The Apalachicola times

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00262

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, March 20, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Seafood workers seek lower bag limit By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The talk last week was about working to nurse Apalachicola Bay back to health, as seafood workers focused on ways to rejuvenate the oyster bars and get people back to work. The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association hammered out a recommendation at its March 11 meeting to lower the daily bag limit to better spread out the harvest that begins June 1 when the summer bars open. FCSWA President Shannon Harts eld said the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has asked for input on the best way to control the summer harvest. Harts eld said the 15-member Seafood Management Assistance Recovery Team (SMART) has discussed trying to change the bag limit and making East Hole into a summer bar. He reminded the rank-andle who lled the courthouse annex that a ve-day-a-week season, with all oysters brought in by 2 p.m., were necessary rules. “If we go back to seven days and don’t give this bay a chance to come back, it ain’t going to come back,” he said. “If we don’t start monitoring ourselves, we’re not going to have a bay.” Harts eld said the SMART group wants to recommend a daily limit well below the current 20 bags per licensed cardholder, which in July switches to 20 bags per vessel. A voice vote indicated the oystermen want an eight bag limit per license, in June, July and August, an apparent compromise between the sixand 10-bag recommendations. “The price will drop down,” one oysterman said. “You don’t ood the market, so the price stays high. We all know there’s oysters, and they’re on the river bars. We want to try to make it last the whole three months.” The move to ask for a lower bag limit was prompted by a perception that too many licensed part-timers are infringing on the livelihoods of fulltime oystermen. One man described how “the moochers, the opportunists” take off from their regular jobs in June to make money when the summer bars open. “They work all year long, save up vacation, and they take the whole rst week off,” he said. “They take By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The dramatic anticipation at last week’s appeal hearing by Family Dollar before the Apalachicola city commission turned out to be short-lived. No sooner had the March 11 hearing opened before a packed room when City Attorney Pat Floyd rose to advise commissioners that they ought to start the special exception process over again by sending the matter back to planning and zoning. Panama City Beach developer Brett Woodward, represented by attorney Robert Hughes, was hoping city commissioners would reverse the Planning and Zoning Commission’s Nov. 18, 2013, vote that gave a resounding no to a proposal to relocate the store from its current site adjacent to the Gulfside IGA to a lot that neighbors the Best Western Inn. Floyd told commissioners the rst question they must ask, before the content of the appeal, was whether or not Blue Current Development LLC had been provided a quasi-judicial hearing by P&Z. He said such a hearing is called for by case law, not by any particular stipulation in the city’s land development code. Bayshore Trailer Park wins rib cook-off By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com They’re just a bunch of neighbors in a trailer park who every year compete at the Eastpoint Rib Cook-off but don’t ever win. Except for last Saturday, when the Bayshore Porkers, the crew from the Bayshore Trailer Park, savored their rst victory. The crew, led by Jackie Rex and Ira Kelly, used a slow smoked style on their three slabs of ribs, shunning sauce and instead relying on a homemade dry rub to nish off the avor. Rex and Kelly, a part-time resident from Americus, Ga., were all smiles as they took home the trophy on behalf of a cooking team that also featured Jeff and Cheryl Allison, Donna Kelly and Eric Ammons. The team also raised more than $300 for the cause, second among the teams. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A Franklin County jury took a little more than an hour last week to decide that a 24-year-old Carrabelle woman drove drunk in a crash outside Carrabelle two years ago that killed one of her passengers. The jury of four men and two women on March 13 found Rebecca Ann Padowitz, 24, guilty of DUI manslaughter in the April 17, 2012, death of Rona Lavon Hawkins, 28, of Sopchoppy. Hawkins died at the scene of the one-car crash after his 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee, driven by Padowitz, spun out of control on U.S. 98 about 1.6 miles west of Lake Morality Road and about 8 miles west of Carrabelle. Padowitz faces up to 15 years in prison when she is sentenced by Circuit Judge George Reynolds on April 14. According to Florida Highway Patrol reports in the case, the crash occurred about 9:12 p.m. after the eastbound Jeep lost control on a curve, ipped over and struck a tree, bursting into ames. Padowitz, who was celebrating her 23rd birthday, had to be Life Flighted to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. A passenger in the back seat, Julian Kenneth Collins, 33, of Thomasville, Ga., escaped injury. Collins told FHP investigators he was able to crawl out of the passenger side door and pull Padowitz from the wreckage, but that Hawkins’s arm was pinned under the vehicle. A few minutes later, Collins was able to assist in freeing Hawkins, but, Collins said, “it was obvious he was deceased.” An autopsy by Leon County REBECCA PADOWITZ RONA HAWKINS Jury: Drunk driving killed Hawkins Back to drawing board for Family Dollar EASTPOINT RIB COOK-OFF Porkers prevail PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Bayshore Porkers, led by Jackie Rex and Ira Kelly, took top prize. At top, Lt. John Lemieux shows off the ribs being cooked by the Eastpoint re department. See more photos on our Facebook page, The Apalachicola Times. See COOK-OFF A3 See SEAFOOD A3 See FAMILY DOLLAR A3 See DRUNK A3 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 VOL. 128 ISSUE 47 Apalachicola accident A5 ‘Bigfoot’ author to sign latest book From 1-3 p.m. Saturday, March 22, Downtown Books in Apalachicola welcomes cryptozoologist Scott Marlowe to a book signing of “Bigfoot in Art History.” Also available for the rst time in Franklin County, the latest edition of “Cryptid Creatures of Florida” will be on sale with an added chapter on the Carrabelle Cat. Art Walk Saturday in Apalachicola Fine art in all forms will be woven in and around downtown Apalachicola on Saturday, where artists will be showing, selling and demonstrating their talents from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. as part of ArtWalk. A progressive wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres will be 3-6 p.m. at area restaurants. Wines will be sampled at several locations. A special ArtWalk glass, your “ticket,” can be purchased at each tasting station for $25. From 6-9 p.m., participating restaurants will prepare at least one special menu item that highlights local food — oysters, shrimp, crabs, sh, tupelo honey — for their special for the evening, and pair a wine with the special. Del Suggs to play Dixie on Saturday Award-winning singer and songwriter Del Suggs returns for his fourth appearance at 8 p.m. Saturday, March 22, at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Danica and Pete Winter, and Chuck Parker, will be gracing the stage as well, in this celebration of Saltwater Music. Tickets are $25. For reservations, call 653-3200.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 20, 2014 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D + $ & / 1 % $ 2 $ 2 `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y LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com At the March 4 county commission meeting, two county road department employees each received a raise and a promotion after some debate. At the request of Road Department Director Howard Nabors, Lamar Hardy and Thomas Sadler were promoted to the positions of working foreman. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved to grant the promotions, and was sec onded by Commissioner Smokey Par rish. The motion passed 4-1, with Com missioner Pinki Jackel opposed. When Nabors made his request, Jack el asked if there was only one opening. Nabors said there was one opening for the position of assistant superintendent. “What do you think you need to do the job?” Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked Nabors. “That’s the main thing.” Nabors said that instead of one as sistant superintendent, Hardy could help handle prison work crews and fill in when the regular secretary was out. He said Sadler was experienced with road work and culverts. “Lamar would be over the inmates and making sure the job is done,” said Nabors. “Can Tommy (Sadler) supervise in mates?” Jackel asked, Nabors said Sadler had not reinstated his inmate certification. According to a May 2013 memo issued by former Road Director Hubert Chip man, Sadler was disciplined for wasting time that he should have been perform ing county work, and for using county equipment without authorization while he was assigned to be supervising an in mate work crew. Several witnesses said they saw Sadler using a county truck to dump dirt on his own property in the Whispering Pines development in Eastpoint. At least one witness said there were inmates present at the time of the incident. In his responding statement, Sadler said he had used a county truck to trans port bed railings to his property and “left the inmates standing by the road” when he did so. “I never had them on my personal property,” wrote Sadler. Apparently referring to the dumping incident, Nabors, when requesting the promotions, told commissioners “all that mess took place before I took over.” After commissioners agreed to the promotions, Nabors requested a $1,500 raise for each man. Commissioner William Massey sug gested the board wait until county labor attorney Lucy Turner of the Carson and Adkins law firm, was to make her presen tation on job classification and pay scale at the March 18 meeting. Turner has been creating a plan to formally classify county employees and set standardized wage increases based on seniority and performance. Nabors said money for the raises was already in his budget. Lockley moved to approve the salary increase. Parrish seconded. “I understand that when people move from classification to classifica tion, there is a difference in money but I agree with Mr. Massey about Lucy Tay lor,” said Jackel. “ I don’t understand why we would do reclassification and an increase today when we haven’t looked at those grids; when we’ve got other peo ple that we’ve got on hold that. “I don’t know what (Sadler and Har dy) make and I don’t know how they fit into that grid. This is kind of counterpro ductive for what we’ve been trying to do with Lucy Turner. One of these foremen can supervise prisoners and one cannot, so there’s some differences there. I don’t see how we can do this based on what we’ve been doing at prior meetings,” she said. Sanders said both men had worked in the road department for roughly the same period. Nabors said each had more than 25-years of job experience. The motion to increase the salaries passed 3-2, with Jackel and Massey opposed. Sanders asked Director of Admin istrative Services Alan Pierce to add Sadler and Hardy to a list of names Turner is looking at so she could bring correct figures for their salaries to the next county meeting. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Next time you are on the island, take a good look at the lighthouse. You will notice a dazzling difference. Last week the St. George Lighthouse got a new look. The lighthouse association paid to have with high-impact glass replace the polycarbonate panels around the lantern room. Lighthouse association secretary Terry Kemp said the original plastic panels had become scratched and weatherworn. “We set aside money each month for maintenance. This is just part of that,” she said. Alex Klahm Architectural Metal and Design, Inc. of St. Petersburg installed the new glass, which consists of two quarter-inch panes sandwiching a rubber membrane. The glass would not t through the scuttle hole into the lantern room and was hoisted up the side of the lighthouse two panes at a time in a specially designed wooden crate lifted by a cable attached to a pole in the lantern room at one end and a trailer-mounted winch on the other. Kemp said installers added a new system of closable vents above the glass panels for ventilation. They will remain open except during bad weather. H owaOWAR dD N aboABO R sS P inIN K iI J aA CKE lL N oahOAH L oO CK lL EY 2 promoted in roads department D aA ZZ linLIN G nN E wW F a A CE F oO R T hH E ST. GG E oO RGE L iI G hH T

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Thursday, March 20, 2014 ¡ P ¢¦  ¢ Ž  J¢‚¨ G¦ Ž‚ I ¨” Ž¨ ¨ M”¦ Žˆ¢¦ Cove rin g: Me xi co B each al o n g with Gu lf and F rank lin Cou ntie s fšŽ ‚¨Ž ¨”  œŽ £  ¢¦ ‘Ž ¡ P ¢¦  ¢ Ž  J¢‚¨ G¦ Ž‚ I¨” Ž ¨¨ M”¦ Žˆ¢¦ ¢ †Ž ” ¨Ž¦ Ž‹ ” ¢ ‘Ž m‚¦ n ”œ Ž¨ G£ ¦”š ¡ x Ž¨ Sele ct y our Size : Stan dar d List ing (1.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . . . $55 A w ar enes s List ing (3” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . . . $90 Expo sur e List ing (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . . $200 PREM IUM POSI TION S Chec k One (Fir s t Come Fir s t Ser v ed) Insi de Fron t Co v er (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . $300 Insi de Bac k Co v er (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . $250 Outs ide Bac k Co v er (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . $350 All ads ar e pr iced in Full Colo r Rese r v a tion Dead line Apr il 1, 2014 Name of Busi ness : ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ Cont act P er son: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Phon e: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ E-ma il: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ Addr ess: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ City : ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Sta te: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ __ Zip: ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Clas si c a tion (Cir cle One) : Anti ques Attr acti ons, Auto moti ve, Chur ch, Elec tron ics, Even t Coor dina tor Equi pmen t Rent al, Fina ncia l, Fish ing, Flor ists Gift s, Hair styl ist, Home Care Insu ranc e, Jewe lry Lawn Care Lock smit h, Mari ne, Nurs ery Phot ogra phy Plum bing Prop erty Mana geme nt, Real Esta te, Rent als Mana geme nt, Reta il, Rest aura nt, Stor age, Wine & Liqu or Not Lis ted? Wr ite in y our ca tego r y ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ n ¢ k Ž¨Ž¦ Ž x ¢ ¦ m£‚ˆŽ J¢  ‚ˆj ALACHICOLA ALACHICOLA AP For details visit www .Apalachicola.org MARCH 22, 2014 PERFORMING Dixie Theatre Presents Saltw ater Music with Del Suggs 8 pm WINE Progressiv e wine tasting hosted b y select restaurants 3-6 pm A R T Local and regional artists display and sell their w ork throughout do wnto wn 11-6 pm CULINAR Y Area specialties prepared to perf ection 5-9 pm # # !"$$ !! # # \› ‰ a†{› U t›†t‹ b†‹}‹ †‚ [‚ƒ †‚[‚ƒ t›†t‹b†‹}‹ U V’  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  I  Rt•{… Ž> •u ’‰ Œ‰ \› ‰ a† { › L ‹t } Finishing second in the cook-off was Joshua Pru ett’s JP Punk team, which also relied on a dry rub, made from Old South rib rub, but added a light glaze of a combination of sauces. Taking home third place was the Big Top team, whose booth also raised al most $1,600 by itself to lead all 10 contestants. Fire Chief George Pru ett said Saturday’s 13th an nual charity cook-off should gross more than $10,000 for the re department, which will net several thousand dollars. “If we can make $6,000 or $7,000 at a rib cook-off, we’re OK,” he said. “Our needs are more simple than most re departments in our area. We paid off our newest truck a few months ago, and now we’re debt-free.” While some contestants opted for sauce, many did not, opting like the Florida Seafood Festival’s Team Retsyo did for the right blend of cayenne pepper or other spices. They took home the Best Rig or Dis play award. “Low and slow cooking” was the secret for the Pogy Road Porkers, the team of former undersheriff Joel Norred and his wife, Susan, who used a sweet and spicy tomato-based sauce on theirs. The Kickin’ Ash team’s ribs, which took home an Honorable Mention, were the handiwork of Scott Payne and Sterling Kendrick. For the Fan-tastic BBQ team of Michelle and Bert Hicks, and Ty Gillikin, “the secret’s in the box,” a de cade old mysterious metal case, heated by charcoal and wood. This was the rst year for Team Freeport Florida, di rected by Pamela and Terry Rafeld, brother to the late Vince Rafeld. Terry Raf eld, a professional reght er for 33 years, rst with Bay County and now Freeport, seasoned his with Dale’s marinade and some McCor mick steak seasoning. “We slow cook ’em and keep ’em steamed,” he said, taking a moment to thank the local organizers for their hospitality. “Everybody’s just been pleasant over here, sweet as they can be.” For Loco Catering, the team headed by Lee Edm iston and Roy Ogles, “it’s all in the love of the ribs.” The team doesn’t use a sauce, but dusts theirs with garlic and pepper and “whatever we nd in the kitchen at the time,” and cooks its entries three different ways. “And at the end, we taste ’em and see which ones we want to submit,” said Ed miston, whose team raised $289 for the re department, third among the booths. The Apalachicola Vol unteer Fire Department was tight-lipped about their cooking method. “It’s a se cret recipe, just something we threw together,” Ashley Teat said. “Slow and easy.” Six of the eight judges — Paul and Gail Riegelmayer, Jim and Maxine Cobb, Fred Stanley and Jimmy Lewis — were all Kansas City bar becue certied and were assisted by Bob Heide and Vito Bell. With a carnival for the kids and an expanded si lent auction, the entire event “went pretty well,” Chief Pruett said. “We sold out of chicken and ribs, 850 pounds of ribs, close to 50 Boston butts and three cases of chicken halves. It went off without a aw, not one hitch, no glitches. What a blessing.” COOK-OFF from page A1 FAMILY DOLLAR from page A1 A “quasi-judicial decision requires certain due process rights, regardless of merits,” he said. “Required and guar anteed are that applicants have the right to present evi dence, crossexam witnesses have record established on which decision is based.” Floyd said all parties in volved would agree that “the unquestionable determina tion is that those require ments were not complied with as part of P&Z, were not provided at that level. “My recommendation is you make decision to quash the decision that was made, and send it back to P&Z to do that procedure. Send it back, and have them conducted properly and able to be done on its merits.” Commissioner Frank Cook moved, and Mitchell Bartley seconded, a motion to follow Floyd’s advice, and the motion passed unani mously without discussion. Woodward did not speak at the hearing and after ward said he planned to continue his bid to secure a special exception as a re tail specialty store under the terms of the C-3 com mercial zoning. Woodward wants to construct a more than 8,300-square-foot store on 1.16 acres at U.S. 98 and Clairmont. “We have no other alter native but to go back and fol low due process and all the administrative procedures as set forth,” he said. Woodward, 47, said he has been developing for 19 years, mainly single-tenant retail projects. According to the appeal, Blue Current, if granted zoning approval, would develop and con struct the store, and then re ceive rental income arising from lease arrangements between Blue Current and Family Dollar Stores Inc. “This is a rst for me,” he said. “It’s unfortunate. I’ve been coming to Apalachicola a long time vacationing, My father-in-law grew up here; our family comes here three or four times a year.” Woodward said ever since the project began in April 2012, the process has been “an open book.” “I believe the Family Dollar was enhanced archi tecturally to look good. The landscaping package, it’s going to look good. A lot of things we’ve tried to do to make it the nicest store we’ve ever done,” he said. “I do believe the reason they want to relocate is they want to see more groceries. I believe that (once) a lot of people saw retail items they have access to, they would utilize it.” Woodward said he be lieves his request for zoning approval “qualies under the vague denition of spe cialty retail.” That denition is sure to be an issue in P&Z’s up coming revisit to the matter. Hughes admitted in his l ing the city’s land develop ment code does not include “published criteria” as to what constitutes a retail spe cialty store. But, he argued, rather than articulating the evidence that it relied on to makes its decision, P&Z relied on “improper, irrel evant, immaterial and inad missible” comments of the public. The lawyer has argued that P&Z’s unanimous vote in April 2012 to conrm that “the operation is consistent within the C-3 zoning dis trict” led Woodward to spend about $302,000 on the proj ect, including about $245,000 for the land, $24,000 for civil design work, $9,300 for legal fees, $9,000 for architectural work, $8,500 for surveying work and $6,000 for environ mental work. the cream of the crop, and they leave us holding the bag. Y’all stealing from our kids, that’s our time to put money in the bank.” The FCSWA also moved to recommend that the recreational limit be low ered to just two bags over a weekend, about one-quar ter of what it is now. The group split on whether to go along with a view held by the seafood dealers to have the ve-day week extend from Sunday through Thursday, so they can easily ll orders at the beginning of the workweek. “We have to give leeway to the dealers,” Hartseld said. Others, like Eastpoint businessman Rex Pennyc uff, thought it important to preserve Sunday as a day of rest. “It’s a great step to wards family values if par ents were home on Sunday with their kids,” he said. The SMART board is expected to consider the recommendations at their Monday meeting. The composition of that board, which works closely with University of Florida food science professors, in cludes Hartseld; seafood dealers Tommy Ward, David Barber and Lynn Martina; oystermen Eu gene King, Darrin Polous and David Gilbert Sr.; sh ing guides Coy Shiver and Runt Sapp; clammer Fred Jetton; ounder sherman William Massey; crabber Anthony Coulter; and the FCSWA’s Dink Turner. SEAFOOD from page A1 Medical Examiner Dr. An thony Clark determined Hawkins had succumbed to “crushing head trauma.” Hawkins, the son of Sop choppy mayor Colleen Skip per, was a star linebacker at Lincoln High School, from which he graduated in 2002. Collins told FHP Padow itz was driving the vehicle after a day spent at Carra belle Beach, where the three had been “drinking beer and vodka all day.” Toxicology reports later determined Padowitz had a blood alcohol level of .17, more than twice the legal limit, but no drugs in her system. Hawkins was found to have had a blood alcohol level of .102, with the presence of cannabis in his blood. Interviewed by FHP of cers at TMH, Padowitz denied she had been driv ing and said she had been in the front passenger seat. While witnesses said she had entered the car on the driver’s side, only Collins could testify having seen her driving. He was trans ported to Franklin County for the jury trial from Cof fee Correctional Facility in Nicholls, Ga., where he is serving a ve-year sentence for shoplifting. After studying the wreck age, FHP investigators con cluded it was “more feasi ble” that Padowitz had been driving, since the driver’s seat was too close to have t Hawkins, who was at least 6-foot-3. Collins told FHP he was the only one of the three wearing his seat belt and that Padowitz “was driving very fast, and he remem bered telling her to slow down.” Collins told the FHP Pa dowitz seemed to him to be “the more sober one of them all,” when she asked Hawkins if she could drive, since it was her birthday. Padowitz was initially given a bond, but it was re voked in April 2013 after her arrest for possession of a controlled substance. The case was prosecuted by Assistant State Attorney Jarred Patterson, on be half of State Attorney Willie Meggs. Padowitz’s defense was handled by Port St. Joe Attorney Brian Hill, who was assigned the case as conict counsel. DRUNK from page A1 Local The Times | A3

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 20, 2014 A Section By RON POLLACK Special to The Times Have you started to experience challenges with living on your own? Do you need help with medical care or daily activities? A nursing home may seem like your only option. But there are good alternatives, including home care and assisted living. However, it’s important for you to learn what kinds of services Medicare and Medicaid will and won’t cover. (Medicaid is the nation’s health insurance program for low-income individuals and families, including seniors, and for people with disabilities.) You may have access to services such as Meals on Wheels, visiting and shopper services, and adult day care programs. But what if you need other kinds of assistance? Home health services (also called homeand community-based care) help seniors who need additional support so they can safely stay in their homes or who are recovering after a hospital stay. These services include short-term nursing care and rehabilitative care (like physical therapy). Registered nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, home health aides, and medical social workers provide home health care. Medicare pays for a limited number of one-hour home health visits, but only for medical care. Medicaid may pay for other types of home care, depending on your situation and the state you live in. You may be able to nd other non-medical services in your community through your local Area Agency on Aging. Assisted living facilities (or assisted living homes) bridge the gap between independent living and nursing homes. These facilities typically provide services like assistance with personal care and medications, and they give residents more freedom and privacy than nursing homes. They range in size from small houses that serve a few residents to very large facilities with hundreds of residents. Assisted living facilities cost less than nursing homes but are still very expensive, costing an average of $3,300 a month. Many people are confused about what Medicare and Medicaid cover. Nursing Home Care: Medicare does not cover most nursing home care. Medicare pays only for certain skilled nursing or rehabilitative care, and only after a hospital stay. The duration of this coverage is limited. To learn more about coverage limits, visit the Medicare website at www.medicare. gov/coverage/skillednursing-facility-care.html. Medicaid covers most nursing home care if you have a low income. Each state sets its own income eligibility level for Medicaid coverage of nursing home care. In many states, you must also have limited assets to have Medicaid cover your nursing home care. Alternatives to Nursing Home Care: Medicare covers very little of this care. For example, Medicare won’t pay your rent for an assisted living facility, but it will cover some health care you receive while you are in assisted living. Medicaid pays for some assisted living costs for people with low incomes in several states. Every state has at least one Medicaid program that will pay for other alternatives to nursing facility care, and most have multiple programs. Each state’s program is different. Plus, individuals must meet the eligibility rules for that particular program. For example, some programs focus on individuals with particular health care needs. And some programs are limited to a certain number of people, which creates waiting lists. Many people end up paying the full cost of assisted living entirely out of their own pockets. To learn more about Medicare and Medicaid coverage of nursing home care, assisted living, and other options, contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, or SHIP. SHIPs offer free counseling and assistance by phone and in person. Find the SHIP in your state online at shipnpr. shiptalk.org/shippro le. aspx. Also, the Eldercare Locator connects older Americans and their caregivers with information on senior services. Find it online at www.eldercare.gov/ eldercare.net/Public/Index. aspx. Ron Pollack is executive director of Families USA, a national organization for health care consumers that has advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. Alternatives available to nursing home care By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s unemployment rate took a big jump in the wrong direction in January. According to preliminary numbers released Monday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the county’s jobless rate for January stood at 6.0 percent, a hike of seventenths of 1 percent, from 5.3 percent in December. The unemployment rolls added 37 people in January, swelling from 271 to 308 people in search of work. This increase in joblessness occurred even as the workforce grew by 165 people, from 5,157 to 5,092. The current work force has 92 more workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,000 workers and the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 7.5 percent. The January jobless picture dropped the county well away from its long-standing position as one of the 10 best counties in the state for unemployment. It was tied in January with Lee and Calhoun counties for 23rd best among Florida’s 67 counties. Franklin was worse for unemployment than Manatee, Orange, Santa Rosa, Liberty, Union, Clay, Holmes, Nassau, Wakulla, Jefferson, Leon, Seminole, Sumter, Broward, Jackson, Bradford, St. Johns, Alachua, Okaloosa, Walton, and Monroe, the state’s best at 3.8 percent. The unemployment rate in the CareerSource Gulf Coast region Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties was 6.5 percent in January, 2.5 percentage points lower than the year ago rate of 9.0 percent, while 0.2 percentage point above the current state rate of 6.3 percent. Gulf County had a jobless rate of 6.9 percent, and Bay County 6.5 percent. Out of a labor force of 98,613, there were 6,420 unemployed CareerSource Gulf Coast residents. Every March, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) release revised historical data along with the January employment and unemployment estimates. That annual process, known as “benchmarking” is a standard part of the estimation process and take place this same time every year in each state nationwide. As a result of this annual benchmarking process, local employment data has been adjusted to show job growth instead of job losses in the Panama City metro area. The gures that show the Panama CityLynn Haven-Panama City Beach area lost 600 jobs from Dec. 2012 to Dec. 2013 have been adjusted to show an increase of 1,200 jobs, with the largest gains coming from the trade, transportation, and utilities; professional and business services; and mining, logging, and construction industries. “Over the past year, we’ve seen several positive signs in the local job market so we are not surprised that the annual benchmarking process has revised our numbers to show job gains,” said Kim Bodine, executive director for CareerSource Gulf Coast. “The unemployment rate has dropped 2.5 percent and the number of online jobs advertised has increased by almost 20 percent.” County unemployment rate takes wrong turn Page 4 By CELIA HERBERT Special to the Times EDITOR’S NOTE: Happy Endings is a column following up on successful adoptions arranged by the Franklin County Humane Society. Celia and Paul Herbert of Panama City adopted a pair of high-pro le, special-needs dogs from the humane society last year. The following is an update on the dogs and their new home. Some of you may remember us, Dennis and Ralph, canine children belonging to Cynthia Green who was tragically taken away from us in Dec. 2012. We wanted to bring you up-todate on where we are and how we are doing. We would like to thank the Franklin County Humane Society for taking good care of us and nding our new parents. We live in Panama City Beach with Mom, Dad, four other dogs and six cats. Needless to say, there is never a dull moment. We had adjustments to make and it was slow-going in the beginning but we are doing well. We have a very large fenced yard on which to run, roam and hide. We have a pool that we swim in during the warm weather. Our weights are up but the exercise keeps them under control. We visit the vet regularly and get our vaccinations on schedule. Mom allows us free reign of the house and all the children have beds and blankets of their own. We often trade just to make sure our’s is best. We hope you won’t forget us or our rst Mom. She was very important to us and we loved her very much. Please support the Franklin County Humane Society; give other dogs, and cats a good home. Regards to all in Apalachicola and Carrabelle, Dennis and Ralph SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The Herberts’ 2013 Christmas card photo, from left, Dennis, Celia Herbert holding Miss Priss, Ralph, Paul Herbert holding Simba, Bella (the white dog) and Jazz Man with reindeer ears. Happy Endings: Dennis and Ralph Special to the Times Researchers from North Carolina State University have analyzed 50 years’ worth of hit songs to identify key themes that marketing professionals can use to craft advertisements that will resonate with audiences. “People are exposed to a barrage of advertisements, and they often respond by tuning out those advertisements. We wanted to see what we could learn from hit songs to help advertisers break through all that clutter,” said Dr. David Henard, a professor of marketing at NC State and lead author of a paper describing the research. “We also wanted to see if there were speci c themes that could help companies engage with consumers in a positive way via social media. “Our work shows that there is a limited range of widely accepted themes that get at the heart of human experience and resonate with a large and diverse population of consumers,” Henard said. “We’re not saying that every marketing effort should center on one or more of these themes, but the implication is that efforts incorporating these themes will be more successful than efforts that don’t.” The researchers began by compiling a list of every song that hit No. 1 on Billboard magazine’s “Hot 100” song list between Jan. 1960 and Dec. 2009. The tracks ranged from “El Paso” by Marty Robbins on Jan. 4 and 11 in 1960 to “Empire State of Mind” by Jay-Z and Alicia Keys in the last ve weeks of 2009. The researchers used computer programs to run textual analysis of the lyrics for all of those songs and analyzed the results to identify key themes. The researchers identi ed 12 key themes, and related terms, that came up most often in the hit songs. These themes are loss, desire, aspiration, breakup, pain, inspiration, nostalgia, rebellion, jaded, desperation, escapism and confusion. But while these themes are common across the 50-year study period, the most prominent themes have varied over time. “Rebellion,” a prominent theme in the ’60s and ’70s, did not break the top 10 in the ’80s – and was in the middle of the pack in the ’90s and ’00s. The themes of “desperation” and “inspirational” leapt to the top of the list in the ’00s for the rst time – possibly, Henard noted, due to the cultural effects of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. “These themes overwhelmingly re ect emotional content, rather than rational content,” Henard said. “It reinforces the idea that communications centered on emotional themes will have mass audience appeal. Hit songs re ect what consumers respond to, and that’s information that advertisers can use to craft messages that will capture people’s attention.” The paper, “All You Need is Love? Communication Insights from Pop Music’s Number-One Hits,” is forthcoming from the Journal of Advertising Research. The paper was co-authored by Dr. Christian Rossetti, an assistant professor of business management at NC State. 50 years of hit songs yield advertising tips

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 20, 2014 OLIVER is a 1 yr old B eagle and is the best look ing best beha v ed beagle y ou ’ v e ev er seen. He is happ y and social and the per f ec t siz e f or man y people He is hear t w orm positiv e S o ar e 7 other dogs a t the shelt er righ t no w I f y ou w an t t o do something t o help these dogs mak e a dona tion t o the “S ec ond Chanc e F und ” T his fund is set up t o pa y f or medical e xpenses abo v e and bey ond r outine medical car e Y ou can ev en choose t o “ sponsor ” a speci c dog and k no w tha t the dona tion y ou send will be used f or the needs of the dog of y our choic e P lease help V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets Franklin County Humane Society See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y Society Special to The Times Fine art in all forms will be woven in and around downtown Apalachicola Saturday, where artists will be showing, selling and demonstrating their talents from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at part of ArtWalk. Festivities continue into the afternoon with a progressive wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres from 3 to 6 p.m. at area restaurants. Wines will be sampled at several locations. A special ArtWalk glass, your “ticket,” can be purchased at each tasting station for $25. From 6-9 p.m., participating restaurants will prepare at least one special menu item that highlights local food — oysters, shrimp, crabs, sh, tupelo honey — for their special for the evening, and pair a wine with the special. A culinary guide will be prepared to participates know about the specials and encourage them to stay in town for dinner At 8 p.m., Del Suggs & Friends will be performing their original Saltwater music at the Dixie Theatre. Tickets for the show are $25. Call 653-3200 for more information. Special to The Times This Saturday, March 22 from 1-3 p.m., Downtown Books in Apalachicola welcomes cryptozoologist Scott Marlowe to a booksigning, featuring his newest volume “Bigfoot in Art History.” Also available for the rst time in Franklin County, the latest edition of “Cryptid Creatures of Florida” will be on sale with an added chapter on the Carrabelle Cat. Marlowe is and intrepid explorer and a wonderful storyteller don’t miss this opportunity to hear rst hand about his exploits investigating mysterious animals in Florida and beyond. Copies of Marlowe’s 2013 publication Bigfoot Enigma” will also be available. Sebrina Brown, Seth Parkhurst engaged Sam and Donna Poole, of Elberta, Ala., are proud to announce the engagement of their daughter, Sebrina Melissa Brown, to Seth Parkhurst, son of Ken and Nancy Parkhurst, of Bonney Lake, Wash. Sebrina is also the granddaughter of Hoyt and the late Lucille Thompson of Apalachicola. She has a degree in communication and business marketing, is the owner of GaudyGirlSale and is a property manager with Dobler Management in Tacoma, Wash. Seth has a journeyman electrical license and is an electrician with Absco Solutions based in Lynnwood, Wash. An October 2014 wedding is planned. Engagement LOIS SWOBODA | The Times A truck delivering beer had to make way for the new kid in town on March 13 when the Oyster City Brewing Company accepted delivery of two 20-barrel (700 gallon) fermenters. Brewmaster Bo Walker said this is some of the last equipment needed to set up commercial operation at the microbrewery, although they will not be the last fermenters installed. Walker is shown above accepting delivery of the equipment and supervising its transport to the former Oasis Bar, which is being transformed into a modern brewing facility. NE wW bB RE wW inIN T ownOWN Samantha Pouncey, John Nunez to wed Saturday The parents of John Edward Nunez and Samantha Nicole Pouncey would like to announce the upcoming marriage of their children. The wedding will be at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola this Saturday, March 22, at 2:30 p.m., with reception to follow at Rivercrest Lodge. All family and friends are invited to attend. No formal invitations will be sent. Casual attire accepted. Samantha, a 2011 graduate of Franklin County High School, works for the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. She is the child of Cecil “Joe” Pouncey and Frances Hunnings, of Carrabelle, and Alicia Armistead of Texas. She is the granddaughter of Melvin and the late Marilyn Armitage, of Texas, and the late Carolyn Sparks of Carrabelle. John, a 2008 graduate of Franklin County High School, is employed as a sergeant with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. He is the son of Donnie and Meloney Chambers, of Eastpoint, and John J. Nunez, of South Carolina. John is the grandson of the late Cecil E. Simmons, of Sopchoppy, the late Martha Braswell Glass, of Eastpoint, Kelby and Sally Chambers of Eastpoint, and Ben and Rose Hurley of Tallahassee. He is the great-grandson of Selma Shiver Braswell and the late George H. Braswell of Eastpoint; and the late Sercy and Jewell Simmons, of Sopchoppy. Wedding Art Walk Saturday in downtown ApalachDAVIL ADLER ER S TE TE IN | The Times The reception following Sunday’s Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert brought together two artists over a glass of Coke, of sorts. Soprano Joyce Guyer closed out a glorious afternoon at Trinity Episcopal Church, with a work featuring the poems of Frank O’Hara, including “Having a Coke with You,” set to music by Christopher Berg. Afterwards, at the reception, former Coca Cola model and painter Alice Jean Gibbs was the featured artist. In the photo above, Gibbs, left, stands with Guyer before a framed and signed copy (by her maiden name “Alice Anderson”) of Gibbs’ likeness in a Coca-Cola ad, painted by famed illustrator Haddon Sundblom. Monster hunter Marlowe to sign latest book S p P ECial IAL T o O TT HE TiTI MEs S Two Eastpoint girls have been chosen to compete in the upcoming National America Miss Pageant in Jacksonville. The families of Emily Smith, right, the daughter of Richard Smith and Pamela Sullivan; and Brooklyn Freeman, left, daughter of David Freeman and Catherine Gay, are excited for the two girls, and said they wished to thank all who have chosen to sponsor then so far, as well as those who have donated to help these girls get to where they are. The families plan to continue to hold fundraisers through July. G iI R lsLS T oO viVI E F oO R N aA T ionalIONAL AMER iI C aA MissMISS HavingHAVING aA CoCO KE T ogOG ETHER

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The Times | A7 Thursday, March 20, 2014 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur c h -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P .O Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 Faith Raymond Croom, 71, of Apalachicola, passed this life on Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Public visitation was Friday afternoon, March 14, at Battle Memorial Funeral Home in Panama City. Funeral services were held Saturday morning, March 15, at the Love Center Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in the Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. The remains lay in state one hour prior to services on Saturday. Raymond Croom Reuben Manley Siler, Jr. went to be with God on Friday, March 14, 2014. Manley was born Feb. 16, 1939, in Mercer, Tenn., to Opal Irene and Reuben M. Siler, Sr. and was a talented athlete throughout his school years, playing varsity basketball and baseball. He earned an electrical engineering degree from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and went on to work on the Saturn booster that made it possible for our manned moon landing which earned his designation as a rocket scientist with NASA in Huntsville, Ala. He later joined the Hewlett Packard Co. and worked in sales, marketing and management in Huntsville, Atlanta, Ga. and Ft. Collins, Colo. Upon retirement in 1997, Manley moved to St. George Island and became a fulltime resident. Retirement became as busy as his fulltime job had been. His love of golf led to his help in creating the St. George Island Mens Golf Association and playing at least three times a week; he chaired the Civic Clubs Seafood Festival booth for many years; he was a board member of the St. George Plantation and served on and chaired many committees there; and he was a docent for the lighthouse museum and served on the nance committee at Trinity Church. He and his wife shared a love of travel, and he had visited every continent on our planet as well as most of its countries. He was a loving husband to his wife, Glen, and devoted father to his daughter, Magan (husband William Flynn) and son, Gregory (wife Caitlin Foxley). His grandchildren were the joy of his life and included Andrew Gregory Flynn (Baylor, Waco, Texas); Christopher Manley Flynn (San Francisco, Calif.); Molly Flynn (Ann Arbor, Mich. also a rocket scientist); Nathaniel Manley Siler and Benjamin Siler, of Memphis, Tenn.; Molli Foxley (UT, Martin, Tenn.) and Betsy Foxley (Omaha, Neb.). Manley also leaves his brother William (Bill) Siler (wife, Bonnie) of Memphis, Tenn. To all who knew and loved Manley, he was the embodiment of wit, love and wisdom a man of integrity. A celebration of his life (a life well lived) will be announced for May. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Trinity Church, 79 6th St., P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola FL 32329. Services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Manley Siler MANLEY SILER Longtime Franklin County resident Charles B. Smith passed away Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, at his home in Carrabelle. Charles was born Jan. 1, 1935, to Cecil and Delia Smith in Panama City. He is survived by his loving wife of 54 years, Carolyn Cumbie Smith; daughter Sandra Flowers of Wewahitchka; and son Chuck Smith (April) of Port St. Joe; seven grandchildren, Nichole Lance, Adam Flowers, Hayley Smith, Scout Flowers, Tucker Smith, James Giles and Leila Smith. He is also survived by a brother, Gayle Smith; sister Jean Butler (Earl); former daughter-in-law Kelly Smith; former son-inlaw Wayne Flowers; and numerous nephews and nieces. He was preceded in death by his parents; brother Gerald Joe Boy Smith; nephew Tony Smith; and niece Melissa Smith. Charles served in the Air Force for four years and retired from Florida Power Corp. in 1988. He truly enjoyed working for Florida Power and with the many friends he made during his career. He was also a wellknown electrician for many years. A Celebration of Life service was held Feb. 4 at the First Assembly of God church in Carrabelle. Charles will be greatly missed by his family and all the many friends he made during his lifetime. Charles B. Smith CHARLES B. SMITH Mr. William Thomas Bill Henderson, 71, passed away Wednesday, March 5, 2014, at this home in Eastpoint. He was born June 26, 1942, in Apalachicola to Juanita and William Thomas Willie Henderson, Sr. He is survived by his wife, Edna Mae Henderson, and their two sons, Michael Henderson of Apalachicola and Scott (wife, Lee) Henderson of Eastpoint. He leaves also behind a granddaughter, Heather Henderson, and a grandson, Zack McKenzie. Mr. Henderson also had two great-granddaughters, Lily Henderson and Isabella McKenzie. Mr. Henderson was a great public servant and served two terms as county commissioner in the 1970s. He was retired from the Franklin County Public Works Department as director of mosquito control and assistant superintendent. He was also a commercial sherman and business owner. Visitation and Mass was Friday afternoon, March 7, at Kelley Funeral Home in Apalachicola, which was in charge of arrangements. Funeral Mass and burial were Saturday afternoon, March 8, at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola, with Father Joe Pinchock ofciating. Burial followed in Magnolia Cemetery. Pallbearers were Pastor Ray Creamer, Sheriff Mike Mock, Dewitt Polous, Kevin Martina, Bailey Chumney and Billy Hicks. Honorary pallbearers were Pastor Bobby Shiver, Raymond Hall and Bevin Putnal. The Henderson family would like to extend a sincere thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Bill Martina, Mrs. Monica Lemieux, Mrs. Janice Hicks, Mrs. Marcia Johnson, Pastor Bobby Shiver and to everyone else who provided assistance. We also wish to thank everyone else for the owers, food and prayers. He will be missed by all his family and friends. The family also wishes to thank all of the outstanding employees at Big Bend Hospice, who were very professional and kind.Bill Henderson BILL HENDERSON I cant call your numbers if youre not here Wednesday nights playing bingo. Had a nice happy crowd last Wednesday. At break we have the drawings for the door prizes, the pie and the pot of gold. Coffee and soft drinks will be available and cookies and chips if you get the munchies. Come on over to Chillas Hall and join in the fun. The door opens at 6 p.m., and I start calling at 6:30 p.m. Enjoy! Well, we sure did. There were many folks at the golf club banquet last Thursday. The main dining room at Crooked River Grill was packed. Our very own Nola Tolbert and her staff prepared a good buffet for us. Our fearless leader, Nealy Inlow, introduced all the committee chairmen and thanked them and all their helpers. He also introduced me and thanked me for being there to call the bingo. What an evening! Hope you can join us for lunch this afternoon. The door opens at 9 a.m. at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, and the lunch line forms at noon. Be watchin for ya! Your minimum donation of $4 will be collected at the desk. You did mark your calendars for Saturday, March 22, I hope? You gals get looking for your grass skirt and coconut shell bra. The luau dance will start at 7 p.m. Bring your favorite snack to share and your beverage of choice to Chillas Hall. The hula will begin at 7 p.m., and your donation of $7 will be collected at the door. The annual Wandering Star Quilt Show will be Friday and Saturday, March 28-29. There will be no coffee at the hall on Friday. See ya Monday! The quilts will be on display both days at Chillas Hall. Isnt it good to have Joyce Manzanares back with us for a while? She and her late husband Joe were snowbirds for many years. They supported all our activities and were there to pitch in and help. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember our little prayer, God grant me patience, and I want it right now. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry.Eula Rochelle I want to thank God for allowing me to come back home from my recent hospital stay. I want to thank my pastor and his wife, my prayer warrior and my family. May God bless each and every one of you. Eula Rochelle Special to The Times Spring Fling for Market Days on March 29 Carrabelle United Methodist Church is getting ready for its third annual 2014 Market Days Event. Join us for Spring Fling from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 29 at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street, next to the re station in Carrabelle. Come listen to music and shop for anything to do with outside plants, ower arrangements, birdhouses, bird feeders and much more. In addition, enjoy a sh fry with all the xings. Look for directional signs. For more information, call Bonnie Myrick at 899-3175. Remember this is Gods Ministry for the needy. As He works through us, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Make plans to come and be a part of this blessing. Card of THANKS Faith BRIEFS Obituaries Luau dance Saturday evening at Chillas Hall These Alcoholics Anonymous meetings are offered in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000.M ONDAY 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Closed discussions, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St., ApalachicolaT U E S DAYN oon to 1 p.m.: Open discussion, Trinity Episcopal Church, Apalachicola 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Big Book/12&12, open, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St., Carrabelle,W EDNE S DAY 6-7 p.m.: Womens AA, Closed, Trinity Episcopal Church, Apalachicola 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Mens AA, Closed, Trinity Episcopal Church, ApalachicolaTH URS DAYN oon to 1 p.m.: Open discussion, Trinity Episcopal Church, Apalachicola 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Open discussion, St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach DriveFR IDAY 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Open discussion, Trinity Episcopal Church, Apalachicola 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Open discussion, Church of the Ascension, CarrabelleS AT UR DAY 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Discussion group, Alligator Point Mission By The Sea 7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Speakers Meeting, open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton DriveSU NDAY 7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Big Book Study, open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference AA Meeting SCHEDULE LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M ar 20 66 49 30 % F ri, M ar 21 65 54 0 % S a t M ar 22 67 59 0 % Sun, M ar 23 69 62 0 % M on, M ar 24 72 52 % T ues M ar 25 72 52 % W ed M ar 26 72 52 % T ENT SALE! BW OFISH.com 121 W Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 POR T CITY SHOPPING CENTER Friday April 4th 6am-6pm Saturday April 5th 6am-5pm Large inventor y of shing items reduced up to 60% off retail Bring the whole Family! Fishing Seminars on Saturday with Rick Murphy and crew from Florida Fishing Insider W eekly (All T imes are Eastern) 6th Annual Our Biggest Sale of the Y ear! The most popular happening on St. Vincent Island will be held this month, when the annual Open House on St. Vincent Island take places Friday, March 28 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is your chance to experience the beauty of St. Vincent Island and learn more about what goes on at this wildlife refuge and nearby natural areas. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided by the refuge barge, which will pick up visitors at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dock a short distance northeast of the Indian Pass boat ramp. The event this year will be limited to 250 visitors on the island. There will be guided walks and tours, educational presentations, and guided wagon tours. Visitors can sign up for the wagon tour and other guided events when they reach the island (visitors may only sign up for themselves) or they can explore the island on their own. Guided activities include birding and beach walks, photography safaris, and hiking tours. In the outdoor amphitheater, created by placing folding chairs under one of the island’s huge live oaks, there will be educational presentations about the history of St. Vincent Island and “The Plants Around Us.” The Supporters of St. Vincent Island will provide hot dogs and drinks at a booth beside live musical entertainment by Neil Jones. There will be informational booths set up by the St. Marks Refuge, Panama City Fish and Wildlife, Riverkeepers, Florida Park Service, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol and the St. Vincent Supporters. Susan Richardson will be our visiting on-site artist. Come prepared to enjoy the day on St. Vincent Island; wear your walking shoes and a smile. Volunteers will be at the Indian Pass boat ramp to guide you to the barge that will take you to the island. Turtle nesting season will be here soon and you can help support the turtle program on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge by participating in our “Adopta-Nest” program. For a small fee of $25 you will be able to name the turtle whose nest you adopt and you will receive an adoption certi cate, photo of adopted nest, activity/hatchling report, and recognition in Supporters’ newsletter Proceeds from nest adoptions help offset refuge costs for the turtle monitoring program. These costs include fuel for the survey vehicles and materials to construct cages to protect nests from predators. Turtle adoptions make a wonderful gift for people of any age who care about turtles and wildlife preservation. With so many turtles choosing to nest on St. Vincent Island last year we are hoping for another active year. That means we will certainly need an increase in turtle adoptions. To adopt a nest or learn more about the program, email us at supportstvin@ hotmail.com or leave a message at 229-6735 and thank you for your support! There are only two more monthly island tours before the summer heat and bugs arrive and the tours are discontinued until the fall. All tours are on the second Wednesday of each month, April 9, and May 14. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on “Island Tour Sign Up”. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation at www.stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst come, rst served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive – bring everything you need, including drinking water – and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit our web page for more information and volunteer opportunities — www.stvincentfriends. com — and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The tour wagon last year on St. Vincent Island A SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Here is the schedule of events for the March 28 open house on St. Vincent Island: 9 a.m.: Music during the day by Neil Jones 9:30 a.m.: Wagon Tour by John Inzetta and Denise Williams; and Coastal Photo Walk by Paul Phelps 9:45 a.m.: Hiking Tour by Jeff Strickland; and Beach Walk by Brad Smith 10:15 a.m.: Birds of St. Vincent Walk, by Barry Kinzie 11 a.m.: Wagon Tour by Pete Burgher and Shelley Stiaes; History Talk by Carol Brown at the amphitheater; Photographic Safari, by Paul Phelps; and Beach Walk by Trish Petrie. 11:45 a.m.: Hiking Tour by Jeff Strickland Noon: Birds of St. Vincent Walk ANERR, by Matthew Anderson; and Beach Walk, by Brad Smith 12:15 p.m.: Wagon Tour by John Inzetta and Carol Brown 1 p.m.: The Plants Around Us, by Denise Williams at the amphitheater; and Beach Walk by Gloria Austin 1:15 p.m.: Hiking Tour, by Jeff Strickland; and Birds of St. Vincent Walk by Barry Kinzie 1:30 p.m.: Wagon Tour by Dave Francisco and Landy Luther BIRD’S-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND Open house March 28 on St. Vincent Island Inshore/Bay Fishing conditions are starting to improve since we have started to dry out after months of constant rain. The ICW canal in St. Joe is full of small sheepshead and some redfish this week. Live shrimp drifted by the old pilings and the new sea wall will produce fish. Some Spanish Mackerel are still close to shore and are eager to bite this week. Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, March 20, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY By LES HARRISON Special to the Times The 2014 spring gobbler season is less than a week old in Zone D, which includes Franklin County. Hunters are in the woods with mouth and box calls doing their best to sound like a lonesome hen in search of a long bearded Tom. The eastern wild turkey is hunted in Franklin County and much of the eastern United States. The bird’s range extends from north Florida to southern Canada. This is the same turkey species Squanto of the Patuxet tribe used to help the Pilgrims survive the wilderness perils of 1621. Thanksgiving was established with the turkey as the perennial guest of honor. Even the likes of founding father Benjamin Franklin believed the turkey’s qualities so enviable as to suggest it be the avian emblem for America, the young nation with many turkey admirers. He wrote the turkey was a respectable bird of courage that “would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his farm yard with a red coat on.” The eastern wild turkey’s popularity almost proved to be its downfall. Pressure from hunting and habitat destruction reduced the turkeys to dangerously low number and the threat of extinction by the early 20th century. Effective game management and hunting regulations eventually alleviated the possibility of extinction and turkeys returned as a favorite hunting quarry. Life in the 21st century has changed the hunt for a turkey from the woods to the supermarket meat case for most people. Curiously, the commercially produced domestic turkeys are not descendants of the eastern wild turkey in Wakulla’s woods. These gobblers and hens trace their lineage back to southern Mexico and the Aztec Empire. Early enterprising Spanish conquistadores took these tamed south-of-the-border birds back to Europe during the 16th century along with all the gold and silver available. If the food supplies ran out or spoiled during the return voyage to Spain, turkey was the top menu choice. In the decades following, propagation of the domesticated turkeys reached France, Britain and other European countries and provinces. The tasty birds were a prized novelty on the estates of royalty and the landed gentry. Ultimately, European turkey producers were successful enough to export the live birds to the North American colonies to feed the settlers who did not have the time or inclination to hunt the wary and wily eastern wild turkey. The human population is not alone in its enjoyment of turkey as a main dish. Every hunter knows the eastern wild turkey is legendary for its guile and wariness, and for good reason. Many native omnivores enjoy the turkey’s eggs and poults. Additionally, larger carnivores dine on the adult turkeys, except for the mature males or toms. The toms are equipped with several effective defensive tools. Eastern wild turkeys feed on the berries, acorns, seed and occasionally small reptiles. In autumn, the diets of wild turkey can be comprised of up to 70 percent acorns. Acorn production varies by locality, oak species, and between individual oaks of the same species. Turkey hunters are wise to consider this. The spring season runs through April 20. To learn more about Franklin County’s eastern wild turkey, contact your UF/IFAS Franklin Extension Of ce at 653-9337. Les Harrison, the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director, is part of the extension team serving Franklin County. LES HARRISON | Special to The Times Turkey hens are the object of attention for Franklin County Toms, in this photo taken outside Carrabelle in fall 2013. Spring season brings out the Toms

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 20, 2014 A Section Special to the Times The JV Seahawk softball team defeated several district foes en route to one of the best records to date for a Franklin County junior varsity squad, nishing the year 8-2. “This was just a great group of young ladies who just love to play this game and had a tremendous drive to win,” said Coach Brock Johnson. “The future is very bright for our softball program, and these other schools know it now also.” At home Feb. 27 against the Class 5A Rutherford Rams, for the second time this season, the JV Seahawks once again showed that they were a notch above. Led by sixth grader Jaylin Charles, who struck out ve and allowed two runs over ve innings on the mound, the Rams’ bats were kept quiet for the ballgame. “Jay is going to be a great player for our program in the future,” said Johnson. Offensively, Anna Riley, Adriana Butler and Kimmie Boone each went 2-3 at the plate, keeping the bats alive just enough to pull out the 7-2 win. On March 4 at Liberty County, the second goround against the Lady Bulldogs went much the same as the rst, as big hits and great defense paced the way for a 12-4 victory. Myranda McLeod, who went 2-4 at the plate and batted in three runs, and Charles, who was 3-4 with ve RBI, were the big bats for the Seahawks, with Charles also picking up the win on the mound with six strikeouts spread out over four innings. “It was miserably cold this game, but the girls toughed it out and came up with hits and runs when we needed them,” said Johnson. On March 6 at Port St. Joe, the JV Seahawks’ winning streak came to an end on a wet, rainy day at the hands of their district rival 8-6. “One bad inning, that’s what it was, nothing more,” Johnson said. “We gave them the game in their last at-bat, but we’ll learn from it and move on. Our bats were just off today, we couldn’t quite seem to ever get any momentum going.” The Seahawks were kept off balance by St. Joe’s pitcher with the only hits being collected by Boone, Charles and Alexus Johnson, who each were 1-3 at the plate. “The ball was wet for both teams, but for whatever reason we seemed to struggle a little more with it,” said coach Johnson. On March 8 at home against Jacksonville Potter House, the Seahawks got back to their winning ways with the sweep of a doubleheader, 21-6 in the rst game and 20-5 in the second. In the rst game the Seahawks bats were paced by Riley, who went 3-4, Butler, who was 2-2 and scored four runs, and Charles, who was 4-4. She also picked up the win on the mound, striking out six in the game. In the second game of the doubleheader, seventh grader Alexus Johnson got her rst start on the mound for the Seahawks and came away with the win, striking out eight in the run rule shortened game. Butler was 4-4 at the plate and scored four runs to lead the way with the bats, followed closely by Savannah Alday (3-3) and Sara Gibbs (3-3, with three runs scored). “AJ has just been a great player for us this year,” said Johnson. “It seems every time I look up she is on base, and Savannah has been rock steady behind the plate catching for us.” On March 10 at home against the Blountstown Tigers, the Seahawks split an afternoon doubleheader, winning the rst game 10-3 and faltering late in the second game, losing 8-6. “You look back on the St. Joe game and the fth inning in this game, and we were two bad innings away from being undefeated,” said coach Johnson. In the rst game Charles struck out four over ve innings to once again pitch a great game, while the bats were paced by Butler (3-3, with three runs scored) and Riley (2-3, with three RBI). “Anna came up with a big hit when we were struggling somewhat early in the game, it got us the momentum and kick started our bats after that,” said the coach. In the second game, Alexus Johnson got the start on the mound for the Hawks, and struck out ve over four innings, but Blountstown’s bats got hot late to pick up the victory. “Alexus pitched great for four innings, but we just had a couple untimely errors in their last at-bat that cost us,” said coach Johnson. Butler went 3-3, McLeod was 2-3 with three RBI, and Johnson went 2-3 with a pair of RBI, to be the hot bats for the Seahawks in the second game. ) * (& 5 3 5 ; 5 5 1 > 5 4 2 ; 4 6 ? 1 1 > ; 5 4 5 3 ? 1 3 1 ; ; 5 5 5 4 ; 3 3 ; 9 < 5 3 ; > 3 1 5 4 5 6 + ? ( 2 5 ( 1 4 1 > 9 ( 1 4 % > > ; 9 1 ; 5 0 ; 1 = > ; > ; 4 1 1 4 9 5 5 1 > > 3 ; 6 : 5 5 ? 1 > 1 4 4 ; 1 > 6 1 ; ? 1 5 > $ $ 6 4 5 2 ; 6 ? : 5 5 ; ; 9 5 5 ? 5 + : 5 4 5 2 ; 9 5 5 1 > > 3 ; 6 1 ; 9 ; 5 6 1 : 1 > 1 4 3 3 5 5 > 1 1 4 5 3 ; 3 1 ; 3 1 2 5 2 1 ; 5 4 1 5 2 > 5 ( ; : 3 % 8 !1 ; 1 ; 5 ) 5 > ; 4 1 % 8 $ $ 0 6 > 1 1 4 ) 5 3 ; 3 1 ; ; > > 2 5 $ 5 5 1 4 ; 5 6 4 1 2 > 5 : 5 3 = : > 4 2 5 ? 1 4 5 1 1 2 > 5 ( ( ) # + : 5 2 ; 4 ? 3 6 ? ) 5 3 ; % % % 0 > ; 4 1 ) 1 5 2 > ; 3 5 ; 3 ; ? 5 ? > 5 ; 4 1 5 6 : ; < 5 3 ; > > 2 5 % 4 1 6 ? : 5 4 1 5 6 : 5 # ; 3 5 3 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 : 5 3 3 5 6 > 2 ; 4 4 5 ; ; 4 1 5 4 4 1 ? 1 9 5 6 6 1 ; > 5 3 ? > 5 5 : 5 < 5 3 : 5 5 3 ; 5 4 4 1 5 ; > > 2 5 5 1 $ 5 4 1 > 5 1 5 ; 4 ; 3 1 5 : 5 5 5 > 5 : 1 : ; ; 1 5 1 > 5 4 2 ; 4 6 " # + & * 5 1 5 ; ? 5 , 8 1 : 5 1 = > ; > 5 = & 6 3 5 1 = > ; : 5 % % !1 = 5 ) 5 5 ) ; 5 % 1 > 1 3 : ; 3 > 1 > ; 4 1 % % % 1 4 ; > > 2 5 5 5 4 1 4 5 1 4 8 1 : 5 ? ? ; ; ? 5 5 ; 9 1 % 8 2 5 ) 5 5 1 > 1 3 : ; 3 > 1 + : 5 1 4 6 ? ? ; ; 5 5 5 5 : 5 ; 9 : 1 ; 5 ; 6 ? 1 > ; ; 5 ; 1 2 ; 4 1 3 3 5 1 4 / 5 < 5 3 1 1 > > 2 ; 4 1 4 1 3 3 5 : 5 2 ; 4 : 1 ; : 5 ; < 4 9 ? 5 ; > > 2 5 ; : 5 2 5 ; 5 5 6 1 = > ; > > 2 ; 4 : 1 > > 5 ? 1 ; ? 6 1 5 ; 4 6 $ $ 1 6 5 : 5 5 ; 9 > > 2 ; 4 4 5 : 1 > > 3 ? > ; : 1 > > 1 > ; 3 1 2 > 5 ) 1 5 1 4 > 3 1 > > 1 3 3 5 ; 9 > ; 3 5 ; 9 5 9 ; 1 ; 1 4 5 9 > 1 ; 6 3 1 3 4 ; 9 2 ; 5 : 5 ) 1 5 6 > ; 4 1 6 : 1 5 1 5 ; > 5 1 5 3 1 > > > 1 ) ? 1 > > 4 1 $ 0 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Two Franklin County Seahawks are headed to the college football ranks, after each signed a four-year athletic scholarship deal Monday morning at a joyous celebration in the high school gym. At a ceremony conducted by Seahawks Coach Aaron York, and anked by the entire football coaching staff, senior Alex Causey, who will graduate May 29, and Chase Golden, a 2013 Franklin County High School grad, each signed commitments to their respective colleges Causey, last season’s offensive most valuable player for the Seahawks, is headed west to Louisiana College, York’s alma mater, where he is expected to play slot receiver for the Div. III Wildcats, the second winningest team in Louisiana. Golden will be going south to Lake Wales, to play offensive lineman for the Warner University Royals, a program now in its third year playing in the Sun Conference of the NAIA. “It’s a re ection of your school, your community, and who they’re in contact with, their families,” said York. He said the rst thing coaches ask him, when they’re scouting a potential recruit, is “tell me about the kid’s character.” Following that, the coaches want to know about the student’s grades and test scores, and only after that, do they look carefully at the young student’s athleticism, and ask to see their game lms. In both Causey and Golden’s cases, their game lms speak for themselves. The 6’2” 300-pound Golden was a standout on both sides of the ball, and played both basketball and baseball. After graduation, he worked last season as a volunteer assistant coach for York. He plans to major in physical education, to eventually be a football coach. Causey, a right elder for Hawks’ baseball, and a wingman and fullback for the soccer team, excelled as running back, receiver and punter for the Seahawks, as well as defensive end and linebacker. As a young man he played football in middle school, but sat out his high school years before returning last fall to play for York. The 5’9” 185-pounder runs a 4.5 second 40-yard dash, and is expected to be redshirted as a freshman as he buffs up for college play. He plans to major in sports medicine. He said he was impressed with Louisiana College when he paid a visit with his parents over President’s Day weekend. On a tour with the dean of the health and physical education program, he had a chance to meet the college president. York said the football program competes year after a year to win the America Southwest Conference, and will square off against some of the nest small college teams in Arkansas, Texas, Mississippi and Georgia. In Golden’s case, he may see playing time next year under the scheme of offensive coordination Jared Powers, with the Royals facing several Div. I-AA schools. On the schedule next year is a date against Florida Tech, where former Seahawk Dalin Modican is a standout wide receiver. “This could be you some day,” York encouraged the audience of high school students, before introducing Causey and Golden to much applause. “Well, we did it,” said Causey, who thanked his parents and God. “Anybody can do this if they work hard at it. Do what you gotta do; do the work.” York said he started “doing a happy dance” in his of ce when he learned that Causey had bumped up his college prep test score, giving him a chance to qualify for a better scholarship offer. Senior Pastor Ronnie Luke, of the Eastpoint Church of God, offered extended remarks at the ceremony, focusing on a recipe for success. “Moments like this don’t just happen,” he said. “It takes three things faith, patience and endurance.” He re ected on his own growing up in the turbulent 60s, when “things were much different then.” He said it is important “not just to have faith in yourself, but you have to have somebody who believes in you. “The one who wins is the one who endures,” he said. Do you have what it takes to endure to the end?” he asked. He noted the terrain of the Boston Marathon, where the most dif cult part is in the second half. “It’s when you get to the point when your body’s exhausted that the race turns uphill,” he said. “Who has the patience to keep on keeping on? It’s not how many times you fall, it’s how many times you get up.” Luke reminded the two athletes that challenges await them in college, especially balancing academic work with the demands of the game. “You got to do all the physical work, and then when you come back, the books are still on the table,” he said. “We all run in life to win a crown. This is a crowning achievement in their lives.” York thanked Superintendent Nina Marks, Principal Eric Bidwell, Athletic Director Michael Sweatt, all his fellow coaches, the teachers and staff, and all the families for their support of the young student-athletes. Afterwards, the families enjoyed a cake baked in honor of signing day. JV softball nishes season 8-2 ADRIANA BUTLER MICHAELA CASSIDY JAYLIN CHARLES SARA GIBBS ALEXUS JOHNSON BROOKE MARTINA MYRANDA MCLEOD PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEFT: Alex Causey pens his name to a college scholarship, surrounded by family and Seahawk coach Aaron York at left. RIGHT: Chase Golden signs his letter of commitment, with Duane Cook at left. 2 Seahawks sign on for college football Page 9 From Staff Reports Day of Ball planned for March 29 On the weekend of March 28-30, the county will host its annual Day of Ball. One game will be at 6 p.m. March 28 at Kendrick Sports Complex in Carrabelle. On March 29, games will take place from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. at the Kendrick Complex. The public is invited to attend. Monday last day for school pics Monday, March 24, will be spring school pictures. If you have not taken your yearbook picture, it is highly suggested you take this opportunity, for it will be the last chance of the year. The yearbook is coming together. It will be submitted very soon, and if you are a senior and have not returned your senior will or demographics to Jennifer Edwards, you will need to do that now! Sports SHORTS

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A10 | The Times Thursday, March 20, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 94322T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2011-CA000359 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes; Franklin County, Florida; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may cGim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, DtVisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated February 24, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2011CA-000359 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 9, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 1983.60 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1128.67 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 380.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 114.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.37 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 381.12 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BUCK STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 114.59 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 381.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561)998-6700 (561)998-6707 11-227263 FC01 CHE March 13, 20, 2014 94366T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012CA-000145 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. JEREMIAH SLAYMAKER; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on September 17, 2013 in Civil Case No.: 19-2012-CA000145, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff, and, JEREMIAH SLAYMAKER; JANET SLAYMAKER; UNKNOWN TENANT # 1 N/K/A GEORGE GOTSIS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. The clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the FRONT STEPS of the Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 A.M. on April 23, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, BLOCK 2, UNIT 1, GULF TERRACES, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 5, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Aldridge Connors, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 South Congress Avenue, Ste 200 Delray Beach, FL 33433 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 Primary E-Mail: Service Mail@aclawllp.com File No. 1113-8496 IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATION AT (850) 5774401, OR AT THE LEON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ROOM 225, 301 S. MONROE STREET, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF RECEIPT OF A NOTICE COMPELLING YOU TO APPEAR AT A COURT PROCEEDING; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. THE ADA COORDINATOR FOR THE COURTS IN LEON COUNTY IS DOUG SMITH. HE MAY BE REACHED AT (850) 577-4444 OR THROUGH THE FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE, TDD AT 1-800-955-8771. THE ADDRESS FOR THE OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATION IS: LEON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 301 S. MONROE STREET, ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301. IN ALL OTHER COUNTIES IN THE CIRCUIT PLEASE CONTACT THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE AND ASK FOR THE ADA COORDINATOR. THE CLERK’S NUMBER is INCLUDED ON EACH COUNTY PAGE. March 20, 27, 2014 94410T IN THE SECOND CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192013CA 000020XXXXXX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. CINDY S. COLLINS; ET AL. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 4, 2014, and entered in Case No. 192013CA 000020XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CINDY S. COLLINS; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, 11:00 a.m. on the 23rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 2 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1787) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF BLOCK “235” OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT IN COMMON USE ON FILE AT THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT OFFICE OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF FULTON STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTE 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 55.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4432) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 11.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4432), THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 109.28 FEET TO A REROD (MARKED #4432), THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 26.02 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4432), THENCE RUN SOUTH 48 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 77.16 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4432), THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 12.97 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4432) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF FULTON STREET THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 41.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.07 ACRES MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850653-8861 or 1-800-9558770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on March 4, 2014. Johnson M. Marcia As Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1440-131503 March 20, 27, 2014 94422T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA000099 SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARK S. WILLIAMSON, TRACY S. WILLIAMSON, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed February 27, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2013-CA000099 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 16th day of April, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 13, Block 73 of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 5, according to the Plat Book 3, Pages 16 & 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 27th day of February, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court BY: Terry E. Segree Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 5774444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-9558771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. March 20, 27, 2014 94428T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT TN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA000443 Nationstar Mortgage LLC Plaintiff, vs. Martha Elaine Hamlin and Lucile L. HamlinCarter; et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: Martha Elaine Hamlin; CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN: LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, 410 1st Street West, Carrabelle, FL 32322 and Unknown Spouse of Martha Elaine Hamlin; CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN: LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, 410 1st Street West, Carrabelle, FL 32322 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective. unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all ether persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT 6, BLOCK D, RANGE 6, (108) OF PICKETT’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARR.ABELLE, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 20, FRANKLIN COUTNY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as 410 1st Street West, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 18th day of February, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Circuit and County Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, March 20, 2014 The Times | A11 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 4322 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 20, 27, 2014 98077T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000426 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. EUNICE G. MARTY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE GORDON F. MARTY AND EUNICE G. MARTY REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JULY 14, 2005, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE GORDON F. MARTY AND EUNICE G. MARTY REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JULY 14, 2005 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Bay County, Florida: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE MONUMENT) ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FEET HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) 422 FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST, 370.5 FEET ALONG ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING. RUN THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST 200 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST 50 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 200 FEET TO HIGHWAY, THENCE ACROSS HIGHWAY AND ON TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SHORE 50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST TO ROAD AND ACROSS ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 29,200 FEET DEEP ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF ROAD AND INCLUDING THAT PORTION BETWEEN ROAD AND SHORE. LOT 7 IN THE BLOCK BETWEEN 5TH AND 6TH STREET IN EASTPOINT, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE MONUMENT) ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE ONE HUNDRED FOOT HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY TWO (422) FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN SOUTH SIXTY-SIX DEGREES SEVENTEEN MINUTES WEST FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY AND FIVETENTHS (420.5) FEETTO A PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH TWENTYTHREE DEGREES FOURTY-THREE MINUTES WEST 200 FEET. THENCE SOUTH SIXTY-SIX DEGREES SEVENTEEN MINUTES WEST FIFTY FEET. THENCE SOUTH TWENTY-THREE DEGREES FOURTYTHREE MINUTES EAST TWO HUNDRED FEET TO HIGHWAY, THENCE ACROSS HIGHWAY AND ON TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SHORE FIFTY FEET. THENCE NORTH TWENTYTHREE DEGREES FORTY-THREE MINUTES WEST TO ROAD AND ACROSS ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 575 US HIGHWAY 98 EASTPOINT, FL 32328 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before 30 days from the first date of publication service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 25th day of February, 2014. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 JR-13-110753 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861, Fax: (850) 653-9339. March 13, 20, 2014 94434T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09000679 CAAXMX Division No. U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE OF J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-A6 Plaintiff, vs. Arthur J Riccard, et al, Defendants/ RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Foreclosure dated March 4, 2014, and entered in Case No. 09000679CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECONDTH Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE OF J.P MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-A6 is the Plaintiff and Arthur J. Riccard, et al, AND are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, are held. at the 2nd Floor of the Franklin County, Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 A.M. on the 23rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, BLOCK B, MAGNOLIA BAY, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 21, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 4th day of March, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk GILBERT GARCIA GROUP PA. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, Florida 33607 (813) 443-5087 Fla. Bar# 549452 469549.10128/np March 20, 27, 2014 98105T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013CA-000002-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LEROY NOEL, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida, described as: Lot 8, Block E, of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 2, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 15 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A/K/A 1056 E. GORRIE DR. ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 beginning at 11:00 AM ET, on April 9, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 26th day of February, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration; 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; (850)577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 13, 20, 2014 98109T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000056-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY D. DOXSEE A/K/A JEFFREY D. DOXSEE SR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEFFREY D. DOXSEE A/K/A JEFFREY D. DOXSEE SR; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, PREMIER BANK; FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 16th day of April, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida. LOT 20, BLOCK G, LANARK BEACH UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2, AT PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 26th day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H#: 314810 March 13, 20, 2014 98107T PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-135-CA ANTHONY CASTELLI, Plaintiff, vs. LORENZO AMATO and UNKNOWN TENANT (S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2014, in Case No. 13-135-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which ANTHONY CASTELLI is the Plaintiff and LORENZO AMATO is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on April 24, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, AND RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 693.5 FEET, THENCE RUN S 3253’16” E, 85.23 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING IN THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2324.83 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLEOF 0153’56”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 77.05 FEET (CHORD BEARING S 5908’06” W 77.05 FEET) TO RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN S 3255’11” E, 200.00 FEET, TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN N 6922’03” E ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 38.61 FEET, THENCE RUN N 7307’05” E ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 40.86 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE RUN N 3255’11” W, 216.75 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: February 27, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 13, 20, 2014 98119T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-300-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JOSEPH CHAD ZINGARELLI and wife, LISA M. ZINGARELLI, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2014, in Case No.: 13-300-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST on April 23, 2014 the following described property: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 289.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 308.56 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A 15.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 149.05 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), SAID POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF 30.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 287.60 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING IN THE CENTER POINT OF A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS CUL-DE-SAC, THENCE RUN NORTH 159.49 FEET ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF 60.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 289.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.50 FEET, THE SOUTHERLY 15.00 FEET AND THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 656, PAGE 745 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: February 26, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 13, 20, 2014 98139T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-CP-12 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH FRANCES NASTASZEWSKI, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOSEPH FRANCES NASTASZEWSKI, deceased, whose date of death was July 16, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 13, 2014. KIM NASTASZEWSKI Personal Representative 2900 South Valley View Boulevard, Lot 302 Las Vegas, Nevada 89102 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 13, 20, 2014 98205T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 2012 -85 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DELL S. SCHNEIDER, Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on April 23, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24, A DISTANCE OF 1315.43 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 2734.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 620.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 2516.56 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24, A DISTANCE OF 551.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 60.00 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT LYING 30.00 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTH HALF OF SAID SECTION 24, A DISTANCE OF 2640.73 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 620.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 990.42 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 53 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 737.15 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 52 SE-CONDS EAST 702.12 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RIVER ROAD AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone (850) 653-8861, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 4th day of March, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 20, 27, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j At-Home-Mom, Financial Security, LOVE awaits baby!j Lisa & Kenny j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. Port St. Joe : 506 8th St. Friday and Saturday March 21 & 22 from 9am til 4pm Garage Sale Old rope bed, bistro patio set, shelving units, dishes, etc. Text FL83046 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleThurs, Fri., & Sat 9am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL83064 to 56554 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofers Hiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to apply Web ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required. PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL82563 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL82562 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. 850-653-3838 Text FL83056 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL81122 to 56654 Price Reduced Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced, (2) storage buildings 10x20, 10x32 screened back porch, & deep well. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, March 20, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p er t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u nd a nd a r e o f f er i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s D i s c o v er t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o Be a c h P or t S t J o e A p a l a c h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e or g e I s l a nd C a r r a b e l l e a nd s u r r o u nd i n g a r e a s Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times T oday (850) 653-8868 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola Advertise Her e R eal E sta t e P icks MLS 250905 ST GEORGE ISLAND $538,000 T his c ust om built home in the Plan ta tion, nestled among na tiv e I sland v egeta tion and just a shor t w alk t o the G ulf of Me xic o f ea tur es a spacious living/dining/ k it chen ar ea with a gas r eplac e on the rst lev el as w ell as t w o bedr ooms and ba ths S ec ond oor is a full mast er bedr oom and ba th with jett ed tub and huge w alk -in closet T her e is a lof t sitting ar ea with sleeper sofa tha t c ould be o c e or cr af ts r oom. T his home w as designed f or out door living with por ches and sitting ar eas t o enjo y the beautiful views of the G ulf A lar ge priv a t e hea t ed pool adds t o the out door enjo ymen t Plan ta tion clubhouse t ennis c our ts and pool just one str eet a w a y B oth tile and c arpet thr oughout house and tiled ba thr ooms D imensions w er e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .southerncharmsgi.com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 251352 $110,000 St. George Island P L A N TAT I O N C O R N E R L O T O n e o f a k i n d 1 / 2 a c r e 3 r d t i e r l o t w i t h a f o u r t h t i e r l o t ( h o u s e ) l o c at e d b e t w e e n t h i s l o t & L e i s u r e L a n e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y f o r G u l f V i e w s a r e m o r e l i k e l y t h a n s o m e 2 n d t i e r l o t s L o t i s h i g h e r t h a n t h e ro a d b y a g o o d m a r g i n t o p q u a l i t y Pl a n t at i o n l o t S u z i e C o u r t W e s t John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250987 $399,000 St. George Island A P A L A C H IC O L A BA Y V I E W 4 B R 5 B A r e n o v at e d i n 2 0 0 2 g ro u n d l e ve l h a s L R w i t h r e p l a c e D R k i t c h e n m a s t e r b e d ro o m s c r e e n e d p o r c h l a u n d r y & p a n t r y a r e a 2 n d o o r h a s 2 n d L R w i t h r e p l a c e & k i t c h e t t e b a l c o n y o v e r l o o k i n g t h e b a y c o r n e r l o t o w n e r n a n c i n g M c C l o u d A ve 4516161 29,000 (((( (( % ""/'"/) % 0 # # " % $ & & ) 0 0 ' 0 $ + / + % ) / + / + / & + & ) / / / + % ' 0 ) ' & & % 0 $ & 0 % & / & / % / ' ' & + 0 ) ' / % Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D • 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E NC E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center JOE'S LA WN C ARE IF IT'S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES TREE TRIMMING AND REMO V AL ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INSTILLA TION PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE C ALL JOE@ 850-323-074 1 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO .COM “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) What was the Secret Service code name for Ronald Reagan? Gunsmoke, Rawhide, Rieman, McCloud 2) Which province was formerly named Lower Canada? Manitoba, Ontario, Alberta, Quebec 3) What did Henry J. Raymond and George Jones found? Sports Illustrated, NY Times, Reader’s Digest, Life magazine 4) Which “Operation”: was the Japanese code name for the Pearl Harbor attack during WWII? D, G, T, Z 5) What was the original name of Scrabble (game)? Letitia, Blockers, Lexico, Potter 6) Who is Gareld’s owner in the comic strip? Dan Marshall, Ric Gibson, Jon Arbuckle, Sam Picco 7) What was the last name of Italian Renaissance poet “Dante”? Carpathia, Alighieri, Furcula, Levitch 8) In Superman comics what’s the nickname of Metropolis? Big Apricot, Toontown, Night City, Lite Side 9) What player restriction is in effect in both polo and jai alai, no “what”? Left-handers, One over 6’, Women, One over 175 lbs 10) Simethicone is the active ingredient in many ... ? Vitamins, Diet drinks, Ointment creams, Antacids 11) Who wrote the lyrics to “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”? Al Evans, Bert Shepard, Bobo Newsom, Jack Norworth 12) Upton Machine Company was the original name of what appliance manufacturer? Maytag, GE, Whirlpool, Kenmore 13) What did Frederick Walton invent in 1863? Linoleum, Repeating rie, Igniter, Roller skates 14) Whose chemical name is sildenal citrate? Viagra, Aspirin, Rubbing Alcohol, Bubblegum ANSWERS 1) Rawhide. 2) Quebec. 3) NY Times. 4) Z. 5) Lexico. 6) Jon Arbuckle. 7) Alighieri. 8) Big Apricot. 9) Left-handers. 10) Antacids. 11) Jack Norworth. 12) Whirlpool. 13) Linoleum. 14) Viagra. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com