The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00261

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, March 13, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Eastpoint rib cook-off Saturday The 13th annual Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department Charity Rib Cook-off will be this Saturday, March 15 at the Eastpoint Firehouse on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road Gate opens at 9 a.m. BBQ chicken, rib and pulled pork dinners, pork rinds, apple dumpling with ice cream and more will be served from 11 a.m. until all gone. Enjoy a kids carnival Friday afternoon and all day Saturday, plus silent auction, live music from CR 67, the Liars Contest and more. To compete, or to donate to auction, or for more info, please call George Pruett at 670-9000 or pru911@fairpoint.net ‘Authors in Apalach’ Saturday The third annual “Authors in Apalach” booksigning, book fair and writers’ forum will be held this Saturday, March 15 all day at the Fort Coombs Armory. Apalachicola librarian Caty Greene said the program, which is free, gets underway from 10:15 to 11 a.m. with Sharman Burson Ramsey, about research for local historical ction. The schedule includes “Adding ‘Place’ to Your Fiction,” with Charles Farley, Dawn Radford, Dale Cox and Ron Harris, from 11:15 a.m. to noon; and “Lunch with Storytellers” featuring James Hargrove, Kenneth Tucker, Olivia DeBelle Byrd, Gill Autrey, Bill Spohrer, Alice Jean Gibbs and Lois Swoboda, from noon to 1 p.m.. The program continues with “Writing for NonBook Formats,” with Caron Spikes Myers, Tony Simmons, Sue Cronkite and By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At a festive ceremony Friday afternoon, members of the Apalachicola community gathered to dedicate the city’s recreation and community service complex in honor of Mayor Van W. Johnson, Sr. The former Apalachicola High School, given over to the city when the county’s two high schools consolidated six years ago, was turned into a bustling facility for non-pro ts, after-school groups, and government agencies under Johnson’s administration. With all ve city commissioners, City Attorney Pat Floyd and city staff in attendance, the ceremony got underway with remarks from Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook, who read a detailed proclamation from the city. Floyd then led the gathering in prayer, and in the Pledge of Allegiance. After that, it was time for Johnson to receive the accolade of having a building named in his honor, and he responded with extended prepared remarks, thanking family, friends, supporters, and wellwishers for sharing in the special occasion. “Today is a good day and certainly an unanticipated chapter in the journey of my life for which rst and foremost I’m grateful to Almighty God. I’m grateful for His never-ending grace, His mercy and provision shown during my administration as mayor of Board to consider ballot measure to end direct election By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A school board member last week asked colleagues to consider placing a measure before voters that could end the direct election of the superintendent of schools, who would instead be hired by a vote of the school board. Pam Shiver, now in the second year of her rst term on the board, on March 6 shared with the board a written outline that asked them to consider the pros and cons of having a hired, rather than an elected, superintendent. “I basically want to do a study on this, and that’s something that has to be done quickly,” she said, asking that her fellow school board members begin discussion of the proposal at their April 3 meeting. If a majority of the board votes to place the matter on the November ballot, it would then require a vote by the county commissioners to place the referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot. If a majority of county voters support the measure, it would then go into effect after Superintendent Nina Marks completes her term in 2016. First elected in Nov. 2008, Marks was re-elected in 2012 without opposition. In her opening remarks, Shiver indicated she was moving forward with her proposal now because it was well in advance of when possible candidacies would surface ahead of the Nov. 2016 election. “Franklin County has been fortunate to have a highly quali ed By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The old Robbins house, built in 1910 on the historic north side of Apalachicola was claimed by re Thursday morning. The house at 213 US 98 was largely destroyed, but all of the six occupants escaped injury. The call came in at 5:01 a.m. One volunteer re ghter said he passed the house on the way to the rehouse and could see the second oor was already burning. When Apalachicola re ghters reached the house at around 5:14 a.m., the second oor was engulfed. St. George Island and Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Departments also responded to the alarm. Eastpoint Fire Chief George Pruett said the blaze was visible as the department’s trucks crossed the John Gorrie Bridge. Corky Dykes and Rena En nger shared an apartment on the second oor of the Robbins home with daughter Delores Marcum and her two children, Emanuel, 6, and four-month-old Tommy. Dykes and En nger said Marcum woke them up at about 1 a.m. to say she smelled something burning. They said they searched the house except for the second-story rooms occupied by William Laine, who owned the Robbins house. They found nothing so they went back to bed. Dykes awoke again around 4:15 a.m. and said the smell was stronger. When he tried to wake En nger, she was sluggish and appeared to be affected by the fumes, he said. Dykes said he then went to the door of Laine’s apartment Celebrating the greatest generation ‘Rosies’ abound at Camp Gordon Johnston Days By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The weather could not have been better for this year’s Camp Gordon Johnston Days celebration. As always, every World War II vet in attendance was designated as a Grand Marshall of the Saturday morning parade. Honored this year was Carrabelle’s own Curley Messer, a Camp Gordon Johnston alumnus; Bob Franklin, who served in the 29th Infantry Division and was wounded at the Battle of the Bulge; Walter Mallett, a Carrabelle son who served on the Ticonderoga where he was wounded by a kamikaze aircraft; and Carrabelle resident Don MacLean who served in the Army and drove landing craft in the Paci c Theatre. He has volunteered at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum and built a number of the models on display there. Also honored were Pete Hill, who served in Army’s 4th Brigade in the Paci c; Bob Dietz of Lanark Village who after getting his father’s permission to join the Army at 17, was stationed in Hawaii when war ended; Mary Britz also of Lanark Village, who was a Navy nurse in San Diego who, about to be married, had her discharge cancelled when war was declared and served for the duration; and Col. Ernest Berger, a retired Air Force pilot who ew P-51 Mustangs. Tony Minichiello, a spokesman for the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, said the head count of veterans was up this year, although a few familiar faces were missing. Buddy Scala, who attended for the last three years, is laid up with a broken ankle and tail gunner Ken Tucker, an Eastpoint native who chronicled his wartime experiences in Crazy about cobia, A10 Should superintendent be hired? PAM SHIVER See SUPERINTENDENT A3 See CELEBRATING A2 Mayor Van Johnson complex dedicated DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Mayor Van Johnson addresses the audience beneath a sign for the building named in his honor. See COMPLEX A3 Fire claims historic home ROBBINS HOUSE BURNS LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Fire ghters battle to contain a blaze at the historic Robbins home at about 6 a.m. Thursday. See FIRE A7 See OUT TO SEE A3 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 VOL. 128 ISSUE 46

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 a memoir “The Last Roll Call” also begged off due to health issues. Minichiello said a popu lar favorite, the 98th Army “Silver Wings” Band, out of Fort Rucker, Ala., was un able to take part this year due to budget cutbacks. A well-attended gala dinner dance on Saturday night at C-Quarters Ma rina offered a festive close to the weekend. Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper and her family greeted at tendees at the door, and this year’s queens from the 2014 Miss Seahawk Pageant, together with students from Stephanie Howze Jones’ class, served up a delicious meal of fried or baked chicken, or ham. Minichiello presented Carrabelle restaurateur Ken La Paz with a plaque honoring him for service to the museum. Minichiello said he has supported the museum with money and food. “He’s one great guy and very active in the commu nity,” Minichiello said. He said Jimmy Crowder would also receive a plaque for donating the use of CQuarters for the dance. Dressed in cowboy at tire, Greg Kristofferson, from American Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village, spun tunes all night long, with several people step ping forward to sing tunes in tribute to the World War II era. Lanark Village maga zine publisher Chuck Spicer, and musician Jack Zurawka, sang many of the songs, as they took turns with songstresses Brenda La Paz, Evelyn McAnally, Shirley Cox and Ann Mer rell, each of the ladies, dressed as Rosie the Riv eter, having helped with serving and clearing tables all evening. The show featured such numbers as “Sing, Sing, Sing,” “If I Didn’t Care,” “I Got Rhythm,” “Accentuate the Positive,” “You are My Sunshine,” and “That Old Black Magic.” Highlighting the eve ning’s tribute was the lead ing of the audience in the singing of the Star-Span gled Banner by Skipper’s grandson, Devin Daniels. CELEBRATING from page A1 .. 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S A V E 3 0 % ON P AINT S & ST AINS V a l i d o n r e t a i l s a l e s o f r e t a i l p r o d u c t s o n l y D i s c o u n t t a k e n o o f o u r l i s t p r i c e S a l e p r i c i n g o r o t h e r o f f e r s t h a t r e s u l t i n g r e a t e r s a v i n g s w i l l s u p e r s e d e t h i s o f f e r M u s t s u r r e n d e r c o u p o n a t t i m e o f r e d e m p t i o n C a s h va l u e : 1 / 1 0 0 o f 1 ¢ O e r e x c l u d e s p r e v i o u s p u r c h a s e s a n d p u r c h a s e s o f g i f t c a r d s M u l t i P u r p o s e p r i m e r s M i n w a x W o o d F i n i s h q u a r t s l add e r s s pr a y e q u i pm e n t a n d a c c e s sor i e s O t h e r e x c l u s i o n s m a y a p p l y s e e s t o r e f o r d e t a i l s V o i d i f t r a n s f e r r e d p u r c h a s e d s o l d a l t e r e d o r d u p l i c a t e d o r w h e r e p r o h i b i t e d b y l a w V a li d a t Sh e r w i n W i lli a m s a n d Sh e r w i n W i lli a ms o p e r a t e d r e t a i l p a i n t s t o r e s o n l y W e r e s e r v e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t r e f u s e o r l i m i t t h e u s e o f a n y c o u p o n O f f e r v a l i d 3 / 9 / 1 4 – 3 / 3 1 / 1 4 2 0 1 4 T h e S h e r w i n W i l l i a m s C o m p a n y 3 0 % O F F ( wit h c o u p o n ) P A I N T S & S T A I N S Y OU R L U CK Y C O L O R M A R C H 9 – 3 1 T o lo c at e a Sher winW illiams st or e near y ou visit sher win-williams .c om or c all 1 -800-4SHERWIN. MO N F R I: 7 A M TO 7 P M S AT : S U N: 10 A M TO 6 P M S t o r e h o u r s m a y v a r y S e e s t o r e f o r d e t a i ls S T ORE H O U R S : Join us on LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Bob Durham was surrounded in his vintage World War II jeep by a bevy of beauties including his wife, Ann, as Rosie the Riveter. Riding in back, from left, are Franklin County High School students Kendall Myers, Melanie Collins and Ursula Countryman. Accompanied by several generations of the Lowery family, Carrabelle native Clarence Lowery designed this oat commemorating training days at Camp Gordon Johnston for the Carrabelle Boat Club. Greg Kristofferson, right, and his wife Brenda La Paz, sing as part of the World War II tribute Saturday night. Jacob Hand of Sneads was ag carrier for the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The crowd was bountiful on Saturday night at C-Quarters. Tony Minichiello, right, presents a plaque of appreciation Saturday night to restaurateur Ken La Paz.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, March 13, 2014 David Adlerstein from 1 to 1:45 p.m.; and, from 2 to 3:15 p.m. “Franklin County and Apalachicola History” with special presentations by retired Ole Miss history professor Harry P. Owens, retired Florida State University professor William Warren Rogers, Michael Kinnett and Mark Curenton. This will introduce Owens’ newly published “Apalachicola Before 1861.” From 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. will be “Writing For and Outreach to Youth Readers” featuring Lydia Countryman, Adrian Fogelin, Leslee Horner, Rhett DeVane, Susan Womble and other youth writers; and from 4:30 to 5 p.m. “Lit Map Project,” with Caty Greene and Robin Vroegop. For more info call Greene at (850) 323-2305. representative in our superintendent position in terms of the past, and also in the current seat,” Shiver said. “The nature of this study is to consider op tions that will allow for a broader pool of qualied candidates to be consid ered as the CEO of our school system, based solely on professional qualica tions and leadership skill. “Our superintendent has done an exemplary job in her but has voiced her lack of desire to run for an additional term,” she said. “The process is not intended to undermine the control of the local voter but to enhance the abil ity to choose the best candidate whose qualications are currently limited to county borders.” Shiver noted that any registered voter at least 18 years old is entitled to run for the superintendent post, which this scal year pays $94,071, as per state statute. “There are no qualica tions to run for the position,” she said. Presently, 26 of Florida’s 67 coun ties – or about 40 percent – have hired superintendents, with the remain ing 41 counties, mainly the small and mid-size ones, continuing to elect their superintendents. According to a 2012 Tennessee study, only three states Al abama, Florida, and Mississippi allow for local districts to elect superinten dents. Across those states, 147 of the 355 districts, or about 41 percent, elect superintendents a total representing less than 1 percent of the more than 14,000 districts nationwide. Last week, the Walton County school board voted 4-1 to draw up a resolution to switch to a hired superintendent, which that board plans to vote on at an upcoming meeting. Shiver said her research of the is sue on the internet brought forth both supporting and opposing arguments for a hired superintendent, which she outlined for the board. In her summary of the supporting arguments, she wrote that a hired su perintendent would be accountable to the school board and could be re moved at any time for failure to meet established goals and performance standards. “Some may argue that the elected superintendent is more accessible and accountable to the public. However once the superintendent is elected, only ethical violations or the end of term may remove the individual from seat,” Shiver cited. “The superinten dent is accountable to the school board to achieve common goals.” She noted in the supporting argu ments that a hired superintendent would be less affected by politics, or driven by a personal agenda. “Some districts that have hired superinten dents claim that the system is more balanced since the board and the su perintendent are not both elected po sitions,” wrote Shiver. “The hired su perintendent would not be concerned about pleasing a constituent base and not beholden to political supporters.” She stressed that hiring a super intendent would provide a larger pool of qualied school leaders. “We would no longer be limited to individuals liv ing in district and are willing to or can afford to run for ofce,” Shiver wrote. “Our CEO should spend his or her ef fort on student achievement and not how each decision will affect next elec tion. The superintendent of our schools should spend their time working with administrators to improve our school, rather than giving attention to winning an election.” Alongside the supporting argu ments, Shiver noted the opposing arguments. “Generally, hired superintendents have a higher pay scale to include ben ets package, career development, and perks,” she wrote. “Canceling contract may result in severance and leave pay.” Shiver wrote that a committee would have to be formed to set job de scription, requirements and contract. “A search and hiring committee will need to be established and may result in additional expenses,” she said. Lastly, she wrote that “voters may feel an outsider is not able to relate to our unique area.” The only school board member to speak on the issue was David Hinton, who served in the Air Force before be coming a science teacher at Carrabelle High School. “As a retired military person, one of the things I’m concerned about is that I don’t want us to ever give up a vote for anybody for anything,” he said. “No one has ever said constitutional gov ernment is the most efcient govern ment, (but I do not want) to take away the vote from the public.” Shiver replied that some in the community have said “it felt like it was unbalanced to have a board and super intendent (both elected). They felt like ti was counterproductive. “I think it would be something worth looking into,” she said. 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D Apalachicola,” he said. “Secondly, I’m extremely thankful to the people of this great city for their continued support and show of condence not once, but twice, in electing me to the sometimes difcult and demanding task of leading this city. For it has been said of such, ‘Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.’” Johnson continued by voicing his appre ciation to the volunteers “who make up our boards and committees for their seless ser vice to this city. The key to our success rests in people like you, who embody the spirit of greatness by saying, “Yes I can, and so can each of you!” The mayor shared his gratitude to City Administrator Betty Webb and her staff, “who each day stand on the frontline on behalf of this city. I’ve come to truly regard them for their dedication and personal sac rice in choosing a career path that allow for them to serve the needs of others, for our greatest heroes, are those who forego of themselves for the benet of others. “ Johnson thanked each of the elected of cials by name, for their “kind consideration in bestowing this great honor upon me and my beloved family. I nd solace in your excellent leadership, your impeccable integrity and your unwavering commitment toward the prosperity of Apalachicola. Let your service be a constant reminder to all of the work we have accomplished as a cohesive board for the residents of this great city.” The mayor recalled his “fond memories of attending school in this very building. However, it never crossed my mind during those years that I spent walking the grounds of this campus and running in the halls of this building, that I would return 36-years later in an ofcial capacity to receive such a high honor. It’s a very humbling experience for which I am truly grateful. Lastly, he spoke of his wife of 33 years, “who I was chasing while running through these halls, my most avid supporter. Your faith in me and my love for this community is what propels me each day to continue in this work with hopes of creating a better tomor row for all. I love you much baby. “ And he closed with thanks to his parents, the late Abe and Azalee Johnson, Sr. “ I know that you’re both looking down today from heaven assured that the life you led before me and your work within this community has not been in vain,” he said. The memories of Johnson’s parents was invoked minutes later when Franklin’s Prom ise Coalition Director Joe Taylor stepped forward to present the mayor with a framed note from Johnson’s mother when he was 17. Taylor said the note had been found among records at the high school. Azalee Johnson’s note asked for her son to be excused because he had assisted in taking her husband to the Veterans Administration hospital. During the last years of his life, Abe Johnson, who was blinded by a land mine during his ser vice during World War II, made several trips to the VA, his son said. Also thanking the mayor for his hard work was Faye Johnson, who directs the Project Impact after-school program which is held at the complex. Following the ceremony, guests retired into the school for a buffet lunch and slices of a cake baked in the mayor’s honor. COMPLEX from page A1 SUPERINTENDENT from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Mayor Van Johnson shares a smile with Rosa Tolliver at the reception. OUT TO SEE from page A1

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 13, 2014 A Section Special to The Times New sex offender laws will be considered in the upcoming legislative session, which began March 4. Unfortunately, our sex offender policies, both existing and proposed, are based on commonly held and grossly erroneous, myths about Stranger Danger and the recidivism rate among registered sex offenders (RSOs). They do not address the real risks to children. We have seen this cycle before; a heinous crime, in this case the murder of Cherish Periwinkle by a justreleased rapist, is followed by sensational media coverage. Feeling pressure to do something, legislators pass new laws that broaden de nitions of criminality, impose additional jail time and add restrictions on all RSOs. These laws would cost many millions and stress law enforcement organizations across the state. Sadly, the proposed laws won’t protect children. Our sex offender policies are predicated on preventing strangers from abducting and hurting children. But strangers are not the primary threat. A Bureau of Justice Statistics study nds that 93 percent of sex crimes perpetrated against children are committed by people who are known and trusted within, or close to, the family. The 93 percent are not on the registry, which shows the necessity for better education and support throughout the public citizenship. The second myth underlying our laws is most RSOs will re-offend. All analysis shows this belief is wrong. A largescale, multistate study of sex offender recidivism by the Department of Justice found re-arrest rates among RSOs to be 3.6 percent. This is the lowest recidivism rate of any major category of crime except murder. And after the rst three years of being released, this percentage is even less. Instead of relying on “popular but misguided perceptions”, our laws should be built on empirical evidence. Our legislators should consult research by such respected organizations as the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers and The Journal of the American Medical Association. They should invite highly credentialed individuals, such as Dr. Jill Levinson at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Dr. Suzonne Kline, a former head of the Sexually Violent Predator program for the State of Florida, and Dr. Eric Imhof, current president of Florida Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, to participate in workshops. Before layering on new laws, the time has come to conduct a thoughtful, comprehensive evaluation of what we have achieved/learned/ spent over the last 20 years, since the enactment of The Jacob Wetterling Act. The proposed legislation will not protect children because it does not address the source of real threats. The proposed legislation will waste more taxpayer money. And the proposed legislation will needlessly criminalize more citizens. Florida Action Committee (FAC), founded in 2006, is a statewide consortium of concerned citizens and professionals whose purpose is to promote the prevention of sexual abuse while preserving the safety and dignity of all citizens through carefully structured laws targeting the truly violent, forced, and/or dangerous predatory acts of sex. FAC believes many aspects of the current approach to sex offenders seriously undermine justice and actually increase the threat of sexual assault against others, particularly children. FAC opposes a publicized registry of sex offenders and seeks to bring an end to the humiliation of people who have already paid for their crimes. FAC asserts that only by supporting justice for all people offenders and victims alike can a truly safe society be built and secured for all Americans. We need rational sex laws Do you ever ask yourself that question? I got tired of asking myself that question every month so I followed a plan to record my spending for several months and analyze where my nancial loopholes were. It certainly opened my eyes and reminded me how important it is to know my spending habits before developing a spending plan (budget). A simple no-cost method of tracking your spending is by recording your expenses on paper. Start with a plain sheet of 5.5” x 11” paper. Fold it in half from side and side, lengthwise. Then fold it in half again two more times to create eight sections on each side. Label the rst seven sections with each day of the week and the last section should be labeled totals. Carry this sheet everywhere with the current day in top and make a note of each item you purchase and how much you pay for it. Don’t forget you’re to record your debit or credit card purchases and automatic withdrawals from your checking or savings account. Keep this paper in a safe place through the month. Complete this exercise for a month or two and then total the expenditures by category in the eighth section. You will have to decide if this is an exercise to be carried out by you or if you should encourage all of your family members to do it. Your decision will allow you to total your total expenses or your family’s total expenses. Then divide the expenditures into categories. They might include: groceries, eating out, snacks, entertainment, gas for car, personal (haircuts, grooming, etc.), rent or house payment, car payment, utilities, daycare, clothing (new, dry cleaning or repairs) and other. Try to limit the other category for it is easy to get lazy and put many items in that category. This results on not knowing where your money was spent. After keeping records for a month or two and reviewing your records, ask yourself some questions. Are there any categories that surprise you? Are you spending far more money on personal items or entertainment than you expected? Determine how much money you could have at month’s end if you gave up eating out several times during a month or by giving up cigarettes. Analyze your results. Set some goals to change some of your spending habits and reward yourself if you have unplanned money at the end of the next month. This is the rst step in developing a sound spending plan. The Franklin County Extension Of ce has many free educational materials and tools to use concerning money management. In addition, our Florida Master Money Mentors offer you free, one-onone sessions to discuss any aspect of money management. Just give me a phone call to access any of these materials or services. As Yogi Berra said, “You have got to be very careful if you don’t know where you are going, because you might not get there.” The UF/IFAS Franklin County Extension of ce has staff and related resources to assist you in nding your nancial direction! 653-9337 is the number to call. Shelley Swenson is the UF/IFAS Franklin/Wakulla extension agent for food and consumer services. SHELLEY SWENSON By BRAD BUCK Special to the Times A computer model developed, in part, by University of Florida researchers can help coastal managers better understand the long-term effects of major storms, sea-level rise and beach restoration activities and possibly save millions of dollars. Researchers used erosion data following tropical storms and hurricanes that hit Santa Rosa Island, off Florida’s Panhandle, and sea-level rise projections to predict beach habitat changes over the next 90 years. But they say their model can be used to inform nourishment decisions at any beach. Since the rst project of its kind in the U.S. at Coney Island, N.Y., in 1922, coastal managers have used beach nourishment – essentially importing sand to replace sediment lost through storms or erosion – to restore damaged beaches, but it is laborious and expensive. Adding to coastal managers’ headaches, the offshore sand used for such ventures is running short. “Moving large amounts of sand onto the beach is costly,” said Rafael MuozCarpena, a UF professor of agricultural and biological engineering and study co-author. “Certainly preserving the beach has important bene ts for humans and ecology, but as with any management decision, bene ts need to be balanced by cost, especially when sooner or later the beach might be lost to sealevel rise or a major storm. How much is it worth for society to keep the beach longer in a given spot?” Decision makers must answer those questions, and the answers won’t be cheap, Muoz-Carpena said. UF researchers used their model to nd out how long a beach would last under varying conditions, said Greg Kiker, an associate professor in agricultural and biological engineering and a study co-author. With mean sea level rising, a storm that may not have done as much damage 20 to 40 years ago can do more damage today, he said. “As engineers, we said, ‘OK, what can we do about it?’” UF researchers used erosion data and post-storm nourishment strategies after hurricanes Ivan and Dennis and Tropical Storm Katrina struck the island, which is part of Eglin Air Force Base in Fort Walton Beach. The beach suffered severe erosion after each storm. They also used National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data from 69 major storms over the past 154 years, within about 65 miles of Santa Rosa Island, to construct storm-striking scenarios. Computer simulations of 4,000 storms suggested that without nourishment, a tropical storm or hurricane and sea level rise would reduce Santa Rosa Island’s beach by 97 percent to 100 percent by the year 2100. But that loss can be cut to 60 percent with a 3-foot beach, and to 34 percent with 5 feet in sand nourishment, the study said. Muoz-Carpena and his colleagues said they’re not urging coastal managers to pump sand, which generally comes from offshore, onto beaches at any particular frequency. He cautions that the data may be limited by the uncertainty of future tropical storms and sea level projections. The paper is in this month’s issue of the journal Environmental Modelling and Software. Brad Buck is a writer for the University of Florida. He can be reached at bradbuck@u .edu Page 4 PHOTO BY TYLER JONES | UF/IFAS A piece of Florida coastline and ock of birds ying as a storm approaches. UF: Computer model helps with beach nourishment Want to know where your money’s going? Letters to the EDITORS New hospital would keep patients, attract doctors I am writing in response to a letter regarding Weems Memorial Hospital in your Feb. 27 issue (See “Weems soap opera: 10 minutes vs. $10 million”) questioning the wisdom of bringing the hospital up to date or simply dismantling it and sending all patients to Port St Joe. I must disagree with this assessment based on my 50 years of medical practice in Apalachicola. During this period the county has constructed a 25bed hospital that served the community and Franklin County admirably offering mot only medical care but obstetrical and surgical services. At that time Port St Joe had a 35-bed facility and today I understand they have only a 19-bed facility. So now it is being discussed to let a 19-bed hospital take care of the hospital needs of two communities that formerly had a combined total of 60 beds. Think about that! Most cities are expanding their hospital bed capacity and services, not shrinking them at this date. Over the years Weems not only survived, but made a modest pro t with an average patient census of about 17 under the direction of the hospital board and the county commissioners. If the hospital were to close and thereby requiring all patients to be transferred to out-of-town hospitals, some of them could be possibly be put at serious risk should they develop a sudden or acute medical problem requiring immediate treatment and stabilization before being transported to an area hospital. Patients should not be put in jeopardy in such a situation or from a life-threatening accident. In the old days we tried to do this so that a patient could be safely transferred by helicopter to a regional hospital. A new hospital would encourage doctors to locate in Apalachicola. A family practice physician, an obstetrician and general surgeon would more likely come to Apalachicola and the hospital census would go up dramatically. An active medical staff would be bene cial not only to the hospital but to the community. I would like to congratulate Mr. Ray Bloodworth, the hospital board of trustees and the county commissioners in their efforts to build a new Weems Hospital and wish them every success. Sincerely, Photis Nichols, M.D. ‘Leave No Trace’ tramples on property rights In view of recent letters published in The Times, I think your readers should know that the defeated “Leave No Trace Ordinance” discarded the United States Constitution, the Florida Constitution and existing Franklin County ordinances. Yes, the proposed ordinance trampled upon private property rights as if they did not exist. Here is what the proposed ordinance would allow: • Authorize non-law enforcement personnel without warrant and no distinguishing clothing to enter upon private property 24 hours a day and seize personal property. • Allow vehicles on the beach to haul off the con scated personal property contrary to existing ordinances that prohibit vehicles on the beach and in many cases violate the covenants and deed restrictions of private property owners. Needless to say, enforcement of the ordinance would expand local government, increase taxes and, in my humble judgment, have a negative impact on our tourist trade. If I have heard it said one time in recent years, I have heard it said a thousand times: “We don’t want St. George Island to become another Panama City Beach.” Guess what?! That ‘s where the ordinance came from. Willie Norred St. George Island

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, March 13, 2014 Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-415-1638 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 1/14. Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders 20144-3-T4 Single T ooth Implant inc luding Cr o wn st ar ting at $ 1 8 95 Dentur e Implants st ar ting at $ 1 5 95 L o w er Ar c h $ 1 9 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 Upper Ar c h ) * (& 5 3 5 ; 5 5 1 > 5 4 2 ; 4 6 ? 1 1 > ; 5 4 5 3 ? 1 3 1 ; ; 5 5 5 4 ; 3 3 ; 9 < 5 3 ; > 3 1 5 4 5 6 + ? 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The Carrabelle Artists Association host ed an exhibit at the Franklin County Senior Center. The Rio Carrabelle downtown shop displayed works by Joan Matey and Fred Aman. Artists Joe Klotzman, Marian Mor ris, Harriet Beach, Cal Allen and Shirley Cox each opened their homes to art enthusiasts. Moore’s Treasures also hosted a display. A special treat is still on display at the residence of Leon Wiesener. The retired art professor has completed phase three of his bottle house project, a lighted glass arch constructed totally of bottles. Wiesener created the display as a landmark to draw tourists to Carrabelle. Along with the arch, he has constructed a house and a working lighthouse of bottles. Visitors are welcome to the glass struc tures at 604 SE Ave. F. Be sure to shut the gate to keep the Wieseners’ two friendly standard poodles safe inside. — By LOIS SWOBODA By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com Backers of a plan to create a new Forgotten Coast Fitness and Wellness Center in the former Apalachicola High School are hoping to open the new facil ity by next month. The nonprot venture arose after the closure in January of the Apalachicola Fitness Center, which was housed at 45 Ave. D until the building was sold to the owners of Papa Joe’s Restaurant, who plan to relocate there shortly. Ed Aguiar, a member of the proposed center’s board of directors along with Henry Kozlowsky, Gary Niblack, Sarah Madson and Jan Thomas, said organiz ers are working on collecting dues from the original 54 people who committed to pre-paid annual memberships. “Our plan is to recognize this group as ‘the founding members,’ and they will be honored as such,” Aguiar said. “As of this past weekend, 20 of the 54 commit ments for per-paid annual memberships have been collected, and when success ful, this will secure the success of the new center.” Members are being asked to pay for a one-year membership of $420, a sixmonth membership of $210, a threemonth membership of $105 or a monthly membership of $35. “Our goal is to have all funds col lected and deposited by Monday, March 17,” Thomas said. “This will allow us to schedule construction and installation of our own entryway door with keyless entry for members and to get started on improvements to the space. We have all our approvals with the city of Apala chicola and Franklin’s Promise Coalition in place and will execute our lease this week.” Thomas said improvements include creating a pass-through that joins two former classrooms to create a larger space, installing carpeting and replacing whiteboards with mirrors and paint. The idea is to acquire the most popu lar pieces of equipment from the nowshuttered center and relocate them to the municipal complex at 192 14th St. Members would have exclusive 24-hour access with member keys. Thomas said though the target date for opening is Monday, March 31, “the sooner we collect money, the sooner we open.” Organizers plan to provide space for April Patriotis to continue aerobic and kickboxing classes. Eric Olson also would be available as a personal trainer. For more info, call or email Jan Thom as 653-1068 or janetina@hotmail.com. From Staff Reports Guardian ad Litem class offered The Guardian ad Litem program for the Second Judicial District is offering training in Eastpoint from 4:30-8:30 p.m.. March 21 and March 28 at the Eastpoint Church of God. Guardians ad Litem are citizens who volunteer to represent children before the court, social service agencies and the community. Volunteers are trained and supervised by program staff, including attorneys. On average, guardians devote eight to ten hours a month to their cases. To become a Guardian, you must be at least 19 years of age and successfully complete a criminal background screening and the pre-service training program that is completed with in your community. For more information, call Sara Blumenthal, 2nd Circuit Guardian ad Litem volunteer recruiter, at 606-1213 or 445-1121, or visit www.gal2.org. Carrabelle library offers ood insurance help From 12:45-2:15 p.m. Tuesday, March 18, will be a webinar at the Carrabelle Library meeting room to introduce and explain the Community Rating System. CRS provides reduced premiums for ood insurance policy holders in communities that implement programs and activities that exceed the minimum criteria for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. If your community conducts oodplain mapping, regulatory, loss reduction, emergency management and/or public information activities, you could benet from this program. Come learn about CRS basics credit points and classes, costs and benets, where to get help and how to apply. This training is part of the new CRS Webinar Series and will be repeated along with more advanced topics in the coming months. Schedules are posted at https:// atkinsglobalna.webex.com/tc. New tness center plans push ahead LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Leon Wiesener tells visitors how he constructed his glass art during Saturday’s art tour. Carrabelle comes alive with art News b B R iI EF sS “As of this past weekend, 20 of the 54 commitments for per-paid annual memberships have been collected, and when successful, this will secure the success of the new center.”EE d Aguiar, board of directors

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 Dƒ l ~ l pz| p ‚ ~ l F l ‘ H z l †‹t† fpz ‚ ‚ ~ 3 Š ‹z f‹†tt ‹ Dƒ l ~ l pz| p ‚ ~ l NV ' ŠŠ Š ¤ƒ z ‚ € t“ ' 3 ¤v l  “    Plnpt l x ~ tˆP ‚ †x l n pˆp z ‚ ‚ ~ A l n ptl x ~ tˆP‚†x Apalachicola Ba y Char ter School KINDERGAR TEN R OUNDUP March 21, 2014 Y ou will need to br ing y our child, their bir th cer ti cate Social Secur ity Card and Immunization Records Please stop b y the fr ont of ce f or a r egistr ation f orm and to schedule an appointment f or Fr ida y mar ch 21st to meet teachers, visit classr ooms and ha v e y our child scr eened. Open enr ollment contin ues thr ough Mar ch 28th. PLEASE CONT A CT OUR SCHOOL EVEN IF Y OU MISSED THE DEADLINE. T he ABC School is a famil y lear ning comm unity w or king as a team to pr o vide a br ighter futur e for our childr en. "# # # # " JWGG ;ww‚ ‡q hk }t @ h ‡t ;n Š K th }Š { L€‰ ‹‡h €n t G €‡‚ }} ~t €Š Yt ~| €h ‡ ‰ [{ ‹‡‰ q hŽ C O h‡ n { I Š { h Š „ ~ h Š tt ~‰ K‚‰ „| Š h} nhw t Š t‡| h J ‡| q hŽ C O h ‡n { 6 ‰ Š hŠ 66 h ~ h Š t t ~‰ O t q | nh} @t € Š t‡ G h ‰Š |€ @h ‡‡h k t}} t Mt h ‡€ hk ‚‹ Š K th }Š{ L€‰ ‹‡ h€ n t ‹€q t‡ Š { t ;w w ‚ ‡qh k}t @ h‡ t ; nŠ  Wtnt |Œ t Yh ~t DhŽ ; ‰‰ | ‰Šh €n t |Š { Kth }Š { L €‰ ‹‡h €n t G€ ‡‚ }} ~t €Š  D ‹‡| €z Š { t ~‚ € Š { ‚w O h ‡n { C t t ~‰ J }‚ ‡| q h Kt h}Š { @‚€ € tnŠ ‚ ‡ | }} n‚€ Š | €‹t Š ‚ ‚ wwt ‡ w ‡tt h ‰‰ | ‰ Š h €nt | Š { { t h}Š { | €‰ ‹‡ h€ nt t €‡ ‚ }} ~t € Š Wt~ t ~k t‡ R„ t € G€‡ ‚ }} ~t €Š G€ q ‰ O h‡ n { 6 ‰Š  Xw p †p zx} d „ † x} † ˆ„ d } j p p } „ y y zp } ‡ † p †† x } † d „ p s sp „ p m g Œ Jy „ x md Lp d y ‡w A} } p j‡ „ D d y jdy d vp} ‡ s „ J y „ x md >y ˆp < J „ z „ p x} s „ zd ‡ x } D  y p d †p jdy y D || D p ‹ ‡< 4 I 4 < ŠŠ Š< Špp z† zp z „ x d y •u ’‰ Œ‰ \› ‰ a† { › L ‹t } \› ‰ a†{ › U t› † t‹ b†‹} ‹ †‚ [ ‚ƒ Coupon Expir es: 3-31-14 CODE: AP00 o M Š t The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. March 4 Chianne R. Russ, 38, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) Brandon D. Robinson, 29, Lynn Haven, warrants for Bay County and Gulf County failure to appear (FCSO) Larry T. Holland, Jr., 29, Apalachicola, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and child neglect (FCSO) March 5 Leah N. Page, 33, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and reckless driving (FCSO) March 6 Denim M. Johnson, 25, Carrabelle, retail theft (FCSO) Clifton R. Galloway, 25, Carrabelle, Liberty County violation of probation (FCSO) Larry T. Holland, Jr., 29, Apalachicola, lewd or lascivious battery, contributing to delinquency of a minor, possession of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) David D. Hartman, 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) March 7 Jerry M. Landrum, 36, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence, and harvesting commercial quantities of saltwater products without SPL license (FCSO) Jonathon C. Stephens, 21, Tallahassee, possession of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Michael T. Allen, 18, Apalachicola, petit theft (FCSO) March 9 Rashed O. Brown, 31, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) Brian M. Falk, 56, Apalachicola, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) On Feb. 26, Florida’s First District Court of Appeals handed the city of Apalachicola a victory in a suit against the county over the process by which RE STORE Act funds will be administered. The three-judge panel – Judges Wil liam Van Nortwick, Jr., Philip Padovano and Lori Rowe – overturned Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey’s March 2013 ruling that the city had no basis on which to assert that the county had to meet with them under the terms of Florida Statute 164. This law, known as the Florida Gov ernmental Conict Resolution Act, en courages the resolution of conicts be tween local and regional governments without resorting to litigation. Beginning in August 2012, both Apala chicola and Carrabelle made numerous requests to the county to meet with the cities to discuss a fair plan for divvying up the county’s eventual share of billions of dollars in compensation for damages resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Ho rizon oil spill. That total amount has yet to be decided by a federal judge, but is expected to bring into Franklin County several million dollars. On the advice of County Attorney Michael Shuler, the county declined the cities’ requests, prompting Apalachicola to le suit in circuit court to compel the county to meet publicly with the two cities. In her ruling, Dempsey dismissed the city’s complaint with prejudice, which forever barred the city from reling the case. The appellate court reversed Dempsey’s decision, and wrote that Apalachicola had legal grounds for seek ing declaratory relief. The justices noted the Florida legislature intended the Florida Governmental Conict Resolu tion Act as a means “to enhance inter governmental coordination by creating a governmental conict resolution pro cedure to provide a method for resolving conicts between and among local and regional governmental entities.” The justices remanded the case back to the circuit court, where it will now be heard by Circuit Judge George Reynolds. – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Arrest re RE PO rtRT Law Enforcement Appeals court reverses decision in REST OO RE Act suit Special to The Times Help is here for those people who want to take advantage of the Affordable Care Act by the March 31 deadline. Martin Shefeld, with Florida Health Connector, a large Panama City insur ance agency doing market ing for Florida Blue (Blue Cross/Blue Shield), said his group is trying to boost en rollment in Franklin County by holding regular weekly sessions, and two large enrollment sessions next week. The sessions are at 6 p.m. March 20 at the Weems Memorial Hospital cafete ria, and at 11 a.m. March 21 at Weems Medical Center East in Carrabelle. During March, the hospi tal continues to offer assis tance with health insurance enrollment by a Florida Health Connector represen tative – on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Weems Hos pital; on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to noon at Weems Hos pital; and on Wednesdays from 1-4 p.m. at Weems East in Carrabelle. “Because participation is so low here, we’re trying to help bring people the mes sage about the Affordable Care Act,” Shefeld said. “This is a very important time in an ever-changing in dustry. There are now have subsidies if your income falls between $11,495 and $48,000” Florida Blue is the only company between Pensaco la and Tampa that is taking part in the health insurance exchanges. “We can go out determine what your subsi dy is and apply it to a Florida Blue plan and explain how a subsidy will bring down the price and internal subsidies that will help out-ofpocket expenses,” Shefeld said. The federal government offers support in the form of tax credits that can be applied directly to monthly insurance premiums. For example, an individual can qualify for credit with an in come between $11,490 and $45,960 and a family of four can qualify for credit with an income between $23,550 and $94,200. Help available with health insurance

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, March 13, 2014 and kicked it in, where he found Laine sit ting on the corner of the bed, which was in ames. Dykes attempted to douse the re with water from a bathroom but rapidly realized it was futile. “I threw the bucket on the ames and ran to get my family out,” he said. Ennger said the baby was unrespon sive when she took him from his crib. She performed CPR and revived him. Marcum said she took both children to Apalachicola pediatrician Dr. Robert Head the next day and he pronounced them unharmed. After evacuating his family, Dykes said he went back for Laine. He said his land lord seemed to have been affected by the smoke and didn’t want to leave his rooms. “The re truck is on the way,” Dykes said Laine told him. “ It will go out.” Dykes said he dragged Laine from the burning room. “I told him I’m not going to let you burn alive,” Dykes said. At 6 a.m., there was a cold drizzle as Sa vannah Dykes tearfully watched her home burn. Corky Dykes’ daughter resided on the rst oor of the house with her daugh ter Layla. Both were out of the house, vis iting a relative at the time of the blaze. “I’m glad we weren’t here when it start ed. I’m glad everybody made it out but all of my stuff is in there. I guess I’ll come back later and look for my cat,” she said, without much hope. The cat, Mahi, a male Siamese, is still missing. The Dykes family asks that any one who has seen the cat contact them. A dog belonging to Dykes and Ennger, and an elderly black Labrador retriever be longing to Laine, escaped unhurt. American Red Cross representative Gathana Parmenas was on hand at 10 a.m. interviewing the residents and arranging for temporary housing. In the gray morning, exhausted re ghters stood vigil over the steaming shell as they rolled up their hoses. Fireghter Mark Creamer was proud some of the lower oor was still standing of the home, which was named for a for mer county sheriff. “We saved some of it. That’s a fat lighter house,” he said. “Those walls are hollow. You can stand in the attic and look straight down to the ground. It creates a chimney effect. The deluge cannons worked great. They were what put out the re.” Three blocks of US 98 were cordoned off by emergency workers. Duke Energy power lines running along the adjacent al ley burned and fell, leaving live wires for reghters to contend with. By the start of the work day, Apalachicola Fire Chief George Watkins had reopened a single lane on US 98, but the re would need at tention for hours to come. “It’s too early to call the re marshal. It’s still burning. It will be back,” he said at the time. The State Fire Marshall’s of ce said Monday the re is still under investigation. Corky Dykes, Ennger, Laine and the Marcum family are staying at the Rancho Inn, which the Red Cross paid for tempo rarily. The families expect to receive funds from Laine’s father to cover a more ex tended period. Dykes said his family would move into public housing as soon as they can replace birth certicates and other iden tication lost in the re. They said Sandy Hengle, homeless liaison for the Franklin County Schools, is helping them obtain the papers. Hengle, who spent hours at the Rob bins house the morning of the re, was taken to the emergency room and treated for respiratory problems related to smoke inhalation the next day. In their hotel room on Tuesday, Delores Marcum, Corky Dykes and Ennger said they have lost virtually everything. “We are so grateful to the people who have come forward to help us,” said Enn ger. “We have enough clothes for the baby. A lady drove down from Alabama to bring me some clothes.” A benet account has been set up at Centennial Bank for the family, under the Ruby Dykes. EASTPOINT FIR E HOUSE CAR NIV AL Located one block North of US Hwy 98. Corner of 6th St. CC Land Rd. FRIDA Y & SA T UR DA Y MAR CH 14TH & 15TH EASTPOINT FIR E DEP AR TMENT ANNUAL CHARIT Y RIB COOKER SA T UR DA Y MAR CH 15TH BBQ Dinners serv ed fr om 11:00 till the food is gone. Come out and enjo y a day of food, fun, and music with the F ire F ighters. All proceeds go to bene t the Eastpoint V olunteer F ire Department. For mor e information or to be a sponsor contact us at 850-570-9000 or email to pru911@gtcom.n et or visit our w ebsite at www .eastpointvfd. com HELP NEEDED FOR FAMILY BURNED OUT OF hH OME A family left homeless by a March 1 re is hoping for help to restore their lives. A doublewide mobile home owned by Marjorie Marie Wilson was completely destroyed by ames on Saturday morning, March 1. Wilson shared the home at 536 Oyster Road in Apalachicola, with daughter and son-in-law Vickie and Sonny Ray Taylor, granddaughter Dana Taylor and great-grandson Michael Taylor. They are temporarily living in a borrowed camper on the site of their re-ravaged home and are seeking a donated trailer. A benet account has been set up at Centennial Bank for the family, under the name Vickie and Calvin Ray Taylor. Apalachicola businessman Harry Arnold is temporarily storing some furniture and household goods he obtained that were left over from the auction at the St. George Island Chili Cook-off. If you can help, please call victim’s advocate Clarice Powell at 370-6086. Powell said $500 has been donated to the Taylor family by the Knights of Columbus Bishop O’Sullivan Council #1648. FIRE from page A1 LOILOI S SWOBODA OBODA | The Times At left, at about 10 a.m. March 6, reghters still were struggling to contain the smoldering ruins of the Robbins house. YOUYOU C ANAN H ELPELP Help is needed for the former residents of the Robbins house. To nd out how you can be of assistance, please call victim’s advocate Clarice Powell at 370-6086.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 Shelt on is a v er y handsome Lab tha t w as lef t in the dr op pen. W e c ould t ell he had been someone ’ s y ar d dog and nev er spen t time on a leash or inside W e had t o carr y him inside and although it t ook a f ew da y s t o get him leash tr ained and c omf or table going thr ough thr esholds he ’ s a pr o no w! I f y ou ar e a lo v er of the br eed and will o er this sw eet bo y a home tha t will allo w him t o be inside please c ome meet this handsome Lab! V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or go tt en pe ts .o r g t o se e mo r e of ou r ad op ta bl e pe ts Franklin County Humane Society See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y Twelve volunteers from the University of Florida dedicated their spring break last week to Franklin County’s schools. Among them was 2012 Franklin County High School salutatorian Adreenah Wynn, who is now studying graphic design on the Gainesville campus. Spring was in the air Tuesday as a half-dozen college students got to work refurbishing the garden at the ABC School under the guidance of Kris Sullivan. The garden was originally installed by the Arts in Medicine program in 2011. She said a second troupe was busy at the Franklin County School using theater to address violence issues with fourthgrade students. Brent Banks’ ABC middle school students took time off to help with the digging. The fourthgrade chorus, above, put in an appearance to serenade Sullivan and her crew with “Counting Stars.” — By LOIS SWOBODA On Feb. 20, members of Philaco Womens Club turned their regular monthly luncheon into a mission. Barb Paget, chair of the International Affairs Committee, organized a work day to prepare items for donation to Operation Smile, a charitable organization that provides free surgery for children who suffer from cleft palate and do not have access to medical care. Their medical missions deliver safe surgeries to places where access to surgery might not be available, frequently in the developing world, through the talent of medical volunteers from different countries. The treatment provided by Operation Smile save thousands of lives annually. On a typical international medical mission, 300500 children receive full medical evaluations and 100-150 children are treated surgically. This year, Operation Smile plans to launch 30 such missions, visiting places like Amman, Jordan; Musanze, Rwanda; and Lima, Peru. Philaco’s volunteers created more than 100 hospital gowns and accessories for children who will receive surgery on this year’s missions. Paget said she gives special thanks to four volunteers who worked at home on the project for more than a month: Cathy Bailey, Mary Jean Heide, Beverly Kelley and Liz Sisung. — By LOIS SWOBODA Special to The Times The Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts will present soprano Joyce Guyer in concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at Trinity Episcopal Church. Accompanied by pianist Bianca Lupsha, Guyer has been a valued principal artist for 16 seasons at New York’s Metropolitan Opera with roles such as Susanna in “Le Nozze di Figaro,” Sophie in “Der Rosenkavalier,” Sophie in “Werther” and Pamina in “Die Zauberte.” In New York City, she has performed at Carnegie Hall, Weill Hall and Avery Fisher Hall with such notable conductors as James Levine, Sir Colin Davis, Wolfgang Sawallisch, Gerard Schwartz and Robert Bass. In Europe, Guyer spent ve years at the Bayreuther Festspiele as Woglinde and Die Waldvogel in Wagner’s Ring Cycle conducted by Levine. Her teaching career includes positions as professor at Florida State University and the University of Washington. She has returned to Tallahassee, where she maintains a private studio. Guyer’s program on Sunday includes “Sieben frhe Lieder,” a 1907 work by Alban Berg; a 2002 work by Alan Smith called “Vignettes: Letters from George to Evelyn from the Private Papers of a World War II Bride”; “Deit Silvane,” a 1917 work by Ottorino Respighi; and the poems of Frank O’Hara, including “Having a Coke with You,” set to music by Christopher Berg. Admission to the concert is $5; students and children are free. At the level of Patron contributor ($100 or more) and above, free admission is extended to family members. For more information, call 653-8894. There will be a birthday celebration of 90 years young for Elgin E. “Red” Sizemore from 2-4 p.m. March 29 at the First Baptist Church, 46 Ninth St., Apalachicola. Please, no gifts or cards. If you want to do something, do it for the church. Your presence is your gift to him. There will be a book to sign or comment. “Big Red” was born in Apalachicola. His mother entered him into the nursery at First Baptist Church when he was 3 months old. After high school, Red spent ve years in the Navy in World War II. When he returned home, he was in the hardware business for about 65 years. He was a Boy Scout leader for 50 years. He earned his Eagle Scout rank and Silver Beaver Award. Red became a Christian when he was 14 years old. He is still serving the Lord as a deacon in the Baptist church. He presently works four days a week for the local ACE hardware in Apalachicola. He says that “Jesus Christ has and is so very, very, very good to him.” God bless you for sharing this celebration with “Big Red.” Zy’Marion Jh’Kel Williams celebrated his 5th birthday on Tuesday, March 11, with his brother Zy’on Williams and friends in Tallahassee. He is the son of James and Keneidra CummingsWilliams; the maternal grandson of Patricia Lane and the late Bill Lane, and Alvin and Felicia Cummings, all of Apalachicola; and grandson of James Williams, Sr. and the late Sheliaa Williams of Fort Lauderdale. Hugs and kisses. We love you, Jh’Kel! Happy birthday, we love you! Robert, Daddy, Mama, Shellie, Wendy, Trey, Ashley, Taren, Claire and Alaina What a great weekend! Hope you got to enjoy it. The breakfast and the parade and the other events. The gentlemen of Curfew Lodge asked me to thank you again for your support. Had another big crowd at Bingo last weekend, March 7. We play bingo every Wednesday night. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 6 p.m., and I start calling at 6:30 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening with us, why don’t you? Refreshments available. Don’t forget about lunch this afternoon. The doors open at Franklin County Senior Citizens Center at 9 a.m. Chow line forms at noon. Minimum donation of $4 will be collected at the desk. Hope you can make it? I’m sure Sarge and the other faithful volunteers will have a good lunch prepared for us. Hamburgers and chips are the order of Friday evening at the American Legion Post 82, 2316 Oak St., in Lanark Village. Your donation of $6 will be collected in the lounge. Village cleanup day is this Saturday, March 15. Volunteers will gather in the Gene Sewell Park and Betty Roberts Pavilion at 9 a.m. Your monthly sugar x will be ready at 9 a.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Pancakes/French toast, bacon/sausage, eggs, juice and coffee and sometimes grits. Yum! Yum! Your donation at $5 will be collected inside the door. Hope to see you. Later, on Saturday evening, the March Birthday Bash will be held at Legion Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m. Party hearty! Sunday, March 16, we will gather at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Just bring a dish to share, donation and your hunger pangs. We always have a good time. After lunch, we will come to the Gene Sewell Park and Betty Roberts Pavilion and take part in the pinecone kickoff. Enjoy! We will celebrate St Patrick’s Day at Chillas Hall on Wednesday, March 19. We will enjoy Reuben sandwiches, chips, beverage and dessert. The door will open at 11 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. Lanark Village Association members will donate $6 and nonmembers will donate $8. See ya there! Mark your calendars for March 22 and March 29. On March 22, there will be a luau dance and party at Chillas Hall. Door open at 7 p.m. Be sure to bring your favorites snack to share, your beverage of choice and the ice will be provided. Greg K and Krewe will provide the music. Your donation of $7 will be collected at the door. On March 29 at Chillas Hall will be the annual quilt show sponsored by Lanark Wandering Quilters Club. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and Happy St. Patrick’s Day. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Happy BIRTHDAY‘Big RR ed’ SS izemore to turn 90 Zy’Marion WW illiams turns 5 Lordy, Lordy, look who’s 40! Village cleanup day is Saturday JOYCE GUYER Soprano to sing Sunday concert L OIS OIS SWOSWO B ODA ODA | The Times Cathy Bailey, left, and Beverly Kelley prepare garments to be donated to Project Smile. Philaco sews for better smiles UF volunteers spruce up gardenL OIS OIS SWOSWO B ODA ODA | The Times Society

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The Times | A9 Thursday, March 13, 2014 101 NE F irst Street Carrabelle SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Obituaries Clifton Van Brunt Lewis, 94, died in her sleep on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, in Tallahassee. She was the widow of George Lewis II, who predeceased her in 1996, and the daughter of William Edwin Van Brunt, a Tallahassee dentist, and his wife, Lina Clifton Byrd. Clifton graduated from Leon High School, where she was the 1936 May Queen. She was a Kappa Delta at and graduated from Florida State College for Women in 1940, and was married at Trinity Methodist Church later that summer. Since her marriage, she was a member of St. Johns Episcopal Church and Holy Comforter Episcopal Church. Clifton and George had four children, George Edward Lewis II, William Van Brunt Lewis, who predeceased his mother on June 6, 2011, Clifton Byrd Lewis Mashburn, and Benjamin Bridges Lewis. Her other survivors include daughter-in-law Mary Alda Balthrop, her 10 grandchildren; and her 10 great-grandchildren. Clifton may be remembered for her advocacy for peace, people, the arts, the environment and good government. She was the only curator of the little gallery, which she started in the lobby of The Lewis State Bank in the 1950s and which led to the establishment of LeMoyne Art Foundation at its original location on South Calhoun Street. She was one of the founders of the Tallahassee Junior Museum, now the Tallahassee Museum of History and Natural Science, and was the rst president of its board of trustees. Both Clifton and her late husband were recognized by the City of Tallahassee as two of the Foot Soldiers in the Footsteps to Freedom, acknowledging their participation in the local struggle for the end to racial inequality. One of the enduring interests in Cliftons life was her involvement in the arts, believing all children should have the opportunity to see and touch beautiful things and hear magical sounds. Her time with friends and relatives wherever they occurred were most often memorable and usually exceptional. Clifton was never more in her element than when such events could occur at St. Teresa or on Dog Island, which were spiritual places to her for her entire life. In the early 1950s, she convinced George they should meet architect Frank Lloyd Wright, to ask if he would design a home for them. Mr. Wright agreed, and the result was the creation of Spring House, their home from 1954 until their deaths. Spring House was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on Feb. 14, 1979, indeed unusual for a site that was only 25 years old at the time. Shortly after Georges death, Clifton and others formed the Spring House Institute Inc. and charged it with the tasks of restoring and preserving this historic property and converting it into benecial public use. A memorial service for Clifton is scheduled for 3 p.m. Friday, March 14 at St. Johns Episcopal Church, 211 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee. Persons wishing to assist with Cliftons efforts to preserve Spring House may contribute to the Institute at www.preservespringhouse. org, or by mail to Spring House Institute Inc., P. O. Box 10146, Tallahassee, FL 32302-0146. Donations may also be made to any of the other organizations to which she devoted so much of her efforts. Clifton Van Brunt Lewis Charles R. Kelsey, 98, of Monterey, Ind., passed away peacefully on Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, in his sons home in Apalachicola. The son of Dr. Arthur and Augusta (Keitzer) Kelsey, he was born in Monterey on March 21, 1915. He married Mary Helen Kennerk in Fort Wayne, Ind., on Jan. 6, 1940. She preceded him in death July 6, 1989. Charles was a graduate of Monterey High School and earned a degree in forestry from the University of Michigan. He had a strong passion for the outdoors and agriculture, serving on several agricultural boards in Monterey and Pulaski County. He was also a longstanding member of the First National Bank of Monterey board of directors, serving over 60 years. An avid traveler, Charles enjoyed sharing stories of his adventures. He was wealth of knowledge of the people and development of the town of Monterey. He appreciated an audience when recalling historical facts and details of Monterey and surrounding areas. He is survived by his children, Kathleen (James) Hastings, Rapid City, S.D., Michael (Liz) Apalachicola, Arthur (Joyce) Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Robert (Kathy) Monterey, Ind., Martha (David) Shouldis, Seymour, Conn., David (Pat) Lake Lotawana, Mo., and Terrance (Kathy) Culver, Ind.; 19 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; four great-great-grandchildren; one sister, Roberta (Bill) Thomas, Phoenix, Ariz.; and one sister-in-law, Vieve Kelsey, Chandler, Ariz. Charles was preceded in death by his parents; brothers Bernard, William H., Paul, Lawrence and Edward; and sisters Martha, Mary Richter, Catherine Hiland and Ruth Kleykamp. A Celebration of Life will be held May 25, 2014, in Monterey, Ind. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions can be made in his name to Public Television Michiana, Inc., 2405 Division St., Mishawaka, IN 46546, or Habitat for Humanity International, 121 Habitat St, Americus, GA 31709. Charles R. Kelsey William Joseph Luberto, Sr., 84, passed away on Sunday, March 2, 2014, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Willie was born March 26, 1929, in Bergeneld, N.J., to the late John and Rose Luberto. He was the youngest of 10 brothers and sisters. Willie resided most of his life in Little Ferry, N.J., and moved to Eastpoint in 1993, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was preceded in death by his wife, Beatrice Luberto. He is survived by his son, William J. Luberto, Jr., (late Paula Luberto) of Eastpoint and daughter, Catherine Bomzer (Hal) of Ridgeeld Park, N.J.; ve grandchildren, William G. Luberto, (Misty), Lauren Luberto and Michael Luberto of Eastpoint and Kelly Bomzer and Phillip Bomzer of New Jersey; two great-grandchildren, Jadyn Luberto and Will Luberto of Eastpoint; along with a number of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, March 5, at St. Patricks Catholic Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Eastpoint Cemetery. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. William Luberto, Sr. Mrs. Alice M. Walker passed away Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, in Apalachicola. She was born in Apalachicola on Feb. 21, 1924, to the now late John T. and Evanna McIntosh, lifelong residents of Franklin County. For many years she made her living in the seafood industry by picking crabs. Sister Walker joined Friendship Missionary Baptist Church and embraced the Christian faith. She accepted the Lord as her personal savior. She was a dedicated servant and demonstrated her love for the Lord, and loved her church family and many friends. She enjoyed a happy life; her sense of humor, warm smile, and generous nature touched the lives of many friends and relatives. She leaves to cherish her memories a loving and dedicated grandson, Edgar S. Edwards of Los Angeles, Calif.; her sonin-law Adolph Edwards; three nieces, Monica D. Higgins of Los Angeles, Tina Grifn of Jacksonville and Shirley Goldstein of Los Angeles; two nephews, Charles McIntosh of Apalachicola and Larsen Grifn of Miami; special cousin, Bobby C. Martin of Apalachicola, Anna Barnes of Thomasville, Ga., Catherine Gatlin of Thomasville, Nathaniel Barnes of Thomasville, George McDaniels of New Jersey and Thomas and Doris Fain of Richmond, Va.; four goddaughters, Tamara E. Harris, Michele Myers, Carolyn Williams and Vanessa Green; special friend Emma Daniels, Annette Fagan, Kelli Sullivan, Betty Stephens, Essie M. Woodyard, Penny Cates, Fred Brown, Betty Prince, the Simmons family and Teresa A. Martin; and a host of other relatives and friends. Alice M. Walker will proceed in glory along with her husband, Willie Walker, daughter Emma J. Edwards and brother Joseph E. McIntosh. Going Home services were held Wednesday, Feb. 19, at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, with Pastor James Williams ofciating. Interment followed in Magnolia Cemetery. Pallbearers were Charles McIntosh, Fred Brown, Bernard Simmons, Bobby Clay Martin, Henry Brown, Jr., Deacon Clarence Williams Jr. and Larsen Grifn. Honorary pallbearers were Deacon Clarence Williams, Deacon Noah Lockley and Brother Al Daniels. Alice M. Walker ALICE M. W ALKER Karen M. Amison, 45, passed away Friday, March 7, 2014, at her home in Wakulla County, Crawfordville, where she had lived for 11 years after moving from Leon County. She was born in Apalachicola to Kitturah Amison and the late Eddie Amison. Karen is survived by brother David Amison (Theresa), sister Katherine Edeneld (Lee), sister Becky Podnode (Bobby), brother Tim Amison (Ava), and brother Joe Amison (Blanche); nephews Phillip Hill, Jr., Christopher Glenn Cobb, James Cobb, David Amison, Craig Amison and a host of other nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her father, Eddie Amison; her maternal grandparents, Harley Hamilton and Maggie Hamilton of Walton County; and paternal grandparents Elbert Maudlin and Mary Maudlin of Bay County. A 1986 graduate of Apalachicola High School, Karen earned a bachelors degree in early childhood education in 1991 and a masters degree in elementary education in 1999, both from Florida State University. She was employed with the Wakulla County School Board for 22 years. She taught for 11 years at Shadeville Elementary School, where she was thirdand fth-grade team leader, Sunshine Committee chairperson, School Safety Patrol chairperson, Golden Whistle Award recipient, Science Fair sponsor and supervising teacher to multiple interns. She later transferred to Wakulla Middle School, where she also taught for 11 years. Karen served as the National Junior Honor Society sponsor, the assistant track and volleyball coach and was the school-site representative for the Wakulla County Teachers Association. During her years as an educator, she served as a Delta Kappa Gamma committee chairperson and later as president of the Gamma Eta chapter, having been an active member for 16 years. She was also selected by her peers as Teacher of the Month for February 2013. She was a member of Faith Lutheran Church in Tallahassee. Karen loved and enjoyed traveling, the only thing she loved more were her students, many of whom she remained in contact with even after their graduation from high school and college. She considered her students her children, and her interest in their wellbeing extended beyond the classroom. She once wrote, Learning does not begin or end in the classroom. We can learn from students as they learn from us. Visitation is 4-7 p.m. today, March 13, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville, which is assisting the family with arrangements. Funeral services are at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 15, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services will be ofciated by Pastor Joel Russow of Faith Lutheran Church, Tallahassee. Burial will follow at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. Active pallbearers are Michael Barwick, Christopher Cobb, Logan Crouch, Tolar Grifn, Josh Sandgren, and Larry Shiver. Honorary pallbearers are Lee Edeneld, Phillip Hill, Jr. and David Amison. Judie Nell Alford Vause was born April 17, 1945, to the now late Sherman and Katie Crum Alford. She died Wednesday, March 5, 2014. Judie is survived by her children, Deidra Padgett (Jack), Panacea, Patti Lemieux (Mitchell), Eastpoint, Lisa Custer, Apalachicola, Wesley Vause (Linda), Crawfordville, and Corey Vause (Randi), Eastpoint; sisters Joann Abbott (Sonny), Tallahassee, Carolyn Randall (Larry), Utah, and Betty Dowd, Las Vegas; and brothers Lloyd Alford, Apalachicola, Floyd Alford, Crawfordville, and Wayne Alford, Las Vegas. Judie was preceded in death by her brother, Billy Alford, and lifelong friend, Avon Blanchard. A memorial service for Judie Alford Vause will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Highland Park Community Church. All family and friends are invited to attend. Judie Vause Karen M. Amison KAREN M. AMISON WoW prayer breakfast Saturday at Rec The Women of Worship WoW Prayer Breakfast will be this Saturday morning, March 15, at the Sixth Street Community Center, affectionately called the Rec. The breakfast is free of charge and will run from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come anytime for the worship and leave with the experience. Women only, please. For more information, call Carol Bareld at 653-9224. Alice Walker Family To the residents of Apalachicola, thank you for the love, support and assistance given to my grandmother, Mrs. Alice Walker. To the women of the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, who made the daily wakeup calls and the ofcers who visited the house; To the people who made home repairs and the trash collectors who took the extra time to place her barrels inside the yard; To the medical staff at Weems hospital, NHC, and Big Bend Hospice, who made sure she was comfortable in her declining health; To her Friendship Missionary Baptist Church family, and to all her friends, neighbors and church family, who took time out of your days to lift her spirits; Thank you so very much! Edgar S. Edwards Grandson Faith BRIEF Friends of the County Library The Friends of the Franklin County Public Library would like to thank everyone who donated items (breads, soups and books) to their SOUPer Bread and Book Sale held Feb. 16 at the Sea Oats Gallery on St. George Island. There were at least 15 different delicious homemade soups, from vegetable with venison to a vegan spicy black bean, sold by the bowl or the take-home quart. Yummy breads and hundreds of books were also sold. A big thank-you to all who helped to make this event a grand success! Our mission as Friends is to aid the Franklin County Public Library system through fundraising, building projects, program support and community relations. Cards of THANKS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net It might not feel like cobia season, with night temps still in the 40s, but the calendar and the sunrise times both say it is. Each year, cobia begin prowling Panhandle beaches sometime soon after March 1, and the parade continues through late April. Beach water temperature has been wavering around 68, and that de nitely is in the zone for cobia—the sh start showing at around 65 most years, and the prime run continues until around the time it passes 72. The “brown bombers” can be spotted anywhere from 30 yards off the beach to several miles out. Just beyond the “green reef,” the secondary bar along much of the Panhandle shoreline is always a good place to start searching. They often travel in pods of two to six sh, and cruise along just a foot or two below the surface, making it easy to spot them for those who know what to look for. In fact, they look much like small sharks to an inexpert eye, swimming with the same slow, steady tail beat. Beach cobia typically weigh anywhere from 20 to 60 pounds, but far larger ones have been caught in waters of the northern Gulf, including several over 100 pounds taken from the Alabama shoreline, just beyond Florida’s Panhandle — the same sh that pass through Sunshine State waters wind up off Dauphin Island a few days later. The Florida record, caught near Destin, weighed 130 pounds, 1 ounce. The alltackle IGFA record is 135 pounds, 9 ounces, for a sh taken off Australia. Cobia is one of the few species that is exactly the same throughout all the world’s temperate oceans, biologists say. Although the Panhandle cobia shery primarily targets sh cruising off the beaches, the species can be caught throughout the warmer months and into November most years around area wrecks, reefs, buoys, piers and other structures anywhere from depths of 10 feet on out to several hundred feet. Cobia are also noted for following large sea creatures closely — manta rays and whale sharks sometimes attract large schools, so anytime anglers spot one of these denizens it’s worth checking to see if there are cobia hanging under them. Even temporary structures may attract cobia—they sometimes stack up under shrimp boats at anchor, or beneath tankers moored offshore, waiting to come in and unload. Cobia also sometimes join king sh and mackerel in following bait sh schools. They’re typically found on the outer edges of bait balls, while the mackerel clan will be inside slicing and dicing. Cobia look much like oversized remora’s, except that they lack the suction cup on the head. Biologists say they are not closely related, but everything from color to skin texture is similar, plus they share the tendency to hang with larger sea creatures. However, remora’s never attain larger sizes. Cobia tactics Classic cobia shing is sight shing, and there’s no where it’s practiced so frequently as in Panhandle waters from Apalachicola westward all the way to the barrier islands of Louisiana. The sh here show themselves, making it relatively easy to get in front of them and put a bait on their nose. Most area charterboat skippers who regularly chase cobia have their boats rigged with ying bridges or tuna towers, which gives them a much better view down into the water to spot the sh. Add a pair of polarized glasses and a few decades of experience and it’s no problem at all for the average skipper to locate sh frequently. For those who like to chase the sh out of their own boats, it’s smart to set up so that you’re traveling with the sun at your back. It’s easier to see the sh from about 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is high, though sh seen at mid-day have often already had several baits ung at them and may be cautious. If you can spot a sh shortly after sunrise and be the rst to put a bait or lure on it, that sh will often become cobia llets. Those which have been hammered on by a halfdozen boats, on the other hand, totally might ignore your offerings. Cobia eat about anything which will t down their gullets, but they do have some favorite foods. Eels are near the top, and many Destin area skippers rely on these slippery critters to lure cobia in season. Eels are hard to handle and hard to put on the hook, and they don’t cast all that well, but if you can get a lively one in front of a cobia, you rarely will get a turn-down. A tip: put the eels on dry newspaper for a moment to remove some of the slime and you will nd them much easier to get on the hook. Almost as good, and much easier to handle and cast, are large soft plastic eel imitations — those with swimming tails and multiple hooks are often best. Cobia are also known as “crab-eaters,” and that name gives you a clue as to another favorite food; small crabs, about 3 inches across, make excellent baits. Hook them through the outer points of the shell on a 3/0 extra strong short-shank live bait hook. Soft crab imitations like the avored models from GULP! also do the job at times. All sorts of bait sh catch cobia; pin sh are easy to get, durable and easy to cast. Blue runners are another favorite — very durable and active. Large scaled sardines also are excellent, though they’re pretty much a do-ityourself bait since they don’t live well in bait tanks. Ditto for thread ns, which have a very short lifespan but are good baits just after being sabikied aboard. Baits about 4 to 5 inches long are best for cobia 20 pounds and up. Cobia can also readily be caught on all sorts of arti cial lures, particularly when they rst show up and have not been hammered on; a ounce jig with a 5 to 7 inch shad tail often does the job, as do shad-imitating swimbaits like the 1-ounce Tsunami Swimshad. Big topwaters like the Super Spook also can fool them at times. Presentation is everything Presentation is everything in successful cobia shing. First trick is to get the boat in the right position. As in shing tarpon, you can rarely catch sh by motoring up on them from behind. The trick is to spot the sh, then motor in a wide arc around them, then shut down and let the sh swim into range. Quiet engines are a de nite advantage — inboards and four-stroke outboards generally can get closer than older two-stroke rigs. However, those equipped with powerful electric trolling motors on center-console rigs can often slip in very close without spooking the sh. Get yourself into range and put a long cast about 10 feet ahead of them. If you’re shing live bait, just let it sit and the sh often will do the rest. If you’re throwing arti cials, pull the lure quartering away from them and you’re likely to get bit. Remember, real bait never attacks the sh — cobia, like all species, take arti cials best when they appear to be trying to escape. Best tackle for chasing cobia these days is a big offshore spinning rig — these allow throwing lighter baits farther than anyone can manage with even the most skilled use of revolving spook rigs.An 8-foot, mediumheavy rod with two-hand grip and the spool loaded with 30 to 50 pound braided line will do the job. Add several feet of 40 to 60 pound uorocarbon leader between line and hook, tying it in with a double uni-knot. The ght starts late Cobia are very strong sh, but at times they seem almost docile on the hook. If you stick them at a distance, then crank them in without really leaning on them — you can do this by easing the boat close as you reel — you can often have them all the way to the boat before they know the jig is up, so to speak. The other advantage of this “stealth ght” is that you often will get a second or third cobia following the hooked sh — drop a live bait next to them and you will have two cobia rather than one. The ght actually starts when you stick the sh with the gaff and haul it into the boat. No species goes more berserk than the cobia when it hits the deck — the big ones are powerful and actually dangerous — they can knock a man down, sprain ankles and send tackle sailing overboard. The best tactic, if you have a giant ice chest or sh box, is to jerk them directly into the box, slam down the lid and sit on it until the ruckus subsides. This is assuming you want to keep your sh, of course. They are one of the tastiest of nearshore sh, with rm white llets that are good broiled, blackened or baked — I release most species but it’s hard to let a cobia go. The limit is one cobia per person per day, or six per boat, whichever is less. Minimum length is 33 inches to the fork of the tail. There are numerous cobia tournaments in the area in March and April — check out these two for a start: www.destin cobiatournament.com and www.cobiaworld championships.com. FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The Times The annual cobia run into Panhandle waters typically gets underway when water temperatures along the beach exceed 65 degrees, and it’s already at 68. Cobia just around the corner T ENT SALE! BW OFISH.com 121 W Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 POR T CITY SHOPPING CENTER Friday April 4th 6am-6pm Saturday April 5th 6am-5pm Large inventor y of shing items reduced up to 60% off retail Bring the whole Family! Fishing Seminars on Saturday with Rick Murphy and crew from Florida Fishing Insider W eekly (All T imes are Eastern) 6th Annual Our Biggest Sale of the Y ear! WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M ar 13 59 43 10 % F ri, M ar 14 59 49 10 % S a t M ar 15 64 54 0 % Sun, M ar .16 66 56 0 % M on, M ar 17 71 50 10 % T ues M ar 18 71 50 % W ed M ar 19 71 51 % www.apalachtimes.com O UTDOORS Thursday, March 13, 2014 Page 10 SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Local area waters are starting to come back alive with the springtime weather. After rain water runoffs of last week, most backwaters and freshwater areas are still muddy, but producing sh. Trout and red sh catches are on the rise in the ICW canal, and a few anglers are starting to catch ounder again as well. Small Spanish mackerel are holding close to shore and schooling up near the mouth of the St. Joe Marina and running the beaches already with a few sh over 18 inches.

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 13, 2014 A Section FOR MORE INFORMA TION IN FRANKLIN COUNTY CALL 850-653-211ext 123 M A R C H 1 9, 2 0 1 4 K I C K B U T T S D A Y T ogether we can make our voice hear d. Speak out against Big T obacco on Mar ch 19th. learn mor e at cwat orida.com Franklin County Page 11 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks won two out of three district games last week and brought their overall record to 12-5 and 6-3 in the district. On March 4, the girls travelled to Bristol and pummeled Liberty County by a score of 17-5. Sophomore Krista Martina was the winning pitcher, throwing a complete game, giving up ve runs on ve hits with eight walks and six strikeouts. Senior Ally Millender was 5-for-5 with two doubles, ve runs scored, four RBIs and two stolen bases. Junior Calli Westbrook was 3-for-4 with two doubles, four runs scored, two RBIs and a stolen base. Martina, senior Morgan Mock, freshman Scout Segree, senior Ashley Carroll, freshman Allie Kirvin, and seventh grader Melanie Collins had one hit each. “Krista pitched well, we played errorfree defense and Ally and Calli had huge nights at the plate in what turned out to be a fun game and an important district win for our team,” said head coach Scott Collins. On March 6, the Lady Seahawks played at district rival Port St. Joe and lost a tough one, 6-5. Freshman Megan Collins was the losing pitcher, giving up six runs on 12 hits, with three strikeouts and three walks in 4 2/3 innings. Martina relieved and pitched 1 1/3 innings, giving up three hits, with one walk. Millender led all hitters, going 2-for4 with a run scored and a stolen base. Mock, Segree, Martina, Carroll, and Melanie Collins all had one hit each as the team took a 5-0 lead on Port St. Joe, but couldn’t hold on. On Friday, district foe Bozeman played host and lost to the Lady Seahawks 118. Martina was the starting pitcher and hurled three innings, giving up three earned runs on four hits, with four strikeouts and ve walks. Megan Collins picked up the win, pitching the nal four innings, giving up four earned runs, on ve hits, with one strikeout and two walks. Melanie Collins was 3-for-4 with a run scored and two stolen bases. Mock was 3-for-5 with three runs scored and an RBI. Westbrook was also 3-for-5 with four RBIs. Segree was 2-for-3 with a double and two RBIs. Martina reached base all four times up to bat with two hits and two walks. Seventh grader Sophie Kirvin and junior Madison Newell had two hits and an RBI each. Carroll added a hit for a team total of 18 base hits on the night. “The girls played well this week and earning season sweeps over Liberty and Bozeman gives us a lot of con dence going into spring break and next month’s district tournament,” said Collins. New scoreboards for DW Wilson eld At their Feb. 4 meeting, county commissioners instructed Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender to try to obtain additional equipment for Apalachicola’s Donnie Wilson Field in preparation for a statewide Dixie League softball tournament to be played here this summer. At the March 4 county meeting, Millender announced she has secured the donation of three electronic wireless scoreboards needed for the event. WastePro, Duke Energy and Centennial Bank have each pledged to donate a board at a cost of about $3,000 Commissioners instructed Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce to send letters of thanks to the three donors. Big soccer game set for March 29 On Saturday, March 29 at Franklin County High School, the school’s two varsity soccer teams will take part in the Black vs. White Soccer Classic beginning at 2 p.m. This co-ed game will serve as Senior Day, with senior student-athletes honored at half-time. Concessions will be available. “Join us for the last soccer game of the year!” said girls head coach Joe Shields. “The last home game of the year was cancelled due to weather. This is an opportunity to honor the seniors who missed out on their last home game in front of their families, friends and fans.” By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County High School varsity baseball team lost twice last week, falling 12-1 to Port St. Joe at home March 4, and then 14-0 at Bozeman Friday. “This week in baseball we did not fare well,” said coach Aaron York. “Our pitching did well but the other aspects of the game did not do well. We made too many errors in the eld to be competitive. If we ever get all three aspects of the game going at the same time — pitching, defense and hitting — we will compete in the district.” After playing Monday at Munroe in Quincy, the team was off the rest of the week for spring break. They will be back in action Tuesday, March 18 against Bozeman at home. BRIEFS Seahawk baseball has rough week Two wins lift Lady Hawks’ record to 12-5 PLAYER OF THE WEEK Franklin County junior Calli Westbrook went 6-for-12 on the week, smacking two doubles, and netting six RBIs for the Lady Seahawks varsity softball team. “Calli has worked hard and continues to improve her swing and her defensive play throughout the season,” said Coach Scott Collins

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A12 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 98067 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2012-CA-000325 AUDIE E. LANGSTON, Plaintiff, vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT; TANYA SHIVER; ANYAND ALLUKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOW PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1 AND TENANT#2; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA; FRANKLIN COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 22, 2014 and entered in Case No. 19-2012-CA000325 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein AUDIE E. LANGSTON. is the Plaintiff and CHRIS CARTWRIGHT; TANYASHIVER; ANY AND ALLUKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOW PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1 AND TENANT#2; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA; FRANKLIN COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at: THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA 32320 at 11:00AM, on the 2nd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT91, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 760.00 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. From said POINTOF BEGINNING continue South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds East 40.89 feet to a point on the Northwesterly right-ofway Boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway said point lying on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3410.00 feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds for an arc distance of 447.51 feet, the chord of said arc being North 38 degrees 27 minutes 47 seconds East 447.19 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 319.25 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNNIG containing 1.40 acres, more or less. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on February 27, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at the County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1 800 955 8771 or (V) 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service. March 6, 13, 2014 94028T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-CA-412 OLD MAN 2, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. RANDALL W. SCOTT, DAVID SNYDER; if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming bythrough, under or against them; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RANDALL W. SCOTT, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against him YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: Lots One (1), Two (2), Three (3) and Four (4), Block 84 (247), of KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION, in the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with 1983 Mobile Home bearing VIN # KBGASNA323354 & KBGASNB323354/ Title #’s 22540073 & 22540074 AND Together with 1989 Towncreek Mobile Home bearing VIN #BHAL0289SN1395 and Title # 47477399 Franklin County Parcel ID No. 20-07S04W-4212-0084-0010 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs’ attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 5th day February, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 March 6, 13, 2014 94206T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold an auction on: March 22, 2014 at: 10:00 am at SEMINOLE SAFE N SECURE 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: JONATHAN COOPER CANDICE LEWICKI Before the sale date of March 22, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. LISA BAROODY SITE MANAGER March 6, 13, 2014 94202T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: March 15, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Robert Schmidt Rose Messer Dean Lord Before the sale date of March 15, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. March 6, 13, 2014 94322T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2011-CA000359 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes; Franklin County, Florida; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may cGim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, DtVisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated February 24, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2011CA-000359 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 9, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 1983.60 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1128.67 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 380.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 114.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.37 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 381.12 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BUCK STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 114.59 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 381.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561)998-6700 (561)998-6707 11-227263 FC01 CHE March 13, 20, 2014 98047T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROBATE DIVISION File No. 14-0003CP Division__________ IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES WALTER ZALVIS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CHARLES WALTER ZALVIS, deceased, whose date of death was November 23, 2008, File Number: 14-0003 CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal repre-sentative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, March 13, 2014 The Times | A13 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516135First UMC of PSJ is seeking a Director of Children's Ministry Job description can be viewed at psjumc.org. Please mail resumes to PSJ UMC PO Box 266 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or email to fumcpsj@gtcom.net Attention Children's Ministry 1123213ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY: The primary functions of this faculty position is to teach courses in Microsoft computer applications, Business Administration and Management program, Technology Management, and Entrepreneurship and to develop and ensure the curriculum meets local industry standards, and advise technology students for these programs. Minimum Quali cations: Masters degree in Business Administration, Marketing, or Management with Microsoft O ce Certi cations in Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point, or a Masters degree in Computer Science or Management Information Systems, or other related computer eld. Deadline to apply: 3/27/2014Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 6, 2014. Personal Representative: Mary Margaret Oliver c/o Pesetsky & Zack, P.A. 1031 N. Miami Beach Blvd. N. Miami Beach, FL 33162 Attorney for Personal Representative: Elliott Noel Zack FL Bar No. 121727 Pesetsky & Zack, P.A. 1031 N. Miami Beach Blvd. N. Miami Beach, FL 33162 (305) 940-0023 March 6, 13, 2014 98055T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000268 Section:_________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. FRANKIE W. BENNINGFIELD; DONNA P. BENNINGFIELD; DOROTHY L. WALN; ALAN B. WALN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated February 19, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012CA-000268 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 2nd day of April, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL “A”, A PORTION OF TRACTS 2 AND 2-A, COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND RUN NORTH 57 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 1310.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 57 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 577.36 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 100.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 100.02 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 46.41 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 141.83 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 17.70 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 336.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.89 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A 100’ POWER LINE EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY 100.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HGHWAY NO. 98 AND NORTH 57 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1305.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 99.23 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 57 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 61.67 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #Z160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 76.79 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 61.71 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 73.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.11 ACRES MORE OR LESS. THE AGGREGATE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS BEING 1.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 25th day of February, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 March 6, 13, 2014 98077T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000426 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. EUNICE G. MARTY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE GORDON F. MARTY AND EUNICE G. MARTY REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JULY 14, 2005, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE GORDON F. MARTY AND EUNICE G. MARTY REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JULY 14, 2005 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Bay County, Florida: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE MONUMENT) ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FEET HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) 422 FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST, 370.5 FEET ALONG ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING. RUN THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST 200 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST 50 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 200 FEET TO HIGHWAY, THENCE ACROSS HIGHWAY AND ON TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SHORE 50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST TO ROAD AND ACROSS ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 29,200 FEET DEEP ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF ROAD AND INCLUDING THAT PORTION BETWEEN ROAD AND SHORE. LOT 7 IN THE BLOCK BETWEEN 5TH AND 6TH STREET IN EASTPOINT, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE MONUMENT) ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE ONE HUNDRED FOOT HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY TWO (422) FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN SOUTH SIXTY-SIX DEGREES SEVENTEEN MINUTES WEST FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY AND FIVETENTHS (420.5) FEETTO A PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH TWENTYTHREE DEGREES FOURTY-THREE MINUTES WEST 200 FEET. THENCE SOUTH SIXTY-SIX DEGREES SEVENTEEN MINUTES WEST FIFTY FEET. THENCE SOUTH TWENTY-THREE DEGREES FOURTYTHREE MINUTES EAST TWO HUNDRED FEET TO HIGHWAY, THENCE ACROSS HIGHWAY AND ON TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SHORE FIFTY FEET. THENCE NORTH TWENTYTHREE DEGREES FORTY-THREE MINUTES WEST TO ROAD AND ACROSS ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 575 US HIGHWAY 98 EASTPOINT, FL 32328 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before 30 days from the first date of publication service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 25th day of February, 2014. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 JR-13-110753 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861, Fax: (850) 653-9339. March 13, 20, 2014 98107T PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-135-CA ANTHONY CASTELLI, Plaintiff, vs. LORENZO AMATO and UNKNOWN TENANT (S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2014, in Case No. 13-135-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which ANTHONY CASTELLI is the Plaintiff and LORENZO AMATO is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on April 24, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, AND RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 693.5 FEET, THENCE RUN S 3253’16” E, 85.23 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING IN THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2324.83 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLEOF 0153’56”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 77.05 FEET (CHORD BEARING S 5908’06” W 77.05 FEET) TO RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN S 3255’11” E, 200.00 FEET, TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN N 6922’03” E ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 38.61 FEET, THENCE RUN N 7307’05” E ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 40.86 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE RUN N 3255’11” W, 216.75 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: February 27, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 13, 20, 2014 98105T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013CA-000002-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LEROY NOEL, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida, described as: Lot 8, Block E, of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 2, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 15 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A/K/A 1056 E. GORRIE DR. ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 beginning at 11:00 AM ET, on April 9, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 26th day of February, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration; 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; (850)577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 13, 20, 2014 98119T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-300-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JOSEPH CHAD ZINGARELLI and wife, LISA M. ZINGARELLI, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2014, in Case No.: 13-300-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST on April 23, 2014 the following described property: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 289.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 308.56 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A 15.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 149.05 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), SAID POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF 30.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 287.60 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING IN THE CENTER POINT OF A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS CUL-DE-SAC, THENCE RUN NORTH 159.49 FEET ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF 60.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 289.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.50 FEET, THE SOUTHERLY 15.00 FEET AND THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 656, PAGE 745 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: February 26, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 13, 20, 2014 98109T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000056-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY D. DOXSEE A/K/A JEFFREY D. DOXSEE SR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEFFREY D. DOXSEE A/K/A JEFFREY D. DOXSEE SR; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, PREMIER BANK; FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 16th day of April, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida. LOT 20, BLOCK G, LANARK BEACH UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2, AT PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 26th day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H#: 314810 March 13, 20, 2014 98139T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-CP-12 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH FRANCES NASTASZEWSKI, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOSEPH FRANCES NASTASZEWSKI, deceased, whose date of death was July 16, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 13, 2014. KIM NASTASZEWSKI Personal Representative 2900 South Valley View Boulevard, Lot 302 Las Vegas, Nevada 89102 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 13, 20, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j At-Home-Mom, Financial Security, LOVE awaits baby!j Lisa & Kenny j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. Weekly Inside Yard SaleThurs, Fri., & Sat 9am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL83064 to 56554 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofers Hiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to apply Web ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair Diesel Mechanic With own tools, full time position. Extensive light, medium, and heavy equipment experience required. For immediate interview send resumes to Blind Box 3399 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34282890 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL82563 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL82562 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. 850-653-3838 Text FL83056 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL81122 to 56654 Price Reduced Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced, (2) storage buildings 10x20, 10x32 screened back porch, & deep well. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176 GULF COUNTY WATERFRONT LOTBeautiful lot 100+ feet on deepwater side of Wettapo Creek. 800’ deep with existing driveway the length of the lot. We are advised there are two wells (one deep and one shallow). Underground power. Offers are solicited. Call 850-763-7311 for more info.

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County TimesAdvertiser. 1) Reportedly how many U.K. publishers turned down the 1st Harry Potter manuscript before small Bloomsbury (at the time) accepted it? 2, 6, 10, 12 2) What’s the name of the white-colored dog appearing in Scooby Doo cartoons? Ralph, Scooby Dum, Hercules, Mergertroid 3) How much did 1903’s rst 8-count box of Crayola crayons sell for? Nickel, Dime, Quarter, Dollar 4) Carl Sagan was a famed astronomer at what university? Cornell, Notre Dame, Stanford, MIT 5) Which of these is not a Canadian province? New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Yukon, Manitoba 6) How many NFL teams have “bird” nicknames? 1, 3, 5, 7 7) Along with relish, ketchup and mayo are basically the main items of which salad dressing? Thousand Island, Ranch, Italian, French 8) “Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades” got its start in a fuller quote from? Mining, Baseball, Golf, Quilting 9) Of these comedians who was born in Harlem, Georgia? Sinbad, Oliver Hardy, Jeff Foxworthy, Cable Guy 10) What’s the total amount of money in a standard U.S. Monopoly game? $15,140; $20,000; $27,260; $30,000 11) How many times did Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard ght against each other? 1, 2, 3, 4 12) Where did a dance called “the jig” originate? Southern USA, NYC, British Isles, Australia 13) How many knuckles are in a human hand? 8, 10, 14, 15 14) Which is an advanced, sealed tobacco curing barn with a system of ductworks? Candela, Calfrisa, Cantero, Carotene ANSWERS 1) 12. 2) Scooby Dum. 3) Nickel. 4) Cornell. 5) Yukon. 6) 5. 7) Thousand Island. 8) Baseball. 9) Oliver Hardy. 10) $15,140. 11) 3. 12) British Isles. 13) 14. 14) Calfrisa. O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p er t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u nd a nd a r e o f f er i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s D i s c o v er t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o Be a c h P or t S t J o e A p a l a c h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e or g e I s l a nd C a r r a b e l l e a nd s u r r o u nd i n g a r e a s Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times T oday (850) 653-8868 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola Advertise Her e R eal E sta t e P icks 4 51 6 1 2 2 J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 250350 $64,900 St. George Island I S L A N D L O T FO R S A L E H i g h d r y w a l k a b l e l o t m e a s u r i ng 9 0 x 1 3 5 a d j a c e n t l o t i s s e p a r at e l y f o r s a l e q u i e t a r e a o f t h e I s l a n d o n E a s t S a w y e r A ve n u e n e a r e n d o f P o r t e r S t r e e t s h o r t d i s t a n c e f ro m t h e G u l f o f M e x i c o a n d A p a l a c h i c o l a B a y l i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 251282 $1,450,000 St. George Island P L A N TAT I O N B E A C H F R O N T C u s t o m h o m e i n T h e B l u f f s p ro t e c t e d b y d u n e s b u t s t i l l G r e at G u l f v i e w k i t c h e n w i t h r e p l a c e d e c k s g a l o r e 3 B R 3 B A d u m b w a i t e r 2 n d L R s c r e e n p o r c h c o m m u n i t y P O O L i n a p a r k l i k e s e t t i n g s h c l e a n i n g s i n k o u t d o o r s h o w e r s c r e e n e d ro o m 4516121 29,000 # # $ % $ $ ! $ % $ ( $ $ $ & % ($ $ & $ % $ & $ & ( ( $ $ $ $( ( $ $ ( $ % $ $ $ $ & $ $ $ $ ( ( $ & $ 4516490 4516125 4516827 MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com 4516130 REDUCED Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D • 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E NC E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center JOE'S LA WN C ARE IF IT'S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES TREE TRIMMING AND REMO V AL ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INSTILLA TION PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE C ALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO .COM Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, March 13, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Eastpoint rib cook-off SaturdayThe 13th annual Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department Charity Rib Cook-off will be this Saturday, March 15 at the Eastpoint Firehouse on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road Gate opens at 9 a.m. BBQ chicken, rib and pulled pork dinners, pork rinds, apple dumpling with ice cream and more will be served from 11 a.m. until all gone. Enjoy a kids carnival Friday afternoon and all day Saturday, plus silent auction, live music from CR 67, the Liars Contest and more. To compete, or to donate to auction, or for more info, please call George Pruett at 670-9000 or pru911@fairpoint.net Authors in Apalach SaturdayThe third annual Authors in Apalach booksigning, book fair and writers forum will be held this Saturday, March 15 all day at the Fort Coombs Armory. Apalachicola librarian Caty Greene said the program, which is free, gets underway from 10:15 to 11 a.m. with Sharman Burson Ramsey, about research for local historical ction. The schedule includes Adding Place to Your Fiction, with Charles Farley, Dawn Radford, Dale Cox and Ron Harris, from 11:15 a.m. to noon; and Lunch with Storytellers featuring James Hargrove, Kenneth Tucker, Olivia DeBelle Byrd, Gill Autrey, Bill Spohrer, Alice Jean Gibbs and Lois Swoboda, from noon to 1 p.m.. The program continues with Writing for NonBook Formats, with Caron Spikes Myers, Tony Simmons, Sue Cronkite and By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At a festive ceremony Friday afternoon, members of the Apalachicola community gathered to dedicate the citys recreation and community service complex in honor of Mayor Van W. Johnson, Sr. The former Apalachicola High School, given over to the city when the countys two high schools consolidated six years ago, was turned into a bustling facility for non-pro ts, after-school groups, and government agencies under Johnsons administration. With all ve city commissioners, City Attorney Pat Floyd and city staff in attendance, the ceremony got underway with remarks from Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook, who read a detailed proclamation from the city. Floyd then led the gathering in prayer, and in the Pledge of Allegiance. After that, it was time for Johnson to receive the accolade of having a building named in his honor, and he responded with extended prepared remarks, thanking family, friends, supporters, and wellwishers for sharing in the special occasion. Today is a good day and certainly an unanticipated chapter in the journey of my life for which rst and foremost Im grateful to Almighty God. Im grateful for His never-ending grace, His mercy and provision shown during my administration as mayor of Board to consider ballot measure to end direct electionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A school board member last week asked colleagues to consider placing a measure before voters that could end the direct election of the superintendent of schools, who would instead be hired by a vote of the school board. Pam Shiver, now in the second year of her rst term on the board, on March 6 shared with the board a written outline that asked them to consider the pros and cons of having a hired, rather than an elected, superintendent. I basically want to do a study on this, and thats something that has to be done quickly, she said, asking that her fellow school board members begin discussion of the proposal at their April 3 meeting. If a majority of the board votes to place the matter on the November ballot, it would then require a vote by the county commissioners to place the referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot. If a majority of county voters support the measure, it would then go into effect after Superintendent Nina Marks completes her term in 2016. First elected in Nov. 2008, Marks was re-elected in 2012 without opposition. In her opening remarks, Shiver indicated she was moving forward with her proposal now because it was well in advance of when possible candidacies would surface ahead of the Nov. 2016 election. Franklin County has been fortunate to have a highly quali ed By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The old Robbins house, built in 1910 on the historic north side of Apalachicola was claimed by re Thursday morning. The house at 213 US 98 was largely destroyed, but all of the six occupants escaped injury. The call came in at 5:01 a.m. One volunteer re ghter said he passed the house on the way to the rehouse and could see the second oor was already burning. When Apalachicola re ghters reached the house at around 5:14 a.m., the second oor was engulfed. St. George Island and Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Departments also responded to the alarm. Eastpoint Fire Chief George Pruett said the blaze was visible as the departments trucks crossed the John Gorrie Bridge. Corky Dykes and Rena En nger shared an apartment on the second oor of the Robbins home with daughter Delores Marcum and her two children, Emanuel, 6, and four-month-old Tommy. Dykes and En nger said Marcum woke them up at about 1 a.m. to say she smelled something burning. They said they searched the house except for the second-story rooms occupied by William Laine, who owned the Robbins house. They found nothing so they went back to bed. Dykes awoke again around 4:15 a.m. and said the smell was stronger. When he tried to wake En nger, she was sluggish and appeared to be affected by the fumes, he said. Dykes said he then went to the door of Laines apartment Celebrating the greatest generationRosies abound at Camp Gordon Johnston DaysBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The weather could not have been better for this years Camp Gordon Johnston Days celebration. As always, every World War II vet in attendance was designated as a Grand Marshall of the Saturday morning parade. Honored this year was Carrabelles own Curley Messer, a Camp Gordon Johnston alumnus; Bob Franklin, who served in the 29th Infantry Division and was wounded at the Battle of the Bulge; Walter Mallett, a Carrabelle son who served on the Ticonderoga where he was wounded by a kamikaze aircraft; and Carrabelle resident Don MacLean who served in the Army and drove landing craft in the Paci c Theatre. He has volunteered at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum and built a number of the models on display there. Also honored were Pete Hill, who served in Armys 4th Brigade in the Paci c; Bob Dietz of Lanark Village who after getting his fathers permission to join the Army at 17, was stationed in Hawaii when war ended; Mary Britz also of Lanark Village, who was a Navy nurse in San Diego who, about to be married, had her discharge cancelled when war was declared and served for the duration; and Col. Ernest Berger, a retired Air Force pilot who ew P-51 Mustangs. Tony Minichiello, a spokesman for the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, said the head count of veterans was up this year, although a few familiar faces were missing. Buddy Scala, who attended for the last three years, is laid up with a broken ankle and tail gunner Ken Tucker, an Eastpoint native who chronicled his wartime experiences in Crazy about cobia, A10Should superintendent be hired? PAM SHIVERSee SUPERINTENDENT A3 See CELEBRATING A2 Mayor Van Johnson complex dedicatedDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesMayor Van Johnson addresses the audience beneath a sign for the building named in his honor.See COMPLEX A3 Fire claims historic home ROBBINS HOUSE BURNSLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesFire ghters battle to contain a blaze at the historic Robbins home at about 6 a.m. Thursday. See FIRE A7 See OUT TO SEE A3 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13VOL. 128 ISSUE 46

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 a memoir The Last Roll Call also begged off due to health issues. Minichiello said a popular favorite, the 98th Army Silver Wings Band, out of Fort Rucker, Ala., was unable to take part this year due to budget cutbacks. A well-attended gala dinner dance on Saturday night at C-Quarters Marina offered a festive close to the weekend. Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper and her family greeted attendees at the door, and this years queens from the 2014 Miss Seahawk Pageant, together with students from Stephanie Howze Jones class, served up a delicious meal of fried or baked chicken, or ham. Minichiello presented Carrabelle restaurateur Ken La Paz with a plaque honoring him for service to the museum. Minichiello said he has supported the museum with money and food. Hes one great guy and very active in the community, Minichiello said. He said Jimmy Crowder would also receive a plaque for donating the use of CQuarters for the dance. Dressed in cowboy attire, Greg Kristofferson, from American Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village, spun tunes all night long, with several people stepping forward to sing tunes in tribute to the World War II era. Lanark Village magazine publisher Chuck Spicer, and musician Jack Zurawka, sang many of the songs, as they took turns with songstresses Brenda La Paz, Evelyn McAnally, Shirley Cox and Ann Merrell, each of the ladies, dressed as Rosie the Riveter, having helped with serving and clearing tables all evening. The show featured such numbers as Sing, Sing, Sing, If I Didnt Care, I Got Rhythm, Accentuate the Positive, You are My Sunshine, and That Old Black Magic. Highlighting the evenings tribute was the leading of the audience in the singing of the Star-Spangled Banner by Skippers grandson, Devin Daniels. CELEBRATING from page A1 BalloonBouquets51MarketSt.,SuiteA ( 850 ) 899-1588 SAVE15%ONPAINTINGSUPPLIESBringthiscouponinandsave!SAVE30%ONPAINTS&STAINS *Validonretailsalesofretailproductsonly.Discounttakenoofourlistprice.Sale pricingorotheroffersthatresultingreatersavingswillsupersedethisoffer. Mustsurrendercouponattimeofredemption.Cashvalue:1/100of1.Oer excludespreviouspurchases,andpurchasesofgiftcards,Multi-Purposeprimers, MinwaxWoodFinishquarts,ladders,sprayequipmentandaccessories.Other exclusionsmayapply,seestorefordetails.Voidiftransferred,purchased,sold,alteredor duplicated,orwhereprohibitedbylaw.ValidatSherwin-WilliamsandSherwin-Williams operatedretailpaintstoresonly.Wereservetherighttoaccept,refuseorlimittheuseof anycoupon.Offervalid3/9/143/31/14.2014TheSherwin-WilliamsCompany. 30%OFF*(withcoupon)PAINTS&STAINSYOURLUCKYCOLORMARCH931 TolocateaSherwin-Williamsstore nearyou,visitsherwin-williams.com orcall1-800-4-SHERWIN. MONFRI: 7AMTO7PM SAT: SUN: 10AMTO6PMStorehoursmayvary.Seestorefordetails.STOREHOURS:Joinuson LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesBob Durham was surrounded in his vintage World War II jeep by a bevy of beauties including his wife, Ann, as Rosie the Riveter. Riding in back, from left, are Franklin County High School students Kendall Myers, Melanie Collins and Ursula Countryman. Accompanied by several generations of the Lowery family, Carrabelle native Clarence Lowery designed this oat commemorating training days at Camp Gordon Johnston for the Carrabelle Boat Club. Greg Kristofferson, right, and his wife Brenda La Paz, sing as part of the World War II tribute Saturday night. Jacob Hand of Sneads was ag carrier for the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The crowd was bountiful on Saturday night at C-Quarters. Tony Minichiello, right, presents a plaque of appreciation Saturday night to restaurateur Ken La Paz.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, March 13, 2014 David Adlerstein from 1 to 1:45 p.m.; and, from 2 to 3:15 p.m. Franklin County and Apalachicola History with special presentations by retired Ole Miss history professor Harry P. Owens, retired Florida State University professor William Warren Rogers, Michael Kinnett and Mark Curenton. This will introduce Owens newly published Apalachicola Before 1861. From 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. will be Writing For and Outreach to Youth Readers featuring Lydia Countryman, Adrian Fogelin, Leslee Horner, Rhett DeVane, Susan Womble and other youth writers; and from 4:30 to 5 p.m. Lit Map Project, with Caty Greene and Robin Vroegop. For more info call Greene at (850) 323-2305.representative in our superintendent position in terms of the past, and also in the current seat, Shiver said. The nature of this study is to consider options that will allow for a broader pool of qualied candidates to be considered as the CEO of our school system, based solely on professional qualications and leadership skill. Our superintendent has done an exemplary job in her but has voiced her lack of desire to run for an additional term, she said. The process is not intended to undermine the control of the local voter but to enhance the ability to choose the best candidate whose qualications are currently limited to county borders. Shiver noted that any registered voter at least 18 years old is entitled to run for the superintendent post, which this scal year pays $94,071, as per state statute. There are no qualications to run for the position, she said. Presently, 26 of Floridas 67 counties or about 40 percent have hired superintendents, with the remaining 41 counties, mainly the small and mid-size ones, continuing to elect their superintendents. According to a 2012 Tennessee study, only three states Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi allow for local districts to elect superintendents. Across those states, 147 of the 355 districts, or about 41 percent, elect superintendents a total representing less than 1 percent of the more than 14,000 districts nationwide. Last week, the Walton County school board voted 4-1 to draw up a resolution to switch to a hired superintendent, which that board plans to vote on at an upcoming meeting. Shiver said her research of the issue on the internet brought forth both supporting and opposing arguments for a hired superintendent, which she outlined for the board. In her summary of the supporting arguments, she wrote that a hired superintendent would be accountable to the school board and could be removed at any time for failure to meet established goals and performance standards. Some may argue that the elected superintendent is more accessible and accountable to the public. However once the superintendent is elected, only ethical violations or the end of term may remove the individual from seat, Shiver cited. The superintendent is accountable to the school board to achieve common goals. She noted in the supporting arguments that a hired superintendent would be less affected by politics, or driven by a personal agenda. Some districts that have hired superintendents claim that the system is more balanced since the board and the superintendent are not both elected positions, wrote Shiver. The hired superintendent would not be concerned about pleasing a constituent base and not beholden to political supporters. She stressed that hiring a superintendent would provide a larger pool of qualied school leaders. We would no longer be limited to individuals living in district and are willing to or can afford to run for ofce, Shiver wrote. Our CEO should spend his or her effort on student achievement and not how each decision will affect next election. The superintendent of our schools should spend their time working with administrators to improve our school, rather than giving attention to winning an election. Alongside the supporting arguments, Shiver noted the opposing arguments. Generally, hired superintendents have a higher pay scale to include benets package, career development, and perks, she wrote. Canceling contract may result in severance and leave pay. Shiver wrote that a committee would have to be formed to set job description, requirements and contract. A search and hiring committee will need to be established and may result in additional expenses, she said. Lastly, she wrote that voters may feel an outsider is not able to relate to our unique area. The only school board member to speak on the issue was David Hinton, who served in the Air Force before becoming a science teacher at Carrabelle High School. As a retired military person, one of the things Im concerned about is that I dont want us to ever give up a vote for anybody for anything, he said. No one has ever said constitutional government is the most efcient government, (but I do not want) to take away the vote from the public. Shiver replied that some in the community have said it felt like it was unbalanced to have a board and superintendent (both elected). They felt like ti was counterproductive. I think it would be something worth looking into, she said. 139-12thStreet Apalachicola,FL32320(850)653-2111HelenCook,ARNP Dr.IvanBackerman ClinicSchedule:Monday-Friday ApalachicolaClinicTuesday-Wednesday Calltoschedule yourappointmentat(850)653-2111 FloridaDepartmentof Healthin FranklinCounty WOMEN'SHEALTHCLINICFriendly,CaringSta TimesofOperation: Monday-ursday 7:30am6:00pmFloridaDepartment ofHealthFranklinCounty 1065thStreet Carrabelle,FL32322 (850)697-4121 CARRABELLEDENTALCLINIC Accepting: Servicesforchildren: ReneeParrishDMD Apalachicola, he said. Secondly, Im extremely thankful to the people of this great city for their continued support and show of condence not once, but twice, in electing me to the sometimes difcult and demanding task of leading this city. For it has been said of such, Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. Johnson continued by voicing his appreciation to the volunteers who make up our boards and committees for their seless service to this city. The key to our success rests in people like you, who embody the spirit of greatness by saying, Yes I can, and so can each of you! The mayor shared his gratitude to City Administrator Betty Webb and her staff, who each day stand on the frontline on behalf of this city. Ive come to truly regard them for their dedication and personal sacrice in choosing a career path that allow for them to serve the needs of others, for our greatest heroes, are those who forego of themselves for the benet of others. Johnson thanked each of the elected ofcials by name, for their kind consideration in bestowing this great honor upon me and my beloved family. I nd solace in your excellent leadership, your impeccable integrity and your unwavering commitment toward the prosperity of Apalachicola. Let your service be a constant reminder to all of the work we have accomplished as a cohesive board for the residents of this great city. The mayor recalled his fond memories of attending school in this very building. However, it never crossed my mind during those years that I spent walking the grounds of this campus and running in the halls of this building, that I would return 36-years later in an ofcial capacity to receive such a high honor. Its a very humbling experience for which I am truly grateful. Lastly, he spoke of his wife of 33 years, who I was chasing while running through these halls, my most avid supporter. Your faith in me and my love for this community is what propels me each day to continue in this work with hopes of creating a better tomorrow for all. I love you much baby. And he closed with thanks to his parents, the late Abe and Azalee Johnson, Sr. I know that youre both looking down today from heaven assured that the life you led before me and your work within this community has not been in vain, he said. The memories of Johnsons parents was invoked minutes later when Franklins Promise Coalition Director Joe Taylor stepped forward to present the mayor with a framed note from Johnsons mother when he was 17. Taylor said the note had been found among records at the high school. Azalee Johnsons note asked for her son to be excused because he had assisted in taking her husband to the Veterans Administration hospital. During the last years of his life, Abe Johnson, who was blinded by a land mine during his service during World War II, made several trips to the VA, his son said. Also thanking the mayor for his hard work was Faye Johnson, who directs the Project Impact after-school program which is held at the complex. Following the ceremony, guests retired into the school for a buffet lunch and slices of a cake baked in the mayors honor. COMPLEX from page A1 SUPERINTENDENT from page A1DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Mayor Van Johnson shares a smile with Rosa Tolliver at the reception. OUT TO SEE from page A1

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 13, 2014 ASectionSpecial to The TimesNew sex offender laws will be considered in the upcoming legislative session, which began March 4. Unfortunately, our sex offender policies, both existing and proposed, are based on commonly held and grossly erroneous, myths about Stranger Danger and the recidivism rate among registered sex offenders (RSOs). They do not address the real risks to children. We have seen this cycle before; a heinous crime, in this case the murder of Cherish Periwinkle by a justreleased rapist, is followed by sensational media coverage. Feeling pressure to do something, legislators pass new laws that broaden de nitions of criminality, impose additional jail time and add restrictions on all RSOs. These laws would cost many millions and stress law enforcement organizations across the state. Sadly, the proposed laws wont protect children. Our sex offender policies are predicated on preventing strangers from abducting and hurting children. But strangers are not the primary threat. A Bureau of Justice Statistics study nds that 93 percent of sex crimes perpetrated against children are committed by people who are known and trusted within, or close to, the family. The 93 percent are not on the registry, which shows the necessity for better education and support throughout the public citizenship. The second myth underlying our laws is most RSOs will re-offend. All analysis shows this belief is wrong. A largescale, multistate study of sex offender recidivism by the Department of Justice found re-arrest rates among RSOs to be 3.6 percent. This is the lowest recidivism rate of any major category of crime except murder. And after the rst three years of being released, this percentage is even less. Instead of relying on popular but misguided perceptions, our laws should be built on empirical evidence. Our legislators should consult research by such respected organizations as the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers and The Journal of the American Medical Association. They should invite highly credentialed individuals, such as Dr. Jill Levinson at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Dr. Suzonne Kline, a former head of the Sexually Violent Predator program for the State of Florida, and Dr. Eric Imhof, current president of Florida Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers, to participate in workshops. Before layering on new laws, the time has come to conduct a thoughtful, comprehensive evaluation of what we have achieved/learned/ spent over the last 20 years, since the enactment of The Jacob Wetterling Act. The proposed legislation will not protect children because it does not address the source of real threats. The proposed legislation will waste more taxpayer money. And the proposed legislation will needlessly criminalize more citizens. Florida Action Committee (FAC), founded in 2006, is a statewide consortium of concerned citizens and professionals whose purpose is to promote the prevention of sexual abuse while preserving the safety and dignity of all citizens through carefully structured laws targeting the truly violent, forced, and/or dangerous predatory acts of sex. FAC believes many aspects of the current approach to sex offenders seriously undermine justice and actually increase the threat of sexual assault against others, particularly children. FAC opposes a publicized registry of sex offenders and seeks to bring an end to the humiliation of people who have already paid for their crimes. FAC asserts that only by supporting justice for all people offenders and victims alike can a truly safe society be built and secured for all Americans.We need rational sex lawsDo you ever ask yourself that question? I got tired of asking myself that question every month so I followed a plan to record my spending for several months and analyze where my nancial loopholes were. It certainly opened my eyes and reminded me how important it is to know my spending habits before developing a spending plan (budget). A simple no-cost method of tracking your spending is by recording your expenses on paper. Start with a plain sheet of 5.5 x 11 paper. Fold it in half from side and side, lengthwise. Then fold it in half again two more times to create eight sections on each side. Label the rst seven sections with each day of the week and the last section should be labeled totals. Carry this sheet everywhere with the current day in top and make a note of each item you purchase and how much you pay for it. Dont forget youre to record your debit or credit card purchases and automatic withdrawals from your checking or savings account. Keep this paper in a safe place through the month. Complete this exercise for a month or two and then total the expenditures by category in the eighth section. You will have to decide if this is an exercise to be carried out by you or if you should encourage all of your family members to do it. Your decision will allow you to total your total expenses or your familys total expenses. Then divide the expenditures into categories. They might include: groceries, eating out, snacks, entertainment, gas for car, personal (haircuts, grooming, etc.), rent or house payment, car payment, utilities, daycare, clothing (new, dry cleaning or repairs) and other. Try to limit the other category for it is easy to get lazy and put many items in that category. This results on not knowing where your money was spent. After keeping records for a month or two and reviewing your records, ask yourself some questions. Are there any categories that surprise you? Are you spending far more money on personal items or entertainment than you expected? Determine how much money you could have at months end if you gave up eating out several times during a month or by giving up cigarettes. Analyze your results. Set some goals to change some of your spending habits and reward yourself if you have unplanned money at the end of the next month. This is the rst step in developing a sound spending plan. The Franklin County Extension Of ce has many free educational materials and tools to use concerning money management. In addition, our Florida Master Money Mentors offer you free, one-onone sessions to discuss any aspect of money management. Just give me a phone call to access any of these materials or services. As Yogi Berra said, You have got to be very careful if you dont know where you are going, because you might not get there. The UF/IFAS Franklin County Extension of ce has staff and related resources to assist you in nding your nancial direction! 653-9337 is the number to call. Shelley Swenson is the UF/IFAS Franklin/Wakulla extension agent for food and consumer services. SHELLEY SWENSONBy BRAD BUCKSpecial to the Times A computer model developed, in part, by University of Florida researchers can help coastal managers better understand the long-term effects of major storms, sea-level rise and beach restoration activities and possibly save millions of dollars. Researchers used erosion data following tropical storms and hurricanes that hit Santa Rosa Island, off Floridas Panhandle, and sea-level rise projections to predict beach habitat changes over the next 90 years. But they say their model can be used to inform nourishment decisions at any beach. Since the rst project of its kind in the U.S. at Coney Island, N.Y., in 1922, coastal managers have used beach nourishment essentially importing sand to replace sediment lost through storms or erosion to restore damaged beaches, but it is laborious and expensive. Adding to coastal managers headaches, the offshore sand used for such ventures is running short. Moving large amounts of sand onto the beach is costly, said Rafael MuozCarpena, a UF professor of agricultural and biological engineering and study co-author. Certainly preserving the beach has important bene ts for humans and ecology, but as with any management decision, bene ts need to be balanced by cost, especially when sooner or later the beach might be lost to sealevel rise or a major storm. How much is it worth for society to keep the beach longer in a given spot? Decision makers must answer those questions, and the answers wont be cheap, Muoz-Carpena said. UF researchers used their model to nd out how long a beach would last under varying conditions, said Greg Kiker, an associate professor in agricultural and biological engineering and a study co-author. With mean sea level rising, a storm that may not have done as much damage 20 to 40 years ago can do more damage today, he said. As engineers, we said, OK, what can we do about it? UF researchers used erosion data and post-storm nourishment strategies after hurricanes Ivan and Dennis and Tropical Storm Katrina struck the island, which is part of Eglin Air Force Base in Fort Walton Beach. The beach suffered severe erosion after each storm. They also used National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data from 69 major storms over the past 154 years, within about 65 miles of Santa Rosa Island, to construct storm-striking scenarios. Computer simulations of 4,000 storms suggested that without nourishment, a tropical storm or hurricane and sea level rise would reduce Santa Rosa Islands beach by 97 percent to 100 percent by the year 2100. But that loss can be cut to 60 percent with a 3-foot beach, and to 34 percent with 5 feet in sand nourishment, the study said. Muoz-Carpena and his colleagues said theyre not urging coastal managers to pump sand, which generally comes from offshore, onto beaches at any particular frequency. He cautions that the data may be limited by the uncertainty of future tropical storms and sea level projections. The paper is in this months issue of the journal Environmental Modelling and Software. Brad Buck is a writer for the University of Florida. He can be reached at bradbuck@u .eduPage 4 PHOTO BY TYLER JONES | UF/IFASA piece of Florida coastline and ock of birds ying as a storm approaches.UF: Computer model helps with beach nourishmentWant to know where your moneys going? Letters to the EDITORSNew hospital would keep patients, attract doctorsI am writing in response to a letter regarding Weems Memorial Hospital in your Feb. 27 issue (See Weems soap opera: 10 minutes vs. $10 million) questioning the wisdom of bringing the hospital up to date or simply dismantling it and sending all patients to Port St Joe. I must disagree with this assessment based on my 50 years of medical practice in Apalachicola. During this period the county has constructed a 25bed hospital that served the community and Franklin County admirably offering mot only medical care but obstetrical and surgical services. At that time Port St Joe had a 35-bed facility and today I understand they have only a 19-bed facility. So now it is being discussed to let a 19-bed hospital take care of the hospital needs of two communities that formerly had a combined total of 60 beds. Think about that! Most cities are expanding their hospital bed capacity and services, not shrinking them at this date. Over the years Weems not only survived, but made a modest pro t with an average patient census of about 17 under the direction of the hospital board and the county commissioners. If the hospital were to close and thereby requiring all patients to be transferred to out-of-town hospitals, some of them could be possibly be put at serious risk should they develop a sudden or acute medical problem requiring immediate treatment and stabilization before being transported to an area hospital. Patients should not be put in jeopardy in such a situation or from a life-threatening accident. In the old days we tried to do this so that a patient could be safely transferred by helicopter to a regional hospital. A new hospital would encourage doctors to locate in Apalachicola. A family practice physician, an obstetrician and general surgeon would more likely come to Apalachicola and the hospital census would go up dramatically. An active medical staff would be bene cial not only to the hospital but to the community. I would like to congratulate Mr. Ray Bloodworth, the hospital board of trustees and the county commissioners in their efforts to build a new Weems Hospital and wish them every success. Sincerely,Photis Nichols, M.D.Leave No Trace tramples on property rightsIn view of recent letters published in The Times, I think your readers should know that the defeated Leave No Trace Ordinance discarded the United States Constitution, the Florida Constitution and existing Franklin County ordinances. Yes, the proposed ordinance trampled upon private property rights as if they did not exist. Here is what the proposed ordinance would allow: Authorize non-law enforcement personnel without warrant and no distinguishing clothing to enter upon private property 24 hours a day and seize personal property. Allow vehicles on the beach to haul off the con scated personal property contrary to existing ordinances that prohibit vehicles on the beach and in many cases violate the covenants and deed restrictions of private property owners. Needless to say, enforcement of the ordinance would expand local government, increase taxes and, in my humble judgment, have a negative impact on our tourist trade. If I have heard it said one time in recent years, I have heard it said a thousand times: We dont want St. George Island to become another Panama City Beach. Guess what?! That s where the ordinance came from.Willie NorredSt. George Island

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, March 13, 2014 Implants&CrownsAffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.WilliamC.Knapke,DDS,GeneralDentistPanamaCitySquare617West23rdStreet,PanamaCityFL CallForInformation1-888-415-1638 Feeseffectivethrough11/21/14.Additionalfeesmaybeincurred dependingonindividualcases.Same-dayCrownservicemaynot beavailableincertaincases.AffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.Ofce#:(850)872-6155. Great vs.other Dental providers20144-3-T4 SingleToothImplant includingCrownstartingat$1,895Denture Implantsstartingat$1,595LowerArch$1,995 Same-DayCrowns$695UpperArch KindergartenRound-Up (March21,2014-Callforascheduledtime) ABCElementarySchoolforGradesPreK-5 ABCMiddleSchoolforGrades6-8 LIMITEDENROLLMENTEnrollmentpacket:Call,comebyorvisitourwebsite ApalachicolaBayCharterSchool 98-12thStreet,Apalachicola,FL32320 653-1222(phone)653-1857(fax) www.abceagles.orgabcschool@abceagles.org BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 2NICELOTS 12TH&OWEN,$16,500 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 On Saturday, dozens of visitors ocked to Carrabelle to visit a citywide display showcasing local artists. The Carrabelle Artists Association hosted an exhibit at the Franklin County Senior Center. The Rio Carrabelle downtown shop displayed works by Joan Matey and Fred Aman. Artists Joe Klotzman, Marian Morris, Harriet Beach, Cal Allen and Shirley Cox each opened their homes to art enthusiasts. Moores Treasures also hosted a display. A special treat is still on display at the residence of Leon Wiesener. The retired art professor has completed phase three of his bottle house project, a lighted glass arch constructed totally of bottles. Wiesener created the display as a landmark to draw tourists to Carrabelle. Along with the arch, he has constructed a house and a working lighthouse of bottles. Visitors are welcome to the glass structures at 604 SE Ave. F. Be sure to shut the gate to keep the Wieseners two friendly standard poodles safe inside. By LOIS SWOBODA By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com Backers of a plan to create a new Forgotten Coast Fitness and Wellness Center in the former Apalachicola High School are hoping to open the new facility by next month. The nonprot venture arose after the closure in January of the Apalachicola Fitness Center, which was housed at 45 Ave. D until the building was sold to the owners of Papa Joes Restaurant, who plan to relocate there shortly. Ed Aguiar, a member of the proposed centers board of directors along with Henry Kozlowsky, Gary Niblack, Sarah Madson and Jan Thomas, said organizers are working on collecting dues from the original 54 people who committed to pre-paid annual memberships. Our plan is to recognize this group as the founding members, and they will be honored as such, Aguiar said. As of this past weekend, 20 of the 54 commitments for per-paid annual memberships have been collected, and when successful, this will secure the success of the new center. Members are being asked to pay for a one-year membership of $420, a sixmonth membership of $210, a threemonth membership of $105 or a monthly membership of $35. Our goal is to have all funds collected and deposited by Monday, March 17, Thomas said. This will allow us to schedule construction and installation of our own entryway door with keyless entry for members and to get started on improvements to the space. We have all our approvals with the city of Apalachicola and Franklins Promise Coalition in place and will execute our lease this week. Thomas said improvements include creating a pass-through that joins two former classrooms to create a larger space, installing carpeting and replacing whiteboards with mirrors and paint. The idea is to acquire the most popular pieces of equipment from the nowshuttered center and relocate them to the municipal complex at 192 14th St. Members would have exclusive 24-hour access with member keys. Thomas said though the target date for opening is Monday, March 31, the sooner we collect money, the sooner we open. Organizers plan to provide space for April Patriotis to continue aerobic and kickboxing classes. Eric Olson also would be available as a personal trainer. For more info, call or email Jan Thomas 653-1068 or janetina@hotmail.com.From Staff ReportsGuardian ad Litem class offered The Guardian ad Litem program for the Second Judicial District is offering training in Eastpoint from 4:30-8:30 p.m.. March 21 and March 28 at the Eastpoint Church of God. Guardians ad Litem are citizens who volunteer to represent children before the court, social service agencies and the community. Volunteers are trained and supervised by program staff, including attorneys. On average, guardians devote eight to ten hours a month to their cases. To become a Guardian, you must be at least 19 years of age and successfully complete a criminal background screening and the pre-service training program that is completed with in your community. For more information, call Sara Blumenthal, 2nd Circuit Guardian ad Litem volunteer recruiter, at 606-1213 or 445-1121, or visit www.gal2.org.Carrabelle library offers ood insurance helpFrom 12:45-2:15 p.m. Tuesday, March 18, will be a webinar at the Carrabelle Library meeting room to introduce and explain the Community Rating System. CRS provides reduced premiums for ood insurance policy holders in communities that implement programs and activities that exceed the minimum criteria for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. If your community conducts oodplain mapping, regulatory, loss reduction, emergency management and/or public information activities, you could benet from this program. Come learn about CRS basics credit points and classes, costs and benets, where to get help and how to apply. This training is part of the new CRS Webinar Series and will be repeated along with more advanced topics in the coming months. Schedules are posted at https:// atkinsglobalna.webex.com/tc. New tness center plans push aheadLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesLeon Wiesener tells visitors how he constructed his glass art during Saturdays art tour.Carrabelle comes alive with art News bBRiIEFsS As of this past weekend, 20 of the 54 commitments for per-paid annual memberships have been collected, and when successful, this will secure the success of the new center.EEd Aguiar, board of directors

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 ApalachicolaBayCharterSchoolKINDERGARTEN ROUNDUPMarch21,2014Youwillneedtobringyourchild,theirbirthcerticate, SocialSecurityCardandImmunizationRecords.Pleasestopbythefrontofceforaregistrationformandto scheduleanappointmentforFriday,march21stto meetteachers,visitclassroomsandhaveyourchildscreened. OpenenrollmentcontinuesthroughMarch28th.PLEASECONTACTOURSCHOOLEVENIFYOUMISSEDTHEDEADLINE.TheABCSchoolisafamilylearningcommunity workingasateamtoprovideabrighterfutureforourchildren. CONCERTSERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents ALACHICOLA ALACHICOLA AP Fordetailsvisit www.Apalachicola.orgMARCH22,2014 PERFORMINGDixieTheatrePresents SaltwaterMusicwithDelSuggs 8pmWINEProgressivewinetasting hostedbyselectrestaurants 3-6pmARTLocalandregionalartists displayandselltheirwork throughoutdowntown 11-6pmCULINARYAreaspecialtiesprepared toperfection 5-9pm CouponExpires:3-31-14CODE:AP00 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed were made by ofcers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.March 4Chianne R. Russ, 38, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) Brandon D. Robinson, 29, Lynn Haven, warrants for Bay County and Gulf County failure to appear (FCSO) Larry T. Holland, Jr., 29, Apalachicola, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and child neglect (FCSO)March 5Leah N. Page, 33, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and reckless driving (FCSO)March 6Denim M. Johnson, 25, Carrabelle, retail theft (FCSO) Clifton R. Galloway, 25, Carrabelle, Liberty County violation of probation (FCSO) Larry T. Holland, Jr., 29, Apalachicola, lewd or lascivious battery, contributing to delinquency of a minor, possession of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) David D. Hartman, 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)March 7Jerry M. Landrum, 36, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence, and harvesting commercial quantities of saltwater products without SPL license (FCSO) Jonathon C. Stephens, 21, Tallahassee, possession of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Michael T. Allen, 18, Apalachicola, petit theft (FCSO)March 9Rashed O. Brown, 31, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) Brian M. Falk, 56, Apalachicola, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) On Feb. 26, Floridas First District Court of Appeals handed the city of Apalachicola a victory in a suit against the county over the process by which RESTORE Act funds will be administered. The three-judge panel Judges William Van Nortwick, Jr., Philip Padovano and Lori Rowe overturned Circuit Judge Angela Dempseys March 2013 ruling that the city had no basis on which to assert that the county had to meet with them under the terms of Florida Statute 164. This law, known as the Florida Governmental Conict Resolution Act, encourages the resolution of conicts between local and regional governments without resorting to litigation. Beginning in August 2012, both Apalachicola and Carrabelle made numerous requests to the county to meet with the cities to discuss a fair plan for divvying up the countys eventual share of billions of dollars in compensation for damages resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. That total amount has yet to be decided by a federal judge, but is expected to bring into Franklin County several million dollars. On the advice of County Attorney Michael Shuler, the county declined the cities requests, prompting Apalachicola to le suit in circuit court to compel the county to meet publicly with the two cities. In her ruling, Dempsey dismissed the citys complaint with prejudice, which forever barred the city from reling the case. The appellate court reversed Dempseys decision, and wrote that Apalachicola had legal grounds for seeking declaratory relief. The justices noted the Florida legislature intended the Florida Governmental Conict Resolution Act as a means to enhance intergovernmental coordination by creating a governmental conict resolution procedure to provide a method for resolving conicts between and among local and regional governmental entities. The justices remanded the case back to the circuit court, where it will now be heard by Circuit Judge George Reynolds. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Arrest reREPOrtRT Law EnforcementAppeals court reverses decision in RESTO ORE Act suitSpecial to The TimesHelp is here for those people who want to take advantage of the Affordable Care Act by the March 31 deadline. Martin Shefeld, with Florida Health Connector, a large Panama City insurance agency doing marketing for Florida Blue (Blue Cross/Blue Shield), said his group is trying to boost enrollment in Franklin County by holding regular weekly sessions, and two large enrollment sessions next week. The sessions are at 6 p.m. March 20 at the Weems Memorial Hospital cafeteria, and at 11 a.m. March 21 at Weems Medical Center East in Carrabelle. During March, the hospital continues to offer assistance with health insurance enrollment by a Florida Health Connector representative on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Weems Hospital; on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to noon at Weems Hospital; and on Wednesdays from 1-4 p.m. at Weems East in Carrabelle. Because participation is so low here, were trying to help bring people the message about the Affordable Care Act, Shefeld said. This is a very important time in an ever-changing industry. There are now have subsidies if your income falls between $11,495 and $48,000 Florida Blue is the only company between Pensacola and Tampa that is taking part in the health insurance exchanges. We can go out determine what your subsidy is and apply it to a Florida Blue plan and explain how a subsidy will bring down the price and internal subsidies that will help out-ofpocket expenses, Shefeld said. The federal government offers support in the form of tax credits that can be applied directly to monthly insurance premiums. For example, an individual can qualify for credit with an income between $11,490 and $45,960 and a family of four can qualify for credit with an income between $23,550 and $94,200.Help available with health insurance

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, March 13, 2014and kicked it in, where he found Laine sitting on the corner of the bed, which was in ames. Dykes attempted to douse the re with water from a bathroom but rapidly realized it was futile. I threw the bucket on the ames and ran to get my family out, he said. Ennger said the baby was unresponsive when she took him from his crib. She performed CPR and revived him. Marcum said she took both children to Apalachicola pediatrician Dr. Robert Head the next day and he pronounced them unharmed. After evacuating his family, Dykes said he went back for Laine. He said his landlord seemed to have been affected by the smoke and didnt want to leave his rooms. The re truck is on the way, Dykes said Laine told him. It will go out. Dykes said he dragged Laine from the burning room. I told him Im not going to let you burn alive, Dykes said. At 6 a.m., there was a cold drizzle as Savannah Dykes tearfully watched her home burn. Corky Dykes daughter resided on the rst oor of the house with her daughter Layla. Both were out of the house, visiting a relative at the time of the blaze. Im glad we werent here when it started. Im glad everybody made it out but all of my stuff is in there. I guess Ill come back later and look for my cat, she said, without much hope. The cat, Mahi, a male Siamese, is still missing. The Dykes family asks that anyone who has seen the cat contact them. A dog belonging to Dykes and Ennger, and an elderly black Labrador retriever belonging to Laine, escaped unhurt. American Red Cross representative Gathana Parmenas was on hand at 10 a.m. interviewing the residents and arranging for temporary housing. In the gray morning, exhausted reghters stood vigil over the steaming shell as they rolled up their hoses. Fireghter Mark Creamer was proud some of the lower oor was still standing of the home, which was named for a former county sheriff. We saved some of it. Thats a fat lighter house, he said. Those walls are hollow. You can stand in the attic and look straight down to the ground. It creates a chimney effect. The deluge cannons worked great. They were what put out the re. Three blocks of US 98 were cordoned off by emergency workers. Duke Energy power lines running along the adjacent alley burned and fell, leaving live wires for reghters to contend with. By the start of the work day, Apalachicola Fire Chief George Watkins had reopened a single lane on US 98, but the re would need attention for hours to come. Its too early to call the re marshal. Its still burning. It will be back, he said at the time. The State Fire Marshalls ofce said Monday the re is still under investigation. Corky Dykes, Ennger, Laine and the Marcum family are staying at the Rancho Inn, which the Red Cross paid for temporarily. The families expect to receive funds from Laines father to cover a more extended period. Dykes said his family would move into public housing as soon as they can replace birth certicates and other identication lost in the re. They said Sandy Hengle, homeless liaison for the Franklin County Schools, is helping them obtain the papers. Hengle, who spent hours at the Robbins house the morning of the re, was taken to the emergency room and treated for respiratory problems related to smoke inhalation the next day. In their hotel room on Tuesday, Delores Marcum, Corky Dykes and Ennger said they have lost virtually everything. We are so grateful to the people who have come forward to help us, said Ennger. We have enough clothes for the baby. A lady drove down from Alabama to bring me some clothes. A benet account has been set up at Centennial Bank for the family, under the Ruby Dykes. EASTPOINTFIREHOUSE CARNIVALLocatedoneblockNorthofUSHwy98. Cornerof6thSt.CCLandRd. FRIDAY&SATURDAYMARCH14TH&15TH EASTPOINTFIREDEPARTMENT ANNUALCHARITYRIBCOOKER SATURDAY,MARCH15TH BBQDinnersservedfrom11:00tillthefoodisgone.Comeoutandenjoyadayoffood,fun,andmusic withtheFireFighters.Allproceedsgotobenetthe EastpointVolunteerFireDepartment.Formoreinformationortobeasponsor,contactus at850-570-9000oremailtopru911@gtcom.netor visitourwebsiteatwww.eastpointvfd.com. HELP NEEDED FOR FAMILY BURNED OUT OF hHOMEA family left homeless by a March 1 re is hoping for help to restore their lives. A doublewide mobile home owned by Marjorie Marie Wilson was completely destroyed by ames on Saturday morning, March 1. Wilson shared the home at 536 Oyster Road in Apalachicola, with daughter and son-in-law Vickie and Sonny Ray Taylor, granddaughter Dana Taylor and great-grandson Michael Taylor. They are temporarily living in a borrowed camper on the site of their re-ravaged home and are seeking a donated trailer. A benet account has been set up at Centennial Bank for the family, under the name Vickie and Calvin Ray Taylor. Apalachicola businessman Harry Arnold is temporarily storing some furniture and household goods he obtained that were left over from the auction at the St. George Island Chili Cook-off. If you can help, please call victims advocate Clarice Powell at 370-6086. Powell said $500 has been donated to the Taylor family by the Knights of Columbus Bishop OSullivan Council #1648. FIRE from page A1 LOILOI S SWOBODA OBODA | The TimesAt left, at about 10 a.m. March 6, reghters still were struggling to contain the smoldering ruins of the Robbins house. YOUYOU CANAN HELPELPHelp is needed for the former residents of the Robbins house. To nd out how you can be of assistance, please call victims advocate Clarice Powell at 370-6086.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 Sheltonisaveryhandsome Labthatwasleftinthedrop pen.Wecouldtellhehadbeen someonesyarddogandnever spenttimeonaleashorinside. Wehadtocarryhiminsideand althoughittookafewdays togethimleashtrainedand comfortablegoingthrough thresholds,hesapronow!If youarealoverofthebreed andwilloerthissweetboya homethatwillallowhimtobe inside,pleasecomemeetthishandsomeLab! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofouranimals intotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucanspare wouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCounty HumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogonto thewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets. FranklinCountyHumaneSociety SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday Twelve volunteers from the University of Florida dedicated their spring break last week to Franklin Countys schools. Among them was 2012 Franklin County High School salutatorian Adreenah Wynn, who is now studying graphic design on the Gainesville campus. Spring was in the air Tuesday as a half-dozen college students got to work refurbishing the garden at the ABC School under the guidance of Kris Sullivan. The garden was originally installed by the Arts in Medicine program in 2011. She said a second troupe was busy at the Franklin County School using theater to address violence issues with fourthgrade students. Brent Banks ABC middle school students took time off to help with the digging. The fourthgrade chorus, above, put in an appearance to serenade Sullivan and her crew with Counting Stars. By LOIS SWOBODAOn Feb. 20, members of Philaco Womens Club turned their regular monthly luncheon into a mission. Barb Paget, chair of the International Affairs Committee, organized a work day to prepare items for donation to Operation Smile, a charitable organization that provides free surgery for children who suffer from cleft palate and do not have access to medical care. Their medical missions deliver safe surgeries to places where access to surgery might not be available, frequently in the developing world, through the talent of medical volunteers from different countries. The treatment provided by Operation Smile save thousands of lives annually. On a typical international medical mission, 300500 children receive full medical evaluations and 100-150 children are treated surgically. This year, Operation Smile plans to launch 30 such missions, visiting places like Amman, Jordan; Musanze, Rwanda; and Lima, Peru. Philacos volunteers created more than 100 hospital gowns and accessories for children who will receive surgery on this years missions. Paget said she gives special thanks to four volunteers who worked at home on the project for more than a month: Cathy Bailey, Mary Jean Heide, Beverly Kelley and Liz Sisung. By LOIS SWOBODA Special to The TimesThe Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts will present soprano Joyce Guyer in concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at Trinity Episcopal Church. Accompanied by pianist Bianca Lupsha, Guyer has been a valued principal artist for 16 seasons at New Yorks Metropolitan Opera with roles such as Susanna in Le Nozze di Figaro, Sophie in Der Rosenkavalier, Sophie in Werther and Pamina in Die Zauberte. In New York City, she has performed at Carnegie Hall, Weill Hall and Avery Fisher Hall with such notable conductors as James Levine, Sir Colin Davis, Wolfgang Sawallisch, Gerard Schwartz and Robert Bass. In Europe, Guyer spent ve years at the Bayreuther Festspiele as Woglinde and Die Waldvogel in Wagners Ring Cycle conducted by Levine. Her teaching career includes positions as professor at Florida State University and the University of Washington. She has returned to Tallahassee, where she maintains a private studio. Guyers program on Sunday includes Sieben frhe Lieder, a 1907 work by Alban Berg; a 2002 work by Alan Smith called Vignettes: Letters from George to Evelyn from the Private Papers of a World War II Bride; Deit Silvane, a 1917 work by Ottorino Respighi; and the poems of Frank OHara, including Having a Coke with You, set to music by Christopher Berg. Admission to the concert is $5; students and children are free. At the level of Patron contributor ($100 or more) and above, free admission is extended to family members. For more information, call 653-8894. There will be a birthday celebration of 90 years young for Elgin E. Red Sizemore from 2-4 p.m. March 29 at the First Baptist Church, 46 Ninth St., Apalachicola. Please, no gifts or cards. If you want to do something, do it for the church. Your presence is your gift to him. There will be a book to sign or comment. Big Red was born in Apalachicola. His mother entered him into the nursery at First Baptist Church when he was 3 months old. After high school, Red spent ve years in the Navy in World War II. When he returned home, he was in the hardware business for about 65 years. He was a Boy Scout leader for 50 years. He earned his Eagle Scout rank and Silver Beaver Award. Red became a Christian when he was 14 years old. He is still serving the Lord as a deacon in the Baptist church. He presently works four days a week for the local ACE hardware in Apalachicola. He says that Jesus Christ has and is so very, very, very good to him. God bless you for sharing this celebration with Big Red. ZyMarion JhKel Williams celebrated his 5th birthday on Tuesday, March 11, with his brother Zyon Williams and friends in Tallahassee. He is the son of James and Keneidra CummingsWilliams; the maternal grandson of Patricia Lane and the late Bill Lane, and Alvin and Felicia Cummings, all of Apalachicola; and grandson of James Williams, Sr. and the late Sheliaa Williams of Fort Lauderdale. Hugs and kisses. We love you, JhKel! Happy birthday, we love you!Robert, Daddy, Mama, Shellie, Wendy, Trey, Ashley, Taren, Claire and AlainaWhat a great weekend! Hope you got to enjoy it. The breakfast and the parade and the other events. The gentlemen of Curfew Lodge asked me to thank you again for your support. Had another big crowd at Bingo last weekend, March 7. We play bingo every Wednesday night. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 6 p.m., and I start calling at 6:30 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening with us, why dont you? Refreshments available. Dont forget about lunch this afternoon. The doors open at Franklin County Senior Citizens Center at 9 a.m. Chow line forms at noon. Minimum donation of $4 will be collected at the desk. Hope you can make it? Im sure Sarge and the other faithful volunteers will have a good lunch prepared for us. Hamburgers and chips are the order of Friday evening at the American Legion Post 82, 2316 Oak St., in Lanark Village. Your donation of $6 will be collected in the lounge. Village cleanup day is this Saturday, March 15. Volunteers will gather in the Gene Sewell Park and Betty Roberts Pavilion at 9 a.m. Your monthly sugar x will be ready at 9 a.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Pancakes/French toast, bacon/sausage, eggs, juice and coffee and sometimes grits. Yum! Yum! Your donation at $5 will be collected inside the door. Hope to see you. Later, on Saturday evening, the March Birthday Bash will be held at Legion Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m. Party hearty! Sunday, March 16, we will gather at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Just bring a dish to share, donation and your hunger pangs. We always have a good time. After lunch, we will come to the Gene Sewell Park and Betty Roberts Pavilion and take part in the pinecone kickoff. Enjoy! We will celebrate St Patricks Day at Chillas Hall on Wednesday, March 19. We will enjoy Reuben sandwiches, chips, beverage and dessert. The door will open at 11 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. Lanark Village Association members will donate $6 and nonmembers will donate $8. See ya there! Mark your calendars for March 22 and March 29. On March 22, there will be a luau dance and party at Chillas Hall. Door open at 7 p.m. Be sure to bring your favorites snack to share, your beverage of choice and the ice will be provided. Greg K and Krewe will provide the music. Your donation of $7 will be collected at the door. On March 29 at Chillas Hall will be the annual quilt show sponsored by Lanark Wandering Quilters Club. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and Happy St. Patricks Day. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, the homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Happy BIRTHDAYBig RRed SSizemore to turn 90 ZyMarion WWilliams turns 5 Lordy, Lordy, look whos 40! Village cleanup day is Saturday JOYCE GUYER Soprano to sing Sunday concertLOIS OIS SWOSWO BODA ODA | The TimesCathy Bailey, left, and Beverly Kelley prepare garments to be donated to Project Smile.Philaco sews for better smilesUF volunteers spruce up gardenLOIS OIS SWOSWO BODA ODA | The Times Society

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The Times | A9Thursday, March 13, 2014 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService ObituariesClifton Van Brunt Lewis, 94, died in her sleep on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, in Tallahassee. She was the widow of George Lewis II, who predeceased her in 1996, and the daughter of William Edwin Van Brunt, a Tallahassee dentist, and his wife, Lina Clifton Byrd. Clifton graduated from Leon High School, where she was the 1936 May Queen. She was a Kappa Delta at and graduated from Florida State College for Women in 1940, and was married at Trinity Methodist Church later that summer. Since her marriage, she was a member of St. Johns Episcopal Church and Holy Comforter Episcopal Church. Clifton and George had four children, George Edward Lewis II, William Van Brunt Lewis, who predeceased his mother on June 6, 2011, Clifton Byrd Lewis Mashburn, and Benjamin Bridges Lewis. Her other survivors include daughter-in-law Mary Alda Balthrop, her 10 grandchildren; and her 10 great-grandchildren. Clifton may be remembered for her advocacy for peace, people, the arts, the environment and good government. She was the only curator of the little gallery, which she started in the lobby of The Lewis State Bank in the 1950s and which led to the establishment of LeMoyne Art Foundation at its original location on South Calhoun Street. She was one of the founders of the Tallahassee Junior Museum, now the Tallahassee Museum of History and Natural Science, and was the rst president of its board of trustees. Both Clifton and her late husband were recognized by the City of Tallahassee as two of the Foot Soldiers in the Footsteps to Freedom, acknowledging their participation in the local struggle for the end to racial inequality. One of the enduring interests in Cliftons life was her involvement in the arts, believing all children should have the opportunity to see and touch beautiful things and hear magical sounds. Her time with friends and relatives wherever they occurred were most often memorable and usually exceptional. Clifton was never more in her element than when such events could occur at St. Teresa or on Dog Island, which were spiritual places to her for her entire life. In the early 1950s, she convinced George they should meet architect Frank Lloyd Wright, to ask if he would design a home for them. Mr. Wright agreed, and the result was the creation of Spring House, their home from 1954 until their deaths. Spring House was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on Feb. 14, 1979, indeed unusual for a site that was only 25 years old at the time. Shortly after Georges death, Clifton and others formed the Spring House Institute Inc. and charged it with the tasks of restoring and preserving this historic property and converting it into benecial public use. A memorial service for Clifton is scheduled for 3 p.m. Friday, March 14 at St. Johns Episcopal Church, 211 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee. Persons wishing to assist with Cliftons efforts to preserve Spring House may contribute to the Institute at www.preservespringhouse. org, or by mail to Spring House Institute Inc., P. O. Box 10146, Tallahassee, FL 32302-0146. Donations may also be made to any of the other organizations to which she devoted so much of her efforts.Clifton Van Brunt LewisCharles R. Kelsey, 98, of Monterey, Ind., passed away peacefully on Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, in his sons home in Apalachicola. The son of Dr. Arthur and Augusta (Keitzer) Kelsey, he was born in Monterey on March 21, 1915. He married Mary Helen Kennerk in Fort Wayne, Ind., on Jan. 6, 1940. She preceded him in death July 6, 1989. Charles was a graduate of Monterey High School and earned a degree in forestry from the University of Michigan. He had a strong passion for the outdoors and agriculture, serving on several agricultural boards in Monterey and Pulaski County. He was also a longstanding member of the First National Bank of Monterey board of directors, serving over 60 years. An avid traveler, Charles enjoyed sharing stories of his adventures. He was wealth of knowledge of the people and development of the town of Monterey. He appreciated an audience when recalling historical facts and details of Monterey and surrounding areas. He is survived by his children, Kathleen (James) Hastings, Rapid City, S.D., Michael (Liz) Apalachicola, Arthur (Joyce) Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Robert (Kathy) Monterey, Ind., Martha (David) Shouldis, Seymour, Conn., David (Pat) Lake Lotawana, Mo., and Terrance (Kathy) Culver, Ind.; 19 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; four great-great-grandchildren; one sister, Roberta (Bill) Thomas, Phoenix, Ariz.; and one sister-in-law, Vieve Kelsey, Chandler, Ariz. Charles was preceded in death by his parents; brothers Bernard, William H., Paul, Lawrence and Edward; and sisters Martha, Mary Richter, Catherine Hiland and Ruth Kleykamp. A Celebration of Life will be held May 25, 2014, in Monterey, Ind. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions can be made in his name to Public Television Michiana, Inc., 2405 Division St., Mishawaka, IN 46546, or Habitat for Humanity International, 121 Habitat St, Americus, GA 31709.Charles R. Kelsey William Joseph Luberto, Sr., 84, passed away on Sunday, March 2, 2014, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Willie was born March 26, 1929, in Bergeneld, N.J., to the late John and Rose Luberto. He was the youngest of 10 brothers and sisters. Willie resided most of his life in Little Ferry, N.J., and moved to Eastpoint in 1993, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was preceded in death by his wife, Beatrice Luberto. He is survived by his son, William J. Luberto, Jr., (late Paula Luberto) of Eastpoint and daughter, Catherine Bomzer (Hal) of Ridgeeld Park, N.J.; ve grandchildren, William G. Luberto, (Misty), Lauren Luberto and Michael Luberto of Eastpoint and Kelly Bomzer and Phillip Bomzer of New Jersey; two great-grandchildren, Jadyn Luberto and Will Luberto of Eastpoint; along with a number of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, March 5, at St. Patricks Catholic Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Eastpoint Cemetery. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.William Luberto, Sr.Mrs. Alice M. Walker passed away Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, in Apalachicola. She was born in Apalachicola on Feb. 21, 1924, to the now late John T. and Evanna McIntosh, lifelong residents of Franklin County. For many years she made her living in the seafood industry by picking crabs. Sister Walker joined Friendship Missionary Baptist Church and embraced the Christian faith. She accepted the Lord as her personal savior. She was a dedicated servant and demonstrated her love for the Lord, and loved her church family and many friends. She enjoyed a happy life; her sense of humor, warm smile, and generous nature touched the lives of many friends and relatives. She leaves to cherish her memories a loving and dedicated grandson, Edgar S. Edwards of Los Angeles, Calif.; her sonin-law Adolph Edwards; three nieces, Monica D. Higgins of Los Angeles, Tina Grifn of Jacksonville and Shirley Goldstein of Los Angeles; two nephews, Charles McIntosh of Apalachicola and Larsen Grifn of Miami; special cousin, Bobby C. Martin of Apalachicola, Anna Barnes of Thomasville, Ga., Catherine Gatlin of Thomasville, Nathaniel Barnes of Thomasville, George McDaniels of New Jersey and Thomas and Doris Fain of Richmond, Va.; four goddaughters, Tamara E. Harris, Michele Myers, Carolyn Williams and Vanessa Green; special friend Emma Daniels, Annette Fagan, Kelli Sullivan, Betty Stephens, Essie M. Woodyard, Penny Cates, Fred Brown, Betty Prince, the Simmons family and Teresa A. Martin; and a host of other relatives and friends. Alice M. Walker will proceed in glory along with her husband, Willie Walker, daughter Emma J. Edwards and brother Joseph E. McIntosh. Going Home services were held Wednesday, Feb. 19, at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, with Pastor James Williams ofciating. Interment followed in Magnolia Cemetery. Pallbearers were Charles McIntosh, Fred Brown, Bernard Simmons, Bobby Clay Martin, Henry Brown, Jr., Deacon Clarence Williams Jr. and Larsen Grifn. Honorary pallbearers were Deacon Clarence Williams, Deacon Noah Lockley and Brother Al Daniels.Alice M. Walker AlLIcCE M. Walk ALKErRKaren M. Amison, 45, passed away Friday, March 7, 2014, at her home in Wakulla County, Crawfordville, where she had lived for 11 years after moving from Leon County. She was born in Apalachicola to Kitturah Amison and the late Eddie Amison. Karen is survived by brother David Amison (Theresa), sister Katherine Edeneld (Lee), sister Becky Podnode (Bobby), brother Tim Amison (Ava), and brother Joe Amison (Blanche); nephews Phillip Hill, Jr., Christopher Glenn Cobb, James Cobb, David Amison, Craig Amison and a host of other nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her father, Eddie Amison; her maternal grandparents, Harley Hamilton and Maggie Hamilton of Walton County; and paternal grandparents Elbert Maudlin and Mary Maudlin of Bay County. A 1986 graduate of Apalachicola High School, Karen earned a bachelors degree in early childhood education in 1991 and a masters degree in elementary education in 1999, both from Florida State University. She was employed with the Wakulla County School Board for 22 years. She taught for 11 years at Shadeville Elementary School, where she was thirdand fth-grade team leader, Sunshine Committee chairperson, School Safety Patrol chairperson, Golden Whistle Award recipient, Science Fair sponsor and supervising teacher to multiple interns. She later transferred to Wakulla Middle School, where she also taught for 11 years. Karen served as the National Junior Honor Society sponsor, the assistant track and volleyball coach and was the school-site representative for the Wakulla County Teachers Association. During her years as an educator, she served as a Delta Kappa Gamma committee chairperson and later as president of the Gamma Eta chapter, having been an active member for 16 years. She was also selected by her peers as Teacher of the Month for February 2013. She was a member of Faith Lutheran Church in Tallahassee. Karen loved and enjoyed traveling, the only thing she loved more were her students, many of whom she remained in contact with even after their graduation from high school and college. She considered her students her children, and her interest in their wellbeing extended beyond the classroom. She once wrote, Learning does not begin or end in the classroom. We can learn from students as they learn from us. Visitation is 4-7 p.m. today, March 13, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville, which is assisting the family with arrangements. Funeral services are at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 15, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services will be ofciated by Pastor Joel Russow of Faith Lutheran Church, Tallahassee. Burial will follow at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. Active pallbearers are Michael Barwick, Christopher Cobb, Logan Crouch, Tolar Grifn, Josh Sandgren, and Larry Shiver. Honorary pallbearers are Lee Edeneld, Phillip Hill, Jr. and David Amison. Judie Nell Alford Vause was born April 17, 1945, to the now late Sherman and Katie Crum Alford. She died Wednesday, March 5, 2014. Judie is survived by her children, Deidra Padgett (Jack), Panacea, Patti Lemieux (Mitchell), Eastpoint, Lisa Custer, Apalachicola, Wesley Vause (Linda), Crawfordville, and Corey Vause (Randi), Eastpoint; sisters Joann Abbott (Sonny), Tallahassee, Carolyn Randall (Larry), Utah, and Betty Dowd, Las Vegas; and brothers Lloyd Alford, Apalachicola, Floyd Alford, Crawfordville, and Wayne Alford, Las Vegas. Judie was preceded in death by her brother, Billy Alford, and lifelong friend, Avon Blanchard. A memorial service for Judie Alford Vause will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Highland Park Community Church. All family and friends are invited to attend.Judie Vause Karen M. Amison KarAREN M. AmMIsSONWoW prayer breakfast Saturday at RecThe Women of Worship WoW Prayer Breakfast will be this Saturday morning, March 15, at the Sixth Street Community Center, affectionately called the Rec. The breakfast is free of charge and will run from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come anytime for the worship and leave with the experience. Women only, please. For more information, call Carol Bareld at 653-9224.Alice Walker FamilyTo the residents of Apalachicola, thank you for the love, support and assistance given to my grandmother, Mrs. Alice Walker. To the women of the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, who made the daily wakeup calls and the ofcers who visited the house; To the people who made home repairs and the trash collectors who took the extra time to place her barrels inside the yard; To the medical staff at Weems hospital, NHC, and Big Bend Hospice, who made sure she was comfortable in her declining health; To her Friendship Missionary Baptist Church family, and to all her friends, neighbors and church family, who took time out of your days to lift her spirits; Thank you so very much!Edgar S. EdwardsGrandson Faith brBRIEfFFriends of the County LibraryThe Friends of the Franklin County Public Library would like to thank everyone who donated items (breads, soups and books) to their SOUPer Bread and Book Sale held Feb. 16 at the Sea Oats Gallery on St. George Island. There were at least 15 different delicious homemade soups, from vegetable with venison to a vegan spicy black bean, sold by the bowl or the take-home quart. Yummy breads and hundreds of books were also sold. A big thank-you to all who helped to make this event a grand success! Our mission as Friends is to aid the Franklin County Public Library system through fundraising, building projects, program support and community relations. Cards of THaANksKS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .comwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net It might not feel like cobia season, with night temps still in the 40s, but the calendar and the sunrise times both say it is. Each year, cobia begin prowling Panhandle beaches sometime soon after March 1, and the parade continues through late April. Beach water temperature has been wavering around 68, and that de nitely is in the zone for cobiathe sh start showing at around 65 most years, and the prime run continues until around the time it passes 72. The brown bombers can be spotted anywhere from 30 yards off the beach to several miles out. Just beyond the green reef, the secondary bar along much of the Panhandle shoreline is always a good place to start searching. They often travel in pods of two to six sh, and cruise along just a foot or two below the surface, making it easy to spot them for those who know what to look for. In fact, they look much like small sharks to an inexpert eye, swimming with the same slow, steady tail beat. Beach cobia typically weigh anywhere from 20 to 60 pounds, but far larger ones have been caught in waters of the northern Gulf, including several over 100 pounds taken from the Alabama shoreline, just beyond Floridas Panhandle the same sh that pass through Sunshine State waters wind up off Dauphin Island a few days later. The Florida record, caught near Destin, weighed 130 pounds, 1 ounce. The alltackle IGFA record is 135 pounds, 9 ounces, for a sh taken off Australia. Cobia is one of the few species that is exactly the same throughout all the worlds temperate oceans, biologists say. Although the Panhandle cobia shery primarily targets sh cruising off the beaches, the species can be caught throughout the warmer months and into November most years around area wrecks, reefs, buoys, piers and other structures anywhere from depths of 10 feet on out to several hundred feet. Cobia are also noted for following large sea creatures closely manta rays and whale sharks sometimes attract large schools, so anytime anglers spot one of these denizens its worth checking to see if there are cobia hanging under them. Even temporary structures may attract cobiathey sometimes stack up under shrimp boats at anchor, or beneath tankers moored offshore, waiting to come in and unload. Cobia also sometimes join king sh and mackerel in following bait sh schools. Theyre typically found on the outer edges of bait balls, while the mackerel clan will be inside slicing and dicing. Cobia look much like oversized remoras, except that they lack the suction cup on the head. Biologists say they are not closely related, but everything from color to skin texture is similar, plus they share the tendency to hang with larger sea creatures. However, remoras never attain larger sizes. Cobia tacticsClassic cobia shing is sight shing, and theres no where its practiced so frequently as in Panhandle waters from Apalachicola westward all the way to the barrier islands of Louisiana. The sh here show themselves, making it relatively easy to get in front of them and put a bait on their nose. Most area charterboat skippers who regularly chase cobia have their boats rigged with ying bridges or tuna towers, which gives them a much better view down into the water to spot the sh. Add a pair of polarized glasses and a few decades of experience and its no problem at all for the average skipper to locate sh frequently. For those who like to chase the sh out of their own boats, its smart to set up so that youre traveling with the sun at your back. Its easier to see the sh from about 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is high, though sh seen at mid-day have often already had several baits ung at them and may be cautious. If you can spot a sh shortly after sunrise and be the rst to put a bait or lure on it, that sh will often become cobia llets. Those which have been hammered on by a halfdozen boats, on the other hand, totally might ignore your offerings. Cobia eat about anything which will t down their gullets, but they do have some favorite foods. Eels are near the top, and many Destin area skippers rely on these slippery critters to lure cobia in season. Eels are hard to handle and hard to put on the hook, and they dont cast all that well, but if you can get a lively one in front of a cobia, you rarely will get a turn-down. A tip: put the eels on dry newspaper for a moment to remove some of the slime and you will nd them much easier to get on the hook. Almost as good, and much easier to handle and cast, are large soft plastic eel imitations those with swimming tails and multiple hooks are often best. Cobia are also known as crab-eaters, and that name gives you a clue as to another favorite food; small crabs, about 3 inches across, make excellent baits. Hook them through the outer points of the shell on a 3/0 extra strong short-shank live bait hook. Soft crab imitations like the avored models from GULP! also do the job at times. All sorts of bait sh catch cobia; pin sh are easy to get, durable and easy to cast. Blue runners are another favorite very durable and active. Large scaled sardines also are excellent, though theyre pretty much a do-ityourself bait since they dont live well in bait tanks. Ditto for thread ns, which have a very short lifespan but are good baits just after being sabikied aboard. Baits about 4 to 5 inches long are best for cobia 20 pounds and up. Cobia can also readily be caught on all sorts of arti cial lures, particularly when they rst show up and have not been hammered on; a ounce jig with a 5 to 7 inch shad tail often does the job, as do shad-imitating swimbaits like the 1-ounce Tsunami Swimshad. Big topwaters like the Super Spook also can fool them at times.Presentation is everythingPresentation is everything in successful cobia shing. First trick is to get the boat in the right position. As in shing tarpon, you can rarely catch sh by motoring up on them from behind. The trick is to spot the sh, then motor in a wide arc around them, then shut down and let the sh swim into range. Quiet engines are a de nite advantage inboards and four-stroke outboards generally can get closer than older two-stroke rigs. However, those equipped with powerful electric trolling motors on center-console rigs can often slip in very close without spooking the sh. Get yourself into range and put a long cast about 10 feet ahead of them. If youre shing live bait, just let it sit and the sh often will do the rest. If youre throwing arti cials, pull the lure quartering away from them and youre likely to get bit. Remember, real bait never attacks the sh cobia, like all species, take arti cials best when they appear to be trying to escape. Best tackle for chasing cobia these days is a big offshore spinning rig these allow throwing lighter baits farther than anyone can manage with even the most skilled use of revolving spook rigs.An 8-foot, mediumheavy rod with two-hand grip and the spool loaded with 30 to 50 pound braided line will do the job. Add several feet of 40 to 60 pound uorocarbon leader between line and hook, tying it in with a double uni-knot.The ght starts lateCobia are very strong sh, but at times they seem almost docile on the hook. If you stick them at a distance, then crank them in without really leaning on them you can do this by easing the boat close as you reel you can often have them all the way to the boat before they know the jig is up, so to speak. The other advantage of this stealth ght is that you often will get a second or third cobia following the hooked sh drop a live bait next to them and you will have two cobia rather than one. The ght actually starts when you stick the sh with the gaff and haul it into the boat. No species goes more berserk than the cobia when it hits the deck the big ones are powerful and actually dangerous they can knock a man down, sprain ankles and send tackle sailing overboard. The best tactic, if you have a giant ice chest or sh box, is to jerk them directly into the box, slam down the lid and sit on it until the ruckus subsides. This is assuming you want to keep your sh, of course. They are one of the tastiest of nearshore sh, with rm white llets that are good broiled, blackened or baked I release most species but its hard to let a cobia go. The limit is one cobia per person per day, or six per boat, whichever is less. Minimum length is 33 inches to the fork of the tail. There are numerous cobia tournaments in the area in March and April check out these two for a start: www.destin cobiatournament.com and www.cobiaworld championships.com. FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The TimesThe annual cobia run into Panhandle waters typically gets underway when water temperatures along the beach exceed 65 degrees, and its already at 68. Cobia just around the corner TENTSALE!BWOFISH.com121WHwy98,PortSt.Joe,FL32456 PORTCITYSHOPPINGCENTERFriday,April4th6am-6pm Saturday,April5th6am-5pmLargeinventoryofshingitems reducedupto60%offretail BringthewholeFamily! FishingSeminarsonSaturdaywith RickMurphyandcrewfrom FloridaFishingInsiderWeekly(AllTimesareEastern) 6thAnnual OurBiggest Saleofthe Year! WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Mar.1359 4310% Fri,Mar.1459 4910% Sat,Mar.1564 54 0% Sun,Mar.1666 56 0% Mon,Mar.1771 5010% Tues,Mar.1871 50 -% Wed,Mar.1971 51 -% www.apalachtimes.com OUTDOORS Thursday, March 13, 2014 Page 10SPONSORED BY Inshore/BayLocal area waters are starting to come back alive with the springtime weather. After rain water runoffs of last week, most backwaters and freshwater areas are still muddy, but producing sh. Trout and red sh catches are on the rise in the ICW canal, and a few anglers are starting to catch ounder again as well. Small Spanish mackerel are holding close to shore and schooling up near the mouth of the St. Joe Marina and running the beaches already with a few sh over 18 inches.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 13, 2014 ASection FORMOREINFORMATIONINFRANKLINCOUNTYCALL 850-653-211-ext123 M A R C H 1 9, 2 0 1 4K I C K B U T T S D A Y Togetherwecanmakeourvoiceheard. SpeakoutagainstBigTobaccoonMarch19th.learnmoreatcwatorida.comFranklinCounty Page 11By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks won two out of three district games last week and brought their overall record to 12-5 and 6-3 in the district. On March 4, the girls travelled to Bristol and pummeled Liberty County by a score of 17-5. Sophomore Krista Martina was the winning pitcher, throwing a complete game, giving up ve runs on ve hits with eight walks and six strikeouts. Senior Ally Millender was 5-for-5 with two doubles, ve runs scored, four RBIs and two stolen bases. Junior Calli Westbrook was 3-for-4 with two doubles, four runs scored, two RBIs and a stolen base. Martina, senior Morgan Mock, freshman Scout Segree, senior Ashley Carroll, freshman Allie Kirvin, and seventh grader Melanie Collins had one hit each. Krista pitched well, we played errorfree defense and Ally and Calli had huge nights at the plate in what turned out to be a fun game and an important district win for our team, said head coach Scott Collins. On March 6, the Lady Seahawks played at district rival Port St. Joe and lost a tough one, 6-5. Freshman Megan Collins was the losing pitcher, giving up six runs on 12 hits, with three strikeouts and three walks in 4 2/3 innings. Martina relieved and pitched 1 1/3 innings, giving up three hits, with one walk. Millender led all hitters, going 2-for4 with a run scored and a stolen base. Mock, Segree, Martina, Carroll, and Melanie Collins all had one hit each as the team took a 5-0 lead on Port St. Joe, but couldnt hold on. On Friday, district foe Bozeman played host and lost to the Lady Seahawks 118. Martina was the starting pitcher and hurled three innings, giving up three earned runs on four hits, with four strikeouts and ve walks. Megan Collins picked up the win, pitching the nal four innings, giving up four earned runs, on ve hits, with one strikeout and two walks. Melanie Collins was 3-for-4 with a run scored and two stolen bases. Mock was 3-for-5 with three runs scored and an RBI. Westbrook was also 3-for-5 with four RBIs. Segree was 2-for-3 with a double and two RBIs. Martina reached base all four times up to bat with two hits and two walks. Seventh grader Sophie Kirvin and junior Madison Newell had two hits and an RBI each. Carroll added a hit for a team total of 18 base hits on the night. The girls played well this week and earning season sweeps over Liberty and Bozeman gives us a lot of con dence going into spring break and next months district tournament, said Collins.New scoreboards for DW Wilson eldAt their Feb. 4 meeting, county commissioners instructed Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender to try to obtain additional equipment for Apalachicolas Donnie Wilson Field in preparation for a statewide Dixie League softball tournament to be played here this summer. At the March 4 county meeting, Millender announced she has secured the donation of three electronic wireless scoreboards needed for the event. WastePro, Duke Energy and Centennial Bank have each pledged to donate a board at a cost of about $3,000 Commissioners instructed Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce to send letters of thanks to the three donors.Big soccer game set for March 29On Saturday, March 29 at Franklin County High School, the schools two varsity soccer teams will take part in the Black vs. White Soccer Classic beginning at 2 p.m. This co-ed game will serve as Senior Day, with senior student-athletes honored at half-time. Concessions will be available. Join us for the last soccer game of the year! said girls head coach Joe Shields. The last home game of the year was cancelled due to weather. This is an opportunity to honor the seniors who missed out on their last home game in front of their families, friends and fans.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County High School varsity baseball team lost twice last week, falling 12-1 to Port St. Joe at home March 4, and then 14-0 at Bozeman Friday. This week in baseball we did not fare well, said coach Aaron York. Our pitching did well but the other aspects of the game did not do well. We made too many errors in the eld to be competitive. If we ever get all three aspects of the game going at the same time pitching, defense and hitting we will compete in the district. After playing Monday at Munroe in Quincy, the team was off the rest of the week for spring break. They will be back in action Tuesday, March 18 against Bozeman at home. BRIEFS Seahawk baseball has rough week Two wins lift Lady Hawks record to 12-5 PLAYER OF THE WEEKFranklin County junior Calli Westbrook went 6-for-12 on the week, smacking two doubles, and netting six RBIs for the Lady Seahawks varsity softball team. Calli has worked hard and continues to improve her swing and her defensive play throughout the season, said Coach Scott Collins

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 98067 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2012-CA-000325 AUDIE E. LANGSTON, Plaintiff, vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT; TANYA SHIVER; ANYAND ALLUKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOW PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1 AND TENANT#2; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA; FRANKLIN COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 22, 2014 and entered in Case No. 19-2012-CA000325 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein AUDIE E. LANGSTON. is the Plaintiff and CHRIS CARTWRIGHT; TANYASHIVER; ANY AND ALLUKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOW PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1 AND TENANT#2; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA; FRANKLIN COUNTYBOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at: THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA 32320 at 11:00AM, on the 2nd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT91, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 760.00 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNING. From said POINTOF BEGINNING continue South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds East 40.89 feet to a point on the Northwesterly right-ofway Boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway said point lying on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3410.00 feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds for an arc distance of 447.51 feet, the chord of said arc being North 38 degrees 27 minutes 47 seconds East 447.19 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 319.25 feet to the POINTOF BEGINNNIG containing 1.40 acres, more or less. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on February 27, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at the County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1 800 955 8771 or (V) 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service. March 6, 13, 2014 94028T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-CA-412 OLD MAN 2, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. RANDALL W. SCOTT, DAVID SNYDER; if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming bythrough, under or against them; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RANDALL W. SCOTT, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against him YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: Lots One (1), Two (2), Three (3) and Four (4), Block 84 (247), of KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION, in the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with 1983 Mobile Home bearing VIN # KBGASNA323354 & KBGASNB323354/ Title #s 22540073 & 22540074 AND Together with 1989 Towncreek Mobile Home bearing VIN #BHAL0289SN1395 and Title # 47477399 Franklin County Parcel ID No. 20-07S04W-4212-0084-0010 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 5th day February, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 March 6, 13, 2014 94206T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold an auction on: March 22, 2014 at: 10:00 am at SEMINOLE SAFE N SECURE 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: JONATHAN COOPER CANDICE LEWICKI Before the sale date of March 22, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. LISA BAROODY SITE MANAGER March 6, 13, 2014 94202T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: March 15, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Robert Schmidt Rose Messer Dean Lord Before the sale date of March 15, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. March 6, 13, 2014 94322T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2011-CA000359 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes; Franklin County, Florida; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may cGim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, DtVisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated February 24, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2011CA-000359 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James R. Serrato a/k/a James Serrato and Kellie A. Estes a/k/a Kellie Estes are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON 33 MARKET STREET, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 9, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 1983.60 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1128.67 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 380.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 114.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 114.37 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 381.12 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BUCK STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 114.59 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 381.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561)998-6700 (561)998-6707 11-227263 FC01 CHE March 13, 20, 2014 98047T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROBATE DIVISION File No. 14-0003CP Division__________ IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES WALTER ZALVIS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CHARLES WALTER ZALVIS, deceased, whose date of death was November 23, 2008, File Number: 14-0003 CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal repre-sentatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 13, 2014 The Times | A13 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516135First UMC of PSJ is seeking a Director of Children's Ministry Job description can be viewed at psjumc.org. Please mail resumes to PSJ UMC PO Box 266 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or email to fumcpsj@gtcom.net Attention Children's Ministry 1123213ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY: The primary functions of this faculty position is to teach courses in Microsoft computer applications, Business Administration and Management program, Technology Management, and Entrepreneurship and to develop and ensure the curriculum meets local industry standards, and advise technology students for these programs. Minimum Quali cations: Masters degree in Business Administration, Marketing, or Management with Microsoft O ce Certi cations in Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point, or a Masters degree in Computer Science or Management Information Systems, or other related computer eld. Deadline to apply: 3/27/2014Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 6, 2014. Personal Representative: Mary Margaret Oliver c/o Pesetsky & Zack, P.A. 1031 N. Miami Beach Blvd. N. Miami Beach, FL 33162 Attorney for Personal Representative: Elliott Noel Zack FL Bar No. 121727 Pesetsky & Zack, P.A. 1031 N. Miami Beach Blvd. N. Miami Beach, FL 33162 (305) 940-0023 March 6, 13, 2014 98055T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000268 Section:_________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. FRANKIE W. BENNINGFIELD; DONNA P. BENNINGFIELD; DOROTHY L. WALN; ALAN B. WALN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated February 19, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012CA-000268 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 2nd day of April, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL A, A PORTION OF TRACTS 2 AND 2-A, COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND RUN NORTH 57 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 1310.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 57 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 577.36 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 100.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 100.02 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 46.41 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 141.83 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 17.70 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 336.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.89 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A 100 POWER LINE EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY 100.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HGHWAY NO. 98 AND NORTH 57 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1305.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 99.23 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 57 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 61.67 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #Z160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 76.79 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 61.71 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 73.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.11 ACRES MORE OR LESS. THE AGGREGATE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS BEING 1.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 25th day of February, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 March 6, 13, 2014 98077T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000426 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. EUNICE G. MARTY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE GORDON F. MARTY AND EUNICE G. MARTY REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JULY 14, 2005, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE GORDON F. MARTY AND EUNICE G. MARTY REVOCABLE TRUST DATED JULY 14, 2005 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Bay County, Florida: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE MONUMENT) ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FEET HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) 422 FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST, 370.5 FEET ALONG ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING. RUN THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST 200 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST 50 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 200 FEET TO HIGHWAY, THENCE ACROSS HIGHWAY AND ON TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SHORE 50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST TO ROAD AND ACROSS ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 29,200 FEET DEEP ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF ROAD AND INCLUDING THAT PORTION BETWEEN ROAD AND SHORE. LOT 7 IN THE BLOCK BETWEEN 5TH AND 6TH STREET IN EASTPOINT, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE MONUMENT) ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE ONE HUNDRED FOOT HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY TWO (422) FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN SOUTH SIXTY-SIX DEGREES SEVENTEEN MINUTES WEST FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY AND FIVETENTHS (420.5) FEETTO A PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH TWENTYTHREE DEGREES FOURTY-THREE MINUTES WEST 200 FEET. THENCE SOUTH SIXTY-SIX DEGREES SEVENTEEN MINUTES WEST FIFTY FEET. THENCE SOUTH TWENTY-THREE DEGREES FOURTYTHREE MINUTES EAST TWO HUNDRED FEET TO HIGHWAY, THENCE ACROSS HIGHWAY AND ON TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SHORE FIFTY FEET. THENCE NORTH TWENTYTHREE DEGREES FORTY-THREE MINUTES WEST TO ROAD AND ACROSS ROAD TO POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 575 US HIGHWAY 98 EASTPOINT, FL 32328 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before 30 days from the first date of publication service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 25th day of February, 2014. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 JR-13-110753 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861, Fax: (850) 653-9339. March 13, 20, 2014 98107T PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-135-CA ANTHONY CASTELLI, Plaintiff, vs. LORENZO AMATO and UNKNOWN TENANT (S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2014, in Case No. 13-135-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which ANTHONY CASTELLI is the Plaintiff and LORENZO AMATO is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on April 24, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, AND RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 693.5 FEET, THENCE RUN S 32 E, 85.23 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING IN THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2324.83 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLEOF 01, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 77.05 FEET (CHORD BEARING S 59 W 77.05 FEET) TO RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN S 32 E, 200.00 FEET, TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN N 69 E ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 38.61 FEET, THENCE RUN N 73 E ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 40.86 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE RUN N 32 W, 216.75 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: February 27, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 13, 20, 2014 98105T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013CA-000002-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LEROY NOEL, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida, described as: Lot 8, Block E, of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 2, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 15 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A/K/A 1056 E. GORRIE DR. ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 beginning at 11:00 AM ET, on April 9, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 26th day of February, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration; 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; (850)577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 13, 20, 2014 98119T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-300-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JOSEPH CHAD ZINGARELLI and wife, LISA M. ZINGARELLI, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2014, in Case No.: 13-300-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST on April 23, 2014 the following described property: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 289.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 308.56 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A 15.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 149.05 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), SAID POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF 30.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 287.60 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING IN THE CENTER POINT OF A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS CUL-DE-SAC, THENCE RUN NORTH 159.49 FEET ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF 60.00 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 289.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.50 FEET, THE SOUTHERLY 15.00 FEET AND THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 656, PAGE 745 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: February 26, 2014 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 13, 20, 2014 98109T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000056-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY D. DOXSEE A/K/A JEFFREY D. DOXSEE SR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEFFREY D. DOXSEE A/K/A JEFFREY D. DOXSEE SR; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, PREMIER BANK; FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 16th day of April, 2014, at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida. LOT 20, BLOCK G, LANARK BEACH UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2, AT PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 26th day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H#: 314810 March 13, 20, 2014 98139T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-CP-12 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH FRANCES NASTASZEWSKI, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOSEPH FRANCES NASTASZEWSKI, deceased, whose date of death was July 16, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 13, 2014. KIM NASTASZEWSKI Personal Representative 2900 South Valley View Boulevard, Lot 302 Las Vegas, Nevada 89102 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 13, 20, 2014 ADOPTION: At-Home-Mom, Financial Security, LOVE awaits baby!Lisa & Kenny 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. Weekly Inside Yard SaleThurs, Fri., & Sat 9am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint.txt FL83064 to 56554 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofersHiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to applyWeb ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairDiesel MechanicWith own tools, full time position. Extensive light, medium, and heavy equipment experience required. For immediate interview send resumes to Blind Box 3399 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34282890 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL82563 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL82562 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. 850-653-3838 Text FL83056 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL81122 to 56654 Price ReducedCarrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced, (2) storage buildings 10x20, 10x32 screened back porch, & deep well. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176 GULF COUNTY WATERFRONT LOTBeautiful lot 100+ feet on deepwater side of Wettapo Creek. 800 deep with existing driveway the length of the lot. We are advised there are two wells (one deep and one shallow). Underground power. Offers are solicited. Call 850-763-7311 for more info.

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, March 13, 2014 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County TimesAdvertiser. 1) Reportedly how many U.K. publishers turned down the 1st Harry Potter manuscript before small Bloomsbury (at the time) accepted it? 2, 6, 10, 12 2) Whats the name of the white-colored dog appearing in Scooby Doo cartoons? Ralph, Scooby Dum, Hercules, Mergertroid 3) How much did 1903s rst 8-count box of Crayola crayons sell for? Nickel, Dime, Quarter, Dollar 4) Carl Sagan was a famed astronomer at what university? Cornell, Notre Dame, Stanford, MIT 5) Which of these is not a Canadian province? New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Yukon, Manitoba 6) How many NFL teams have bird nicknames? 1, 3, 5, 7 7) Along with relish, ketchup and mayo are basically the main items of which salad dressing? Thousand Island, Ranch, Italian, French 8) Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades got its start in a fuller quote from? Mining, Baseball, Golf, Quilting 9) Of these comedians who was born in Harlem, Georgia? Sinbad, Oliver Hardy, Jeff Foxworthy, Cable Guy 10) Whats the total amount of money in a standard U.S. Monopoly game? $15,140; $20,000; $27,260; $30,000 11) How many times did Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard ght against each other? 1, 2, 3, 4 12) Where did a dance called the jig originate? Southern USA, NYC, British Isles, Australia 13) How many knuckles are in a human hand? 8, 10, 14, 15 14) Which is an advanced, sealed tobacco curing barn with a system of ductworks? Candela, Calfrisa, Cantero, Carotene ANSWERS 1) 12. 2) Scooby Dum. 3) Nickel. 4) Cornell. 5) Yukon. 6) 5. 7) Thousand Island. 8) Baseball. 9) Oliver Hardy. 10) $15,140. 11) 3. 12) British Isles. 13) 14. 14) Calfrisa. Ourlocalrealestateexperts haveidentiedwhattheyfeelare thebestvaluesaroundandare offeringthemtoyouin RealEstatePicks! Discoverthebestrealestate valuesinMexicoBeach,PortSt. Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas, St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleand surroundingareas. BestValuesontheForgottenCoastContactThe TimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola AdvertiseHere RealEstatePicks 4516122 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250350$64,900St.GeorgeIslandISLANDLOTFORSALEHigh,dry,walk-ablelotmeasuring90x135,adjacentlotis separatelyforsale,quietareaoftheIslandonEastSawyer AvenuenearendofPorterStreet,shortdistancefromthe GulfofMexicoandApalachicolaBay,listedbyJohnShelby JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#251282$1,450,000St.GeorgeIslandPLANTATIONBEACHFRONTCustomhomeinTheBluffsprotectedbydunesbutstillGreat Gulfview,kitchenwithreplace,decksgalore,3BR,3BA, dumbwaiter,2ndLR,screenporch,communityPOOLinapark likesetting,shcleaningsink,outdoorshower,screenedroom. 4516121 29,000 4516490 4516125 4516827 MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,199,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com 4516130 REDUCED KimHawkinsDavisCPAHwy98at11thStreet,Suite4 Apalachicola,FL32320850-653-6875 andMuchMorePromptProfessionalPersonalService Trades&Services ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines LICENSEDANDINSURED 20YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O.Box439 Carrabelle,FL32322 697-2783orMobile566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter JOE'SLAWNCARE IFIT'SINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES,TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVAL ALSOCLEANGUTTERSANDIRRIGATION INSTILLATION,PLANTINGANDBEDDINGAVAILABLECALLJOE@850-323-0741ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com