the federal grant. They surveyed the roughly 234 oystermen who took part in the shelling program and a plan was worked up to nd training in the various choices. We didnt believe all of them would want to go into vocational training so we wrote a budget and proposal for 94 people, she said. This can only be used for those who participated in the earlier Tropical Storm Debby grant. That was the feds decision. This is an extension of that earlier grant, not a new grant, said Bodine. The biggest chunk of the money, $930,600, will be spent on an average of 36 weeks of needs based payments to those who take part, at $275 per week. This is paid out only during the training and licensure period, which varies depending on occupational choice. A little more than $143,000, or 8 percent of the total, will be spent on funding non-personnel administrative costs. The hiring of a project supervisor, and two case managers, will take out $230,000 for 24 months, and when bene ts are added in, will cost $310,500. About 62 participants, or twothirds of the total, are expected to enroll in training that includes correctional of cers, auto technicians, commercial truck drivers, welders, and heavy equipment mechanics, among others (see sidebar). The remaining third is targeted for enrollment in a combined GED-work experience program, which will enable them to receive their high school diploma as s step towards further training. This will cost the grant an average of $1,800 each, and include ca work experience component. Adult education cant be a standalone activity, said Jennifer German, deputy director of CSGC. It must be paired with something else. The grant includes an on-the-job training wage supplementation for 15 participants at $7,500 each. This is paid directly to the employer to subsidize part of the workers pay. There are a number of other lesser expenditures to assist in the training, such as $44,820 for passenger vans to Lively Vocational Tech in Tallahassee; lodging costs in Marianna for 12 truck driver trainees, which as $200 a week for hotel will run $19,200; and supportive service costs, for gas cards and the like, which run on average $200 per participant, of about $18,800. We have 24 months to work with, said German. Some training is 18 months and we need to pad in for testing or retakes for state licensure. Bodine said that the grant process to secure the funds took longer than is typical. Ive never really quite been needled on a proposal like this one, she said. They wanted more and more detail but we dont have a crystal ball. Bodine said the federal government has invested millions of dollars in projects around the nation related to fishery failures, and they are concerned the money is spent wisely. What theyve seen is people will go to training but then do everything they do to stay in the same occupation, she said. It has to be something they can get a job in. German said that while she is waiting on a notice of funds availability, to arrive shortly, my staff is sitting on go and is already started contacting the people. She said her staff will do what it can to assist in successful completion of the vocational training, including providing an academic lab at the Van Johnson municipal complex, where the administration arm of the program will be housed. We do what we can within reason to help, she said, but stressed it takes commitment on the part of participants. If you dont attend classes, theres no point in us giving you the money. In his announcement Monday, Scott said we will continue training workers and expanding the Apalachicola Bay economy with these funds. With this $2.1 million investment we will work to get this community back on its feet. Were working tirelessly to support the natural treasures families in the area rely on, he said. Diversi cation is a key element of a strong economy, said Department of Economic Opportunity Executive Director Jesse Panuccio. We look forward to continuing to work with this community to ensure a thriving Apalachicola Bay economy that supports multiple industries and jobs for Florida families. U.S. Representative Steve Southerland said that while we may be a long way from restoring Apalachicola Bays oyster shery, these additional funds help move us one step closer to the goal of restoring peace of mind for this proud, but struggling community. RETRAINING from page A1 Page 9 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks nished their season by losing to South Walton in the district tournament on Wednesday, April 16 by a score of 8-2. Freshman Megan Collins was the losing pitcher, throwing a complete game and giving up nine hits and one walk. Junior Madison Newell led the Seahawks offensively going 2-for-2 with a walk. Senior Ally Millender was 1-for-3 with a triple and two RBIs. Seventh grader Melanie Collins was 1-for-3 with a run scored. Senior Morgan Mock scored the only other Seahawk run. South Walton took a rst inning lead on an error and added three more in the fourth inning, one of which came on another error. They scored their last three in the sixth inning. The Lady Seahawks made two errors on the night, but they led to three runs. The girls were disappointed, but you have to give credit to the South Walton pitcher. She worked ahead in the count all night and her rise ball was very effective, said head coach Scott Collins. The Lady Seahawks ended the season with 19 wins and seven losses and return nine out of 12 players next year including juniors Madison Newell and Calli Westbrook, sophomore Krista Martina, freshmen Scout Segree, Allie Kirvin, Megan Collins, and Adriana Butler, and seventh graders Melanie Collins and Sophia Kirvin. Our seniors (Mock, Millender, Ashley Carroll) will be missed and there is no way to replace some of their production, but we have a lot of young talent returning on both our varsity and junior varsity teams and the future looks bright, said Collins. PLAYER OF THE WEEK Senior Ally Millender was 1-for-3 with a triple and two RBIs in last weeks Lady Seahawks softball playoff game against South Walton in the districts. Ally had a great senior season and her leadership was a big part of our success, said head coach Scott Collins. Lady Seahawks close out at 19-7 Seniors will be missed ALLY MILLENDER SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Honored before the Senior Night game were, from left, seniors Morgan Mock, Ashley Carroll and Ally Millender. Soccer seniors honored at Saturday Classic Moving forward Photos by GINA TARANTO | Special to the Times Pictured with daughter Jessica are, from left, Karen and soccer coach Joe Shields. Below, pictured with assistant coach Stacy Kirvin, center, are, from left, seniors Graham Kirvin, James Harris, Alex Causey, James Bailey, James Newell and Stefan DeVaughn. Bottom, among the senior Lady Seahawks honored were, from left, Gracyn Kirvin, Adriana Reeder, Deborah Dempsey and Ally Millender.

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Franklin County a Blueway community At its April 15 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to accept a Florida Paddling Trails Association designation as a Blueway Community. The designation was supported by the Tourist Development Council. The Florida Paddling Trails Association (FPTA), a 501(c)(3) organization, established the Blueway Community Program to help communities develop locations of interest to both in-state paddlers and outof-state tourists. FPTA de nes a Blueway as a water path or trail with launch points, camping and picnic locations and points of interest for paddlers. Blueways are typically developed to encourage recreation, education and community development. To qualify as a Blueway community, a county or municipality must be in proximity to a Florida paddling trail or Blueway and have available accommodations, restaurants and additional recreational opportunities like hiking trails, museums and shopping. According to FPTA, Florida has more than 40 designated paddling trails on various rivers and streams in addition to the 1,515-mile Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail. As a Blueway community, Franklin County will be featured on the FPTA website and in associated advertising. Other Blueway communities include Cedar Key, Yankeetown, New Port Richey, Desoto County, Zolfo Springs, Boca Grande, Live Oak, White Springs, Estero and Suwannee. Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center N O T I C E T O R E C E I V E S E A L E D B I D S F r a n k l i n C oun t y w i l l r e c e i v e d s e a l e d b i d s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d c o n t r a c t o r t o p e r f o r m r e no v a t i o n s t o a n e x is t i ng 1 2 3 0 s q u a r e f o o t c o n c r et e b l o ck b u i l d i ng a t 7 3 1 U S H w y 9 8 E a s t p oi n t F l o r i da T he b u i l d i ng w a s o r i g i na l l y b u i lt a s a F l o r i da H i gh w a y P a t r ol s u b s t a t i o n a n d i n r e c e n t y e a r s ha s b e e n u s e d b y t he F r a n k l i n C oun t y S c ho ol B o a rd B i d s s ha l l i n c l u de a l l c o s t s f o r l a b o r e q u i p m e n t m a t e r i a ls w a r r a n t i e s a n d s u b c o n t r a c t o r s ne c e s s a r y f o r t he r e no v a t i o n s I n g e ne r a l t he p r o j e c t i n c l u de s : a ne w A D A r e s t r o o m ; a ne w e l e c t r i c a l c l o s et ; a f u t u r e b r e a k r o o m ne w o o r i ng c e i l i ng s p a i n t a n d n is he s de m ol it i o n o f t he e x is t i ng f a a de b r i ck a n d b r i ck c ol um n o n t he f r o n t e n t r y a n d r e p l a c e m e n t w it h a s t r u c t u r a l r e i n f o r c e m e n t t o t he e n t r y c a nop y de m ol it i o n o f t he e x is t i ng r a d i o a n d e l e c t r i c a l r o o m s de m ol it i o n a n d r e p l a c e m e n t o f w e s t f a c i ng s i de w a l k w it h ne w s i de w a l k a n d A D A p a r k i ng T he r e no v a t i o n s i n c l u de t he i n s t a l l a t i o n o f a ne w 3 t o n H V A C ne w s u p p l y a n d r et u r n d u c t w o r k p r o g r a m m a b l e t he r m o s t a t a n d a s s o c i a t e d c o m p o ne n t s B i d s s hou l d b e i n a s e a l e d e n v e l op e a n d b e c l e a r l y m a r k e d E a s t p oi n t V is it o r C e n t e r B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i v e d un t i l 4 : 3 0 P M a t M a y 5 2 0 1 4 a t t he F r a n k l i n C oun t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C oun t y C ou r t hou s e 3 3 M a r k et S t S u it e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c ol a F l o r i da 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e op e ne d a n d r e a d a l ou d o n T u e s da y M a y 6 2 0 1 4 a t t he r e g u l a r l y s c he d u l e d C oun t y C o m m is s i o n m e et i ng wh i c h b e g i n s a t 9 A M a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t A p a l a c h i c ol a F l o r i da P r op o s a ls r e c e i v e d a f t e r t he de s i gna t e d t i m e w i l l no t b e c o n s i de r e d P l a n s a n d s p e c i c a t i o n s c a n b e ob t a i ne d f r o m t he C oun t y B u i l d i ng D e p a r t m e n t a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t A p a l a c h i c ol a F l o r i da 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 C o m p l et i o n da t e f o r t h is p r o j e c t w i l l b e 1 2 0 da y s f r o m t he da t e o f t he N o t i c e T o P r o c e e d p r e s e n t e d t o t he s u c c e s s f u l b i d de r T he B o a rd o f C oun t y C o m m is s i o ne r s r e s e r v e s t he r i gh t t o w a i v e i n f o r m a l it i e s i n a n y b i d t o a c c e p t a n d / o r r e j e c t a n y o r a l l b i d s a n d t o a c c e p t t he b i d t ha t i n t he i r j u d gm e n t w i l l b e i n t he b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C oun t y I f y ou ha v e a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l A l a n P i e r c e a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 e x t 1 6 1. Patriot s Day Picnic e t h i r d a n n ua l P a tr io t s D a y c e le b r a tio n i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y w i l l t a k e p la c e o n Saturday April 26 at V eteran s Memorial Plaza, on Market Street in Apalachicola. Memorial Cer emony begins at 11 a.m. A Cajun lunch will be ser v ed at noon. Cost of the meal is $7 f or adults and all childr en eat fr ee. Ev ery one is welcome. All pr oceeds go to the support of V eteran s Memorial Plaza and Thr ee Soldier s Detail South. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400 + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 50 X 150 G U L F L O T $35,000 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Law Enforcement A10 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 Arrest REPORTS The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department, Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. April 16 Krista R. Whiddon, 26, Port St. Joe, aggravated battery on a pregnant victim (FCSO) Justin D. Massey, 23, Carrabelle, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) April 17 Joey E. Sanders, 35, Hosford, Bay County warrant (FWC) April 18 James A. Seaman, 55, Panama City, Bay County warrant for violation of probation (FWC) April 19 Kathy D. Ekorn, 60, Crawfordville, DUI (CPD) Brett L. Davis, 41, St. George Island, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) April 21 Daniel Stepp, 46, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Clifton R. Galloway, 25, Carrabelle, possession of cannabis, uttering, forgery, and attempted burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Jece Hat eld, 18, Clarksville, possession of a legend drug without a prescription (FCSO) Emily M. Hat eld, 19, Apalachicola, possession of a legend drug without a prescription (FCSO) The Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce Investigations Division has initiated an investigation into the increase of counterfeit money in circulation locally.Detectives have uncovered at least one counterfeit printing operation that has been active at several locations in Franklin County. Detectives have seized printing equipment, software, ink and more than $1,400 in counterfeit bills. Sheriff Mike Mock said multiple arrests and charges are pending the conclusion of this investigation. If you believe you have been a victim of counterfeiting, you are asked to call the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce at 670-8500. News BRIEF Bogus bill arrests loom THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on

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The Times | A11 Thursday, April 24, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, April 24, 2014 The Times | A11 94740T THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA-000238 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. CHANCE R. MOORE, GINA MOORE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered October 28, 2013, in Civil Case No. 19-2013-CA-000238 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CHANCE R. MOORE, GINA MOORE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of May, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 48, Whispering Pines Subdivision, Phases 3 and 4, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of March, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 5774444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-9558771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. April 24, May 1, 2014 94756T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-000311-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DIANE S. WHIDDON, AQUA FINANCE INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT; ROBERT A. WHIDDON; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of March, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13-000311-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and DIANE S. WHIDDON AQUA FINANCE INC. ROBERT A. WHIDDON UNKNOWN TENANT; and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, 2nd Floor Lobby OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA. A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, AND FURHTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT 626 FEET SOUTH, AND 44 FEET EAST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER (CON. MON.) OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4; RUN THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF THE PROPOSED 88 FOOT GARDENIA STREET, 125 FEET; THENCE WEST TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT SOUTH BAY SHORE DRIVE (STATE S-65); THENCE NORTHWESTERLY, CURVING ALONG THE SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF BAY SHORE DRIVE 125 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT (CON. MON.) DUE WEST OF THE BEGINNING POINT; THENCE 616 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PROVIDIING A MATCHING 44 FOOT STRIP ALONG THE ABC School The following is the honor roll for the third nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. FIR S T GR A DER R amsdell, All As: Shlok Patel, Gracyn Paul, Jazmyn Pavon, Olivia Poloronis, Evie-Morgan Price, Promise Suddeth and Mabry Wallace. A/B: Josh Dykes, Addyson Kent, Desiree Messer, Ryan Mills, Joel Taylor and Josalyn Ward H. Baroody, All As: Breahna Fleming, Zariah Harvey, Mya Huckeba, Khali McNair, Issy Nations and Krista Varnes A/B: Ben Butler, Taylen Kendrick, Shaylee Martina and Micahlyn ONealSE C OND GR A DE S. Herrington, All As: Peyton Blackburn, Nathaniel Bolinger, CJ Conway, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Taylor Mallon, Weston Taranto and Jostyn Tipton A/B: Hannah Grace Abel, Cody Abercrombie, Charlie Ramsdell, and Aubrie Thompson. J. Mallon, All As: Reece Juno, Taylor Pendleton and Kiana Weeks A/B: Trinity Creamer, William Luberto, Alexcia McNair, Isabella Price, Aniyah Rivera, Cassandra Robertson and Emma RowlandTH IRD GR A DE W. Martina, All As: Lucy Neill and River Sheridan A/B: Mitchell Adkins, Faline Everitt, Zach Libby, Arav Patel, Owen Poloronis, Trinity Taylor and Mark Willis T Moses, All As: Kylah Ross A/B: Alisha Arroyo, Jonathan Carter, Kendall Hill, Eric Lau, JohnMichael Thompson, Colin Weng and Leah WrenFOURTH GRADE L. Bockelman, All As: Meredith Alford, Dylan Griffin, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Myia Maxwell, Brooklyn ONeal, Rory Ramsdell, John Sanders and and Nico Valenzuela A/B: Carson Davis, Severyn Everitt and Gracie Smith M. Lee, All As: Weston Bockelman and Lauren Conway A/B: Lanie Allen, Colin Amison, Ella Friedman, Andrew Monod andGenevieve MontgomeryFI F T H GR A DE J. Ammons, All As: Camille Davis, Alex Joanos and Livia Monod A/B: Devin Daniels, Kaylee Hicks, Skye Huber and Kiersten Prince L. Poloronis, All As: Brycin Huckeba, Abby Johnson, and Jack Vail A/B: Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clinton Rester, Madalyn Thompson, Caden Turrell and Jarvis TurrellSIXT H GR A DE Karen Ward, All As: Cade Juno and Nash Ramsdell A/B: Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Jake Norred, Allison Register, Sophia Robertson, and Hannah Sweet Brant Banks, All As: Alyssa Robinson, Drake Stanley and Camille Williams A/B: Tanner Amison and Janacia BunyonSEVENT H GR A DET anya Joanos, All As: Kevin Flores-Perez, Mikalin Huckeba, Alexus Johnson, Sophia Kirvin and Jack Ramsdell A/B: Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Bryce Kent, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott and Ethan Vonier Anna Keel, All As: Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer and Becca WillisEIGHTH GRADE Melanie Copeland, A/B: Mia Cummings, Joseph Martinez and Sallie Rose Paul T ara Ward, All As: Christian Amison, Faith Sapp, Lucas Sasnett and Savannah Montgomery A/B: Michaela Cassidy, Simon Hodgson, Nick Joanos, Brooke Martina, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Madison Smith and Allie Zingarelli Franklin County E lementary The following is the Honor Roll for the third nine-week grading period at Franklin County Elementary.FIRST GRADE All As: Christopher Creek, Josiah Friddle, Sarah Ham, Bradley Page, Nathan Rotella, Dexton Teat A/B: Jordan Barber, Dalton Barrack, Sy Bartlett, Preston Butler, Loghan Carver, Serenity Cassell, Christian Daughtry, Nyashia Davis, Raegan Dempsey, Kassidy Denney, Ayla Derico, Layla Dixon, Dominic Durbin, Robert Estes, Cammie Gilbert, Daylen Gilbert, Jasmine Gray, Mahalah Griggs, Michael Hill, Jerzy Jackson, Christian Johns, Lilianna Joiner, Esteban Juan, Charity Larkin, Daniel Lively, Harmony Malone, Emmanuel Marcum, Adrionna Martin, Ajaylen McNair, Madison Wagner, Lester Owens, Asya Owens, Rosa Juan, Jesus Lopez, Estela Virbes, Reshard Robinson, Christopher Russell, Dezmonae Sanders, Michelle Weisz and Mckenna Young.SECOND GRADE All As: Jada Allen, Logan Bentley, Imani Ison, Emily Patterson, Onamae Millender, Corbin Pritchard, Evan Ogden, Kylie Proctor A/B: Laelah Carranza, William Chipman, Aryauna Benjamin, Marcus Clayton, Dillon Evans, Natalie Gibbens, Charles Glass, Bradlynn Hutchins, Bricyn Kennedy, Kirsten Martina, Brian Millender, Reid Nix, Mason Pace, Cole Polous, Terry Proctor, Chandler Sanders, Alonah Segree, Gavin Shelley, Anthony Stulsky, Christian Wilson, Austin Chapman, Ansley Savage, Jesse Whitted, Erick Romero, Corbin Pritchard, Austin Millender, Rebecca Mahon, Kayleigh Leonard, Hannah Creamer, Denim Chastain, Aryauna BenjaminTH IRD GR A DE All As: Grace Carroll, Lucy Edwards, OMarion Kelley, Kylie Rudd, Emaleigh Segree A/B: Ellis Bilingsley, Sarai Crumbliss, Dylan Culver, Kyla Culver, Don Davis, Emily Fichera, September Ferrell, Emily Fichera, Emily Giddens, Marissa Gilbert, Trott Ivey, Alondra Jimenez, Sara Johnsen, Tariah Jones, Tashawn Jones, Autumn Loesch, Cloey Malone, Kelsey Martina, Parker Martina, Shalyn Massey, Jesse MockFOURT H GR A DE All As: Savannah Brannan, Steven Cook, Casandra Gibbens, Rachel Rudd, Maddison Whitten A/B: Ariel Andrews, Mary Bareld, Trinity Barron, Briana Caldwell, Christain Custer, Bryce Gilbert, Merrideth Kiernan, Michael Melton, Robert Nessly, Marina ONeal, Grace Patterson, Brendon Polous, Brantly Richards, Anthony Roberts, Sarah Segree, Rebecca Shiver, Sydney Shuman, Annie Smith, Kristen Stancil, JachobEarl Thompson, Larry WinchesterFI F T H GR A DE All As: Martina Granger, William Gray, Katie Newman A/B: Tiauana Benjamin, Capri Cargill, Layla Chisholm, Tressie Edwards, Camron Evans, Kerry Garner, Francisco Juan, Hollie Larkin, Stephen Malone, Patrick Millender, Shayden Pearson, Shirah Pelt, Destanie Proctor, Colson Shelley, Makayla Varner, Lorne Whaley, Charlee Winchester Franklin County Middle School The following is the honor roll for the third nine-week grading period at Franklin County Middle School.SIXT H GR A DE All As: Brandon Farr, Kt Nessly A/B: Chasity Ard, Nicolas Hutchins, Jacob ShirleySEVENT H GR A DE All As: Jessica Rudd A/B: Colby Boatwright, Charles Cassell, Melanie Collins, Preston Edwards, Kiana Foley, Hannah Hogan, Tanya Harris, Casey Riley, Kirsten Robinson, Mitchell Sand, Tonnor Segree, Makenzie Shuman, Beyla WalkerE IG H T H GR A DE All As: Josie Kriss A/B: Ana Aguilar, Morgan Anderson, Tylyn Gillikin, Jesse Page, Jake Paterson, Leah Reeder, Dalyn Sheridan, Sawyer Stultz, Chance White Franklin County High School The following is the Honor Roll for the third nine-week grading period at Franklin County High SchoolFRE SHM EN All As: Tessa Carlisle, Emily Crosby, Melody Hateld, Kacey Howard, Allie Kirvin, Zachary May, Astrid Ramirez, Landa Reeder, Mallorie Shiver, Jackson Subbarao, Thomas Subbarao, Tyanna Townsend A/B: Jayla Alley, Adriana Butler, Holly Chambers, Christopher Creamer, Tia Cummings, Logan Crosby, Maxwell Davis, Jill Diestelhorst, Bianca Huber, Jaylon Gainer, Myranda McLeod, Chelsea Register, Mercedes Rice, Natasia Robinson, Scout Segree, Alexis Segree, Bianca Huber, Vanessa Simmons, Marshall SweetSO PH O M ORE S All As: Adam Hames, Quinnaland Rhodes, John White A/B: Amelia Newman, Anna Riley, Hollie Shiver, Nathan WandersJUNIOR S All As: Austin Carter, Whitney Frye-Amison, Julie Diestelhorst, Macey Hunt, Samantha Marxsen, Payton Smith, Chaseon Taranto, Aaliyah West A/B: Amanda Anthony, Tressie Buffkin, Myesha Campbell, Sasha Carr, Johnnie Daniels, Zoie Lance, Chandler White, Curtis Gordie, Dexter HarrisSENIOR S All As: Amber Adkins, Alex Causey, Myel DeCourcey, Austin Martina, Tevis Page, Malachi Parker, Brook Pittman, Josie Turner, Bria Walker A/B: Thadaeisha Carr, Ashley Carroll, Cynthia Duncan, Logan McLeod, James Newell, Jennifer Stratton, Cameron White Honor Rolls

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A12| The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519007850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast 1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519051 JOBANNOUNCEMENTPreschool and Substitute Teachers –Calhoun and Gulf Counties – NFCD is seeking quali ed applicants for Preschool and Substitute Teacher positions at our centers in Calhoun and Gulf Counties. Requirements include an High School Diplolma; some experience teaching in early childhood setting, and training courses and certi cations mandated by DCF. NFCD offers an attractive bene t package (health, dental, life, disability, sick leave, 401k, etc.) Contact: Send resumes to Sebrina McGill at smcgill@ oridachildren.org, fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE 4519012BADCOCK'S IS HIRING in Eastpoint! We are needing delivery and warehouse help. Please apply at store. Must have a valid Florida License.CALL 850-670-4333 4518084The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for possible teaching positions in preschool through 8th grade for 2014-15 school year: Classroom teachers must be eligible forFloridateachercertication. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer.Pleasesendresumesto: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12thStreet,Apalachicola,FL32320. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW EAST BOUNDARY OF THE PARCEL JUST DESCRIBED FOR THE 88 FOOT RIGHT-OFWAY OF SAID “GARDENIA STREET,” THIS PARCEL BEING A PORTION OF THE PARCEL RECORDED IN VOL. 103, PAGE 464, OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA. MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A RECENT SURVEY DATED APRIL 03, 1996, BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES INC., BEARING JOB NUMBER 96-200 (PSC NO. 13019), AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN EAST 44.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 626.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 124.86 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 598.68 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SOUTH BAY SHORE DRIVE, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1410.93 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 127.85 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 127.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 616.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 44.00 FEET THEREOF. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 25th day of March, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. P.O. Box 9908 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-9908 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 09-78569 April 24, May 1, 2014 94758T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 13-000201 CAAXMX WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC., Plaintiff, vs. EDDIE JOSEPH III; WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR FOR WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL BANK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE FOR EDDIE JOSEPH III; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of March, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13-000201 CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. is the Plaintiff and EDDIE JOSEPH III WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL BANK UNKNOWN SPOUSE FOR EDDIE JOSEPH III N/K/A GWEN JOSEPH UNKNOWN TENANT; and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgement to wit: LOT 7 AND 8, OF BLOCK 153, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN GENERAL USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to particiate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of March, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 11-22534 April 24, May 1, 2014 98383T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE: 14-00090-CA ESTATE OF ALICE MCINTOSH WALKER a/k/a ALICE M. WALKER, DECEASED. Plaintiff, vs. Ollie M. Pender, and all unknown persons claiming interests by, through, under or against Ollie M. Pender, whether as spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors or other individuals, agents, corporation, associates, partners, beneficiaries, or otherwise, and all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against any known or unknown person who is dead or is not known to be either alive or dead, together with any and all unknown assigns, successors in interests, trustees, of such parties. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: Ollie M. Pender, and all unknown persons claiming interests by, through, under or against Ollie M. Pender, whether as spouse, heirs, grantees, creditors or other individuals, agents, corporations, associates, partners, beneficiaries or otherwise, whose last known residence was 199-13th Street, Apalachicola, Florida and whose present residence, address and whereabouts are unknown, and all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against any known or unknown person who is dead or is not known to be either alive or dead, together with any and all unknown assigns, successors in interests, trustees, of such parties. YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT AN ACTION TO QUIET TITLE ON THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA HAS BEEN FILED: Lots 6 & 7, Block 147, Apalachicola, Florida. You are required to serve a copy of written defenses, if any, to it on Thomas M. Shuler, Esquire, Plaintiffs Attorney, of The Law Offices of Thomas M. Shuler, P.A., whose address is 40-4th Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on or before May 8, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default shall be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: March 28, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michael Moron As Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98497T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, THOMAS J. WEBB, JR. or VALENTNA R. WEBB, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1204 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: LOT 6 BLOCK 154 CITY OF APALACHICOLA COUNTY OF FRANKLIN and STATE OF FLORIDA, according to the map or plat of said city in general use. PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0154-00 60 Name is which assessed: CAROLYN S. BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98489T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2013-CA-000239 Division CENLAR FSB, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS S. DALY AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on March 27, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: LOT NINE (9), OF BLOCK ONE HUNDRED FIVE (105) OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR SAID CITY IN COMMON USE. and commonly known 107 17TH ST., APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the higher and best bidder, for cash, at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Courthouse, at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Florida, on August 6, 2014 at 11:00 AM EST. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of March, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2014 98559T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000077CAAXMX PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS, et al Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE RE-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiff’s Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed March 31, 2014, and entered in Case No. 192012CA 000077CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, wherein PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 22 day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: LOTS 25, 26, AND 27, BLOCK 246, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, this 4th day of April, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, 2014 98499T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, ROY H. SOLOMON & MARJORIE D. SOLOMON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1075 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 9 BLOCK B THE RESERVE AT MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES, UN 1. FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE. PARCEL NO: 30-08s-06w-1003-000b0090 Name is which assessed: NANCY BROWN All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the FIRST (1st) Monday in the month of JUNE 2014, which is the 2nd day of JUNE 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 4th day of MARCH 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2014 98607T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000312CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KAYLA M. BARBER A/K/A KAYLA MARTINA BARBER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE KAYLA M. BARBER A/K/A KAYLA MARTINA BARBER; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; FRANKLIN COUNTY, A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA; DAVID E. BARBER II A/K/A DAVID ELLIS BARBER II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 22nd day of May, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida. LOT 46, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION, PHASES 3 AND 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 2nd day of April, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H#: 316772 April 24, May 1, 2014 ADOPTION: Actress, Former, yearns to be Future At-Home-Mom. Financially Secure & Very Loving. Trish 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com East Point 93 S Bayshore Dr April 25th and 26thYard SaleKitchen Items, Appliances, Lots of Misc. Text FL86895 to 56654 Mexico Bch: 412 La Siesta Dr. (off 15th St) Sat April 26th, 7a-4pYard SaleElectric Golf Cart, Golf Clubs, Decor, Furniture, Lamps, Fishing Supplies, Misc. Text FL87187 to 56654 Port St. Joe 506 8th St Fri-Sat April 25th and 26th. 9a-4pYard SaleAntique Coffee Table, Cedar Chest, Collectible Glass Ware, Elvis Doll And Mem. And Lots More. Text FL86684 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleThurs, Fri., & Sat 9am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL83066 to 56554 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow Taking Applications for ALL POSITIONS at our new location. Apply in person only 45 Avenue D, Apalachicola Web Id 34287208 Food Svs/HospitalityServers Bartenders Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34287016 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34285183 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34285183 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Dep Required Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL86476 to 56654 Eastpoint : Hwy 98, Sea Air RV Park, efficiency apt, w/ vaulted ceiling, gazebo & deck $450/mo 599-5496 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL84527 to 56654 Located in Port St. Joe 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 Apalachacola : 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo; Also 3Br/2Ba House For Rent $800/mo. Call 850-643-7740 Text FL85667 to 56654 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. $159,500 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. Carrabelle: Riverfront lot on Crooked River, high & dry, $49k or will trade for boat of equal value. 850-599-5496 Susie’s Cleaning Service20 Years of Experience Call 850-708-2441 or 850-670-1049 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 24, 2014 The Times | A13 1122710 1123119 Jos.A.Bank JobFairinDestin,FL Wed,April16th 10:00AMto6:00PM TheJos.A.Bankstore DestinCommons 4106LegendaryDrive. WeAreHiring -SalesAssociates -Keyholders FullandPart-Time positionsavailable! Bringyourresumeanddressto impress-on-siteinterviews willbeheld! Questions?Call850-650-6850 Seeallavailablejobsathttps://jobs.josbank.com/ad/de-EOEM/F/D/V Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1122729GulfCoastStateCollegehasAdjunctpositions availablefortheFall2014semesterinthefollowing areas:Thesepositionswillberequiredtoteachpart-timeclasses, maintainaccurateclassattendancerecords,meetdeadlinesfor submittinggrades,giveassistancetostudentswhoneedhelp outsideofclasstime,&abidebythesyllabi&text.Requirements:Master’sdegreewith18graduate hoursinsubjectmatter Salary:$636.00/percredithour Deadlinetoapply:Openuntillled ApplywithrespectivedivisionsatGCSC, 5230W.U.S.Highway98PanamaCity,FL ***Additionalinformation:gulfcoast.edu/hr/employment.htmGulfCoastStateCollegedoesnotdiscriminateagainstanypersononthebasis ofrace,color,nationalorigin,ethnicity,sex,age,maritalstatus,ordisabilityin itsprograms,activitiesoremployment.RobertaMackey,ExecutiveDirectorof HumanResources,850-872-3866,hasbeendesignatedasthepersontohandle allinquiriesregardingnondiscriminationpolicies.*Hospitality&TourismManagement *Accounting *CertiedSurgicalFirstAssistant *Chemistry *Economics *Music *PhysicalTherapistAssistant *Religion *Physics *Biology *ComputerProgramming *History *MusicProductionTechnology *PoliticalScience *Sociology *Engineering(Mechatronics/Mechanical/Electrical) *ComputerScience(DatabaseManagement,WebDesign/DigitalMedia, DigitalForensics&Investigations,Cybersecurity,CompTIAA+hardware& software,Linuxoperatingsystems,EthicalHacking,Networking) YouSeek. WeFind. CareerSourceGulfCoastisapowerfulnetwork ofworkforceprofessionalswhoarereadyto connectyouwiththeskilledtalentyouseek.With ourstatewidereachandlocalroots,weprovide employeerecruitmentandtrainingresourcestohelp yourbusinessthrive.Letushelpyoundyournext staremployee.Contactustoday!FranklinCounty 192CoachWagonerBlvd.,Apalachicola Phone: 850.653.4981 Email :customerservice@careersourcegc.com OntheWeb: careersourcegc.com Anequalopportunityemployer/program.Auxiliaryaidsandservices areavailableuponrequesttoindividualswithdisabilities.Allvoice telephonenumbersonthisdocumentmaybereachedby personsusingTTY/TDDequipmentviatheFloridaRelayServiceat711. GulfCounty 401PetersStreet,PortSt.Joe 850.229.1641 BayCounty 625Highway231,PanamaCity 850.872.4340 AdditionalLocations Recruiting Employees? 1122830 1122629 EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLETheEastpointWaterand SewerDistrictisseekingapplicationsforaeldposition inoperationsandmaintenance.ApplicationsareavailableattheEastpointWater andSewerDistrictOfce,40 IslandDrive,Eastpoint,FL 32328duringnormalbusinesshours,MondaythruFriday8:30am-4:30pmEST.TheEastpointWaterand SewerDistrictisanequal opportunityemployerandis adrugfreeworkplace. 1123104ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 WebID#:34284633 1122603 Biller/CoderPartTime/FullTime. Sendresumesto BlindBox3611c/o TheNewsHerald,P.O. Box1940,Panama City,FL32402 1122630 LPN/CNA MedicalOfceseeking FullTimeLPN/CNA. SendresumetoPO2052, LynnHaven,FL32444or Emailto: emcoffmgr@yahoo.com 1122714YOUNGQUESTBROTHERS WELLDRILLINGNowHiringDrillers&FloorHands atPanamaCitylocation.Mustpassdrugtest.Emailresumesto asspencer2@hotmail.com or 239-229-8064 1122633CNA's,HomeHealthAides& Companion/Homemakersneededforinhomepatientcare. Parttime&Fulltime.24/7. Backgroundcheckrequired. VisitHopewellHomeHealthcareat: www.hopewellcare.com foranapplicationor call850-386-5552 1122632Isnowhiringforthefollowingpositions:EMT RN Paramedic FloorTechnician Applicationsareavailableat: www.weemsmemorial.com &maybesubmittedtoGinnyGriner,WMHHRDirector, ggriner@weemsmemorial.comBymailto:POBox580,Apalachicola,FL32320, or FAXEDto(850)653-1879Dietary RevenueCycleManager Housekeeping

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, April 24, 2014 Contact The Times T oday (850) 653-8868 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com M L S # 2 5 0 8 9 3 $ 3 4 9 0 0 A p a la c h i c o la H I S T OR I C N OR T H S I DE T w o l o t P a r c e l o n t h e C O R N E R o f 5 t h & A ve K J u s t 3 b l o c k s a w a y f ro m t h e A p a l a c h i c o l a R i ve r & s h o p p i n g a n d r e s t a u r a n t s h i g h & d r y w o n d e r f u l l i ve o a k s & p a l m s Pl e n t y o f ro o m f o r b l d g o n t h i s D O U B L E l o t L i s t e d b y J a n i e B u r k e 4519034 J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 251618 $549,000 St. George Island B A Y F R ON T L I V I NG D e e p w at e r at e n d o f D o c k Sp e c t a c u l a r S u n s e t V i e w 3 B R 2 B A g o u r m e t k i t c h e n t i l e d o o r s f u r n i s h e d l a r g e s c r e e n ro o m H O T T U B p i l i n g s & e l e c t r i c i t y i n p l a c e f o r 2 b o at l i f t s r i p r ap p a r k l i k e s e t t i n g g o o d r e n t a l i n c o m e M a r k s S t r e e t l i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 P ositiv e S pace Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the den c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com REDUCED 29,000 29,000 850-566-6761 or 850-385-6363 www .tlgproperty .com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose last publicly-performed song was Bridge Over Troubled Water? Beatles, Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Elvis Presley 2) Which king in a suit of playing cards sticks his sword through/behind his head? Clubs, Spades, Hearts, Diamonds 3) The Mall of America in Bloomington, Minn., is large enough to t about how many NY Yankee stadiums inside it? 3, 5, 7, 9 4) In Tamarack, Idaho, what cant you buy after dark without a special permit from the sheriff? Buttermilk, Wine, Bullets, Onions 5) Whats the most popular sport played in American nudist camps? Basketball, Volleyball, Flag football, Soccer 6) In legal jargon what does a codicil supplement? Lease, Escrow, Will, Equity 7) Yearly in the U.S., which of these sells more units than the other three combined? Frisbees, Baseballs, Basketballs, Footballs 8) As assigned by the United Nations whats the numerical code for the United States? 333, 520, 732, 840 9) Who regularly played Scrabble in the White House? FDR, Eisenhower, JFK, Nixon 10) Statistically, how many men out of ve propose marriage on one knee? 1, 2, 3, 4 11) Whats a sunken panel in a ceiling called? Abutment, Pendentive, Coffer, Spire 12) The British Medical Journal estimates that smoking one cigarette takes how many minutes off the average persons life? 2, 6, 11, 20 13) Whats the largest city in the United States with a one-syllable name? Ames, Iowa; Flint, Mich.; Rye, N.H.,; York, Pa. 14) Over 200 new varieties of what product have been introduced since 2001? Potato chips, Coffee, Pepper, Vodka ANSWERS 1) Elvis Presley. 2) Hearts. 3) 7. 4) Onions. 5) Volleyball. 6) Will. 7) Frisbees. 8) 840. 9) Nixon. 10) 1. 11) Coffer. 12) 11. 13) Flint, Mich. 14) Vodka. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Special to the Times Your chance to spend a summer at the lake comes to the Dixie Theatre this weekend, with The Panhandle Players production of On Golden Pond, by Ernest Thompson. Performances will be Friday and Saturday, April 25 and 26, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, April 27, at 3 p.m. With humor and poignancy, themes of mortality, family relationships, marriage, and generational differences all play out at Norman and Ethel Thayers small lake house in Maine beside Golden Pond, where 48 years of vacation memories have accumulated like the photographs clustered on every at surface. Through clashes and reconciliation, the play explores the often turbulent relationships of growing up and the difculties faced by a couple in the twilight years of a long marriage. With all the years of acrimony, recriminations, wounded feelings, distrust, heart palpitations, and mosquitoes, will this nally be the summer of healing? Featuring Royce Hodge as Norman Thayer, Liz Sisung as Ethel Thayer, Gary Niblack as Charlie Martin, Judy Loftus as Chelsea Thayer, Mikel Register as Billy Ray, and Phillip Carroll as Bill Ray, the play is directed by Pam Vest, with the adroit stage management of Bob Inguagiato. Tickets are $15 and will be available at the door on performance dates. Tickets may also be purchased in advance at Downtown Books in Apalachicola, The Butler Agency in Eastpoint, Carrabelle Junction, No Name Cafe Books & More in Port St. Joe, and Caribbean Coffee in Mexico Beach. On Golden Pond is produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., and funded in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. On Golden Pond plays at the Dixie PAM VEST | Special to the Times In On Golden Pond rehearsals, Norman Thayer, Jr. (Royce Hodge), left, reminds his young shing buddy Billy Ray (Mikel Register) that Billy has to catch one more biggie to match the shing prowess of the old man of the sea. Left the cast of this weekends Panhandle Players production of On Golden Pond, are, from left, are Gary Niblack, Mikel Register, Royce Hodge, Liz Sisung, Phillip Carroll, and Judy Loftus.