The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00258

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, February 20, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 VOL. 128 ISSUE 43 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com One of the rst warm and sunny days of the season greeted the 11th annual African-American History Celebration on Saturday, as Franklin Square came alive with festivity. Retired Chapman Elementary School teacher Lorine Banks served as grand marshal of the annual parade Saturday morning, a traditionally spirited, modest affair that precedes the Saturday morning ribbon cutting. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson and Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper represented county of cials in the parade, which featured plenty of beads thrown from the cars and golf carts but less candy than typically is ung. The mood was sweet and upbeat though, even when organizers had to “ guratively cut the ribbon” on the festival from the main stage at 11 a.m. Covenant Word Pastor David Walker offered a blessing over the festival, followed by a collective rendition by a chorus of members of By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A candidate for Florida governor campaigned at last weekend’s African-American History celebration, but he wasn’t your typical politician Kyle “KC” Gibson, 44, from Fort Lauderdale, is hoping to gather almost 120,000 signatures to get his name on the November ballot as a candidate without political af liation. The former elementary school teacher and now pastor of the Gibbs Chapel AME Church in North Miami Beach, Gibson said he has aspired since age 7 to run for governor. In January 2010, right after Gov. Scott stepped into of ce, Gibson said he led to run for By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Tuesday, county commissioners again tabled a new set of rules that would govern county workers. Concern over speci cs on how job classi cations would be instituted, and their immediate effect on the county budget, prompted commissioners to table discussion of the rules until they could study the estimated nancial impact of the change over the next ve years. They plan to discuss the proposed work rules at their March 18 meeting. If the work rules eventually are passed, county employees would receive annual performance evaluations beginning this year. On Tuesday afternoon, county legal advisor Lucille Turner of the Carson and Adkins law rm in Tallahassee, presented commissioners with a plan to formally classify county employees and set standardized wage increases based on seniority and performance. Turner began work on the labor rules in October 2012. The wage classi cation plan would end across-the-board raises to county employees and require annual employee evaluations by department supervisors. Turner developed a standardized form to simplify evaluations. Employee assessments would be completed every year on or before Sept. 1 so information on employee performance would be available to commissioners during annual budget hearings. “We want to tie (evaluations) directly to pay, so we want to have County ponders pay hike plans DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Kyle Gibson gets a signature for his petition to get his name on the November ballot. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Franklin County High School valedictorian Bria Walker, left, and salutatorian Jathan Martin read President Obama’s proclamation for Black History Month. Below, Natalie Booth, a licensed practical nurse who grew up here, came from Tallahassee to offer free blood pressure and blood glucose tests. History on the Hill AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY CELEBRATION Gubernatorial candidate works the crowd See PAY A5 See HISTORY A11 See CANDIDATE A11 Civilians to organize for security By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Local law enforcement has blessed an effort to organize a neighborhood watch group in Apalachicola. On Feb. 11, about 20 people met at Battery Park to discuss crime in Apalachicola. Jackie Itzkovitz chaired the meeting. She said she became aware of a crime problem in the city after metal furniture and a golf cart charger were stolen from her yard. Itzkovitz read a list of crimes committed around town over the last three months. “In 52 years I have not been robbed, and now it has happened, and I feel violated,” Itzkovitz said. She said she posted her concerns on Facebook and now has 360 followers. She said a watch group is in the works for Carrabelle, but she plans to concentrate on Apalachicola. In attendance were Sgt. Ryan Sandoval, community liaison with See SECURITY A5 County moves forward on Weems nancials By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com After much discussion, county commissioners Tuesday moved forward with investing in steps to nance a new hospital. In the morning session, the commissioners balked at approving a $60,000 expenditure, requested by Weems Memorial Hospital CEO Ray Brownsworth, to secure an opinion letter from BKD that would be needed to secure a loan for the new hospital. “If we want to proceed forward with the project, we have to do this,” said Brownsworth, noting that this $60,000 expenditure was $15,000 less than it would have cost two years ago. But Commissioner Pinki Jackel led opposition to moving forward with this expenditure, stressing that it was her understanding that the commissioners has recently agreed that a $50,000 expenditure foe a feasibility study See WEEMS A7 Cigarette secrets, A3 Dixie continues professional season Apalachicola’s Dixie Theatre will show the play “Almost, Maine,” a work by John Cariani comprising nine short plays that explore love and loss at 8 p.m. Saturday; 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28; and 3 p.m. March 1. The play “Mrs. Mannerly” is a comedy by Jeffrey Hatcher that recounts his experiences studying manners and etiquette as a 10-year-old as taught by a demanding teacher. It takes the stage at 8 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Wednesday and 8 p.m. March 1. Get tickets, $25, by calling 653-3200. For more information, visit www.dixietheatre.com ‘Flags of Our Fathers’ at museum Saturday At 10:15 a.m. Saturday, “Flags of Our Fathers” will be shown at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. This lm will last a little over two hours, and free popcorn will be provided. No admission fee. ‘Market Days’ in Carrabelle Saturday Carrabelle United Methodist Church will have its second 2014 Market Days event from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street. For more information or to make donations, call Bonnie Myrick at 899-3175. Trio Solis to perform Sunday The Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts will present Trio Solis at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. Admission is $5; all students (and children) including college, are free. For more information, call 653-8894.

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+ & & !" $* $ '" " (%. #0 /. $. '. CONCER T SERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents ( + + "&)$*&,$,()) + + + + # % % + ( $ % % TDC MEETI NG SCHED ULE MARCH 2014 WEDNE SDA Y 5TH 3:00 PM FRANK LIN COUNT Y TDC BOARD CARRA BELLE CITY OFFIC ES 106 SE A VENUE B, CARRA BELLE WEDNE SDA Y 19TH 1:30 PM FCTDC COMMI TTEES CARRA BELLE CITY OFFIC ES 106 SE A VENUE B, CARRA BELLE TDC MEETI NG SCHED ULE APRIL 2014 WEDNE SDA Y 2ND 3:00 PM FRANK LIN COUNT Y TDC BOARD ANERR (ESTU AR Y RESER VE), 359 CARRO LL, EASTP OINT WEDNE SDA Y 16TH 1:30 PM FCTDC COMMI TTEES AP ALACH ICOLA COMMU NITY ROOM 1 BA Y A VENUE AP ALACH Special to the Times In the early morning hours of Wednesday, Feb. 12, ofcers with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce, with the assistance of the Apalachicola and Carrabelle police departments, served numerous drug offense warrants in the Franklin County area. The sheriff’s ofce said this was the culmination of an extensive narcotics investigation led by the Franklin County Drug Unit. Charges range from trafcking in narcotics to the sale or possession of narcotics, with several child neglect charges also included. Numerous types of controlled substances were seized. During the narcotics investigations, controlled substances such as crack and powder cocaine, methamphetamines, methadone and numerous types of prescription pills were obtained. The following individuals were arrested by sheriff’s deputies and transported to The Franklin County Jail where they were booked on the following charges. Jeremy James, 23, Apalachicola, two counts of sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing Carlos A. Morris, 42, Port St. Joe, sale of controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, sale of a controlled substance, and sale of a substance in lieu of cocaine Howard L. Nabors, 28, Apalachicola, trafcking four grams or more in illegal drugs, and possession of a controlled substance Gary M. Barineau, 40, Apalachicola, trafcking four grams or more in illegal drugs Brandon D. Robinson, 29, Lynn Haven, sale of a controlled substance Alexander D. Simmons, 23, Apalachicola, sale of a controlled substance within 1000 feet of public housing Lamecka D. Harris, 30, Crestview, possession of cannabis, resisting ofcer without violence and indecent exposure Robyn N. Pedrick, 33, Carrabelle, possession of cannabis Daniel Hicks, 33, Apalachicola, sale of a prescription drug, and sale of substance in lieu of cocaine Byllie A. Murray, 18, Eastpoint, two counts of sale of a controlled substance Katie Matthews, 28, Eastpoint, trafcking in controlled substance Kamron L. Barwick, 21, Wewahitchka, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing Angela L. Law, 30, Eastpoint, child neglect and sale of a controlled substance Franklin County area drug round-up snares 13 suspects KAMRON BARWICkK GARY BARINEAU BYLLIE M M URRAY DANIEL HIC kK S RR O bB YN PE dD RIC kK LL AMEC kK A HARRIS AA LEXAN dD ER S S IMMONS AA N gG ELA L L AW KATIE MATThH EWS HOWARdD N N A bB ORS CC ARLOS M M ORRIS BRAN dD ON R R O bB INSON JEREMY JAMES Special to the Times William “Geri” Eaton, 60, was sentenced to 27 months in prison for tax evasion and for making false statements in a matter involving a health care benet program. Between 2004 and 2008, Eaton, a realtor, earned more than $1.18 million in taxable income. He failed to le his federal income tax returns as they became due and instead, in the fall of 2009, Eaton led late returns for all four prior tax years. His total tax due, not counting interest and penalties, was more than $472,000. In early 2010, Eaton entered an agreement to pay his back-taxes in monthly installments of $1,000. He made six payments, and then stopped paying altogether. On April 29, 2011, Eaton opened an account under a false Social Security number at a Tallahassee credit union. One week later, he sold his beach house in St. Teresa for more than $1.3 million. To conceal the money from the IRS, Eaton deposited the $727,437 in proceeds he received from the sale into his fraudulently-opened credit union account. He later transferred a portion of this money to a Pensacola credit union account, which he had also opened under a false Social Security number. Over the course of the next seven months, Eaton spent more than $125,000 of the sales proceeds, and made no payments on his taxes during this period. In Sept. 2011, Eaton was treated for a heart attack at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola. In his application to the hospital for nancial assistance in paying his bill, he falsely claimed that he had a single checking account with a balance of only $1,588, when, in fact, the balances in his accounts totaled well over $600,000. In listing his assets on the application, Eaton also fraudulently omitted the fact that he had purchased two vehicles for $31,000 only a month before. In reliance on Eaton’s false statements, Sacred Heart wrote off $79,622 in charges for Eaton’s care. In Nov. 2011, the IRS levied Eaton’s fraudulentlyopened credit union accounts and obtained approximately $610,000 as payments toward his tax liabilities. In Nov. 2013, Eaton pleaded guilty to charges of tax evasion and making false statements in a matter involving a health care benet program. In addition to his prison sentence, Eaton was ordered to pay $99,126 in restitution to the IRS and to Sacred Heart Health System. In announcing the sentence handed down by the court, United States Attorney Pamela C. Marsh expressed her deep gratitude for the work of the assistant U.S. attorney who prosecuted the case, as well as the agents of IRS Criminal Investigations who investigated the case. The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Karen Rhew-Miller. Realtor heads to prison for tax evasion WW ILLIAM “GERI” E E ATON The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Feb. 11: Byllie A. Murray, 18, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) John Carl Cooper, 53, Eastpoint, Bay County warrant for withholding child support (FCSO) Feb. 12: See related story Feb. 13: Gary M. Barineau, 40, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Kaila L. Odom, 30, Bristol, violation of probation (FCSO) Feb. 14: Joseph S. Pumphrey, 24, Eastpoint, possession of unshaded oysters (FWC) Feb. 15: Ellese A. Brady, 23, Lanark Village, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Feb. 16: Steven C. Martin, 22, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Feb. 17: Patrick R. Jones, 23, Apalachicola, domestic battery (CPD); Jeremy R. Nowling, 36, Apalachicola, sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver, possession of more than 20 grams of cannabis and trafcking in four grams or more of illegal drugs (FCSO); Lonnie N. Crum, 24, Carrabelle, felony criminal mischief (FCSO) Coupon Expir es: 2-28-14 CODE: AP00 Arrest RE pP ORT Law Enforcement A2 | The Times Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, February 20, 2014 T H R O U G H W I T H 2/ 1 6 2/ 2 2 W E E K C H E W By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com One of Carrabelle’s favorite sons is shining in his Coast Guard career. Born here in 1982, he graduated from Carrabelle High School in 2000 and immediately enlisted in the Coast Guard. Since then his career has been meteoric. In fall 2012, he was proled in Coast Guard Magazine where he spoke proudly of his Franklin County roots. “The Coast Guard Cutter Sea Hawk was the most exciting place I have been because of its location; my home town,” Pedrick told his Coast Guard interviewer. “I come from a small town and graduated high school with only 32 students in my senior class, as a result, it’s a very tight community and how many times in our career do we get to work in our hometown? “Getting to drive the Cutter Boat Medium and drop off boarding teams on boats that I used to work on as a young man is something we don’t get to do every day in the Coast Guard,” he said. Today, Pedrick is an E6 boatswain mate rst class on the Aids to Navigation team (ANT) at Kodiak, Alaska and executive petty ofcer for the unit. ANTs are a vital element to the safety of life at sea for shing vessel crews, commercial cargo vessels and other mariners when entering and departing through treacherous waters near ports and harbors. It’s the job of Coast Guardsmen at units like ANT Kodiak to maintain navigational aids so commercial mariners can safely deliver products and groceries throughout the communities of Alaska. ANT Kodiak’s primary mission is to maintain the aids to navigation from the entrance of the Prince William Sound in the east to the southwestern tip of Kodiak and ranging as far north as Point Hope in the Arctic. When not occupied with maintaining beacons and buoys, ANT Kodiak provides a training vessel for the air station to hone and rene their skills for hoisting a basket or swimmer to a vessel from a helicopter to be ready for emergencies. They also simulate a vessel in distress for training exercises. This is done so when the aircrews have to respond to a maritime emergency they are ready to expertly place an emergency life raft or hoist basket on or near a vessel in distress. Pedrick married a Carrabelle beauty, Ruth Murphy and has 8-year-old twins Bobbie and Joshua. Last August, Ruth gave birth to a baby boy Vance Eugene Pedrick. Pedrick said his wife is his hero who “picks up from everything she knows and moves around the world” to support his career, all the while caring for three children alone while he is deployed. Ruth and Vance Pedrick are active in scouting and enjoy the outdoors and visiting Carrabelle. Vance’s mother, Carrabelle resident Janice Pedrick, is very proud of her son and hopes he will be an example to Franklin County’s youth. “We want people to know kids in Carrabelle can go to this school, get a good education and go out into the world and be whatever they want to and be doctors and lawyers and anything else they can dream of,” she said. Vance Pedrick offers the following advice to students, “Set goals and push yourself to reach them, the world has lots to offer and you can be anything you want to be as long as you work hard.” Petty Ofcer 1st Class SARA FRANCIS | Special to The Times Petty Ofcer 1st Class Vance Pedrick, right, executive petty ofcer of Aids to Navigation Team Kodiak, explains modications made to the 38-foot special purpose craft/training boat used for training with Air Station Kodiak to Adm. Robert Papp, Coast Guard commandant, during an Aug. 2012 tour of the base in Kodiak, Alaska. Pedrick always ready with Coast Guard career By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A prominent former researcher for the Phillip Morris cigarette company used a powerful delivery, a visual presentation and a freeze-dried money brain to drive home the message to schoolkids last week that all forms of nicotine addiction are bad news. Victor DeNoble, PhD., who once worked in a secret research lab for the tobacco giant to develop a cigarette with reduced heart risk, spoke Feb. 13 to ABC School middle schoolers in the morning, to Franklin County fth through 12th graders in the afternoon, and to the Franklin County School Board in the evening. In it he shared his background as a researcher, in which he said his ndings were suppressed by Philip Morris, he was eventually red and his laboratory and data were seized. In 1994, after a decade of being silenced by a secrecy agreement, DeNoble became the rst whistle-blower to testify before Congress about his research conducted within the tobacco industry, which showed nicotine has addictive properties similar to other drugs of addiction. In talking with the students, he told of how one of his monkeys had developed a craving for nicotine, and then passed around a preserved monkey brain for the young people to examine. Before returning to his home in San Diego, Calif., DeNoble paid a visit to the school board. “Your brain doesn’t care where nicotine comes from,” he said. “What kids don’t understand is that everyone in this room is wired for drug addiction. “Kids don’t know that, they think they’re immune,” said DeNoble, accompanied by Gina Moore, Tobacco Prevention Specialist with the county health department. “We talked about electronic cigarettes. They’re really going to be trouble for us. People are using them to maintain their addiction where they can’t use tobacco products. “We now know they contain at least ve components that cause cancer,” he said. “We’re beginning to understand these vapors are just as toxic as the cigarette, and what’s more disturbing is that young people can purchase e-cigarettes. Middle school kids are taking the empty cartridges and lling them with other drugs, like alcohol, nail polish and glue. “E-cigarettes are probably something you guys are going to have to face soon,” he told the board. “Having the ban on school grounds would really go a long way.” DeNoble also spoke to the SWAT executive council during his visit. “We were fortunate to get him,” said Moore. The $2,500 cost of DeNobles’ visit came out of the tobacco prevention program’s grant funding. Cigarette researcher monkeys around at schools DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Dr. Victor DeNoble shares his monkey brain with the ABC students.

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Transparency builds trust Working together was a hot topic at the last Apalachicola city commissioner’s meeting. It’s easier to work together if we all feel fairly treated. Fair treatment in city government (or in any governing body) requires good governance. A principle of good governance includes transparency. One way transparency can help folks work together is to make it very clear just how people are appointed to various boards, and how and by whom they are selected. Apalachicola is a huge bene ciary of all the energy and talent provided by the many volunteers who make the city a better place to live, but Ms. A will not trust Mr. B if she believes he is only on that board to promote someone’s special interest and that he is getting favors in return, favors that Ms. A doesn’t get. In fact no one on any board should be getting favors, but that’s another principle of good governance for another day. The process by which board members are appointed should be available to anyone who wants to know, and the process by which any individual board member was selected should be available to anyone who wants to know. Transparency in how the board members are appointed is one step to fairness, trust, and the goal of working together. Sincerely, Ellen Stitt Military training, where and how? As a property owner in Franklin County, I was planning to build a home on a lot I own on the New River. I attended the December meeting in Apalachicola regarding the Air Force’s interest in conducting military exercises in the area, known as GRASI. At the time I was undecided. Not any more. An exercise was conducted in January unrelated to the proposed GRASI exercises. An announcement of this was posted on the Franklin County Sheriff’s Facebook page. I do not check this page on a daily basis. After talking to some neighbors, neither do they. I did not see it. I was told it stated an exercise was to be held in Franklin County. No location or time was given. After reading various letters in the Times and talking to neighbors, I realized that numerous people were compensated for the exercises. That’s ne. But what about compensating the families that were under aircraft that were ying at treetop level, at night, experiencing the noise and vibrations for four hours? What about the property owners whose property is being devalued due to the fact that they now own property that is underneath airspace that hosts military exercises? Do people want to build and expand the county tax base if their property is subject to these exercises? Is the lost tax base worth the compensation a few receive? I contacted the FAA regarding the low altitude the aircraft were ying at. I was told that minimum ight altitude was 500 feet above the ground. The FAA contact asked what type of aircraft they were. When I told him multiple helicopters, he said the noise and vibrations must have been intense. Indeed! He also informed me that the FAA only regulates civilian aircraft and they have no jurisdiction over military aircraft. So while the contact did empathize with the situation, the FAA could not process a complaint. It’s interesting that if these aircraft were civilian, they would be in violation of ight rules. At any rate I got to thinking about why these exercises were being held in the rst place. Then I realized the reason practice. They were held so the participants could gain experience, i.e. skills which are derived from direct participation in these exercises. Which begs the following questions: How much experience do these participants have? How many hours experience do the pilots have ying at treetop level at night? What types of armaments are on these aircraft ying at night, at treetop level, over occupied residential areas? How much fuel do these aircraft carry ying at night, at treetop level, hundreds, thousands of gallons? What effect would a spill have on the river and bay if a crash would occur? Yes, these participants need the practice, but at night, at treetop level, over occupied residential areas? How would the residents of Apalachicola or St. George Island react to helicopters ying at treetop level at night, with minimum notice? G. Cerfus Franklin County Public input needed as Weems moves forward I write in response to Mr. Allan J. Feifer’s Feb. 13 letter to the editor (“Get on board with the board”) in reference to the Weems Memorial Hospital board of directors’ recent decision to limit public comment to three minutes per person (or ve minutes in the case of three or less speakers from the public) at the beginning of board meetings. Most of Mr. Feifer’s concerns in his letter focused on the nancial stability of our hospital. There are two very important facts that need to be considered by the public. First, the Weems balance sheet/pro t and loss statement re ects ambulance service as costs to the hospital and those costs are re ected as a “subsidy” from the county to Weems. It is vital for the public to understand that the state of Florida mandates that each county provide ambulance services. If the costs were not on the Weems’ nancial statements as a “loss,” they would appear on the Franklin County budget as a “loss.” Therefore, those costs are not generally attributable to hospital operations. Next, the hospital is making great strides in getting the nancial reporting to the point that it actually re ects what I believe will be stronger than we expect, and which I am con dent will grow stronger under the current leadership of the hospital. Finally, public input is not something I disregard or disdain. It is simply something that has a time and a place. Deliberative bodies all over the state of Florida structure their meetings with limitations on public comment. Having said that, I appreciate Mr. Feifer’s decision not to mention me by name in his letter; his addressing the concern he had about the Weems board’s decision was gracious, and I believe it was done in order to help the public understand that this is not a personal issue between Mr. Feifer and me. I will say that I do not mind being identi ed personally when I have made a public comment, but I believe Mr. Feifer was being a gentleman. I appreciate that and hope at all times to reciprocate that attitude. The reason I moved to limit public comment is the same reason that I have requested that the Weems board make an effort to follow parliamentary procedure in our meetings. We need to act as a deliberative body and use time ef ciently. Following Roberts Rules of Order or some other similar parliamentary guide allows for focused, thorough and effective discussion; in fact, I am one of the most vocal members of the board of directors and parliamentary procedure can and should limit my own comments when necessary. I encourage the board’s interim chair, Mr. Jim Bachrach, to make sure I am kept in line! As to Mr. Feifer’s desire to offer input to the Weems board during meetings, I believe his input is valuable and necessary in an environment where we are functioning as a countyowned facility. Every citizen, landowner and taxpayer in our county deserves the right to give input to the organizations that are responsible for directing government operations. Weems Memorial Hospital is such an organization, and I welcome public input. On the other hand, as we move forward with the renovation and construction project that has already been mandated and partially funded by a vote of the citizens of Franklin County, there will be many decisions that will need to be made by the Weems board with the welcomed advice and consent of the Franklin County Board of Commissioners. These decisions will not be done in secret, and they will not be done without public input, but the decisions must be made, and they must be made in a timely manner. Having explained my motives as to my motion to structure public input in board meetings, it is my intention to move at the next Weems’ board meeting that we revoke the rule which we passed. I regret the impression that I did not want public input. It is a misapprehension of my views. I value public input. At the same time, we are well past the time where we must make the decision whether or not to move forward with the taxpayer’s mandate to develop a new hospital facility. That decision has been made. Now, as a board of directors, we must, with the oversight of the county commissioners and with the help of the public, implement the directive we have received. We must build a new hospital facility and renovate existing structures in order to meet the healthcare needs of our great county and her guests. Very respectfully, Homer I. McMillan, II, Esq. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 20, 2014 A Page A4 Section By Stephenie Livingston Special to the Times The world experienced the lowest number of shark attacks since 2009, although fatalities in 2013 were above average, according to the University of Florida’s International Shark Attack File report released today. The U.S. saw a decrease in attacks with 47, lower than the 2012 total of 54, which was the highest yearly total of the current century. There were 10 fatalities worldwide, which is higher than the 10-year average from 2003 to 2012. Two localities, Western Australia (six deaths in past four years) and Reunion Island ( ve deaths in three years) in the southwest Indian Ocean, remained shark-attack hot spots, while places where shark activity is typically rare or nonexistent also experienced attacks, said George Burgess, curator of the le housed at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus. “When sudden increases in shark attacks occur, usually human factors are involved that promote interactions between sharks and people,” Burgess said. “Shark populations are not in a growth phase by any means, so a rise in the number of sharks is not to blame. However, we can predict with some reliability that shark attacks will concurrently rise with the growth of human populations, a trend we saw throughout the past century.” Seventy-two unprovoked attacks occurred worldwide, which was lower than 2012 and represents the lowest global total since 2009 when there were 67 attacks. In recent years, Burgess said, globalization, tourism and population growth worldwide have led to shark attacks in historically low-contact areas like Reunion Island, Papua New Guinea, Madagascar, Solomon Island and the small island Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, which in 2013 saw its rst recorded shark attack. As more people enter the water in these areas, they become equal opportunity locations for shark-human interaction, he said. “Globalization of societies and the ease of modern travel means that we have access to places that have never been frequented by tourists before,” Burgess said. “Remote destinations are not typically medically equipped to handle a serious shark attack. This situation is a key factor in the higher death rate this year. When a shark attack happens in a remote place, the results are going to be more dire than if it happened on a Florida beach, for instance.” Traditionally leading the world in shark attacks, North American waters saw 34 attacks in 2013 compared with 43 in 2012. Yearly uctuations in attacks are normal because changes in ocean systems and economics, and human conditions affect the opportunities for humans to encounter sharks, Burgess said. The 47 U.S. incidents include Hawaii, which is not recorded as occurring in North American waters by the International Shark Attack File database. Florida led the country with 23, followed by Hawaii (13), South Carolina (6) and one each in Alabama, California, North Carolina, Oregon and Texas. The single U.S. fatality occurred in Hawaii. Most incidents in Florida occurred in Volusia County (8), a historical hot spot that has experienced more than one-third of Florida’s shark attacks, which is attributable to the heavy draw of surfers and tourists to its attractive beaches, Burgess said. The 13 attacks recorded in Hawaii were higher than its recent average of 4.3. Burgess said spikes occurring over the past two years on the island of Maui could be due to an increase in area surfers, who globally encountered sharks most often in 2013 in 46 percent of reported cases, while swimmers were affected by 31 percent of attacks, followed by divers, with 14 percent. Although Australia experienced an average year with 10 attacks and two fatalities, international attention has been drawn to the country regarding incidents in Western Australia that resulted in the controversial reinstatement of government-sanctioned culling hunts for endangered white sharks in December. “Even if one ignores that an endangered species is involved, the archaic reaction can only be characterized as ‘revenge killings,’” Burgess said. “Although infrequent, shark attacks are highpro le events that excite the emotions of human beings and often impact a community. Killing 10 sharks after a death is not the answer as it does not result in reduced attacks. This problem has been faced in other locations around the world and addressed in more effective ways.” In addition to sharkculling activity in Australia and in Natal, South Africa, Burgess said shark populations are declining signi cantly as a result of overshing and habitat loss, with 30 million to 70 million sharks killed every year by sheries. People, he said, pose a greater threat to sharks than sharks do to humans. “Sharks have a lot more to fear from us than we do from them,” Burgess said. “Statistically, shark attacks are extremely rare, especially considering the number of humans that enter the water each year.” Burgess said that as in any wilderness experience, it is humans’ responsibility to avoid dangerous situations, or risk meeting a shark and potentially paying the consequences. He emphasized the role that scienti c research can have in reducing shark attacks by creating a better understanding of the species. For safety tips and to view the 2013 Worldwide Shark Attack Summary, visit www. mnh.u .edu/ sh/sharks/isaf/isaf.htm. Stephenie Livingston is a writer with the University of Florida, She can be reached at slivingston@ mnh.u edu. RAY CARSON | University of Florida George Burgess, curator of the shark le housed at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus. University of Florida reports fewer shark attacks in 2013 Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, February 20, 2014 them occur just before po tential pay raises come up,” she said. “If someone is not performing up to the standard we need, they will not get a pay raise until performance comes up to a satisfactory level.” She said all employ ees should be evaluated around the same time to allow easier comparison of their work habits. Qualities considered during evalu ations will include qual ity of work, job knowledge, productivity, dependability, initiative, enthusiasm, co operation and teamwork. Turner said the form is simple and provides only three categories for per formance: above average, satisfactory and needs improvement. Supervi sors who rate an employee above average or needs improvement must provide an explanation of why the rating is deserved. Turner said this would help avoid overstated grades and pro vide commissioners and the employee with detailed information about the rea sons for the rating. Both the evaluator and employee must sign the completed evalua tion. Employees can add their own comments to an evaluation. Employees must re ceive an overall satisfacto ry rating to receive any pay raise including annual cost of living adjustments. Em ployees who have received an unsatisfactory rating in two or more areas of an evaluation will have three months in which to raise their rating to satisfactory. If they do so, they will be awarded the raise effective on the date of the success ful evaluation. Anyone who does not improve in three months would be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said at the Feb. 4 meeting the new system would help the county end discretionary pay raises and discourage favoritism. On Tuesday, in reviewing Turner’s plan, she said she had not expected sala ries to increase by regu lar increments under the new system. Turner said because the raises would be subject to a success ful evaluation, they would not be across-the-board raises. Under the new system, there are nine employee classications based on seniority. Employees with fewer than six months of satisfactory service are “probationary trainees.” Grade I employees, those with less than two years on the job, receive the base salary, a minimum of $25,000, and higher de pending on the job descrip tion. They are eligible for a 5 percent raise when they reach Grade II, after more than two years but fewer than ve years of satisfac tory performance. At ve years of employ ment, the individual would become eligible for a onetime 5 percent seniority raise, that could either be given in a lump or phased in at 1 percent over the ve years. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved to approve the 1 percent annual raise format, but after Commis sioner Smokey Parrish objected, noting that the nancial impact was not fully clear, Lockley with drew his motion. Turner said adjust ments could be made to the base salary annually depending on the county budget and based on the cost of living. The adjust ment to the base salary would increase salaries on all levels. The amount of the annual increase would be based on the cost of liv ing increase awarded by the state to county com missioners annually. “I would like to see something plugged in there so it will be an au tomatic thing during the budget review. Then we wouldn’t have the has sle of it,” Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said Feb. 4. “Across the board raises is what people get up in arms about.” Commissioner Noah Lockley said, also at the Feb. 4 meeting, “In my opinion, if we don’t have an automatic clause in there, we’re just wasting time.” Turner’s proposed rules also dealt with em ployees switching jobs and pay scale. Under the new rules, if an employee switches to a job with a lower pay rate, their sal ary will be reduced to the correct level for the new job. “I like this because if you are making $40,000 in a job with a lot of responsi bility and transfer to a job with less responsibility,” Parrish said. “That’s an option that you are going to have to look at that before they make that transfer.” Inmate supervisors would continue to receive extra compensation. 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D $ & ! # # # ! ! % ! # ! % % !" " % ! % ! % !# #! % ' ! ' ! % # SECURITY from page A1 the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce, and Apalachicola police of cers Ginger Creamer and Pam Lewis. “This meeting is not meant to be a complaint session about the services these good people pro vide us on their limited budget,” Itzkovitz said. She said she wants to explore how the community can help the police to ght crime. Itzkovitz said she believed the primary role of a neighborhood watch group would be to provide information and quash rumors. They will not attempt to apprehend suspected criminals and will not be armed, she said. Nighttime neighborhood pa trols are planned as part of the service offered by volunteer crime ghters. “The sheriff has offered me a car and gas any night I want ed it, and I’m going to take him up on that,” she said. Itzkovitz invited the police of cers to speak. Sandoval took the oor rst. He said help from the public is needed to ght crime. “A lot of people don’t report the crimes they’re supposed to be re porting,” Sandoval said. Lewis agreed. She said people who nd stolen belongings fre quently refuse to press charges when their things are returned. Mayor Van Johnson said he had worked with an earlier neighbor hood watch group that disbanded. “I remember some of the chal lenges we faced,” he said. “People don’t want to tell, don’t want to be a snitch.” Sandoval said a strong volun teer base, training and a struc tured program are all part of an effective neighborhood watch group, such as what already ex ist in Lanark Village and on St. George Island. “We need people who have lived here and know everybody to participate,” Lewis said. “Some thing suspicious to somebody new in the neighborhood may not be suspicious to someone who has lived there for a while.” Creamer said safety was a major issue with crime ghting volunteers. “Never approach any body,” she said. “Try to get the tag number or a description of the clothing, but the main thing is just be safe.” Palmer Philyaw said he was a member of the police auxiliary for nine years. He stressed the importance of building a relation ship with residents of patrol areas. “They need to learn the patrol car is not the enemy,” he said. “I want to be trained,” Itzkovitz said. Sandy Mitchem and Jim Kemp, organizers of the St. George Island Neighborhood Watch, attended. Mitchem said her group is anx ious to help and offered to assist with training and take prospective Apalachicola watchers along on island night patrol. She said members of the is land watch receive uniforms and ID cards after completing a back ground check and training. “Edu cating the community comes rst,” she said. “Don’t post on Facebook that you are going on vacation.” Franklin’s Promise Director Joe Taylor said state attention is focused on Franklin County’s crime problem. “A lot of resources are coming from the state, but it will take time,” he said. If you are interested in volun teering or want more information about Neighborhood Watch, call Itzkovitz at 370-1080. PAY from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | the Times Neighborhood watch organizer Jackie Itzkovitz, left, with Mayor Van Johnson. News b B R iI EF sS From Staff Reports EE merald Warrior to stage from work camp At Tuesday’s county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to rent the Bay City Work camp to Visual Awareness Technologies and Consulting, Inc. (VATC) of Tampa on a shortterm basis. VATC spokesperson Jeff Mason said VATC wants to stage a twoweek training session the last two weeks in April from the work camp. In the past, participating troops have been quartered in the t-hangers at Apalachicola Regional Airport. Mason said VATC has budgeted $2,500 daily for lodging for troops. He said $2,000 will go to the county for use of the camp and the other $500 will be spent with local caterers and cleaners. He said the exercise will be largely aquatic, with fuel for boats used during the exercise will be purchased locally. Mason said there is a possibility of an additional 10-day rental of the camp for exercises scheduled for May. Sanaulluh now county provider The county’s health insurance carrier, Capital Health Plan, has added cardiologist Dr. Shezad Sanaulluh as a provider, effective March 1.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, February 20, 2014 CHARLIE is a beautiful 3 yr old R otti mix. She is v er y in t elligen t and obedien t She k no w s basic c ommands and ev en k no w s ho w t o c ommand the danc e oor while standing and t wir ling on her r ear legs She needs t o be the only dog in the household as she c onsiders herself a queen and doesn ’ t t oler a t e c ommoners w ell V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith 's T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r Fo l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y S t G e o r g e Isl a nd, $ 3 5 9 0 0 0 B u i l t 2 0 0 4 1 9 0 3 S F p l u s 4 0 0 S F b u n k r oo m & s t o r a g e 3 B R 2 b a t hs 3 h a l f b a t hs o f c e a r e a v a u l t ed c ed a r c e i l i n g 5 s k yl i g h t s w h i rl p oo l t u b 2 p o r c h e s 2 o pen d e c k s F o r mo r e i n f o co n t a c t o w n er z e b z e b r ow s k i@ g m ail .c o m 2 2 5 2 2 9 1 2 5 2 dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ I€ :qq €… 3€ˆ‹ As I€ Nqn €Žq…“ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  T h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i v e s e a l e d bid s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d pe r s on c o m pa n y or c or p or a t i on i n t e r es t e d i n c ons t r u c t i n g : C R 3 7 0 RE V E T M EN T REP A I R P r o j e c t i s l o c a t e d a l o n g C o u n t y R o a d 3 7 0 ( A l l i g a t o r D r i v e ) i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a a n d g e n e r a l l y c o n s i s t s o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 2 0 C Y o f d e b r i s r e m o v a l a n d i n s t a l l a t i o n o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 5 8 8 C Y o f A l a b a m a C l a s s I I r i p r a p a n d F D O T N o 1 b e d d i n g s t o n e o v e r D 2 l t e r f a b r i c P l a ns a n d spec i c a t i ons c a n b e ob t ai n e d a t P r e bl e R i sh I nc 3 2 4 M a r i n a D r i v e P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C o s t f o r P l a n s a n d Spec i c a t i ons w i l l b e $ 5 0 0 0 pe r se t a n d i s non r e f u n d a bl e C h ec k s s h o u l d b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o P R E B L E R I S H I N C T h e b i d m u s t c o n f o r m t o S ec t i on 2 8 7 1 3 3 ( 3 ) Fl or id a S t a t u t es on pu bl i c e n t i t y c r i m es C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l b e 3 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i c e t o P r o ce e d p r ese n t e d t o t h e s u c ce s s f u l bid d e r L i q u id a t e d d am a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e p r o j e c t o n t h e s p e c i e d d a t e w i l l b e s e t a t $ 7 5 0 0 0 p e r d a y P l e a s e i n d i c a t e o n t h e e n v e l o p e t h a t t h i s i s a s e a l e d b i d f o r “ C R 3 7 0 R e v e t m e n t R e p a i r P r o j e c t ” B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i v e d u n t i l 4 : 0 0 p m e a s t e r n t i m e o n M a r c h 3 2 0 1 4 a t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d o n M a r c h 4 2 0 1 4 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F L T h e B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e i n f o r m a l i t i e s i n a n y b i d t o a c c e p t a n d / o r r e j e c t a n y o r a l l b i d s a n d t o a c c e p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r j u d g m e n t w i l l b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n r m f o r a p e r i o d o f s i x t y d a y s a f t e r t h e ope n i n g A l l bid d e r s sh al l c o m ply w i t h al l a p pl i c a bl e S t a t e a n d l o c al l a ws c once r n i n g l i ce ns i n g r e gi s t r a t i on a n d r e g u l a t i on o f c on t r a c t or s do i n g bu s i n es s t o t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a I f y o u h a v e a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l C l a y S m a l l w o o d a t ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C R 3 7 0 R E V E T M E N T R E P A I R P RO J E C T # 0 07 1 07 NO T I C E T O R E C E I V E S E A L E D B I D S Society The Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts is pleased to be able to present Trio Solis this Sunday at 4 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church. Founded in 2008 by violinist Corinne Stillwell, cellist Greg Sauer and pianist Read Gainsford, the trio have embarked on a journey together to explore the piano trio repertoire with a unique synergy of brilliant technique, probing musicianship and a breadth of experience. Sunday’s concert will feature “Piano Trio in B-at Major, Op. 11,” by Ludwig van Beethoven; Cowboys, from Nicky’s Trio (2002), by 42-year-old Carter Pann; “Caf Music (1987)” by Paul Schoeneld; and “Piano Trio,” by Maurice Ravel. Highlights of recent seasons include the trio’s debut at Carnegie Hall and collaboration with internationally acclaimed clarinetist Richard Stoltzman for the Seven Days of Opening Nights series. The members of Trio Solis maintain full studios at the College of Music at Florida State University. The Trio’s rst CD, “Diamonds in a Haystack,” was released by MSR Classics in February 2012. Featuring works by Franaix, Schoeneld and Babajanian, it was chosen as Critic’s Choice for January/February 2013 by the American Record Guide, who describe is as “an exceptional recording. All the players are a pleasure to listen to ... the result is captivating.” Admission to the concert is $5; all students (and children) including college, are free. At the level of Patron contributor ($100 or more) and above, free admission is extended to family members. For more information, call 653-8894. Mr. and Mrs. Franklin King and Mr. and Mrs. Chris Jones are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children, Christopher Westley Jones and Kirstie Morgan King. Kirstie is the granddaughter of Charlsey King and the late Harvey King, of Apalachicola, and Wallace Braswell and the late Betty Mae Braswell, of Apalachicola. Westley is the grandson of Thomas and Clarabelle Sapp, of Apalachicola, and James and Nadine Jones, and the late Agnes Jones, of Eastpoint. The wedding will be held Saturday, March 1, at 5 p.m. at Living Waters Assembly of God in Apalachicola. Reception to follow at Apalachicola Armory. Family and friends are invited to attend. Special to The Times If you like your Florida history served up with a generous side of snark, plan to visit Downtown Books on Thursday afternoon, Feb, 27. That’s when author and journalist T. D. Allman will be on hand with his provocative book “Finding Florida.” Subtitled “The True History of the Sunshine State,” “Finding Florida” claims to wrestle the state’s remarkable history from the clutches of the mythologizers, the apologists and the boosters, tracing its discovery, exploration and transformation from swampland to “paradise.” Along the way, he takes gleeful potshots at “playboy segregationists,” Disney, “newcomer oligarch opportunists,” BP and even the state bird, “the Mockingbird, so called because of its habit of purporting to be what it is not.” Apalachicola squeaks by with a reference to Dr. John Gorrie, his ice machine and his modern-day legacy, the Slurpee, but considerable ink is devoted to the Negro Fort Massacre at Fort Gadsden. Longlisted for the 2013 National Book Award and a Kirkus Reviews Best Nonction Book of the Year, “Finding Florida” won praise from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal but also got some pushback from reviewers who tuttutted about his fulsome, take-noprisoners approach. Allman is also the author of “Miami: City of the Future,” which spent three years on the Miami Herald bestseller list. Born in Florida, he is a former Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal and an Edward R. Murrow fellow at the Council of Foreign Relations. He will be in Apalachicola to sign his book from 1-3 p.m. Downtown Books is at 67 Commerce St. across from the post ofce. For more information, call 653-1290. Special to The Times Mark W. Friedman has announced that Maegen Jones Conners has joined Friedman Financial Advisors as a nancial advisor. After working at Cadence Bank in Port St. Joe for six years and completing her bachelor’s degree in nance, Maegen decided helping people achieve a secure nancial future is what she wanted as her career. To achieve this goal, she left banking and worked hard over the past several months to pass her Series 7 and 66 securities exams, as well as the life, health and variable annuity licensing. Maegen is a lifelong resident of Franklin and Gulf counties and looks forward to working with citizens of her community to achieve their nancial goals. She will be working out of the ofce in Eastpoint in the areas of investments, retirement planning and wealth management. “ I am very excited about the opportunity to assist her with her new career,” Friedman said. Brody Drake Johnson celebrated his fourth birthday on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, surrounded by his family and friends. Brody is the son of Brock and Kim Johnson of Apalachicola and brother to Alexus and Abby Johnson. Paternal grandparents are Robbie and Marcia Johnson, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Thomas and Nedy Leavins, of Austin, Colo. Paternal greatgrandparents are Bill and Burnell Martina of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandmother is Ada Leavins of Panama City. Auditions will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday at the Eastpoint Firehouse for the Panhandle Players’ spring production of “On Golden Pond” by Ernest Thompson. The play is a classic American comedy/drama that is every bit as touching, warm and witty today as when it debuted on Broadway in 1979. Retired couple Ethel and Norman Thayer spend every summer at their home on Golden Pond. This year, their adult daughter visits, bringing along her anc and his 13-yearold son. The turbulent relationship between father and daughter, the gap between three generations and the difculties facing a couple in the twilight years of a long marriage, all combine to give this play a poignant insight into modern family relationships. Director Pam Vest is seeking six players to portray four male and two female characters: 80-year-old retired college professor Norman Thayer Jr.; his 10-years-younger wife, Ethel; their early 40s daughter, Chelsea; the daughter’s 40ish anc, Bill; Chelsea’s longtime 40+ year-old admirer and Golden Pond mailman Charlie; and 13-year-old Billy Ray, son of Bill. Players do not have to be the ages of the characters, just be able to portray the age level scripted. Persons auditioning will be asked to do a cold read from the play’s script. They also may perform a short monologue, recite or read something of their own choosing in order to demonstrate stage presence, voice projection and acting potential. Three performances are scheduled for April 18, 19 and 20 at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Contact Vest at 927-3183 for additional information or if you are interested in serving as a member of the crew, such as stage manager, makeup, props, costuming, set design and construction, scene painting, sound effects tech, lights tech or curtain tender. MAEGEN JONES CONNERS T.J. A A LL mM AN Provocative Florida author in Apalach Feb. 27 Wedding Birthday Kirstie King, Westley Jones to wed Brody Johnson turns 4 Trio Solis to perform Sunday Auditions for ‘On Golden Pond’ next week Conners joins Friedman Financial A A dvisors

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The Times | A7 Thursday, February 20, 2014 W e l c om e s Y ou H w y 9 8 6 t h S t A p a l a c h i c o l a 85 0 6 5 3 95 5 0 S u n d a y W o r s h i p S e r v i c e s 8 & 1 0 : 3 0 a m. S h r o v e T u e s d a y P a n c a k e S u p p e r M a r c h 4 t h 5 7 p m. A l l y o u c a n e a t f o r $ 5 0 0 M a r c h 5t h A s h W e d ne s d a y S e r v i c e s N o o n & 6 p m. Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur c h -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P .O Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 R. Micha el Whale y P astor _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice On Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, at the age of 82, proud servant, husband, father and grandfather Dr. Chai Sereebutra passed away peacefully at his home in Covington, La. He was born Aug. 6, 1931, the youngest of eight children to Chur Seributra and Chiam Hanesavat, both of Bangkok, Thailand. He is survived by his wife, Connie Melancon Sereebutra, of Covington, La., and their three children and eight grandchildren: Theo Sereebutra, his wife, Julie, and their two children Noah and Phoebe, from Atlanta, Ga.; Charles Sereebutra, his wife, Cindy, and their four children Will, Alex, Mary and Charlie from Chattanooga, Tenn.; and Dr. Paula Sereebutra Seal, her husband, Britt, and their two children Madeleine and Evan of New Orleans, La. Dr. Sereebutra graduated from medical school in Thailand and subsequently moved to Houston, Texas, where he was to complete his training and meet his wife, Connie. Dr. Sereebutra practiced medicine in Apalachicola for most of his career. He retired at the age of 72 in Covington, La. He was always sel ess in his care for others. Chai was a devoted husband for 45 years, then a proud father and a doting grandfather. His other passions included boxing, billiards and playing the lottery. Family and friends were welcome to join Chai’s immediate family for a viewing on Thursday evening, Feb. 13, at E.J. Fielding Funeral Home, Covington, La. A funeral was held Friday morning, Feb. 14, at E.J. Fielding Funeral Home. Visitation began Friday morning. In lieu of owers, the family asks that donations be made to Wat Wimuttayaram Temple, 1601 Stanton Road, New Orleans, LA 70131. Chai Sereebutra CHAI SEREEBUTRA Obituary GUESTBOOKS View obituaries and sign guestbooks at www.apalachtimes.com By TEVIS PAGE Special to The Times As last week winded down, the students were getting excited about our long weekend. The excitement was short lived. The school informed us that we would be having school on Monday, Feb. 17, to make up for our “snow days.” Many students decided not to attend in recognition of Presidents Day. The rest of the week is looking fair. The weather seems to be looking up and it is de nitely lightening the moods of the students and teachers. There is a small bug oating around that is grasping many students as the winter seems to be ending. Senior pages are being ordered, and prom is underway. The year is almost over, and there is so much left to do. From Staff Reports Millender reunion Saturday in Eastpoint The Millender family reunion will be Saturday, Feb. 22, at the Eastpoint re house. We will begin at noon with a covered dish lunch. ‘Market Days’ in Carrabelle Saturday Carrabelle United Methodist Church is gearing up for its second 2014 Market Days event from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street in Carrabelle. Make plans to join us for music, rummage sale, warm soup, baked goods, specialty coffees, raffles and a cake walk. Look for directional signs. For more information or to make donations to the rummage sale or bake sale, call Bonnie Myrick at 899-3175. Remember this is “God’s Ministry” for the needy. As He works through us, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. We invite you to come and be a part of this blessing. A big thank you to all who enjoyed and supported the weekend meals and parties. We had a full house at the spaghetti dinner at Chillas Hall, the Valentine dinner at the Legion, the pancake breakfast at the boat club, the February Birthday Bash at the Legion and the covered dish at Chillas Hall. Hip hip hooray! I got to see a lot of people I hadn’t seen for a while and had a nice visit with all of them. Hope to see you at the lunch this afternoon. The doors to the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center will open at 9 a.m., and the lunch starts at noon. Your donation will be collected at the desk. Be watching for you. Don’t forget about our 22nd annual community breakfast this Saturday, Feb. 22, at Chillas Hall. The doors will open at 8 a.m. and close at 11 a.m. Members of the Curfew Lodge in Carrabelle will prepare and serve you the breakfast. You can choose from pancakes, French toast, bacon, sausage, eggs with juice and coffee. All for just a donation of $6. Hope you can make it. Our First Saturday breakfast will be at Chillas Hall on March 1, starting at 9 a.m. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve. See ya there! Later that Saturday night, come on down to the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center and dance the night away. The dance will start at 7 p.m. Just gather up your favorite snack and beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze and have a ball. One, two, three. One, two, three. Members and guest will gather at Chillas Hall Monday, March 3 for the monthly membership meeting of the Lanark Village Association. Board meeting starts at 6 p.m., and the gavel falls at 7 p.m. for the regular meeting. Bingo every Wednesday night at Chillas Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening with us. Who know, you just might win a game or two. The more who play, the more we can pay! Camp Gordon Johnston Day will be March 8. Start off Saturday with breakfast at Curfew Lodge in Carrabelle at 8 a.m. Then it’s off to the big parade with step off at 10 a.m. and a dinner dance at C-Quarters Marina. More on this later. Remember all meals, games and other fundraisers are open to everyone. I will note members only when the occasion arises. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, you’re not getting older, you’re getting better. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Community breakfast Saturday at Chillas Hall LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS HAWK TALK Better weather lightens the school’s mood Faith WEEMS from page A1 by Adams Consulting Group was their last move in this regard. “I can support this if this is not in addition to the prior funds we already approved,” Jackel said. “Didn’t we say we had paid once and for all? “I cannot support it because we said we were going to cap it,” she said. “I was under the understanding that we were getting the feasibility study we needed at that time for the USDA.” By a 3-2 vote, with commissioners Noah Lockley and Smokey Parrish, the commissioners said no to approving the $60,000 expenditure at the morning meeting, asking that county of cials research what had been OK’d earlier. In the afternoon, Alan Pierce, director of administrative services, reported that the commissioners had been told earlier that the BKD expenditure would be forthcoming and had approved it. By unanimous vote, the commissioners voted Tuesday to release the money. “They’re gonna examine the data Adams came up with and tell us what we can build and what we can afford,” Commissioner Smokey Parrish said. “They’re going to analyze the data and tell us what we can build. Their company’s reputation will be riding on this opinion letter they write for this board.” Despite the approval, the matter appeared to give commissioners the jitters. “It’s got me confused, it’s got me nervous,” Commissioner William Massey said. “You don’t know what nervous is. It has me concerned,” Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said. “I don’t think anything’s gonna keep me from having some concerns over this hospital. I’ve been here a long time, and I’ve seen the ups and downs of the hospital. It’s my gut feeling sitting here and looking at these numbers.” Brownsworth said that in scaling down the hospital renovation project to $10.25 million, with about $6 million to $7 million in construction costs, Weems of cials have been “prudent stewards” of sales tax funds that go to the hospital. He said of the $67,000, on average, in monthly hospital capital outlay funds, about $10,000 goes to funds the clinics, and about 90 percent of the remaining $57,000 would be used to cover debt service for the new hospital, which could be built by mid to late 2016. But Jackel questioned whether this funding stream would be suitable to cover the costs of funding a new hospital. “That’s not conservative,” she said. “I want a new hospital built because I know that we need it, but we’ve got to be able to afford it.” Commissioner Cheryl Sanders questioned Brownsworth about past due monies that are owed to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, as well as the overall balance sheet. “How do you plan on paying them?” she asked. “I’m not liking the numbers is what I’m telling you, Mr. Ray.” Brownsworth said $54,000 of that debt was paid down to TMH over last year. “We are six months behind,” he said. “They are willing to oat that right now. We haven’t been pushed by them to pay that off. It might take two years to get it down to 30 days, 60 days.” He said Weems was improving its bottom line. “We’re making little steady progress towards building the assets and cash of the organization, and reducing the liabilities,” Brownsworth said. Also at Tuesday’s meeting, Brownsworth announced that Weems had hired a new chief nancial of cer, John C. Graham. He is expected to start April 15 and will be paid $110,000 annually. Currently the CFO at Barnwell County Hospital in Tifton, Ga., where he lives, Graham also has been working as CFO at Caverna Memorial Hospital, in Horse Cave, Ky. Holder of a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Murray State University, he has served for 15 years as a nancial of cer with Good Hope Hospital, in Erwin. North Carolina; Transitional Hospital Corporation, in Indianapolis, Ind.; Garrard County Memorial Hospital in Lancaster, Ky.; Fort Logan Hospital in Stanford, Ky.; and Phoebe Worth Medical Center, in Sylvester, Ga. “It has me concerned. I don’t think anything’s gonna keep me from having some concerns over this hospital. I’ve been here a long time, and I’ve seen the ups and downs of the hospital. It’s my gut feeling sitting here and looking at these numbers.” Commissioner Cheryl Sanders

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, February 20, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is almost here! S h o p o u r h u g e s e l e c t i o n o f b e a c h w a r e s, c h ai r s, a n d t o y s. N e w a r r i v a l s d ai l y o f k a y a k s, P a d d l e b o a r d s, a n d shi n g g e a r Spring time is almost here! WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu F eb 20 69 61 10 % F ri, F eb 21 69 55 40 % S a t F eb 22 67 56 30 % Sun, F eb 23 65 49 50 % M on, F eb 24 63 44 40 % T ues F eb 25 61 44 30 % W ed F eb 26 62 44 0 % Page 8 By LES HARRISON Special to the Times General gun season for deer is rapidly coming to a close in Zone D, which includes Franklin County. Many hunters and land managers are already assessing the effectiveness of game plots for attracting, nourishing and retaining deer. A variety of annual crops have been successfully used for a number of years. One negative feature of this method is they require annual replenishment, which, depending on the circumstances, can be expensive. There is a cost-effective alternative, fruit trees and oaks. Landowners can increase the survival and reproduction of many animal species by providing a steady supply of fruit and acorns. The availability of fruit and acorns can reduce food stress and increase overall animal well-being. This potentially increases their resistance to disease and parasites. Abundant food can reduce the amount of time animals need to search for food, which can decrease their vulnerability to predators. Ample supplies also can decrease the distance of daily animal movements and decrease the likelihood animals will embark on long distance movements away from speci c locales. Research has indicated the abundance of acorns one year can even affect the reproductive success of animals the following year. An additional reason to consider planting fruit trees and oaks is to reduce foraging pressure on other plants. Attractive, safe and a consistent supply of food may reduce deer browsing of agricultural crops or ornamental plants by providing animals with an acceptable alternative food source. When selecting and managing oaks, it is important to recognize there are many differences existing among members of this species. First, oaks of different species produce acorns, which vary in nutritional quality. White oaks have larger, heavier acorns and are produced annually, red oaks are on a biennial production schedule, smaller in size, but have more protein, fat, ber and calories by weight than white oaks. Additionally, oak species differ in the timing of acorn production. Acorns from trees in the white oak group tend to be available for shorter periods of time than acorns from the red oak group. As a complement to the mix of oaks, persimmons, crabapples, sand pears and loquats may be established also. While the fruit is much more perishable than acorns, they produce at times which complement acorn production. By maintaining a welldistributed and abundant food and cover sources throughout property, landowners allow animals to better meet their dietary needs within a relatively small space. These factors decrease the likelihood animals will move to adjacent properties that may not be available for hunting. Choosing the correct oak species for a site is critical to success in establishing oaks. Some species will thrive in wet bottomland soils, such as overcup, swamp chestnut, diamondleaf, cherrybark, shumard and willow oak. Other oaks, blackjack, bluejack, Chapman, turkey and live oaks are suited to drier, upland soils. A few oaks like water, Southern red and post oaks are adapted to both bottomland and upland sites. Planting seedlings is more likely to lead to successful establishment of new oaks than is sowing acorns. Use of containerized planting stock on dry upland sites will optimize establishment. A key to obtaining good survival with oaks is to use seedlings with large stem diameters of one inch or larger. Also, plant the seedlings during winter when the soil is typically moist. To learn more about the use of trees as a game plot alternative read “The Value of Oaks to Wildlife” (http:// edis.ifas.u .edu/UW292) or contact your UF/IFAS Franklin County extension of ce at 653-9337. Les Harrison, the UF/ IFAS Wakulla County extension director, is part of the extension team serving Franklin County. The wait is on to see whether the Apalachicola eagles successfully nested this winter. Rick LaFleur captured this image of a pair of possible parents scoping out the neighborhood just before Valentines Day. Cassie Gary, who lives across the street from the nest, said this could mean the eggs have hatched and there are chicks. She said the eagles have used the nest at Avenue D and 12th Street for at least eight years and raised their rst brood about ve years ago. Some mystery surrounds the pair of uptown eagles. Last year, an injured male eagle was found in wetlands adjacent to the bay, and it was theorized he was one of the eagles that nest in the historic district. He was taken to the Florida Wild Mammal Association for treatment and now permanently resides in Miami, having lost part of one wing. X-rays taken before his last surgery revealed that he had been shot. Some observers maintain he could not be one of the Avenue D eagles because two eagles were seen at the nest after his rescue. The FWMA’s Chris Beatty said a female eagle, left in a crisis situation with no mate and young to feed, will often recruit a stand in. We will never know whether this picture shows the same pair of raptors that nested on Ninth Street in 2012. The good news is the two eaglets that were hatched there last year both survived to edge. — By LOIS SWOBODA Painted buntings might be a species on the way out, but efforts are underway to save them. Painted buntings are shy, secretive and often dif cult to observe, except when they are busy at a bird feeder. Once they have discovered an easy source of food, over time they become less wary of activity nearby. Otherwise, this bird loves to hide in thickets making it dif cult to spot. This bird is considered by many to be the most beautiful in North America, and their behaviors are interesting to watch. The male has a dark blue head, green back with red rump and underparts, which make it extremely easy to identify. The plumage of female and juvenile is green and yellow-green, one of the only truly green birds native to the United States. It is a member of the cardinal family. During the spring, males sing from exposed perches. The song is sweet and variable. They also utter around like a butter y, uff, bow and quiver their wings when seeking a mate. Painted buntings feed on seed, snails, spiders and small insects. They often forage on the ground, hopping about nervously to avoid predators. They are largely monogamous and are most often seen alone or as a mated pair. Breeding begins in late April and lasts through to early August. The nest is typically hidden in low, dense vegetation. Working alone, the female weaves it into the surrounding shrubs for strength. Each brood contains three or four gray-white eggs, often spotted with brown, which are incubated for about 10 days. About 30 days after the rst eggs hatch, the female usually lays a second clutch. Cowbirds frequently lay their eggs in the painted bunting’s nest, pushing the bunting’s eggs to the ground. Large snakes and hawks are common predators of eggs, young and brooding females. Males are especially at risk from raptors because of their bright plumage. The painted bunting can live to more than 10 years of age, though most wild buntings probably live barely half that long. The male painted bunting was once a popular caged bird, but its capture is now illegal. Populations are primarily declining because of habitat loss, especially in wetlands. Painting buntings, listed as near threatened by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, are protected by the U.S. Migratory Bird Act. This beautiful, multicolored songbird can be found year-round in Florida as a migrant, a winter resident and occasionally as a local breeder. The Painted Bunting Observation Team started in the spring of 2005 as a grassroots project to study these birds in coastal North Carolina. Dr. Jamie Rotenberg at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington enlisted the help of the members of Lower Cape Fear Bird Club to observe and report the number of painted buntings at their feeders. From these humble beginnings, PBOT has grown with the help of funding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partnerships with the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Georgia, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission and many others. PBOT has now expanded its research area to include Florida. To learn more about PBOT or to join, visit www. paintedbuntings.org. SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay St. Joe Bay is still sleepy for trout and reds, but good ounder reports are starting to come in daily. Live shrimp is getting more available now that the shrimpers can stand the weather. Conditions are improving this month. As the sun comes out this week, our waters will start to warm. We all will get a feeling of spring, and hopefully so will the sh! Our local waters are still getting over the freezing colds from the past several weeks, but the shing is actually pretty good in the ICW and East and West Bay for inshore species such as trout and red sh. ROD GASCHE | Special to The Times Painted buntings a beautiful native species BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda LES HARRISON Fruit trees, oaks can enhance hunting RICK LAFLEUR | Special to The Times Wait is on for 2014 eaglets

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 20, 2014 A Section The Seahawks varsity baseball team, under the direction of coach Aaron York won its home opener Feb. 11, downing Altha 7-6. Franklin County rallied with six runs in the bottom of the seventh, scoring three runs after Corbin Rester’s in eld single and a throwing error with two outs. Alex Causey had three hits, and James Newell added two hits and a 10strikeout effort on the mound for the Seahawks (1-0). On Feb. 13 at Maclay, the Seahawks fell 10-4. Leading hitters included Kirvin and Rester each with hits; Bobby John Curry pitched well but took the loss. The team lost 12-5 to Munroe at home Feb. 13. Leading hitters included Causey, Logan McLeod, Kirvin and Newell, with Newell and Rester both taking the mound. On Feb. 18, the team lost an away game 10-0 against John Paul II. The Hawks managed one hit by Kirvin, and committed six errors. Newell threw well in the loss. — By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Seahawks down Altha F r a n k l i n C oun t y H igh S c ho ol s e n i o r A l l y M i l le n de r ha s b e e n h o t a s t h e l e a d o f f h i t t e r f o r t h e v a r s i t y s o f t b a l l t e a m O n F e b 7 a t R u t h e r f o r d s h e w e n t 3/ 3 w i t h t w o r u n s s c o r e d a n d t w o s t o l e n b a s e s O n F e b 1 0 i n a 1 6 1 w i n a t B l o u n t s t o w n s h e w e n t 2 / 2 w i t h t w o d o u b l e s t w o s t o l e n b a s e s a n d t w o r u n s s c o r e d O n F e b 1 3 s h e t a l l i e d t h r e e h i t s i n a 1 6 2 w i n a t A l t h a A l l y i s a h a r d w o r k e r a n d s e n i o r l e a d e r t h a t a l w a y s s tr i v e s f o r e x c e l l e n c e s a i d C o a c h S c o t t C o l l i n s S h e i s a g r e a t r o l e m o d e l b o t h o n t h e e l d a n d i n t h e c l a s s r o o m f o r o u r y o u n g e r p l a y e r s P L AY E R OF T H E WE E K A ll y M ille n d e r F LO R I D A D EP A R T MEN T O F H E A L T H I N FR A N K L I N C OUN T Y C l o s i ng t h e G ap P r o gr am F e b r u a r y i s A me r ic a n H e a r t M o n t h H e a r t d i s e a s e i s t h e l e a d i n g c a u s e o f d e a t h f o r b o t h m e n a n d w o m e n a n d i t i s o e n p r e v e n t a b l e a n d c o n tr o l l a b l e E v e r y y e a r a b o u t 7 1 5 0 0 0 A m e r i c a n s h a v e a h e a r t a t t a c k A b o u t 6 0 0 0 0 0 p e o p l e d i e f r o m h e a r t d i s e a s e i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s e a c h y e a r ( t h a t ’ s 1 o u t o f e v e r y 4 d e a t h s ) B e l o w a r e v e m a j o r s y m p t o m s o f a h e a r t a t t a c k : $ " $ $ $ $ $ $ $ I f y o u t h i n k t h a t y o u o r s o m e o n e y o u k n o w i s h a v i n g a h e a r t a t t a c k c a l l 9 1 1 i m m e d i ate ly e t e r m “ h e a r t d i s e a s e ” r efe r s t o s e v e r a l t y p e s o f h e a r t c o n d i t i o n s e m os t c o m m o n t y p e i n t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s i s c o r o n a r y h e a r t d i s e a s e ( a l s o c a l l e d c o r o n a r y a r t e r y d i s e a s e ) w h i c h o c c u r s w h e n a su bs t a n c e c a l l e d p l a q u e b u i l d s u p i n $ $ $ $ $ h e a r t a t t a c k a n g i n a h e a r t f a i l u r e a n d a r r h y t h m i a s P l a n f o r P r e v e nti o n S o m e h e a l t h c o n d i t i o n s a n d l i f e s t y l e f a c t o r s c a n p u t p e o p l e a t h i g h r i s k f o r d e v e l o p i n g h e a r t d i s e a s e Y o u c a n h e l p p r e v e n t h e a r t d i s e a s e b y m a k i n g h e a l t h y c h o i c e s a n d m a n a g i n g a l l o f y o u r k n o w n m e d i c a l c o n d i t i o n s H e r e a r e n i n e t i p s t o h e l p p r e v e n t h e a r t d i se a se : E a t a h e a l t h y d i e t B e s u r e t o e a t p l e n t y o f f r u i t s a n d v e g e t a b l e s a n d e a t f o o d s t h a t a r e l o w i n s at u ra te d / t ra n s f at s M a i n t a i n a h e a l t h y w e i g h t B e i n g o v e r w e i g h t o r o b e s e c a n i n c r e a s e y o u r r i s k f o r h e a r t d i s e a s e # $ $ $ $ $ c h o le s t e ro l a nd b l o o d p r e s s u r e M o n i t o r y o u r b l o o d p r e s s u r e H i g h b l o o d p r e s s u r e o e n h a s n o s y m p t o m s s o b e s u r e t o h a v e i t c h e c k e d o n a r e g u l a r b a s i s " $ L i m i t a l c o h o l u s e A v o i d d r i n k i n g t o o m u c h a l c o h o l w h i c h c a n i n c r e a s e yo u r b l o o d pre s s u re Ha v e y o u r c h o l e s t e r o l c h e c k e d Y o u r h e a l t h c a r e p r o v i d e r s h o u l d t e s t y o u r c h o l e s t e r o l l e v e l s a t l e a s t o n c e e v e r y 5 y e a r s M a n a g e y o u r d i a b e t e s I f y o u h a v e d i a b e t e s m o n i t o r y o u r b l o o d s u g a r l e v e l s c l o s e l y a n d t a l k w i t h y o u r d o c t o r a b o u t t r e a t m e n t o p t i o n s T a k e y o u r m e d i c i n e I f y o u ’ r e t a k i n g m e d i c a t i o n t o t r e a t h i g h b l o o d p r e s s u r e h i g h c h o l e s t e r o l o r d i a b e t e s f o l l o w y o u r d o c t o r ’ s i n s t r u c t i o n s c a r e f u l l y Apalachicola Dixie Youth registration ends Saturday It’s that time of year again. Who’s ready to play some ball? The Apalachicola Dixie Youth baseball and softball program will hold registration at the DW Wilson Sports Complex for one more week from 5:30-7 p.m. today. Registration will end from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Registration fee is $50. If your child has not played in Apalachicola baseball or softball, remember to bring a copy of their birth certi cate to registration. In order for a child to be eligible to play T-ball, they must be at least 5 years old before May 1, 2014. If you have any questions about registration, contact Kim Johnson at 653-6887. The Lady Seahawks junior varsity softball team opened at 3-0, under the direction of coaches Brock Johnson and Kevin Newell. On Feb, 7 at Rutherford, the team came away with a big 14-3 win against the 5A Lady Rams. Led by the strong ne-inning pitching of sixth grader Jaylin Charles, with three strikeouts and just two hits allowed, the team secured timely hitting from freshman Myranda McLeod, with three RBIs, sophomore Anna Riley, who went 2-4 with two RBIs, and freshman Adriana Butler, who scored three runs. “Jaylin pitched a good game. She kept their hitters off balance with her pitches. She located her pitches where she wanted them to go, which is big when she is doing that,” said Johnson. On Feb. 11 against Port St. Joe, the bats continued to stay hot for the JV Seahawks as they downed their district rivals 15-9. Offensively the Seahawks were led by freshman Kimmie Boone, who went 2-3 and scored two runs; Butler, who was 23 with three runs; Riley, who went 2-2, with three runs and two RBI; sophomore Savannah Alday, who scored two runs and knocked in three RBI; and McLeod, who was 1-3, with three runs and ve RBI. “The girls hit the ball extremely well today. We came up with big hits with runners in scoring position several times,” said Johnson. On Feb. 18 vs Liberty County, Charles hurled ve innings, striking out ve, allowing two hits and three runs, as she once again led the way on the mound by downing the visiting Bulldogs. At the plate the Seahawks struggled in the early innings before getting hot like they have in the previous games. Leading the way offensively were Riley, who went 2-3 with two runs; McLeod, who was 3-3 with two RBI; Butler, who scored two runs and stole two bases; and Alday, who batted in three runs. “We played probably our best all-around game yet. We started out real slow, offensively and defensively,” said Johnson. “Then we played like we were capable of and turned it on from the third inning on. These girls are slowly but surely learning the potential that they are capable of having and it’s starting to look pretty good.” — By DAVID ADLERSTEIN By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity softball team has opened with a 5-2 record, although they lost their district opener to Port St. Joe. On Feb. 4, the team blacked Blountstown 100, with sophomore Krista Martina hurling a ve-inning complete game, striking out six. Freshman Scout Segree went 4/4 with two doubles and two RBIs. Senior Morgan Mock was 2/4 with a pair of doubles and two RBIs. Junior Madison Newell was 2/3 with a double and an RBI. Senior Ally Millender and freshman Vanessa Simmons had one hit each. The Feb. 6 against Quincy Munroe was postponed until Feb. 25. On Feb. 7, the team lost at Rutherford 8-7 after taking a 7-6 lead into the bottom of the seventh inning in the back-and-forth game. Rutherford tied the game on a one-out solo home run and then won it on an in eld error. Martina took the loss. Leadoff hitter Millender was 3/3 with two runs scored and two stolen bases. Mock was 3/5 with two doubles and three RBIs. Seventh grader Sophie Kirvin, freshman Allie Kirvin and Simmons had two hits each. On Feb. 10, Franklin County shelled Blountstown 16-1. Freshman Megan Collins was the winning pitcher, throwing three innings, striking out three and giving up one run on four hits. Senior Ashley Carroll pitched the fourth inning and didn’t allow a base runner. Allie Kirvin was 3/3 with two stolen bases and three RBIs. Millender was 2/2 with two doubles, two stolen bases and two runs scored. Mock has two hits including a triple and three RBIs. Martina and seventh grader Melanie Collins each had a base hit and an RBI. On Feb. 11, the team lost at home to Port St. Joe 10 0 in six innings. Martina was the losing pitcher, throwing a complete game and giving up seven hits and three walks, while striking out two. Mock had a triple and Sophie Kirvin added a double as the Lady Seahawks lost their rst district game. On Thursday, Feb. 13, the team picked up their fth win of the season when they went to Altha and pounded out 21 hits, as they slugged their way to a victory over the Lady Wildcats 16-2. Carroll was the winning pitcher, throwing three complete innings and giving up one run on three hits, with no walks while striking out one. Megan Collins pitched the last two innings, also giving up one run on one hit, with no walks, and striking out six. Mock had four hits, while Millender, Segree and Sophie Kirvin had three each. Junior Calli Westbrook, Simmons and Allie Kirvin had two apiece, while Newell and Martina both added one. “The girls have great attitudes and continue to get better every day,” said head coach Scott Collins. Sports BRIEF SCOUT SEGREE Lady Seahawks open at 5-2 ASHLEY CARROLL KRISTA MARTINA ALLY MILLENDER MORGAN MOCK MYRANDA MCLEOD KIMMIE BOONE ANNA RILEY JV softball girls undefeated Page 9

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, February 20, 2014 Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E NC E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center BA Y S H O R E DRI V E S C O P P R O JEC T P R O JEC T # 0 0 7 1 1 1 N OT I CE T O R E CE IV E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i v e s e a l e d b id s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d pe r s on c o m pa n y or c or p or a t i on in t e r e s t e d in c o n s t r u c t in g : B A Y S H O R E D R I V E S C O P P R O J E C T P r o j e c t i s l o c a t e d i n E a s t p o i n t F l o r i d a a n d c o n s i s t s o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 4 5 m i l e s o f r o a d w a y w i d e n i n g a n d r e s u r f a c i n g a l o n g B a yshor e D r i v e P l a ns a n d spec i c a t i ons c a n b e ob t a i n e d a t P r e b l e R i sh I nc 3 2 4 M a r i n a D r i v e P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C o s t f o r P l a n s a n d S p e c i c a t i o n s w i l l b e $ 5 0 0 0 p e r s e t a n d i s n o n r e f u n d a b l e C h e c k s s h o u l d b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o P R E B L E R I S H I N C T h e b id m u s t c on f or m t o S ec t i on 2 8 7 1 3 3 ( 3 ) Fl or id a S t a t u t e s on pu b l i c e n t i t y c r i m e s A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l b e F D O T q u a l i e d p e r S e c t i o n 2 1 o f t h e F D O T S t a n d a r d Spec i c a t i ons f or R oa d a n d B r id g e C ons t r u c t i on l a t es t e d i t i o n i n t h e f o l l ow i n g w o r k c l a s s e s : G r a d i n g D r a i n ag e F l e x i b l e P av i n g a n d H o t P l a n t M i x B i t u m i n o u s C o u r s e C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l b e 15 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d ate o f t h e N o t i c e t o P r o c e e d p r e s e n t e d t o t h e s u c c e s s f u l b i d d e r L i q u i d a t e d d a m ag e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e p r o j e c t o n t h e s p e c i e d d a t e w i l l b e s e t a t $ 7 5 0 0 0 p e r d a y P l e a s e i n d i c a t e o n t h e e n v e l o p e t h a t t h i s i s a s e a l e d b i d f o r B a y s h o r e D r i v e S C O P P r o j e c t B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i v e d u n t i l 4: 0 0 p .m e a s t e r n t i m e o n M a r c h 1 7 2 0 1 4 a t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d o n M a r c h 18 2 0 14 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t A p a l ach i c ol a F L T h e B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e i n f or m a l i t i e s i n a n y b id t o a c c e p t a n d / or r e j ec t a n y or a l l b id s a n d t o a c c e p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r j u d g m e n t w i l l b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n r m f o r a p e r i o d o f s i x t y d a y s a f t e r t h e o p e n i n g A l l b id d e r s sh a l l c o m p ly w i t h a l l a p p l i c a b l e S t a t e a n d l o c a l l a w s c onc e r n i n g l i c e ns i n g r e gi s t r a t i on a n d r e g u l a t i on o f c on t r a c t or s d o i n g b u s i n e s s t o t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a I f y o u h av e a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l C l a y S m a l l w o o d a t ( 8 5 0 ) 2 27 7 20 0 OA K S T R E E T S C O P P R O J E C T P R O J E C T # 0 0 7 1 1 0 N O TI C E T O R E C E I V E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i ve s e a l e d b i d s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d p e r s o n c o m p a n y o r c o r p o r a t i o n i n t e r e s t ed i n c o n s t r uc t i n g : OA K S T R E E T S C O P P R O J E C T P r o j e c t i s l o c a t e d i n L a n a r k V i l l a g e F l o r i d a a n d c o n s i s t s o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 5 m i l e s o f r o a d w a y w i d e n i n g r e s u r f a c i n g a n d a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 m i l e o f n e w c o n s t r u c t i o n r o a d w a y a l o n g O a k S t r e e t P l a n s a n d s p e c i c a t i o n s c a n b e o b t a i n e d a t P r e b l e R i s h I n c 3 2 4 M a r i n a D r i ve P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C o s t f o r P l a n s a n d S p e c i c a t i o n s w i l l b e $ 5 0 0 0 p e r s e t a n d i s n o n r e f u n d a b l e C h e c k s s h o u l d b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o P R E B L E R I S H I N C T h e b i d m u s t c o n f o r m t o S e c t i o n 2 8 7 1 3 3 ( 3 ) F l o r i d a S t a t u t e s o n p u b l i c en t i t y cr i m e s A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l b e F D O T q u a l i e d p e r S e c t i o n 2 1 o f t h e F D O T S t a n d a r d Sp e c i c a t i ons f or Roa d a n d B r i d g e C ons t r u c t i on l a te s t e d i t i on i n t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r k c l a s s e s : G r a d i n g D r a i n a g e F l e x i b l e P a v i n g and H ot P l an t M i x B i t u m i n o us C o u r s e C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l b e 1 5 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i ce t o P r o ce e d p r ese n t e d t o t h e s u c ces s f u l bid d e r L i q u id a t e d d a m a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e p r o j e c t o n t h e s p e c i e d d a t e w i l l b e s e t a t $ 7 5 0 0 0 p e r d a y P l e a s e i n d i c a t e o n t h e e n ve l o p e t h a t t h i s i s a s e a l e d b i d f o r O a k S t r e e t S C O P P r o j e c t B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i ve d u n t i l 4 : 0 0 p m e a s t e r n t i m e o n M a r c h 1 7 2 0 1 4 a t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d o n M a r c h 1 8 2 0 1 4 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F L T h e B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r ve s t h e r i g h t t o w a i ve i n f o r m a l i t i e s i n a n y b i d t o a c c e p t a n d / o r r e j e c t a n y o r a l l b i d s a n d t o a c c e p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r j u d g m e n t w i l l b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n r m f o r a p e r i o d o f s i x t y d a y s af t er t h e o p en i n g A l l bi d d e r s sh a l l c o m pl y w i t h al l a p pl i c a bl e S t a t e a n d l o c al l a ws c onc e r n i n g l i c e ns i n g r e g i s t r a t i on a n d r e g u l a t i on o f c on t r a c t or s do i n g b u s i n e s s t o t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a I f y o u h a ve a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l C l a y S m a l l w o o d a t ( 8 5 0) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0. Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-415-1638 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 1/14. Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders 20144-3-T4 Single T ooth Implant inc luding Cr o wn st ar ting at $ 1 8 95 Dentur e Implants st ar ting at $ 1 5 95 L o w er Ar c h $ 1 9 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 Upper Ar c h HEALT H DEPARTMENT TO CELEBRATE TODAY Celebrate 125 years of public health in Florida today by visiting a clinic near you. The Florida Department of Health will host the celebration on from 1-3 p.m. today at the Carrabelle Clinic, at 106 North Fifth St., and from 2-4 p.m. at the Apalachicola Clinic, at 139-12th St. For more information, contact Gina Moore, Department of Health in Franklin County 6532111 Ext. 123 FLAGS O F O UR FAT H ERS AT MUSEUM S ATURDAY At 10:15 a.m. this Saturday, Flags of Our Fathers, directed by Clint Eastwood, will be shown at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. The plot focuses on seven U. S. Marines of the 28th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division Sgt. Mike Strank, Pfc. Rene Gagnon, Pfc. Ira Hayes, Cpl. Harlon Block, Pfc. Franklin Sousley, Sgt. Hank Hansen, and Pfc. Ralph Ignatowski as well as their Navy corpsman, PhM2 John Doc Bradley. Because of the graphic scenes of violence shown in this lm, absolutely no one under the age of 18 will be allowed to view this lm. Perhaps this lm best demonstrates what our Army, Navy and Marine veterans faced while in combat in the Pacic. This lm will last a little more than two hours, and free popcorn will be provided. Though there is no admission fee, remember the museum operates on donations, and donations are welcome.C OMMUNITY DRUMMING IN A PALAC H ICOLA Community Drumming in Apalachicola will be from 3-4 p.m. this Sunday at Water Street Gardens Shop, at Commerce and Water streets. This drumming workshop/circle is hand drumming with African djembes provided, with learning technique, drum exercises and rhythms played together. Cost for participation is $15 for workshop, facilitated by Mershell Sherman, more than 20 years as a percussionist. Beginners welcome. Drumming benets mind, body and spirit.A RTIST TO DEMONSTRATE ENCAUSTIC PAINTING On Feb. 27, Denise Callaghan will give a demonstration of encaustic painting, which will utilize hot beeswax with pigment and sometimes includes collage elements found items to be incorporated into the painting. This is part of an outreach by the Carrabelle Artists Association at the Carrabelle City Complex from 6-8 p.m. every other Thursday evening. Artists and interested people are invited to watch and/or participate in the free presentation. Artists are welcomed to work on other projects. Callaghan will give a similar free demonstration on March 8 for the Coastal Art Tour in the Carrabelle Area. For questions, call 294-9664.C ARRABELLE ARTISTS PLAN ART TOUR M ARC H 7-8 The Carrabelle Artists Association is presenting its fourth annual Coastal Art Tour in conjunction with Camp Gordon Johnston Days. Various art exhibits and demonstrations will be presented at participating galleries, studios and shops from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 8. From 7-9 p.m. March 7, a reception with live music will be held at the Rio Carrabelle (corner of U.S. 98 and Tallahassee Street), where maps can be obtained. From Carrabelle Beach to St. James, more than 20 artists at multiple locations will be participating and demonstrating ne art, portrait drawing, sculpture, pottery and photography. Maps and information available at the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce, Carrabelle City Hall, the Franklin County Senior Center and each participating location and also on Facebook at Carrabelle Artist Association. For information on this event, call Bill Owen at 653-6426 or email at billowen@wildblue.netE XTENSION MAY MOVE TO S CIPIO C REEK On Feb. 4, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners he, Dr. Pete Vergot and other University of Florida personnel discussed on Jan. 30 the possible relocation and expansion of the UF Extension Ofce. The current idea is to relocate the county extension ofce out of the Armory and into the old Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) building at Scipio Creek. The University of Florida would also then locate a lab and other programs and services into that building. The lab would provide services associated with one of several oyster re-shelling programs that will soon be started in the Apalachicola Bay. The city of Apalachicola owns the land, and there is a reverter clause that if the building ceases to used by ANERR, the property will revert back to the city. Pierce said UF ofcials believe if the city allows the university to set up an educational program in the building, the federal government will let it revert back to the city.G AS TAX PROVIDES $1.6 MILLION F OR CONSTRUCTION At the Feb. 4 county commission meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce reported on funds available in the local gas tax fund. He said there will be about $1.6 million in construction funds available, or approximately $325,000 per district by Sept. 30. He said milled asphalt from CW Roberts is currently $350 per truckload delivered to the county yard on State Route 65. A truckload is about 18 tons, or 18 cubic yards. News BRIEFS

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, February 20, 2014 Quinn retiring as newspaper publisher Special to The Times Panama City News Herald Publisher Rog er Quinn, a 48-year veteran of the newspaper business, announced Monday he is retiring at the end of the month. But he won’t be going far. “We love Panama City,” Quinn said. “We put down roots, and we’re going to stay here.” Quinn, who joined The News Herald in August 2012, shortly after its purchase by Halifax Media Group, plans to focus more time on his civ ic activities like his work with the Salvation Army, where he serves on the board. Halifax Media Group CEO Michael Red ding, who was in Panama City for the an nouncement, thanked Quinn for his hard work and attitude and said a nationwide search for a new publisher would begin immediately. “Roger has a distinguished newspaper career, and we are going to miss him,” Red ding said. “He is a great guy, as well as a friend, and we all wish him the best.” Quinn began his career in 1966 in Gads den, Ala., beginning a path that would lead him to a position as a New York Times Re gional Media Group publisher. There, he oversaw a group of papers in North and South Carolina that included properties in Spartanburg and Hendersonville before those newspapers were purchased by Hali fax late in 2011. After Halifax purchased The News Her ald, the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times and several other Freedom Communica tions newspapers in Florida and North Carolina in 2012, Quinn joined The News Herald as publisher but also served as re gional publisher with responsibility over all the properties in Halifax’s central region, which includes Northwest Florida, Alabama and Louisiana. Halifax, headquartered in Daytona Beach, boasts a strong presence across the South east that includes newspapers in key Florida cities like Daytona Beach, Gainesville, Sara sota, Lakeland and Fort Walton Beach. ROGE rR QUINN HISTORY from page A1 H’COLA of “Lift Evry Voice and Sing,” considered the Negro National Anthem. The nonprot community action group H’COLA, which stands for Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola, has been the force behind the festival for the past 11 years, held the third weekend in February, to celebrate the contributions to society made by both national and local black citizens. Van Johnson, the city’s rst black mayor, offered a welcome that touched on the larger issues of civil rights in the nation’s history. “We gather to gauge how far we have come as a soci ety since the institution of slavery, Jim Crow laws and racial imbalance marred the landscape of this great nation founded upon the principles of liberty and justice for all,” he said. “We gather not to relive past hurts or injustices, but to determine for ourselves after 238 years since the signing of the Declaration of Indepen dence whether this great na tion, a melting pot of human ity, can justiably call itself the sweet land of liberty. “And we gather 151 years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation to ensure that our children, and our chil dren’s children will be able to continue to sing ‘Long may our land be bright with free dom’s holy light; Protect us by Thy might, Great God, our King.’” Johnson said. The Baby Boomers who form the heart of the event’s organizers gathered Fri day night at the Sixth Street Recreation Center for a ’70s Bash, bringing back that era at a party that used to be the Friday before Labor Day. “It was neat; we had a good turnout,” said Elinor Mount-Simmons, who helped coordinate the festival. “A lot of folks came.” As the morning events commenced, Franklin County High School co-valedictorian Bria Walker and salutatorian Jathan Martin read Presi dent Obama’s proclamation for Black History Month, and then Banks was introduced as grand marshal. Also introduced was the Royal Court, which included Tiny Miss Hillside Aubriunna Davis and Tiny Mr. Hillside Antrell O’Neal; Miss Hill side Alonna Brown; Hillside Princess Arryonna Cargill; and Hillside Queen Trianna Lockley. As a basketball tourna ment energized the nearby courts, the event continued with plenty of food booths, in cluding one serving curried and jerk chicken, and goat, as well as booths from Franklin’s Promise Coalition, the Apala chicola library, the health department’s anti-tobacco program, and FAMU Physics Professor Ronald Williams, who offered hands-on science demonstrations. The Hillside Talent Show case featured original music artist Courtney “C-bell” Bell, and there was the traditional ethnic fashion show, coordi nated by Sherry O’Neal, plus this year line dancing led by Dan Savage and Asenath Thomas. Also performing were the dance ministries of Hillside Dancers for Christ, a community-based troupe directed by Teresa Ann Mar tin, and True Love and Heav enly Angels, troupes from the Friendship Missionary Bap tist Church. Members of Tallahassee’s Valentine Lodge No. 147 of the F&AM Masonic Order, were on hand to promote their hopes of reviving what once was a vibrant Masonic lodge on the Hill until the 1980s. The musical group Sharp er 5, from Valdosta, Ga., under the direction of Eric Sharper, got the crowd on its feet as evening rolled in. The event closed at 8 p.m. Saturday, and Mount-Sim mons said plans are to move the featured entertainment to earlier in the afternoon. “It’s still wintertime, and once the sun goes down, it gets cold,” she said. “The gates now close at 8 p.m., which is a great time to end up.” A worship service at noon Sunday drew from almost all the churches on the Hill, with the featured speaker Roderick Robinson, the high school’s guidance counselor. He spoke on a comparison of slavery of biblical days to slavery in the United States. “We were pleased with this year’s event,” Mount-Sim mons said. “We had gorgeous weather, and people were moving in all day long.” the ofce and has been at it ever since. He said he’s gathered about half the needed signa tures and has made reform to education, and to the Florida Department of Corrections, his primary issues. He said he would like to de-emphasize standardized testing. “I would like to focus on development of their edu cation (in pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and rst grade) versus the passing of a test,” Gibson said. He said close to 85 per cent of inmates incarcerated in Florida lack a high school education, and this number could be improved by a great er emphasis on early child hood education. Gibson isn’t daunted by the huge amount of needed to compete for the governorship in Florida. “People just want integrity and openness, that your yes means yes and your no means no,” he said. “They want a person that they’re willing — even if they didn’t vote for — to say ‘that’s the governor of my state.’” His campaign will formally kick off in May with a twoweek bicycle ride through all of the state’s 67 counties, from Key West to Pensacola. Gibson said he won’t ride the entire route, but much of it, with the longest leg 91 miles, from Fort Walton Beach to Pensacola, and many of the others rang ing from 47 to 67 miles. To learn more about Gibson’s campaign, email kc2020vision@aol.com. CANDIDATE from page A1 DAVId D AdAD LEr R STEIN | The Times The Sharper 5 and Company from Valdosta, Ga., was the featured entertainment. CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, February 20, 2014 The Times | A11 93896T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO, 13-CA-415 ROBERT PETERSON and MARGUERITE PETERSON, Plaintiffs, vs. CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR. at al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR.; MYRTLE E. DUNLAP, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all of the parties claiming by through, under or against them. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: See “Exhibit “A”, attached hereto and by reference made a part hereof, EXHIBIT “A” COMMENCE AT A FOUND 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA: THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE MONUMENTED WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 900.50 FEET TO A FOUND RAILROAD IRON; THENCE GO NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 1,432.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 500.00 FEET TO A FOUND 1/2” IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 88.21 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 233.19 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 298.03 FEET TO A FOUND 4”X4” CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF OLD FERRY ROAD (66’ R/W) AND SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1,192.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 241.96 FEET (CH. 241.55’ CH. BRG. N75 DEGREES 06’06” W) TO A POINT; THENCE DEPARTING SAID CURVE AND NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 148.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL OF LAND IS SITUATED IN SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs’ attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 16th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Feb 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 93910T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-000040-CA CERTUSBANK, N.A., a national banking association, Plaintiff, v. DSW HOLDINGS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, J. SIDNEY DUMAS, individually, J. TRAVIS STANLEY, individually, and WALTER M. WARD, SR., individually, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Other Relief entered on January 27, 2014 in the abovenoted case, that I will sell the following real property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, and all personal property associated therewith: PARCEL A ALL OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 08 SOUTH, RANGE 08 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALL OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 08 SOUTH, RANGE 08 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION THAT LIES WITHIN THE RAILROAD RIGHTOF-WAY. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION THAT MAY LIE WITHIN ANY ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY. PARCEL B NORTH HALF OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PORTION OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 515, PAGE 302, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6” X 6” CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKED S.J.P.C. AT THE WEST QUARTER CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST; THENCE RUN ALONG THE HALF SECTION LINE OF SAID SECTION 5, SOUTH 8901’32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 5287.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE WEST QUARTER CORNER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST; THENCE RUN NORTH 0041’27” EAST A DISTANCE OF 2662.53 FEET TO A FOUND 3” X 3” LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE RUN SOUTH 8902’32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 5279.42 FEET TO A FOUND 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT STAMPED BDE 0340 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0037’51” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2624.86 FEET TO A FOUND CONCRETE MONUMENT STAMPED BDI LB 0340, MARKING THE EAST QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE RUN NORTH 8927’03” WEST A DISTANCE OF 5281.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT FROM PARCEL A THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST A DISTANCE OF 598.10 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF THE NORTHERN APALACHICOLA RAILROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE NORTHERN APALACHICOLA RAILROAD SOUTH 8025’22” WEST A DISTANCE OF 352.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0106’25” EAST A DISTANCE OF 662.16 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SOUTH 8905’43” EAST A DISTANCE OF 346.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 33,

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A12 | The Times Thursday, February 20, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2477.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 287.96 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8927’04” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 807.86 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0904’44” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 291.16 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8927’04” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 767.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING WITHIN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY. FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1937.09 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 6449’11” WEST A DISTANCE OF 543.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 7317’12” WEST A DISTANCE OF 294.21 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0904’44” WEST A DISTANCE OF 786.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8927’04” EAST A DISTANCE OF 60.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0904’44” EAST A DISTANCE OF 740.11 FEET; THENCE NORTH 7317’12” EAST A DISTANCE OF 261.01 FEET; THENCE NORTH 6449’11” EAST A DISTANCE OF 518.29 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, NORTH 0106’25” EAST A DISTANCE OF 66.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND COMMENCE AT A 5 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION, A DISTANCE OF 3038.44 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY SECTION BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 846.19 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 502.45 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 735.03 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 220.27 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 437.25 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 194.81 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #0340), THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES, 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 568.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A PROPOSED 60.00 FOOT INGRESS/ EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1937.09 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 543.48 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 294.21 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 786.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 60.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 740.11 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 261.01 FEET; THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 518.29 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, NORTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 66.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1937.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 543.48 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 294.21 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 66.64 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 402.53 FEET; THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 216.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 34.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 07 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 43.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 29.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 204.80 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 315.35 FEET; THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 804.56 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 556.90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1136.71 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST FORA DISTANCE OF 519.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 792.34 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 28.50 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1970.55 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY LINE, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST A DISTANCE OF 506.59 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID EAST BOUNDARY LINE, NORTH 8927’04” WEST A DISTANCE OF 767.48 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0904’44” EAST A DISTANCE OF 195.89 FEET; THENCE NORTH 7317’12” EAST, A DISTANCE OF 277.61 FEET; THENCE NORTH 6449’11” EAST A DISTANCE OF 530.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AD BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33 FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SECTION 33, NORTH 8902’32” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1030.00 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE NORTH 0106’ 25” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2456.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8902’32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1030.00 FEET TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY LINE, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2156.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. including the timber, buildings, appurtenances, and fixtures located thereon, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, on March 5, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. ET in the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The highest bidder shall immediately following the sale post with the clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit must be in cash or cashier’s check payable to Clerk of Court. The successful bidder must pay the balance of the final bid, plus the registry of court service charge and the foreclosure sale fee, no later than 4:00 p.m. ET on the day of the sale. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Court at Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, this 30th day of January, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk I. William Spivey, II Courtney M. Keller Greenberg Traurig, P.A. 450 South Orange Avenue, Suite 650 Orlando, Florida 32801 Counsellor Plaintiff’ Feb 13, 20, 2014 93928T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-000369-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. JANET S. GLOSSON A/K/A JANET STROTHER GLOSSON AKA JANET STROTHER AKA JANET GLOSSON, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: SIDNEY PARKER AS EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF HARVEY Q. STROTHER Last Known Address: Unkown Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 7, BLOCK C, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 16 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 28th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk File No. 13-07547 February 13, 20, 2014 93954T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2009-CA000701 U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the benefit of CitiGroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc. AssetBacked Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AHL2 Plaintiff, vs. Jeffrey M. Wilson a/k/a Jeffrey Wilson and Patricia J. Wilson, Husband and Wife; Chancay, Inc.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 27, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2009CA-000701 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the benefit of CitiGroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc. Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007AHL2, Plaintiff and Jeffrey M. Wilson a/k/a Jeffrey Wilson and Patricia J. Wilson, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on March 5, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 4, BLOCK 86, ACCORDING TO THAT CERTAIN PLAT KNOWN AS ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 5, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THE SAME BEING RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 16-17, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 09-156803 FC01 SPS February 13, 20, 2014 94028T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-CA-412 OLD MAN 2, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. RANDALL W. SCOTT, DAVID SNYDER; if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming bythrough, under or against them; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RANDALL W. SCOTT, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against him YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: Lots One (1), Two (2), Three (3) and Four (4), Block 84 (247), of KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION, in the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with 1983 Mobile Home bearing VIN # KBGASNA323354 & KBGASNB323354/ Title #’s 22540073 & 22540074 AND Together with 1989 Towncreek Mobile Home bearing VIN #BHAL0289SN1395 and Title # 47477399 Franklin County Parcel ID No. 20-07S04W-4212-0084-0010 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs’ attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 5th day February, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 March 6, 13, 2014 93962T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA000054 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON MORTGAGE SECURITIES CORP., CSAB MORTGAGEBACKED TRUST 2006-4, CSAB MORTGAGE-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4 Plaintiff, v. TAYLEN C. PEADEN; JAMES BRUMMETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TAYLEN C. PEADEN A/K/A TAYLEN CLAY PEADEN; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; ANDERSON & SONS CONSTRUCTION, INC. F/K/A ANDERSON & SON CONSTRUCTION, INC.; GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 11, 2013, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on January 27, 2014, this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 8, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 17, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 214 GRAMERCY PLANTATION BLVD., EASTPOINT, FL 32328 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Inside front door of the courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at eleven o’clock a.m., on March 5, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 28th day of January, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE COURT ADMINISTRATOR, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 33320 AT 850-653-8861 EXT. 105 OR FAX TO 850-6534795 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1800-955-8771 FOR THE FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE. February 13, 20, 2014 94026T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a Financial Meeting on 2/28/14 at the Destin Wine Bar, located at 4424 Commons Drive East, Suite E3, Destin, FL. The meeting will begin at 10:00 a.m. CST. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in these meetings is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or alicia.stepheri@hdrinc.co m. Pub: February 20, 2014 97539T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on March 6, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property Lot 1, Block 6, Lanark Village Unit No 1. according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2 at Pages 14 and 14A of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. P ersonal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count II and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count I in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to Gulf State Community Bank by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Gulf State Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. JERRILYN H. HELBING, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2013-CA-000336. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. “If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.” WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 30th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 2014 94038T REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS The Gulf Coast Workforce Development Board, Inc. d/b/a CareerSource Gulf Coast announces the availability of the following Request for Proposals: CareerSource Gulf Coast Job Center Operator, In-School Youth Services for ages14-18, and Welfare Transition Services. All of these programs are funded through federal and state funds; primarily made up of Workforce Investment Act and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families dollars. The purpose of these RFP’s is to solicit proposals from an organization or groups of organizations that are interested in becoming service providers for the delivery of workforce services in Bay, Gulf and Franklin Counties. CareerSource Gulf Coast is seeking proposals from organizations capable of providing exceptional service and with the capability to manage complex federal and state programs with multiple funding streams and performance requirements. Proposals are due: April 1, 2014. To obtain an RFP, or for further information, contact: CareerSource Gulf Coast 5230 West US Hwy 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-913-3285 1-800-311-3685 ext.3285 dwilliams@r4careersourcegc.com Minority Businesses are encouraged to apply. The Workforce Investment Act is an equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. February 20, 2014 97657T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000408 Bank of America, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Jacalyn R. Murray; Unknown Spouse of Jacalyn R. Murray; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 29, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000408 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, National Association, Plaintiff and Jacalyn R. Murray are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 23, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 44, OF VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA, PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 17-18, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-251501 FC01 CWF February 13, 20, 2014 97691T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 192014CP 000008CPAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH MARXINE SLUSSER A/K/A BETTY BASCOMBE LAMBERSON Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH MARXINE SLUS-SER A/K/A BETTY BASCOMBE LAMBER-SON, deceased, whose date of death was April 20, 2013; File Number 192014CP000008CP AXMX, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: February 20, 2014. Personal Representative: JUDITH LAMBERSON TAYLOR 2175 Highway 98 West Carrabelle, FL 32322 Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire -FBN: 114278

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, February 20, 2014 The Times | A13 4516365Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking seasonal part-time, Housekeepers. Some experience is required. Must be energetic and detailed oriented. Weekends are required. Great hours and weekly pay! Please apply in person at112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 915 NORTH CASEY, CRA WFORDVILLE. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. FENCE YARD 750.00/MO. 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. Bldg Const/TradesOPS Wildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Tate’s Hell Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $27,487.20 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Send electronic resumes to: Billie.Clayton@MyFWC.com For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34280991 Program/Project Management Now Hiring Part Time Program Coordinatorto re-establish Friends of Franklin County Public Library’s Youth Program in Eastpoint, approximate 10 hours per week until 6/30/14 or longer contingent on Grant funding; to coordinate after school activities, provide basic/ work skills training, supervise youth 10 and older; recruit participants, maintain records, promote community support. Minimum requirements: High School diploma or equivalent, computer skills, enjoys working with youth, driver’s license. Must be creative, energetic, and flexible. Some travel. Position open until filled. Pick up application at Eastpoint or Carrabelle Library Branch. Drug Free Workplace. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web Id 34279990 Text FL79990 to 56654 dba@gendersalvarez. com Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire -FBN: 146528 afd@gendersalvarez. com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE, P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street Tampa, Florida 33609 Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813) 254-5222 February 20, 27, 2014 97737T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 192012CA 000190CAXXXX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. DIXIE L. RUSSELL AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DIXIE L RUSSELL, JOHN DOE AND MARY DOE, SUNTRUST BANK, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSE RESORT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 6th day of March 2014, at 11am at 33 Market St., Apalachicola, Florida, 2nd Floor Lobby Franklin County, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: UNIT 4, BUILDING “A”, PELICAN BAY TOWNHOUSES COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A, ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 48-A AND A PROJECTION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 473.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 22.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 22.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10 00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 61.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 61.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT NONEXCLUSIVE INGRESS/EGRESS, UTILITY AND DRAINAGE EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 48-A ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF ALLIGATOR DRIVE (COUNTY ROAD NO 370) AND A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHERLY, THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AND SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5704.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.02 FEET (CHORD BEARS NORTH 86 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 30.02 FEET), THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 443.85 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 13 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 444.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 11th day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 20, 27, 2014 97707T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Coastline RV Resort and Campground, located at 957 Highway 98, in the City of Eastpoint, Florida, 32328, in the County of FRANKLIN, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 6th day of February, 2014. Coastline Rentals, LLC February 20, 2014 97765T ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 1.1 Sealed Bids will be received by the City of Apalachicola, City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 until two o’clock p.m. (2:00 EDT) March 25, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at two thirty p.m. (2:30 EDT) March 25, 2014 at the City Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, for the construction of: APALACHICOLA AWT WET WEATHER/ REJECT STORAGE POND UPGRADES according to drawings and specifications covering the work. 1.2 Any Bids received after closing time will be returned unopened. 1.3 A mandatory prebid meeting will be held on March 4, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at the City of Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. 1.4 Contract documents, including drawings and specifications relative thereto may be inspected at the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), 1538 Metropolitan Blvd. Ste A2, Tallahassee, Florida, and the office of the Consultant, BaskervilleDonovan, Inc., 22219 Panama City Beach Pkwy, Suite 200, Panama City Beach, Florida or 449 West Main Street, Pensacola, Florida, and at the City of Apalachicola, City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. Electronic pdf copies of the Contract Documents may be secured from the Consultant at a cost of $50.00 per CD, the cost of which is non-refundable. Shipping will be via USPS standard service unless requested and paid for by contractor. Questions regarding plans and specifications can be addressed to the Consultant via fax, e-mail or US mail at the following address: Baskerville-Donovan, Inc. Attn: Richard Delp, CSI, CDT 449 West Main Street Pensacola, FL 32502 Phone: 850-438-9661 Ext 4314 Fax: 850-433-6761 E-mail: rdelp@baskervilledonovan.com No questions will be entertained after 2:00 p.m. on March 18, 2014. 1.5 Each Bid shall be submitted on the form supplied by the Engineer. Each Bid must be accompanied by certified check or Bid Bond in the amount of five percent (5%) of the Base Bid as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract will within thirty (30) consecutive calendar days after written notice being given or such award, enter into a written contract with the Owner in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a one hundred percent (100%) Performance Bond and one hundred percent (100%) labor and material Payment Bond satisfactory to the Owner. No Bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of Bids for a period of forty-five (45) days. 1.6 The Owner reserves the right to waive formalities in bidding and reject any and all Bids. CITY OF APALACHICOLA Betty Taylor-Webb, Administrator February 20, 27, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j Adoring, Financially Secure couple await jjj 1st baby. jjj j Allison & Hal j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Beautiful Dining Room Table w/ 8 Chairs, China Cabinet, Buffet, & Tea Cart, Made in Belgium, Med Oak, In Excellent Condition, $1800 OBO Noritakey China, “Applique Pattern” Service for 12, Includes, Serving Pieces, Coffee & Tea Services $300 OBO 850-866-8588 Carrabelle: 1405 Owens Ave Left on 12th St, 2nd Rt, Sat, Feb 22nd 8am-5pm PLEASE NO EARLY ARRIVALSEstate/Moving Sale Furniture, Linens, Rods & Reels, Garden Tools, Lawn Mowers, & Much More Text FL80569 to 56654 GUN SHOW FORTWALTON FAIRGROUNDSFebruary 22nd & 23rd SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL79626 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityBartenders Servers Cooks Dishwashers Bussers BLUE PARROT NOW HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34280042 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34279561 Food Svs/HospitalityHousekeepers At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work weeknds & holidays Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34279565 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for reliable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required. Great benefits for FT Employees. FT Guest Services Greet & assist guests with check-in/ -out; resolve Issues. Professional, friendly, good general office & computer skills. FT Office Assistant Coordinates work of cleaners; general office work. Good organization & computer skills. Works well under pressure. Prefer some office experience. Eastpoint location. PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34279796 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City Beach Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Terri McAfee at tmcafee @pcnh.com OR 850-747-5054 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34280828 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Terri McAfee at tmcafee @pcnh.com OR 850-747-5054 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34280829 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo 850-643-7740 Text FL79130 to 56654 3Br/2Ba House, CH&A, 525 W Hwy 98 $800/mo Water & Sewer Included 850-643-7740 Text FL78952 to 56654 Price Reduced Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com1120043 Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! AtBoozAllenHamilton EngineeringServices,LLC,you’llhavethetoolstogrowyourcareerwhile buildinghighlysophisticatedsolutionsfortheUS DepartmentofDefense.You’llbeanimportantpart ofourteamofengineeringexpertswhoareagile andefcient,andprovidelife-cyclesolutionsfrom researchanddevelopmenttotestingandevaluation support. Thefollowingopportunitiesandmanyothers areavailableinthePanamaCity,FL,area: €Assemblers €CellularSystemsEngineers €FabricationSupervisors €ProductionControlSpecialists €SoftwareSystemsEngineersVisitboozallen.com/careersengineertalenttocreateand submitaprole. www.boozallen.com/careersWeareproudofourdiverseenvironment, EOE/M/F/D/V.Applicantsselectedwillbesubject toasecurityinvestigationandmayneedtomeet eligibilityrequirementsforaccesstoclassied information 1121827 1120075LicensedMental HealthCounselorJointherewardingeldofcorrectional healthcare!You'llndautonomy,variety, stabilityandexibilityinthisambulatory setting.Corizonhaspositionsavailableat GulfCorrectionalFacilityinWewahitchka, FL.WearecurrentlylookingforFullTime, LicensedMentalHealthCounselors.Callto learnwhycorrectionalhealthcarecouldbe therefreshingchangeyouneed!YouMUST belicensedasaMentalHealthCounselor oraRegisteredMHCounselorInternwithin therst2yearsofinternship.Weoffer competitivepayplusanexcellentbenet packagethatincludesgenerouspaiddays offandsomuchmore! Formoreinfo,contact: EOE/AAP/DTRWebId34280788 TracyMazuranic 1-800-222-8215x9553 tracy.mazuranic@corizonhealth.com orQuickApplyonline (underthejobopportunitieslink). www.corizonhealth.com 1126945 CUSTOMERRELATIONS POSITION Mustbemotivated,ENTHUSIASTICand possessoutstandingphoneskills.Thisunique opportunityisaperfecttforthepersonthat lovesinteractingwithpeopleandworkingin fastpacedenvironments.Positionwilloffer salaryplusbonusopportunities. SubmitapplicationtoChrisCramer. ApplyonlineatBillCramerGM.com orcall850-747-7613toschedule anappointment. BenetsInclude:401K,GroupMedicalInsurance,PaidHolidaysandVacationsplusmoreBillCramer ChevroletCadillacB uickGMC 2251W23rdSt,PanamaCity,FLDRUG-FREEWORKPLACE,DMVCHECKAND EOE. 1126933 TruckDriving Position CDLRequired. Routesupanddown theEastcoast. Applyinperson 234E.BeachDror Call850-769-4658

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, February 20, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e ex p e r ts h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s ar o u n d an d are o er i ng t h em t o y ou i n R e a l E s t at e P i c k s! D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M ex i c o B e a c h P o r t S t J o e Ap al a c h i c o la C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I sl an d C ar r a b e l l e an d s u r r o u n din g are a s Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast MLS 250905 ST GEORGE ISLAND $538,000 T his c ust om built home in the Plan ta tion, nestled among na tiv e I sland v egeta tion and just a shor t w alk t o the G ulf of Me xic o f ea tur es a spacious living/dining/ k it chen ar ea with a gas r eplac e on the rst lev el as w ell as t w o bedr ooms and ba ths S ec ond oor is a full mast er bedr oom and ba th with jett ed tub and huge w alk -in closet T her e is a lof t sitting ar ea with sleeper sofa tha t c ould be o c e or cr af ts r oom. T his home w as designed f or out door living with por ches and sitting ar eas t o enjo y the beautiful views of the G ulf A lar ge priv a t e hea t ed pool adds t o the out door enjo ymen t Plan ta tion clubhouse t ennis c our ts and pool just one str eet a w a y B oth tile and c arpet thr oughout house and tiled ba thr ooms D imensions w er e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .southerncharmsgi.com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249957 $129,000 St. George Island S E C O N D T I E R L O T L o c at e d o n t h e s o u t h s i d e o f E a s t G u l f B e a c h D r i ve d i r e c t l y o n t h e b i k e p at h o n l y o n e l o t a w a y f ro m t h e c o r n e r o f 6 t h S t r e e t f o r q u i c k b e a c h a c c e s s t h i s l o t i s 1 / 3 a c r e m e a s u r i n g 1 0 0 x 1 5 0 b u i l d n o w o r h o l d a s i n ve s t m e n t L i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y 4516382 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250296 $269,900 St. George Island I S L AND G E T A W A Y 3 B R 1 1 / 2 B A h o m e i n q u i e t a r e a o f I s l a n d N e w m e t a l ro o f & d e c k B e a u t i f u l y a r d w i t h m a n i c u r e d L i ve O a k s & L a r g e P i n e O a k c a b i n e t s & i s l a n d i n k i t c h e n f u r n i s h e d 2 c a r u n d e r h o u s e g a r a g e w i t h w o r k s h o p / s t o r a g e w i t h 8 2 5 s q f t a r e a W e s t P i n e A ve n u e 29,000 $(( + $(( 4516218 REDUCED MAK E AN OFF ER & -' ) ) & " % -' # " % ' * ' % ' -' ' % MLS# 249088 $275,000 401 St. James A ve. #10 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Get read y for spring shing! Beautiful 2 bedroom/2.5 ba th unit in Riverside a t Carrabelle. Unit comes with a designa ted boa t slip with 10,000 lb. boa t lift. Currently the least expensive river front to wn home a vailable in Carrabelle. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 250890 $365,000 1308 Azalea Dr St. Geroge Island St. George Island, FL 32328 Cozy 3 bedroom/2 ba th beach cotta ge with priva te pool loca ted in St. George Planta tion sitting on a beautiful vegeta ted lot with easy beach access. Good rental histor y! Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 249258 $139,000 31 Re x Buzzett St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Check out this remodeled 3 bedroom/2 ba th home in a quiet area of A palachicola sitting on 4 city lots. Grea t property for 1st time home buyer or investment. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 249979 $135,000 196 7th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 W ell maintained 4 bedroom / 1 ba th home loca ted in North Historic District. Separa te building on property could be converted into a guest cotta ge. Conveniently loca ted near do wnto wn shops and restaurants. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 R eal E sta t e P icks “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) On being the largest carved one in the world, what main color is the “Millennium Sapphire”? Blue, Pink, Black, Yellow 2) The busiest international telephone route is between the U.S. and what country? Canada, Mexico, India, U.K. 3) “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin died after being stung by what sea creature? Barracuda, Stingray, Tunicate, Oarsh 4) As created in 1866 what’s the oldest brand of ginger ale still being sold? Canada Dry, Blenheim, Vernor’s, Schweppes 5) Which region’s airport has the world’s largest terminal building? London, Chicago, Sydney, Hong Kong 6) Bill Klem and Bruce Froemming were the rst two umpires in MLB history to work how many games? 2,000; 3,000; 5,000; 7,000 7) In TV’s “Everybody Loves Raymond” what was Ray’s last name? Martin, Simon, Calvo, Barone 8) Rip Van Winkle sleeps for 20 years in what author’s story? Longfellow, Irving, Poe, Thoreau 9) Statistically what’s the worst state for auto-deer collisions? S. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Pennsylvania 10) Which of these means a long word? Sesquipedalian, Ratite, Concordant, Annatto 11) What’s the most losses in a season in which a MLB pitcher won the Cy Young Award (Gaylord Perry)? 7, 9, 13, 16 12) Which state eats twice as much ice cream per capita than the rest of the nation? Alaska, Florida, Arizona, New Jersey 13) What was the rst Western TV series to be televised in color? Rieman, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, Laredo 14) Actress Teri Hatcher was at one time a cheerleader for which NFL team? Falcons, Broncos, 49ers, Seahawks ANSWERS 1) Blue. 2) Canada. 3) Stingray. 4) Vernor’s. 5) Hong Kong. 6) 5,000. 7) Barone. 8) Irving. 9) Pennsylvania 10) Sesquipedalian. 11) 16. 12) Alaska. 13) Bonanza. 14) 49ers. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Eastpoint library closes temporarily At Tuesday’s county commission meeting, Library Director Anne Birchwell told commissioners she closed the Eastpoint branch of the Franklin County Public Library temporarily due to construction on the site. Birchwell said that when she arrived at the library on Monday, Jason White Construction had removed the fencing surrounding the stormwater drainage ponds and was in the progress of repairing them. Birchwell said the work was ordered last April but has been postponed due to bad weather. She said she was concerned both about the exposed ponds and the liability of having patrons visit the library while heavy equipment was in operation. Commissioners asked Sheriff Mike Mock to put the county’s portable road sign on the site, warning that the library was closed, and to place trafc cones at the entry. In a telephone interview Wednesday, Birchwell said the fences were being restored but it was unclear when the work would be complete. She said she believed the library would reopen by the end of the week. She advised patrons to call the library at 6704423 to be sure it was open before coming.