The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00259

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, February 27, 2014 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Earlier this month, county commissioners asked architect Warren Emo to estimate the total renovation cost for the Coombs Armory. Last week, he told them the price tag is $2.3 million. In an elaborate presentation at the Feb. 18 meeting, Emo laid out two possible options for renovating the historic structure, dividing the repairs and upgrades into three phases. He told commissioners that since the last meeting, structural engineers found water damage in their explorations of area under the building. Emo said multiple overlays of pavement on Avenue D have affected drainage, causing support to wash out and leaving the oor spongy under the southwest corner. Inside the building, there is a visible irregularity in the oor, and a 2-inch gap has formed between the oor and baseboard in the southwest corner, he said. Emo said ooding around the main entrance is also a problem that needs to be addressed. Theres not a lot of stormwater control out there, and the sidewalks in pretty bad condition, he said. Were looking at new sidewalk all around the perimeter. He said the new plan would create a paved 18-space parking lot and an Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant entry on the north side of the building. Under either option, Phase City to hear Family Dollar appealBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Members of Apalachicolas city commission will hear an appeal by Family Dollar on March 11, the latest chapter in an effort by the retailer to overcome neighbors objections and relocate to a wooded site on U.S. 98 on the western edge of Apalachicola. In January, Panama City attorney Robert Hughes appealed the Planning and Zoning Commissions Nov. 18, 2013, vote that gave a resounding no to a proposal to relocate the store from its current site next to the Gulfside IGA to a lot that neighbors the Best Western Inn. Hughes, who represents Blue Current Development LLC, the rm of Panama City Beachs Brett Woodward, sought to have the action overturned by the Board of Adjustment, claiming the citys zoning approval process was riddled with errors and impropriety.No decision on No Trace ordinanceBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Feb. 18, commissioners held a public hearing on the proposed No Trace ordinance, which would make it illegal to leave holes in the sand, tents, chairs, grills and other equipment on any county beach overnight. The ordinance was proposed to protect nesting sea turtles, which can become entangled in equipment or in deep holes, and to keep the appearance of county beaches neat and uncluttered. The ordinance would apply to both public and privately owned beaches throughout the county. When questions were raised about funding and enforcement of the law, a motion by Commissioner Pinki Jackel to pass the ordinance failed 3-2, with Cheryl Sanders, Smokey Parrish and Noah Lockley opposed. Under the proposed ordinance, By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com That a living, breathing human soul is standing just a few feet away, near enough to see and hear but with enough distance that we may quietly avert our eyes if we wish, is a big reason live theatre can affect us as it does. In such a quiet, comfortable place as a small theatre, where ones attention is disturbed only by that which the tranquil mind conjures, the full embodiment of a captivating story, and a deeper response to the characters in it, can be thoroughly enjoyed, more so than reading about them in a novel, or a newspaper. When characters are nely drawn by the playwright, and then fully enlivened by the actors, the show will delight, and the audience will walk away glad to have had seats when the curtain opened, and all the way through to the moment it closed. For the past two weeks, the Dixie Theatres 17th professional season has presented, in repertory, a pair of plays that provide just such an experience. They offer a passing opportunity, especially rare in places such as here where stage plays are infrequent, to enjoy a ne example of theatres power. This weekend is the nal one for the shows, both comedies with an underlying, more than occasionally glimpsed, layer of sadness. Mrs. Mannerly takes place entirely in the imagination of the author, Jeffrey Hatcher, who re ects ARCHITECT ESTIMATE:$2.3 million needed to x Armory STAGES OF LIFE Dixie Theatre features serious comedy in repertoryPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesDixie Partington, as Glory, a hiker, and David Caldwell, as East, a repairman, in Almost, Maine. Below, Cleo Holladay crafts an indelible portrait of Mrs. Mannerly. LAST CHANCEThe Dixie Theatre concludes its professional stage season this weekend. The play Almost, Maine, a work by John Cariani comprising nine short plays that explore love and loss in a remote, mythical town, is on stage this at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Saturday. The play Mrs. Mannerly by Jeffrey Hatcher takes the stage at 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $25. Tickets can be reserved by calling the box of ce at 653-3200. For more information, visit www.dixietheatre.com.Perfecting the presidents, A6 VOL. 128 ISSUE 44See ARMORY A5 See FAMILY DOLLAR A5 See NO TRACE A7 See DIXIE A7 Chili Cookoff on island SaturdayMore than 40 chili cooks will liven up St. George Island Saturday. The event begins with an art review from 5-7 p.m. Friday at the Civil Hall in the East End Firehouse. Cost is $5. At 8 a.m. Saturday will be the 5K Red Pepper Run, starting in front of the Blue Parrot. Entry is $15 per adult or $10 per person 18 and under. For information, call Susan Bassett at 3230092. At 9:30 a.m., the amateur crock-pot chili must be onsite. $5 entry fee required. For the professional competition, International Chili Society rules will be in effect. At 11 a.m., the auction starts. Between 12:15 and 12:45 p.m., will be the Miss Chili Pepper judging, and from 12:45 to 1:15 p.m., the Mr. Hot Sauce judging. For more info, call Grayson Shepard at 6536718 or email grayshep@ yahoo.comCarrabelle salt exhibit opens March 5Learn about the history and value of salt by visiting the Carrabelle History Museums newest exhibit, beginning with an open house from 1-3 p.m. Thursday, March 5. Displays will explain Floridas valued mineral importance to the South during the Civil War. Centuries of historical value and the many uses of salt will be highlighted. Collections of unique salt shakers may be viewed during this unusual exhibit. The museum, in the former Carrabelle City Hall at 106 SE Ave. B, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and by appointment by calling 524-1153. The museum is a project of the Carrabelle Waterfront Partnership and the City of Carrabelle. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A13

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com A little smaller than usual eld of chili cooks will liven up St. George Island on Saturday, with about 40 teams vying for a chance to earn a ticket to Nationals. Our winner last year, Paul Nunn with Nunn Better Chili, came in second at Nationals last year, said Grayson Shepard, who oversees the competition. That tells me our judging system works since we picked a good chili. So far, seven teams have signed up to enter the newly added salsa division, which will be judged by a crew from Sometimes Its Hotter on St. George Island. Salsa, like the chili completion, is an International Chili Society category, so the winner of the St. George Island competition also will be eligible to go the ICS Nationals to compete there. The 41 chili chefs who have so far signed up for Saturdays regional completion include John Blackwell (Red Tail Chili), Paul and Tim Nunn and Alyssa Jones (Nunn Better), Chuck Stubbs (Blue Water Cooking Company), Bill Avery (Waterdog Chili), Steve Merrill (Blow N Go), Jim Fulton (Red Hots), Roy Geigle (Cowpokes Chuckwagon Chili), Jim Kemp (Lighthouse Chili), J.G. Carver and Greg Machamer (Team Spice Boys), Larry Underkofer (LEUs Q Crew), Billy Bergfel (Burnin at Both Ends), David Thonen (Blow & Go) and Sandy Walker (G.R.I.T.S.). Also taking part will be Neal Trafford (Fireghters Forever), Chad West (Yellow Creek Swamp Sauce), Dana Kelly (Mad Cow Chili), Will English (Chili Dawgs), Jack Proctor (Proctor), John Homan (Rajun Cajun), Kim Poole (Hot Lips Chili), Matt Solomon (Sumpn Hot!), Mike Groh (Monumental Chili), Thomas Crawford (St Alfonzos Soup Kitchen Cooks), Gary Dorris (Team Toilet Bowl), Jim Smith (Sunset Isle Chili Heads), Wanda Gangswich (Three Sheets to the Wind), Bob Alexander, son, and Bob Alexander, dad (Roadkills Red Hot Chili), Craig Gibson (Apalachicola VFD), Cathy Korfanty (Eastwood Caf Maneater Chili), Trent Hatcher (Just Plane Chili), Gary Carlson (Uncle Bugs Chili), Tim Center, Veni Miller (Bubba and Cha Cha Chili Pub) and David Ditmar and Julia Spires (Pod Stalker). The event begins Friday, Feb. 28, with an art review from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Civil Hall in the East End Firehouse. Preview donation is $5. At 8 a.m. Saturday, there will be the 5K Red Pepper Run, starting in front of the Blue Parrot. Entry fee is $15 per adult or $10 per person 18 years and under. All entrants will receive a T-shirt. For information, call Susan Bassett at 3230092. You can register the morning of the race. Booth set-up begins at 8:30 a.m. At 9:30 a.m., the amateur crock-pot chili must be onsite. $5 entry fee required. For the professional competition, International Chili Society rules will be in effect. (No beans, pasta, etc.) Chili prepared on site from scratch, no prepackaged chili mixes. Meat may be cut, sliced or ground in advance, but not treated or cooked except during competition. At 11 a.m., the auction starts. Between 12:15 and 12:45 p.m., will be the Miss Chili Pepper judging, and from 12:45 to 1:15 p.m., the Mr. Hot Sauce judging. At 3:30 p.m., awards will be presented in the chili judging area. For more info, call Grayson Shepard at 653-6718 or email grayshep@yahoo. com. 139-12thStreet Apalachicola,FL32320(850)653-2111HelenCook,ARNP Dr.IvanBackerman ClinicSchedule:Monday-Friday ApalachicolaClinicTuesday-Wednesday Calltoschedule yourappointmentat(850)653-2111 FloridaDepartmentof Healthin FranklinCounty WOMEN'SHEALTHCLINICFriendly,CaringSta TimesofOperation: Monday-ursday 7:30am6:00pmFloridaDepartment ofHealthFranklinCounty 1065thStreet Carrabelle,FL32322 (850)697-4121 CARRABELLEDENTALCLINIC Accepting: Servicesforchildren: ReneeParrishDMD CouponExpires:3-15-14CODE:AP00 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com After ve years of vacancy, Carrabelles Hexaport building on John McInnis Road has a new tenant. On Feb. 18, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to lease the factory to Gulf Unmanned Systems Center after much negotiation. The 65,000-square-foot structure has been vacant since modular home manufacturer Greensteel declared bankruptcy in 2009. Centennial Bank took possession of the lease during bankruptcy proceedings against Greensteel. GUSC will buy the lease. GUSC will pay $10 per year to lease the factory for the rst 15 years, after which the cost of rent will be adjusted. There is no way Carrabelle can lose in this situation, Mayor Curley Messer said. If the business fails, the city gets possession of the building under the contract. According to their business plan, GUSC, a Panama Citybased company that plans to test both aerial and aquatic robot drones here, will spend almost $900,000 on upgrades and improvements there over the rst year. Bruce MacCormack, CEO of GUSC said he has signed a contract with the bank, and the lease will be signed by the middle of next month. He said he will begin cleaning the property immediately because he has already scheduled visits to the facility by important prospective clients. He said he would begin interviewing applicants for employment with GUSC immediately. He expects to have 10 people the payroll by mid-April, a stipulation called for in GUSCs lease with the city.Chili Cookoff to light up island this weekend LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesGulf Unmanned Systems Center will be the new tenant of Carrabelles Hexaport building.Gulf Unmanned Systems leases Hexaport

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The Times | A3Thursday, February 27, 2014 JoinUsforYourAnnualMeeting Theentirecreditunionbenetswhen membersparticipate.Thatswhywe inviteeverymembertoattendour yourannualmeeting.Allmembers areequalownersofthecreditunion. Ourannualmeetingisanoccasionfor managementandelectedofcialsto reporttoyou,theowners.And,itsanopportunityforyoutolearnabout thecreditunionsnancialposition,productsandservices,currentbusinessissues,andgoals.Youllmeetface-to-facewiththepeoplewhorun yourcreditunion.Withoutyourinput,leaderscanonlyguesswhatyouand otherownerswantfromyourcreditunion. Allmembersattendingwillreceiveagiftatthedoor.Oncethebusiness meetingisconcluded,wewillhavedrawingsforseveralcashprizesgiven bythecreditunion.Wehopetoseeyouthere! NotamemberofEmeraldCoastFederalCreditUnionyet?Thenweinvite youtojoin!Weareacommunitycreditunion.Thatmeansifyoulive, work,worship,orattendschoolinGulfCounty,FranklinCounty,ortheCity ofMexicoBeach,youareeligibleformembership!Sopleasestopbyto meetourfriendlystaffandtakeadvantageofalltheservicesweoffer.At EmeraldCoastFederalCreditUnionyouaremorethanjustanumber,you arepartofourfamily!Event:CreditUnionAnnualMeeting When:MondayMarch10,2014at7:00pm,EST Where:PortSt.JoeElementarySchoolAuditorium502WoodwardAvenue,PortSaintJoe,Florida32456 101EastRiverRoad,Wewahitchka,Florida32465 248USHighway98,Eastpoint,Florida32328 Ph:(850)227-1156(850)639-5024(850)670-1199 Toll-free:1-877-874-0007 Email:emeraldcoast@fairpoint.net www.emeraldcoastfcu.com By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A misplaced surveyors stake is causing headaches on St. George Island. At the Feb. 18 county meeting, commissioners discussed a request for an after-the-fact variance to the county building code at length. The countys Board of Adjustment recommended the variance be granted. William and Donna Nichols, owners of a house at 1080 Gulf Beach Drive, want permission to leave their new cement swimming pool at its current location, even though it is 6 feet over the 10-foot setback line at the rear of their lot. Williams told commissioners he had the property surveyed and obtained the necessary permits before construction the pool in December. County Planner Alan Pierce said a neighbor, Eric Myers, came to the planning and building ofce before the pools construction and complained the survey was incorrect and that the pool would encroach on the setback. Pierce said he showed Myers the plans and permit and told him the pool complied with the building code. Construction of the pool began, and Myers complained to Nichols. Both men contacted the original surveyor, Wade Brown of Edwin G. Brown and Associates of Crawfordville. Brown returned to the site Jan. 2 and discovered a second stake on the southeast corner of the property, about 9 feet closer to the Nichols home. Brown determined this was the correct stake marking the Nichols property line and that his original survey was in error. Brown said at that time, the pool was 80 percent complete, according to Cox Pools, the contractor. Brown said he offered to construct a fence or install landscaping to buffer the pool, but the Myerses refused and said they wanted the pool moved. Brown said his company carries insurance to pay for moving the pool, if necessary. William Nichols addressed commissioners and termed the situation unfortunate. My wife and I recently retired and wanted to fulll our dream of living down on the island, he said. That included renovations to the house and installing a pool. The Myerses were represented by an attorney, John Grant of Tallahassee, who said the variance application did not meet legal requirements. He said the Nicholses, as property owners, were responsible for the actions of their contractors and that, under Florida law, the request to move the pool is reasonable. Angie Myers said she was concerned about noise and activity in a pool so close to her home. We too want to retire to St. George Island, she said. This is certainly nothing personal. Its about having an expensive piece of property that may decrease in value. Mr. Brown has liability insurance to pay for this. We shouldnt have to pay for a mistake thats not our fault. The Myerses said they plan to construct a deck next month on land adjacent to the pool. Grant said in addition to encroaching on the setback on the south side, the pool encroaches on the eastern setback into the public right of way. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said it appeared to him from the diagram provided in his packet that there was a second encroachment. Pierce said he had not been made aware of the additional encroachment. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the BOA must review the second encroachment before commissioners could act on a request for any variance. Commissioner voted unanimously to table the discussion until the request returned to the BOA.Special to The TimesAlbert Hendrik Henk Van Der Merwe, 46, of Crawfordville was sentenced Feb. 14 by United States District Judge Robert Hinkle to serve 12 months in prison for importing merchandise under false invoice and for receiving unregistered silencers. Van Der Merwe will serve a three-year term of supervised release after his incarceration, during which he will be subject to search by his probation ofcer. As a consequence of this conviction, he cannot own or possess rearms. The court also entered an order forfeiting Van Der Merwes interest in three silencers and in an Uzi 9 millimeter carbine. Van Der Merwe was arrested on April 10, 2013, after agents intercepted three silencers he had ordered from South Africa under an invoice declaring them to be motorcycle parts. Messages retrieved from Van Der Merwes email accounts reected that he had ordered another silencer from the same supplier in the past, that he wanted these shipped discretely and that he was interested in obtaining additional silencers for friends. He requested that the silencer for the Uzi be full-auto rated. Examination of the weapon determined the Uzi had been converted to a machine gun. U.S. Attorney Pamela Marsh credited the success of this prosecution to the joint efforts of the U.S. Customs Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Michael T. Simpson. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed here were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.FEB. 18Carrie K. Richards, 32, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) William T. Romeka, 35, Panacea, violation of probation (FCSO)FEB. 19Tonya D. Elrod, 37, Athens, Tenn., violation of probation (FCSO) John C. Thomas, 42, Crawfordville, driving while license suspended or revoked (CPD) Jessica M. Opie, 27, St. George Island, failure to appear (FCSO)FEB. 20Vonnie R. Tinsley, 33, Tallahassee, three counts burglary or attempted burglary of a structure (FCSO)FEB. 21Michelle D. Massey, 37, Carrabelle, tampering with physical evidence (FCSO) James A. Farmer, 43, Crawfordville, possession of a controlled substance, eeing or attempting to elude a law enforcement ofcer, aggravated assault on a law enforcement ofcer, tampering with physical evidence and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Aubrey D. Sasnett, 57, Eastpoint, ofcial misconduct of public servant, tampering with physical evidence, and tampering with a witness or informant (FCSO) Willie F. Baucham, 57, Apalachicola, burglary or attempted of a structure, two counts of grand theft, criminal mischief, burglary of a dwelling and dealing in stolen property (APD) Christopher J. Wells, 20, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Lawrence E. Russell, 28, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO)FEB. 22Juan H. Pavon, 26, Eastpoint, reckless driving and no valid drivers license (APD)FEB. 23David B. Keith, Jr., 23, Carrabelle, aggravated battery great bodily harm (CPD)FEB. 24Jimmy D. Kilgore, 36, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence, sh or set net with greater than two-inch stretch mesh, unmarked entangling net on vessel, entangling in vessel under 25 feet long with forward power, no ice on sh, eeing or attempting to elude law ofcer in boat, harvesting saltwater products under revoked saltwater products license, and harvest marine life with net over 500 square feet agrant violation (FCSO) Dillan D. Grimes, 21, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Christopher J. Wells, 20, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Preston W. Smith, 34, Carrabelle, grand theft and dealing in stolen property (FCSO) Adam D. Garry, 24, St. George Island, driving while license suspended or revoked, and reckless driving (APD) Corey D. Grifn, 26, Eastpoint, possession of cannabis (FCSO) Arrest REPOrR T Law Enforcement Crawfordville man imprisoned on silencer chargesThe case of the misplaced pool LO O IS SWOBO OBO DA | The TimesThe pool in question can be seen in the rear of William and Donna Nichols home at 1080 E. Gulf Beach Drive.

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, February 27, 2014 ASectionWeems soap opera: 10 minutes vs. $10 millionTo the Franklin County board of commissioners and to the residents of Franklin County, I respectfully submit to you this letter for your consideration regarding the future of Weems Memorial Hospital. I have lived in Franklin County now for three years. Coupled with my time in neighboring Wakulla County, Ive been in this immediate area for close to 20 years. While I am no expert, I can say that Franklin County residents have been victimized by the economy, the downward trend of the shing industry and the inability of Franklin County of cials to offset these hardships with achieving growth and/or in making better decisions. Wakulla County has no hospital, and it is a considerably larger county in comparison to Franklin County based on population. Wakulla County has become an extension to Leon County and our state capital, Tallahassee. If Wakulla County does not have a hospital, why is it Franklin County needs a hospital? Franklin County is in a better position than Wakulla County; we have the same hospitals they have in Tallahassee. Plus, we have what they dont have just 10-15 minutes away by ambulance in Port St Joe, a new outreach hospital af liated with one of the best hospitals and medical care providers in this state. Without Weems Memorial Hospital, from a geographical standpoint, Franklin County is still in a better position for hospital care for its residents than many residents in Wakulla County. Wakulla County does not have the luxury of a new highly rated hospital about 15 minutes west of Apalachicola, a straight shot on U.S. 98. We here in Franklin County do. This must be taken into consideration with any decision-making process that may result in a $10 million to $20 million burden levied upon residents here in Franklin County. Is it really worth $10 million to $20 million, at the expense of Franklin County residents, for a few more years of existence for Weems Memorial Hospital, a hospital already operating at a substantial loss? Who in their right mind will spend $20 million on a hospital losing over $2 million annually already? You are only prolonging the inevitable closure of this hospital. Why place this burden on our children or grandchildren? Lets do the right thing, think with our heads and not let the heart interfere with the decision that needs to be made in the best interest of Franklin County residents. Weems Memorial Hospital is an albatross. Lets not bring hardship upon the residents here in Franklin County more than what they already face or drive the stake in even farther. People in this county cannot afford it. Very truly yours,Michael J. CauleyFranklin County residentNows the time for Leave No Trace law15 miles of beach these words from this mornings hearing on the Leave No Trace ordinance keep echoing in my mind. These 15 miles of beach are the heart and soul of Franklin County. While I dont have the exact figures to look at, Im guessing the property adjoining these 15 miles of beach bring in the most taxes property taxes, bed taxes, sales taxes from beachfront businesses and properties. The property adjoining these 15 miles of beach are sold at the highest prices and bring income to realtors, insurance agents, title companies and attorneys involved in property sales. These 15 miles of beach are the main reason hundreds of thousands of tourists visit Franklin County; shop in Franklin County businesses; eat in Franklin County restaurants; stay in Franklin County hotels and rental houses; hire Franklin County guide fisherman; rent bikes, chairs and umbrellas from Franklin County vendors; and buy Franklin County oysters and shrimp to pack in their coolers to take back home with them. These 15 miles of beach provide jobs to construction workers, house cleaners, pool maintenance companies, landscaping and lawn services, real estate sales and rental employees, restaurant employees and those who rent beach items. Franklin Countys 15 miles of beach are often featured in newspapers in Atlanta, nationally distributed magazines (Southern Living, Cond Nast and Sports Illustrated). I talk to tourists almost every day during the summer months. I hear over and over how much they love it here in the unspoiled part of Florida; how they used to go to Panama City and Destin, but stopped going there because of the crowds and development. Yes, the Leave No Trace ordinance is very important for sea turtles who can do nothing on their own to protect their nesting beaches, but this ordinance is just as important to everyone who lives, works and/or vacations in Franklin County. If our beaches become so cluttered and littered that they are no longer the beautiful beaches we all love, the tourists will find another place to spend their money, property values will drop and unemployment will soar. I realize that in todays economy, the county must watch every penny and be careful not to take on new projects that could add costs to the budget, but taking care of our beaches has to be our No. 1 priority. Passing the Leave No Trace ordinance and advertising it will go a long way to returning our beaches to their pristine state. Once word gets out that items left on the beach will be confiscated, there will be fewer items left. I applaud Nikki Millender and her staff for being on board and being willing to take on this new challenge. It seems to me that it would be impossible to cover the entire 15 miles each night, but if there was an unpublished, rotating schedule where a couple of miles of beach are checked and decluttered each night, folks will take their items in. I also think personal items need to be taken off the beach or placed under a boardwalk. Moving beach items to the high water mark or to the dune will not help the sea turtles. Sea turtles are not aware of human boundaries, and the safest place for their nest is often in or on top of the dunes. It also seems that the items recovered from the beach could be a source of income for the county. It would be impossible to determine who the items belonged to, but if all items were taken to a central location and offered for sale, the funds raised could be used to help defray the costs involved in picking them up (gasoline, wages, advertising,). I would hate to see our land ll cost go up because we have discarded items that could be purchased and used by others. Businesses that operate on the beach should be allowed to continue to operate, although I think those who rent chairs, umbrellas, etc. should make it clear to renters that if the items are not picked up at night, they might be con scated, and if that happens, the renter will have to pay to replace the item that was lost. These businesses have the names and contact information for the renters, so it would be easy for them to collect any necessary fees. It seems to me that you might want to contact Bay County to see what suggestions they might have after having their ordinance in place for at least a year. They might have ideas on the time of day they patrol their beaches, or how they handle folks who want to stay on the beach later with their items, and what they do with the items they have collected. Thank you again for your time and consideration of this ordinance; I dont see how Franklin County can survive if we dont take care of these 15 miles of beach.Sharon HutchinsonSt. George IslandBy STEVE SOUTHERLANDSpecial to the Times With partisan gridlock all too prevalent in todays Washington, I have worked hard to break through those barriers and join with Republicans and Democrats who are as interested as I am in growing jobs and restoring certainty for hardworking families. The recently-passed Farm Bill is an example of what can be accomplished by putting partnership above partisanship. For more than a year Congress debated the latest reauthorization of the Farm Bill, which sets national agriculture and food policy for the next ve years. With Florida being a national leader in agricultural production and the second largest specialty crop-producing state in America, I was committed to doing all I could to advance a common sense Farm Bill that restored certainty for North and Northwest Florida farmers and strengthened our rural communities. I was honored to be the only Floridian in Congress appointed to the bipartisan conference committee tasked with ironing out the nal Farm Bill agreement. It was a tremendous, hardearned victory when both parties and both chambers came together for the good of the American people and passed a ve-year Farm Bill that provides much-needed relief to our hardworking farming families and saves taxpayers $23 billion while allowing us to nally move past the costly, big government policies passed under then-Speaker Nancy Pelosis Farm Bill six years ago. I am also pleased that Republicans and Democrats came together to support a provision in the Farm Bill I introduced to empower vulnerable families with a renewed opportunity for earned success. By including a 10-state pilot program for work, job training, and community volunteerism for healthy, working-age food stamp bene ciaries, weve now put nutrition assistance on the same proven path of success that helped change a culture for the better during welfare reform in the 1990s. As the rst reforms to the food stamp program since the successful welfare reforms of 1996, the Farm Bill takes important steps to empower families in need with a renewed opportunity at earned success. Additionally, the Farm Bill includes several provisions I crafted to sustain the economies of our rural communities. The bipartisan Building Rural Communities Act ensures that small, rural areas have access to the technical assistance and training necessary to enhance vital infrastructure including police and re stations and community health clinics all at no additional cost to Americas taxpayers. Another provision I advanced strengthens our forestry communities by ensuring that wood products qualify under the USDAs Biobased Marketing Program. I also fought to guarantee the long-term viability of citrus production in Florida by helping secure $125 million to research remedies for citrus greening, a disease decimating citrus groves in Florida and nationwide. Updating the Farm Bill is never easy, but this bill represents the good that can come out of both parties and both chambers rising above politics to do what is right for the American people. Our farmers and rural families deserve real solutions not political mud ghts and this bipartisan Farm Bill is a big step in the right direction. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, is the congressman for Floridas 2nd congressional district, which includes Franklin County.Page 4 STEVE SOUTHERLANDFarm Bill a step toward bipartisanshipSpecial to the TimesThe majority of Americans feel breakfast is important, but hectic mornings make it dif cult to t the meal in every day. In fact, 40 percent of moms say their child does not eat breakfast daily, according to Kelloggs Breakfast in America survey. To garner increased participation in the School Breakfast Program, Franklin County School will recognize National School Breakfast Week March 3-7, a weeklong celebration aimed at increasing awareness of the School Breakfast Program among students and parents. The breakfast week theme, Take Time for School Breakfast, which will appear in the school cafeteria during National School Breakfast Week, encourages parents to consider the school breakfast program as a timesaving option for those busy mornings. Too many children are showing up at school hungry, and hungry children cant learn, said Robin Tennille. Eating breakfast at school can help families save time in the morning. And knowing that school breakfast is healthy and a great value is a huge relief for parents. Cafeterias will promote school breakfast with special menus and decorations, activities and events all week. Activities will include a writing contest for grades K-12, art contest for grades pre-K -2, recipe contest for grades 6-12, breakfast themed games for grades 1-5, and Time themed music will also be played during breakfast time. Winners of the contests will be announced Monday, March 17 during breakfast. Every school day, Franklin County Schools breakfast program offers students a healthy breakfast that they need to get set for a busy school day. Items include, but are not limited to yogurt parfaits, cereal, Peanut butter and jelly graham snacker, chicken and biscuit, sausage and biscuit, jumbo muf n, breakfast pizza, breakfast burrito, French toast stick, and pancake on stick. Every school breakfast served meets federal nutrition standards limiting fat, calories, sodium. Take Time for School Breakfast was created by the nonpro t School Nutrition Association with support from Kelloggs Foodservice. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, National School Breakfast Week was launched in 1989 to raise awareness of the availability of the School Breakfast Program to all children and to promote the links between eating a good breakfast, academic achievement and healthy lifestyles. Breakfast Week promotes bene ts for busy families Letters to the EDITOR

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, February 27, 2014 PUBLICNOTICETheCityCommissionoftheCityofCarrabellewill meetinregularsessiononThursday,March6,2014at approximately6:00p.m.orassoonascanbeheardinthe CityofCarrabelleCommissionChamberslocatedat1001 GrayAve,Carrabelle,FL(850)697-2727toconsiderthe followinginaccordancewithOrdinanceNo.443,Consent ofUsefortheConsumptionandSaleofAlcohol: 1.Allowingarestaurantlocatedat201St.JamesAve. (Fathoms)tosellalcohol. Allinterestedpartiesareinvitedtoattendthepublic hearingonthismatter.Furtherinformationconcerning theproposedamendmentcanbeobtainedfromtheCity ClerkatCityHall,at1001GrayAvenue,Carrabelle,Florida, 32322,orbycalling(850)697-2727,betweenthehoursof 8:00A.M.and4:30P.M.,MondaythroughFriday,excluding holidays. Ifanindividualdecidestoappealanydecisionmade bytheCityCommissionwithrespecttothismeeting,a verbatimtranscriptmayberequired.Ifso,theindividual shouldmakeprovisionforatranscripttobemadeatthe meeting,(RE:FloridaStatute286.0105).Pursuanttothe provisionsoftheAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,any personrequiringspecialaccommodationtoparticipatein thismeetingisaskedtoadvisethecityatleast48hours beforethemeetingbycontactingKeishaMesseratthe aboveaddressorphonenumber. WilburnMesser,Mayor Attest: KeishaMesser,CityClerk PublishFebruary27,2014 NOTICEOFAPPEALHEARING CITYCOMMISSION CITYOFAPALACHICOLA,FLORIDATheApalachicolaCityCommissionwillholdaPublicAppealHearingon Tuesday,March11,2014at6:00PMatCityHall,CommunityCenterMeetingRoom,1 BayAvenue,Apalachicola,FloridaontheAppealofBlueCurrentDevelopment,LLC oftheDecisionoftheApalachicolaPlanningandZoningBoardofNovember18,2013 denyingtheSpecialExceptionrequestedbyAppellant,BlueCurrentDevelopment, LLCfortheFamilyDollarStoreproposedtobedevelopedonthepropertylocated atthecornerofHighway98andClairmontAvenueinApalachicola,Florida,thelegal descriptiondescribedbelow: ASpecialExceptionisdenedbytheApalachicolaLandCodeasfollows: Ausethatwouldnotbeappropriategenerallywithoutrestriction throughouttheparticularzoningdistrictorclassicationbutwhichif controlledasanumber,area,location,orrelationtotheneighborhood, wouldnotadverselyaffectthepublichealth,safety,comfort,goodorder, appearance,convenience,morals,andthegeneralwelfare. DueprocesswillbeprovidedandevidencereceivedattheAppealHearingas necessary. ThisnoticeisbeingprovidedinaccordancewithrequirementsoftheCityof ApalachicolaLandDevelopmentCode.YoumayreceiveacopyoftheDecision ofthePlanningandZoningBoardandtheAppealoftheAppellant,BlueCurrent Development,LLCaswellasrelevantportionsoftheApalachicolaLandDevelopment CodemaybeobtainedattheCityHall,CityofApalachicola,AdministrativeBuilding address. FORTHECITYCOMMISSIONOFTHECITYOFAPALACHICOLA Anypersonwhodesirestoappealanydecisionatthismeetingwillneedarecord oftheproceedingandforthispurpose,mayneedtoensurethataverbatimrecord oftheproceedingismadewhichincludestestimonyandevidenceuponwhichthe appealisbased.Personswithdisabilitiesneedingassistancetoparticipateinanyof theseproceedingsshouldcontacttheCityClerksOfceat850-653-931948hours inadvanceofthemeeting. AparcelofLandinSection12,Township9South,Range8West,Franklin County,Florida,describedasfollows:Commenceatanironpipemarking theSoutheastCornerofthatcertainparcelortractoflanddescribedina deedfromW.H.NeelandSophrinaNeel,hiswife,toClaraD.Gibson,dated December31,1903,recordedinDeedBookL,Pages242through246ofthe PublicRecordsofFranklinCounty,Florida,andrunthenceNorth14degrees 46minutes46secondsWest538.94feettoanironrod(#1999)ontheNorth boundarylineoftherightofwayofStateRoadNo.30(USHighway98)and hePointofBeginning.FromsaidPointofBeginningrunNorth11degrees 22minutes19secondsWestalongtheWesterlyrightofwayboundaryof ClairmontStreet(50footrightofway)adistanceof137.57feettoaniron rod(#1999)attheSoutheastcornerofLot10,Block5,NeelsAdditiontothe CityofApalachicola,thenceSouth75degrees13minutes51secondsWest alongtheagreeduponSoutherlyboundaryofsaidBlock5,asperProperty LineAgreementrecordedinthePublicRecordsofFranklinCounty,Florida,a distanceof281.87feet;thencerunSouth16degrees02minutes23seconds East226.78feettoapointontheNortherlyrightofwayboundaryofStateRoad 30,saidpointbeingonacurveconcaveNorthwesterly;thenceNortheasterly alongsaidcurvehavingaradiusof3788.22feetthroughacentralangleof04 degrees17minutes02secondsforanarclengthof283.24feet(thechordof saidarcbearsNorth56degrees49minutes40secondsEast283.18feet)to thePointofBeginning.LessandExceptanyportionofthesubjectproperty thatmayliewithinaroadrightofway. 1 of the construction would include adding a new warming kitchen; making the structure ADA-compliant; and installing hurricane-proof windows in the northern wing, a re sprinkler system in the north wing and heating and air conditioning for the entire building. Other changes include possible ways to relocate bathrooms and conference rooms, creating an equipment yard for exterior equipment and adding a ticket ofce. The price tag also would include additional planning and design. Emo set the cost for Phase 1 at $1.3 million. He said with funding in place, the project could be complete by years end. Phase 2 would involve cleaning and painting interior surfaces and renishing oors. The windows in the main auditorium would be replaced and a sprinkler system installed. The acoustics in the building would be corrected and an audiovisual system roughed in. One of the ofces on the upper oor would be converted to a media room. This phase would cost an estimated $769,000 and could be completed by May 25, 2015, if funding was in place. Phase 3 would deal with exterior work, including revisions to parking, landscaping, a new stormwater system and outdoor lighting. Emo suggested installing outdoor cooking facilities and dining area. He said streetlights similar to those already downtown would be installed. The nal phase of the renovation would cost an estimated $300,000 and could be complete by July 2015. Emo said changes in both proposed plans would bring the Armory up to more current code and more consistent historical perspective. He said the main difference between the two possible interior designs is the location of the kitchen. We are looking at something that would stand the test of time, he said. I want to know where the moneys coming from, said Commissioner William Massey said. I love the Armory. Its a good building. I couldnt vote to put the county in that kind of debt. In 20 years, Ill be dead and gone and still be cussed. If we have a storm and we put this county in debt for almost $3 million on this project, the county will be in a mess. Emo said his rm had not been asked to do a business report. That may be a logical outcome because this is a tremendous asset, he said. People love the building in its current state, but there are restrictions for how you can use it and for what you can charge for use. There are issues in the building that, if not mitigated and corrected, are just going to get worse. Properly managed, it could not only start making some money itself but lling up a lot of hotel rooms, Emo said. Filling up a lot of restaurants, caterers and that sort of thing. Commissioner Smokey Parrish asked how much money had been allocated to repairs over the next year. Tourist Development Council Administrator Curt Blair said with uncollected but expected revenue, the TDC could provide roughly $500,000 for the project to be spent within the next eight or 10 months and about $200,000 annually after that. If we could get historic grants, that would be different, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said. That is not to say Mr. Emo didnt do a good job. I dont think anybody on this commission can go with a $3 million project. We need to get together as a board and see what we can do. We need to put this on a back burner. Emo said he thought the smart thing to do, now that weve got it broken out, would be to work with either staff or a committee to come back with a recommended scope of work and to establish a business prole for funding to see how it would work nancially. We commend you for having the vision to want to look at the whole thing. Were tickled about what could happen. Mr. Emo, youve got to understand were not Leon County, Sanders said. We pay as we go. Sanders instructed Emo to discuss what changes were essential to stabilizing the building with county staff and the board thanked him for his presentation. Pierce said the additional time would be covered by funds already paid to Emo. Im hoping that there are some historical grants to help with funding sources to complete these projects, Parrish said. We could almost pay for Phase 1 with the existing funds we have, Commissioner Pinki Jackel said. If we could pass a simple majority vote of 1 percent increase in the TDC tax, that would generate almost half a million dollars revenue in the next 12 months. So, we could pay cash for Phase 1. That 1 percent is usable for these types of funding programs, and then we would not be hamstrung with rest of the marketing. ARMORY from page A1 Fa AMILY DOLLaAR from page A1City Attorney Pat Floyd last month reviewed Hughes ling and determined the proper avenue would be for the developer to go directly to the city commission, after paying a $500 fee. At the city commissions Feb. 4 meeting, it was agreed to hold the appeals hearing at 6 p.m. March 11 in the commission chambers at Battery Park. An appeal to the city is a prerequisite if the developer should go to circuit court and seek to recover damages. Hughes wants the city to reverse P&Zs denial of the special exception request and to direct the city to grant the retail a specialty store exception found in the C-3 commercial zoning. Woodward wants to construct a more than 8,300square-foot store on 1.16 acres at U.S. 98 and Clairmont. The lawyer argues P&Zs unanimous vote in April 2012 to conrm that the operation is consistent within the C-3 zoning district led to Woodward spending about $302,000 on the project, including about $245,000 for the land, $24,000 for civil design work, $9,300 for legal fees, $9,000 for architectural work, $8,500 for surveying work and $6,000 for environmental work. In his recounting of the case, Hughes cited City Administrator Betty Webbs Sept. 19, 2012, follow-up letter conrming the initial P&Z vote as justiable reliance upon which Woodward went ahead to buy the property a month later. He said Blue Current worked diligently in late 2012 and spring of 2013 to develop its site plan in conformity with the citys land development code. Hughes said the company incurred extensive obligations and expenses such that it would be highly inequitable and unjust to now prohibit (Blue Current) from proceeding with the projects development. He said P&Z Chairman Tom Dalys comment at the November 2013 hearing, that the reality is we voted on something very quickly without really thinking it through at that time, shows P&Z acted negligently, did not exercise sound judgment and was not without wanton disregard for the companys rights in the property. Hughes said in this ling the citys land development code does not include published criteria as to what constitutes a retail specialty store. But, he argues, rather than articulating the evidence that it relied on to makes its decision, P&Z relied on improper, irrelevant, immaterial and inadmissible comments of the public. P&Z capriciously blocked (Blue Current) from actually developing the property after the company purchased the property in reliance on the ofrecord actions of (P&Z) and the written assurance of City Administrator Betty Webb, Hughes wrote in his ling. According to the ling, Blue Current, if granted permission, would develop and construct the store, and then receive rental income arising from lease arrangements between Blue Current and Family Dollar Stores Inc. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesA room at the northwest corner of the Armory has damaged windows.

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 BAYSHOREDRIVESCOPPROJECTPROJECT#007.111 NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDS TheFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionerswillreceive sealedbidsfromanyqualiedperson,companyorcorporation interestedinconstructing: BAYSHOREDRIVESCOPPROJECT ProjectislocatedinEastpoint,Floridaandconsistsofapproximately4.5milesofroadwaywideningandresurfacingalong BayshoreDrive. PlansandspecicationscanbeobtainedatPreble-Rish,Inc.,324 MarinaDrive,PortSt.Joe,Florida32456,(850)227-7200.Cost forPlansandSpecicationswillbe$50.00persetandisnonrefundable.ChecksshouldbemadepayabletoPREBLE-RISH, INC.ThebidmustconformtoSection287.133(3)FloridaStatutes, onpublicentitycrimes. AllbiddersshallbeFDOTqualiedperSection2-1oftheFDOT StandardSpecicationsforRoadandBridgeConstruction,latest editioninthefollowingworkclasses:Grading,Drainage,Flexible Paving,andHotPlantMix-BituminousCourse. Completiondateforthisprojectwillbe150daysfromthedate oftheNoticetoProceedpresentedtothesuccessfulbidder. Liquidateddamagesforfailuretocompletetheprojectonthe specieddatewillbesetat$750.00perday. Pleaseindicateontheenvelopethatthisisasealedbid,for BayshoreDriveSCOPProject. Bidswillbereceiveduntil4:00p.m.easterntime,onMarch 17,2014,attheFranklinCountyClerk'sOfce,FranklinCounty Courthouse,33MarketStreet,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida 32320-2317,andwillbeopenedandreadaloudonMarch18, 2014attheCountyCommissionmeetingat34ForbesStreet, Apalachicola,FL. TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttowaive informalitiesinanybid,toacceptand/orrejectanyorallbids, andtoacceptthebidthatintheirjudgmentwillbeinthebest interestofFranklinCounty.Allbidsshallremainrmforaperiod ofsixtydaysaftertheopening. AllbiddersshallcomplywithallapplicableStateandlocallaws concerninglicensingregistrationandregulationofcontractors doingbusinesstotheStateofFlorida. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecallClaySmallwoodat (850)227-7200 OAKSTREETSCOPPROJECTPROJECT#007.110NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDSTheFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionerswillreceive sealedbidsfromanyqualiedperson,companyorcorporationinterestedinconstructing:OAKSTREETSCOPPROJECTProjectislocatedinLanarkVillage,Floridaandconsistsofapproximately1.5milesofroadwaywidening,resurfacingandapproximately1mileofnewconstructionroadwayalongOakStreet. PlansandspecicationscanbeobtainedatPreble-Rish,Inc.,324 MarinaDrive,PortSt.Joe,Florida32456,(850)227-7200.Costfor PlansandSpecicationswillbe$50.00persetandisnon-refundable.ChecksshouldbemadepayabletoPREBLE-RISH,INC.The bidmustconformtoSection287.133(3)FloridaStatutes,onpublic entitycrimes. AllbiddersshallbeFDOTqualiedperSection2-1oftheFDOTStandardSpecicationsforRoadandBridgeConstruction,latestedition inthefollowingworkclasses:Grading,Drainage,FlexiblePaving, andHotPlantMix-BituminousCourse. Completiondateforthisprojectwillbe150daysfromthedateofthe NoticetoProceedpresentedtothesuccessfulbidder.Liquidated damagesforfailuretocompletetheprojectonthespecieddate willbesetat$750.00perday. Pleaseindicateontheenvelopethatthisisasealedbid,forOak StreetSCOPProject. Bidswillbereceiveduntil4:00p.m.easterntime,onMarch17, 2014,attheFranklinCountyClerk'sOfce,FranklinCountyCourthouse,33MarketStreet,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida323202317,andwillbeopenedandreadaloudonMarch18,2014atthe CountyCommissionmeetingat34ForbesStreet,Apalachicola,FL. TheBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttowaive informalitiesinanybid,toacceptand/orrejectanyorallbids,and toacceptthebidthatintheirjudgmentwillbeinthebestinterestof FranklinCounty.Allbidsshallremainrmforaperiodofsixtydays aftertheopening. AllbiddersshallcomplywithallapplicableStateandlocallaws concerninglicensingregistrationandregulationofcontractorsdoing businesstotheStateofFlorida. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecallClaySmallwoodat (850)227-7200. HAIL TO THE CHIEFLast week, seventh graders at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School created a Presidential Wax Museum for parents and their fellow students. Students in Tanya Joanos class dressed to look like the president, or rst lady, who they selected, and when visitors to the media center walked by, and dropped a coin in their cups, the students came to life, and shared a brief history of the person they were portraying. Can you guess who is who? Answers are below. CHLOE DAVIS DAIJON PENAMON MATTHEW ADKINS BRYCE KENT JAN LOWE HALEY GAY JACK RAMSDELL DAMIEN FREEMAN MADISON COULTER SCOUT MCLEMORE JACOB PENDLETON IAN LASHLEY ALEXUS JOHNSON SOPHIA KIRVIN BRANDON TARANTO MIKALIN HUCKEBA CALVIN COOLIDGE FIRST LADY ELIZA JOHNSON WILLIAM H. HARRISON FIRST LADY LYDIA TYLER JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT CHESTER ARTHUR WILLIAM MCKINLEY TEDDY ROOSEVELT WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT GEORGE H. W. BUSH HERBERT HOOVER GERALD FORD RICHARD NIXON RONALD REAGAN GROVER CLEVELAND ANSWERSChloe Davis Grover Cleveland Matthew Adkins Ronald Reagan Bryce Kent Richard M. Nixon Daijon Penamon Gerald Ford Jan Lowe Herbert Hoover Haley Gay George H.W. Bush Jack Ramsdell William Howard Taft Damien Freeman Teddy Roosevelt Madison Coulter William McKinley Scout MeLemore Chester Arthur Jacob Pendleton Franklin D. Roosevelt Ian Lashley John Fitzgerald Kennedy Alexus Johnson First Lady Eliza Johnson Sophia Kirvin First Lady Lydia Tyler Brandon Taranto William H. Harrison Mikalin Huckeba Calvin Coolidge NOT PICTURED: Angel Henning Abraham Lincoln Kevin Flores Andrew Jackson Connor Messer George Washington Jaiden Hill John Fitzgerald Kennedy Cole Smith Woodrow Wilson Sean Williams John Adams Ethan Vonier Bill Clinton Aaron Martin Thomas Jefferson Cameron Wynn Barack Obama

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, February 27, 2014 4516044PUBLICNOTICEeCityCommissionoftheCityofCarrabellewill meetinregularsessiononursdayMarch6,2014,at approximately6:00p.m.orassoonascanbeheardinthe CityofCarrabelleCommissionChamberslocatedat1001 GrayAve,Carrabelle,FL(850)697-2727toconsiderthe followinginaccordancewithOrdinanceNo.443,Consent ofUsefortheConsumptionandSaleofAlcohol: 1.AllowingCrowder/C-Quarterstosellpackage locatedat208St.JamesAvenue,Ste.A. Allinterestedpartiesareinvitedtoattendthepublic hearingonthismatter.Furtherinformationconcerning theproposedamendmentcanbeobtainedfromtheCity ClerkatCityHall,at1001GrayAvenue,Carrabelle, Florida,32322,orbycalling(850)697-2727,betweenthe hoursof8:00A.M.and4:30P.M.,MondaythroughFriday, excludingholidays. Ifanindividualdecidestoappealanydecisionmade bytheCityCommissionwithrespecttothismeeting,a verbatimtranscriptmayberequired.Ifso,theindividual shouldmakeprovisionforatranscripttobemadeatthe meeting,(RE:FloridaStatute286.0105).Pursuanttothe provisionsoftheAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,any personrequiringspecialaccommodationtoparticipate inthismeetingisaskedtoadvisethecityatleast48hours beforethemeetingbycontactingKeishaMesseratthe aboveaddressorphonenumber. WilburnMesser,Mayor Attest: KeishaMesser,CityClerk PublishFebruary27,2014 tourist lodgings would be required to display a copy of the ordinance at all times. Beach equipment would have to be pulled back in the evenings to the toe of the dunes and could not encroach on vegetation or to the line of development if dunes and vegetation are not present. Equipment not in compliance with the law would be collected sometime between sunset and 7 a.m., according to the motion. Jackel had asked for modication of an earlier version that called for collection between 7 p.m. and sunrise. Josh Hodson, manager of Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park, said the state has an existing protocol for beach clearance, and he suggested to ordinance adhere to the state rule. Commissioners questioned who would enforce the rule. Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender said members of her staff remove abandoned equipment from the beach, although not on a daily basis. She said the county owns an off-road vehicle dedicated to beach clean-up. She said she has employees on call at night to deal with problems at public restrooms, and she has investigated having more employees to work in the evening during busy season, This is a well drafted ordinance, said St. George Island resident Barbara Sanders, herself an attorney. We need this. It sets a standard, and I commend you for that. Its a good message to get out for safety. I want the citizens who use that beach to support this ordinance. There would be no penalty for breaking the No Trace law in its suggested form, other than the loss of the property. Conscated items could be reclaimed at the county landll. Parrish objected to the policy of returning property to offenders. I dont agree with spending county resources to pick it up and then give it back to them, he said. Whats the deterrent? Whos responsible for this property once we pick it up? Once its on the county truck, it belongs to the county. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson expressed concerns about funding for the beach cleanup. None of this is currently in the budget, she said. She worried about the cost of maintaining the vehicle and patrolling a much larger stretch of beach on a regular basis. She said the county must be accountable for anything conscated, and an auditor would be needed. Johnson said she believed companies that rent beach equipment should bear the cost of removing abandoned items from the beach. She also worried that tourists might be offended by having their equipment taken. I dont see how Parks and Recreation can enforce it, and Im concerned about going on private land, she said. Millender suggested the county investigate generating funds by selling permits for beach weddings. I think we need to look a little deeper into this, Sanders said. back nearly 40 years to the time he took a manners class in his Rust Belt childhood home of Steubenville, Ohio. Presented without interruption, with its two characters on stage nearly entirely throughout, the play features the lead actor (Eric Folks) as the narrator Jeffrey, who brings to life seven other characters his father, a coarse and comic boor; his amboyant drama teacher, Bill Crossky, who obsesses on all things showbiz; four of his classmates, Chucky the annoying suck-up, Jamie the inquisitive and sexually curious, Kim the Cold War paranoid, and Ralph the sluggish slob; and Patsy, the sexpot who is Jeffreys only rival to earning a perfect score for etiquette at the end-of-the-year matrons ball. As the teacher, Mrs. Mannerly, actress Cleo Holladay shows she commands the physical energy, range of emotion and well-crafted subtlety that has come from her more than 60 years as a professional actress. The sternness of her classroom persona, the impetuousness with which she snatches Jeffreys tuition check, the comfort she conveys in a dive bar, all testify to a vintage, multi-layered performance by a woman gracefully entering the twilight of her years in the footlights. As strong a performance as Holladay provides, the iron man of the stage is young Folks, a graduate of Otterbein Colleges esteemed theatre program, which also produced David Caldwell, who directed both shows. Folks is a bundle of manic energy that complements Holladays frosty self-control, and then, hours later, he ably steps into a completely contrasting place, the mythical northern Maine town of Almost. It is in that second show, either later or earlier on Saturday, that Folks shows his gifts for elongating the pain of love and loss, and unearthing the quaking of our hearts, that we all try to hide as best we can. The show features nearly a dozen separate, and softly desperate, scenes, each at the same time on a moonless Friday evening during a Maine winter. Folks is in about half of them, playing heartbroken former lovers, frustrated married men, bewildered suitors, with smoothness and familiarity. His equal are the three actors who share in the energy of Almost, Maine, Caldwell, who is featured as an average Joe in a couple of the scenes; Caitlin Morris, a fellow Otterbein graduate; and Dixie Partington, who together with Jerry Hall produced the shows for the Dixie Theatre Foundation, which she heads. Morris, originally from St. Petersburg, is making her second appearance at the Dixie, and displays a talent for opening the emotional passageways of the girl next door. She is a pleasure to watch, whether she is giddily cavorting on a skimobile, or holding her ground skittishly on ice skates against a distant husband. Partington offers a sadder, more poignant persona in her performance, evoking the pain of a long-forsaken love, or the confusion of a girlfriend who shows up at her boyfriends doorstep with plastic trash bags full of the love he gave her. Caldwell, the director, anchors his shows with a solid grasp of the men he manifests. As usual, the Dixie doesnt present an elaborate set, there is no backdrop to evoke Steubenville, or the winter wonderland of Almost. What there is, in full bloom, is superb acting that reminds us of the exquisite power of live theatre. PHOTOS BY DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The TimesAbove, Eric Folks, as Randy, left, and David Caldwell, as Chad, are two county boys in Almost, Maine. At right, The two scenes with Eric Folks, as Pete, and Caitlin Morris as Ginette, open and close Almost, Maine. NO TRACE from page A1 DIXIE from page A1

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A8 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 CRAEMERisagorgeousGoldenRetriever mix.Heisaboutayearold,super friendlyandsocial.Hewasdumped inaneighborhoodalongwithseveral otherdogs,allofwhomwereemaciated andneglected.Theothershavebeen transferredtootherrescuesbutthissweet boyisstillwaitingforhisforeverhome. HeisheartwormpositivebuttheHumane Societywillhavehimtreatedwhenthe rightadopterrescueshim. Volunteersaredesperatelyneededto socializeallofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofour animalsintotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytime youcansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklin CountyHumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.You maylogontothewebsiteat www.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets. FranklinCountyHumaneSociety SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday FeaturingLocalArtisans LanarkVillage BoatClubSpringMarch8th,20149am~1pmLUNCH ngirSp PUBLICNOTICETHEFRANKLINCOUNTYADVISORYBOARDOF ADJUSTMENTWILLHOLDAPUBLICHEARINGON WEDNESDAY,MARCH5,2014AT10:00A.M.,INTHECOUNTY COMMISSIONMEETINGROOMOFTHEFRANKLINCOUNTY COURTHOUSEANNEXTOCONSIDERTHEFOLLOWING VARIANCES,APPEALSANDSPECIALEXCEPTIONS: 1-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUEST FORASPECIALEXCEPTIONTOLOCATEA COMMUNICATIONTOWERONA100X100FTPARCEL OUTOFA26.8ACREPARCELONPROPERTYZONED R-6RURALRESIDENTIAL.THISPROPERTYIS DESCRIBEDASLYINGINSECTION8,TOWNSHIP 8SOUTH,RANGE5WESTBETWEENEASTPOINT ANDCARRABELLE,NORTHOFHIGHWAY98.THE APPLICANTISALSOREQUESTINGAVARIANCETO THE47FTHEIGHTLIMITTOCONSTRUCTA200FT TOWER.REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYBLACKWATER GROUP,LANEWRIGHT,AGENTFORAT&T. 2-RECONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFOR ANAFTER-THE-FACTVARIANCETOINSTALLA SWIMMINGPOOL6.5FEETINTOTHEREARSETBACK LINEAND4FEETINTOTHE25FTSETBACKLINEOFF OF11THSTREETEASTONPROPERTYDESCRIBED AS1080EASTGULFBEACHDRIVE,LOT11,BLOCK J,UNIT2,ST.GEORGEISLAND,FRANKLINCOUNTY, FLORIDA.REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYWILLIAM& DONNANICHOLS,OWNERS. THEBOARDOFCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERSACTINGAS THEBOARDOFADJUSTMENTWILLADDRESSTHESE REQUESTSATTHEIRMEETINGONMARCH18,2014,AT9:00 A.M. *Personswishingtocommentmaydosoinpersonorinwriting totheFranklinCountyPlanning&ZoningDepartment,34Forbes Street,Suite1,Apalachicola,FL32320.Transactionsofthishearingwillnotberecorded,personswishingtorecordtheproceedings mustmakethenecessaryarrangementforrecording. Society WeddingsThe parents of John Edward Nunez and Samantha Nicole Pouncey would like to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children. John is a 2008 graduate of Franklin County High School and is currently employed as a sergeant with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. He is the son of Donnie and Meloney Chambers, of Eastpoint, and John J. Nunez, of South Carolina. John is the grandson of the late Cecil E. Simmons, of Sopchoppy, the late Martha Braswell Glass, of Eastpoint, Kelby and Sally Chambers of Eastpoint, and Ben and Rose Hurley of Tallahassee. He is the great-grandson of Selma Shiver Braswell and the late George H. Braswell of Eastpoint; and the late Sercy and Jewell Simmons, of Sopchoppy. Samantha is a 2011 graduate of Franklin County High School and currently works for the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. She is the child of Cecil Joe Pouncey and Frances Hunnings, of Carrabelle, and Alicia Armistead of Texas. She is the granddaughter of Melvin and the late Marilyn Armitage, of Texas, and the late Carolyn Sparks of Carrabelle. The wedding will be held at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola on Saturday, March 22, 2014, at 2:30 p.m. with a reception to follow at Rivercrest Lodge. All family and friends are invited to attend. No formal invitations will be sent. Casual attire accepted. Marshall Sweet and Rosamae Cummings would like to announce their wedding this Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, at 6 p.m. at the Community Center at Battery Park in Apalachicola. Marshall is the son of the late Diane Mack and the late Marshall Malveaux. Rosamae is the daughter of Robert Cummings, of Apalachicola, and the late Jackie Houston. We invite all our family and friends to come celebrate with us. A reception will follow at the community center. On Thursday, Feb. 20, health departments across Florida celebrated the 125th anniversary of public health in Florida. Floridas health department was born when a young Marine, Dr. Joseph Yates Porter, was appointed the states rst public health ofcer after helping to control an outbreak of yellow fever in Jacksonville. At health department ofces in Apalachicola and Carrabelle, workers and guests celebrated public health with healthy snacks, free dental supplies and lots of literature on staying t. Behind a display table, a slide show highlighted the history of public health in Franklin County. Today as we celebrate 125 years of public health, it is tting to reect upon those whose shoulders we now stand on, health department spokesman David Walker said. And to take note of the contributions of the countless people of public health whose often seless and valiant efforts to protect and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts are remembered.Happy birthday!Shes got style, Shes got air. Thats My Girl With the bouffant hair. Happy 40th birthday Bijoux Harmon celebrated her 16th birthday on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, in Apalachicola. Bijoux is a Cairn Terrier (Remember Toto?) and has brought much joy, happiness, and consternation in her 16 years. She is a welltraveled little dog and a ne little studio dog and is the inspiration for Oystertown Dog Designs. Bijoux was 2013 Mardi Paws Queen. She is a proud member of Col. Potter Cairn Terrier Rescue, which rescues and places Cairns throughout the U.S. Bijouxs birthday wish is for all dogs to have loving, caring, forever homes and to enjoy a long, well-cared-for life as she has had.Rosamae Cummings, Marshall Sweet to wed Friday Samantha Pouncey, John Nunez to marry LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAttending the celebration of 125 years of public health at the county health department ofces are, from left, Interim Director Marcia Lindeman, Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove, Health Education Consultant Talitha Robinson and Alma Pugh of Florida Healthy Families.A happy birthday to good health Special to The TimesApalachicola resident Ron Harris, writing as R. Juan Harris, will debut his novel The Ruby Sea Glass at Downtown Books on Saturday. Harris moved here from Atlanta four years ago, when his real estate career went South along with the market. Along the way, he discovered a passion for writing. In this new novel, Florida State University freshman Sloan Abernathy promises his dying father that he will buckle down, get straight As, and shun unsuitable relationships. He believes that he is meeting these expectations when he joins ROTC, excels academically, and falls in love with a beautiful transfer student from Boston. But, after graduation, stationed at an Army base in Spain, Sloan makes a single mistake that sends his life veering off in entirely different directions. Nicholas Sparks fans are sure to enjoy this story of a decent man trying to do the right thing while holding fast to his dream of sailing off into the sunset with his true love by his side. Friends and wellwishers can join the author at Downtown Books from 1-3 pm. For more information or to reserve a copy of The Ruby Sea Glass, call the bookstore at 653-1290. BirthdaysBijoux marks her Sweet 16 Harris launches debut novel Saturday

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The Times | A9Thursday, February 27, 2014February is just about history. March is shaping up to be another busy month. Guess well see you at lunch this afternoon. Sarge and his helpers will have a nice lunch xed for us. The chow line forms at noon. Your donation of $4 will be collected at the desk at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, 201 Avenue F in Carrabelle. Friday nights are always hamburger and chip nights at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 here in the village. A donation of $6 will be collected in the lounge. Eat in or take out. You will enjoy the evening. Start off Saturday morning, March 1 with a full breakfast at Chillas Hall. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will cook and serve pancakes/French toast, eggs, bacon/sausage, juice and coffee. Yum! Yum! Your donation of $5 will be collected inside the doors. See ya there! Ill be in the front of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church after 5 p.m. Mass on Saturday to kick off our annual tootsie roll drive for the handicapped and mentally impaired, sponsored by the Knights of Columbus. Later, on Saturday night, you can have a fun evening at the Over 50 Dance at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Bring your favorite snack, your beverage of choice, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. Jim the deejay will provide the music for your dancing and listening pleasure. Hop! Hop! Hop! Every Sunday evening is pizza night at Legion Post 82. Doors open at 4 p.m. Orders taken after 5 p.m. Pizza by the slice requires a donation of $1. Betcha cant eat just one. Whole pizza is $8 donation and take-out goes for a donation of $10. Monday, March 3 will be our monthly meeting of the Lanark Village Association. Membership meeting at 7 p.m. The door at Chillas Hall will open at 5:45 p.m. Every Wednesday night we have bingo at Chillas Hall. The door will open at 6 p.m. and I will start calling at 6:30 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening with us. Cookies and soft drinks available. On Thursday, March 6, World War II veterans can register for Camp Gordon Johnston Days at the World War II Museum, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle. We will have our annual reception for the veterans on March 7. Sorry, no hamburgers or chips that night, but the Legion Post will have a low country boil. All World War II vets, active duty troops, Legionnaires, Sons, Auxiliary and their spouses are invited to attend. There is no charge for this event, which begins at 6 p.m. Members are encouraged to bring a dish to share. The Not Quite Ready Band will play dinner music. This is not a public event. Chillas Hall was packed out last Saturday, Feb. 22. Everyone enjoyed the great full breakfast and service. No, I didnt win the drawing. Oh, well. We will enjoy another great breakfast and service, on Saturday, March 8, only this time it will be held at the Curfew Lodge, 108 NE First Street, in Carrabelle. After youve enjoyed your breakfast, its off to the big parade. Step-off at 10 a.m. Also, Saturday March 8, the members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will hold their annual spring bazaar from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., inside and outside the clubhouse. Breakfast sandwiches will be available and well have lunch also. The dinner dance will be held at 6 p.m. above C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle. The catered dinner features choice of chicken, fried or baked, or ham with all the classic Southern sides. Tea and coffee provided, or bring a beverage of your choice. The evenings entertainment features music from the World War II era to present, with several local crooners on hand to sing some of the familiar songs. All this for a $10 donation per person. All World War II and active duty troops attend at no charge. For tickets and further information, call the museum at 697-8575. Deadline for ticket purchases is Wednesday, March 5. When you get home from the dinner dance, or just out on the town, set you clocks ahead one hour before going to see the sandman and while youre at it, check the batteries in those smoke alarms. Remember all meals, games and other fundraisers are open to everyone. I will note members only when the occasion arises. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, ASAP also stands for always say a prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry.Preparing for Camp Gordon Johnston Days 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService WelcomesYouHwy.986thSt. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 SundayWorshipServices 8&10:30a.m. ShroveTuesdayPancakeSupper March4th5-7p.m. Allyoucaneatfor$5.00 March5th AshWednesdayServices Noon&6p.m. Faith LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Faith BRIEFBefore the chili cook-off Saturday, there will be a pancake breakfast this Saturday, March 1 from 7:30 to 10 a.m. at the St. George Island United Methodist Church, 210 E. Gulf Beach Drive. Pancakes, sausage, coffee, juice, all for $6. Take-out available. Benet is for the Nicaragua Mission Team.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Just as Pope Francis has energized the faithful worldwide, so too are members of Apalachicolas St. Patrick Catholic Church planning a spiritual awakening in Franklin County. A monthly series of theological discussions, conducted in a relaxed, restaurant environment, had its inaugural session last week at Tamaras Caf, as a dining room full of interested people drew up possible topics for what is being called Theology on Tap. God is still alive. God is not dead, said Ryan Totolo, a parishioner at St. Dominics in Panama City who, together with Justin Gagnon, attended the Feb. 18 gathering to share how Bay Countys program has worked. This is for people from all walks of life, in a local setting outside the church. It is important that we do things outside of our church and homes, he said. Apalachicola resident Oliver Monod, member of a seven-person organizing committee, conducted the brainstorming session, as diners provided possible topics for future sessions. Also serving on the committee are Father Roger Latosynski, Jim Dunkin, Ramon Valenzuela, Gerald Shannon, Mark Vail and Franklin County High School sophomore Gabby Bond. Bonds suggestion of The 10 commandments, what do they mean and how do we understand how to live by them? was just one of about a dozen topics suggested by the gathering. Other ideas included God and creation, Vatican II, women and the Church, diversity in the Church, the new evangelization and the meaning of the sacraments. Monod stressed that the entire Franklin County community is welcome to take part in the monthly Theology on Tap, sessions, and that the group plans to explore both Catholic theology as well as the teachings of different aspects of the JudeoChristian tradition. The spirits not just catching on, its caught on, said Father Joe, a retired Bay County priest who often assists Father Roger at St. Patrick. Its a new faith, a whole new vision. Katie Wood, who described herself as a nondenominational Christian who grew up in a regular Pentecostal church, said she would be interested in becoming more knowledgeable with Catholic terminology. A Christian denomination can identify with a relationship with Christ, said one woman. That can be a topic, a relationship with Jesus. Monod said the organizing committee plans to assemble a schedule of topics for the monthly sessions, which will last about an hour, and will begin at Tamaras Caf. For more information on Theology on Tap, call Monod at 899-7999.The SSmith FFamilyWe would like to thank our family and friends for the outpouring of love and kindness extended to us during the illness and passing of our beloved Charles. We are so blessed to have such a loving family and wonderful, caring friends. The food, owers, cards and all of the other expressions of love and caring were appreciated more than we can ever express.The Charles B. Smith FamilyFFamily and FFriends DayThank you, thank you. I would like to thank God for allowing me to have another Family and Friends Day. I would like to thank all the churches, my pastor and his wife, and all the ones that sang and danced, and most of all I want to thank God for Jesus and my family. May God bless everyoneEula Rochelle, chairperson Cards of tTHANKSDA A VI I D AA DLERS ERS TEIN EIN | The TimesArnold Tolliver, left, urged the gathering to focus on basic meaning of the Gospel, and not get tangled up in minute details, Olivier Monod is at right.Catholics to pore over the theologicalMethodists host breakfast on island SSaturday From Staff ReportsEight oak trees in front of Marks Insurance, 61 Ave. E, were removed Monday from the state right-of-way. Wilbur Bellew, the city of Apalachicolas eld operations assistant, said they were cut down after the Florida Department of Transportation determined they were a safety hazard. Bellew said the insurance company requested ve of the trees be removed because they had customers slip and fall due to the acorns, and sidewalks cracking. He said Chuck Marks, owner of the insurance agency, applied to the city to have the ve trees removed, but the application was put on hold because being that its on the state right-ofway we cannot approve it without a signed release from DOT, so we told him he had to get a request from DOT in writing to do anything. When DOT came down and analyzed the problem, they said it was a safety and maintenance issue and they had to take them all out. Bellew said Transeld, a DOT contractor, did the removal. He said it is likely they will be replaced by palm trees, but the city has not yet received a formal request for replanting. 8 oak trees removed from right-of-wayLOIS IS SWSW OB B ODA A | The TimesWorkers remove oak trees Monday from in front of Marks Insurance.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, February 27, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By TOM BAIRD Special to The Times The eye of the casual explorer in the bay or on the beach is rst taken by the numerous shelled animals, the mollusks, like crown conchs and lightening whelks, or the arthropods, like horseshoe, spider and blue crabs. But on closer inspection, one nds the remains or living specimens of another major group the echinoderms. Echinoderms include star sh, sand dollars, brittle stars, sea cucumbers, and sea urchins and are by far some of the most extraordinary animals alive. First, they are all marine. Think about it. You nd freshwater clams, freshwater prawns and shrimp, etc., yet there are no freshwater star sh or freshwater urchins. The mollusks and the crustaceans invaded freshwater, but to be such a major group, the echinoderms never managed to adapt to freshwater habitats. You wont nd any land star sh either. There are no terrestrial echinoderms, yet we have plenty of terrestrial mollusks (snails) and arthropods (think insects, etc.). The most distinctive feature of echinoderms is their radial symmetry. Fish and insects, dogs and cats, and you and I have bilateral symmetry. Our major sense organs are on our heads or the direction of movement. Echinoderms, with their radial symmetry, meet the world 360 degrees around. This can be a major advantage with sense organs facing all directions. There is no head and motion can be in any direction. The other extraordinary feature is their power to regenerate limbs and organs. If a star sh loses one of its legs, a new one will regrow. This ability has made echinoderms the focus of a lot of biomedical research. Imagine if you lost a nger or arm in an accident that you could regrow it, or if we could regenerate lost or damaged nerves. Unlocking echinoderms ability to regenerate tissues could be a huge boon to mankind. Ever notice the banner of The Star newspaper? It features what appears to be a keyhole sand dollar, an appropriate logo with its ve pointed radial star pattern. The keyhole sand dollar, Mellita tenuis, inhabits the Florida Gulf Coast. Its the species we nd here. Another species, M. quinquiesperforata, ranges from the mouth of the Mississippi, along the Texas coast and down as far as South America. Yet another species, M. isometra, inhabits our Atlantic coasts. Some researchers believe these are all varieties of Mellita quiquiesperforata. While there are subtle differences, they all share certain features. They all grow up to about three inches in diameter and in life are brown, greyish tan, and if there are algae growing among the cilia, a greyish green. Most people are familiar with only the bleached skeletal remains found on the beach. If you have been fortunate to handle a living sand dollar you know that the brown outer covering is a moving mosaic of tiny cilia. The calcareous skeleton (called a test) is, in life, covered by a thin skin and muscles. On this living surface are spines, tube feet, and cilia. The cilia help to move food particles to the mouth, which is in the center of the at underside. Tube feet help provide locomotion and spines help in burrowing. The sand dollars burrow in sandy bottoms for protection from wave action and from predators, mainly bottom feeding sh like ounder. They feed on tiny planktonic organisms or other organic matter suspended in the water or in the sandy substrate as they burrow. Sand dollars are really just attened forms of sea urchins and are sometimes called keyhole urchins. On the upper surface can be seen the ve features that form the star-shaped pattern. These are called petalloids, and are used as gills and have specialized tube feet. The ve oval holes in the test are called lunules, and they are paired except for the larger long hole that looks like an oldfashioned keyhole. As you turn a living sand dollar over, one sees the moving mouth parts with ve teeth arranged in a circle. In death, these pieces become disarticulated and can sometimes be heard rattling around inside the empty test. If you break the test open, these structures look somewhat like a white winged bird in ight. This dove-like shape has led some to ascribe a religious signi cance to the ve mouthparts and various legends have grown up about these formations. The larvae of keyhole sand dollars are planktonic and have the ability to swim. Once the eggs are fertilized they develop into bilaterally symmetrical larvae and feed on smaller plankton. They will pass through several life stages and in four to six weeks they will develop into radially symmetrical adults and spend the rest of their lives burrowing in or living on the sea oor. The remains of sand dollars and sea urchins are avidly collected by beachcombers. You probably have a few white sand dollar tests in your house. They are incorporated in numerous art works and craft pieces. Yet this silent little animal is not only of major importance to the ecology of the bay, but holds secrets within its cells that could bene t all of us in the future. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher, director of a science and environmental center, and teacher of science and principal. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Feb.2752 4010% Fri,Feb.2855 4420% Sat,Mar.158 4830% Sun,Mar.262 57 0% Mon,Mar.369 48 -% Tues,Mar.469 48 -% Wed,Mar.569 48 -% Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeisalmosthere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. Spring time is almost here! By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Next month, Paddle Florida is hosting a sevenday trip down the Ochlockonee River for paddlers of all ages. Paddle Florida Inc. is a not-for-pro t 501(c)(3) corporation organized to promote and support paddling in Florida, as well as creating paddling events, promoting water conservation, wildlife preservation, and the restoration of springs and protection of waterways in Florida. From March 15-21, Paddle Florida will launch its fourth trip down the Ochlockonee and its 26th adventure for paddlers. The trip begins at Ed and Bernices Fish Camp just below the Lake Talquin Dam. The entire route is 76 miles and averages 15 miles a day with stops at Drake Landing, Whitehead Lake Landing, Revell Landing, Log Cabin Campsite, Womack Creek and more. Meals catered by local providers are available for an additional fee and campers will enjoy an evening program every night before turning in. Organizers advise travelers to pack a dry bag of clothing and rain gear but say they have never had to cancel a trip due to weather during their six years of organizing boating expeditions. In a review of last years Ochlocknee trip, Mim Duncan wrote the following, Paddle Florida trips are well organized and its so convenient to have our luggage and camping gear carried to each campsite rather than having to haul it in our kayaks. Meals are provided by caterers, so the trips are more relaxing than non-assisted trips. Paddle Floridas leadership works hard to make our trips easier. Many of us have formed friendships through these experiences and have paddled numerous trips with this group. Its always a joy to reconnect with established friends and to meet new ones. The cost of trips is reasonable. Registration for adults on the Ochlockonee trip is $300; $275 for seniors and college students and $250 for youngsters 8-17 years of age. Children 7 and younger paddle free. The meal package is an additional $175 per person. There is a $25 per person and per boat for shuttle service to and from the boat ramps. Registration ends March 1. You can contact Paddle Florida at P.O. Box 5953, Gainesville, FL 32627, 1710 SW 35th Place, Unit C, Gainesville, FL 32608 or call (352) 377-8342. JILL LINDGARD | Special to The TimesFrank Konciewicz and Chuck Bennick set out through morning fog during last years Ochlockonee adventure. Paddle the Ochlockonee in MarchA sea urchin out and aboutTurning over sand dollars and star sh PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMESA keyhole sand dollarPage 10Local area streams and lakes will be on the rise as rain water and runoff waters ll our area from the vast amounts of rain this week. This should be a good thing for local cat sh and bream anglers, but may hinder the inshore guys looking for trout and red sh. We should start to see spring time feeding patterns emerge soon! SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, February 27, 2014 ASectionThe Franklin County High School track team, under the direction of Shevial Weston, begins its 2014 season Saturday. The team will compete at the 10th annual Jesse Forbes High School Invitational, at Godby High School, in Tallahassee. On March 5, 12 and 19, the team travels to Liberty County High School in Bristol for meets. On March 25, the Franklin County athletes will take part in the James Pelham Invitational at East Gadsden High School in Quincy. On April 5, the Seahawk speedsters participate in the North Florida Invitational at Bay High School, in Panama City. The district meet will be held April 8 at Wewahitchka High School. Regionals are April 18 at Florida High, in Tallahassee, with the state meet May 2 in Jacksonville. Weston said FCHS is not yet equipped to handle a home track meet. The girls who are members of the Seahawk team include Jencyn Stultz, Deborah Dempsey, Tyanna Townsend, Myesha Campbell, Evangelina Ducker, Diamond Butler, Josie Turner and DyShereah Key. The boys include Maliek Rhodes, Chandler White, Joshua Patriotis, Johnny Jones, Jaylon Gainer, Shane Bellew, Quantavius Fuller, Dallas Shiver, Matthew Turner and Cole Wheeler. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN FLORIDADEPARTMENTOFHEALTH INFRANKLINCOUNTYClosingtheGapProgram FebruaryisAmericanHeartMonthHeartdiseaseistheleadingcauseofdeathforboth menandwomenanditisoenpreventableand controllable.Everyyear,about715,000Americans haveaheartattack.About600,000peoplediefrom heartdiseaseintheUnitedStateseachyear(thats1 outofevery4deaths).Belowarevemajorsymptomsofaheartattack: Ifyouthinkthatyouorsomeoneyouknowishavingaheartattack, call911immediately. etermheartdiseasereferstoseveraltypesofheartconditions.emost commontypeintheUnitedStatesiscoronaryheartdisease(alsocalledcoronaryarterydisease),whichoccurswhenasubstancecalledplaquebuildsupin heartattack,angina,heartfailure,andarrhythmias.PlanforPreventionSomehealthconditionsandlifestylefactorscanputpeopleathighriskfordeveloping heartdisease.Youcanhelppreventheartdiseasebymakinghealthychoicesand managingallofyourknownmedicalconditions.Hereareninetipstohelpprevent heartdisease: Eatahealthydiet-Besuretoeatplentyoffruitsandvegetablesandeatfoodsthatare lowinsaturated/transfats. Maintainahealthyweight-Beingoverweightorobesecanincreaseyourrisk forheartdisease. cholesterolandbloodpressure. Monitoryourbloodpressure.-Highbloodpressureoenhasnosymptomssobesure tohaveitcheckedonaregularbasis. Limitalcoholuse-Avoiddrinkingtoomuchalcoholwhichcanincrease yourbloodpressure. Haveyourcholesterolchecked-Yourhealthcareprovidershouldtestyour cholesterollevelsatleastonceevery5years. Manageyourdiabetes-Ifyouhavediabetes,monitoryourbloodsugarlevelsclosely andtalkwithyourdoctorabouttreatmentoptions. Takeyourmedicine-Ifyouretakingmedicationtotreathighbloodpressure, highcholesterol,ordiabetesfollowyourdoctorsinstructionscarefully. FreshmanMeganCollinswontwodistrictgamesonthe moundfortheLadySeahawksvarsitysoftballteamlast week.PitchinginreliefFeb.18,shehurledthenalthree inningsagainstLibertyCountytoearnthe11-10win.In Friday's6-2winathomeagainstBozeman,shetossed thenalveinnings,givinguponerunonsevenhitswith threestrikeouts.Overtheentireweek,shegaveuptwo runsovereightinnings,andstruckoutve. PLAYEROFTHEWEEK MeganCollins The Seahawks varsity baseball team, under the direction of coach Aaron York won its rst district game of the year Feb. 20 against West Gadsden. The winning pitcher was senior Bobby John Curry, who did not allow a hit and struck out six. Senior Alex Causey went 3-3 with two doubles, senior Graham Kirvin was 2-3 and scored three runs, and senior Logan McLeod went 2-3 and scored two runs. Junior Jonny Riley smacked a pair of doubles. The Seahawks are now 2-3, and 1-0 in district play. They faced Liberty County at home Tuesday night. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN From Staff ReportAt the regular Feb. 18 county meeting, Nikki Millender, director of parks and recreation, has announced the 2014 District 4 Dixie Youth Baseball Tournament would be played at Donnie Wilson Field on June 13-16. At the previous county meeting, commissioners had asked Millender to investigate possible sources for a public address system and scoreboards needed for the tourney. Last week, Millender said she was able to put together a public address system using existing county equipment and needed only to purchase two microphones to complete the system. Millender said she has funded one scoreboard, at a cost of about $3,300, with a grant from WastePro. She said Duke Energy has committed to funding a second board. She said she was con dent she could nd a source for funding a third scoreboard. The commissioners congratulated her on locating the needed equipment. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity softball team won four district games as they went undefeated for the week. On Tuesday, Feb. 18, the team hosted Liberty County and defeated the Lady Bulldogs 11-10 in nine innings. Freshman Megan Collins relieved sophomore Krista Martina and pitched the nal three innings to earn the win. The Lady Seahawks led 95 with three innings to play before Liberty County scratched out four runs to tie the game in the sixth inning. Both teams scored a run in the eighth inning. In the ninth, with the game tied 10-all, junior Calli Westbrook led off with a single, followed by a bunt for a base hit by seventh grader Melanie Collins. Senior Ally Millender laid down a sacri ce bunt to advance both runners and senior Morgan Mock ended the game with a double to the left-center eld gap. Mock had three hits on the night. Senior Ashley Carroll and junior Madison Newell had two each. Seventh grader Sophia Kirvin, freshman Scout Segree, Martina and Millender also had hits. Our girls were determined to nd a way to win, said head coach Scott Collins. On Thursday, Feb. 20, the team accepted two forfeits from district foe West Gadsden. On Friday, Panama City Bozeman traveled to Franklin County and lost 6 -2. Megan Collins was the winning pitcher, hurling the nal ve innings, giving up one run on seven hits with three strikeouts. Mock led the team with two hits. Segree, Newell, Millender, Westbrook and Melanie Collins all had one hit each. The Lady Seahawks are 9-2 on the season and 41 in district play. We are off to a great start, but we have a lot of work to do and plenty of room to improve, said coach Collins. Dixie Youth tourney coming to Wilson FieldPHIL COALE | Special to the TimesSenior Graham Kirvin rounds the base paths.Seahawks blank West GadsdenPage 11 Track team opens season Saturday at Godby PHIL COALE | The TimesSenior Ally Millender continues to be a steady force behind the plate.Lady Seahawks win four district games

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The Lanark Village Boat Club is spearheading an effort to build community awareness among new village residents. On Friday, Feb. 21, several dozen Lanark village residents gathered at the Lanark Village Boat Club to share dinner and ideas about building relationships within the community. Anyone was free to attend, but invitations were extended to the press, the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce and members of the boat club, The St. James Lanark Village Volunteer Fire Department, the Lanark Village Golf Club and the Lanark Village Association. Most of those in attendance served on the boards of one or more of those organizations. Norm Gempel, commodore of the boat club, led the meeting. He said activity in the village is on the upswing citing increased attendance at the boat clubs monthly breakfast as an indicator. At one time, we might get 50 people, even during the on season when there were lots of snowbirds, We thought about shutting down the breakfast during the summer, he said. This year, weve been averaging 100 to 110 people per meal. Gempel said his aim for Fridays meeting was to build communication between village organizations and exchange contact information. All attendees were asked to put their contact information on a sign-up sheet that will be converted to a list and distributed to the four clubs invited to the meeting and to attendees. Gempel said the boat club has an active website www.lanarkboatclub.com and each month publishes a calendar of activities available on the web and posted at Chillas Hall and the boat club clubhouse. He invited other Lanark organizations to link to the boat club website. He said the two goals of this move to organize are to build awareness among newcomer residents, and to create partnerships within the community. The whole situation in the village is very cyclical and right now its on the way up, Gempel told the assembly. We want to know how we can help you to help us get the word out. I think this is the rst time in the 20 years Ive had a home here that we have exchanged information, like this. We should be doing it every year. Dot Bless, treasurer of the Lanark Village Association, said the organization has received permission from the state to refurbish the sign announcing Lanark Village located in the public right of way. She said someone unidentied is maintaining two Facebook pages, one for Lanark Village and one for Lanark Village by the Sea. She said information about Village activities appears on these pages. She said the Lanark by the Sea site is public and anyone can post to it. KimHawkinsDavisCPAHwy98at11thStreet,Suite4 Apalachicola,FL32320850-653-6875 andMuchMorePromptProfessionalPersonalService Trades&Services ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter Special to The TimesAttendance at this years island tour of homes increased by 11 percent over 2013. In spite of cold and blustery weather, 534 sightseers turned out for the third annual St. George Island Tour of homes. Organizer Terry Kemp said there were fewer walk-ins the day of the tour. She speculated that the weather discouraged daytrippers who did not already hold tickets. A brief survey was circulated with the tour brochure and 22 percent of the forms were returned providing with information about attendees. Twenty-six percent of participants said they learned about the tour from a friend. Posters ranked second at 21 percent and newspapers were the third most popular source of information at 20 percent. Kemp said the Tourist Development Council placed ads in several local newspapers, including the Times. She said the Lighthouse Association bought additional newspaper ads in Panama City, Tallahassee and Dothan. About half the attendees came from Florida but there were participants from Canada and 21 states including Michigan, Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Idaho. Kemp said, based on conversations with guests, she believed about half were snowbirds. More than half of those attending the 2014 tour had attended a tour in the past. Over 95 percent said they would like to attend another island tour of homes. More than 100 volunteers helped with the event, most as docents in the homes, and drivers for the Plantation shuttle. Proceeds will help fund maintenance and enhancements to the Lighthouse, the Keepers House, and Lighthouse Park in the coming year. By LOIS SWOBODA Seafood workers to meet March 10Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will hold a meeting at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola on Monday, March 10 at 6 p.m. The meeting will discuss the shelling program and anything else we need to discuss For more info, call Luther Hateld, secretary, at 850-532-4464St. George Lighthouse to close temporarilyThe Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be closed for lantern room improvements from Monday, March 3, through Thursday, March 13. During that time new glass will be installed in the lantern room and a series of vents will be added above the upper glass panes. The work will be done by renowned lighthouse preservation rm Alex Klahm Architectural Metal and Design, Inc. of St. Petersburg. The vent system, which will not affect the historical integrity of the lighthouse, is being designed and built by Alex Klahm, an award-winning metalsmith who has restored the metalwork on 21 lighthouses nationwide, including the neighboring Cape San Blas and Crooked River lighthouses. Alex has been honored by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation for work on the St. Augustine Lighthouse, and by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation for restoration work at the Tybee Island Lighthouse. The ironwork of the Cape St. George lantern room is also being cleaned and repainted as part of this project, spearheaded by St. George Lighthouse Association member Mark Vail. For more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Enrollment help available for Affordable Care ActThe Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin counties, and the Franklin County Public Libraries in Eastpoint and Carrabelle, is hosting health insurance marketplace outreach and enrollment assistance for the Affordable Care Act all next month. Certied application counselors will be on hand to answer questions about health insurance and will also provide enrolling assistance. An appointment is preferred but walk-ins will be worked in. Please bring to the appointment Social Security numbers (or document numbers for legal immigrants) for each family member; birth dates for each family member; pay stubs, W-2 forms, or recent tax return; and policy numbers for any current health insurance. To make an appointment for Monday, March 10, Tuesday, March 25, or Thursday, March 27, call the Eastpoint library branch at 670-8151. To make an appointment for Monday, March 17, Tuesday, March 18, or Monday, March 24 call the Carrabelle library branch at 697-2366. Aguiar and Carmichael take library helmThe Franklin County Libraries have new leadership. Both Joyce Estes, head of the Friends of the Franklin County Library and Denise Butler, chair of the library board, stepped down this month. Anna Carmichael, of Eastpoint, will assume leadership of the Friends, and Kate Aguiar of St. George Island will now head the library. At the Feb. 18 meeting, county commissioners instructed Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce to send a letter of thanks to Butler and Estes for their years of service.New roof for the EOC At the Feb. 18 county meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners that, Director of Emergency Management Pam Brownell has received the fully executed grant for $73,000 to put a new roof and new shutters on the Emergency Operations Center. There is a 25 percent cash match required so that depending on the cost of the improvements, the county will have to come up with between $15,000 and $20,000 out of the countys capital outlay fund. A request for bids on the renovation will be published in the near future.TDC to meet in EastpointOn Feb. 18, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners that the Tourist Development Council has added Eastpoint into the rotation of TDC meeting locations, so now there will be TDC meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, and Eastpoint.County allows seawall extensionActing on the recommendation of the Board of Adjustment, county commissioners voter unanimously on Feb. 18 to approve a request for a variance to extend and repair a wooden seawall on property lying in Section at 2086 Highway 98 West, Carrabelle. The request was submitted by David R. Zimmerman, owner.Two new docks allowedOn the recommendation of the Planning and Zoning Board, the county board unanimously approved the construction of two new docks for private use. Lee Harrison and Patricia Hart were given permission to construct a 328-foot pier with two boatlifts on undeveloped land at 324 Marks Street on St. George Island. Lewis T. Christie was given permission to construct a 200-foot pier at his house located at 3146 US 98 East.Special to The TimesParents, are you looking for a fun-lled learning experience for your child during Spring Break? On Wednesday, March 12, the UF/IFAS Extension Franklin County 4-H program will be hosting a 4-H Robotics Day Camp. This day camp will offer handson learning experiences to help your child build skills in science, engineering, and technology through building robots. The day camp is designed to help Franklin County youth ages 8-12 (as of Sept. 1, 2013), build skills in science, engineering, and technology. Youth will learn how to build and program a LEGO Mindstorms robot. The camp will be held at the Franklin County Extension Ofce, 66 Fourth Street, Apalachicola, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This camp is limited to the rst 16 youth who register. The $5 registration fee will cover all day camp supplies and a healthy snack will be provided. Please bring a sack lunch. To save your childs spot, and to receive a registration packet that must be returned by March 7, contact the Franklin County Extension Ofce at 653-9337. Ofce hours are MondayFriday, 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. You may also email questions to hckent@ u.edu or metaylor@u. edu. Dont miss out on this exciting and unique day camp opportunity. This day camp is lled on a rst come, rst served basis, so sign up now!Robotics Day Camp is spring break fun News bBRieIEFsS Attendance up at island home tour LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbout three dozen people attended Fridays meeting at the Lanark Village Boat ClubLanark looks to boost relationships

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 27, 2014 The Times | A13 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516041Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking seasonal part-time, Housekeepers. Some experience is required. Must be energetic and detailed oriented. Weekends are required. Great hours and weekly pay! Please apply in person at112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. Bldg Const/TradesOPS Wildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Tates Hell Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $27,487.20 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Send electronic resumes to: Billie.Clayton@MyFWC.com For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34280991 93896T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO, 13-CA-415 ROBERT PETERSON and MARGUERITE PETERSON, Plaintiffs, vs. CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR. at al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR.; MYRTLE E. DUNLAP, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all of the parties claiming by through, under or against them. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: See Exhibit A, attached hereto and by reference made a part hereof, EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A FOUND 4 X 4 CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA: THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE MONUMENTED WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 900.50 FEET TO A FOUND RAILROAD IRON; THENCE GO NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 1,432.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 500.00 FEET TO A FOUND 1/2 IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 88.21 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 233.19 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 298.03 FEET TO A FOUND 4X4 CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF OLD FERRY ROAD (66 R/W) AND SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1,192.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 241.96 FEET (CH. 241.55 CH. BRG. N75 DEGREES 06 W) TO A POINT; THENCE DEPARTING SAID CURVE AND NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 148.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL OF LAND IS SITUATED IN SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 16th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Feb 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 97691T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 192014CP 000008CPAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH MARXINE SLUSSER A/K/A BETTY BASCOMBE LAMBERSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH MARXINE SLUS-SER A/K/A BETTY BASCOMBE LAMBER-SON, deceased, whose date of death was April 20, 2013; File Number 192014CP000008CP AXMX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: February 20, 2014. Personal Representative: JUDITH LAMBERSON TAYLOR 2175 Highway 98 West Carrabelle, FL 32322 Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire -FBN: 114278 dba@gendersalvarez. com Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire -FBN: 146528 afd@gendersalvarez. com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE, P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street Tampa, Florida 33609 Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813) 254-5222 February 20, 27, 2014 94028T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-CA-412 OLD MAN 2, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. RANDALL W. SCOTT, DAVID SNYDER; if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming bythrough, under or against them; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RANDALL W. SCOTT, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against him YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: Lots One (1), Two (2), Three (3) and Four (4), Block 84 (247), of KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION, in the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with 1983 Mobile Home bearing VIN # KBGASNA323354 & KBGASNB323354/ Title #s 22540073 & 22540074 AND Together with 1989 Towncreek Mobile Home bearing VIN #BHAL0289SN1395 and Title # 47477399 Franklin County Parcel ID No. 20-07S04W-4212-0084-0010 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 5th day February, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 March 6, 13, 2014 97737T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 192012CA 000190CAXXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. DIXIE L. RUSSELL AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIXIE L RUSSELL, JOHN DOE AND MARY DOE, SUNTRUST BANK, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSE RESORT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 6th day of March 2014, at 11am at 33 Market St., Apalachicola, Florida, 2nd Floor Lobby Franklin County, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: UNIT 4, BUILDING A, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSES COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A, ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 48-A AND A PROJECTION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 473.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 22.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 22.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10 00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 61.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 61.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT NONEXCLUSIVE INGRESS/EGRESS, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF ALLIGATOR DRIVE (COUNTY ROAD NO 370) AND A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AND SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5704.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.02 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 86 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.02 FEET), THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 443.85 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 444.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 11th day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 97765T ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 1.1 Sealed Bids will be received by the City of Apalachicola, City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 until two oclock p.m. (2:00 EDT) March 25, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at two thirty p.m. (2:30 EDT) March 25, 2014 at the City Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, for the construction of: APALACHICOLA AWT WET WEATHER/ REJECT STORAGE POND UPGRADES according to drawings and specifications covering the work. 1.2 Any Bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. 1.3 A mandatory prebid meeting will be held on March 4, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at the City of Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. 1.4 Contract documents, including drawings and specifications relative thereto may be inspected at the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), 1538 Metropolitan Blvd. Ste A2, Tallahassee, Florida, and the office of the Consultant, BaskervilleDonovan, Inc., 22219 Panama City Beach Pkwy, Suite 200, Panama City Beach, Florida or 449 West Main Street, Pensacola, Florida, and at the City of Apalachicola, City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. Electronic pdf copies of the Contract Documents may be secured from the Consultant at a cost of $50.00 per CD, the cost of which is non-refundable. Shipping will be via USPS standard service unless requested and paid for by contractor. Questions regarding plans and specifications can be addressed to the Consultant via fax, e-mail or US mail at the following address: Baskerville-Donovan, Inc. Attn: Richard Delp, CSI, CDT 449 West Main Street Pensacola, FL 32502 Phone: 850-438-9661 Ext 4314 Fax: 850-433-6761 E-mail: rdelp@baskervilledonovan.com No questions will be entertained after 2:00 p.m. on March 18, 2014. 1.5 Each Bid shall be submitted on the form supplied by the Engineer. Each Bid must be accompanied by certified check or Bid Bond in the amount of five percent (5%) of the Base Bid as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract will within thirty (30) consecutive calendar days after written notice being given or such award, enter into a written contract with the Owner in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a one hundred percent (100%) Performance Bond and one hundred percent (100%) labor and material Payment Bond satisfactory to the Owner. No Bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of Bids for a period of forty-five (45) days. 1.6 The Owner reserves the right to waive formalities in bidding and reject any and all Bids. CITY OF APALACHICOLA Betty Taylor-Webb, Administrator February 20, 27, 2014 97971T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case #:13-000065-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is: 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The Case Number is 2013-000065-CP. The estate is believed to be intestate. The date of the decedents death was August 22, 2013. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2014. Personal Representative: Erin Marie Kinser Ellinger 1124 North Sherbourne Drive, Apt. 36 West Hollywood, CA 90069 Attorney for Personal Representative: Eric S. Haug FL Bar No. 850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031 Tallahassee, FL 32317 (850) 583-1480 (850) 297-0300 Telefax eric@erichaug.com Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 2014 Eastpoint: Eastpoint Fire House Sat Mar 1st 8am-untilHuge 6 Family Yard SaleRain or Shine GUN SHOWMarch 1&2 Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL81163 to 56654 EducationEarly Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will work collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and org. skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281148 Text FL81148 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler Caregiversare needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281149 Text FL81149 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityBartenders Servers Cooks Dishwashers BussersBLUE PARROT NOW HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Web Id 34280042 Install/Maint/RepairLandscapingNeed persons experienced in landscape installation/construction and lawn maintenance. Must have valid drivers license. Contact Noles Scapes at 248-0973. Web ID#: 34281289 Text FL81289 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34279561 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required.PT InspectorsAttentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 SecurityNow HiringSecurity Officers and Supervisors for new account start up. Starting at $9.50 per hr. All positions are permanent. 1-888-948-2738 or 850-563-1022 Web ID#: 34281166 Lanark Village: 56-6 Parker Ave, 2Bd/1Ba, Furnished $500/mo + Dep 850-697-2594 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL81122 to 56654 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo 850-643-7740 Text FL79130 to 56654 Apalachicola -2 br, 1 ba. 113 10th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $900 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Lanark: Small Cottage, 150 Miller St, 1Bd/1Ba, Furnished, Inclu Water & Elec $400/mo + $100 Dep, No Pets 850-697-2594 Price ReducedCarrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176 Set of Four (4) Used Bridgestone Tires in Good Condition -Still Decent Tread P275/60R20 Apalach $120 727-515-8537 Spot Advertising works!

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 Ourlocalrealestateexperts haveidentiedwhattheyfeelare thebestvaluesaroundandare offeringthemtoyouin RealEstatePicks! Discoverthebestrealestate valuesinMexicoBeach,PortSt. Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas, St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleand surroundingareas. BestValuesontheForgottenCoastContactThe TimesToday(850)653-8868YOURHOMETOWNNEWSPAPERFORMORETHAN120YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y THE T IMES&CarrabelleApalachicola AdvertiseHere RealEstatePicks 4515384 MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,199,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com REDUCED JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250350$64,900St.GeorgeIslandISLANDLOTFORSALEHigh,dry,walk-ablelotmeasuring90x135,1/3acre,adjacent lotisseparatelyforsale,quietareaoftheIslandonEastSawyer AvenuenearendofPorterStreet,shortdistancefromtheGulf ofMexicoandApalachicolaBay,listedbyJohnShelby 4516014 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#251118$89,000EastpointCOMM./RES.(ZONEDC-4)Usehalfasanofce&storageandliveintheotherhalfOR usethewholebldgassmallprofessionalofceORuseitas a2BR2BAhouse(hasafulleat-inkitchen),10ftceilings, 6ftchainlinkfencedbackyardwith2largegates,storage bldg.306Hwy98 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) A person would gain an extra how many pounds each year by drinking an extra can of sugarladen soda each day? 5, 10, 15, 20 2) What work did Typhoid Mary hold that allowed her to infect so many people of the disease? Cook, Nurse, Prostitute, Maid 3) In the U.S. approximately what percent of men ask for parent approval for their brides hand in marriage? 4, 6, 8, 10 4) Whom did Erle Stanley Gardner introduce in a series of books? Luke Skywalker, Perry Mason, Lone Ranger, Tarzan 5) When was the rst pay-per-view television system? 1951, 1960, 1972, 1983 6) Where is the country of Djibouti? Europe, Asia, S. America, Africa 7) From older TVs The Big Valley what was the name of Heaths (Lee Majors) horse? Beauty, Hilltop, Charger, Maggie 8) Each year American dentists use about how many tons of gold for llings? 9, 13, 17, 21 9) What do American moms say they need more of the most? Time, Love, Patience, Money 10) Whose original name was the Elgins? Spinners, Temptations, Drifters, Stylistics 11) What is deglutition the medical term for? Sneezing, Blinking, Swallowing, Sprain 12) Who was president when Minnesota, Oregon, and Kansas were admitted to the Union? Buchanan, Pierce, Grant, Taylor 13) Of these 1990s TV series, which aired the most original episodes at 202? Party of Five, Spin City, Ally McBeal, X-Files 14) Which bird hovers like a helicopter? Wren, Finch, Hummingbird, Robin ANSWERS 1) 15. 2) Cook. 3) 4 percent. 4) Perry Mason. 5) 1951. 6) Africa. 7) Charger. 8) 13. 9) Time. 10) Temptations. 11) Swallowing. 12) Buchanan. 13) X-Files. 14) Hummingbird. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By Tevis PageSpecial to the Times This week has started off on a great note. This past weekend the school hosted the Miss Seahawk Pageant. The pageant was a success. The 201314 Seahawk Royalty is Jamison Broker (Tiny Miss), Dezmonae Sanders (Little Miss), Maddison Whitten (Junior Miss), Hannah Hogan (Teen Miss) and Kelsey Shuler (Miss Seahawk). All the participating girls were fantastic; the performances were truly one of a kind and a joy to witness. Beta Club is hosting the Franklin County 2014 Career Day. Elinor MountSimmons and the acting president, Brook Pittman, are requesting that any local businesses wanting to participate in the career day, please contact them. If interested please respond to Pittman at brooklyn22. bp@gmail.com, or MountSimmons at emountsimmons@franklin.k12. .us before March 14. The Career Day will be held in the multi-purpose building on April 17. They would greatly appreciate the presence of local businesses. This week was Florida Writes, held on Tuesday, Feb. 25. Makeups were on Wednesday, Feb. 26. There is a lot going on this week, I hope everything goes well.SPECIAL tT O tT HE TIMEs SThis West Highland terrier was found wandering in Apalachicola last Friday, Feb. 21. He is a neutered male of unknown age and wore no collar. If you have information about this dog, please call 653-2025 or 653-5857. DOG fFOUNdD IN AAPALACHICOLA Featured with pageant organizer, Lynn Clark, standing at left, are, from left Jamison Broker (Tiny Miss), Dezmonae Sanders (Little Miss), Maddison Whitten (Junior Miss), Hannah Hogan (Teen Miss) and Kelsey Shuler (Miss Seahawk). SPECIAL tT O tT HE TIMEs S HAHA WK TAL ALK Seahawk royalty graces the stage



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, February 27, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Earlier this month, county commissioners asked architect Warren Emo to estimate the total renovation cost for the Coombs Armory. Last week, he told them the price tag is $2.3 million. In an elaborate presentation at the Feb. 18 meeting, Emo laid out two possible options for renovating the historic structure, dividing the repairs and upgrades into three phases. He told commissioners that since the last meeting, structural engineers found water damage in their explorations of area under the building Emo said multiple overlays of pavement on Avenue D have affected drainage, causing support to wash out and leaving the oor spongy under the southwest corner. Inside the building, there is a visible irregularity in the oor, and a 2-inch gap has formed between the oor and baseboard in the southwest corner, he said. Emo said ooding around the main entrance is also a problem that needs to be addressed. “There’s not a lot of stormwater control out there, and the sidewalk’s in pretty bad condition,” he said. “We’re looking at new sidewalk all around the perimeter.” He said the new plan would create a paved 18-space parking lot and an Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant entry on the north side of the building. Under either option, Phase City to hear Family Dollar appeal By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Members of Apalachicola’s city commission will hear an appeal by Family Dollar on March 11, the latest chapter in an effort by the retailer to overcome neighbors’ objections and relocate to a wooded site on U.S. 98 on the western edge of Apalachicola. In January, Panama City attorney Robert Hughes appealed the Planning and Zoning Commission’s Nov. 18, 2013, vote that gave a resounding no to a proposal to relocate the store from its current site next to the Gulfside IGA to a lot that neighbors the Best Western Inn. Hughes, who represents Blue Current Development LLC, the rm of Panama City Beach’s Brett Woodward, sought to have the action overturned by the Board of Adjustment, claiming the city’s zoning approval process was riddled with errors and impropriety. No decision on ‘No Trace’ ordinance By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Feb. 18, commissioners held a public hearing on the proposed “No Trace” ordinance, which would make it illegal to leave holes in the sand, tents, chairs, grills and other equipment on any county beach overnight. The ordinance was proposed to protect nesting sea turtles, which can become entangled in equipment or in deep holes, and to keep the appearance of county beaches neat and uncluttered. The ordinance would apply to both public and privately owned beaches throughout the county. When questions were raised about funding and enforcement of the law, a motion by Commissioner Pinki Jackel to pass the ordinance failed 3-2, with Cheryl Sanders, Smokey Parrish and Noah Lockley opposed. Under the proposed ordinance, By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com That a living, breathing human soul is standing just a few feet away, near enough to see and hear but with enough distance that we may quietly avert our eyes if we wish, is a big reason live theatre can affect us as it does. In such a quiet, comfortable place as a small theatre, where one’s attention is disturbed only by that which the tranquil mind conjures, the full embodiment of a captivating story, and a deeper response to the characters in it, can be thoroughly enjoyed, more so than reading about them in a novel, or a newspaper. When characters are nely drawn by the playwright, and then fully enlivened by the actors, the show will delight, and the audience will walk away glad to have had seats when the curtain opened, and all the way through to the moment it closed. For the past two weeks, the Dixie Theatre’s 17th professional season has presented, in repertory, a pair of plays that provide just such an experience. They offer a passing opportunity, especially rare in places such as here where stage plays are infrequent, to enjoy a ne example of theatre’s power. This weekend is the nal one for the shows, both comedies with an underlying, more than occasionally glimpsed, layer of sadness. “Mrs. Mannerly” takes place entirely in the imagination of the author, Jeffrey Hatcher, who re ects ARCHITECT ESTIMATE: $2.3 million needed to x Armory STAGES OF LIFE Dixie Theatre features serious comedy in repertory PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Dixie Partington, as Glory, a hiker, and David Caldwell, as East, a repairman, in “Almost, Maine.” Below, Cleo Holladay crafts an indelible portrait of Mrs. Mannerly. LAST CHANCE The Dixie Theatre concludes its professional stage season this weekend. The play “Almost, Maine,” a work by John Cariani comprising nine short plays that explore love and loss in a remote, mythical town, is on stage this at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Saturday. The play “Mrs. Mannerly” by Jeffrey Hatcher takes the stage at 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $25. Tickets can be reserved by calling the box of ce at 653-3200. For more information, visit www.dixietheatre.com. Perfecting the presidents A6 VOL. 128 ISSUE 44 See ARMORY A5 See FAMILY DOLLAR A5 See ‘ NO TRACE’ A7 See DIXIE A7 Chili Cookoff on island Saturday More than 40 chili cooks will liven up St. George Island Saturday. The event begins with an art review from 5-7 p.m. Friday at the Civil Hall in the East End Firehouse. Cost is $5. At 8 a.m. Saturday will be the 5K Red Pepper Run, starting in front of the Blue Parrot. Entry is $15 per adult or $10 per person 18 and under. For information, call Susan Bassett at 3230092. At 9:30 a.m., the amateur crock-pot chili must be onsite. $5 entry fee required. For the “professional” competition, International Chili Society rules will be in effect. At 11 a.m., the auction starts. Between 12:15 and 12:45 p.m., will be the Miss Chili Pepper judging, and from 12:45 to 1:15 p.m., the Mr. Hot Sauce judging. For more info, call Grayson Shepard at 6536718 or email grayshep@ yahoo.com Carrabelle salt exhibit opens March 5 Learn about the history and value of salt by visiting the Carrabelle History Museum’s newest exhibit, beginning with an open house from 1-3 p.m. Thursday, March 5. Displays will explain Florida’s valued mineral importance to the South during the Civil War. Centuries of historical value and the many uses of salt will be highlighted. Collections of unique salt shakers may be viewed during this unusual exhibit. The museum, in the former Carrabelle City Hall at 106 SE Ave. B, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and by appointment by calling 524-1153. The museum is a project of the Carrabelle Waterfront Partnership and the City of Carrabelle. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A13

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com A little smaller than usual eld of chili cooks will liven up St. George Island on Saturday, with about 40 teams vying for a chance to earn a ticket to Nationals. “Our winner last year, Paul Nunn with Nunn Bet ter Chili, came in second at Nationals last year,” said Grayson Shepard, who oversees the competition. “That tells me our judg ing system works since we picked a good chili.” So far, seven teams have signed up to enter the newly added salsa divi sion, which will be judged by a crew from Sometimes It’s Hotter on St. George Island. Salsa, like the chili completion, is an Interna tional Chili Society catego ry, so the winner of the St. George Island competition also will be eligible to go the ICS Nationals to com pete there. The 41 chili chefs who have so far signed up for Saturday’s regional completion include John Blackwell (Red Tail Chili), Paul and Tim Nunn and Alyssa Jones (Nunn Bet ter), Chuck Stubbs (Blue Water Cooking Company), Bill Avery (Waterdog Chili), Steve Merrill (Blow N’ Go), Jim Fulton (Red Hots), Roy Geigle (Cowpokes Chuck wagon Chili), Jim Kemp (Lighthouse Chili), J.G. Carver and Greg Macha mer (Team Spice Boys), Larry Underkofer (LEU’s “Q” Crew), Billy Bergfel (Burnin’ at Both Ends), David Thonen (Blow & Go) and Sandy Walker (G.R.I.T.S.). Also taking part will be Neal Trafford (Fireght ers Forever), Chad West (Yellow Creek Swamp Sauce), Dana Kelly (Mad Cow Chili), Will English (Chili Dawgs), Jack Proc tor (Proctor), John Homan (Rajun Cajun), Kim Poole (Hot Lips Chili), Matt Solomon (Sump’n Hot!), Mike Groh (Monumental Chili), Thomas Crawford (St Alfonzo’s Soup Kitchen Cooks), Gary Dorris (Team Toilet Bowl), Jim Smith (Sunset Isle Chili Heads), Wanda Gangswich (Three Sheets to the Wind), Bob Alexander, son, and Bob Alexander, dad (Roadkill’s Red Hot Chili), Craig Gib son (Apalachicola VFD), Cathy Korfanty (Eastwood Caf Maneater Chili), Trent Hatcher (Just Plane Chili), Gary Carlson (Uncle Bugs Chili), Tim Center, Veni Miller (Bubba and Cha Cha Chili Pub) and David Dit mar and Julia Spires (Pod Stalker). The event begins Fri day, Feb. 28, with an art re view from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Civil Hall in the East End Firehouse. Preview dona tion is $5. At 8 a.m. Saturday, there will be the 5K Red Pepper Run, starting in front of the Blue Parrot. Entry fee is $15 per adult or $10 per person 18 years and under. All entrants will receive a T-shirt. For information, call Susan Bassett at 3230092. You can register the morning of the race. Booth set-up begins at 8:30 a.m. At 9:30 a.m., the amateur crock-pot chili must be onsite. $5 entry fee required. For the “professional” competition, International Chili Society rules will be in effect. (No beans, pasta, etc.) Chili prepared on site from scratch, no prepack aged chili mixes. Meat may be cut, sliced or ground in advance, but not treated or cooked except during competition. At 11 a.m., the auction starts. Between 12:15 and 12:45 p.m., will be the Miss Chili Pepper judging, and from 12:45 to 1:15 p.m., the Mr. Hot Sauce judging. At 3:30 p.m., awards will be presented in the chili judg ing area. For more info, call Gray son Shepard at 653-6718 or email grayshep@yahoo. com. # !$ 0 !0 ! # # ! " $ $ 0 ! & &% 1! ! *'1%3 24/ ) ,(1 $ $ 1 !" $ ( ! &,/ &)! ! *'1%3 21, & 1)1 $ $ 1 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D Coupon Expir es: 3-15-14 CODE: AP00 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com After ve years of vacancy, Carrabelle’s Hexaport building on John McInnis Road has a new tenant. On Feb. 18, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unani mously to lease the factory to Gulf Unmanned Systems Center after much negotiation. The 65,000-square-foot struc ture has been vacant since mod ular home manufacturer Green steel declared bankruptcy in 2009. Centennial Bank took possession of the lease during bankruptcy proceedings against Greensteel. GUSC will buy the lease. GUSC will pay $10 per year to lease the factory for the rst 15 years, after which the cost of rent will be adjusted. “There is no way Carrabelle can lose in this situation,” Mayor Curley Messer said. “If the busi ness fails, the city gets posses sion of the building under the contract.” According to their business plan, GUSC, a Panama Citybased company that plans to test both aerial and aquatic ro bot drones here, will spend al most $900,000 on upgrades and improvements there over the rst year. Bruce MacCormack, CEO of GUSC said he has signed a contract with the bank, and the lease will be signed by the mid dle of next month. He said he will begin cleaning the property immediately because he has al ready scheduled visits to the fa cility by important prospective clients. He said he would begin inter viewing applicants for employ ment with GUSC immediately. He expects to have 10 people the payroll by mid-April, a stipula tion called for in GUSC’s lease with the city. Chili Cookoff to light up island this weekend LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Gulf Unmanned Systems Center will be the new tenant of Carrabelle’s Hexaport building. Gulf Unmanned Systems leases Hexaport

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The Times | A3 Thursday, February 27, 2014 J o i n U s f o r Y o u r A n n u a l M e e t i n g T h e e n t i re c re d i t u n i o n b e n e t s w h e n m e m b e r s p a r t i c i p a t e T h a t ’ s w h y w e i n v i t e e v e r y m e m b e r t o a t t e n d o u r – y o u r – a n n u a l m e e t i n g A l l m e m b e r s a re e q u a l o w n e r s o f t h e c re d i t u n i o n O u r a n n u a l m e e t i n g i s a n oc ca s i o n f o r m an a ge m e n t an d e l e c t ed o f c i a l s to re po r t t o y o u t h e o w n e r s. A n d i t ’ s a n o p po r t u n i t y f o r y o u t o l e a r n a bo u t t h e c re d i t u n i o n ’ s n a n c i a l po s i t i o n p r od u c t s a n d s e r v i c e s c u r re n t b u s i n e s s i s s u e s a n d g o a l s. Y o u ’ l l m e e t f a c e t o f a c e w i t h t h e p e o p l e w h o r u n y o u r c re d i t u n i o n W i t h o u t y o u r i n p u t l e a d e r s ca n o n l y g u e s s w h a t y o u a n d o t h e r o w n e r s w a n t f r o m y o u r c re d i t u n i o n A l l m e m b e r s a t t e n d i n g w i l l re c e i v e a g i f t a t t h e d oo r O n c e t h e b u s i n e s s m e e t i n g i s c o n c l u d e d w e w i l l h a v e d r a w i n g s f o r s e v e r a l ca s h p r i z e s g i v e n b y t h e c re d i t u n i o n W e h o p e t o s e e y o u t h e re No t a m e m b e r o f E m e r a l d C o a s t F e d e r a l C re d i t U n i o n y e t ? T h e n w e i n v i t e y o u t o j o i n W e a re a c o m m u n i t y c re d i t u n i o n T h a t m e a n s i f y o u l i v e w o r k w o r s h i p o r a t t e n d s c h oo l i n G u l f C o u n t y F r a n k l i n C o u n t y o r t h e C i t y o f M e xi c o B e a c h y o u a re e l i g i b l e f o r m e m b e r s h i p S o p l e a s e s t o p b y t o m e e t o u r f r i e n d l y s t a f f a n d t a k e a d v a n t a g e o f a l l t h e s e r v i c e s w e o f f e r A t E m e r a l d C o a s t F e d e r a l C re d i t U n i o n y o u a re m o re t h a n j u s t a n u m b e r y o u a re p a r t o f o u r f a m i l y E v en t : C r ed i t U ni o n A n n u al M e e t i n g W h e n: M o n d a y M a r c h 1 0 2 0 1 4 a t 7 : 0 0 p m E S T W h e r e : P o r t S t J o e E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l A u d i t o r i u m 5 0 2 W oo d w a r d A v en u e P o r t S a i n t Jo e F l o ri d a 3 2 4 5 6 1 0 1 E a s t R i v er R o a d W e w a h i t c h k a F l o ri d a 3 2 4 6 5 2 4 8 U S H i g h w a y 9 8 E a s t p o i n t F l o ri d a 3 2 3 2 8 P h : ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 1 1 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 3 9 5 0 2 4 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 7 0 1 1 9 9 T o l l f re e : 1 87 7 87 40 0 07 E m ail: e m e r al d c o a s t @ f ai r p o i n t n e t w w w .e m e r al d c o a s t f c u .c o m " !! # &3*% 00. ++0(* )(" & &(* 0 *" 0( /&*2 &33) & 0 2' *3'* ))00&2 + )*0. 0( 1* &22 $$" $$-" $" W• › \› ‰ M " ‰M ›\› W• ‰M ›\› W• ‰M ›\› W• By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A misplaced surveyors’ stake is causing headaches on St. George Island. At the Feb. 18 county meeting, commissioners discussed a request for an after-the-fact variance to the county building code at length. The county’s Board of Adjustment rec ommended the variance be granted. William and Donna Nichols, own ers of a house at 1080 Gulf Beach Drive, want permission to leave their new cement swimming pool at its current location, even though it is 6 feet over the 10-foot setback line at the rear of their lot. Williams told commissioners he had the property surveyed and ob tained the necessary permits before construction the pool in December. County Planner Alan Pierce said a neighbor, Eric Myers, came to the planning and building ofce before the pool’s construction and com plained the survey was incorrect and that the pool would encroach on the setback. Pierce said he showed Myers the plans and permit and told him the pool complied with the build ing code. Construction of the pool began, and Myers complained to Nichols. Both men contacted the original surveyor, Wade Brown of Edwin G. Brown and Associates of Crawford ville. Brown returned to the site Jan. 2 and discovered a second stake on the southeast corner of the property, about 9 feet closer to the Nichols home. Brown determined this was the correct stake marking the Nich ols’ property line and that his origi nal survey was in error. Brown said at that time, the pool was 80 percent complete, according to Cox Pools, the contractor. Brown said he offered to construct a fence or install landscaping to buffer the pool, but the Myerses refused and said they wanted the pool moved. Brown said his company carries in surance to pay for moving the pool, if necessary. William Nichols addressed com missioners and termed the situation “unfortunate.” “My wife and I recently retired and wanted to fulll our dream of living down on the island,” he said. “That included renovations to the house and installing a pool.” The Myerses were represented by an attorney, John Grant of Tallahas see, who said the variance applica tion did not meet legal requirements. He said the Nicholses, as property owners, were responsible for the ac tions of their contractors and that, under Florida law, the request to move the pool is reasonable. Angie Myers said she was con cerned about noise and activity in a pool so close to her home. “We too want to retire to St. George Island,” she said. “This is certainly nothing personal. It’s about having an expensive piece of prop erty that may decrease in value. Mr. Brown has liability insurance to pay for this. We shouldn’t have to pay for a mistake that’s not our fault.” The Myerses said they plan to construct a deck next month on land adjacent to the pool. Grant said in addition to encroach ing on the setback on the south side, the pool encroaches on the eastern setback into the public right of way. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said it appeared to him from the diagram provided in his packet that there was a second encroachment. Pierce said he had not been made aware of the additional encroachment. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the BOA must review the sec ond encroachment before commis sioners could act on a request for any variance. Commissioner voted unanimous ly to table the discussion until the re quest returned to the BOA. Special to The Times Albert Hendrik “Henk” Van Der Merwe, 46, of Crawfordville was sen tenced Feb. 14 by United States Dis trict Judge Robert Hinkle to serve 12 months in prison for importing mer chandise under false invoice and for receiving unregistered silencers. Van Der Merwe will serve a three-year term of supervised re lease after his incarceration, during which he will be subject to search by his probation ofcer. As a conse quence of this conviction, he cannot own or possess rearms. The court also entered an order forfeiting Van Der Merwe’s interest in three si lencers and in an Uzi 9 millimeter carbine. Van Der Merwe was arrested on April 10, 2013, after agents intercept ed three silencers he had ordered from South Africa under an invoice declaring them to be motorcycle parts. Messages retrieved from Van Der Merwe’s email accounts reect ed that he had ordered another si lencer from the same supplier in the past, that he wanted these shipped “discretely” and that he was inter ested in obtaining additional silenc ers for friends. He requested that the silencer for the Uzi be “full-auto rated.” Examination of the weapon determined the Uzi had been con verted to a machine gun. U.S. Attorney Pamela Marsh credited the success of this prosecu tion to the joint efforts of the U.S. Customs Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. The case was prosecuted by Assis tant United States Attorney Michael T. Simpson. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. FEB. 18 Carrie K. Richards, 32, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) William T. Romeka, 35, Panacea, violation of probation (FCSO) FEB. 19 Tonya D. Elrod, 37, Athens, Tenn., violation of probation (FCSO) John C. Thomas, 42, Crawfordville, driving while license suspended or revoked (CPD) Jessica M. Opie, 27, St. George Island, failure to appear (FCSO) FEB. 20 Vonnie R. Tinsley, 33, Tallahassee, three counts – burglary or attempted burglary of a structure (FCSO) FEB. 21 Michelle D. Massey, 37, Carrabelle, tampering with physical evidence (FCSO) James A. Farmer, 43, Crawfordville, possession of a controlled substance, eeing or attempting to elude a law enforcement ofcer, aggravated assault on a law enforcement ofcer, tampering with physical evidence and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Aubrey D. Sasnett, 57, Eastpoint, ofcial misconduct of public servant, tampering with physical evidence, and tampering with a witness or informant (FCSO) Willie F. Baucham, 57, Apalachicola, burglary or attempted of a structure, two counts of grand theft, criminal mischief, burglary of a dwelling and dealing in stolen property (APD) Christopher J. Wells, 20, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance (FCSO) Lawrence E. Russell, 28, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) FEB. 22 Juan H. Pavon, 26, Eastpoint, reckless driving and no valid drivers license (APD) FEB. 23 David B. Keith, Jr., 23, Carrabelle, aggravated battery great bodily harm (CPD) FEB. 24 Jimmy D. Kilgore, 36, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence, sh or set net with greater than two-inch stretch mesh, unmarked entangling net on vessel, entangling in vessel under 25 feet long with forward power, no ice on sh, eeing or attempting to elude law ofcer in boat, harvesting saltwater products under revoked saltwater products license, and harvest marine life with net over 500 square feet – agrant violation (FCSO) Dillan D. Grimes, 21, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Christopher J. Wells, 20, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Preston W. Smith, 34, Carrabelle, grand theft and dealing in stolen property (FCSO) Adam D. Garry, 24, St. George Island, driving while license suspended or revoked, and reckless driving (APD) Corey D. Grifn, 26, Eastpoint, possession of cannabis (FCSO) Arrest REPO rR T Law Enforcement Crawfordville man imprisoned on silencer charges The case of the misplaced pool L O O IS SWOBO OBO DA | The Times The pool in question can be seen in the rear of William and Donna Nichols’ home at 1080 E. Gulf Beach Drive.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 27, 2014 A Section Weems soap opera: 10 minutes vs. $10 million To the Franklin County board of commissioners and to the residents of Franklin County, I respectfully submit to you this letter for your consideration regarding the future of Weems Memorial Hospital. I have lived in Franklin County now for three years. Coupled with my time in neighboring Wakulla County, I’ve been in this immediate area for close to 20 years. While I am no expert, I can say that Franklin County residents have been victimized by the economy, the downward trend of the shing industry and the inability of Franklin County of cials to offset these hardships with achieving growth and/or in making better decisions. Wakulla County has no hospital, and it is a considerably larger county in comparison to Franklin County based on population. Wakulla County has become an extension to Leon County and our state capital, Tallahassee. If Wakulla County does not have a hospital, why is it Franklin County needs a hospital? Franklin County is in a better position than Wakulla County; we have the same hospitals they have in Tallahassee. Plus, we have what they don’t have just 10-15 minutes away by ambulance in Port St Joe, a new outreach hospital af liated with one of the best hospitals and medical care providers in this state. Without Weems Memorial Hospital, from a geographical standpoint, Franklin County is still in a better position for hospital care for its residents than many residents in Wakulla County. Wakulla County does not have the luxury of a new highly rated hospital about 15 minutes west of Apalachicola, a straight shot on U.S. 98. We here in Franklin County do. This must be taken into consideration with any decision-making process that may result in a $10 million to $20 million burden levied upon residents here in Franklin County. Is it really worth $10 million to $20 million, at the expense of Franklin County residents, for a few more years of existence for Weems Memorial Hospital, a hospital already operating at a substantial loss? Who in their right mind will spend $20 million on a hospital losing over $2 million annually already? You are only prolonging the inevitable closure of this hospital. Why place this burden on our children or grandchildren? Let’s do the right thing, think with our heads and not let the heart interfere with the decision that needs to be made in the best interest of Franklin County residents. Weems Memorial Hospital is an albatross. Let’s not bring hardship upon the residents here in Franklin County more than what they already face or drive the stake in even farther. People in this county cannot afford it. Very truly yours, Michael J. Cauley Franklin County resident Now’s the time for ‘Leave No Trace’ law “15 miles of beach…” these words from this morning’s hearing on the Leave No Trace ordinance keep echoing in my mind. These 15 miles of beach are the heart and soul of Franklin County. While I don’t have the exact figures to look at, I’m guessing the property adjoining these 15 miles of beach bring in the most taxes … property taxes, bed taxes, sales taxes from beachfront businesses and properties. The property adjoining these 15 miles of beach are sold at the highest prices and bring income to realtors, insurance agents, title companies and attorneys involved in property sales. These 15 miles of beach are the main reason hundreds of thousands of tourists visit Franklin County; shop in Franklin County businesses; eat in Franklin County restaurants; stay in Franklin County hotels and rental houses; hire Franklin County guide fisherman; rent bikes, chairs and umbrellas from Franklin County vendors; and buy Franklin County oysters and shrimp to pack in their coolers to take back home with them. These 15 miles of beach provide jobs to construction workers, house cleaners, pool maintenance companies, landscaping and lawn services, real estate sales and rental employees, restaurant employees and those who rent beach items. Franklin County’s 15 miles of beach are often featured in newspapers in Atlanta, nationally distributed magazines (Southern Living, Cond Nast and Sports Illustrated). I talk to tourists almost every day during the summer months. I hear over and over how much they love it here in the unspoiled part of Florida; how they used to go to Panama City and Destin, but stopped going there because of the crowds and development. Yes, the Leave No Trace ordinance is very important for sea turtles who can do nothing on their own to protect their nesting beaches, but this ordinance is just as important to everyone who lives, works and/or vacations in Franklin County. If our beaches become so cluttered and littered that they are no longer the beautiful beaches we all love, the tourists will find another place to spend their money, property values will drop and unemployment will soar. I realize that in today’s economy, the county must watch every penny and be careful not to take on new projects that could add costs to the budget, but taking care of our beaches has to be our No. 1 priority. Passing the Leave No Trace ordinance and advertising it will go a long way to returning our beaches to their pristine state. Once word gets out that items left on the beach will be confiscated, there will be fewer items left. I applaud Nikki Millender and her staff for being on board and being willing to take on this new challenge. It seems to me that it would be impossible to cover the entire 15 miles each night, but if there was an unpublished, rotating schedule where a couple of miles of beach are checked and “decluttered” each night, folks will take their items in. I also think personal items need to be taken off the beach or placed under a boardwalk. Moving beach items to the high water mark or to the dune will not help the sea turtles. Sea turtles are not aware of human boundaries, and the safest place for their nest is often in or on top of the dunes. It also seems that the items recovered from the beach could be a source of income for the county. It would be impossible to determine who the items belonged to, but if all items were taken to a central location and offered for sale, the funds raised could be used to help defray the costs involved in picking them up (gasoline, wages, advertising,). I would hate to see our land ll cost go up because we have discarded items that could be purchased and used by others. Businesses that operate on the beach should be allowed to continue to operate, although I think those who rent chairs, umbrellas, etc. should make it clear to renters that if the items are not picked up at night, they might be con scated, and if that happens, the renter will have to pay to replace the item that was lost. These businesses have the names and contact information for the renters, so it would be easy for them to collect any necessary fees. It seems to me that you might want to contact Bay County to see what suggestions they might have after having their ordinance in place for at least a year. They might have ideas on the time of day they patrol their beaches, or how they handle folks who want to stay on the beach later with their items, and what they do with the items they have collected. Thank you again for your time and consideration of this ordinance; I don’t see how Franklin County can survive if we don’t take care of these “15 miles of beach.” Sharon Hutchinson St. George Island By STEVE SOUTHERLAND Special to the Times With partisan gridlock all too prevalent in today’s Washington, I have worked hard to break through those barriers and join with Republicans and Democrats who are as interested as I am in growing jobs and restoring certainty for hardworking families. The recently-passed Farm Bill is an example of what can be accomplished by putting partnership above partisanship. For more than a year Congress debated the latest reauthorization of the Farm Bill, which sets national agriculture and food policy for the next ve years. With Florida being a national leader in agricultural production and the second largest specialty crop-producing state in America, I was committed to doing all I could to advance a common sense Farm Bill that restored certainty for North and Northwest Florida farmers and strengthened our rural communities. I was honored to be the only Floridian in Congress appointed to the bipartisan conference committee tasked with ironing out the nal Farm Bill agreement. It was a tremendous, hardearned victory when both parties and both chambers came together for the good of the American people and passed a ve-year Farm Bill that provides much-needed relief to our hardworking farming families and saves taxpayers $23 billion – while allowing us to nally move past the costly, big government policies passed under then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Farm Bill six years ago. I am also pleased that Republicans and Democrats came together to support a provision in the Farm Bill I introduced to empower vulnerable families with a renewed opportunity for earned success. By including a 10-state pilot program for work, job training, and community volunteerism for healthy, working-age food stamp bene ciaries, we’ve now put nutrition assistance on the same proven path of success that helped change a culture for the better during welfare reform in the 1990s. As the rst reforms to the food stamp program since the successful welfare reforms of 1996, the Farm Bill takes important steps to empower families in need with a renewed opportunity at earned success. Additionally, the Farm Bill includes several provisions I crafted to sustain the economies of our rural communities. The bipartisan Building Rural Communities Act ensures that small, rural areas have access to the technical assistance and training necessary to enhance vital infrastructure – including police and re stations and community health clinics – all at no additional cost to America’s taxpayers. Another provision I advanced strengthens our forestry communities by ensuring that wood products qualify under the USDA’s Biobased Marketing Program. I also fought to guarantee the long-term viability of citrus production in Florida by helping secure $125 million to research remedies for citrus greening, a disease decimating citrus groves in Florida and nationwide. Updating the Farm Bill is never easy, but this bill represents the good that can come out of both parties and both chambers rising above politics to do what is right for the American people. Our farmers and rural families deserve real solutions – not political mud ghts – and this bipartisan Farm Bill is a big step in the right direction. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, is the congressman for Florida’s 2nd congressional district, which includes Franklin County. Page 4 STEVE SOUTHERLAND Farm Bill a step toward bipartisanship Special to the Times The majority of Americans feel breakfast is important, but hectic mornings make it dif cult to t the meal in every day. In fact, 40 percent of moms say their child does not eat breakfast daily, according to Kellogg’s Breakfast in America survey. To garner increased participation in the School Breakfast Program, Franklin County School will recognize National School Breakfast Week March 3-7, a weeklong celebration aimed at increasing awareness of the School Breakfast Program among students and parents. The breakfast week theme, “Take Time for School Breakfast,” which will appear in the school cafeteria during National School Breakfast Week, encourages parents to consider the school breakfast program as a timesaving option for those busy mornings. “Too many children are showing up at school hungry, and hungry children can’t learn,” said Robin Tennille. “Eating breakfast at school can help families save time in the morning. And knowing that school breakfast is healthy and a great value is a huge relief for parents.” Cafeterias will promote school breakfast with special menus and decorations, activities and events all week. Activities will include a writing contest for grades K-12, art contest for grades pre-K -2, recipe contest for grades 6-12, breakfast themed games for grades 1-5, and “Time” themed music will also be played during breakfast time. Winners of the contests will be announced Monday, March 17 during breakfast. Every school day, Franklin County School’s breakfast program offers students a healthy breakfast that they need to get set for a busy school day. Items include, but are not limited to yogurt parfaits, cereal, Peanut butter and jelly graham snacker, chicken and biscuit, sausage and biscuit, jumbo muf n, breakfast pizza, breakfast burrito, French toast stick, and pancake on stick. Every school breakfast served meets federal nutrition standards limiting fat, calories, sodium. “Take Time for School Breakfast” was created by the nonpro t School Nutrition Association with support from Kellogg’s Foodservice. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, National School Breakfast Week was launched in 1989 to raise awareness of the availability of the School Breakfast Program to all children and to promote the links between eating a good breakfast, academic achievement and healthy lifestyles. Breakfast Week promotes bene ts for busy families Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, February 27, 2014 P U B L IC N O T IC E T h e Ci t y C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e Ci t y o f C a r r a b e l l e w i l l m e et i n r e g u l a r s e s s i o n o n T h u r s d a y M a r c h 6 2 0 1 4 a t a p p r o x i m a t e l y 6 : 0 0 p m o r a s s o o n a s c a n b e h e a r d i n t h e Ci t y o f C a r r a b e l l e C o m m i s s i o n C h a m b e r s l o c a t e d a t 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e C a r r a b e l l e F L ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 t o c o n s i d e r t h e f o l l o w i n g i n a c c or d a nc e w i t h O r d i n a nc e N o 4 4 3 C ons e n t o f U s e f or t h e C ons u m p t i on a n d S a l e o f A l c oho l : 1 A l l o w i n g a r e s t a u r a nt l o c a t e d a t 2 0 1 S t J a m e s A v e ( F a t ho m ’ s ) t o s e l l a l c oho l A l l i n t e r e s t ed p ar ti e s ar e i n v it ed to a t t e n d t h e p u b l i c h e a ri n g o n t h i s m a t t e r F u r t h e r i n f o rm a t i o n c o n c e r n i n g t h e p r o p o s e d a m e n d m e nt c a n b e o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e Ci t y Cl e r k a t Ci t y H a l l a t 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e n u e C a r r a b e l l e F l o ri d a 32 32 2 o r b y c a l l i n g ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 b et w e e n t h e h o u r s o f 8 : 0 0 A M a n d 4 : 3 0 P M M o n d a y t h r o u g h F ri d a y e x c l u d i n g ho l id a ys I f a n i n d i v id u a l d ec id es t o a p pe al a n y d ec i s i on m a d e b y t h e Ci t y C o m m i s s i o n w i t h r e s p e c t t o t h i s m e et i n g a v e r b a ti m t r an sc r i p t m a y be r eq u i r ed I f so t h e i n d i v i d u a l s h o u l d m a k e p r o v i s i o n f o r a t r a n s c ri p t t o b e m a d e a t t h e m e et i n g ( R E : F l o ri d a S t a t u t e 2 8 6 0 1 0 5 ) Pu r s u a nt t o t h e p r o v i s i o n s o f t h e A m e ri c a n s w i t h D i sa b i l i t i e s A c t a n y pe r s on r e q u i r i n g spec i a l a c c o m m o d a t i on t o p a r t i c i pa t e i n t h i s m e et i n g i s a s k e d t o a dv i s e t h e c i t y a t l e a s t 4 8 h o u r s b e f o r e t h e m e et i n g b y c o nt a c t i n g K e i s h a M e s s e r a t t h e a b o v e a d d r es s or p hon e n u m b e r W i l bu r n M es s e r M a y or At t e s t : K e i s h a M e s s e r Ci t y Cl e r k Pu b l i s h F e b r u a r y 2 7 2 0 1 4 N O TI C E O F A P P E A L HE A R I NG C I T Y CO M M I S SIO N C I T Y OF A P A L A C H I C OL A F L ORI D A T h e A p a l a c h i c o l a C i t y C o m m i s s i o n w i l l h o l d a P u b l i c A p p e a l H e a r i n g o n T u e s d a y M a r c h 1 1 2 0 1 4 a t 6 : 0 0 P M a t C i t y H a l l C o m m u n i t y C e n t e r M e e t i n g R o o m 1 Ba y A v e n u e A pa lac h i c ola F lo r i da o n t he A p p e a l o f B l u e C u r r e n t D e v e lop m e n t LL C o f t he D e c i s io n o f t he A pa lac h i c ola P la nn i ng a n d Z o n i ng B oa rd o f N o v e mb e r 1 8 2 0 1 3 d e n y i n g t h e S p e c i a l E x c e p t i o n r e q u e s t e d b y A p p e l l a n t B l u e C u r r e n t D e v e l o p m e n t L L C f o r t h e “ F a m i l y D o l l a r S t o r e ” p r o p o s e d t o b e d e v e l o p e d o n t h e p r o p e r t y l o c a t e d a t t he c o r ne r o f H igh w a y 9 8 a n d C la i r m o n t A v e n u e i n A pa lac h i c ola F lo r i da t he le g a l d e scr i p t i o n d e scr i be d be l o w : A S p e c ia l E x c e p t io n i s de ne d b y t he A pa lac h i c ola L a n d C o de a s f ol lo w s : A u s e t h a t w o u l d n o t b e a p p r o p r i a t e g e n e r a l l y w i t h o u t r e s t r i c t i o n t h r ou ghou t t he pa r t i c u la r z o n i ng d i s t r i c t o r c la s s i c a t io n b u t w h i c h i f c o n t r ol le d a s a n umb e r a r e a lo c a t io n o r r e la t io n t o t he ne igh b o r ho o d w o u l d n o t a d v e r s e l y a f fe c t t h e p u b l i c h e a l t h, s a fe t y c o m f o r t g o o d o r d e r a p p e a r a n c e c o n v e n i e n c e m o r a l s a n d t h e g e n e r a l w e l f a r e. D u e p r o c e s s w i l l b e p r o v i d e d a n d e v i d e n c e r e c e i v e d a t t h e A p p e a l H e a r i n g a s n e c e s s a r y. T h i s n o t i c e i s b e i n g p r o v i d e d i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h r e q u i r e m e n t s o f t h e C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a L a n d D e v e l o p m e n t C o d e. Y o u m a y r e c e i v e a c o p y o f t h e D e c i s i o n o f t h e P l a n n i n g a n d Z o n i n g B o a r d a n d t h e A p p e a l o f t h e A p p e l l a n t B l u e C u r r e n t D e v e lop m e n t LL C a s w e l l a s r e le v a n t p o r t io n s o f t he A pa lac h i c ola L a n d D e v e lop m e n t C o d e m a y b e o b t a i n e d a t t h e C i t y H a l l C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a A d m i n i s t r a t i v e B u i l d i n g ad dr e s s F O R T H E C I T Y C O M M I S S I O N O F T H E C I T Y O F A P A L A C H I C O L A A n y p e r s o n w h o d e s i r e s t o a p p e a l a n y d e c i s i o n a t t h i s m e e t i n g w i l l n e e d a r e c o r d o f t h e p r o c e e d i n g a n d f o r t h i s p u r p o s e m a y n e e d t o e n s u r e t h a t a v e r b a t i m r e c o r d o f t h e p r o c e e d i n g i s m a d e w h i c h i n c l u d e s t e s t i m o n y a n d e v i d e n c e u p o n w h i c h t h e a p p e a l i s b a s e d P e r s o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s n e e d i n g a s s i s t a n c e t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n a n y o f t h e s e p r o c e e d i n g s s h o u l d c o n t a c t t h e C i t y C l e r k ’ s O f c e a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 3 1 9 4 8 h o u r s i n a d v a n c e o f t h e m e e t i n g A p a r c e l o f L a n d i n S e c t i o n 1 2 T o w n s h i p 9 S o u t h, R a n g e 8 W e s t F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a d e s c r i b e d a s f o l l o w s : C o m m e n c e a t a n i r o n p i p e m a r k i n g t h e S o u t h e a s t C o r n e r o f t h a t c e r t a i n p a r c e l o r t r a c t o f l a n d d e s c r i b e d i n a d e e d f r o m W H N e e l a n d S o p h r i n a N e e l h i s w i fe t o C l a r a D G i b s o n, d a t e d D e c e m b e r 3 1 1 9 0 3 r e c o r d e d i n D e e d B o o k L P a g e s 2 4 2 t h r o u g h 2 4 6 o f t h e P u b l i c R e c o r d s o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a a n d r u n t h e n c e N o r t h 1 4 d e g r e e s 4 6 m i n u t e s 4 6 s e c o n d s W e s t 5 3 8 9 4 fe e t t o a n i r o n r o d ( # 1 9 9 9) o n t h e N o r t h b o u n d a r y l i n e o f t h e r i g h t o f w a y o f S t a t e R o a d N o 3 0 ( U S H i g h w a y 9 8) a n d h e P o i n t o f B e g i n n i n g F r o m s a i d P o i n t o f B e g i n n i n g r u n N o r t h 1 1 d e g r e e s 2 2 m i n u t e s 1 9 s e c o n d s W e s t a l o n g t h e W e s t e r l y r i g h t o f w a y b o u n d a r y o f C l a i r m o n t S t r e e t (5 0 f o o t r i g h t o f w a y ) a d i s t a n c e o f 1 3 7 5 7 fe e t t o a n i r o n r o d ( # 1 9 9 9) a t t h e S o u t h e a s t c o r n e r o f L o t 1 0 B l o c k 5 N e e l ’ s A d d i t i o n t o t h e C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a t h e n c e S o u t h 7 5 d e g r e e s 1 3 m i n u t e s 5 1 s e c o n d s W e s t a l o n g t h e a g r e e d u p o n S o u t h e r l y b o u n d a r y o f s a i d B l o c k 5 a s p e r Pr o p e r t y L i n e A g r e e m e n t r e c o r d e d i n t h e P u b l i c R e c o r d s o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a a d i s t a n c e o f 2 8 1 8 7 fe e t ; t h e n c e r u n S o u t h 1 6 d e g r e e s 0 2 m i n u t e s 2 3 s e c o n d s E a s t 2 2 6 7 8 fe e t t o a p o i n t o n t h e N o r t h e r l y r i g h t o f w a y b o u n d a r y o f S t a t e R o a d 3 0 s a i d p o i n t b e i n g o n a c u r v e c o n c a v e N o r t h w e s t e r l y ; t h e n c e N o r t h e a s t e r l y a l o n g s a i d c u r v e h a v i n g a r a d i u s o f 3 7 8 8 2 2 fe e t t h r o u g h a c e n t r a l a n g l e o f 0 4 d e g r e e s 1 7 m i n u t e s 0 2 s e c o n d s f o r a n a r c l e n g t h o f 2 8 3 2 4 fe e t ( t h e c h o r d o f s a i d a r c b e a r s N o r t h 5 6 d e g r e e s 4 9 m i n u t e s 4 0 s e c o n d s E a s t 2 8 3 1 8 fe e t ) t o t h e P o i n t o f B e g i n n i n g L e s s a n d E x c e p t a n y p o r t i o n o f t h e s u b j e c t p r o p e r t y t h a t m a y l i e w i t h i n a r o a d r i g h t o f w a y 1 of the construction would include adding a new warming kitchen; mak ing the structure ADA-compliant; and installing hurricane-proof windows in the northern wing, a re sprinkler system in the north wing and heat ing and air conditioning for the entire building. Other changes include possible ways to relocate bathrooms and con ference rooms, creating an equip ment yard for exterior equipment and adding a ticket ofce. The price tag also would include additional planning and design. Emo set the cost for Phase 1 at $1.3 million. He said with funding in place, the project could be complete by year’s end. Phase 2 would involve cleaning and painting interior surfaces and re nishing oors. The windows in the main auditorium would be replaced and a sprinkler system installed. The acoustics in the building would be corrected and an audiovisual system “roughed in.” One of the ofces on the upper oor would be converted to a media room. This phase would cost an estimat ed $769,000 and could be completed by May 25, 2015, if funding was in place. Phase 3 would deal with exterior work, including revisions to park ing, landscaping, a new stormwater system and outdoor lighting. Emo suggested installing outdoor cook ing facilities and dining area. He said streetlights similar to those already downtown would be installed. The nal phase of the renovation would cost an estimated $300,000 and could be complete by July 2015. Emo said changes in both pro posed plans would bring the Armory up to more current code and more consistent historical perspective. He said the main difference between the two possible interior designs is the location of the kitchen. “We are looking at something that would stand the test of time,” he said. “I want to know where the money’s coming from,” said Commissioner William Massey said. “I love the Ar mory. It’s a good building. I couldn’t vote to put the county in that kind of debt. In 20 years, I’ll be dead and gone and still be cussed. If we have a storm and we put this county in debt for almost $3 million on this project, the county will be in a mess.” Emo said his rm had not been asked to do a business report. “That may be a logical outcome because this is a tremendous asset,” he said. “People love the building in its cur rent state, but there are restrictions for how you can use it and for what you can charge for use. There are is sues in the building that, if not miti gated and corrected, are just going to get worse. “Properly managed, it could not only start making some money itself but lling up a lot of hotel rooms,” Emo said. “Filling up a lot of res taurants, caterers and that sort of thing.” Commissioner Smokey Parrish asked how much money had been al located to repairs over the next year. Tourist Development Council Ad ministrator Curt Blair said with un collected but expected revenue, the TDC could provide roughly $500,000 for the project to be spent within the next eight or 10 months and about $200,000 annually after that. “If we could get historic grants, that would be different,” Commis sioner Cheryl Sanders said. “That is not to say Mr. Emo didn’t do a good job. I don’t think anybody on this commission can go with a $3 million project. We need to get together as a board and see what we can do. We need to put this on a back burner.” Emo said he thought “the smart thing to do, now that we’ve got it bro ken out, would be to work with either staff or a committee to come back with a recommended scope of work and to establish a business prole for funding to see how it would work nancially. We commend you for hav ing the vision to want to look at the whole thing. We’re tickled about what could happen.” “Mr. Emo, you’ve got to under stand we’re not Leon County,” Sand ers said. “We pay as we go.” Sanders instructed Emo to dis cuss what changes were essential to stabilizing the building with county staff and the board thanked him for his presentation. Pierce said the additional time would be covered by funds already paid to Emo. “I’m hoping that there are some historical grants to help with funding sources to complete these projects,” Parrish said. “We could almost pay for Phase 1 with the existing funds we have,” Commissioner Pinki Jackel said. “If we could pass a simple majority vote of 1 percent increase in the TDC tax, that would generate almost half a million dollars revenue in the next 12 months. So, we could pay cash for Phase 1. That 1 percent is usable for these types of funding programs, and then we would not be hamstrung with rest of the marketing.” ARMORY from page A1 F a A MILY DOLLaA R from page A1 City Attorney Pat Floyd last month reviewed Hughes’ ling and determined the proper avenue would be for the developer to go directly to the city commission, after paying a $500 fee. At the city commission’s Feb. 4 meeting, it was agreed to hold the appeals hearing at 6 p.m. March 11 in the commission chambers at Battery Park. An appeal to the city is a prerequisite if the developer should go to circuit court and seek to recover damages. Hughes wants the city to reverse P&Z’s de nial of the special exception request and to di rect the city to grant the retail a specialty store exception found in the C-3 commercial zoning. Woodward wants to construct a more than 8,300square-foot store on 1.16 acres at U.S. 98 and Clairmont. The lawyer argues P&Z’s unanimous vote in April 2012 to conrm that “the operation is con sistent within the C-3 zoning district” led to Wood ward spending about $302,000 on the project, including about $245,000 for the land, $24,000 for civil design work, $9,300 for legal fees, $9,000 for architectural work, $8,500 for surveying work and $6,000 for environmental work. In his recounting of the case, Hughes cited City Administrator Betty Webb’s Sept. 19, 2012, follow-up letter conrming the initial P&Z vote as “justiable reliance” upon which Woodward went ahead to buy the property a month later. He said Blue Current “worked diligently in late 2012 and spring of 2013 to develop its site plan in conformity with the city’s land development code.” Hughes said the company “incurred exten sive obligations and expenses such that it would be highly inequitable and unjust to now prohibit (Blue Current) from proceeding with the project’s development.” He said P&Z Chairman Tom Daly’s comment at the November 2013 hearing, that “the reality is we voted on something very quickly without really thinking it through at that time,” shows P&Z act ed negligently, did not exercise sound judgment and was not “without wanton disregard for the company’s rights in the property.” Hughes said in this ling the city’s land devel opment code does not include “published criteria” as to what constitutes a retail specialty store. But, he argues, rather than articulating the evidence that it relied on to makes its decision, P&Z relied on “improper, irrelevant, immaterial and inadmis sible” comments of the public. P&Z “capriciously blocked (Blue Current) from actually developing the property after the compa ny purchased the property in reliance on the ofrecord actions of (P&Z) and the written assurance of City Administrator Betty Webb,” Hughes wrote in his ling. According to the ling, Blue Current, if grant ed permission, would develop and construct the store, and then receive rental income arising from lease arrangements between Blue Current and Family Dollar Stores Inc. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times A room at the northwest corner of the Armory has damaged windows.

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 BA Y S H O R E DRI V E – S C O P P R O JEC T P R O JEC T # 0 0 7 1 1 1 N OT I CE T O R E CE IV E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i v e s e a l e d b id s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d pe r s on c o m pa n y or c or p or a t i on in t e r e s t e d in c o n s t r u c t in g : B A Y S H O R E D R I V E – S C O P P R O J E C T P r o j e c t i s l o c a t e d i n E a s t p o i n t F l o r i d a a n d c o n s i s t s o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 4 5 m i l e s o f r o a d w a y w i d e n i n g a n d r e s u r f a c i n g a l o n g B a yshor e D r i v e P l a ns a n d spec i c a t i ons c a n b e ob t a i n e d a t P r e b l e R i sh I nc 3 2 4 M a r i n a D r i v e P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C o s t f o r P l a n s a n d S p e c i c a t i o n s w i l l b e $ 5 0 0 0 p e r s e t a n d i s n o n r e f u n d a b l e C h e c k s s h o u l d b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o P R E B L E R I S H I N C T h e b id m u s t c on f or m t o S ec t i on 2 8 7 1 3 3 ( 3 ) Fl or id a S t a t u t e s on pu b l i c e n t i t y c r i m e s A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l b e F D O T q u a l i e d p e r S e c t i o n 2 1 o f t h e F D O T S t a n d a r d Spec i c a t i ons f or R oa d a n d B r id g e C ons t r u c t i on l a t es t e d i t i o n i n t h e f o l l ow i n g w o r k c l a s s e s : G r a d i n g D r a i n ag e F l e x i b l e P av i n g a n d H o t P l a n t M i x B i t u m i n o u s C o u r s e C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l b e 15 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d ate o f t h e N o t i c e t o P r o c e e d p r e s e n t e d t o t h e s u c c e s s f u l b i d d e r L i q u i d a t e d d a m ag e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e p r o j e c t o n t h e s p e c i e d d a t e w i l l b e s e t a t $ 7 5 0 0 0 p e r d a y P l e a s e i n d i c a t e o n t h e e n v e l o p e t h a t t h i s i s a s e a l e d b i d f o r “ B a y s h o r e D r i v e – S C O P P r o j e c t ” B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i v e d u n t i l 4: 0 0 p .m e a s t e r n t i m e o n M a r c h 1 7 2 0 1 4 a t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d o n M a r c h 18 2 0 14 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t A p a l ach i c ol a F L T h e B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e i n f or m a l i t i e s i n a n y b id t o a c c e p t a n d / or r e j ec t a n y or a l l b id s a n d t o a c c e p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r j u d g m e n t w i l l b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n r m f o r a p e r i o d o f s i x t y d a y s a f t e r t h e o p e n i n g A l l b id d e r s sh a l l c o m p ly w i t h a l l a p p l i c a b l e S t a t e a n d l o c a l l a w s c onc e r n i n g l i c e ns i n g r e gi s t r a t i on a n d r e g u l a t i on o f c on t r a c t or s d o i n g b u s i n e s s t o t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a I f y o u h av e a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l C l a y S m a l l w o o d a t ( 8 5 0 ) 2 27 7 20 0 OA K S T R E E T – S C O P P R O J E C T P R O J E C T # 0 0 7 1 1 0 N O TI C E T O R E C E I V E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i ve s e a l e d b i d s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d p e r s o n c o m p a n y o r c o r p o r a t i o n i n t e r e s t ed i n c o n s t r uc t i n g : OA K S T R E E T – S C O P P R O J E C T P r o j e c t i s l o c a t e d i n L a n a r k V i l l a g e F l o r i d a a n d c o n s i s t s o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 5 m i l e s o f r o a d w a y w i d e n i n g r e s u r f a c i n g a n d a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 m i l e o f n e w c o n s t r u c t i o n r o a d w a y a l o n g O a k S t r e e t P l a n s a n d s p e c i c a t i o n s c a n b e o b t a i n e d a t P r e b l e R i s h I n c 3 2 4 M a r i n a D r i ve P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C o s t f o r P l a n s a n d S p e c i c a t i o n s w i l l b e $ 5 0 0 0 p e r s e t a n d i s n o n r e f u n d a b l e C h e c k s s h o u l d b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o P R E B L E R I S H I N C T h e b i d m u s t c o n f o r m t o S e c t i o n 2 8 7 1 3 3 ( 3 ) F l o r i d a S t a t u t e s o n p u b l i c en t i t y cr i m e s A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l b e F D O T q u a l i e d p e r S e c t i o n 2 1 o f t h e F D O T S t a n d a r d Sp e c i c a t i ons f or Roa d a n d B r i d g e C ons t r u c t i on l a te s t e d i t i on i n t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r k c l a s s e s : G r a d i n g D r a i n a g e F l e x i b l e P a v i n g and H ot P l an t M i x B i t u m i n o us C o u r s e C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l b e 1 5 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i ce t o P r o ce e d p r ese n t e d t o t h e s u c ces s f u l bid d e r L i q u id a t e d d a m a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e p r o j e c t o n t h e s p e c i e d d a t e w i l l b e s e t a t $ 7 5 0 0 0 p e r d a y P l e a s e i n d i c a t e o n t h e e n ve l o p e t h a t t h i s i s a s e a l e d b i d f o r “ O a k S t r e e t – S C O P P r o j e c t ” B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i ve d u n t i l 4 : 0 0 p m e a s t e r n t i m e o n M a r c h 1 7 2 0 1 4 a t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d o n M a r c h 1 8 2 0 1 4 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F L T h e B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r ve s t h e r i g h t t o w a i ve i n f o r m a l i t i e s i n a n y b i d t o a c c e p t a n d / o r r e j e c t a n y o r a l l b i d s a n d t o a c c e p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r j u d g m e n t w i l l b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n r m f o r a p e r i o d o f s i x t y d a y s af t er t h e o p en i n g A l l bi d d e r s sh a l l c o m pl y w i t h al l a p pl i c a bl e S t a t e a n d l o c al l a ws c onc e r n i n g l i c e ns i n g r e g i s t r a t i on a n d r e g u l a t i on o f c on t r a c t or s do i n g b u s i n e s s t o t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a I f y o u h a ve a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l C l a y S m a l l w o o d a t ( 8 5 0) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0. dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ I€ :qq €… 3€ˆ‹ As I€ Nqn €Žq…“ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  HAIL TO THE CHIEF Last week, seventh graders at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School created a Presidential Wax Museum for parents and their fellow students. Students in Tanya Joanos’ class dressed to look like the president, or rst lady, who they selected, and when visitors to the media center walked by, and dropped a coin in their cups, the students came to life, and shared a brief history of the person they were portraying. Can you guess who is who? Answers are below. CHLOE DAVIS DAIJON PENAMON MATTHEW ADKINS BRYCE KENT JAN LOWE HALEY GAY JACK RAMSDELL DAMIEN FREEMAN MADISON COULTER SCOUT MCLEMORE JACOB PENDLETON IAN LASHLEY ALEXUS JOHNSON SOPHIA KIRVIN BRANDON TARANTO MIKALIN HUCKEBA CALVIN COOLIDGE FIRST LADY ELIZA JOHNSON WILLIAM H. HARRISON FIRST LADY LYDIA TYLER JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT CHESTER ARTHUR WILLIAM MCKINLEY TEDDY ROOSEVELT WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT GEORGE H. W. BUSH HERBERT HOOVER GERALD FORD RICHARD NIXON RONALD REAGAN GROVER CLEVELAND ANSWERS Chloe Davis — Grover Cleveland Matthew Adkins — Ronald Reagan Bryce Kent — Richard M. Nixon Daijon Penamon — Gerald Ford Jan Lowe — Herbert Hoover Haley Gay — George H.W. Bush Jack Ramsdell — William Howard Taft Damien Freeman — Teddy Roosevelt Madison Coulter — William McKinley Scout MeLemore — Chester Arthur Jacob Pendleton — Franklin D. Roosevelt Ian Lashley — John Fitzgerald Kennedy Alexus Johnson — First Lady Eliza Johnson Sophia Kirvin — First Lady Lydia Tyler Brandon Taranto — William H. Harrison Mikalin Huckeba — Calvin Coolidge NOT PICTURED: Angel Henning – Abraham Lincoln Kevin Flores – Andrew Jackson Connor Messer – George Washington Jaiden Hill – John Fitzgerald Kennedy Cole Smith – Woodrow Wilson Sean Williams – John Adams Ethan Vonier – Bill Clinton Aaron Martin – Thomas Jefferson Cameron Wynn – Barack Obama

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, February 27, 2014 4516044 PUB LI C N O TI CE e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n o f t h e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le w i l l m e et in r egu l a r s es sio n o n ur s d a y M a r c h 6, 2014, a t a p p r o xim a t e l y 6:00 p .m. o r a s s o o n a s c a n b e h e a r d in t h e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le C o mmi s sio n C h a m b er s lo c a t e d a t 1001 G ra y A v e C a r ra b e l le FL (850)697-2727 t o co n sider t h e f o l lo w in g in acco r d a n ce w i t h Or din a n ce N o .443, C o n s en t o f U s e f o r t h e C o n s um p t io n a n d Sa le o f A lco h o l: 1. Al l o w in g C r o w d e r/C-Q u a r t e rs t o s e l l p ack age l o c a t e d a t 208 S t J a mes A v e n u e S t e A. A l l in t er es t e d p a r t ies a r e in v i t e d t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o n t hi s m a t t er F ur t h er inf o r m a t io n co n cer nin g t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t c a n b e o b t a in e d f r o m t h e Ci t y C ler k a t Ci t y H a l l a t 1001 G ra y A v en ue C a r ra b e l le Flo r id a, 32322, o r b y c a l lin g (850) 697-2727, b et w e en t h e h o ur s o f 8:00 A.M. a n d 4:30 P .M., M o n d a y t hr o ug h F r id a y ex c l udin g h o lid a ys. I f a n in di v id u a l de cides t o a p p e a l a n y de ci sio n m ade b y t h e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n w i t h r es p e c t t o t hi s m e et in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t m a y b e r e q uir e d I f s o t h e in di v id u a l s h o u ld m a k e p r o v i sio n f o r a t ra n s cr i p t t o b e m ade a t t h e m e et in g (RE: Flo r id a S t a t u t e 286.0105). Pur s u a n t t o t h e p r o v i sio n s o f t h e A m er ic a n s w i t h Di s a b i li t ies A c t, a n y p er s o n r e q uir in g s p e ci a l acco mm o d a t io n t o p a r t ici p a t e in t hi s m e et in g i s a s k e d t o ad v i s e t h e ci t y a t le a s t 48 h o ur s b ef o r e t h e m e et in g b y co n t ac t in g K ei s h a M es s er a t t h e a b o v e addr es s o r p h o n e n um b er W i l b ur n M es s er M a y o r A t t es t: K ei s h a M es s er Ci t y C ler k Pu b li s h F e b r u a r y 27, 2014 tourist lodgings would be required to display a copy of the ordinance at all times. Beach equip ment would have to be pulled back in the evenings to the toe of the dunes and could not encroach on vegetation or to the line of development if dunes and vegetation are not present. Equipment not in compliance with the law would be collected sometime between sunset and 7 a.m., according to the motion. Jackel had asked for modication of an earlier version that called for collection between 7 p.m. and sunrise. Josh Hodson, manager of Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park, said the state has an existing protocol for beach clearance, and he sug gested to ordinance adhere to the state rule. Commissioners questioned who would enforce the rule. Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millen der said members of her staff remove abandoned equipment from the beach, although not on a daily basis. She said the county owns an off-road vehicle dedicated to beach clean-up. She said she has em ployees on call at night to deal with problems at public restrooms, and she has investigated hav ing more employees to work in the evening during busy season, “This is a well drafted ordinance,” said St. George Island resident Barbara Sanders, herself an attorney. “We need this. It sets a standard, and I commend you for that. It’s a good message to get out for safety. I want the citizens who use that beach to support this ordinance.” There would be no penalty for breaking the “No Trace” law in its suggested form, other than the loss of the property. Conscated items could be re claimed at the county landll. Parrish objected to the policy of returning property to offenders. “I don’t agree with spend ing county resources to pick it up and then give it back to them,” he said. “What’s the deterrent? Who’s responsible for this property once we pick it up? Once it’s on the county truck, it belongs to the county.” Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson expressed con cerns about funding for the beach cleanup. “None of this is currently in the budget,” she said. She worried about the cost of maintaining the vehicle and patrolling a much larger stretch of beach on a regular basis. She said the county must be accountable for anything conscated, and an auditor would be needed. Johnson said she believed companies that rent beach equipment should bear the cost of removing abandoned items from the beach. She also worried that tourists might be offended by having their equipment taken. “I don’t see how Parks and Recreation can en force it, and I’m concerned about going on private land,” she said. Millender suggested the county investigate generating funds by selling permits for beach wed dings. “I think we need to look a little deeper into this,” Sanders said. back nearly 40 years to the time he took a manners class in his Rust Belt childhood home of Steubenville, Ohio. Presented without interruption, with its two characters on stage nearly entirely throughout, the play features the lead actor (Eric Folks) as the narrator Jeffrey, who brings to life seven other characters – his father, a coarse and comic boor; his amboyant drama teacher, Bill Crossky, who obsesses on all things showbiz; four of his classmates, Chucky the annoying suck-up, Jamie the inquisitive and sexually curious, Kim the Cold War paranoid, and Ralph the sluggish slob; and Patsy, the sexpot who is Jeffrey’s only rival to earning a perfect score for etiquette at the end-of-the-year matron’s ball. As the teacher, Mrs. Mannerly, actress Cleo Holladay shows she commands the physical energy, range of emotion and well-crafted subtlety that has come from her more than 60 years as a professional actress. The sternness of her classroom persona, the impetuousness with which she snatches Jeffrey’s tuition check, the comfort she conveys in a dive bar, all testify to a vintage, multi-layered performance by a woman gracefully entering the twilight of her years in the footlights. As strong a performance as Holladay provides, the “iron man” of the stage is young Folks, a graduate of Otterbein College’s esteemed theatre program, which also produced David Caldwell, who directed both shows. Folks is a bundle of manic energy that complements Holladay’s frosty self-control, and then, hours later, he ably steps into a completely contrasting place, the mythical northern Maine town of Almost. It is in that second show, either later or earlier on Saturday, that Folks shows his gifts for elongating the pain of love and loss, and unearthing the quaking of our hearts, that we all try to hide as best we can. The show features nearly a dozen separate, and softly desperate, scenes, each at the same time on a moonless Friday evening during a Maine winter. Folks is in about half of them, playing heartbroken former lovers, frustrated married men, bewildered suitors, with smoothness and familiarity. His equal are the three actors who share in the energy of “Almost, Maine,” Caldwell, who is featured as an average Joe in a couple of the scenes; Caitlin Morris, a fellow Otterbein graduate; and Dixie Partington, who together with Jerry Hall produced the shows for the Dixie Theatre Foundation, which she heads. Morris, originally from St. Petersburg, is making her second appearance at the Dixie, and displays a talent for opening the emotional passageways of “the girl next door.” She is a pleasure to watch, whether she is giddily cavorting on a skimobile, or holding her ground skittishly on ice skates against a distant husband. Partington offers a sadder, more poignant persona in her performance, evoking the pain of a long-forsaken love, or the confusion of a girlfriend who shows up at her boyfriend’s doorstep with plastic trash bags full of “the love he gave her.” Caldwell, the director, anchors his shows with a solid grasp of the men he manifests. As usual, the Dixie doesn’t present an elaborate set, there is no backdrop to evoke Steubenville, or the winter “wonderland” of Almost. What there is, in full bloom, is superb acting that reminds us of the exquisite power of live theatre. PHOTOS BY DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The Times Above, Eric Folks, as Randy, left, and David Caldwell, as Chad, are two “county boys” in “Almost, Maine.” At right, The two scenes with Eric Folks, as Pete, and Caitlin Morris as Ginette, open and close “Almost, Maine.” ‘NO TRACE’ from page A1 DIXIE from page A1

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A8 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 CR AEMER is a gor geous G olden R etriev er mix. He is about a y ear old super friendly and social He w as dumped in a neighbor hood along with sev er al other dogs all of whom w er e emacia t ed and neglec t ed T he others ha v e been tr ansf err ed t o other r escues but this sw eet bo y is still w aiting f or his f or ev er home He is hear t w orm positiv e but the Humane S ociet y will ha v e him tr ea t ed when the righ t adopt er r escues him. V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets Franklin County Humane Society See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y F ea tu r i ng L o c a l A r t i s a n s L a n ar k V i l l a g e B o a t C l u b Sp r i ng Ma r c h 8 t h 2 0 14 9 a m ~ 1 p m LU N C H # & #) # ) ( + ( $ ) ng i r Sp PUBLIC NO TICE THE FRANKLIN COUNTY AD VISOR Y BO ARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESD A Y MARCH 5, 2014 A T 10:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING R OOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COUR THOUSE ANNEX T O CONSIDER THE FOLLO WING V ARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: 1 CONSIDERA TION OF A REQ UEST FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION T O LOCA TE A COMMUNICA TION T O WER ON A 100X100 FT P ARCEL OUT OF A 26.8 A CRE P ARCEL ON PR OPER TY ZONED R-6 R URAL RESIDENTIAL. THIS PR OPER TY IS DESCRIBED AS L YING IN SECTION 8, T O WNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST BETWEEN EASTPOINT AND CARRABELLE, NOR TH OF HIGHW A Y 98. THE APPLICANT IS ALSO REQ UESTING A V ARIANCE T O THE 47 FT HEIGHT LIMIT T O CONSTR UCT A 200 FT T O WER. REQ UEST SUBMITTED BY BLA CKW A TER GR OUP LANE WRIGHT A GENT FOR A T&T 2 RECONSIDERA TION OF A REQ UEST FOR AN AFTER-THE-F A CT V ARIANCE T O INST ALL A SWIMMING POOL 6.5 FEET INT O THE REAR SETB A CK LINE AND 4 FEET INT O THE 25 FT SETB A CK LINE OFF OF 11TH STREET EAST ON PR OPER TY DESCRIBED AS 1080 EAST GULF BEA CH DRIVE, LO T 11, BLOCK J, UNIT 2, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORID A. REQ UEST SUBMITTED BY WILLIAM & DONN A NICHOLS, O WNERS. THE BO ARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS A CTING AS THE BO ARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL ADDRESS THESE REQ UESTS A T THEIR MEETING ON MARCH 18, 2014, A T 9:00 A.M. *Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Franklin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 F orbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL 32320. T ransactions of this hear ing will not be recorded, persons wishing to record the proceedings must mak e the necessary arrangement for recording. Society Weddings The parents of John Edward Nunez and Samantha Nicole Pouncey would like to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children. John is a 2008 graduate of Franklin County High School and is currently employed as a sergeant with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. He is the son of Donnie and Meloney Chambers, of Eastpoint, and John J. Nunez, of South Carolina. John is the grandson of the late Cecil E. Simmons, of Sopchoppy, the late Martha Braswell Glass, of Eastpoint, Kelby and Sally Chambers of Eastpoint, and Ben and Rose Hurley of Tallahassee. He is the great-grandson of Selma Shiver Braswell and the late George H. Braswell of Eastpoint; and the late Sercy and Jewell Simmons, of Sopchoppy. Samantha is a 2011 graduate of Franklin County High School and currently works for the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. She is the child of Cecil “Joe” Pouncey and Frances Hunnings, of Carrabelle, and Alicia Armistead of Texas. She is the granddaughter of Melvin and the late Marilyn Armitage, of Texas, and the late Carolyn Sparks of Carrabelle. The wedding will be held at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola on Saturday, March 22, 2014, at 2:30 p.m. with a reception to follow at Rivercrest Lodge. All family and friends are invited to attend. No formal invitations will be sent. Casual attire accepted. Marshall Sweet and Rosamae Cummings would like to announce their wedding this Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, at 6 p.m. at the Community Center at Battery Park in Apalachicola. Marshall is the son of the late Diane Mack and the late Marshall Malveaux. Rosamae is the daughter of Robert Cummings, of Apalachicola, and the late Jackie Houston. We invite all our family and friends to come celebrate with us. A reception will follow at the community center. On Thursday, Feb. 20, health departments across Florida celebrated the 125th anniversary of public health in Florida. Florida’s health department was born when a young Marine, Dr. Joseph Yates Porter, was appointed the state’s rst public health ofcer after helping to control an outbreak of yellow fever in Jacksonville. At health department ofces in Apalachicola and Carrabelle, workers and guests celebrated public health with healthy snacks, free dental supplies and lots of literature on staying t. Behind a display table, a slide show highlighted the history of public health in Franklin County. “Today as we celebrate 125 years of public health, it is tting to reect upon those whose shoulders we now stand on,” health department spokesman David Walker said. “And to take note of the contributions of the countless people of public health whose often seless and valiant efforts to protect and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts are remembered.” Happy birthday! She’s got style, She’s got air. That’s “My Girl” With the bouffant hair. Happy 40th birthday Bijoux Harmon celebrated her 16th birthday on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, in Apalachicola. Bijoux is a Cairn Terrier (Remember Toto?) and has brought much joy, happiness, and consternation in her 16 years. She is a welltraveled little dog and a ne little studio dog and is the inspiration for Oystertown Dog Designs. Bijoux was 2013 Mardi Paws Queen. She is a proud member of Col. Potter Cairn Terrier Rescue, which rescues and places Cairns throughout the U.S. Bijoux’s birthday wish is for all dogs to have loving, caring, forever homes and to enjoy a long, well-cared-for life as she has had. Rosamae Cummings, Marshall Sweet to wed Friday Samantha Pouncey, John Nunez to marry LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Attending the celebration of 125 years of public health at the county health department ofces are, from left, Interim Director Marcia Lindeman, Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove, Health Education Consultant Talitha Robinson and Alma Pugh of Florida Healthy Families. A happy birthday to good health Special to The Times Apalachicola resident Ron Harris, writing as R. Juan Harris, will debut his novel “The Ruby Sea Glass” at Downtown Books on Saturday. Harris moved here from Atlanta four years ago, when his real estate career went South along with the market. Along the way, he discovered a passion for writing. In this new novel, Florida State University freshman Sloan Abernathy promises his dying father that he will buckle down, get straight A’s, and shun unsuitable relationships. He believes that he is meeting these expectations when he joins ROTC, excels academically, and falls in love with a beautiful transfer student from Boston. But, after graduation, stationed at an Army base in Spain, Sloan makes a single mistake that sends his life veering off in entirely different directions. Nicholas Sparks’ fans are sure to enjoy this story of a decent man trying to do the right thing while holding fast to his dream of sailing off into the sunset with his true love by his side. Friends and wellwishers can join the author at Downtown Books from 1-3 pm. For more information or to reserve a copy of “The Ruby Sea Glass,” call the bookstore at 653-1290. Birthdays Bijoux marks her Sweet 16 Harris launches debut novel Saturday

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The Times | A9 Thursday, February 27, 2014 February is just about history. March is shaping up to be another busy month. Guess we’ll see you at lunch this afternoon. Sarge and his helpers will have a nice lunch xed for us. The chow line forms at noon. Your donation of $4 will be collected at the desk at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, 201 Avenue F in Carrabelle. Friday nights are always hamburger and chip nights at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 here in the village. A donation of $6 will be collected in the lounge. Eat in or take out. You will enjoy the evening. Start off Saturday morning, March 1 with a full breakfast at Chillas Hall. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will cook and serve pancakes/French toast, eggs, bacon/sausage, juice and coffee. Yum! Yum! Your donation of $5 will be collected inside the doors. See ya there! I’ll be in the front of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church after 5 p.m. Mass on Saturday to kick off our annual tootsie roll drive for the handicapped and mentally impaired, sponsored by the Knights of Columbus. Later, on Saturday night, you can have a fun evening at the Over 50 Dance at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Bring your favorite snack, your beverage of choice, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. Jim the deejay will provide the music for your dancing and listening pleasure. Hop! Hop! Hop! Every Sunday evening is pizza night at Legion Post 82. Doors open at 4 p.m. Orders taken after 5 p.m. Pizza by the slice requires a donation of $1. Betcha can’t eat just one. Whole pizza is $8 donation and take-out goes for a donation of $10. Monday, March 3 will be our monthly meeting of the Lanark Village Association. Membership meeting at 7 p.m. The door at Chillas Hall will open at 5:45 p.m. Every Wednesday night we have bingo at Chillas Hall. The door will open at 6 p.m. and I will start calling at 6:30 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening with us. Cookies and soft drinks available. On Thursday, March 6, World War II veterans can register for Camp Gordon Johnston Days at the World War II Museum, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle. We will have our annual reception for the veterans on March 7. Sorry, no hamburgers or chips that night, but the Legion Post will have a low country boil. All World War II vets, active duty troops, Legionnaires, Sons, Auxiliary and their spouses are invited to attend. There is no charge for this event, which begins at 6 p.m. Members are encouraged to bring a dish to share. The Not Quite Ready Band will play dinner music. This is not a public event. Chillas Hall was packed out last Saturday, Feb. 22. Everyone enjoyed the great full breakfast and service. No, I didn’t win the drawing. Oh, well. We will enjoy another great breakfast and service, on Saturday, March 8, only this time it will be held at the Curfew Lodge, 108 NE First Street, in Carrabelle. After you’ve enjoyed your breakfast, it’s off to the big parade. Step-off at 10 a.m. Also, Saturday March 8, the members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will hold their annual spring bazaar from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., inside and outside the clubhouse. Breakfast sandwiches will be available and we’ll have lunch also. The dinner dance will be held at 6 p.m. above C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle. The catered dinner features choice of chicken, fried or baked, or ham with all the classic Southern sides. Tea and coffee provided, or bring a beverage of your choice. The evening’s entertainment features music from the World War II era to present, with several local crooners on hand to sing some of the familiar songs. All this for a $10 donation per person. All World War II and active duty troops attend at no charge. For tickets and further information, call the museum at 697-8575. Deadline for ticket purchases is Wednesday, March 5. When you get home from the dinner dance, or just out on the town, set you clocks ahead one hour before going to see the sandman and while you’re at it, check the batteries in those smoke alarms. Remember all meals, games and other fundraisers are open to everyone. I will note members only when the occasion arises. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, ASAP also stands for always say a prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. 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Faith LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEF Before the chili cook-off Saturday, there will be a pancake breakfast this Saturday, March 1 from 7:30 to 10 a.m. at the St. George Island United Methodist Church, 210 E. Gulf Beach Drive. Pancakes, sausage, coffee, juice, all for $6. Take-out available. Benet is for the Nicaragua Mission Team. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Just as Pope Francis has energized the faithful worldwide, so too are members of Apalachicola’s St. Patrick Catholic Church planning a spiritual awakening in Franklin County. A monthly series of theological discussions, conducted in a relaxed, restaurant environment, had its inaugural session last week at Tamara’s Caf, as a dining room full of interested people drew up possible topics for what is being called “Theology on Tap.” “God is still alive. God is not dead,” said Ryan Totolo, a parishioner at St. Dominic’s in Panama City who, together with Justin Gagnon, attended the Feb. 18 gathering to share how Bay County’s program has worked. “This is for people from all walks of life, in a local setting outside the church. It is important that we do things outside of our church and homes,” he said. Apalachicola resident Oliver Monod, member of a seven-person organizing committee, conducted the brainstorming session, as diners provided possible topics for future sessions. Also serving on the committee are Father Roger Latosynski, Jim Dunkin, Ramon Valenzuela, Gerald Shannon, Mark Vail and Franklin County High School sophomore Gabby Bond. Bond’s suggestion of “The 10 commandments, what do they mean and how do we understand how to live by them?” was just one of about a dozen topics suggested by the gathering. Other ideas included God and creation, Vatican II, women and the Church, diversity in the Church, the new evangelization and the meaning of the sacraments. Monod stressed that the entire Franklin County community is welcome to take part in the monthly “Theology on Tap,” sessions, and that the group plans to explore both Catholic theology as well as the teachings of different aspects of the JudeoChristian tradition. “The spirit’s not just catching on, it’s caught on,” said Father Joe, a retired Bay County priest who often assists Father Roger at St. Patrick. “It’s a new faith, a whole new vision.” Katie Wood, who described herself as a nondenominational Christian who grew up in a regular Pentecostal church, said she would be interested in becoming more knowledgeable with Catholic terminology. “A Christian denomination can identify with a relationship with Christ,” said one woman. “That can be a topic, a relationship with Jesus.” Monod said the organizing committee plans to assemble a schedule of topics for the monthly sessions, which will last about an hour, and will begin at Tamara’s Caf. For more information on “Theology on Tap,” call Monod at 899-7999.The SS mith FF amily We would like to thank our family and friends for the outpouring of love and kindness extended to us during the illness and passing of our beloved Charles. We are so blessed to have such a loving family and wonderful, caring friends. The food, owers, cards and all of the other expressions of love and caring were appreciated more than we can ever express. The Charles B. Smith Family FF amily and FF riends Day Thank you, thank you. I would like to thank God for allowing me to have another Family and Friends Day. I would like to thank all the churches, my pastor and his wife, and all the ones that sang and danced, and most of all I want to thank God for Jesus and my family. May God bless everyone Eula Rochelle, chairperson Cards of t T HANKS D A A V I I D AA DLERS ERS T EIN EIN | The Times Arnold Tolliver, left, urged the gathering to focus on basic meaning of the Gospel, and not get tangled up in minute details, Olivier Monod is at right. Catholics to pore over the theologicalMethodists host breakfast on island SS aturday From Staff Reports Eight oak trees in front of Marks Insurance, 61 Ave. E, were removed Monday from the state right-of-way. Wilbur Bellew, the city of Apalachic ola’s eld operations assistant, said they were cut down after the Florida Department of Transportation de termined they were a safety hazard. Bellew said the insurance com pany requested ve of the trees be removed “because they had custom ers slip and fall due to the acorns, and sidewalks cracking.” He said Chuck Marks, owner of the insur ance agency, applied to the city to have the ve trees removed, but the application was put on hold because “being that it’s on the state right-ofway we cannot approve it without a signed release from DOT, so we told him he had to get a request from DOT in writing to do anything. When DOT came down and analyzed the problem, they said it was a safety and maintenance issue and they had to take them all out.” Bellew said Transeld, a DOT contractor, did the removal. He said it is likely they will be replaced by palm trees, but the city has not yet received a formal request for replanting. 8 oak trees removed from right-of-wayLOIS IS SWSW O B B ODA A | The Times Workers remove oak trees Monday from in front of Marks Insurance.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, February 27, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By TOM BAIRD Special to The Times The eye of the casual explorer in the bay or on the beach is rst taken by the numerous shelled animals, the mollusks, like crown conchs and lightening whelks, or the arthropods, like horseshoe, spider and blue crabs. But on closer inspection, one nds the remains or living specimens of another major group – the echinoderms. Echinoderms include star sh, sand dollars, brittle stars, sea cucumbers, and sea urchins and are by far some of the most extraordinary animals alive. First, they are all marine. Think about it. You nd freshwater clams, freshwater prawns and shrimp, etc., yet there are no freshwater star sh or freshwater urchins. The mollusks and the crustaceans invaded freshwater, but to be such a major group, the echinoderms never managed to adapt to freshwater habitats. You won’t nd any land star sh either. There are no terrestrial echinoderms, yet we have plenty of terrestrial mollusks (snails) and arthropods (think insects, etc.). The most distinctive feature of echinoderms is their radial symmetry. Fish and insects, dogs and cats, and you and I have bilateral symmetry. Our major sense organs are on our heads or the direction of movement. Echinoderms, with their radial symmetry, meet the world 360 degrees around. This can be a major advantage with sense organs facing all directions. There is no “head” and motion can be in any direction. The other extraordinary feature is their power to regenerate limbs and organs. If a star sh loses one of its legs, a new one will regrow. This ability has made echinoderms the focus of a lot of biomedical research. Imagine if you lost a nger or arm in an accident that you could regrow it, or if we could regenerate lost or damaged nerves. Unlocking echinoderm’s ability to regenerate tissues could be a huge boon to mankind. Ever notice the banner of The Star newspaper? It features what appears to be a keyhole sand dollar, an appropriate logo with its ve pointed radial star pattern. The keyhole sand dollar, Mellita tenuis, inhabits the Florida Gulf Coast. It’s the species we nd here. Another species, M. quinquiesperforata, ranges from the mouth of the Mississippi, along the Texas coast and down as far as South America. Yet another species, M. isometra, inhabits our Atlantic coasts. Some researchers believe these are all varieties of Mellita quiquiesperforata. While there are subtle differences, they all share certain features. They all grow up to about three inches in diameter and in life are brown, greyish tan, and if there are algae growing among the cilia, a greyish green. Most people are familiar with only the bleached skeletal remains found on the beach. If you have been fortunate to handle a living sand dollar you know that the brown outer covering is a moving mosaic of tiny cilia. The calcareous skeleton (called a test) is, in life, covered by a thin skin and muscles. On this living surface are spines, tube feet, and cilia. The cilia help to move food particles to the mouth, which is in the center of the at underside. Tube feet help provide locomotion and spines help in burrowing. The sand dollars burrow in sandy bottoms for protection from wave action and from predators, mainly bottom feeding sh like ounder. They feed on tiny planktonic organisms or other organic matter suspended in the water or in the sandy substrate as they burrow. Sand dollars are really just attened forms of sea urchins and are sometimes called keyhole urchins. On the upper surface can be seen the ve features that form the star-shaped pattern. These are called petalloids, and are used as gills and have specialized tube feet. The ve oval holes in the test are called lunules, and they are paired except for the larger long hole that looks like an oldfashioned keyhole. As you turn a living sand dollar over, one sees the moving mouth parts with ve “teeth” arranged in a circle. In death, these pieces become disarticulated and can sometimes be heard rattling around inside the empty test. If you break the test open, these structures look somewhat like a white winged bird in ight. This dove-like shape has led some to ascribe a religious signi cance to the ve mouthparts and various legends have grown up about these formations. The larvae of keyhole sand dollars are planktonic and have the ability to swim. Once the eggs are fertilized they develop into bilaterally symmetrical larvae and feed on smaller plankton. They will pass through several life stages and in four to six weeks they will develop into radially symmetrical adults and spend the rest of their lives burrowing in or living on the sea oor. The remains of sand dollars and sea urchins are avidly collected by beachcombers. You probably have a few white sand dollar tests in your house. They are incorporated in numerous art works and craft pieces. Yet this silent little animal is not only of major importance to the ecology of the bay, but holds secrets within its cells that could bene t all of us in the future. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher, director of a science and environmental center, and teacher of science and principal. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu F eb 27 52 40 10 % F ri, F eb 28 55 44 20 % S a t M ar 1 58 48 30 % Sun, M ar 2 62 57 0 % M on, M ar 3 69 48 % T ues M ar 4 69 48 % W ed M ar 5 69 48 % Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is almost here! S h o p o u r h u g e s e l e c t i o n o f b e a c h w a r e s, c h ai r s, a n d t o y s. N e w a r r i v a l s d ai l y o f k a y a k s, P a d d l e b o a r d s, a n d shi n g g e a r Spring time is almost here! By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Next month, Paddle Florida is hosting a sevenday trip down the Ochlockonee River for paddlers of all ages. Paddle Florida Inc. is a not-for-pro t 501(c)(3) corporation organized to promote and support paddling in Florida, as well as creating paddling events, promoting water conservation, wildlife preservation, and the restoration of springs and protection of waterways in Florida. From March 15-21, Paddle Florida will launch its fourth trip down the Ochlockonee and its 26th adventure for paddlers. The trip begins at Ed and Bernice’s Fish Camp just below the Lake Talquin Dam. The entire route is 76 miles and averages 15 miles a day with stops at Drake Landing, Whitehead Lake Landing, Revell Landing, Log Cabin Campsite, Womack Creek and more. Meals catered by local providers are available for an additional fee and campers will enjoy an evening program every night before turning in. Organizers advise travelers to pack a dry bag of clothing and rain gear but say they have never had to cancel a trip due to weather during their six years of organizing boating expeditions. In a review of last year’s Ochlocknee trip, Mim Duncan wrote the following, “Paddle Florida trips are well organized and it’s so convenient to have our luggage and camping gear carried to each campsite rather than having to haul it in our kayaks. Meals are provided by caterers, so the trips are more relaxing than non-assisted trips. Paddle Florida’s leadership works hard to make our trips easier. Many of us have formed friendships through these experiences and have paddled numerous trips with this group. It’s always a joy to reconnect with established friends and to meet new ones.” The cost of trips is reasonable. Registration for adults on the Ochlockonee trip is $300; $275 for seniors and college students and $250 for youngsters 8-17 years of age. Children 7 and younger paddle free. The meal package is an additional $175 per person. There is a $25 per person and per boat for shuttle service to and from the boat ramps. Registration ends March 1. You can contact Paddle Florida at P.O. Box 5953, Gainesville, FL 32627, 1710 SW 35th Place, Unit C, Gainesville, FL 32608 or call (352) 377-8342. JILL LINDGARD | Special to The Times Frank Konciewicz and Chuck Bennick set out through morning fog during last year’s Ochlockonee adventure. Paddle the Ochlockonee in March A sea urchin out and about Turning over sand dollars and star sh PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES A keyhole sand dollar Page 10 Local area streams and lakes will be on the rise as rain water and runoff waters ll our area from the vast amounts of rain this week. This should be a good thing for local cat sh and bream anglers, but may hinder the inshore guys looking for trout and red sh. We should start to see spring time feeding patterns emerge soon! SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 27, 2014 A Section The Franklin County High School track team, under the direction of Shevial Weston, begins its 2014 season Saturday. The team will compete at the 10th annual Jesse Forbes High School Invitational, at Godby High School, in Tallahassee. On March 5, 12 and 19, the team travels to Liberty County High School in Bristol for meets. On March 25, the Franklin County athletes will take part in the James Pelham Invitational at East Gadsden High School in Quincy. On April 5, the Seahawk speedsters participate in the North Florida Invitational at Bay High School, in Panama City. The district meet will be held April 8 at Wewahitchka High School. Regionals are April 18 at Florida High, in Tallahassee, with the state meet May 2 in Jacksonville. Weston said FCHS is not yet equipped to handle a home track meet. The girls who are members of the Seahawk team include Jencyn Stultz, Deborah Dempsey, Tyanna Townsend, Myesha Campbell, Evangelina Ducker, Diamond Butler, Josie Turner and Dy’Shereah Key. The boys include Maliek Rhodes, Chandler White, Joshua Patriotis, Johnny Jones, Jaylon Gainer, Shane Bellew, Quantavius Fuller, Dallas Shiver, Matthew Turner and Cole Wheeler. — By DAVID ADLERSTEIN F LO R I D A D EP A R T MEN T O F H E A L T H I N FR A N K L I N C OUN T Y C l o s i ng t h e G ap P r o gr am F e b r u a r y i s A me r ic a n H e a r t M o n t h H e a r t d i s e a s e i s t h e l e a d i n g c a u s e o f d e a t h f o r b o t h m e n a n d w o m e n a n d i t i s o e n p r e v e n t a b l e a n d c o n tr o l l a b l e E v e r y y e a r a b o u t 7 1 5 0 0 0 A m e r i c a n s h a v e a h e a r t a t t a c k A b o u t 6 0 0 0 0 0 p e o p l e d i e f r o m h e a r t d i s e a s e i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s e a c h y e a r ( t h a t ’ s 1 o u t o f e v e r y 4 d e a t h s ) B e l o w a r e v e m a j o r s y m p t o m s o f a h e a r t a t t a c k : $ " $ $ $ $ $ $ $ I f y o u t h i n k t h a t y o u o r s o m e o n e y o u k n o w i s h a v i n g a h e a r t a t t a c k c a l l 9 1 1 i m m e d i ate ly e t e r m “ h e a r t d i s e a s e ” r efe r s t o s e v e r a l t y p e s o f h e a r t c o n d i t i o n s e m os t c o m m o n t y p e i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s i s c o r o n a r y h e a r t d i s e a s e ( a l s o c a l l e d c o r o n a r y a r t e r y d i s e a s e ) w h i c h o c c u r s w h e n a su bs t a n c e c a l l e d p l a q u e b u i l d s u p i n $ $ $ $ $ h e a r t a t t a c k a n g i n a h e a r t f a i l u r e a n d a r r h y t h m i a s P l a n f o r P r e v e nti o n S o m e h e a l t h c o n d i t i o n s a n d l i f e s t y l e f a c t o r s c a n p u t p e o p l e a t h i g h r i s k f o r d e v e l o p i n g h e a r t d i s e a s e Y o u c a n h e l p p r e v e n t h e a r t d i s e a s e b y m a k i n g h e a l t h y c h o i c e s a n d m a n a g i n g a l l o f y o u r k n o w n m e d i c a l c o n d i t i o n s H e r e a r e n i n e t i p s t o h e l p p r e v e n t h e a r t d i se a se : E a t a h e a l t h y d i e t B e s u r e t o e a t p l e n t y o f f r u i t s a n d v e g e t a b l e s a n d e a t f o o d s t h a t a r e l o w i n s at u ra te d / t ra n s f at s M a i n t a i n a h e a l t h y w e i g h t B e i n g o v e r w e i g h t o r o b e s e c a n i n c r e a s e y o u r r i s k f o r h e a r t d i s e a s e # $ $ $ $ $ c h o le s t e ro l a nd b l o o d p r e s s u r e M o n i t o r y o u r b l o o d p r e s s u r e H i g h b l o o d p r e s s u r e o e n h a s n o s y m p t o m s s o b e s u r e t o h a v e i t c h e c k e d o n a r e g u l a r b a s i s " $ L i m i t a l c o h o l u s e A v o i d d r i n k i n g t o o m u c h a l c o h o l w h i c h c a n i n c r e a s e yo u r b l o o d pre s s u re Ha v e y o u r c h o l e s t e r o l c h e c k e d Y o u r h e a l t h c a r e p r o v i d e r s h o u l d t e s t y o u r c h o l e s t e r o l l e v e l s a t l e a s t o n c e e v e r y 5 y e a r s M a n a g e y o u r d i a b e t e s I f y o u h a v e d i a b e t e s m o n i t o r y o u r b l o o d s u g a r l e v e l s c l o s e l y a n d t a l k w i t h y o u r d o c t o r a b o u t t r e a t m e n t o p t i o n s T a k e y o u r m e d i c i n e I f y o u ’ r e t a k i n g m e d i c a t i o n t o t r e a t h i g h b l o o d p r e s s u r e h i g h c h o l e s t e r o l o r d i a b e t e s f o l l o w y o u r d o c t o r ’ s i n s t r u c t i o n s c a r e f u l l y F r e s h m a n M e g a n C o l l i n s w o n t w o di s tr i c t g a m e s o n t h e m o u n d f o r t h e L a d y S e a h a w k s v a r s i t y s o f t b a l l t e a m l a s t w e e k P i t c h i n g i n r e l i e f F e b 1 8, s h e h u r l e d t h e n a l t h r e e i n n i n g s a g a i n s t L ib e r t y C o u n t y t o e a r n t h e 1 1 1 0 w i n I n F r i d a y s 6 2 w i n a t h o m e a g a i n s t B o z e m a n s h e t o s s e d t h e n a l v e i n n i n g s g i v i n g u p o n e r u n o n s e v e n h i t s w i t h t h r e e s tr i k e o u t s O v e r t h e e n t i r e w e e k s h e g a v e u p t w o r u n s o v e r e i g h t i n n i n g s a n d s tr u c k o u t v e P L AY E R OF T H E WE E K M e g a n C o lli n s The Seahawks varsity baseball team, under the direction of coach Aaron York won its rst district game of the year Feb. 20 against West Gadsden. The winning pitcher was senior Bobby John Curry, who did not allow a hit and struck out six. Senior Alex Causey went 3-3 with two doubles, senior Graham Kirvin was 2-3 and scored three runs, and senior Logan McLeod went 2-3 and scored two runs. Junior Jonny Riley smacked a pair of doubles. The Seahawks are now 2-3, and 1-0 in district play. They faced Liberty County at home Tuesday night. — By DAVID ADLERSTEIN From Staff Report At the regular Feb. 18 county meeting, Nikki Millender, director of parks and recreation, has announced the 2014 District 4 Dixie Youth Baseball Tournament would be played at Donnie Wilson Field on June 13-16. At the previous county meeting, commissioners had asked Millender to investigate possible sources for a public address system and scoreboards needed for the tourney. Last week, Millender said she was able to put together a public address system using existing county equipment and needed only to purchase two microphones to complete the system. Millender said she has funded one scoreboard, at a cost of about $3,300, with a grant from WastePro. She said Duke Energy has committed to funding a second board. She said she was con dent she could nd a source for funding a third scoreboard. The commissioners congratulated her on locating the needed equipment. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity softball team won four district games as they went undefeated for the week. On Tuesday, Feb. 18, the team hosted Liberty County and defeated the Lady Bulldogs 11-10 in nine innings. Freshman Megan Collins relieved sophomore Krista Martina and pitched the nal three innings to earn the win. The Lady Seahawks led 95 with three innings to play before Liberty County scratched out four runs to tie the game in the sixth inning. Both teams scored a run in the eighth inning. In the ninth, with the game tied 10-all, junior Calli Westbrook led off with a single, followed by a bunt for a base hit by seventh grader Melanie Collins. Senior Ally Millender laid down a sacri ce bunt to advance both runners and senior Morgan Mock ended the game with a double to the left-center eld gap. Mock had three hits on the night. Senior Ashley Carroll and junior Madison Newell had two each. Seventh grader Sophia Kirvin, freshman Scout Segree, Martina and Millender also had hits. “Our girls were determined to nd a way to win,” said head coach Scott Collins. On Thursday, Feb. 20, the team accepted two forfeits from district foe West Gadsden. On Friday, Panama City Bozeman traveled to Franklin County and lost 6 -2. Megan Collins was the winning pitcher, hurling the nal ve innings, giving up one run on seven hits with three strikeouts. Mock led the team with two hits. Segree, Newell, Millender, Westbrook and Melanie Collins all had one hit each. The Lady Seahawks are 9-2 on the season and 41 in district play. “We are off to a great start, but we have a lot of work to do and plenty of room to improve,” said coach Collins. Dixie Youth tourney coming to Wilson Field PHIL COALE | Special to the Times Senior Graham Kirvin rounds the base paths. Seahawks blank West Gadsden Page 11 Track team opens season Saturday at Godby PHIL COALE | The Times Senior Ally Millender continues to be a steady force behind the plate. Lady Seahawks win four district games

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The Lanark Village Boat Club is spearheading an effort to build community awareness among new vil lage residents. On Friday, Feb. 21, sev eral dozen Lanark village residents gathered at the Lanark Village Boat Club to share dinner and ideas about building relationships within the community. Any one was free to attend, but invitations were extended to the press, the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce and members of the boat club, The St. James Lanark Vil lage Volunteer Fire Depart ment, the Lanark Village Golf Club and the Lanark Village Association. Most of those in attendance served on the boards of one or more of those organizations. Norm Gempel, commo dore of the boat club, led the meeting. He said activity in the village is on the upswing citing increased attendance at the boat club’s monthly breakfast as an indicator. “At one time, we might get 50 people, even during the on season when there were lots of snowbirds, We thought about shutting down the breakfast during the summer,” he said. “This year, we’ve been averaging 100 to 110 people per meal.” Gempel said his aim for Friday’s meeting was to build communication between village organiza tions and exchange contact information. All attendees were asked to put their contact information on a sign-up sheet that will be converted to a list and dis tributed to the four clubs invited to the meeting and to attendees. Gempel said the boat club has an active website www.lanarkboatclub.com and each month publishes a calendar of activities avail able on the web and posted at Chillas Hall and the boat club clubhouse. He invited other Lanark organiza tions to link to the boat club website. He said the two goals of this move to organize are to build awareness among newcomer residents, and to create partnerships within the community. “The whole situation in the village is very cycli cal and right now it’s on the way up,” Gempel told the assembly. “We want to know how we can help you to help us get the word out. I think this is the rst time in the 20 years I’ve had a home here that we have ex changed information, like this. We should be doing it every year.” Dot Bless, treasurer of the Lanark Village Associa tion, said the organization has received permission from the state to refurbish the sign announcing La nark Village located in the public right of way. She said someone unidentied is maintaining two Facebook pages, one for Lanark Vil lage and one for Lanark Village by the Sea. She said information about Village activities appears on these pages. She said the Lanark by the Sea site is public and anyone can post to it. Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Special to The Times Attendance at this year’s island tour of homes in creased by 11 percent over 2013. In spite of cold and blus tery weather, 534 sightseers turned out for the third an nual St. George Island Tour of homes. Organizer Terry Kemp said there were fewer walk-ins the day of the tour. She speculated that the weather discouraged daytrippers who did not already hold tickets. A brief survey was circu lated with the tour brochure and 22 percent of the forms were returned providing with information about attendees. Twenty-six percent of par ticipants said they learned about the tour from a friend. Posters ranked second at 21 percent and newspapers were the third most popular source of information at 20 percent. Kemp said the Tour ist Development Council placed ads in several local newspapers, including the Times. She said the Light house Association bought additional newspaper ads in Panama City, Tallahassee and Dothan. About half the attendees came from Florida but there were participants from Can ada and 21 states including Michigan, Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Idaho. Kemp said, based on conversations with guests, she believed about half were snowbirds. More than half of those attending the 2014 tour had attended a tour in the past. Over 95 percent said they would like to attend another island tour of homes. More than 100 volunteers helped with the event, most as docents in the homes, and drivers for the Planta tion shuttle. Proceeds will help fund maintenance and enhance ments to the Lighthouse, the Keeper’s House, and Lighthouse Park in the com ing year. — By LOIS SWOBODA Seafood workers to meet March 10 Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will hold a meeting at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola on Monday, March 10 at 6 p.m. The meeting will discuss the shelling program and anything else we need to discuss For more info, call Luther Hateld, secretary, at 850-532-4464 St. George Lighthouse to close temporarily The Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be closed for lantern room improvements from Monday, March 3, through Thursday, March 13. During that time new glass will be installed in the lantern room and a series of vents will be added above the upper glass panes. The work will be done by renowned lighthouse preservation rm Alex Klahm Architectural Metal and Design, Inc. of St. Petersburg. The vent system, which will not affect the historical integrity of the lighthouse, is being designed and built by Alex Klahm, an award-winning metalsmith who has restored the metalwork on 21 lighthouses nationwide, including the neighboring Cape San Blas and Crooked River lighthouses. Alex has been honored by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation for work on the St. Augustine Lighthouse, and by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation for restoration work at the Tybee Island Lighthouse. The ironwork of the Cape St. George lantern room is also being cleaned and repainted as part of this project, spearheaded by St. George Lighthouse Association member Mark Vail. For more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Enrollment help available for Affordable Care Act The Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin counties, and the Franklin County Public Libraries in Eastpoint and Carrabelle, is hosting health insurance marketplace outreach and enrollment assistance for the Affordable Care Act all next month. Certied application counselors will be on hand to answer questions about health insurance and will also provide enrolling assistance. An appointment is preferred but walk-ins will be worked in. Please bring to the appointment Social Security numbers (or document numbers for legal immigrants) for each family member; birth dates for each family member; pay stubs, W-2 forms, or recent tax return; and policy numbers for any current health insurance. To make an appointment for Monday, March 10, Tuesday, March 25, or Thursday, March 27, call the Eastpoint library branch at 670-8151. To make an appointment for Monday, March 17, Tuesday, March 18, or Monday, March 24 call the Carrabelle library branch at 697-2366. Aguiar and Carmichael take library helm The Franklin County Libraries have new leadership. Both Joyce Estes, head of the Friends of the Franklin County Library and Denise Butler, chair of the library board, stepped down this month. Anna Carmichael, of Eastpoint, will assume leadership of the Friends, and Kate Aguiar of St. George Island will now head the library. At the Feb. 18 meeting, county commissioners instructed Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce to send a letter of thanks to Butler and Estes for their years of service. New roof for the EOC At the Feb. 18 county meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners that, Director of Emergency Management Pam Brownell has received the fully executed grant for $73,000 to put a new roof and new shutters on the Emergency Operations Center. There is a 25 percent cash match required so that depending on the cost of the improvements, the county will have to come up with between $15,000 and $20,000 out of the county’s capital outlay fund. A request for bids on the renovation will be published in the near future. TDC to meet in Eastpoint On Feb. 18, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners that the Tourist Development Council has added Eastpoint into the rotation of TDC meeting locations, so now there will be TDC meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, and Eastpoint. County allows seawall extension Acting on the recommendation of the Board of Adjustment, county commissioners voter unanimously on Feb. 18 to approve a request for a variance to extend and repair a wooden seawall on property lying in Section at 2086 Highway 98 West, Carrabelle. The request was submitted by David R. Zimmerman, owner. Two new docks allowed On the recommendation of the Planning and Zoning Board, the county board unanimously approved the construction of two new docks for private use. Lee Harrison and Patricia Hart were given permission to construct a 328-foot pier with two boatlifts on undeveloped land at 324 Marks Street on St. George Island. Lewis T. Christie was given permission to construct a 200-foot pier at his house located at 3146 US 98 East. Special to The Times Parents, are you looking for a fun-lled learning expe rience for your child during Spring Break? On Wednesday, March 12, the UF/IFAS Extension Franklin County 4-H pro gram will be hosting a 4-H Robotics Day Camp. This day camp will offer handson learning experiences to help your child build skills in science, engineering, and technology through building robots. The day camp is designed to help Franklin County youth ages 8-12 (as of Sept. 1, 2013), build skills in science, engineering, and technology. Youth will learn how to build and program a LEGO Mind storms robot. The camp will be held at the Franklin County Exten sion Ofce, 66 Fourth Street, Apalachicola, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This camp is limited to the rst 16 youth who reg ister. The $5 registration fee will cover all day camp sup plies and a healthy snack will be provided. Please bring a sack lunch. To save your child’s spot, and to receive a registra tion packet that must be re turned by March 7, contact the Franklin County Exten sion Ofce at 653-9337. Ofce hours are MondayFriday, 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4:30 p.m. You may also email questions to hckent@ u.edu or metaylor@u. edu. Don’t miss out on this ex citing and unique day camp opportunity. This day camp is lled on a rst come, rst served ba sis, so sign up now! Robotics Day Camp is spring break fun News b B R ieIE F sS Attendance up at island home tour LOIS SWOBODA | The Times About three dozen people attended Friday’s meeting at the Lanark Village Boat Club Lanark looks to boost relationships

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, February 27, 2014 The Times | A13 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516041Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking seasonal part-time, Housekeepers. Some experience is required. Must be energetic and detailed oriented. Weekends are required. Great hours and weekly pay! Please apply in person at112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. Bldg Const/TradesOPS Wildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Tate’s Hell Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $27,487.20 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Send electronic resumes to: Billie.Clayton@MyFWC.com For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34280991 93896T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO, 13-CA-415 ROBERT PETERSON and MARGUERITE PETERSON, Plaintiffs, vs. CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR. at al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR.; MYRTLE E. DUNLAP, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all of the parties claiming by through, under or against them. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: See “Exhibit “A”, attached hereto and by reference made a part hereof, EXHIBIT “A” COMMENCE AT A FOUND 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA: THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE MONUMENTED WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 900.50 FEET TO A FOUND RAILROAD IRON; THENCE GO NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 1,432.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 500.00 FEET TO A FOUND 1/2” IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 88.21 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 233.19 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 298.03 FEET TO A FOUND 4”X4” CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF OLD FERRY ROAD (66’ R/W) AND SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1,192.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 241.96 FEET (CH. 241.55’ CH. BRG. N75 DEGREES 06’06” W) TO A POINT; THENCE DEPARTING SAID CURVE AND NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 148.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL OF LAND IS SITUATED IN SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs’ attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 16th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Feb 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 97691T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 192014CP 000008CPAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH MARXINE SLUSSER A/K/A BETTY BASCOMBE LAMBERSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH MARXINE SLUS-SER A/K/A BETTY BASCOMBE LAMBER-SON, deceased, whose date of death was April 20, 2013; File Number 192014CP000008CP AXMX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: February 20, 2014. Personal Representative: JUDITH LAMBERSON TAYLOR 2175 Highway 98 West Carrabelle, FL 32322 Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire -FBN: 114278 dba@gendersalvarez. com Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire -FBN: 146528 afd@gendersalvarez. com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE, P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street Tampa, Florida 33609 Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813) 254-5222 February 20, 27, 2014 94028T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-CA-412 OLD MAN 2, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. RANDALL W. SCOTT, DAVID SNYDER; if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming bythrough, under or against them; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RANDALL W. SCOTT, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against him YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: Lots One (1), Two (2), Three (3) and Four (4), Block 84 (247), of KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION, in the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with 1983 Mobile Home bearing VIN # KBGASNA323354 & KBGASNB323354/ Title #’s 22540073 & 22540074 AND Together with 1989 Towncreek Mobile Home bearing VIN #BHAL0289SN1395 and Title # 47477399 Franklin County Parcel ID No. 20-07S04W-4212-0084-0010 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs’ attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 5th day February, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 March 6, 13, 2014 97737T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 192012CA 000190CAXXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. DIXIE L. RUSSELL AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIXIE L RUSSELL, JOHN DOE AND MARY DOE, SUNTRUST BANK, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSE RESORT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 6th day of March 2014, at 11am at 33 Market St., Apalachicola, Florida, 2nd Floor Lobby Franklin County, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: UNIT 4, BUILDING “A”, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSES COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A, ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 48-A AND A PROJECTION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 473.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 22.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 22.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10 00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 61.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 61.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT NONEXCLUSIVE INGRESS/EGRESS, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF ALLIGATOR DRIVE (COUNTY ROAD NO 370) AND A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AND SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5704.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.02 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 86 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.02 FEET), THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 443.85 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 444.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 11th day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 97765T ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 1.1 Sealed Bids will be received by the City of Apalachicola, City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 until two o’clock p.m. (2:00 EDT) March 25, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at two thirty p.m. (2:30 EDT) March 25, 2014 at the City Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, for the construction of: APALACHICOLA AWT WET WEATHER/ REJECT STORAGE POND UPGRADES according to drawings and specifications covering the work. 1.2 Any Bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. 1.3 A mandatory prebid meeting will be held on March 4, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at the City of Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. 1.4 Contract documents, including drawings and specifications relative thereto may be inspected at the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), 1538 Metropolitan Blvd. Ste A2, Tallahassee, Florida, and the office of the Consultant, BaskervilleDonovan, Inc., 22219 Panama City Beach Pkwy, Suite 200, Panama City Beach, Florida or 449 West Main Street, Pensacola, Florida, and at the City of Apalachicola, City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. Electronic pdf copies of the Contract Documents may be secured from the Consultant at a cost of $50.00 per CD, the cost of which is non-refundable. Shipping will be via USPS standard service unless requested and paid for by contractor. Questions regarding plans and specifications can be addressed to the Consultant via fax, e-mail or US mail at the following address: Baskerville-Donovan, Inc. Attn: Richard Delp, CSI, CDT 449 West Main Street Pensacola, FL 32502 Phone: 850-438-9661 Ext 4314 Fax: 850-433-6761 E-mail: rdelp@baskervilledonovan.com No questions will be entertained after 2:00 p.m. on March 18, 2014. 1.5 Each Bid shall be submitted on the form supplied by the Engineer. Each Bid must be accompanied by certified check or Bid Bond in the amount of five percent (5%) of the Base Bid as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract will within thirty (30) consecutive calendar days after written notice being given or such award, enter into a written contract with the Owner in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a one hundred percent (100%) Performance Bond and one hundred percent (100%) labor and material Payment Bond satisfactory to the Owner. No Bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of Bids for a period of forty-five (45) days. 1.6 The Owner reserves the right to waive formalities in bidding and reject any and all Bids. CITY OF APALACHICOLA Betty Taylor-Webb, Administrator February 20, 27, 2014 97971T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case #:13-000065-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is: 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The Case Number is 2013-000065-CP. The estate is believed to be intestate. The date of the decedent’s death was August 22, 2013. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2014. Personal Representative: Erin Marie Kinser Ellinger 1124 North Sherbourne Drive, Apt. 36 West Hollywood, CA 90069 Attorney for Personal Representative: Eric S. Haug FL Bar No. 850713 Eric S. Haug Law & Consulting, P.A. Post Office Box 12031 Tallahassee, FL 32317 (850) 583-1480 (850) 297-0300 Telefax eric@erichaug.com Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 2014 Eastpoint : Eastpoint Fire House Sat Mar 1st 8am-until Huge 6 Family Yard SaleRain or Shine GUN SHOW March 1&2 Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL81163 to 56654 Education Early Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will work collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and org. skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281148 Text FL81148 to 56654 Education Infant/Toddler Caregivers are needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281149 Text FL81149 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityBartenders Servers Cooks Dishwashers Bussers BLUE PARROT NOW HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34280042 Install/Maint/RepairLandscaping Need persons experienced in landscape installation/construction and lawn maintenance. Must have valid driver’s license. Contact Noles Scapes at 248-0973. Web ID#: 34281289 Text FL81289 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34279561 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required. PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 Security Now Hiring Security Officers and Supervisors for new account start up. Starting at $9.50 per hr. All positions are permanent. 1-888-948-2738 or 850-563-1022 Web ID#: 34281166 Lanark Village : 56-6 Parker Ave, 2Bd/1Ba, Furnished $500/mo + Dep 850-697-2594 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL81122 to 56654 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo 850-643-7740 Text FL79130 to 56654 Apalachicola -2 br, 1 ba. 113 10th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $900 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Lanark : Small Cottage, 150 Miller St, 1Bd/1Ba, Furnished, Inclu Water & Elec $400/mo + $100 Dep, No Pets 850-697-2594 Price Reduced Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176 Set of Four (4) Used Bridgestone Tires in Good Condition -Still Decent Tread P275/60R20 Apalach $120 727-515-8537 Spot Advertising works!

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, February 27, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p er t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u nd a nd a r e o f f er i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s D i s c o v er t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o Be a c h P or t S t J o e A p a l a c h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e or g e I s l a nd C a r r a b e l l e a nd s u r r o u nd i n g a r e a s Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times T oday (850) 653-8868 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola Advertise Her e R eal E sta t e P icks %) & ) " ) & ") &" """ ) $ )& "" " ) )" & " & " "" " ( " " ! # ! $ 4515384 MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250350 $64,900 St. George Island I S L A N D L O T FO R S A L E H i g h d r y w a l k a b l e l o t m e a s u r i n g 9 0 x 1 3 5 1 / 3 a c r e a d j a c e n t l o t i s s e p a r at e l y f o r s a l e q u i e t a r e a o f t h e I s l a n d o n E a s t S a w y e r A ve n u e n e a r e n d o f P o r t e r S t r e e t s h o r t d i s t a n c e f ro m t h e G u l f o f M e x i c o a n d A p a l a c h i c o l a B a y l i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y 4516014 J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 251118 $89,000 Eastpoint C O M M / R E S ( Z O N E D C4 ) U s e h a l f a s a n o f c e & s t o r a g e a n d l i ve i n t h e o t h e r h a l f O R u s e t h e w h o l e b l d g a s s m a l l p ro f e s s i o n a l o f c e O R u s e i t a s a 2 B R 2 B A h o u s e ( h a s a f u l l e at i n k i t c h e n ) 1 0 f t c e i l i n g s 6 f t c h a i n l i n k f e n c e d b a c k y a r d w i t h 2 l a r g e g at e s s t o r a g e b l d g 3 0 6 H w y 9 8 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) A person would gain an extra how many pounds each year by drinking an extra can of sugarladen soda each day? 5, 10, 15, 20 2) What work did “Typhoid Mary” hold that allowed her to infect so many people of the disease? Cook, Nurse, Prostitute, Maid 3) In the U.S. approximately what percent of men ask for parent approval for their bride’s hand in marriage? 4, 6, 8, 10 4) Whom did Erle Stanley Gardner introduce in a series of books? Luke Skywalker, Perry Mason, Lone Ranger, Tarzan 5) When was the rst pay-per-view television system? 1951, 1960, 1972, 1983 6) Where is the country of Djibouti? Europe, Asia, S. America, Africa 7) From older TV’s “The Big Valley” what was the name of Heath’s (Lee Majors) horse? Beauty, Hilltop, Charger, Maggie 8) Each year American dentists use about how many tons of gold for llings? 9, 13, 17, 21 9) What do American moms say they need more of the most? Time, Love, Patience, Money 10) Whose original name was the Elgins? Spinners, Temptations, Drifters, Stylistics 11) What is deglutition the medical term for? Sneezing, Blinking, Swallowing, Sprain 12) Who was president when Minnesota, Oregon, and Kansas were admitted to the Union? Buchanan, Pierce, Grant, Taylor 13) Of these 1990s TV series, which aired the most original episodes at 202? Party of Five, Spin City, Ally McBeal, X-Files 14) Which bird hovers like a helicopter? Wren, Finch, Hummingbird, Robin ANSWERS 1) 15. 2) Cook. 3) 4 percent. 4) Perry Mason. 5) 1951. 6) Africa. 7) Charger. 8) 13. 9) Time. 10) Temptations. 11) Swallowing. 12) Buchanan. 13) X-Files. 14) Hummingbird. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By Tevis Page Special to the Times This week has started off on a great note. This past weekend the school hosted the Miss Seahawk Pageant. The pageant was a success. The 201314 Seahawk Royalty is Jamison Broker (Tiny Miss), Dezmonae Sanders (Little Miss), Maddison Whitten (Junior Miss), Hannah Hogan (Teen Miss) and Kelsey Shuler (Miss Seahawk). All the participating girls were fantastic; the performances were truly one of a kind and a joy to witness. Beta Club is hosting the Franklin County 2014 Career Day. Elinor MountSimmons and the acting president, Brook Pittman, are requesting that any local businesses wanting to participate in the career day, please contact them. If interested please respond to Pittman at brooklyn22. bp@gmail.com, or MountSimmons at emountsimmons@franklin.k12. .us before March 14. The Career Day will be held in the multi-purpose building on April 17. They would greatly appreciate the presence of local businesses. This week was Florida Writes, held on Tuesday, Feb. 25. Makeups were on Wednesday, Feb. 26. There is a lot going on this week, I hope everything goes well.SPECIAL tT O tT HE TIMEs S This West Highland terrier was found wandering in Apalachicola last Friday, Feb. 21. He is a neutered male of unknown age and wore no collar. If you have information about this dog, please call 653-2025 or 653-5857. DOG fF OUN dD IN AA PALACHICOLA Featured with pageant organizer, Lynn Clark, standing at left, are, from left Jamison Broker (Tiny Miss), Dezmonae Sanders (Little Miss), Maddison Whitten (Junior Miss), Hannah Hogan (Teen Miss) and Kelsey Shuler (Miss Seahawk). SPECIAL tT O tT HE TIMEs S HAHA WK T AL AL K Seahawk royalty graces the stage