The Apalachicola times

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00257

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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VOL. 128 ISSUE 42 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County third grade teacher Katrina Ham is making a colorful splash with her students, and for that feat she was named ‘Teacher of the Year’ at a banquet Monday night. For her rst nine years in the district, initially at Brown Elementary straight out of Florida State, she taught strictly rst graders. Until this year, when she was tasked to teach third grade for the rst time. “It was a blank canvas,” she said, in remarks By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Apalachicola city commissioners last month accepted a guaranteed minimum price of a little more than $2 million to make improvements to the Scipio Creek Boat Basin. The contractor, PSBI, of Tallahassee, said it would complete the project by November. Before the commissioners unanimously approved the GMP, City Administrator Betty TaylorWebb outlined how the construction work had to be scaled back to t into the total budget of $2.56 million, funded mainly through $1.86 million in federal economic development funds, about a half million dollars in community development block grants from the state and $215,000 in the city’s contribution through the revolving loan fund. Administration by the Apalachee Regional Planning Council costs about $100,000, with another $311,000 going to Inovia, the project engineer. The scope of work allowed for a city contingency allocation of $138,000 to go toward the purchase of a travel lift. Plus, there’s more than $96,000 in PSBI’s contingency as construction manager that could go toward a lift. PSBI President Aaron Boyette said his rm worked with city ofcials and Inovia to alter the design, which called for eliminating the proposed repair building and dock and a freestanding building for an ice house. “On every project, balancing the design with the available funding is always a challenge,” he said. “The changes made by the design team were architectural only; the intended function and uses are consistent with the grant funding requirements. “The original building aesthetics included board and batten architectural elements, but due to funding limitations, all the Scipio Creek to soon improve By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Plans to lease Carrabelle’s Hexaport building are on hold until a special city commission meeting on Feb. 18. At Carrabelle’s regular city meeting Feb. 6, several commissioners asked questions about the business practices of the Gulf Unmanned Systems Center (GUSC), which wants to lease the Hexaport building off Airport Road. The 65,000 square foot structure has remained empty since modular home manufacturer Greensteel declared bankruptcy in 2009. Carrabelle secured grants to nance the construction of the factory building in hopes of securing jobs. At last week’s meeting, GUSC President Bruce McCormack requested city endorsement of an addendum modifying the existing lease on the building. Centennial Bank took possession of the lease during bankruptcy proceedings against the former tenant. According to City Attorney Dan Hartman, McCormack is attempting to buy the lease but cannot do so until the addendum is approved. Once the plant is secured, according to their business plan, GUSC will spend almost $900,000 on upgrades and improvements over the rst year as it prepares its dronetesting center McCormack told commissioners Centennial has accepted his terms and wants to move forward with the transaction. BRUCE MCCORMACK Carrabelle grills GUSC on Hexaport plan See HEXAPORT A3 See SCIPIO A3 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Gov. Rick Scott last week appointed Apalachicola Bay Charter School Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin to represent Franklin County on the Gulf Coast State College district board of trustees. If con rmed by the Florida Senate, Kirvin’s term would run two years, from Feb. 7 until the end of May 2016. She succeeds retired educator and school board member Denise Butler, who completed two fouryear terms, beginning in 2004. In 2011, she was elected to a twoyear term as chair of the trustee board, and Scott chose not make an appointment in 2012, to allow her to complete her chairmanship of that board. “This governor doesn’t like you to go beyond your two terms,” Butler said. “I got a lot of support from the Republican Party and Rep. (Jimmy) Patronis to allow me to complete my term.” Butler said she and Gulf County’s Ralph Roberson, who succeeded Butler as chair of the Gulf Coast board, encouraged Kirvin to apply because of her educational background. A graduate of Apalachicola High School, who Butler taught civics to in the ninth grade, Kirvin, 42, earned an associate’s degree in 1991 from Gulf Coast Community College, the original name DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Elizabeth Kirvin, left, and her husband, Stacy, shared a table at Sunday evening’s Chef Sampler, with Gulf Coast State College President Jim Kerley, center, and Denise Butler, right, and her husband, Cliff. Elizabeth Kirvin succeeds Butler as GCSC trustee TEACHER OF THE YEAR WORK IN PROGRESS PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Katrina Ham reacts after her name was announced as “Teacher of the Year,” with Spencer Tolbert at right. Katrina Ham named district’s ‘Teacher of the Year’ Jody Buzier, right, talks with colleague Barbara Shiver after Monday’s banquet. See TEACHER A5 See KIRVIN A5 The joy of eating, A2 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 African-American History Festival this weekend The Hillside Coalition Of Laborers for Apalachicola (H’COLA) invites you to the 11th annual AfricanAmerican History Festival this Friday through Sunday at Franklin Square in Apalachicola. Come experience the excitement of live entertainment, vendor exhibits, food booths, inspirational speakers, arts, crafts, music, dance and more. H’COLA’s annual festival showcases Apalachicola and Franklin County’s unique African-American history while celebrating the national recognition of African-American History Month. The festival opens at 4 p.m. Friday and kicks off with The ’70s Throwback Costume Party and continues with Saturday’s main day activities. The festival parade begins at 10 a.m., with live entertainment all day and concludes Sunday with outdoor worship at noon. For more information, call 323-0544 or 653-7515 Dixie Theater opens professional season Apalachicola’s Dixie Theater opens its professional stage season this weekend with two comic shows running in repertory through the rst weekend of March. The play “Almost, Maine,” a work by John Cariani comprising nine short plays that explore love and loss in a remote, mythical almosttown called Almost, Maine, is on stage at 8 p.m. Friday and at 3 p.m. Saturday and Wednesday. The play “Mrs. Mannerly” is a hilarious comedy by Jeffrey Hatcher, who recounts his experiences studying manners and etiquette as a 10-year-old as taught by a very demanding and controlling teacher.. It takes the stage at 8 p.m. Saturday. The shows continue the last two weekends of the month. All tickets are $25. Tickets can be reserved by calling the box of ce at 653-3200. For more information, visit www.dixietheatre.com. xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxx African-American xxxxx Thursday, February 13, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, February 13, 2014 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D 1[TvyRv ’x_ Zx_ RmX „x_ Rx x_[ 1avwx Kmax[X ?[x_pXawx -_yvV_ Gpvx Ix 8p[ /[w[vx J_[Rx[v † 1[TvyRv …x_ Šx_ RmX $x_ Rx x_[ Ix 2[pv][ 5wgRmX 1av[_pyw[ JaVd[x GvaV [ Š ’x_ RmX Zx_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rx ’† sj „x_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rx †† sj …x_ RmX Šx_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rw ’† sj $x_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rx †† sj JaVd[xw jR T[ syvV_Rw[X Rx /p{m xp{m +ppdw am )sRgRV_aVpgR J_[ +yxg[v )][mV am 0Rwxsp amx -RvvRT[gg[ 8ymVxapm Bp BRj[ -R\[ +ppdw 6 ?pv[ am Gpvx Ix 8p[ RmX -RvaTT[Rm -p\\[[ am ?[}aVp +[RV_ J_aw [z[mx aw \ymX[X am sRvx T x_[ 1vRmdgam -pymx Jpyvawx /[z[gpsj[mx -pymVag The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department and the Franklin County Sherriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Jan. 28 Danny L. Itzkovitz, 49, Apalachicola, workers compensation fraud (FCSO) Jan. 31 Austin R. Smith, 20, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Jason P. James, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Heather A. Millender, 34, Apalachicola, Jackson County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Feb. 1 Kristi J. Basford, 35, Bristol, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Thomas A. Keith, 55, Carrabelle, three counts of sale/ harvest of saltwater products while SPL under suspension (FCSO) Feb. 4 Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, operating a tattoo establishment without a license and Marion County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Tanith L. White, 30, Carrabelle, trespass after warning (FCSO) Alvin Marks, 42, Sumatra, grand theft (FCSO) Christal Wallace, 38, Carrabelle, Leon County warrant for fraudulent use of a credit card (FCSO) Willie F. Baucham, 57, Apalachicola, grand theft (APD) Feb. 5 Luke T. Gruver, 34, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Rachel L. Bateman, 28, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) Adrienne R. Joyner, 30, Eastpoint, Okeechobee County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Feb. 6 Jason C. Shuman, 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Joshua D. Bell, 29, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Patrick L. Poteete, 26, Lanark Village, harvesting oysters in unclassied area, falsication of shellsh tags, and sale of unlawful product (FCSO) Feb. 7 Cawanna M. Messer, 31, Carrabelle, petit theft (FCSO) Wendy M. Smith, 40, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Charles K. Barnes, Jr., 22, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Feb. 10 John A. Dean, 18, Apalachicola, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Ronald D. Gray, 27, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@starfl.com The food was as tantalizing as it has been every year for the nearly two decades of the Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, but the beverages Sunday night had a new addition. The Oyster City Brewing Company, a craft brewery about to start delivering beer made fresh in downtown Apalachicola, served up two beverages to the crowd that filled the Fort Coombs Armory in this 18th annual fundraiser for the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce. Bo Walker, Oyster City’s brewmaster, and Rex Humphreys, who coowns the Owl Caf and the Tap Room, which is creating the new brewery, poured two beers about to make their debut next month: Mill Pond Blonde and Hooter Brown Ale, the latter made from tupelo honey. The spent grain from the beverages had been used to make bread, that was slathered with sweet tomato kraut and spread with stone ground mustard and topped with bratwurst. The food was among more than a dozen restaurants, which offered such things as homemade fish dip, and scallops, shrimp and rice (Apalachicola Seafood Grill); Grouper Rockefeller (Blue Parrot Oceanfront Caf), potato soup and crostino (The Bridge at Bay St Joe), desserts (Caf con Leche), fish dip and sushi (Caroline’s Dining on the River), salmon and tuna tartare (Sunset Coastal Grill), oysters on the halfshell (Eddy Teach’s Raw Bar), sweet potato bisque (Ira’s at the Gibson Inn), crab cakes (Crooked River Grill), sushi and ceviche (Tamara’s Caf) and blackened mahi-mahi and gluten-free vegan pizza (Up the Creek Raw Bar). Beverages were served by Southern Wine & Spirits, Lewis Bear Company and Republic National Distributing Company. Table designers included Kathy Andrews and Lois Huff; Mandy Andrews; Apalachicola Municipal Library’s Caty Greene; Up the Stairs and the Backstreet Trading Company’s Judi Stokowski: Bayside Gallery & Florist’s Amy Price; Centennial Bank’s BJ Kent; the Florida Seafood Festival; the Franklin County Schools’ Nina Marks; Bonnie Fulmer; Gulf Coast State College and the Butler Insurance Agency; Route 66’s Jan & Wes Houser, and Dot & Bob Wilcoxon; Panache Tent & Event’s Elizabeth and Rich Wynn; Party Rental Company’s Shelly James; Petunia’s Pet Store and the Dixie Theatre Foundation; Butch Rowell; Sacred Heart Hospital’s Paulina Pendarvis; and Studio B’s Barb Ward New brew highlights Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler DAVID ADLER ER S TE TE IN | The Times Top Left: Bo Walker, left, and Rex Humphries offer the newest work of The Oyster City Brewing Company. Top Right: Brett Gormley, chef at Up The Creek Raw Bar, presents a gluten-free veggie pizza, made with zucchini atop atbread. Bottom: Debbie Fletcher, head of the Franklin County School’s culinary arts program, stands with two students who worked the event, Aaliyah West, left, and Sierra Shattuck.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, February 13, 2014 HEXAPORT from page A1 Commissioner Olivia Massey was the rst to question McCormack. She asked if he planned to hire 10 employees immediately after the lease was signed. McCormack said he did, and Massey said she was disappointed in the employ ees who have so far been hired. “We have a different de nition of local people,” she said. McCormack said 95 per cent of the people who have applied for work with GUSC live in Carrabelle. Massey said that a couple just hired had only recently moved to St. George Island. Mayor Curley Messer and Commissioners Bren da La Paz and Charlotte Schneider all expressed concern newly arrived indi viduals had taken two of the jobs. “I’m concerned about the local people. We have some very qualied people in Car rabelle,” Messer said. McCormack said the two new employees were highly qualied. He said he is trying to hire local work ers and is working with Gulf Coast State College’s Advance Training Center to develop a program to train machinists, welders, com posite workers and other specialists. “We know that we have to train,” he said. La Paz next questioned the contents of a business plan McCormack sent to the city. She read part of a description of the dronetesting center in the plan, written in present tense. “You are giving the im pression that you are al ready here and operating,” she said. McCormack said inves tors understood it was a proposal, not a description of an existing facility. La Paz next pointed out a discrepancy in the online posting for the center with the state’s Division of Cor porations. She noted the state listing referred to Gulf Unmanned Systems Center as Gulf Coast Unmanned Systems Center. La Paz asked if there were two companies. Hartman said the differ ence in the “doing business as” name was not an impor tant discrepancy. La Paz asked why Hart man’s name is listed on the business plan as a member of the board of directors for GUSC. Hartman and Mc Cormack both said this was a typographical error and the name should have been removed from the list. McCormack said the copy of the plan he forward ed last week to Carrabelle City Hall was prepared in Oct. 2012 for Dr. Brice Har ris at the University of West Florida who oversaw a grant program. “Dan was included as a local contact for him,” said McCormack. La Paz, Schneider and Massey said Hartman’s name on the list gave the impression of impropriety. “I would like a job and my husband would too, but we thought it would be a con ict of interest,” La Paz said, Hartman said he had never been on the GUSC board, and to serve there would be an illegal conict of interest. Messer said he did not believe Hartman had committed any impropriety. In a telephone interview Monday, Hartman said he has recused himself from further involvement in GUSC negotiations and is seeking another attorney to complete the work. La Paz said the business plan was not delivered until Feb. 4, and the budget por tion could not be printed out in the city ofce. She said she wanted more time to re view the proposal. She also requested letter of credit for GUSC and wanted to know who McCormack’s inves tors were. McCormack said he would provide a letter of credit and told La Paz his in vestors, Carolina Financial Securities LLC, are named in the business plan. “I understand your con cerns about inaccuracies,” Economic Development Council director David But ler said. “Plans are plans. He will have a contract. If he doesn’t do what he’s sup posed to, the city can take the building back. This is go ing to be just another busi ness that’s in Carrabelle. “He doesn’t speak for us. If you have a tenant who’s willing to sign a lease, everything else is just ag gravation. If you have con cerns, you need to make a legal arrangement and put it in there,” he said. “I believe in Carrabelle and I think this is a huge op portunity for the city,” Hart man said. “I’ve been working on this for a year and a half,” McCormack said. “All of the money came out of my back pocket. I have not asked the city for anything. Right now, I own 100 percent of my company. At the end of 30 days, I’ll have right at $1 million in investment and that doesn’t count the un dersea facility.” Massey asked her col leagues not to vote on the lease agreement “until ev eryone has had a chance to go over this.” Commissioners voted unanimously to table discus sion of GUSC until a special meeting that had previously been scheduled for Feb. 18. + & & !" $* $ '" " (%. #0 /. $. '. * !%(#)%+#+'(( * $ # ! & & !" $ % # ! # @xq Ž•mŽ Ÿ "“{ "“{ mˆv "“{ Y“A BxŠŽz x Eƒmˆv @~Žx{Š•x YBE The P anhandle Pl a yers Present Tmˆ{mˆv ƒx‹ƒmŸxŽA sŠ… T mˆ{m ˆvƒx TƒmŸ xŽ  TŽ xxˆ“ & $ $ # $ $ Coupon Expir es: 2-28-14 CODE: AP00 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times A view of the Scipio Creek Marina in the fog. SCIPIO from page A1 buildings were required to be modied to open air structures,” he wrote in an email, changing them to structural steel with metal roof systems. “The market pavilion and restroom buildings were combined to maxi mize efciencies and the available funding,” Boyette wrote. “The boat mainte nance building is now slated to be constructed in a future phase as funding becomes available. The boat main tenance yard is consistent with the original design and has not changed in form or function.” Boyette said the ice house has been changed to an open pavilion designed to accommodate a future ice machine once there are no longer private sector op tions. “How the building is used prior to the installa tion of the ice machine is up to the city of Apalachicola and its citizens’ discretion,” Boyette wrote. The only change in the site utilities has been the switch from a gravity ow system to a force main sys tem. “Due to the subsur face soil conditions, a force main will be used,” Boyette said, which he said was a better system under the conditions. Subcontractors on the project include site work (Coastal), fencing (B&T Fencing), concrete (Cathey Concrete), masonry and miscellaneous labor (Sim plerBuilt Inc.), materials (Taylor’s Building Supply), painting (Universal), steel (Jackson-Cook), dock and piling (Nature Bridges), plumbing and site utilities (RotoRooter) and electrical work (Electrotech).

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Carrabelle ‘Wilderness of the Whiners’ Wait, wait… I just heard a jet plane y over my air space! Quick, stop all commercial air travel. Carrabelle will no longer be the “Pearl of the Panhandle” but rather the “Wilderness of the Whiners.” Waah Waah Waah. Keep Franklin County 1950, but make sure Uncle Sam gives us 2014 dollars. John Hitron Carrabelle Young people ripe for intellectual challenge I had the gratifying experience today and yesterday visiting with students and teachers at the Franklin County community high school. I was invited by Mrs. Howze-Jones to talk with some of classes who are studying the Holocaust, and particularly Kristallnacht, whose 75th commemoration is currently taking place. The Holocaust Education Organization in Tallahassee is sponsoring an essay contest for middle and high school students for all of the eastern Panhandle schools, and Mrs. HowzeJones is trying to encourage some of her students to enter, hence her interest in teaching the Holocaust, and genocide. I was privileged to visit Lydia Countryman’s class last May, and that also was a very satisfying experience. First of all, I feel a responsibility to expose today’s young people to this great human tragedy, before it is erased from our consciousness by the passing of time. So I was so appreciative of the responses from the teachers and students. I spoke with four classes yesterday and today. The students were bright, inquisitive, very involved, and highly motivated. Few had met Jews, and knew little about Judaism, the Jewish people, Jewish history, and the Holocaust. Their questions and comments were thoughtful, caring, and deeply motivated. These young people seemed so ripe for intellectual challenge, and learning about the signi cant issues of our times, socially, politically, economically, etc. I was impressed with the open and caring relationship between students and teachers, and the commitment expressed by the teachers to expose these young people to the best that education can provide. I was quite honestly pleasantly surprised by the caliber of teachers and students, given all the negative publicity in the community, and the fact of the D rating. Whatever investment from the county to challenge and support these youngsters to strive and reach their potentials is well worth it. They are too precious a future resource to not do whatever is necessary to make this school excellent. The committed faculty and students deserve nothing less. Chuck Itzkovitz Apalachicola Get on board with the board For the past ve years or so I have been attending more and more Weems Memorial Hospital board meetings and almost without exception, I am the only person there from the general public in attendance. That’s a shame because the hospital (along with the ambulance service and clinic) are essentially a $6 million business (what it actually spends) losing another $2-million-plus lled in by your taxes. It needs, it demands citizen and commissioner involvement. While I and my organization have been deeply concerned the Weems system has systemic nancial problems, we understand that it is the will of some to push forward with a revitalized and renovated hospital expected to cost in the $10 million to $12 million range. As such, I have worked with both the Weems board and hospital staff on means and methods to ensure that the project can be built to budget and without surprises, such as the consolidated school debacle that ran over budget by some estimates $8 million to $10 million. Back in September I suggested that the hospital board look into the design/build method of construction vs. the lump sum bidding process that caused the school problems, and yesterday the board approved a $14,000 Phase One contract with Adams Management Services, Inc. to do so. I have also known (as the hospital board has also known) for some time that nancial controls at Weems are out of control. Weems is on its third accounting situation in the last 12 months and no one at this time has con dence in the nancial numbers generated. At Friday’s board meeting at Weems, the latest nancial report for last year (there are no current numbers beyond that) show an operating loss of $2.25 million before subsidies and other revenue in-kind that reduces the net loss to $515,615. We were also informed that these numbers are not likely to be nal, with further amendments to follow. In September I did ask the board to consider refraining from committing hundreds of thousands of dollars they don’t have to any project until they were comfortable that they had a handle on their nances and knew how they were going to pay debt service on an expensive new project. At least one board member reacted negatively to my comment and stated that the community expected their new hospital and there was no time for delay. I disagreed politely. At the board meeting Feb. 7, that very same board member proposed what I will term the “Allan Rule,” which a modi ed version was passed by the board that limits public comments to three minutes at the beginning of each meeting. That is a worthless subterfuge that effectively bars public participation in front of the hospital board. The Board of County Commissioners does not follow this method and usually allows limited public comment on an issue-by-issue basis and at the end of each county commission meeting. Why the difference here? The Board of County Commissioners’ meetings don’t usually have a lot of people wanting to speak either, but they do invite everyone to speak their piece. Why should it be any different with a board of well-meaning but sometimes overwhelmed and underequipped hospital board members to hear contrarian or supportive views by a public of one for a few minutes once a month? Near the end of the meeting and after the vote to limit participation, that board member in question turned around and said to me “We are a deliberative body and should not take advice from non-board members. If you want to talk, get on the board.” What do you think commissioners? It’s your board! Allan J. Feifer President. Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 13, 2014 A Page 4 Section By Mickie Anderson Special to the Times Floridians value water, almost as much as they value money and their health -just don’t ask them to time themselves in the shower. An online survey of 516 Floridians found that interest in water ranked third in a list of public issues, just behind the economy and health care, but ahead of taxes and public education. Eighty-three percent of respondents considered water a highly or extremely important issue. The survey respondents were selected to be a demographically representative sample of adult Floridians, said Alexa Lamm, the University of Florida assistant professor who led the survey for the Center for Public Issues Education, or PIE Center. Respondents completed the survey in Dec. 2013. The PIE Center is part of UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Lamm, a faculty member in the department of agricultural education and communication, is the center’s associate director. Jack Payne, UF’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, said it’s important for a large research university where so much scienti c work is being done on water to gauge how well the public understands issues associated with water supply and usage. “We need educated voters at the voting booth, so it’s always good to know the level of understanding our citizens have,” he said. Many critical problems Florida will face in the future revolve around water, he said, including supply, quality and sea-level rise. The survey found that respondents would support some increases in their water utility bills, if the money would help ensure future water supplies. To that end, 69 percent said they would support a 10 percent increase in water bills, if used for that purpose. Perhaps not surprising, support dropped as the bill-hike percentage increased. Only 7 percent of respondents said they would be willing to pay 50 percent more for water to help ensure its supply. Michael Dukes, director of UF/IFAS’ Center for Landscape Conservation and Ecology, said Florida’s growing population will mean more pressure on state water supplies. “I think we’re going to have to come to a decision point on the use of high-quality drinking water – potable water – to maintain landscapes,” he said. But he noted current UF research working to help offset water problems, including studies on ef cient irrigation, new ways to recapture water, and development of droughttolerant turfgrass varieties. Residents are often now looking for ways to landscape with plants that are attractive and drought tolerant, he said. As was true with last year’s water survey, PIE Center of cials learned that the public has varying amounts of tolerance for giving up creature comforts to enhance conservation. For example, Lamm said, while 75 percent of survey respondents said they would wait until their dishwasher is full to turn it on, 47 percent said they would not put a timer in the bathroom to help remind them to shorten their shower. She said the survey also found that Floridians reported low overall knowledge about some water-related current events, despite media coverage. Only 31 percent of survey respondents were aware of last fall’s decline in commercial oyster production in Apalachicola Bay, and only 26 percent knew that Florida of cials led a lawsuit in October over the state of Georgia’s consumption of fresh water from a river that helps support Florida’s oyster industry, she said. The survey did nd that Floridians support state government efforts to protect water, even if it means resolving disputes in court: 83 percent agreed that state government should protect water, while just 18 percent said it would be a waste of government money to ght legal battles over water rights. The survey is part of a number of water-focused activities scheduled this month. The PIE Center will host a webinar with UF Water Institute Director Wendy Graham on Feb. 25 at 10 a.m. The Water Institute will host a water symposium next week focused on what organizers call “Water Supply Planning in a Non-Stationary World.” The water survey, results and a link to register for the webinar can be found here: www. piecenter.com/water. The PIE Center water survey marked the start of the second year of its publicopinion surveys. Besides water, survey topics have included endangered and invasive species, immigration and public perceptions about food safety, food security and genetically modi ed organisms. Mickie Anderson is a writer for the University of Florida. She can be reached at mickiea@u .edu UF: Floridians largely unaware of oyster decline Special to the Times State Representative Halsey Beshears (R-Monticello) has led HB 611, and act relating to Rural Areas of Opportunity. The bill renames the former Rural Areas of Critical Economic Concern (RACEC) to re ect a more current representation of the collaborative efforts to focus on the economic opportunities and potential in our rural counties. In addition, the bill includes revisions for rural infrastructure awards and quali cations to be more competitive with other states and allows for the development of designated targeted industries for rural counties beginning in 2014 that would be speci c to the region. As Florida’s economy continues to improve and the state invests millions of dollars into economic development activity, rural Florida needs to be a part of the discussion and have the ability to capitalize on business growth and recruitment. A key component in HB 611 is that any county in a RACEC region will automatically be designated an Enterprise Zone. Florida’s Enterprise Zone program was created to encourage capital investment and job creation in distressed areas through tax credits and refunds. They are speci c geographic area targeted for economic revitalization. Of the $16.3 million in state dollars awarded to businesses located in Enterprise Zones, only $2.3 million of those dollars were awarded in Florida’s 32 rural counties. In 2012, the state conducted a study to assess what economic development activities could be formulated to enhance business development in rural Florida. Among the many proposals included in the report was a clear recommendation to expand the Enterprise Zone program in rural Florida. “As part of the rural economic development legislation I have led for the 2014 Session, a number of revisions to the rural Enterprise Zone program are included to boost rural counties’ ability to recruit businesses into these zones,” said Beshears. “Rather than limiting the scope of these zones, we need to expand and designate the entire rural county as an Enterprise Zone. By eliminating limits on where a business can locate, we will create true incentives to grow businesses in our rural regions,” he said. “As our rural counties continue to face difficult challenges in their efforts to improve their economies, it is imperative that we remain proactive in our efforts to compete with urban areas and gain parity for our rural counties in opportunities for growth and progression,” Beshears said. “The modifications in this legislation will help level the playing field to ensure rural Florida has a fighting chance to attract jobs.” County could bene t from enterprise zones HALSEY BESHEARS Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, February 13, 2014 for the school. She went on earn a bachelor of science degree magna cum laude in audiology and speech pa thology from Florida State University in 1993, and a master’s in the subject a year later. Kirvin, a licensed speech language pathologist, was a founding board member of the Bay Community School, beginning in 1999, as well as the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, from 2000 to 2007. She’s served on the board of the Early Learn ing Coalition of Northwest Florida from 1999-2010. After working as a speech language patholo gist for the Franklin County School District in 1995-96, she went into private prac tice and in July 2010 was named the ABC School’s assistant principal. “I am beginning my fourth year as a school administrator and am ex tremely grateful to be part of an amazing school com munity,” she wrote in her application. “I currently serve on the School Advi sory Council at the Franklin County School as well. We are constantly assessing how we can graduate stu dents who are college and career ready.” The governor inter viewed Kirvin before mak ing his selections, Butler said. Scott did the two ap pointments and one re appointment he also an nounced last week. Don Crisp, 71, of Pana ma City Beach, vice presi dent of First American Title Insurance, was named to succeed Danny Estes; Steve Millaway, 57, of Pan ama City Beach, a self-em ployed electrical engineer was named to ll a vacant seat; and David Warriner, 48, of Port St. Joe, owner and president of Tapper & Co., was reappointed, all to terms ending May 2017. “You have to have a will ingness to serve because it’s a lot of work,” said Butler. While Gulf County has three trustees, Kirvin is Franklin County’s lone representative, with the remainder of the ninemember board all from Bay County, She also is one of four trustees selected by Roberson to serve as the county’s lone representa tive on a 15-member presi dential search committee, which also includes com munity members and other non-trustees, that is respon sible for vetting candidates to replace Dr. Jim Kerley, who is retiring July 31. Butler, the rst female from the county to serve on the board of trustees, suc ceeded Leon Bloodworth, who followed Bubba Gan der, the county’s rst Gulf Coast college trustee. following Superintendent Nina Marks’ opening of the envelope that had in it whether this highest honor would go to Ham, middle school science teacher Spencer Tolbert or high school English teacher Sherry Joyner. “I thought ‘What am I going to do?’” said Ham, as she set about bringing to life, a decade into her career, the portrait of learning cast by 8 and 9-year-old children as they interact in the clasp of a teacher’s rm gaze. It was like applying paint, she said, and the art of making what others may see as mere messy spatters on canvas, and may wonder “what in the world?” But once completed, then the artist proclaims ‘Now, look at my masterpiece” and the successful image falls in place, Ham said. She recounted this year’s fresh experience and beamed a wide smile when her name was announced, a contrast to how Jo Alice “Jody” Buzier reacted when Marks read out she was the School-Related Employee of the Year.” Tears streamed in abundance as she quietly sobbed in Marks’ embrace. In a line in front stood the four other employees in con sideration for the top honor, cus todian Charles Justice, food ser vice’s Louise Shiver, secretary Connie Sawyer, and bus driver Patricia Golden. Each held a framed certi cate, and a glass bowl of pennies, with a few big bills thrown in, pre sented by the organizing commit tee co-chaired by Deloris Croom and Harolyn Walker. Once she steadied herself to speak, Buzier recalled how her oncologist suggested she might consider cutting back on work during her cancer treatments, and she was against the idea. “I need to be around people, and people help me though this,” Buzier said. She’s worked as a para-pro fessional for 28 years, earlier at both Brown and Carrabelle. Now her job is to handle elementary school ISS, in school suspension. “It’s the kids that’s bad,” she said. “They’re not allowed to talk. They’re in there to do better, and they do better. They like it. It’s quiet in there.” The stubble on Buzier’s scalp was hidden behind a colorful wool cap. “I’m going to beat it and be done with it,” she said. Sharing her table was her hus band, Demetrius, son, Ryan, and mother, Annie Carolyn Martina. Joyner, now in her fourth year at the high school after 16 years teaching in Calhoun, Ga., di vides her teaching duties at the Eastpoint campus between high school junior and senior English and college English both here and on the Gulf Coast State Col lege campus. Ham said she has some of her earlier students in her class this year. “I taught some of these kids in rst grade,” she said. “It’s cool to see how much they change.” Third grade is the rst year elementary students take the FCAT standardized exam, and Ham said she does not try to em phasize it. “I try not to make it a big deal,” she said. “I know that that’s the stress. I tell them it’s just a test.” Ham, married to Lt. Allen Ham, the county’s 911 coordina tor, graduated from Carrabelle High School in 2000, a student of more than one of the former Teachers of the Year who were in the audience. After two years at Gulf Coast State College, she earned her bachelor’s in education at FSU’s campus in Panama City and has been teaching in the district ever since. “It’s truly a great experience being a teacher,” she said. “I want to shine a light and make a difference and be that change.” Ham is the mother of 6-yearold Sarah and 2-year-old Andrew, who together with her husband, she said “trained me well to have patience.” After a tribute in music by trumpeter Melody Hateld and utist Samantha Marxsen, long time educators who intend to retire this year were recognized: Sharon Boatwright (39 years), Carol Davis (34 years), Eddie Jo seph (34 years) and Linda Mitch ell (31 years). Melanie Humble read a long poem she wrote in tribute to the eight nominees, and after a din ner prepared by the culinary arts students, Angeline Stanley sang a stirring a capella version of “Greatest Love.” Sharon Browning, last year’s School-Related Employee of the Year, presented the ve candi dates, with Marks making the announcement. All told, together the ve employees have 81 years of service to the district. Following that, Laura King, last year’s Teacher of the Year, presented the three candidates, and Marks made the announce ment. All told, together the three teachers have 29 years of service to the school district. NO TICE OF INTENT T O ADOPT COUNTY ORDIN ANCE Notice is hereby gi v en that on February 18, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (ET) at 34 F orbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners shall consider adoption of an ordinance, entitled: AN ORDIN ANCE OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORID A PR OHIBITING OBSTR UCTIONS ON THE BEA CH; REQ UIRING THE CONSPICUOUS AND CONTINUOUS POSTING IN EA CH RENT AL UNIT RENTED BY THE D A Y OR WEEK A CONTINUOUSL Y POSTED SIGN EXPLAINING THE “LEA VE NO TRA CE” ORDIN ANCE PR OHIBITING TENTS AND PERSON AL PR OPER TY ON THE BEA CH A T NIGHT AND W ARNING BEA CHGOERS THA T UN A TTENDED PR OPER TY LEFT WILL BE DEEMED DISGARDED BY THE O WNER AND MA Y BE REMO VED AND DISPOSED OF BY THE A UTHORITIES; A UTHORIZING THE DIRECT OR OF ADMINISTRA TIVE SER VICES T O APPR O VE THE FORM AND SUBST ANCE OF SUCH SIGNS; EST ABLISHING THE TIMEFRAME DURING WHICH UN A TTENDED ITEMS SHALL BE PR OHIBITED ON THE BEA CH; CLARIFYING THE ORDIN ANCE’S INTENT T O APPL Y T O UN A TTENDED ITEMS OF PERSON AL PR OPER TY LEFT ON THE BEA CH A T NIGHT ; REPEALING ALL ORDIN ANCES IN CONFLICT ; PR O VIDING AN EFFECTIVE D A TE. The public is in vited to attend this public hearing and comment on the proposed ordinance. The proposed ordinance is on le with, and may be vie wed at, the ofce of the Clerk of Court at the Franklin County Courthouse, which is located at 33 Mark et Street, Apalachicola, Florida. The meeting room is handicap accessible, ho we v er those requiring special assistance to attend the meeting must contact Michael Moron, deputy clerk, at 850-653-8861, e xt. 100, at least three days prior to the meeting. An yone wishing to appeal an y decision made at this meeting are responsible for making arrangements for a v erbatim transcript of the proceedings. T h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i v e s e a l e d bid s f r o m a n y q u a l i e d pe r s on c o m pa n y or c or p or a t i on i n t e r es t e d i n c ons t r u c t i n g : C R 3 7 0 RE V E T M EN T REP A I R P r o j e c t i s l o c a t e d a l o n g C o u n t y R o a d 3 7 0 ( A l l i g a t o r D r i v e ) i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a a n d g e n e r a l l y c o n s i s t s o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 2 0 C Y o f d e b r i s r e m o v a l a n d i n s t a l l a t i o n o f a p p r o x i m a t e l y 5 8 8 C Y o f A l a b a m a C l a s s I I r i p r a p a n d F D O T N o 1 b e d d i n g s t o n e o v e r D 2 l t e r f a b r i c P l a ns a n d spec i c a t i ons c a n b e ob t ai n e d a t P r e bl e R i sh I nc 3 2 4 M a r i n a D r i v e P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C o s t f o r P l a n s a n d Spec i c a t i ons w i l l b e $ 5 0 0 0 pe r se t a n d i s non r e f u n d a bl e C h ec k s s h o u l d b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o P R E B L E R I S H I N C T h e b i d m u s t c o n f o r m t o S ec t i on 2 8 7 1 3 3 ( 3 ) Fl or id a S t a t u t es on pu bl i c e n t i t y c r i m es C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s p r o j e c t w i l l b e 3 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i c e t o P r o ce e d p r ese n t e d t o t h e s u c ce s s f u l bid d e r L i q u id a t e d d am a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e p r o j e c t o n t h e s p e c i e d d a t e w i l l b e s e t a t $ 7 5 0 0 0 p e r d a y P l e a s e i n d i c a t e o n t h e e n v e l o p e t h a t t h i s i s a s e a l e d b i d f o r “ C R 3 7 0 R e v e t m e n t R e p a i r P r o j e c t ” B i d s w i l l b e r e c e i v e d u n t i l 4 : 0 0 p m e a s t e r n t i m e o n M a r c h 3 2 0 1 4 a t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f c e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 a n d w i l l b e o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d o n M a r c h 4 2 0 1 4 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g a t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F L T h e B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e i n f o r m a l i t i e s i n a n y b i d t o a c c e p t a n d / o r r e j e c t a n y o r a l l b i d s a n d t o a c c e p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r j u d g m e n t w i l l b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n r m f o r a p e r i o d o f s i x t y d a y s a f t e r t h e ope n i n g A l l bid d e r s sh al l c o m ply w i t h al l a p pl i c a bl e S t a t e a n d l o c al l a ws c once r n i n g l i ce ns i n g r e gi s t r a t i on a n d r e g u l a t i on o f c on t r a c t or s do i n g bu s i n es s t o t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a I f y o u h a v e a n y q u e s t i o n s p l e a s e c a l l C l a y S m a l l w o o d a t ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 0 0 C R 3 7 0 R E V E T M E N T R E P A I R P RO J E C T # 0 07 1 07 NO T I C E T O R E C E I V E S E A L E D B I D S 2 5 % O F F ( wit h c o u p o n) P A I N T S & S T A I N S F E B R U A R Y 6 – 2 4 L O V E T H A T C O L O R MO N F R I: S AT : 8 S U N: 10 A M T O 6 PM S t o r e h o u r s m a y v a r y S e e s t o r e f o r d e t a i l s S T ORE H O U R S : F i n d a s t or e n ea r y ou a t s he r w i n w i l l i a m s .c o m S A V E 1 5 % O N PA IN T ING SU PP LIES Bring this c oup on in and sav e! S A V E 2 5 % O N PA IN T S & S TA INS V a l i d o n r e t a i l s a le s o f r e t a i l pr o d u c t s o n ly D i s c o u n t t a k e n o o f o u r l i s t p r i c e S a l e p r i c i n g o r o t h e r o e r s t h a t r e s u l t i n g r e a t e r s a v i n g s w i l l s u p e r s e d e t h i s o f f e r M u s t s u r r e n d e r c o u p o n a t t i m e o f r e d e m p t i o n C a s h v a l u e : 1 / 1 0 0 o f 1 ¢. O e r e x c l u d e s p r e v i o u s p u r c h a s e s a n d p u r c h a s e s o f g i f t c a r d s M u l t i P u r p o s e p r i m e r s M i n w a x W o o d F i n i s h q u a r t s l add e r s s p r a y e q u i p m e n t a n d a c c e s s o r i e s O t h e r e x c l u s i o n s m a y a p p l y s e e s t o r e f o r d e t a i l s V o i d i f t r a n s f e r r e d p u r c h a s e d s o l d a l t e r e d o r d u p l i c a t e d o r w h e r e p r o h i b i t e d b y l a w V a li d a t Sh e r w i n W i lli a ms a n d Sh e r w i n W i lli a m s o p e r a t e d r e t a i l p a i n t s t o r e s o n l y W e r e s e r v e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t r e f u s e o r l i m i t t h e u s e o f a n y c o u p o n O e r v a l i d 2 / 6 / 1 4 – 2 / 2 4 / 1 4 2 0 1 4 T h e S h e r w i n W i l l i a m s C o m p a n y 4 51 6 2 0 3 dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ I€ :qq €… 3€ˆ‹ As I€ Nqn €Žq…“ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Young Andrew Ham gets a hello from Jody Buzier, left, after he ran to his mother, Katrina Ham, following the Teacher of the Year announcement TEACHER from page A1 “Ms. Jody she bleeds garnet and gold She’s a ghter and feisty and funny and bold You are so much fun; we might choose to be bad To be sent to ISS with our favorite comrade We’re tired of pink and the fuzzy hat So kick cancer’s #@$^% and stomp it down splat.” — The section on Jo Alice Buzier from a longer poem by Melanie Humble on the eight candidates for top employee honors KIRVIN from page A1

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M i s t y i s a gor ge o u s, s w e et, h o u s e tr a i n e d M a lt i p o o S h e i s 1 0 y e a r s o l d b u t d o n t l e t t h a t fo o l y o u s h e i s f u l l of l i fe a n d l o v e S h e i s v e r y a f fe c t io n a t e a n d l o v e s b e l l y r u b s a n d w a l k s F o r t h o s e of y o u t h a t a t t en d e d t h e M a r d i G r a s P a r ad e i n A p a lc h a fe w w e ek s ag o s h e w a s t h e M a r d i G r a s Q u e en S o i f y o u w o u l d l i k e t o ad o p t r o y a lt y p l e a s e c o m e m e e t h e r m a j e s t y V o l u n te e r s a r e d e s p e r a te l y n e e d e d to s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g to b r i n g o n e o f o u r a n i m a l s i n to t h e i r h o m e to b e f o s te r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o ul d b e g re a tl y a p p re ci a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a te R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n to t h e w e b s i te a t w w w f o r g o t te n p e t s o r g to s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p et s 227.7847 Franklin County Humane Society S e e Y o u r Bu s in e s s Name a n d I n f o Her e f o r O N L Y $ 1 5 p e r w e ek $ 6 0 p e r m o n t h Ca l l T o d a y D on t f or g e t V a l e nt i n e s D a y Flo wers,Roses and Gift Bask ets 51 Mark et St., Suite A Apalac hicola, FL ( 850 ) 899-1588 S t G e o r g e Isl a nd, $ 3 5 9 0 0 0 B u i l t 2 0 0 4 1 9 0 3 S F p l u s 4 0 0 S F b u n k r oo m & s t o r a g e 3 B R 2 b a t hs 3 h a l f b a t hs o f c e a r e a v a u l t ed c ed a r c e i l i n g 5 s k yl i g h t s w h i rl p oo l t u b 2 p o r c h e s 2 o pen d e c k s F o r mo r e i n f o co n t a c t o w n er z e b z e b r ow s k i@ g m ail .c o m 2 2 5 2 2 9 1 2 5 2 N o ti c e o f S p e c i a l M e e ti n g T h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e w i l l c o n d u c t a s p e c i a l m e e t i n g s c h e d u l e d f o r 4 : 0 0 p m E S T o n F e b r u a r y 1 8 2 0 1 4 a t C i t y H a l l C a r r a b e l l e M un ic i p a l C omp l e x 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e n u e Ca r r a b e l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 T h e p u r p o s e o f t h e m e e t i n g w i l l b e t o r e v i e w a n d a d o p t t h e C omm un it y R e d e v e l opm e n t P l a n upd a t e Pub l ic p a r t ic i p a t i on, c omm e n t a n d r e c omm e n d a t i on s a r e e n c our a ge d T h e C R A P l a n u p d a t e i s a v a i l a b l e f o r r e v i e w o n t h e C i t y w e b s i t e a t m y c a r r a b e l l e c o m a n d a t C i t y H a l l W e w i l l b e h o l d i n g o u r r e g u l a r l y s c h e d u l e d C R A m e e t i n g a t 5 : 0 0 p m. A n y i n t e r e s t e d p e r s o n m a y c o n t a c t t h e C i t y C l e r k a t 8 5 0 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 w i t h q u e s t i o n s r e g a r d i n g t h i s N o t i c e o r t h e C R A m e e t i n g d ur i n g nor m a l b u s i n e s s hour s 8 : 3 0 a. m. t h r ou g h 4 : 3 0 p m. M on d a y t h r ou g h F r i d a y a t t h e Ca r r a b e l l e M un ic i p a l C o m p l e x 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e n u e C a r r a b e l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 SP E C I A L RE Q U I RE MEN T S : If y o u r e q u i r e sp e c i a l a i d o r s er vi c es a s a d d r e s s e d i n t h e A m e r i c a n D i s a b i l i t i e s A c t p l e a s e c o n t a c t t h e C i t y C l e r k ’ s O f c e n o l e s s t h a n v e ( 5 ) d a y s p r i o r t o t h e a b o v e s t a t e d h e a r i n g d a t e Society A6 | The Times Thursday, February 13, 2014 Amanda Granger, Matt Kelley to wed March 8 Morgan Hunter and Marci Kelley, along with Ryan and Logan Granger, are proud to announce the upcoming marriage of their parents, James Matthew Kelley to Amanda Glass Granger. The wedding will take place on Saturday, March 8, 2014 at 6 p.m. at Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road, Apalachicola. All friends and family are invited to attend. No local invitations are being sent out. Wedding Happy BIRTHDaA Y A milestone for Kristin On Monday, Feb. 3, Kristin Anderson celebrated her landmarked 70th year at Benedict Hall surrounded by her friends. More than 100 people attended the gala event catered by Renee Bacot. The party was a gift from Kristen’s longtime friend Randy Mims. Born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, she graduated from Portland State College, in Oregon in 1966 with a bachelor of arts in painting. She taught silversmithing in Oregon and Wisconsin before founding her workshop, Kristinworks in 1971. She earned a master’s of ne arts in art metal from the University of Wisconsin in 1974. She traveled the country showing and selling her work at major art fairs from 1971 through1985, when she moved to Apalachicola and founded Long Dream Gallery.DD AVID ID A D D LER R S T T E I I N | The TimesMax BB ridges turns 2 Max Breaux Bridges celebrated his second birthday on Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014. He is the son of Chris and Renae Bridges; and the grandson of Alvin and Kathy Martina of Apalachicola, Denise Johnson of Bristol and Bernarr Bridges of Blountstown. He is the greatgrandson of the late Buddy and Evelyn Martina, Red and the late Betty Hilton, the late William and Lora Anne Bareld, and Bruce and the late Quinnon Bridges. If you have forgotten how it feels like to laugh, there’s a reminder for you. It’s pinned behind a magnet like a note on the refrigerator door, written in bold letters, and it reads “Sweetie, let’s see the show at the rehouse this weekend. I hear it’s hilarious.” Just as you wouldn’t a bouquet of Valentine’s Day owers, try not to forget that the Panhandle Players’ newest production, “The Kitchen Witches,” is this weekend at the St. George Island rehouse and you shouldn’t miss it. Imagine for a moment a brassy Ukrainian woman who stars in a cooking-show on a small local cable-television station. That’s Dolly Biddle, (Sally Crown), whose rosy cheeks are like two cherries atop a cheery, sentimental, creamy interior, savoring the drama of working alongside her schlemiel TV-producer son Stephen (Torben Madson). Isobel Lomax (Melonie Inzetta), a rival cooking show hostess, has been at odds with Dolly for years, ever since Larry Biddle dated one, married the other and then died. Through the magic of television, and the mute camera work of Rob, The Camera Guy (Liam DeVaughn), the two are cast together in a new show called “The Kitchen Witches” where they go after each other’s’ taste buds as well as their throats. Inzetta, who was slowed by a bout of pleurisy earlier in the week, was replaced in Friday’s show in Port St. Joe by Madson’s wife Sarah, who was said to have done an admirable job. Inzetta bounced back and she proved she’s a sly, straight man match for Crown’s vivacious comedy, and together the two promise another heaping helping this weekend. Madson keeps the play moving with his well-timed delivery, crisp as the crust on the confections the two ladies create. The two-act comedy, written by Caroline Smith, was ably directed by Ann Cowles. Curtain on the show this weekend of the St. George Island rehouse, 324 E Pine Ave, goes up at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday evenings, and 3 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $15. Tickets may be purchased at Downtown Books and at Cafe con Leche in Apalachicola, from The Butler Agency in Eastpoint, and Carrabelle Junction. For more information, call 653-5586. – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Dig in to ‘Kitchen Witches’ this weekendDD AVID ID A D D LER R S T T E I I N | The Times Above: Isobel Lomax (Melonie Inzetta), left, and Dolly Biddle (Sally Crown) have fun in “The Kitchen Witches”DD AVID ID A D D LER R S T T E I I N | The Times Above: TV-producer Stephen Biddle (Torben Madson), right, confronts Isobel Lomax (Melonie Inzetta) in the second act of the “The Kitchen Witches”

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The Times | A7 Thursday, February 13, 2014 Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 R. Micha el Whale y P astor _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Mrs. Bobbie Jean Braxton, age 75, of Eastpoint, passed away Tues day, Feb. 4, 2014 at St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center in Carra belle. Bobbie was born in Clarksville and lived in Eastpoint since 1983, coming from Clarks ville. She was a retired CNA and was a member of the Eastpoint Church of God. Survivors include one son, Ricky Moseley and his wife, Beth, of Eastpoint; two stepdaughters, Patricia Enderton and her hus band, John, of Utah, and Michelle Fleming and her husband, Rick, of Montana; one sister, Pauline Stokes and her hus band, Durwood, of Blountstown; eight grandchildren and nine great-grand children. Funeral services were held Friday morning, Feb. 7 at Eastpoint Church of God with the Rev. Scotty Lolley and Rev. Ronnie Luke ofciating. Interment was in Pippin Cemetery in Clarksville. The family received friends on Friday morning, Feb. 7 from 10 a.m. until ser vice time at the church. All arrangements are under the direction of Mar lon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown. Bobbie Jean Braxton BO bbBB IE JEAN BRAXTON Johnnie Mae Hersey, 75, of Dan ciger, Texas, passed peacefully Friday, Feb. 7, 2014. She was born April 6, 1938 in Douglas, Ga. to John and Alene Kersey. She came to the area in 1956 with her husband in the shrimp ing business. Johnnie Mae attended the Faith Baptist Church in Sweeny, Texas. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband of 50 years, Thom as Jackson Hersey; and two sisters, Nanette Fuller and Emma Stevens. Johnnie Mae is survived by six children, Virginia Toomer and husband Roy, of West Columbia, Texas, Joy Jenkins and husband Bob, of West Columbia, Texas, Thomas Hersey, Jr. and wife Linda, of Crystal Beach, Texas, Kevin Hersey and friend Miguel Santiago of Orlando, David Hersey of Clearwater, and Mat thew Hersey and wife Amy, of Apalachicola; 11 grandchildren; 10 great-grand children; sister, Winnie Manucy of St. Augustine; and many nieces and nephews. The fam ily received friends Wednesday evening at Lakewood Chapel. Fu neral services were Thurs day morning, Feb. 13 at Lakewood Funeral Chapel. Interment followed in West Columbia, Texas. Pallbearers were Thom as Hersey Jr., Kevin Hersey, David Hersey, Matthew Hersey, Roy J. Toomer and Miguel Santiago. Honor ary pallbearers were Roy Toomer, Bob Jenkins, Ron nie Wiley and Cliff Wiley. The family requests in lieu of owers donations to the cancer charity of your choice. Arrangements by the Turner family. On line con dolences may be made to lakewoodfuneralchapel. com. Johnnie Mae Hersey JO hH NNIE MAE HERSEY Alwetter Maria Suddeth, affec tionately known as “Veta,” was born Aug. 24, 1945 to the late Donald Livingston and the late Addie Mae Stephens in Apala chicola. She passed away Dec. 5, 2013. Veta spent her early life as a member of First Born Holiness Church of the Living God where she gave her life to Christ. As an adult she relocated to Pascagoula, Miss. where she worked as a pipetter at Ingall’s Shipyard and a chef at several local restau rants. She later returned to Apalachicola and married Glenn Suddeth. Veta remained in Apala chicola until her health prompted her to move to Moss Point, Miss. with her daughter. Upon returning to Mississippi, Veta at tended New Zion Mission ary Baptist Church when her health allowed. Veta often enjoyed being outside gardening and entertaining her family. She is preceded in death by her parents; brother, Richard Stephens; and granddaughter, Danielle Evans. She leaves to rejoice in her homegoing her husband Glenn Suddeth; daughter Sonja Porter; two granddaughters Avie Porter and Devin Cherry; great-grandson Dashawn Mekell Howard; broth ers John Stephens Jr. (Carolyn), Edward Stephens, Reginald Stephens and Mel vin Stephens; sister Angeline Stanley (James); aunts Annie Mae Scott and Leola Cook; brother-in-law Ronnie Hopps; sis ters-in-law Delores, Frances, Georgiana (Noel), Betty, Brenda, Barbara (Willie), Margaretta and Mary; mother-in-law Mar gie Kelly; special aunties Francella and Cydell; spe cial ex-sister-in-law Mary Stephens; special cousins and friends Mildred, Dora, Josie, Freda, Pam Lewis, Louise, Tesa; and a host of stepchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins and other relatives. The family of the late Alwetter “Veta” Suddeth wishes to extend many thanks and blessings to New Zion Missionary Baptist Church (Moss Point, Miss.) and The Love Center Ministries (Apalachicola) for all your support, prayers and gifts during our time of illness and bereavement. Special thanks to Dr. Blount and the staff of DaVita Dialysis Center of Pascagoula for all your excellent care and to all who touched the life of Alwetter. May God richly bless each of you. There will be a memo rial service at Love Center Church at 1 p.m. on Satur day, Feb. 15. Thank you in advance. The FamilyAA lwetter SS uddeth AA LWETTER S S UDDET hH Frances Brinkley, 81, of Carrabelle, died Friday, Jan. 24, 2014. Visitation was held at Crawford and Moultry Funeral Home on Friday evening, Jan. 31. Services were held Saturday after noon, Feb. 1 at Assembly of God Church in Carrabelle, Florida. Crawford and Moultry Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. Frances Brinkley Martha Ellen “Marty” Brady, 72, passed away on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 surrounded by her loving family in her hometown of Greensboro, N.C. She was born in Guil ford County, N.C. on July 8, 1941, to the late Lawrence Brady and Gladys Beaver Brady. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her sisters, Gladys Marie Brady and Mary Lee Brady Smith. Martha is survived by her sister Lynn; broth ers Ken (wife Sandy) and John Brady; nieces Renea Brady and Lesley Brouil lard; and nephew, Todd Brady. Martha was a member of the rst graduating class of Walter Hines Page High School in Greens boro, NC in 1959. She earned her bachelor’s degree in English from Ap palachian State Teacher’s College in 1963 and began her teaching career as an English teacher in Tampa. She also taught English in Satellite Beach, and in Ma bleton, Ga. before matricu lating at the University of Georgia where she earned a master’s degree in guid ance and counseling. A guidance counselor in Cobb County, Ga., she visited St. George Island with friends and she was instantly captivated by the area. She became a language arts teacher at Chapman Junior High School. Two years later, she transferred to Carrabelle High School as guidance counselor and then to Apalachicola High School where she served from 1976 until her retirement on Oct. 30, 1998. In 1985, Martha earned the Master Teacher Award sponsored by the Florida State Board of Education in recognition of her sub ject area knowledge and instructional performance. In 1998, she was selected by her colleagues as the Teacher of the Year at Apalachicola High School. In addition to Martha’s contributions to children in various Georgia and Florida counties, she was a longtime resident of St. George Island, and the owner of various island businesses. She was a member of the St. George Island Methodist Church and the Franklin County Retired Teachers Association. In keeping with Mar tha’s wishes, no funeral services will be held. A time of remembrance and reection will be scheduled at a later date. The family requests memorial contributions be made to the Martha E. Brady Memorial Scholar ship Fund, c/o Stephnia Turrell, Assistant Vice President, Cadence Bank, N.A., 58 4th Street, Apala chicola, FL 32320. Or to Hospice and Palliative Care of Greensboro, 2500 Summit Avenue, Greens boro, NC 27405. Martha Brady Obituaries Frances Brinkley DD EAThH CA mM E KNO ckCK IN’ Death Came Knockin’ All ready and heaven bound Taken from us all without a sound When Death came knockin’ on Ms. Francis’s door We cry, scream and wail Some collapse upon the oor Quiet now and simmer down Smile, yes smile do not frown Listen…. The music is ringing The choir is up and singing Sure, Death came knockin’ But Ms. Francis is still rockin’ Tribute to a rare gift lost, never forgotten Denis Hightower Aka Mad Monkey Mike In Loving m M E mM ORY Missed you at Bingo last night. Had a good crowd but we could have found you a place to sit and play. Maybe you can join us next week, Feb. 19 at Chillas Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. I started calling speedball at 6:30 p.m. Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon. Chow line forms at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center at noon. Sarge and his crew will have a good lunch prepared for us. Minimum donation $4 will be collected at the desk. Be watching for you. No, we won’t have hamburgers and chips Friday night at the Legion. We will, however, enjoy a steak dinner. The dinner will begin at 5 p.m. Come on down and enjoy the delicious steak, salad, baked potato, dessert and coffee. Your donation of $14 will be collected at the bar. Come on down to Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and enjoy Valentines Day with us. On Saturday, Feb. 1 many friends, family and neighbors gathered at the First Assembly of God church to reect on the life of one of the great ladies of Carrabelle. Frances Reynolds Brinkley was laid to rest. She was a longtime, close friend of mine and will be missed a lot. Pray for Frances’ eternal peace and strength and peace for her family. When I got home from the funeral, there was a message on my machine that another longtime friend of mine and great guy had passed away. Pray for Charles Smith’s eternal peace and for Carolyn’s strength and comfort at this time. This Saturday morning, Feb. 15, your monthly sugar x will be ready for you at the Lanark Village Boat Club. The members will prepare and serve your full breakfast of pancakes/French toast, bacon/sausage, eggs, juice and coffee and still only $5. Be watchin’ for ya! There has been a change in bandleaders at the Feb. 15 Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Craig K and crew will provide the music. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come in the door. So come on down Saturday night to the Legion. That’ll be the place to be. Come on over to Chillas Hall Sunday afternoon Feb. 16 and join us for our monthly covered dish luncheon. Just bring your favorite recipe to share, a donation and your growling stomach. The door will open at 12:30 p.m. and lunch will be served at 1 p.m. Hope you can make it. A spaghetti dinner last Saturday was a complete sell out. We all had a good time visiting and enjoying the meal. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club wish to thank you all for your support. I already bought my ticket for the 22nd annual Community Breakfast. The door at Chillas Hall will open at 8 a.m. and close at 11 a.m. The gentlemen will prepare and serve pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, French toast, juice and coffee. All for a donation of $6. After you have enjoyed your breakfast, sashay over to the bake sale table and pick up something to top off your lunch. Yum! Yum! Remember all meals, games and other fundraisers are open to everyone. I will note members only when the occasion arises. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, Jesus loves you. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. The passing away of lifelong friends LL ANAR kK NEWS Jim WelshTT AP INTO Th H EOLOGY T T UESDAY AT T T A m M ARA’S Everyone is invited to attend Theology on Tap presented by St. Patrick’s Catholic Church. This is an opportunity for Catholics and others to learn more about the Catholic faith and to share in the Catholic community. Each month Theology on Tap will be presented at a different restaurant within Franklin County. The rst event is Tuesday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. at Tamara’s Caf, 71 Market Street, in Apalachicola. A buffet or tapas will be available. These events will feature an engaging speaker presenting a theological topic, time for discussion, faith sharing, and community building. For more information contact St. Patrick’s Catholic Church at 653-9453.‘MARk K ET D D AYS’ IN CARRAb B ELLE FEb B 22 Carrabelle United Methodist Church is gearing up for its second 2014 Market Days event, on Saturday, Feb. 22 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street in Carrabelle. Make plans to join us for music, rummage sale, warm soup, baked goods and specialty coffees. Also on-site rafes and cake walk. Look for directional signs. For more information or to make donations to the rummage sale or bake sale, call Bonnie Myrick at 899-3175. Faith b B RIE fF S Faith

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By FRANK SARGEANT Special to the News Herald Sheepshead look like an oversized saltwater bluegill in a convict suit, and as such, they ought to be very easy to catch. To be sure, they are abundant pan sh of the saltwater kind, but catching them can at times be a challenge. However, if you’re interested in eating bottom sh — and who isn’t — they are becoming one of the few games in town, so tightly are the feds limiting our take of grouper and most snappers. And they’re one of the more active species in Panhandle waters from now through March. The limit on sheepshead still allows you to take them home by the ock; the rule is 15 daily over 12 inches, which means if you have two or three anglers aboard and happen into a swarm of hungry ’heads, you can actually ll the cooler, a rarity with any species these days. You won’t be taking home any 20-pounders, as you might with gags or red snapper, to be sure, (the all-tackle sheepshead record is 21 pounds, 4 ounces, the Florida record 15-2) but a stack of 1to 3-pounders is likely, and if you sh offshore rockpiles during the February/April spawn, you might add some sh of 5 to 8 pounds to the box. (There are no federal regulations on the species, but you must comply with state limits when you return to shore.) Sheepshead are not wimps; they’re remarkably powerful critters for their size. A ve-pounder caught on the ats is a match for a red sh of similar size — though it’s rare to catch ’em on the ats because they are so much more wary than red sh (see below). And when you hook up with a heavy one around a piling, he’s just as quick to wrap up and cut you off as any snook. First, a quick scoop of biology; Archosargus probatocephalus is a member of the porgie family, thus his shape. Sheepshead are named for their teeth, which do look somewhat sheeplike, and enable them to crunch up the shell sh and crabs which are their primary diet. Inside the mouth are hard, bony nodules which complete the crushing operation; they can grind up anything from oysters to mussels to barnacles — if you’ve ever tried to scrape barnacles off a boat bottom, you have to truly admire the power in the sheepshead jaws, because they nip them off like carrots. Catching sheepshead is a learned art. It looks as if it should be very simple; toss a piece of fresh-cut shrimp in front of them and they eat it, most of the time. But that parsimonious mouth is very stingy when it comes to ingesting hooks; often they nip off the bait and leave Mr. Mustad hanging naked. First, it’s essential to use a hook small enough to t the relatively small mouth of the sh; size 1 or 1/0 is the ticket to admission. Actually smaller hooks work even better, but the teeth are so strong that the sh can occasionally bite right through the light wire of smaller hardware. (They also can bite through mono or uoro leader and line, and there’s not much you can do about that if the hook goes in far enough for them to chomp on either. Adding wire leader is not an option — they will rarely eat even the tastiest bait suspended on wire.) You usually need a sinker of some sort because ‘heads are most often found in holes, channels and cuts, usually around rocks, concrete or other hard structure where shell sh can x and grow and where small crabs live. Boat docks and bridge pilings also attract them. One good way to rig is to put the hook on a dropper made of 20-pound test hard mono or uoro (both have more resistance to teeth than standard mono) and then hang the sinker on the bitter end of the line about 18 inches below. With this rig, you can immediately feel it when a sh starts nibbling on the bait; if the sinker is above the hook, as in a standard rig, the sh has to bite hard enough to move the sinker before you feel anything—and by that time the bait might be long gone. Using braided line helps a lot — the no-stretch ber transmits the feel of the nibbles much better than mono. Another good rig is a 1/8 to ounce jig head with an oversized hook, size 1/0 or so, on which a piece of fresh cut shrimp, about thumbnail-sized, is impaled. With the jig, you feel the bite immediately, and it casts more easily than a separate sinker/dropper rig. While fresh shrimp is by far the easiest bait to come by, sheepshead also readily take an assortment of other natural baits; oysters, ddler crabs, sand eas and tubeworms are all high on the list of sheepshead a cionados. Whatever the bait, the trick is to hold light tension on the line when you feel that rst bump. If you can sense weight there as you take up the slack, go ahead and set the hook; you miss some, but you hook most once you develop the touch. You often can visually locate sheepshead in clear water; they tend to hang near the surface, and you can spot them as they turn and ash. But even if you don’t see them, you often can stir sh up by chumming around crusty pilings and riprap; use a hoe or spud to scrape the barnacles. As this stuff showers down, sheepshead will smell it and move in from considerable distance. Larger ‘heads congregate on rockpiles and ledges in 8 to 30 feet of water to spawn from February into early April: many nearshore reefs also hold them at this time. There also is a limited ats shery for small sheepshead in Panhandle bays in early spring, anywhere you might see red sh tailing. On the lowest tides, it’s not uncommon to see them up in the shallows waving that gray tail as they root out an oyster or a shrimp. Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) ] \IL []\ R^G \ I9 ]\ WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu F eb 13 61 51 20 % F ri, F eb 14 61 50 10 % S a t F eb 15 60 52 0 % Sun, F eb 16 59 47 20 % M on, F eb 17 66 45 % T ues F eb 18 67 45 % W ed F eb 19 67 45 % FEELING SHEEPISH Tips for tasty winter sheepsheads FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the News Herald Light spinning gear does the job on most sheepshead, and braided line makes it easier to feel the light bites and set the hook. During the winter, the goldfinch (Spinus tristis) is frequently found at local bird feeders. While their winter plumage is less showy than the bright yellow sported by males during breeding season, the males are attractive little birds and may migrate through the Panhandle in great numbers. The American goldfinch is gregarious during the nonbreeding season, when it is often found in large flocks, usually with other finches. Flocks generally fly in an undulating pattern, creating a waveshaped path. The American goldfinch is not aggressive toward predators within its territory; its only reaction is alarm calling. Predators include snakes, squirrels, and blue jays, which may destroy eggs or kill young. Hawks and cats pose a threat to both young and adults. Goldfinches are occasionally victims of brood parasites, particularly brownheaded cowbirds. One study found that nine percent of nests had cowbird eggs in them. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the species is one of the strictest vegetarians in the bird world. Its main diet consists of the seeds from a wide variety of annual plants, often those of weeds grasses and trees, such as thistle, teasel, dandelion, ragweed, mullein, cosmos, sunflower and coneflower. However, it also consumes tree buds, maple sap, and berries. It will eat at bird feeders provided by humans, particularly in the winter months, preferring Niger seed, sometimes called thistle. It will occasionally eat insects, which are also fed to its young to provide protein. Unlike some finch species, the American goldfinch uses its feet extensively in feeding. It frequently hangs from seed heads while feeding in order to reach the seeds more easily. The courtship rituals of the American goldfinch include aerial maneuvers and singing by males, who begin courtship in late July. The nest is built in late summer by the female in the branches of a deciduous shrub or tree at a height of up to 33 feet. The nest building lasts approximately six days. The male frequently flies with the female as she collects nesting materials, and though he may carry some materials back to the nest, he leaves its construction to her. The outer shell of the nest is built of bark, weeds, vines, and grass. The inside diameter of the finished nest is about three inches. The rim is reinforced with bark bound by spider webs and caterpillar silk, and the cup is lined with plant down from milkweed, thistle, or cattail. The nest is so tightly woven that it can hold water, and it is possible for nestlings to drown following a rainstorm if the parents do not cover the nest. American goldfinches lay four to six bluishwhite eggs, oval in shape. Two or three pairs may group their territories together in a loose colony, perhaps to aid in defense against predators. The goldfinch is not threatened by human activity, and is widespread throughout its range. The clearing of forests by humans, though harmful to many species, has benefited the goldfinch. Clearing of woodlands causes declines in numbers of long distance migrants, while favoring the American goldfinch both as a short-distance migrant, and because the created open areas are the preferred environment of the bird, where weeds thrive which produce the primary food source of the goldfinch This handsome little finch is the state bird of New Jersey, Iowa, and Washington. In art and Christian legend, the goldfinch is symbolic of the resurrection. According to one legend, the bird was a witness to Christ carrying the cross and tried to pluck the crown of thorns from his head. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda American gold nch ROD GASCHE | Special to the Times Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, February 13, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Local Local area fishing is improving with good catches of whiting on the beaches and with decent weather, we should see this trend stay for a while. After the freezes of last week, trout and redfish are on the move. Good reports from the ICW canal near the “T” are showing strong numbers of fish. This week’s weather looks like a wet one, so the new freshwater in our area may slow the action down a little. SPONSORED BY

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, February 13, 2014 First Baptist Christian School This is the honor roll for the second nine-weeks grading period at the First Baptist Christian School. KINDERGARTENAA /B: Shaylee Tomes, Laykn QueenSE cC OND GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Caden Allen A A /B: Brayden Barwick, Emma White TT HIRD GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Olivia Barineau A A /B: Riley O’Neal and Skylar Layne FOURTH GRADEAA ll A A ’s: Genesis Jones, Sophia Salman A A /B: Cameron Nash, Carter KembroFI fF TH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Eva Strickland SIXTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Lydia Strickland SEVENTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Adria ValenzuelaA A /B: Talyn ArnettEE IGHTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Jordan Alexander A A /B: Logan Arnett, Nathan Jones FRE sS HMEN AA ll AA ’s: Noah Strickland A A /B: Hunter Butler, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Katy Spann, Xuripha Tiller SENIOR sS AA /B: Ashley Butler, Brandy Parker Honor ROLL Franklin County MM iddle School The following is the honor roll for the second nine-week grading period at Franklin County Middle School. SIXTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Chloe Owens, Kt Nessly A A /B: Chasity Ard, Jacob Shirley, Mikel Register, Shyne Faircloth, Tristin Segree SEVENTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Jessica RuddA A /B: Beyla Walker, Breanna Murray, Makenzie Shuman, Melanie Collins, Ethan Sand, Peyton Millender, Cassey Riley, Kiana Foley, Fisher Edwards, Rory Countryman, Tonnor SegreeEE IGHTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Josie Kriss A A /B: Evangelina Ducker, Jake Paterson, Justin Arellano, Leah Reeder, Matthew Turner Franklin County H H igh School The following is the Honor Roll for the second nine-week grading period at Franklin County High School FRE sS HMEN AA ll A A ’s: Allie Kirvin, Astrid Ramirez, Emily Crosby, Kacey Howard, Mallorie Shiver, Melody Hateld, Ty anna TownsendA A /B: Alexis Segree, Bi anca Huber, Cash Creamer, Eve Bond, Holly Chambers, Jackson Reed Subbarao, Jayla Alley, Jaylon Gainer, Jill Diestelhorst, Reese Hersey, Ann Reeder, Logan Crosby, Marshall Sweet, Maxwell Davis, Megan Collins, Mercedes Rice, Myranda McLeod, Natasia Robinson, Scout Segree, Tessa Carlisle, Thomas Cole Subbarao, Tia Cum mings, Zachary MaySOPHOMORE sS AA ll A A ’s: Amelia Newman, Maliek Rhodes A A /B: Abbreanna Phillips, Adam Hames, Amber Hen ning, Anna Riley, Bernard Walke, Cayce Daniels, Ger ald Messer, Hunter Seg ree, John White, Joshua Patriotis, Kendrick Hunter, Walker DeVaughn, Krista Martina JUNIOR sS AA ll A A ’s: Aaliyah West, Aus tin Carter, Chaseon Taran to, Brooke FryeA A /B: Adriana Vilchez, Amanda Anthony, Corey Bratton, Julie Diestelhorst, Kelsey Shuler, Morgan Martin, Myesha Campbell, Grant Smith, Robyn Seg ree, Samantha Marxsen, Sasha Carr, Tressie Buffkin, Macey Hunt SENIOR sS AA ll A A ’s: Amber Adkins, Bria Walker, Jathan Mar tin, Josie Turner, Laura Gallegos, Lea Venable, Te vis Page.A A /B: Alex Causey, An drea Cupid, Ashley Car roll, Austin Martina, Brook Pittman, Cameron White, Cynthia Duncan, Gracyn Kirvin, Jennifer Stratton, Jessica Shields, Malachi Parker, Ryan Babb, Myel DeCourcey, Samantha Everson, Shannon Fuller, Stefan DeVaughn, Thadaei sha Carr, James Bailey, Graham Kirvin Full moon climb at lighthouse Friday The February Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held Friday, Feb. 14. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. with light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 6:28 p.m. and the moon will rise at 6:27 p.m. on Feb.14. After sunset, people may climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. St. George Lighthouse Park is at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. Please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.LL ibrary’s ‘Book and Bread Sale’ Sunday The Friends of Franklin County Public Library will have their annual SOUPer Book and Bread Sale on Sunday, Feb. 16. Homemade soups breads and hundreds of books will be available for purchase. We will begin selling items at 11 a.m. until we have no more. Sea Oats Art Gallery on Pine Street on St George Island is once again our host for this event. Look for the signs once you exit the SGI Bridge. For information or to donate homemade soup and bread, books or your time, please contact Anna at anna.carmichael@yahoo. com or 850.273.1174 This event is the second biggest money maker for the Friends, second only to PUTTMasters Visit and like the Friends of Franklin County Public Library Facebook page for important updates.School M M onday at FCS, not at A A BC In order to make up for the two ice days, there will be school on Monday, Feb. 17 at the Franklin County School. This will be a regular school day, with the second make-up day slated for Friday, May 30. Because the charter school has sufcient educational hours in so far this year, there will be no school for ABC School students on Monday, Feb. 17. The day will continue to be a planning day for teachers.AA palachicola D D ixie Youth registration ends Feb. 22 It’s that time of year again. Who’s ready to play some ball? The Apalachicola Dixie Youth baseball and softball program will hold registration at the DW Wilson Sports Complex for one more week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. each night. Come by Tuesday, Feb. 18, or on Thursday, Feb. 13 or 20, and register your child, or children for a fun-lled summer athletic adventure. Registration will end Saturday, Feb. 22, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Registration fee is $50. If your child has not played in Apalachicola baseball or softball, please remember to bring a copy of their birth certicate to registration. In order for a child to be eligible to play T-ball, they must be at least 5 years old before May 1, 2014. If you have any questions about registration please contact Kim Johnson at 653-6887.Clint E E astwood lm at museum Feb. 22 On Saturday, Feb. 22 at 10:15 a.m., “FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS,” directed by Clint Eastwood, will be shown at the Camp Gordon Johnston Musuem in Carrabelle. The plot focuses on seven United States Marines of the 28th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division Sgt. Mike Strank, Pfc. Rene Gagnon, Pfc. Ira Hayes, Cpl. Harlon Block, Pfc. Franklin Sousley, Sgt. Hank Hansen, and Pfc. Ralph Ignatowski – as well as their Navy corpsman, PhM2 John “Doc” Bradley. Clint Eastwood was 14 when the Battle of Iwo Jima took place in 1945, old enough to know how Joe Rosenthal’s famous picture vouched for victory with the raising of the second ag atop Mt. Surabachi. This battle commenced on Feb. 19, 1945 and was one of the costliest of the Pacic Campaign. Due to the graphic scenes of violence shown in this lm, absolutely no one under the age of 18 will be allowed to view this lm. Perhaps this lm best demonstrates what our Army, Navy, and Marine veterans faced while in combat in the Pacic. This lm will last a little over two hours and free popcorn will be provided. While there is no admission fee, please remember the museum operates on donations, and donations are welcome.RR evetment repairs O O Kd for A A lligator P P oint On Jan. 21, county commissioners voted unanimously to authorize Preble-Rish to prepare bid documents and specs for a contractor to repair the road within the scope of the funds available. County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners that FEMA has authorized $140,000 for repairs to the part of the Alligator Point revetment between Tom Roberts and Clements Street that was damaged by Tropical Storm Debbie. The repairs will consist of adding more rock to the existing revetment in an attempt to stabilize the road shoulder. Pierce said he attended the Alligator Point Taxpayer Association meeting Saturday, Jan. 18 and explained the project. The cost to replace the rocks with a more permanent solution such as sheet pile is estimated at $1.2 million, so this project is strictly a repair project. Pierce said he did not anticipate more funding for use on the revetment until it suffers more damage. He said the county board has a permit from the Department of Environmental Protection to make these repairs. Pierce said, the Alligator Point community is aware of the project and recognizes that without additional repairs the road is subject to damage under a very minor storm event. News b B RIE fsFS By Tevis Page Special to the Times As the week began, the senior class was excited to know our senior superlatives, which were announced on Tuesday. The rest of the school is in a buzz over prom and freshman formal. The freshmen are selling ower bulbs in order to raise funds. The junior/senior prom will be held on Saturday, April 5. If you or your prom partner are not a FCHS student, you will need to get a permission form from Ms. Gavigan so they will be allowed to attend. Both baseball and softball are starting their seasons this week. The teacher and school related employee of the year was announced on Monday. The football banquet was held on Wednesday and had a nice turnout. The school year is drawing to an end and there are so many loose ends to tie before we can nish. Starting to think about the prom HAHA WK TALTALK S e n i o r s h o r t s t o p M o r g a n M oc k g o t t h e 2 0 1 4 v a r s i t y s o f t b al l s e a s o n o f f t o a b a n g s m a c k i n g a p ai r o f d o u b l e s a n d b a t t i n g i n t w o r u n s i n t h e L a d y S e a h a w k s 1 0 0 w i n a t B l o u n t s t o w n F e b 4 O n F e b 7 a t R u t h e r f o r d M oc k h a d a p ai r o f d o u b l e s a n d t h r e e RB I s i n t h e t e a m s 8 7 l o s s O n M o n d a y a t h o m e M oc k h a d t w o h i t s i n c l u d i n g a t r i p l e a n d 3 RB I s P L AY E R OF T H E WE E K M o r g a n M o c k Calling all artists or graphic designers! The Franklin County Public Li brary is holding a contest to design a new library logo. We are looking for an artistic representation of what FCPL means to the community and/or individ ual. The winning logo will appear on library cards, letterhead, the library web site, and more. Designs can be done in color or black and white, but should be submitted electronically. Acceptable formats are SVG, PNG and JPEG (lossless) PNG and JPG images must be available at print able resolutions (1000px or greater @ 150ppi or great er). However, you can sub mit smaller resolutions for judging. FCPL staff will judge the contest. Entries can be submitted from Feb. 13 through 28. Please send submissions to fcplcon test@gmail.com. Any additional infor mation can be requested by calling the Eastpoint Branch 670-8151, the Car rabelle Branch 697-2366 or by just stopping by! Contest seeks new library logo George and Ira Gershwin, writers of the groundbreaking opera “Porgy and Bess,” may never have visited Apalachicola, but if they had, one can speculate that they would have identied these lyrics of “Summertime” with the heart and soul of this community. Chairperson Bella Rudo said plans are underway for the 22nd annual Historic Apalachicola Home & Garden Tour, sponsored by Trinity Episcopal Church, on Friday and Saturday, May 2 and 3. This year’s theme, “And the Livin’ Is Easy” is as apropos to the grand Gothic Revival home and the beautiful Queen Anne abode as it is to the precious bungalow and all sizes and sorts in between. The homes featured on this year’s tour are vintage homes with interesting histories, contemporary touches and homeowners who take pride in their houses and have found a perfect t for their unique style. The featured house for the 2014 tour is the home of Briana Wheatly, built for George H. Whiteside in the Gothic Revival Style, circa 1872. The Whiteside family owned and operated the Apalachicola Ice and Canning Company and their afuence was reected in some of the home’s distinctive features: two closets per bedroom, heart pine ooring, beautiful crown molding, push bell for summoning servants, a built-in dining room sideboard, and replace between the two parlors. At one point in its history, the house was altered for use as a boarding house, but eventually, it reverted to its single-family dwelling status. A recent major renovation involved the addition of a large kitchen and half bath. On view are many articles of interest that the homeowner has collected in her travels. Plein Air paintings, as well as art work from local artists in Ft. Wayne, Indiana and Seaside, number among them. The lovely garden space was a collaboration of the owner’s vision and that of local landscape designers, Amanda and Bill Kollar. The side and front garden spaces are primarily planted in white to simulate a “moon garden” which effectively complements the cool colors of the house itself. The renovation is truly stunning and will assuredly delight all who enter. Evensong service at Trinity Episcopal Church will be held Friday, May 2 at 5:30 p.m. This service provides the traditional opening for the home tour. It will be followed by a reception to which all are invited. Homes will be open only on Saturday, May 3, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pre-sale tickets will be available at $20 until the day of the event. On May 3, ticket sales will begin at 9:30 a.m. at $25 per ticket. In addition, a sealed-bid auction, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. will be a part of Saturday’s festivities. For more information or ticket sales please contact Trinity Episcopal Church at 653-9550 or the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Please visit the tour website at apalachicolahistoric hometour.org Home tour underscores ‘livin’ is easy’

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A10 | The Times Thursday, February 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 93862T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA000238 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. CHANCE R. MOORE, GINA MOORE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered October 28, 2013, in Civil Case No. 19-2013-CA-000238 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and CHANCE R. MOORE, GINA MOORE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 20th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 48, Whispering Pines Subdivision, Phases 3 and 4, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of January, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court BY: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. February 6, 13, 2014 93874T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 19 2012-CA000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN BRYANT, A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 22, 2014, and entered in 19 2012-CA-000447 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007BC4, is the Plaintiff and STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN BRYANT, A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse Apalachicola FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on March 6, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22nd day of January, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-03090 February 6, 13, 2014 93896T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO, 13-CA-415 ROBERT PETERSON and MARGUERITE PETERSON, Plaintiffs, vs. CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR. at al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR.; MYRTLE E. DUNLAP, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all of the parties claiming by through, under or against them. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Quiet Title has been filed against you and others, regarding the property described as follows: See “Exhibit “A”, attached hereto and by reference made a part hereof, EXHIBIT “A” COMMENCE AT A FOUND 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA: THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE MONUMENTED WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 900.50 FEET TO A FOUND RAILROAD IRON; THENCE GO NORTH 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 1,432.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 500.00 FEET TO A FOUND 1/2” IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 88.21 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 233.19 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 298.03 FEET TO A FOUND 4”X4” CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF OLD FERRY ROAD (66’ R/W) AND SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1,192.50 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE A DISTANCE OF 241.96 FEET (CH. 241.55’ CH. BRG. N75 DEGREES 06’06” W) TO A POINT; THENCE DEPARTING SAID CURVE AND NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 148.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL OF LAND IS SITUATED IN SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs’ attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 323093469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 16th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Feb 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014 93910T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-000040-CA CERTUSBANK, N.A., a national banking association, Plaintiff, v. DSW HOLDINGS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, J. SIDNEY DUMAS, individually, J. TRAVIS STANLEY, individually, and WALTER M. WARD, SR., individually, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Other Relief entered on January 27, 2014 in the abovenoted case, that I will sell the following real property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, and all personal property associated therewith: PARCEL A ALL OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 08 SOUTH, RANGE 08 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALL OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 08 SOUTH, RANGE 08 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION THAT LIES WITHIN THE RAILROAD RIGHTOF-WAY. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION THAT MAY LIE WITHIN ANY ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY. PARCEL B NORTH HALF OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PORTION OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 515, PAGE 302, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6” X 6” CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKED S.J.P.C. AT THE WEST QUARTER CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST; THENCE RUN ALONG THE HALF SECTION LINE OF SAID SECTION 5, SOUTH 8901’32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 5287.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE WEST QUARTER CORNER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST; THENCE RUN NORTH 0041’27” EAST A DISTANCE OF 2662.53 FEET TO A FOUND 3” X 3” LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE RUN SOUTH 8902’32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 5279.42 FEET TO A FOUND 4” X 4” CONCRETE MONUMENT STAMPED BDE 0340 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE RUN SOUTH 0037’51” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2624.86 FEET TO A FOUND CONCRETE MONUMENT STAMPED BDI LB 0340, MARKING THE EAST QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE RUN NORTH 8927’03” WEST A DISTANCE OF 5281.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT FROM PARCEL A THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST A DISTANCE OF 598.10 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF THE NORTHERN APALACHICOLA RAILROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE NORTHERN APALACHICOLA RAILROAD SOUTH 8025’22” WEST A DISTANCE OF 352.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0106’25” EAST A DISTANCE OF 662.16 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SOUTH 8905’43” EAST A DISTANCE OF 346.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2477.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 287.96 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8927’04” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 807.86 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0904’44” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 291.16 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8927’04” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 767.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING WITHIN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY. FLORIDA, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1937.09 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 6449’11” WEST A DISTANCE OF 543.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 7317’12” WEST A DISTANCE OF 294.21 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0904’44” WEST A DISTANCE OF 786.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8927’04” EAST A DISTANCE OF 60.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0904’44” EAST A DISTANCE OF 740.11 FEET; THENCE NORTH 7317’12” EAST A DISTANCE OF 261.01 FEET; THENCE NORTH 6449’11” EAST A DISTANCE OF 518.29 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, NORTH 0106’25” EAST A DISTANCE OF 66.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND COMMENCE AT A 5 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION, A DISTANCE OF 3038.44 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY SECTION BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 846.19 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 502.45 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 735.03 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 220.27 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 437.25 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 194.81 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #0340), THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES, 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 568.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A PROPOSED 60.00 FOOT INGRESS/ EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1937.09 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 543.48 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 294.21 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 786.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 60.67 FEET; THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 740.11 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 261.01 FEET; THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 518.29 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, 93900T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 2013 CA 363 CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. MICHAEL JEFFREY BLOODWORTH et al; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated January 30, 2014, entered in Case No. 2013 CA 363 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Michael Jeffrey Bloodworth a/k/a Michael J. Bloodworth; Ronald M. Bloodworth; Beach Community Bank; Citibank (South Dakota), N.A.; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 2nd floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. on March 6, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: Lot 38, WHISPERING PINES, PHASES 3 & 4, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 32, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 31st day of January, 2014. Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 6, 13, 2014

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, February 13, 2014 The Times | A11 2099699 AL #1481; GAL #2034; FL-AB #1488; NC #6397; Joe Bilbro, Lic. MS R.E. Broker; Thomas J. Tarpley, MSAL #565 10% Buyers Premium 400 140 OfferingsProperties inAUCTION* Feb. 18, 19 & 20 AL€FL€GA€MS€NCOnline Bidding AvailableB S O L U T E No Minimums, No Reserves... Sells Regardless of Price!800.479.1763 www.johndixon .com JOHN DIXON & A SSOCIATESA UCTIONS € M ARKETING Tues, Feb. 18, 11amSale Site: Marroitt Orlando Airport 7499 Augusta National Dr, Orlando, FL 45 Sell with Reserve 50 FL PropertiesIndustrial Warehouse & Storage Buildings €OfceCondos€CarWashFacility& Land€ResidentialLots&Land €Homes€CommercialLots&Land& Much, Much More Through Out Florida!! 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. PICKET'S LANDING CONDO E7. 4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH 2000.00/MO. 4. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 5. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 6. 915 NORTH CASEY, CRA WFORDVILLE. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. FENCE YARD 750.00/MO. 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4.DUPLEX. 3BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLYREMODELED. 700.00/MO. 7 8 6.915 NORTH CASEY, CRA WFORDVILLE. 3 BEDROOM,2 BATH. FENCEYARD750.00/MO. 4516364 LOST! Siamese cat chocolate in color, no tail, indoor cat. Got out Tuesday February 4th at 122 N Bayshore In Eastpoint. If seen or returned call 670-8236. Elderly ladies/ Reward offered. Program/Project Management Now Hiring Part Time Program Coordinatorto re-establish Friends of Franklin County Public Library’s Youth Program in Eastpoint, approximate 10 hours per week until 6/30/14 or longer contingent on Grant funding; to coordinate after school activities, provide basic/ work skills training, supervise youth 10 and older; recruit participants, maintain records, promote community support. Minimum requirements: High School diploma or equivalent, computer skills, enjoys working with youth, driver’s license. Must be creative, energetic, and flexible. Some travel. Position open until filled. Pick up application at Eastpoint or Carrabelle Library Branch. Drug Free Workplace. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web Id 34279990 Text FL79990 to 56654 RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, NORTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 66.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1937.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 543.48 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 294.21 FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 66.64 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 402.53 FEET; THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 216.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 34.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 07 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 43.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 29.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 204.80 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 315.35 FEET; THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 804.56 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 556.90 FEET; THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1136.71 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST FORA DISTANCE OF 519.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 792.34 FEET; THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 28.50 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1970.55 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY LINE, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST A DISTANCE OF 506.59 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID EAST BOUNDARY LINE, NORTH 8927’04” WEST A DISTANCE OF 767.48 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0904’44” EAST A DISTANCE OF 195.89 FEET; THENCE NORTH 7317’12” EAST, A DISTANCE OF 277.61 FEET; THENCE NORTH 6449’11” EAST A DISTANCE OF 530.88 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AD BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33 FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SECTION 33, NORTH 8902’32” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1030.00 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE NORTH 0106’ 25” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2456.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8902’32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1030.00 FEET TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 33; THENCE ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY LINE, SOUTH 0106’25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 2156.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. including the timber, buildings, appurtenances, and fixtures located thereon, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, on March 5, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. ET in the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The highest bidder shall immediately following the sale post with the clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit must be in cash or cashier’s check payable to Clerk of Court. The successful bidder must pay the balance of the final bid, plus the registry of court service charge and the foreclosure sale fee, no later than 4:00 p.m. ET on the day of the sale. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Court at Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, this 30th day of January, 2014. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk I. William Spivey, II Courtney M. Keller Greenberg Traurig, P.A. 450 South Orange Avenue, Suite 650 Orlando, Florida 32801 Counsellor Plaintiff’ Feb 13, 20, 2014 93928T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-000369-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. JANET S. GLOSSON A/K/A JANET STROTHER GLOSSON AKA JANET STROTHER AKA JANET GLOSSON, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: SIDNEY PARKER AS EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF HARVEY Q. STROTHER Last Known Address: Unkown Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 7, BLOCK C, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 16 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 28th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk File No. 13-07547 February 13, 20, 2014 93962T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA000054 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON MORTGAGE SECURITIES CORP., CSAB MORTGAGEBACKED TRUST 2006-4, CSAB MORTGAGE-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-4 Plaintiff, v. TAYLEN C. PEADEN; JAMES BRUMMETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TAYLEN C. PEADEN A/K/A TAYLEN CLAY PEADEN; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; ANDERSON & SONS CONSTRUCTION, INC. F/K/A ANDERSON & SON CONSTRUCTION, INC.; GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 11, 2013, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on January 27, 2014, this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 8, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 17, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 214 GRAMERCY PLANTATION BLVD., EASTPOINT, FL 32328 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Inside front door of the courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at eleven o’clock a.m., on March 5, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 28th day of January, 2014. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE COURT ADMINISTRATOR, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 33320 AT 850-653-8861 EXT. 105 OR FAX TO 850-6534795 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1800-955-8771 FOR THE FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE. February 13, 20, 2014 93954T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2009-CA000701 U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the benefit of CitiGroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc. AssetBacked Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AHL2 Plaintiff, vs. Jeffrey M. Wilson a/k/a Jeffrey Wilson and Patricia J. Wilson, Husband and Wife; Chancay, Inc.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 27, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2009CA-000701 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the benefit of CitiGroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc. Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007AHL2, Plaintiff and Jeffrey M. Wilson a/k/a Jeffrey Wilson and Patricia J. Wilson, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on March 5, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 4, BLOCK 86, ACCORDING TO THAT CERTAIN PLAT KNOWN AS ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 5, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THE SAME BEING RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 16-17, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 09-156803 FC01 SPS February 13, 20, 2014 97503T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-04-CA IN RE: ESTATE OF RONALD GEORGE MARSHALL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of RONALD GEORGE MARSHALL, deceased, whose date of death was September 12, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 6, 2014. GAIL K. SCHATZLE Personal Representative: 104 Waldo Avenue, Rockland, Maine 04841 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 February 6, 13, 2014 97423T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-293-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Aaron Wray, Franci G. Wray, Ida W. Garrett, Kathy Shelton and Magnolia Bay Homeowner’s Association, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE Under F.S. Chapter 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 21, 2014, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on March 5, 2014, the following described property Lot 1, Block A, Magnolia Bay, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page(s) 21, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Dated: January 22, 2014, Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 6, 13, 2014 97539T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on March 6, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property Lot 1, Block 6, Lanark Village Unit No 1. according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2 at Pages 14 and 14A of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. P ersonal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count II and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count I in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to Gulf State Community Bank by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Gulf State Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. JERRILYN H. HELBING, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2013-CA-000336. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. “If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.” WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 30th day of January, 2014. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 2014 97657T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000408 Bank of America, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Jacalyn R. Murray; Unknown Spouse of Jacalyn R. Murray; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 29, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000408 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, National Association, Plaintiff and Jacalyn R. Murray are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 23, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 44, OF VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA, PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 17-18, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-251501 FC01 CWF February 13, 20, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j Adoring, Financially Secure couple await jjj 1st baby. jjj j Allison & Hal j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Kathie, Happy Valentine’s Day and 311th Mooniversary! Bob GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL February 15th & 16th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572) General Admission $6 850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Food Svs/HospitalityBartenders Servers Cooks Dishwashers Bussers BLUE PARROT NOW HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Web Id 34280042 Food Svs/HospitalityHousekeepers At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work weeknds & holidays Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34279565 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Starting Pay $8 hour Call (850) 927-2585 Applications can be picked up at The Buccaneer Inn, 160 West Gorrie Dr, St. George Island. Web ID: 34279561 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for reliable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required. Great benefits for FT Employees. FT Guest Services Greet & assist guests with check-in/ -out; resolve Issues. Professional, friendly, good general office & computer skills. FT Office Assistant Coordinates work of cleaners; general office work. Good organization & computer skills. Works well under pressure. Prefer some office experience. Eastpoint location. PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34279796 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City Beach Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Terri McAfee at tmcafee @pcnh.com OR 850-747-5054 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34280216 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Terri McAfee at tmcafee @pcnh.com OR 850-747-5054 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34280217 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL79011 to 56654 2Br/1Ba Duplex $600/mo 850-643-7740 Text FL79130 to 56654 3Br/2Ba House, CH&A, 525 W Hwy 98 $800/mo Water & Sewer Included 850-643-7740 Text FL78952 to 56654 Senior Citizen looking to rent Studio or 1 Bd Apt in Apalach Area, Needs ASAP 732-552-3143 from 11am-3pm Price Reduced Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced. Close to town and boat ramps. 850-697-2176 Set of 4 used Bridgstone Tires, Good Condition. Decent Tread, P275/60R20 Apalach $140 (727)515-8537 Set of Four (4) Used Bridgestone Tires in Good Condition -Still Decent Tread P275/60R20 Apalach $140 727-515-8537

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, February 13, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast Contact The Times T oday (850) 277-7847 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,199,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 247601 $534,000 St. George Island H I D D E N T R E A SU R E E n t e r i n t o p a r t i a l l y c o ve r e d C o u r t y a r d w i t h W at e r f a l l h u g e L R o w s i n k i t c h e n & D R 4 l a r g e B R 5 5 B A P r i v at e w a l l e d P o o l & H o t T u b g ro u n d l e ve l l i v i ng h u g e e l e v at e d d e c k w i t h o u t s t a n d i n g G u l f v i e w s 1 s t t i e r l o t T o p Q u a l i t y h o m e W e s t G o r r i e D r 29,000 # & % & ! ! $ & & & # ! # % $ & $ # & ! ! # & $ # & ! $ & $ & & ! # ! & $ & ! # & & $ & John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 251061 $295,000 St. George Island E A S T E N D B A Y F R O N T L O T S h e l l H a r b o r 1 4 4 A c r e s t h i s l o t i s e a s t o f t h e S h e l l H a r b o r l a g o o n p ro v i d i n g t r u e b a y f ro n t a g e l o t e x t e n d s f ro m G u l f B e a c h D r i ve t o t h e B a y H u g e l o t w i l l p ro v i d e p r i v a c y d r y l o t a n d e a s i l y t r a ve r s e d a c ro s s f ro m 3 0 0 O c e a n M i l e p os si b le O w n e r F i n a nc i n g 4516341 Advertise Her e Kim Hawkins Davis CP A Hwy 98 at 11th Str eet, Suite 4 Apalachicola, FL 32320 850-653-6875 and Much Mor e Pr ompt Pr ofessional Personal Service T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Supposedly a magic potion to arouse love especially towards a specic person is known as a “what”? Valentino, Philter, Jeeper, Clippo 2) Approximately what portion of Valentine’s Day cards are hand-delivered? Fourth, third, half, twothirds 3) Nebraska and which other state have a town called “Valentine”? New York, Idaho, Florida, Texas 4) About what percentage of Valentine’s Day cards are accompanied by a gift? 45, 55, 65, 75 5) From whose mythology does Cupid use magical arrows of love? Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Arabic 6) About what percentage of U.S. women send themselves owers on Valentine’s Day? 5, 10, 15, 20 7) Where do you “wear your heart” if you’re quick to show feelings? Hands, Sleeve, Shoulder, Smile 8) Of what college was Esther Howland when she crafted the U.S.’ rst valentines (cards)? Harvard, Salem, Mount Holyoke, Hofstra 9) Statistically what percent of U.S. men do not make advance Valentine’s Day plans with their sweethearts? 36, 50, 64, 70 10) How many U.S. presidents were born in a February? 1, 2, 3, 4 11) By sheer numbers who receive the most Valentine’s Day cards? Children, Teachers, Sweethearts, Mothers 12) In what year was Saint Valentine killed? 270, 365, 810, 1262 13) In the U.S. about how many romantic couples take out marriage licenses each year, but don’t use them? 500, 1,500, 9,000, 15,000 14) If your sweetheart suffers from anthophobia, you shouldn’t give him/her “what”? Flowers, Candy, Jewelry, Card ANSWERS 1) Philter. 2) Half. 3) Texas. 4) 65. 5) Roman. 6) 15. 7) Sleeve. 8) Mount Holyoke. 9) 64. 10) 4. 11) Teachers. 12) 270. 13) 9,000. 14) Flowers. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com