The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00255

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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Fire ghters reap rewards from bountiful cook-off By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com There was very little that didn’t go right Saturday at the fourth annual Oyster Cook-off. The crowd was huge, food tasted good, fun prevailed and weather stayed perfect, helping more money than last year roll in to ll the needs of the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department. The volunteering went well beyond the Apalachicola re ghters who pranced around in a conga line after choreography by Pam Nobles dancers, and for Marisa Getter, who chairs the organizing committee, that volunteer effort made all the difference. “It’s the most organized so far,” she said. “We keep getting more organized, but it keeps growing, so we never seem to be both ready and organized.” This year’s growth was noticeable several blocks away, where latecomers later than the noon start were forced to park. The more than a few minutes wait in the lines for peel-and-eat and MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY right Saturday at the fourth annual Oyster Cook-off. Apalachicola re ghters who pranced around in a conga line after choreography by Pam Nobles dancers, and for Marisa Getter, who chairs the organizing committee, that volunteer effort made all the difference. said. “We keep getting more organized, but it keeps growing, so we never seem to be both ready and organized.” several blocks away, where latecomers later than the noon start were forced to park. The more than a few minutes By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com State Rep. Halsey Beshears lay down the sword and shield of politics at the Armory on Monday and lifted up a theme of persistence and positivity as keynote speaker at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. community celebration. The Monticello Republican, an atypical selection to be featured speaker at the county’s annual event, focused on the principles of community service and positive attitude in his remarks. “In service, no matter on what level, take the focus off of yourself. And in doing this, at just the right time, you will reap a harvest of blessing,” said Beshears, whose sprawling district includes the entire county. “You just can’t give up.” Seated as guest of honor alongside Apostle Shirley White, the force behind conducting an annual, countywide gathering broader than her Love Center Church, or any one church, Beshears drew on a godly message from his opening words. “Get right with God,” he summed up the approach he would later elaborate upon. “(Too many people), they’re lost, State rep accents positives of service DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times State Rep. Halsey Beshears, left, Shirley White and Mike Sweatt listen at the King Day event. See MLK A5 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The 47-year-old Apalachicola woman who shot and stabbed her mother to death on an isolated beach west of town a year ago will have 40 years in state prison to come to terms with what she did. On Jan. 14, before Circuit Judge George Reynolds III, Sandra Anne Loudermilk-Conkel pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the Dec. 12, 2012, killing of 68-year-old Cynthia Green. Originally facing rstdegree murder charges with death penalty specications, Conkel was represented by Armando Garcia and a team of attorneys expert in capital cases from the Nancy Daniels’ public defender’s of ce in Tallahassee. State Attorney Willie Meggs was represented by Assistant State Attorney Jarred Patterson, who said the plea arrangement stepped the charge down to second degree and included dropping two other felony charges, aggravated battery with a rearm and tampering with physical evidence. In a Dec. 15, 2012, confession, Conkel told investigators Brett Johnson and Duane Cook she had a heated argument with her mother the morning of the killing after the two drove to 10 Mile Road west of Apalachicola. Conkel said during the argument, she took her mother’s 25caliber handgun and used it to shoot her mother in the back before stabbing her repeatedly. According to an autopsy performed by the Leon County Medical Examiner’s Of ce, Green died from more than 60 stab wounds and a single gunshot to the back of the head. Conkel said she blacked out while stabbing her mother, then dragged the body over a ledge at the end of the road and covered it with debris. She then said she threw the murder weapon into the bay. “This was a heinous and atrocious thing,” Patterson said. SANDRA LOUDERMILKCONKEL Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 Daughter gets 40 years for murdering mom xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, January 23, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 128 ISSUE 39 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Seahawks on a skid, A9 FSU commemorative edition available Proud of the Florida State Seminoles national championship? Want to savor the season in photo, stat and story? Then stop by the Apalachicola Times of ce, 129 Commerce St., and pick up your copy of the 2013 FSU Football Championship Commemorative Edition. For only $1, this 20-page special section of the Panama City News Herald recaps the entire season for your enjoyment. To get your copy today, call 653-8894 or stop by the of ce during regular business hours. Dixie presents Pad De Vie Ballet The Pas De Vie Ballet will perform at the Dixie Theatre at 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24, and 3 p.m. Saturday. In its 26th year, this dance company and Panhandle favorite has delighted Franklin County theater-goers for three years. Tickets are $25. For more information, call 653-3200 or visit www. dixietheatre.com. Get ready for Chef Sampler Celebrate the Forgotten Coast’s fabulous food scene at the 18th annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Fort Coombs Armory at Fourth Street and Avenue D in Apalachicola. In addition to indulging in some of the nest cuisine on the coast, shop owners and local designers add creative air by decorating each table individually. The evening offers the chance to give back to the community with a silent auction bene ting small business programming at the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce. Call 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay.org to reserve tickets. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times TOP ROW: Olivia Barineau leads a conga line of Apalachicola re ghters. Weems Hospital’s “Mirabella Oysters” were topped with caviar. CENTER: Marisa Getter presents one of the entries to judges Jerry Thompson, left, and Michael Allen. BOTTOM ROW: Eastpoint’s assistant re chief Jim Joyner holds the winning entries, while chief George Pruett peeks at right. Erin Rodriguez, back left, and Ottice Amison help lead the shucking crew. See BASH A5 See MURDER A5

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, January 23, 2014 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m The Apalachicola Fitness Center has closed but a group of dedicated tness enthusiasts are ghting to save their gym. The building that formerly housed the tness center, 45 Avenue D, sold recently to the owners of Papa Joe’s Restaurant who plan to relocate their eatery there. On Wednesday, Jan. 15, about 30 people met at the Gibson Inn to dis cuss the creation of a not-for-prot public tness center. Locations in Eastpoint and in the old Chapman High School were discussed and or ganizer Ed Aguiar roughed out sev eral scenarios for nancing the pub lic gym. Members are being asked to pay for a one-year membership, $420, if possible. Depending on the location cho sen for the center and the number of hours it remains open daily, Aguiar estimated between 70 and 120 mem bers are needed. He said supporters of a public gymnasium would buy about 75 percent of the equipment from the old tness center focusing on equipment that is useful to the greatest number of members. Organizers plan to provide space for April Patriotis to continue aero bic and kickboxing classes. Eric Ol son would also be available as a per sonal trainer. A list of current and past Apala chicola Fitness Center members has been distributed to the core group seeking to found the new gym. They plan to contact former gym mem bers to ask if they would like to join the new not for prot group. Sites being considered for the new tness center are the old Apala chicola High School on 13th Street and a section in the Seller’s Tile strip mall in Eastpoint. The project’s future appears to have gotten off a good start. On Fri day, Aguiar sent out an email an nouncing that 29 people have already opted to join as full-time members. If you are interested in joining the new tness center, call 927-2007. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m The guardian ad litem system is making it easier to volunteer in Franklin County. A guardian ad litem (GAL), an advocate ap pointed by the court to represent the interests of an underage person, serves as the voice of the child and may represent the child in court. GALs may assist where a child is removed from a hostile environment, usually by the Florida Department of Children and Families, and in those cases may assist in the protection of the mi nor child. GALs are also appointed in cases where there has been an allegation of  child abuse, neglect or  juvenile delinquency. In these situ ations, the GAL represents the best interests of the minor child, which can dif fer from the position of the state or government agen cy as well as the interest of the parent or guardian. A guardian ad litem is an of cer of the court and in Flor ida, is usually a volunteer. At the Jan. 9 luncheon of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, Karen Blumenthal, spokesperson for the GAL program, urged Franklin County residents to con sider representing a child. She said volunteers are desperately needed. She said guardians ad litem re quire 30 hours of training in Florida. Blumenthal said GAL will hold a training session in the county this spring to make it easier for county residents to participate. Once trained, advocating for a child requires about 10 hours a month, much of it spent doing research or speaking with people out side of the courtroom. Except for court dates, the schedule for GAL vol unteers is exible. Court dates take place in Franklin County. Blumenthal said, in addition to representing the children in court, GAL volunteers seek to provide more normalcy for children who are neglected, abused and displaced. A second not-for-prot, Child Advocates, II (CAII), supports GAL by raising funds to provide cloth ing, transportation, school supplies, housing, medical and dental care and more for children whose total needs are not met by ex isting state agencies. This may include children in the foster system and young people over 18 who “age out” of care and may be handed their belongings in a plastic trash bag and left with no place to go. CAII helps kids aging out of the system to get set up in their rst home. Blumenthal said that in 2013, they provided gifts for more than 400 children at Christmas. CAII serves Leon, Franklin, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, and Liberty counties. For more information about CAII, GAL and vol unteering opportunities, visit http://gal2.org / or call (866) 341-1425. 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D NOTICE It is that time again to le for your 2014 Property T ax Exemptions. If you have had any {…tƒ in your primar y residence since J tt• £ u> •u you may need to check with the Property Appraiser to see of you qualify for any of the following exemptions. The time to mak e these applications is from Januar y 1st through March 1st 2014. $922-0 $(70 -0 (702 $7-.787 $870 2 $% -8 -0 29-2 7-.787 $"27 297 $7-.820 22$' 22$"2 7/22/20 & % -8 -0 29-2 7-.787 #20 (6228/6-7 7/ 4 22-0 802 76 9.-!28-20 7-.787 2820 787297 775 "2 4 787' 22(6 720 7 62 72 4 Ag ) 9/92 7 62 -8-/67/84#/2 0-7062 -.2882 4#/2 Thursday’ s only 4 6-2 27 -. 4 62 297 82-2 0 627-2 /-88 2-62 2 & 297 "2/7-87 1 1++ + GAL seeks to serve every child Gym enthusiasts plan public tness center LOIS SS WOBODA | The Times The Apalachicola Fitness Center’s equipment could form core of new public tness center. News BRIEFS experienced ooding several times during the spring rains of 2013. Cheryl Sanders asked for $600,000 to purchase property known as Island View, which is the former site of the El’s Court motel, and turn it into a county park. Smokey Parrish requested $1.5 million to redo Creekmore Channel in Eastpoint. The channel needs dredging to remove accumulated silt. Noah Lockley asked for $500,000 to improve and repair drainage in culverts and ditches in Apalachicola.BB athroom funded for Classie Lowery Park On Tuesday morning, county commissioner unanimously approved funding for a bathroom for Classie Lowery Park in Carrabelle. The facility will be ADA accessible but not wired for electric lighting. The project is expected to cost about $2,300, with prisoners doing much of the labor. Commissioners ask legislators for funding At Tuesday morning’s regular Jan. 21 meeting, county commissioners directed County Planner Alan Pierce to contact the legislative delegation and request ve items for funding in the 2014 state budget. Pinki Jackel requested $2.5 million for the dredging of Eastpoint Channel. William Massey requested $300,000 for drainage improvements in a system known as Smokey Hollow Drainage, on the east side of the city of Carrabelle. The Smokey Hollow Drainage

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The Times | A3 Thursday, January 23, 2014 Sponsored in part by the Franklin County TDC www.saltyorid a.com Marilyn & Mason Bean F ranklin County Ha bitat f or Humanity 11th Annual R evu e Held at the F o r t C o o m b s Ar mory Saturda y F eb 1st, 2014 at 6:30 pm THE DIR TY TEE SHIR T BAND FRID A Y J AN 31 5:30 PM Golf Cart & Pet Parade from the Bower y to Riverfront Park for a concert SA TURD A Y FEB 1 6:30-10:30 PM Reser ved table & dinner for 6 $300 or $50 pp Show only 7:30-10:30 General Admission $25 All procceds bene t HFH V olunt eers & Info Call: (850) 653-3113 w w w.habit atfranklin.org & ) ) $'"($*"*&'' ) ) &' % ) ! # &% &' % ) &$ # Special to the Times Alek Lane Hoffman of St. George Island celebrated graduation from Naval Aviator Helicopter Training on Jan. 10 at Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Milton. Alek’s wife, Lisa, pinned his wings during the ceremony. Ensign Hoffman has been assigned to Helicopter Military Strike Squadron, Atsugi, Japan and will y an MH-60R airship. According to the commander of the U.S. Naval Forces Japan Public Affairs Of ce, this is one of the Navy’s newest and most capable helicopters. Also in attendance for Hoffman’s big day were his sister, Daren, and her husband Ben George, of Apalachicola; his mother, Barbara Lane, of Capitola, Calif.; his father and stepmother, Carl and Linda Hoffman, of Panama City; and Alek’s Scoutmasters Larry and Patricia Hale, of St. George Island. “We ‘his family’ are all very proud of Alek’s accomplishments,” said Patricia Hale. “He is truly an inspiration.” Law Enforcement Arrest REPORT FWC REPORT Alek Hoffman before his ship with Scoutmasters Larry and Pat Hale. Inset: Patch awarded to Alek Hoffman on completion of his Naval Aviator Helicopter Training. PAT HALE | Special to the Times Local eagle gets his wings Alek Hoffman Patch awarded to Alek Hoffman The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. Arrests listed here were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sherriff’s Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JAN. 14 Mandy A. Langley, 36, Eastpoint, forgery (FCSO) Byllie L. Murray, 18, Eastpoint, criminal mischief and violation of probation (FCSO) JAN. 15 Ellis S. Davis, 28, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JAN. 17 Wyatt J. Eveland, 19, Eastpoint, possession of cannabis (FCSO) JAN. 18 Shelby Hunnings, 21, Eastpoint, possession of cannabis, possession of legend drug without a prescription, and contributing to the delinquency of a minor (FCSO) JAN. 19 Christina Smith, 31, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) During the week of Dec. 1319, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Of cers Anderson and Gore set up surveillance on two subjects duck hunting in Apalachicola Bay. When the hunters quit hunting, the of cers conducted a resource stop to check for bag limit compliance with the ducks that had been shot. When identifying themselves to the hunters, the operator of the boat put the boat in reverse and started backing away from the of cers. When doing this, both of cers observed the hunters throwing ducks overboard. Once getting the vessel stopped, they found the hunters to be in possession of over the bag limit of ducks. The hunters were cited for the bag limit violation and inference with a FWC of cer. During the week of Dec. 20, 2013 to Jan. 2, 2014, Of cer Allen received information a habitual offender would be out shing for mullet near St. George Island with a large mesh net during the evening. Of cers Stephens and Allen worked several hours in the afternoon attempting to locate the suspect’s vehicle and launch location. In the early evening, Allen located the suspect’s vehicle at a private ramp on St. George Island and contacted Of cers Gore and Nelson to assist with surveillance of the ramp. The of cers concealed themselves for several hours waiting for the suspect to arrive and disclosed their location and identi ed themselves as the vessel was being pulled from the water. The primary suspect has an extensive history of net violations and has had his shing privileges revoked, but was in possession of three, large-mesh nylon nets, several hundred pounds of mullet, three red drum and four black drum. Numerous resource and boating safety citations were issued in the case, including a felony for shing with privileges revoked. The suspect was booked into the Franklin County Jail. During the rst three weeks of January, Allen and Stephens have been diligent on patrol locating individuals harvesting undersized oysters in Apalachicola Bay. Their persistence has paid off, with the of cers making several undersized cases. Some of the percentages for the undersized oysters were as high as 90 percent. While in Apalachicola, Of cer Bunker was approached by an individual with information in reference to a boat coming in with undersized oysters. Bunker investigated the information and discovered activity associated with the intelligence. Due to his efforts, he was able to make a possession of undersized oyster case. Later in the week, Bunker was patrolling the Bald Point area when he heard gun re coming from a private lease and saw a vehicle parked on the shoulder of the road. Bunker waited for the hunter to come out of the woods. Upon encountering the hunter, Bunker noticed multiple indicators of alcohol impairment. He completed his investigation and the subject was arrested for use of a rearm while impaired by alcohol as well as possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Due to Bunker’s efforts, this individual was kept off of the highway where he would have been a risk to public safety. During the week of Jan. 10 to 16, Of cers Ramos and Bunker were on patrol in Eastpoint Channel when they noticed an oyster boat entering the channel. They followed the vessel to their docking area and once the oyster boat hit land, two subjects left the vessel and headed toward their vehicle. The third subject left the area and was later located at a gas station across the street. After all three subjects were brought back to their boat, a sheries and boating safety inspection was conducted. All three subjects were cited for 46 percent undersized oysters, untagged oysters, no saltwater products license or Apalachicola Bay oyster permit, and various boating safety violations. Ten bags of oysters were seized and returned to the resource. Of cers Allen, Gore, Anderson and Louque worked information they received about individuals harvesting oysters at night in Apalachicola Bay. While on night patrol, the of cers noticed a utility vehicle near the water’s edge that was loaded with what was later determined to be 22 bags of oysters. The of cers also noticed two individuals hiding in the bushes next to the vehicle. An inspection of the vehicle and vessel at the location revealed a total of 27 bags of oysters, approximately 3,000 pounds, that were untagged and unculled. Also, both individuals gave statements to harvesting the oysters from conditionally approved summer bars during the closure and that they had caught most of the oysters late in the afternoon and then brought the bags into Two Mile Channel, concealing them in an area behind a locked gate until they could bring them to their vehicle. The two men were cited for untagged oysters, harvesting between sunset and sunrise, and failure to deliver shell sh directly to a certi ed dealer. The oysters were returned to the bay. Allen, Gore, Anderson and Louque noticed a vessel with nonnavigation lights entering Two Mile Channel from the east while on night patrol. They stopped the vessel and found three individuals on board, together with nine, untagged bags of oysters weighing approximately 1,000 pounds. The individuals admitted to harvesting the oysters from the summer bars as well as starting to harvest after sunset. The three individuals were issued citations for possession of untagged bags, harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise, and failure to deliver shell sh directly to a certi ed dealer. Acting on the information received, the of cers seized a total of 36 bags of oysters, weighing approximately 4,000 pounds of product, which were returned to the water alive, with ve harvesters cited for 20 misdemeanors and two boating safety infractions.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, January 23, 2014 A Section Round-the-clock music led to matrimony Too bad our mother, Marie Densch Gray, is not still alive and still a city commissioner. My sister, Mayme Gray Millender, and I grew up listening to Mom’s stories of her rst visit to Carrabelle in 1938. She and four other recent graduates from business college in Paducah, Ky., rented a house for two weeks near Carrabelle Beach, next door to “The Juke Joint,” where Two Al’s Restaurant is now located. The jukebox had just two records that played over and over 24 hours a day. “Flat Foot Floogie (with a Floy, Floy)” and “A-tisket, A-tasket,” 24 hours a day. Mom said none of the “girls” slept the two weeks in Carrabelle. Our Dad, Herman Gray, was in charge of “protection” for the future secretaries. Dad worked for the forest service and one of the ve had a connection to Bill Jacobs, his boss’ boss in Tallahassee. J. P. & Grace Massey cared for the Sopchoppy Road re tower. Mom stayed with Grace once while J. P. and Herman were ghting a re. J. P. and Herman also had to put together a SummerCamp Beach sh fry for the “girls” and forest service managers. The Loud Music did not keep Herman from arriving on Marie’s southern Illinois farm doorstep 15 minutes after Mom. Mom had barely set down her suitcase. She asked her older brother Rue, “What do I do with this guy from Florida?” “Invite him in Sis, invite him in.” They married a year later and were married 47 years Harry Gray Tampa Bay Restaurant should consider turning down noise A recent Times article (see Jan. 16, 2014, article “Carrabelle commissioners defend weekend noise”) concerned the band at The Fish Camp playing loud music until after 1 a.m. Even the heading of the article refers to this loud, band playing as weekend “noise.” Commissioner Charlotte Schneider defended The Fish Camp’s actions. However, she did state “Sometimes when there’s loud music at night, we get aggravated.” The article goes on to point out that the loud, latenight band playing was not illegal. I did not see anywhere in the article wherein Ted Brodley, the complainant, asked the band to stop playing altogether. Mr. Brodley’s only complaint, which the article addresses, is that the music is too loud, with the bass even “vibrating his air conditioning vents.” In the article, Commissioner Schneider’s responses to Mr. Brodley seemed rather contentious. Her comments make it seem as if Mr. Brodley wants to shut down The Fish Camp and put all their employees out of work. What has happened to common courtesy and consideration for your neighbors? No one wants to put The Fish Camp or the band out of business. However, the band needs to turn down its volume at a reasonable hour. Their patrons can be entertained and enjoy live music without the volume/bass being at a window-shaking volume. Ms. Schneider mentions that The Fish Camp employs “single mothers and fathers” and that they pay their taxes. Well, Mr. Brodley owns several properties in Franklin County and his tax monies pay to send the children of these single mothers and fathers to school. He has no voice in the election of commissioners, nor does he get the bene t of a homestead exemption when he pays his taxes, but it is people like he who have spent their monies here for years who are keeping this county nancially a oat. What someone can legally do and what someone should rightly do are not always the same thing. It seems to me the solution to this “noise” problem is neither complex nor costly. The Fish Camp needs to be a good neighbor and have the band voluntarily turn down its volume at a reasonable hour. S. Railey Special to The Times Older adults who received as few as 10 sessions of mental training show long-lasting improvements in reasoning and speed of processing skills 10 years after the intervention, according to UF Health researchers with the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly, or ACTIVE, study. The study ndings appeared Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. “Our prior research suggested that the bene ts of the training could last up to ve years, or even seven years, but no one had ever reported 10-year maintenance in mental training in older adults,” said ACTIVE researcher Michael Marsiske, Ph.D., an associate professor of clinical and health psychology at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions. “One of the reasons that this is surprising has to do with how little training we did with participants, about 10 to 18 sessions. This would be like going to the gym for between ve and 10 weeks, never going again, and still seeing positive effects a decade later.” Participants who received the cognitive training also reported signi cantly less dif culty with daily living tasks, such as housework, medication management and shopping. Funded by the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute of Nursing Research, the ACTIVE study involved 2,832 seniors aged 65-96 who were divided into groups for 10 training sessions in memory, reasoning or speed of processing. Training was conducted in 60to 75-minute sessions over a veto six-week period. Some participants were randomly selected to receive booster training 11 and 35 months following the initial training. A control group received no training. Researchers conducted outcome assessments immediately after the training and again two, three, ve and 10 years later. The researchers selected training programs in memory, reasoning and speed of processing because those cognitive abilities are important for activities of daily living and there is evidence that they decline with old age, Marsiske said. “If we can boost these basic skills we think we can also boost everyday functioning or help people maintain their independence,” said Marsiske, a member of UF’s Institute on Aging. At the 10-year mark, nearly three-quarters of study participants who received reasoning training and more than 70 percent of speed of processing participants were performing at or above their baseline level compared to about 62 percent and 50 percent, respectively, of control participants. While memory improvements were not sustained 10 years later among participants in the memory training group, older adults in all three of the training groups reported less decline in their ability to perform daily tasks. Future research may examine whether longer training periods or booster sessions may help older adults maintain gains in memory performance, Marsiske said. ACTIVE investigators are currently studying ways to extend mental training beyond the training sessions to activities that older adults can do on their own, such as computerized training programs and workbooks that couples can do together. Marsiske and other researchers are also evaluating the effect of combining mental exercise with physical exercise. “With the ACTIVE study I think we’ve permanently shattered the myth that old dogs, and older humans, can’t learn new tricks,” Marsiske said. “I think underlying that is a clear understanding, not just from our work, but from the work of others, that a critical thing to do as we get older is to challenge ourselves with new things. Oftentimes older adults will ask ‘Should I do crossword puzzles?’ And yes, those are a wonderful thing to do. But if you’re an expert crossword puzzler, late life is the time to take on some new challenge. So play video games or learn an instrument, because learning new things seems to be the real secret to maintaining mental functioning in old age.” In addition to Marsiske, ACTIVE investigators include George W. Rebok, Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University; Karlene Ball, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham; John N. Morris, Ph.D., Hebrew Senior Life; Sharon Tennstedt, Ph.D., New England Research Institutes; Frederick Unversagt, Ph.D., Indiana University; and Sherry L. Willis, Ph.D., University of Washington. ACTIVE research was supported by the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute for Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health. UF: Bene ts of mental exercises for seniors persist MICHAEL MARSISKE By CINDY SPENCE Special to the Times Bone-crushing tackles may make football fans avert their eyes in horror, but Ghatu Subhash studies collisions, impacts and crashes, both on the eld and off. The University of Florida professor needs to do so in order to perfect his design for a safer helmet, which could address the increasing concerns about concussions and other head injuries in sports from Pop Warner to the National Football League when testing is complete. Subhash and his collaborators have designed a helmet that protects against traumatic brain injury by accounting for the two kinds of force athletes encounter during a football game. Traumatic brain injuries occur 1.7 million times a year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and 20 percent of those injuries are sports-related, including concussions that can cause long-term damage. “Currently, most football helmets are designed for linear force,” said Subhash, a UF Research Foundation professor and the Knox T. Millsaps professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering. “Our design takes into account linear and rotational force.” A linear hit is a centered, frontal hit that pushes the head straight back. Helmets today, however, fail to account for rotational hits, which cause 40 percent of head injuries. The rotational hits occur because a helmet is round, and a frontal hit that misses the middle of the helmet can slide to the side, causing a shearing motion that jostles the brain inside the skull. Both forces can cause traumatic brain injury. “This rotational force can be serious even when the impact is low,” Subhash said. Each kind of force requires a different kind of protection, so Subhash and his colleagues designed a helmet with two kinds of protective chambers to cushion the skull. One layer uses Newtonian uids and the other uses a special uid known as non-Newtonian. Newtonian uids are water and air; non-Newtonian uids are like gels. Layers of the two uids form a protective padding, reducing the impact to the head. Together, the two layers absorb and distribute energy. As one layer experiences force and compresses, the uid inside expands through a connecting tube into the next layer, neutralizing the force. When the pressure is removed, the chambers return to their original state, allowing for repeated use. One layer alone wouldn’t work, Subhash said. For instance, a foam or gel padding that experienced force would just transmit that force to the inside of a helmet, still impacting the skull. “The uidlled cells within the helmet respond, so no matter the angle of impact, the helmet automatically protects any part of the head,” Subhash said. The uidlled cushions work well in the laboratory, and the next stage will be testing on a wider scale with companies interested in manufacturing the helmets. Subhash and his colleagues will demonstrate the helmet for a group of venture capitalists in late January. An Associated Press review of NFL penalties in 2013 found that football players receive an illegal blow to the head or neck almost once each game. The NFL last year settled a lawsuit by more than 4,500 former players, pledging $800 million to diagnose and compensate retired players who blame their brain disorders on tackles during their careers. While the sports applications are obvious, they were not the inspiration for the research, Subhash said. For 15 years, he has been working to improve body armor and helmets for soldiers in combat, looking at materials that are resistant both to impact and velocity from bullets and other objects. UF neurosurgeon Ian Heger found out about his work, and the two began collaborating with UF radiology professor Keith Peters to develop a more protective sports helmet. “It’s glamorous to talk about football, but that’s not the only application,” Subhash said. “Soldiers, skateboarders, bicyclists, re ghters, construction workers, and athletes in other sports can bene t from this design.” The protective layers also are designed to be inexpensive and easy to use in retro tting a helmet, making them ideal for parents who want to protect sports-minded children. “You could go to the store and buy strips of this material and a $10 helmet and make it safer,” Subhash said. “This works for kids, works for soldiers, and for professional athletes, too.” Cindy Spence (cindyrspence@u .edu) is a writer for the University of Florida. SHAWN ROBINSON | University of Florida Dr. Keith Peters, left, an associate professor of neuroradiology at the University of Florida, and UF engineering professor Ghatu Subhash examine gel pads inside a football helmet that they say will reduce the impact caused by frontal and glancing blows that lead most often to concussions among football players. UF researchers offer safer football helmet Letters to the EDITOR Page A4

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, January 23, 2014 fried shrimp, oyster stew and fried, raw and steamed oysters attested to what was even greater than the 25 percent attendance in crease Getter’s crew had forecast. Based just on Friday night’s art preview and Saturday’s cash and credit cards, the event took in $36,000, about one-third more than the $27,000 last year. Friday night’s silent auction and preview at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts, which commit tee member Meghan Da vis “kind of took over this year,” brought in $5,000, about three times last year’s total, Getter said. The attendance was good, and the items and art kept coming in even on Saturday to be auctioned off, she said. Assisting Getter and Davis with organizing du ties were treasurer Shelly Shepard, secretary Car rie Jones, Joe Taylor and Betty Webb. The dozen competitive teams each received their dozen oysters, or a pint for stew, at the noon start of the cook-off. Notice is hereby gi v en that on January 29, 2014, be ginning at 6:30 p.m. (ET), the Franklin County Construction Industry Licensing Board will conduct a public meeting in the county commission meeting room located at the Franklin County Courthouse Anne x, 34 F orbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida to consider pro viding an advisory opinion on the issuance of a b uilding permit application led by John Clark for property located at 696 East Bayshore Dri v e, St. Geor ge Island, Florida. The public is in vited to attend the public hearing. Those persons who desire to speak re g arding the matter shall be gi v en a reasonable opportunity to speak. The proposed application is on le with, and may be vie wed at, the Franklin County Planning and Zoning Ofce, which is located at 33 F orbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida. The meeting room is handicap accessible; ho we v er those persons who may require special assistance to attend the public meeting must mak e arrangements in adv ance by calling deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8161, x100 at least tw o b usiness days in adv ance of the meeting. An y person who may desire to challenge the outcome of the public meeting is responsible for recording a v erbatim transcript of the meeting. MEETING NOTICE OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CONSTRUCTION INDUSTR Y LICENSING BOARD BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Coupon Expir es: 1-31-14 CODE: AP00 “There’s been different conicting stories and statements why. It’s in there somewhere what’s the truth.” He said the prosecutors’ ofce agreed to the four-de cade-long incarceration, of which Conkel will have to serve at least 85 percent, because “it seems most likely a life sentence. “It had to do with the defendant’s age and the length of incarceration and what we felt was it was most likely a life sentence,” he said. “It gives her some semblance of hope.” Conkel has been in the Franklin County Jail for a little more than a year. She has gained considerable weight during that time, after a craving for illegal street drugs believed to have inuenced the crime. Conkel was taken to Lowell Annex and now awaits transfer to a wom en’s facility. She is slated for release on Dec. 4, 2052. they’re in a hurry, they don’t know where they’re going,” he said. “That’s like a life without God.” Beshears, a Tallahassee nurs eryman rst elected in 2012, wore an open collar and an engaging smile as he elaborated on the rst of two central points: Service and attitude. “It starts with service. Some people are called to it. Some people just feel the deep desire to serve on some level,” he said. “I’m not just talking about politics. One per son can make a difference through service, whether it be service to God, service to the church, your country, your state, your commu nity, your family, a charity or cause, your business. “My wife and I are raising our kids to know and understand this, just like my wife and I were raised,” Beshears said. “To those much has been given, much is expected. To give without any expectation of re ciprocation, to help those that you can and those in need, to work hard and set an example for others that through God, hard work and com mitment, anything is possible.” Beshears cited King’s call to service and how “on Aug. 28, 1963, (he) delivered the ‘I Have a Dream Speech’ that absolutely made a dif ference. That speech, and his call to service, have been immortal ized, and every year we recognize his dedication to the equality of all men and women, from all walks of life and from every ethnic propor tion. What an example of service he inspired. “ Earlier in the program, a video of King’s speech was viewed on an enormous screen at the front of the Armory. Beshears conceded that “talk ing about service is hard if you are hurting yourself or you are wor ried about where the next meal is coming from for you or your family. It doesn’t matter if you are swimming for the lifeboat and you drowned two feet from it or 100 feet from it. You still drowned. “Some of you have heard me say this before, but I don’t have all the answers. But I will continue to try and help and do all that is hu manly possible to help and serve. I will continue to help get all those in the lifeboat I can as long as they are ghting to get to it,” Beshears said. He cited verses from Galatians 6:9-10 that read “So let’s not get tired of doing what is good. At just the right time we will reap a har vest of blessing if we don’t give up. Therefore whenever we have the opportunity we should do good to everyone — especially to those in the family of faith.” Beshears then tackled his sec ond theme. “None of what I just mentioned is possible without a good attitude. Your attitude affects you in so many different ways. It truly controls your perspective ev ery day you are alive and awake; it affects your health, your marriage, your job, your spiritual well-being,” he said. “No wonder our government, our country is so lost. We have for gotten the principles of faith that our forefathers came and built this country on,” Beshears said. “It just seems that so many people out there today have a bad attitude. “ The 47-year-old legislator said he often asks people who he meets for the rst time “Tell me some thing good,” and nds people are often at a loss for words. “I know it is tough out there. Times are hard, and people are confused and looking for answers. But rather than look to God and the good book, most people forget that he is there,” he said. “The most common answer I get is ‘I don’t know anything good,’ or ‘I don’t have anything good to tell you,’ or simply ‘I don’t know.’ “Looking around, I can usually tell them two or three things quick ly, like ‘it’s a pretty day,’ ‘the weath er is nice,’ or ‘we have rain and it’s needed’ or ‘it’s Friday’ or ‘God is good, my friend’ or ‘at least you are above the ground and not be neath it’,” Beshears said. “Maybe one of every 10 people I meet has something positive to say. I’ve only met a few that said ‘God is good, my friend.’ Now they knew what’s important.” He closed his prepared re marks, brief compared to the of ten extended oratory of King Day speakers, with a Bible verse that he said “perhaps can help your attitude when you are struggling with life.” “Understand this, my dear brothers and sisters: You must all be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to get angry. Human anger does not produce the righ teousness God desires. So get rid of all the lth and evil in your lives, and humbly accept the word God has planted in your hearts, for it has the power to save your souls,” he cited, from James 1:19 -21. “Imagine if everyone in govern ment on all levels, federal, state and local read this every day and took it to heart,” Beshears said. “If all government ofcials real ized that they are there to serve the people and not themselves. Imagine if all mankind remem bered this and aspired to do what is right when no one is looking, to try and help everyone that genu inely needs help and to serve their community in some small shape, fashion or form. “To quote Dr. King’s words in his famous speech when talking to the people and reminding them: ‘We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dig nity and discipline.’ Dr. King knew that the high road was always the only road that would lead to a bet ter country.” ‘FORGIVENESS IS NOT AN OCCASIONAL ACTION’ The event, under the direction of H’COLA’s Delores Croom, lled much, but not all, of the Armory oor, at least a third of the audience made up of young people, many from the Franklin County School’s SWAT anti-tobacco program. A processional of clergy, city of cials and Florida Highway Patrol troopers joined the young people in owing open the program, pre sided over by the Bishop Robert Davis, of the Love Center. Love Center Pastor Sheila White-Martin gave the opening invocation, followed by a welcome from White. “Especially during this time of major crisis in our country, no man can put you so low as to hate him,” she said. “Forgiveness is not an occasional action, it is a constant attitude.” One rendition that needed no forgiving and summoned glory in the highest was the singing of the national anthem by high school basketball coach Michael Sweatt. The SWAT group led the pledges of allegiance, to both the American ag and Christian ag. Angeline Stanley provided rich vocals to the black national anthem “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” followed by two selections from the Community Mass Choir, directed by Mount Zion Baptist Church Pastor Barry Hand, who provide keyboard accompaniment throughout the entire event. The choir sang “Worthy to Be Praised” to music, and then served up an a cappella version of “It is well with my soul,” which brought the audi ence to its feet. In the greetings from county and city elected ofcials, Sgt. James Pugh lled in for Sheriff Mike Mock, and in doing so, touched on a theme that was repeated several times in others’ remarks. “The dream had to do with equality for all people, freedom for all people, not just for one selected people, but for all people,” Pugh said. Apalachicola was well-repre sented at the event, but no other county or Carrabelle ofcials were in attendance. Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook spoke briey on behalf of Mayor Van Johnson, who handled the sound system throughout the morning program. After a dance number by the Love Center Chosen Generation Youth, Croom recognized a halfdozen state troopers from the unit out of Panama City, which included her sister, Liz Varner, who ad dressed the event. Also recognized was former Apalachicola police of cer Anthony Croom, now in law enforcement in Bay County. Croom offered special matted certicates of recognition to four women: White, for her visionary work with the King Day event; Cadence Bank’s Stephnia Tur rell, who worked her way up from teller to a position as assistant to the bank president; former Chap man teacher Lorine Banks, who as a college student met King during the march in Selma, Ala.; and Myr tice Wynn, who travels down regu larly from Augusta, Ga., as part of an educational outreach. “Unspoken,” a group of high school interpretive dancers, per formed “You Are Our Heroes,” followed by an introduction by high school guidance counselor of Beshears. The 3Ds — Damien Davis and Devonte and Deandre Jordan — then dramatized a mime presentation in service to God’s protection. The event closed with the tra ditional motorcade through down town, and then a light lunch at the Armory for honored guests. LEFT: Pastor Barry Hand directs the Community Mass Choir. CENTER: The 3Ds perform a mime presentation. RIGHT: The group “Unspoken” interprets the song “You Are Our Heroes.” PHOTOS BY DAVI AVI D AA D LERSTEIN LERSTEIN | The Times BASH from page A1 MURDER from page A1 Past winners Jeff Ilardi, with his Pearls of the Bay spruced-up on the half-shell, and the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department, with their “Lazy Lester” deep dish baked oyster dish, both modied their past win ning recipes to take aim at victory this year. John Solomon’s Flori da Seafood festival team, known for their barbe cue wins but not yet for oysters, complicated the challenge both geographi cally and gastronomically with their “Oysters of the World” dish. Solomon used reci pes from Japan, Austra lia and Ireland to create three distinct variations, the Japanese with rice wine, soy, ginger and salmon roe; the Irish dev iled with egg, cayenne, breaded and baked; and the Australian with bacon and bread crumbs, also baked. The small dishes each had a specially ordered ag from their respec tive countries and a map on the plate, but the clues didn’t resonate with judge Michael Allen, owner of Oyster Radio. “I was not told I had to know the ags of the countries,” he said be tween satised bites. With few exceptions, the presentations of the dozen dishes were well done. The Weems team, led by Jody Fortunas, served up two rows of Mirabella oysters, mari nated in garlic, olive oil and lemon juice, topped with black caviar, each atop a ceramic spoon, ac companied by seasoned crackers. Bobbi Walker, from Orange Beach, Ala., pre pared fried oysters a vored with blue cheese and potpourri sauce, in a silver serving dish. She had help from Cheryl Childress and husband, Ron, from Daphne, Ala., and Sheryl Watts, from Meridian, Miss., all stay ing on Cape San Blas. “We just decided we wanted to do something fun,” Walker said. Former undersheriff Joel Norred and his wife, Susan, did “Naked Oys ters Under Glass,” each grilled with bacon, spin ach and anise and served with a “recracker” to add crunch. Earl Solomon did Oys ters Rockefeller, and that earned him third place with Allen and the other two judges — Ron Sewell, a self-described “little fat Ford dealer from Odessa Texas” back for his sec ond year, and St. George Island’s Jerry Thompson, who was at least 15 min utes late because of park ing hassles, which de layed the scheduled start of judging. “I think some dishes would have been better if they had started eating them 15 to 20 minutes be fore, like they were sup posed to, instead of letting them get cold,” Getter said. “I told them this one should have been warm, so keep that in mind. This is cold now, but don’t take it against them.” The three-judge panel eventually selected the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department’s dish for the top prize, the second year in a row, and Ilardi’s halfshell delights for second, repeating top nishes they each earned in previ ous years. Getter said she be lieves it might be time to bring in some fresh palates to the task. “You live and learn,” she said. “Maybe it should be like that, but it doesn’t make sense to have the same judges.” Many of the attendees brought their dogs to the event, and Getter said that, too, boosted turnout. “Everybody had their dog on the leash, which is nice, too,” she said. “My goal always was to have a nice, old-town kind of festival oriented for families.” MLK from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, January 23, 2014 ERNEST is a 9 w eek old A ussie/Lab cr oss He and a litt er ma t e w er e o wner surr ender ed a w eek ago T his c ombina tion of br eeds mak e f or a g r ea t dog I n t elligen t and dev ot ed W e ar e also caring f or a Lab mix mom with 6 pups T hey w on t be r eady f or another 5-6 w eeks but if y ou ha v e been think ing about adopting a pupp y w e in vit e y ou t o c ome meet this litt er! V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets I f y ou ar e missing a pet or w an t t o adopt a new pet please check with y our local Humane S ociet y or Shelt er F ollo w us on F ac ebook : S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k: S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-415-1638 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 1/14. Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders Single T ooth Implant st ar ting at $ 1 8 95 Dentur e Implants st ar ting at $ 1 5 95 L o w er Ar c h $ 1 9 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 Upper Ar c h 20144-3-T4 Longtime St. George Islander Dominic Baragona was treated to a surprise party during a visit to St. George Island last weekend. On Sunday afternoon, aided by Baragona’s daughter, Pam Robinson, and wife, Vilma, Harry Arnold hosted a get together at the Jay Abbott Firehouse. Baragona was lured to the scene with the promise of watching afternoon football with friends. Before sitting down to eat, friends and family took turns recounting memories of Baragona and his time on the island. “Everything that I am and everything that I want to be is because of this person,” said daughter Pam. Wife Vilma thanked everyone present and said the island would always be her home. Many county residents will remember Baragona as the proprietor of Dominic’s Raw Bar that served food on the porch at Harry A’s bar. The Baragonas stopped over on a trip to New Orleans to celebrate his 80th birthday on Monday. Birthdays Society Kevin and Cindy Steiger, of Apalachicola, announce the engagement of their daughter, Katherine “Katie” Steiger, to Adam Hodge, son of Keith and Carla Hodge, of Boonvill, Ind. The couple was engaged over the Christmas holidays. They plan an outdoor wedding during the fall of 2014. Katie and Adam are true high school sweethearts, Katie graduating with the class of 2010, and Adam the class of 2011, both from Port St. Joe High School. They are very happy to share their engagement announcement with all their friends both in Apalachicola and Port St. Joe. Engagement Special to The Times The St. George Plantation will display Susan L. Richardson’s oil paintings at the Clubhouse starting on Feb. 8, the day of the third annual St. George Island Tour of Homes, which will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Richardson, born and raised in London, England, dared to move to the states at the tender age of 20. She has lived in Cleveland, Manhattan and Atlanta but now calls Franklin County home, a home lled with daily wonders and splendors, and here she nds most of her inspiration. The art on display will include some of Richardson’s works that have won recognition and awards in venues from Florida to Georgia. Many of the paintings have been featured in “Art Galleries and Artists of the South” magazine. She has also been working on new paintings that will have their rst viewing in the Clubhouse. “We are fortunate to have these paintings for our viewing pleasure until the end of March,” Plantation General Manager Karen Rudder said. “We invite you to feast your eyes upon some of the best local artwork displayed in a beautiful setting.” You can peruse Susan’s work at www.susanrichardson.artistwebsites. com. To nd out more information on the tour, visit www.sgitourofhomes. com. SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S Off To Tong the Summer Beds oil 8x10 2013 Plantation to showcase Richardson’s oil paintings LOILOI S SWO O B O O D A A | The Times Harry Arnold and Dominic Baragona, right.Katie Steiger, A A dam H H odge engaged By TEVI sS PAGE Special to the Times Students are beginning to feel the drag of school again. The teachers of the year were announced: in elementary school, Mrs. Katrina Ham; in middle school, Mr. Spencer Tolbert; and in high school Ms. Sherry Joyner. They will be recognized at a banquet on Feb. 10. Ms. Jennifer Edwards’ Digital Design classes are being introduced to some new skills that will give them an academic edge in the future. They are being certied in Microsoft Ofce 2013. The certications will be given to those individuals who complete the courses and pass the exams. Most of the students are excited about the new course. The Miss Seahawk pageant is approaching, and students are thrilled. The fth annual pageant is Feb. 22 at the school. Entries are due by end of school day on Feb. 7. Seniors are grasping for scholarships as deadlines approach and graduation draws near. Ms. Edwards will hold a photo shoot for cap and gown pictures on Feb. 1 and 2. HAHA WK TALTALK Students pursue Microsoft Ofce certication Shirley Taylor, of Eastpoint, was honored Sunday afternoon with a birthday party given by her children on the occasion of her 80th birthday, Jan. 17. The Episcopal Church Women catered the affair in Trinity Episcopal Church’s Benedict Hall, with donations collected in lieu of gifts for the Apalachicola Municipal Library, one of the many civic cause with which Taylor has long been active. Pictured, on either end, are daughter and son-inlaw Beth and Nate Tyson, of Loganville, Ga., and from left, granddaughter Renah Tyson, an honor student at Georgia Southern University; granddaughter Kelsey Lanier, a student at Sante Fe Community College; grandson Taylor Tyson, also an honor student at Georgia Southern; Shirley Taylor; son Steve Lanier; granddaughter Walton High School junior Cameron Taylor, of Defuniak Springs; and grandson Kyle Taylor, a freshman at Northwest Florida State College. Not pictured are granddaughter Ashley Lanier, a ight attendant for Miami Air, and daughter-in-law Michelle Doggett, of Defuniak Springs. Taylor honored on 80th birthday Happy birthday, Dominic

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The Times | A7 Thursday, January 23, 2014 Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur c h -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P .O Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 R. Micha el Whale y P astor >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Special to the Times On Jan. 8, the University of Notre Dame Folk Choir from South Bend, Ind., presented an ecumenical Vesper service followed by a concert in St. Patrick Church to a standing-room-only audience. The concert was presented in collaboration with the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society, the Historic Apalachicola Foundation, St. Patrick Catholic Church and Trinity Episcopal Church. The 50-student folk choir, led by composer and director Steven Warner, Assistant Director Karen Schneider Kirner, staffer Michelle Warner and the Rev. David Scheidler, arrived at noon to Apalachicola by bus from the western part of the Panhandle. They were greeted at the Apalachicola Museum of Art by HAF volunteers Beth Appleton, Michaelin and Dave Watts and Marie and Willoughby Marshall. Their delight in this part of the Forgotten Coast is recorded in the director’s blog for that day under Day 6: Old Florida. “The trip we designed for this Florida pilgrimage was expansive; we started in the Winter Park/ Orlando area, then headed all the way up to the Panhandle, past Pensacola. Then, on the way back, we made our way along the Gulf of Mexico to the sleepy little town of Apalachicola,” Warner wrote. “...When, in Fort Walton Beach, we told them we were headed to this sleepy little town of 2,500 people, the response I got was ‘Apalachicola,’ they said ‘that’s Old Florida.’ And it was not said in a demeaning way, but inected in a manner that connotes reverence. Almost like they had realized that all of their cities were turning out the same way, a conglomerate of mall, parking lots and chain restaurants. “I grew up in a town in rural Vermont with a population of 800. So walking through this sleepy little place, a seaport town that had once been a great shipping center for the cotton industry, was a nostalgic trip for me. Small shops, a community bank, houses that were actually known by how they were related to different members of the town… all this contributed to the experience,” he wrote. “...A great American musicologist, Gilbert Chase, once said something that I still keep close to my soul. “Look to the old ways and walk therein.” And that we did in old Florida, in Apalachicola.” The attendees enjoyed not only a beautiful concert but the joy of knowing there are “lovely young people like that in the world,” said Arlene Wingate, chairman of the committee overseeing the Ilse Newell concert series. The ladies of St. Patrick and Trinity, and HAF, provided a supper reception in the church fellowship hall after the concert. Afterward, the tour bus carrying the 50 students and staff from Notre Dame was escorted by the Apalachicola Police Department across the bridge to St. George Island, where they enjoyed the hospitality of an evening’s rest and morning breakfast at the residence of David and Michaelin Watts, and Olivier Monod’s St. George Inn before departing for South Florida. The event promotion was assisted by a $500 grant by the Tourist Development Council to the Historic Apalachicola Foundation. The gate receipts were split between the Ilse Newell Fund and St. Patrick Church. What a great weekend it was. When I got to the boat club for breakfast last Saturday, I was number 99. There was a steady crowd all morning. Hope you can join us next month on Feb. 15. The Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 was rocking last Saturday night at the January Birthday Bash. A good time was had by all. Mark your calendars for Friday, Feb. 14. There will be a Valentine’s Day steak dinner at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. The meal for Lady Legionnaires and Auxiliary League members will be free. For all other members and guests, a donation of $14 will be required. On Sunday afternoon, Jan. 19, many of us gathered at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered luncheon. See you next month, on Sunday, Feb. 16. It’s time to give a big hats off to all our faithful volunteers. You can nd them at Chillas Hall, Post 82, the boat club, the senior center and the food bank, just to name a few places. Let them know you appreciate it. Many of us gathered last Friday at Sacred Heart Church for the mass for Louis Staff. After Father Eddie celebrated Mass, we led into the church hall. Members of the ladies’ guild had a light lunch prepared for us. Pray for the repose of Louis’ soul and for Mary and their family. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, ASAP also stands for Always Say a Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Gayle Smith On Saturday, Jan. 18, I passed out at the 10Foot-Hole. I would like to thank the boys that were down at the “Benches” that called 911. I would like to thank the rst responder people that did what they did. I would like to thank the ambulance crew for getting me to the hospital, I would like to thank the doctors, nurses, cooks, orderlies at Weems Memorial Hospital for all being very professional with my two-day stay with them. I would like to give a special thanks to Greg Chancey for doing so many little things for me over the weekend. Thanks again everyone — a big thumbs-up to all of you. Gayle A. Smith Luigi Cannella of St. George Island died at 5:55 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, at the home of his daughter, Josephine Cannella-Krehl. Originally from Castellammare del Golfo, Sicily, Cannella was 84 years old. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola on Saturday, Feb. 1. In lieu of owers, the family is requesting donations to Big Bend Hospice in memory of Luigi Cannella. He was under the care of Dr. Nancy Chorba of Big Bend Hospice. Luigi Cannella Ronald Duane “Blue” Shiver was born Aug. 12, 1969, in Apalachicola. He passed away Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, at the age of 44 in Apalachicola. He was a commercial sherman and a lifelong resident of Apalachicola. He is survived by his mother, Jane Shiver; brother, Bobby Shiver (Arlene); sister, Melissa Lee (Timothy); numerous nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins; and a host of friends. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, Jan. 22, at Kelley Funeral Home. Viewing was held one hour before services. Ronald Duane Shiver DUANE SHIVE rR Suzanna (Susie) Marie Moore, 46, of Eastpoint, died Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Susie was born Jan. 19, 1967, in St. Petersburg to Michael Pridgen and Maryann Keagle. She married Daniel Albert Moore of Eastpoint on Feb. 6, 1991, and they resided in Eastpoint. Susie, a 1985 Carrabelle High school graduate, was a member of the Eastpoint Church of God. She worked at the Franklin County Health Department. Susie is survived by her husband, Danny Moore, of Eastpoint; parents Michael and Irene Pridgen of Suma tra and Maryann Keagle of St. Petersburg; one daugh ter, Misty Ann Romero and husband, Erick; three sons, Wesley Moore, Johnny Turner and wife, Alana, and Kyle Moore; eight grand children, all of East point; two sisters, Michele Tuggle and husband, Dennis, of Crestview, and Cindy Hogan and husband, Robert, of Eastpoint; one brother, Michael Pridgen and wife, Terry, of Apala chicola; and many nieces and nephews, and loved by all. A memorial service was held Monday afternoon, Jan. 20, at the Eastpoint Church of God, ofciated by Pastor Ronnie Luke of Eastpoint Church of God and Sister Susan Roach of First Pentecostal Holiness Church. Memorialization by cremation. The family would like to extend its sincere gratitude to the community for its outpouring of love and sup port in their time of loss. Suzanna Marie Moore SUZANNA MOO rR E Carrabelle Methodists to host ‘Market Days’ kickoff Saturday Carrabelle United Methodist Church invites all to its 2014 Market Days kickoff event from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25. Hot dogs, chili and crafts will be on sale. Enjoy fellowship with neighbors and listen to lots of local musical talent at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street in Carrabelle, next to the re station. Donations for rafe of handmade, crocheted bed coverlet and two $25 gift certicates from the Seineyard Restaurant will be taken through 2 p.m., when the drawing will be held. Come and expect a true blessing. Obituaries Card of THANK sS Card of THANK sS LANA rR K NEW sS Jim Welsh Faithful volunteers deserve a big hats off Notre Dame folk choir delights audience News B rR IEF sS Museum to screen documentary Saturday The 28th Infantry Division that trained at Camp Gordon Johnston bore the brunt of the opening drive of what was known as the “Battle of the Bulge.” At 10:30 a.m.on Saturday, a documentary, “The Drive to the Ardennes,” will be shown in the movie theater at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum. Produced by CGJ Member John Gaffey, the documentary will feature the valiant effort of the outnumbered 28th which slowed the advances of the Panzer Divisions speeding towards the village, Bastogne, a key objective of the Germans in their “last gasp” attempt to drive a wedge into the Allied forces and recapture the initiative on the Western Front. The documentary will last about one hour, and free popcorn will be provided. While there is no admission fee, remember the museum operates on donations, and donations are welcome. Popham talk highlights F F eb. 8 island home tour Seven distinctive and beautiful homes will be featured during the third annual St. George Island Tour of Homes from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 8. The tour benets the St. George Lighthouse Association (SGLA). Also included on the tour are the Cape St. George Lighthouse and Keeper’s House, and the St. George Plantation Clubhouse. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 on the day of the tour. Tour weekend will begin with a kick-off event on Feb. 7, featuring a special presentation, refreshments and door prizes. James L. Hargrove, author and retired University of Georgia professor, will talk about the early development of St. George Island. Hargrove is the author of “The Oyster King,” which tells the ctionalized story of William Lee Popham, the rst man to attempt the development of St. George Island in the 1920s. This free event is from 6-8 p.m. at the St. George Island Fire Station, 324 East Pine Ave. Tour tickets are available at the Lighthouse Gift Shop on St. George Island. To order tickets, call the Gift Shop at 927-7745. Tickets will be available on Tour Day at Lighthouse Park and at the St. George Plantation Clubhouse. For more information, visit www. sgitourofhomes.com

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As I already mentioned, during the 2013 Christmas Bird Count, I visited Port St. Joe Airport where there are a number of unusual plants. One I noticed particularly is this yellow form of myrtle-leaf holly. Myrtle-leaf holly (Ilex myrtifolia) is an evergreen shrub or small tree with many short, crooked branches and tiny leaves. Height is usually no more than 18-20 feet with a trunk diameter of about six inches but the national champion, near Lawtey, is 40 feet tall with a crown spread of 35 feet. This is a wetland plant often found on the border of ponds, swamps and pine or bald cypress forests. Flowers are tiny and rounded with four white petals and occur in the spring. The plant is dioecious (die-ohsee-us) meaning male and female owers are on separate plants. The berries are found only on female trees. They are usually bright red but may be yellow or orange. They ripen in the autumn. The stiff, leathery leaves are a bit smaller than those of yaupon holly and their edges are smooth. Yaupon leaves are edged with small rounded teeth. This plant is rarely cultivated but deserves more attention from local gardeners. It is native to zone 8 but is viable in zones 7-10. While this plant prefers wet feet, it is droughttolerant and somewhat salt-tolerant. Myrtle-leaf holly prefers full sun but will tolerate some shade. It could be used as an evergreen screen or pruned into a formal hedge. Birds, especially cedar waxwings, eat the berries, which usually persist on the plant until the end of winter. This plant is best propagated with softwood cuttings taken in spring. Although no information on propagation with seed is available, seeds of most holly species require at least two years of dormancy before they will germinate. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu J an. 23 53 41 0 % F ri, J an. 24 51 46 0 % S a t J an. 25 58 47 10 % Sun, J an. 26 56 38 20 % M on, J an. 27 64 42 % T ues J an. 28 64 42 % W ed J an. 29 64 42 % Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) ] \IL []\ R^G \ I9 ]\ By WES LOCHER Halifax Newspapers It’s a tough time to be a turtle. As winter cold snaps lowered the temperature of the Gulf waters, many area sea turtles are becoming “cold-stunned.” The cold water of St. Joe Bay, which has reached lows of 37 degrees, impacts the metabolism of the coldblooded turtles, putting them into a hypothermic state and leaving them unable to get to the surface to breathe. These turtles are in danger of drowning and become susceptible to other illnesses. All around Gulf County, the Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Gulf World Marine Institute (GWMI) and local volunteers spent the last week pulling these turtles out of the water for rehabilitation. According to GWMI, the body temperature of the turtles coming in for rehab was between 40-50 degrees and some of the animal’s heart rates were as slow as one beat per minute. Last week alone GWMI received more than 50 turtles, including several Kemp’s Ridley turtles, which are on the critically endangered species list. “It’s been a really busy week on the Cape,” said Turtle Patrol volunteer Julia Cunningham. “It’s volunteers and the community pulling together that makes this possible.” Volunteers in Gulf County have been launching kayaks daily from Scallop Cove, Cape San Blas Inn and the kayak launch at Stump hole to look for cold-stunned turtles oating below the surface. Once the turtles are pulled from the water, they’re wrapped in blankets and transported to GWMI in Panama City to be slowly warmed and assessed for illness. Only 16 of the 87 turtles rescued were lost, a good ratio, said Secret HolmesDouglas, director of animal care and training at GWMI. On Jan. 14, the 57 turtles rescued from around the county were released into the gulf at Cape Palms Park on St. Joseph Peninsula. They were released into the warm waters on the gulf side to avoid the temperatures of the bay. Prior to release, the turtles were weighed, measured and tagged. Six of the turtles were Kemp’s Ridleys, while the rest were endangered greens. Five turtles were transported back to the Perdido Key area of Gulf Island National Seashore for release and remained in rehabilitation at GWMI due to medical illness or and injuries. More than 200 members of the public turned out to witness the sea turtles released. Holmes-Douglas said that over the next few weeks, they’d nd their way back to St. Joe Bay once the waters were warm and they were no longer in danger. The public is asked to report any stranded, injured or dead sea turtles to the FWC’s Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922) or #FWC or *FWC on a cell phone. Florida residents can help support sea turtle research and response efforts by purchasing a sea turtle license plate at BuyaPlate.com or through their local tax collector. For more information about Florida’s sea turtles, visit MyFWC. com/Research or MyFWC. com/SeaTurtle. VINCE BISHOP | Special to the Times Volunteer rescuer Julia Cunningham of Cape San Blas prepares to release a healthy turtle on January 14. Cold-stunned turtles released on Cape Page 8 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Myrtle-leaf holly By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A bald eagle rescued by Eric Lovestrand and Ronnie Carter is headed to Pensacola. Because it could not y, the bird caught the attention of visitors to Seafood Workers Park west of Apalachicola. On Jan. 3, Lovestrand and Carter, both ANERR employees, captured the sick bird and transported it to the Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA) wildlife rescue facility in Wakulla County for assessment and treatment. FWMA Manager Chris Beatty said blood samples sent off to be tested came back positive for aspergillus, a fungal infection that can be fatal to birds. The eagle is now doing well and is able to perch and feed itself but will require additional therapy before it can be safely released. When it is stable enough to travel, it will go to the Wildlife Sanctuary of Northwest Florida in Pensacola, where it can be handled by eagle specialists. Beatty said the bird’s brief stay at FWMA cost more than $400 in medical tests above and beyond the cost of feeding it and prescribed medications. “It’s just another routine day,” she said. FWMA is a wildlife refuge and rehabilitation center that accepts animals from ve surrounding counties including Franklin. Although FWMA receives injured and orphaned wildlife from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and US Fish and Wildlife Service, the center receives no government support. If you would like to support Beatty’s work, you can donate to FWMA at any time. FWMA always needs bleach, paper towels, fruit cocktail, birdseed, nuts, pelican sh (pin sh, nger mullet, thread herring, butter sh), fresh fruit and vegetables, Pedigree wet and dry dog food, Friskies wet and dry cat food, Dawn dish liquid and gift cards from local grocers to give FWMA exibility in purchasing when needed items are not on hand. They will also gladly accept cash donations. The center is also seeking a reliable transport vehicle for injured animals. You can send a tax-deductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, FL32327, or visit www.wakullawildlife.org/ and use the Paypal button to make an instant donation. If you nd an injured animal, bring it to the Edgar Poole Road facility. ERIC LOVESTRAND | Special to the Times Ronnie Carter holds the rescued eagle. Rescued eagle headed to Pensacola Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, January 23, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Inshore fishing is improving this week as the weather is heating back up to normal temperatures. We are getting good reports form the “Snow Birds” on Cape San Blas and in the state park on whiting catches and a few pompano this week. Most locals are finding good trout and red fish in the ICW canal using live shrimp near the power lines area. Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The cold winds of January haven’t been blowing kindly for the Seahawk boys varsity basketball team, as a young lineup has managed just one win in six games over the last two weeks. Coach Michael Sweatt’s squad fell by 17 points Saturday night at Port St. Joe, 73-56, although they did manage to hit half their shots from the two-point range, and 9of-13 from the free throw line, but snatched only 15 rebounds. The Hawks were behind 3824 at the half, and then were swamped in the third quarter, 20-11 to trail by nearly two dozen points going into the nal stanza. Junior Kelsey Jones, who is averaging better than 15 points and six rebounds a game, led the team’s scoring with 14 points, followed by senior guard Wesley Norred with 11 points. Saturday’s loss followed a 6135 drubbing at home Friday by Bozeman, the margin largely accounted for when the Bucks blew the game open with a 15-5 third quarter. The Hawks shot a lackluster 20 percent from the eld, hitting just two of 18 trey attempts as they struggled to make up ground. Eighth grader Tyler Farmer led the team with 11 points, with Jones pitching in eight. Freshman Kenneth Wilson scored four, and Norred, senior Cameron White and sophomore Josue Barahona each three. Eighth grader Nathan Jones scored a bucket, and pulled down six rebounds, and senior Mercury Wynn scored one. On Jan. 13 at West Gadsden, the team lost 83-53, after a disastrous 26-6 rst quarter set the tone for the night. Wilson nailed a pair of treys en route to 14 points, while Kelsey scored eight, and plucked six rebounds, and White six, plus seven rebounds. Farmer hit two treys for six points, while senior Logan McLeod scored ve, senior guard James Gordon four, and Wynn, Barahona and Howard each three. The team’s lone win came at home Jan. 11, with a 59-36 shelling of Liberty County. The Seahawks opened with a 25-9 rst quarter, and led the rest of the way. Farmer led the team with 13 points, while freshman guard Marshall Sweet’s two treys helped him score eight, the same point production as Jones and McLeod, who also pulled down six rebounds. Wilson scored seven, and had six rebounds, while Gordon tallied six, Barahona ve, and Howard four. The Seahawks lost 69-40 at South Walton Jan. 10, unable to make up ground after falling behind 18-9 rst quarter. Kelsey Jones led the team with 13 points and 13 rebounds, followed by eight points and ve rebounds from White. Farmer added eight points and four rebounds, while McLeod scored four points, and Gordon and Howard each three. Wilson managed only a single point, but pulled down six rebounds. The month started slowly with a 59-46 loss at home against Altha Jan. 8, watched that afternoon by much of the student body. Kelsey Jones hit nine-of22 from the field en route to 27 points and 10 rebounds, while Norred, Barahona and Wilson each scored five. White nabbed seven rebounds, and scored two, while Gordon had six rebounds and two points. Howard had six rebounds. Cold January chills Seahawk hoops Special to the Times The Lady Seahawk girls varsity soccer team’s season nally ended Wednesday evening, Jan. 15 in a District 1-1A seminal match against Maclay High School. The Lady Seahawks, seeded fourth, and Maclay, seeded one, had not faced each other since the rst game of the season and both teams knew what was at stake – a trip to the district championship. “I truly believed we had the strategy and the horses to win this game,” said Coach Joe Shields. “I was devastated and in disbelief, following the loss.” The Lady Seahawks adopted a bend-but-don’tbreak defensive posture. Senior Ally Millender was assigned to defend Maclay‘s #9, a college scholarship recipient, who was their main weapon. “I told the girls that whoever was nearest in cover, would assist Millender in defending her; in essence, a moving double team,” said Shields. The rest of the team dropped back into a defensive posture once the Marauders crossed mideld. The strategy initially ummoxed the Marauders who were unable to mount any signi cant shots on goal. Meanwhile, the Lady Seahawks were forced to attempt scoring off the counterattack. Freshman Allie Kirvin got off the rst shot. Later, freshman Emily Zingarelli, off a beautiful cross from Allie Kirvin, barely missed the back of the net. Seniors Jessica Shields and Gracyn Kirvin also managed a shot on goal. The Marauders were forced to shoot from outside the 18-yard box and prior to the half drove two really nice balls, for distance, which ew in between the cross bar and the outstretched hands of goalkeeper Macey Hunt, giving Maclay a 2-0 lead at the half. “At the half I told them the scoring opportunities would come but there would be less of them because of our defensive positioning, so they had to make the most of every scoring opportunity,” said Shields. When play resumed, the Marauders kept pressing, and scored a third goal with a little over 20 minutes remaining in the match. “We were running out of time and so I told junior Katie Seger to start playing more offensively oriented,” said Shields. Coming from the back, Seger’s presence in the Marauders’ defending third added another player they had to account for, and on a corner kick from Jessica Shields, Seger turned on the cross and buried a goal in the left upper third of the net. With time running out, the Seahawks were down 3-1. The coach then sent senior Deborah Dempsey into their third also, to further overload their defense. Unfortunately, the Lady Seahawks were unable to capitalize on the movement and moment and a counterattack ensued. Left alone, the three remaining backs, eighth graders, Michaela Cassidy and Allie Zingarelli, along with Millender, were unable to stop a fourth goal on the Marauders’ quick breakaway. The Marauders, content with their three-goal lead, possessed the ball to run out the clock, ending the Lady Seahawks season with a 4-1 victory. “As clichd as it sounds, the girls played their best game of the season,” said Shields. “They played as a single cohesive unit throughout the game. What is amazing to me is that the soccer program at this school only started ve years ago, when these same seniors were in eighth grade. “In that rst year of play, they only won two games but since then, this school has brought home two district championships,” he said. “We have a lot of young talent and we are going to be really solid next year. We look forward to continuing soccer’s winning culture at FCHS and bringing home district, regional and state championships, in the future.” Lady Hawks fall to Maclay at districts DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Tyler Howard, left, works defensively at the Battle on the Gulf holiday hoop tourney. Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 L a d y S e a h a w k s e n i o r s A l l y M i l l e n d e r a n d G r a c y n K i r v i n s h a r e h o n o r s t h i s w e e k f o r t h e i r p l a y i n t h e J a n 1 5 d i s t r i c t s e m i n a l s M i l l e n d e r t o o k h e r a s s ignm e n t o f de f e n d i ng M ac la y s le ad i ng s c o r e r t o t he n t h de g r e e w i t h d e f e n s i v e s k i l l s a t a p r e m i u m a s s h e d i s a l l o w e d m a n y a t t e m p t e d p a s s e s a n d s h o t s b y t h e i r b i g g u n S h e w a s i n s t r u m e n t a l i n b e g i n n i n g t h e H a w k s o f f e n s i v e p o s s e s s i o n s w i t h p a s s e s t o t e a m m a t e s K i r v i n a s a c e n t e r m i d e l d e r d i s t r i b u t e d t h e b a l l v e r y w e l l t o h e r t e a m m a t e s w i t h d e f t p a s s e s a n d w a s a r o c k o n d e f e n s e i n b o t h t h e m i d d l e a n d d e f e n d i n g t h i r d Gu l fs i de I G A P L AY E R OF T H E WE E K A ll y M ille n d e r & G r a c y n K i r v i n N O T I C E T O B I DD E R S E A S T A P R O N D R A I N A G E S Y S T E M R E P A I R S A N D S E C U R I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T S A P A L A C H I C O L A R EG I ON A L A I R P ORT F R A N K L I N C OU N T Y F L OR I D A N o t i c e i s h e r e b y g i v e n t h a t t h e Fr a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e c e i v e s e a l e d b i d s a t t h e Fr a n k l i n C o u n t y O c e o f t h e C l e r k o f C o u r t 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 ( o c e : 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 6 1 ) u n t i l 4 : 0 0 P M l o c a l t i m e o n M o n d a y F e b r u a r y 1 7 2 0 1 4 f o r t h e E A S T A P R O N D R A I N A G E S Y S T E M R E P A I R S A N D S E C U R I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T S p r o j e c t a t A p a l a c h i c o l a R e g i o n a l A i r p o r t A l l b i d s w i l l b e p u b l i c l y o p e n e d a n d r e a d a l o u d i n t h e r e g u l a r l y s c h e d u l e d m e e t i n g o f t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s o n T u e s d a y F e b r u a r y 1 8 2 0 1 4 B i d s m u s t b e s u b m i t t e d i n a s e a l e d e n v e l o p e c l e a r l y m a r k e d “ B I D E N C L O S E D : E A S T A P R O N D R A I N A G E S Y S T E M R E P A I R S A N D S E C U R I T Y I MP R O V E M E NT S A p a l a c h i c o l a R e g i o n a l A i r p o r t ” e p r o j e c t g e n e r a l l y i n c l u d e s b u t i s n o t n e c e s s a r i l y l i m i t e d t o t h e f o l l ow i n g t a s k s : B e gi n ni n g o n u r s d a y J a n u a r y 1 6 2 0 1 4 b i d d i n g d o c u m e n t s m a y b e e x a m i n e d a t t h e Fr a n k l i n C o u n t y O c e o f C o u n t y A d m i n i s t r a t o r 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 ( o c e : 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 ) D i g i t a l c o p i e s o f t h e a b o v e d o c u m e n t s m a y b e o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e o c e o f A V C O N I N C 3 2 0 B a y s h o r e D r i v e S u i t e A N i c e v i l l e F l o r i d a 3 2 5 7 8 ( o c e : 8 5 0 67 8 0 0 5 0 ) u p o n p a y m e n t o f a n o n r e f u n d a b l e f e e o f F o r t y d o l l a r s ( $ 4 0 0 0 ) p a y a b l e t o A V C O N I N C H a rd c o p i e s o f t h e a b o v e d o c u m e n t s m a y b e p r o v i d e d a t a n a d d i t i o n a l c o s t Q u e s t i o n s r e l a t i n g t o t h e B i d D o c u m e n t s s h a l l b e s u b m i t t e d t o t h e E n g i n e e r B i d s e c u r i t y i n t h e a m o u n t o f a t l e a s t v e p e rc e n t ( 5 % ) o f t h e t o t a l b i d m u s t b e s u b m i t t e d w i t h t h e b i d e b i d s e c u r i t y m a y b e e i t h e r a c e r t i e d c h e c k o r a p r o p o s a l g u a r a n t y b o n d e x e c u t e d b y a s u r e t y c o m p a n y a u t h o r i z e d t o d o b u s i n e s s i n t h e S t a t e o f F l o r i d a B i d s e c u r i t y s h a l l b e m a d e p a y a b l e t o t h e Fr a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s e s u c c e s s f u l b i d d e r m u s t b e a b l e t o f u r n i s h a 1 0 0 % P e r f o r m a n c e B o n d a n d a 1 0 0 % L a b o r a n d M a t e r i a l s P a y m e n t B o n d a n d s h a l l b e g i n e x e c u t i o n o f t h i s c o n t r a c t w i t h i n v e ( 5 ) c a l e n d a r d a y s f o l l ow i n g t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i c e t o P r o c e e d Fr a n k l i n C o u n t y h a s e s t a b l i s h e d a D i s a d v a n t a g e d B u s i n e s s E n t e r p r i s e (D B E ) g o a l f o r t h i s p r o j e c t e D B E p a r t i c i p a t i o n g o a l f o r t h i s p r o j e c t i s 6 .9 6 % a n d c o m p l i a n c e r e q u i r e m e n t s a r e l i s t e d i n t h e b i d d i n g d o c u m e n t s A N on M a nd a t o r y P r e B i d C on f e r e nc e w i l l b e c o n d u c t e d a t t h e E m e r g e n c y O p e r a t i o n s C e n t e r ( E O C ) c o n f e r e n c e r o o m a t 2 8 A i r p o r t R o a d A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 o n M o n d a y J a n u a r y 2 7 2 0 1 4 a t 1 0 : 0 0 a m l o c a l t i m e ( E D T ) Q u e s t i o n s r e l a t e d t o t h e B i d D o c u m e n t s w i l l b e a n s w e r e d a t t h a t t i m e A t t e n d a n c e b y p r i m e c o n t r a c t o r s i s e n c o u r a g e d b u t n o t r e q u i r e d A l l b i d s s h a l l be s e a l e d a n d s h a l l be a d d r e s s e d a s f o l l o w s : F r a n k l i n C o u n t y O c e o f t h e C l e r k o f C o u r t 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 03 A p a l a c h ic o l a F l or i d a 3 23 2 0 B I D E N C L O S E D : “ E A S T A P R O N D R A I N A G E S Y S T E M R E P A I R S A N D S E C U R I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T S A P A L A C H IC OL A R E G ION A L A I R P O R T ” F u n d i n g f o r t h i s p r o j e c t i s b e i n g p r o v i d e d b y t h e F l o r i d a D e p a r t m e n t o f T r a n s p o r t a t i o n Fr a n k l i n C o u n t y r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o r e j e c t a n y a n d a l l b i d s t o w a i v e a n y t e c h n i c a l o r l e g a l d e c i e n c i e s a n d t o a c c e p t a n y b i d t h a t i t m a y d e e m t o b e i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f t h e C o u n t y N o b i d d e r m a y w i t h d r a w h i s / h e r b i d f o r a p e r i o d o f 1 2 0 c a l e n d a r d a y s f o l l ow i n g t h e b i d o p e n i n g R e m o v e a n d re p l a c e e x i s t i n g c o n c re t e p a v e m e n t a n d d r a i n a ge s t r u c t u re s a l o n g t h e w e s t e d ge o f t h e E a s t A p r o n re m o v e a n d re p l a c e e x i s t i n g d r a i n a ge s t r u c t u re s a n d p ip e s w i t h i n t h e i n e ld a re a a n d i n s t a l l n e w f e n c e a n d g a t e s a d j a c e n t t o t h e F B O bu i ld i n g a n d a i r p o r t p e r i m e t e r f e n c e a t t h e A p a l a c h i c o l a R e g i o n a l A i rp o rt EN G I N EE R ’S C O N T A C T : J o h n C o l l i n s P E P r o je c t M a n a g er A V CO N, I N C 3 2 0 B a y s h o r e D r i v e S u i t e “ A ” N i c e v i l l e Fl o r i d a 32 5 78 T e l : 8 5 0 6 7 8 0 0 5 0 ; F a x : 8 5 0 6 7 8 0 0 4 0 O W N E R ’ S C O N T A C T: A l a n P i er c e D i r e c t o r o f A d m i n i s t r a t i v e S er v i c e s F r an k li n C o u n t y 3 3 M a r k et S t r e et A pa l a ch i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 23 2 0 N i c e v i l l e Fl o r i d a 32 5 78 T e l : 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 ; F a x : 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 9 9 CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, January 23, 2014 A Page 9 Section

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A10 | The Times Thursday, January 23, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 93646T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2013 CA 000221 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON MORTGAGE SECURITIES CORP., CSFB MORTGAGEBACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-8, Plaintiff, vs. CURTIS DIETERICH A/K/A CURTIS H. DIETERICH; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; AND THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of foreclosure dated the 18th day of December, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2013 CA 000221, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON MORTGAGE SECURITIES CORP., CSFB MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-8 is the Plaintiff and CURTIS DIETERICH A/K/A CURTIS H. DIETERICH; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; AND THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash INSIDE FRONT LOBBY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 5th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK K, THREE HUNDRED OCEAN MILE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGE 32 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodatin in order to participate in thei proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 Spouth Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577. 4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 18th day of December, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 11-17804 January 16, 23, 2014 93684T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000268 Section: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, V. FRANKIE W. BENNINGFIELD; DONNA P. BENNINGFIELD; DOROTHY L. WALN; ALAN B. WALN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 31, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA000268 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 20th day of February, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Inside Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL “A”, A PORTION OF TRACTS 2 AND 2-A, COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND RUN NORTH 57 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 1310.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 57 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 577.36 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 100.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 100.02 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 46.41 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 141.83 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP ( MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 17.70 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 336.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.89 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A 100’ POWER LINE EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY 100.00 FEET TIIEREOF. ALSO: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. IIIGHWAY NO. 98 AND NORTH 57 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1305.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 99.23 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 57 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 61.67 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #Z160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 31 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 76.79 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 61.71 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 73.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.11 ACRES MORE OR LESS. THE AGGREGATE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCELS BEING 1.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 6th day of January, 2014. By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 January 16, 23, 2014 93652T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 19-2011-CA-000414 DIVISION: UCN: 192011CA00041 4XXCICI WALTER MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC Plaintiff, vs. CHALATURRELL A/K/ACHALAPARISH; BEN TURRELL; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, PURSUANTTO THE JUDGMENTOF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILLSELLTHE PROPERTYSITUATED IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS: LOTNINE (9), INCLUSIVE IN BLOCK ONE HUNDRED THREE (103) ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT OF THE CITYOF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDAIN MOSTCOMMON USE. ATPUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGHESTAND BESTBIDDER, FOR CASH, ON FEBRUARY6, 2014, AT 11:00AM ATTHE 2ND FLOOR LOBBYOF THE FRANKLIN COUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COSTTO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACTDanny Davis, Court Technology Office, Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, Fl 32303, 850.577.4401 AT LEASTSEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELYUPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL711. DATED: DECEMBER 19, 2013. MARCIAM. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE COURT BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2014 93724T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 12000333CA CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Cassandra L. Jones; Unknown Spouse of Cassandra L. Jones; Unknown Tenant in Possession of the subject property NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an order dated December 18, 2013, entered in Case No. 12000333CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in CitiMortgage, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Cassandra L. Jones; Unknown Spouse of Cassandra L. Jones; Unknown Tenant in Possession of the subject property are the Defendants, that the Clerk of the Courts will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, 2nd floor lobby of the Courthouse at 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 5th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 12 INCH BY 14 INCH GRANITE STONE MARKER LOCATED IN ‘ME NORTHWEST CORNER OF PHILACO SHORES, A SUBDIVISION LOCATED WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 20.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED#1226) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 154.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF ELLIS VAN FLEET STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 113.17 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4889), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 155.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1266), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 113.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 242, PAGE 99 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC Attorney for Plaintiff Jessica Fagen, Esq. FL Bar No. 50668 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 618-6955, ext. 6105 Fax: (954) 618-6954 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577. 4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 96947T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000308 Central Mortgage Company Plaintiff, vs. Jeffrey S. Galloway; et. al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated December 10, 2013, entered in Case No. 2010-CA000308 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Central Mortgage Company is the Plaintiff and Jeffrey S. Galloway; et. al. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front steps of the courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 5th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 35, BAYOU HARBOUR, A SUBDIVSION A PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 10th day of December, 2013. Marcia Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michelle Maxwell As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 16, 23, 2014 97115T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-160-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. WINFRED J. REGISTER, JR. A/K/A WINIFRED J. REGISTER A/K/A WINIFRED J. REGISTER, JR. A/K/A WINFRED JUSTIN REGISTER, JR. A/K/A WINFRED REGISTER JR., LAURA REGISTER A/K/A LAURA C. REGISTER A/K/A LAURA CREAMER REGISTER, ATLANTIC CREDIT & FINANCE INC., AND DISCOVER BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time, on the 6th day of February, 2014, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” LOTS 18 AND 19, BLOCK 104, EACH 50 X 199.5 FEET, ACCORDING TO AN UNRECORDED MAP OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND WHICH SAID LOTS ARE FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A POINT (1.P. STAKE) ON THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT JEFFERSON STREET, 1518 FEET DUE SOUTH AND 998.5 FEET WEST OF THE N.E. CORNER (CON. MON.) OF SAID N.W. 1/4, RUN THENCE WEST 199.5 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 100 FEET, THENCE EAST 199.5 FEET, THENCE NORTH ALONG STREET, 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1987 MOBILE HOME ID# GAFLSH2AG51347406 AND ID# GAFLSH2BG51347406 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 16, 23, 2014 97017T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, PATRICIA S. WALL, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 665 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOT 9 BLOCK 81 APALACHICOLA Full Legal Can be Obtained in the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 01-09S-08W-8330-0081-00 90 Name is which assessed: JIMMIE LEE RICHARDSON All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of FEBRUARY 2014, which is the 10th day of FEBRUARY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 97193T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION Case No.: 13000073CA DIVISION: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD E. SOLOMON ALSO KNOWN AS RONALD ELLIS SOLOMON ALSO KNOWN AS RONALD SOLOMON, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF A TRUST AGREEMENT DATED THE 25TH DAY OF JULY, 2006 KNOWN AS THE RONALD ELLIS SOLOMON LIVING TRUST, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE RONALD ELLIS SOLOMON LIVING TRUST DATED JULY 25, 2006 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 24, OYSTER BAY VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 22 AND 23, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2227 LEISURE LN SAINT GEORGE ISLAND FL 32328-2155 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 17th day of December, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. January 16, 23, 2014 97183T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, January 24, 2014. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #11 Daniel B. Davis Contents-Household STORATE UNIT #22 Charles D. McDaniel Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #32 Sandra McClain Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #56 Moses Cummings Content-Household January 16, 23, 2014 97279T PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T Mobility Services, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of US Highway 98 in St. Teresa, Franklin County, Florida 32346 at latitude 29 55’ 05.9” north and longitude 84 30’ 53.5” west. The height of the tower will be 71.6 meters above ground level (76.9 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865-/ L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205) 6293868. Any interested party may submit comments by February 28, 2014 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/ asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0874644. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR § 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCC’s website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/ asr/environmentalrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. January 23, 2014 97281T PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T Mobility Services, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of US Highway 98 in Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida 32322 at latitude 29 47’ 22.6” north and longitude 84 46’ 2.6” west. The height of the tower will be 64.0 meters above ground level (67.8 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865-/ L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205) 6293868. Any interested party may submit comments by February 28, 2014 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0874578. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR § 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCC’s website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties

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Toapply,pleasecontactDaniel at(850)685-5762orsend resumetodlgonzalez@ars.com Orvisit www.ars.com/about/careers ExperienceRequired 1118226 RegionalUtilitiesof WaltonCounty IsacceptingapplicationsforCertiedWastewater TreatmentPlantOperators.Competitivepay&excellentbenetsincludingmajormedical,disability &lifeinsurance&401-k.ClassA:$18.00-$21.00/hr, ClassB:$16.00-$19.00/hr&ClassC:$14.00-$16.00/hr.Applyatourmainofcelocatedat4432USHwy 98E,SantaRosaBeach,FL32459, call850-231-5114,visitourwebsiteatwww. regionalutilities.netorfaxto850-231-4988. RegionalUtilitiesisaDFWP.WebID#:34277197 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. COMMERCIAL BUILDING ON 98, RIVER VIEW, $1200 WATER INCLUDED. 2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. 3 BEDROOM 3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPS W/LIFT 2 CAR GARAGE 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 391 CARL TONS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/ MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENEDPORCH. 425/MO 6.3 BEDROOM3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPSW/LIFT 2CARGARAGEwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/ asr/environmentalrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. January 23, 2014 97297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-00062-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. SANDS NORTH, L.L.C., a Florida limited liability company; JULIE MILLER, as Personal Representative of the Estate of WILTON R. MILLER; KENNETH G. FISH, an individual; KIRK J. MAURO, an individual; BUNGALOWS BY THE GULF CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a dissolved Florida not for profit corporation; and TAYLOR’S BUILDING SUPPLY, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a summary final judgment of foreclosure in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 4 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 693.50 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 32 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 85.23 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2324.83 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 56 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 77.05 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 59 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 77.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2324.83 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 56 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 21.60 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 60 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 21.60 FEET) TO A NAIL AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 348.15 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 151.46 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE THE FOLLOWING COURSES: NORTH 66 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 76.14 FEET, NORTH 81 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 82.80 FEET, NORTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST 35.98 FEET, NORTH 74 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 20.99 FEET, NORTH 23 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 33.68 FEET, NORTH 57 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 72.90 FEET, NORTH 69 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 78.64 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING A PORTION OF THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 335, PAGE 95 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 4 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 693.50 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 32 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 85.23 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2324.83 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 53 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 98.65 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 59 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 98.65 FEET) TO NAIL AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 348.15 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 60 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.07 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 141.93 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 37.64 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 63.01 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 29 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 151.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL OF LAND BEING THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 11, PAGE 48 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND NOW BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: ALL OF BUNGALOWS BY THE GULF, A COMMERCIAL RESORT CONDOMINIUM, TOGETHER WITH THE COMMON ELEMENTS, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM THEREOF RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 956, PAGE 68 AND AMENDED AND RESTATED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 974, PAGE 352, AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, in the presence of the Plaintiff, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, on February 5, 2014, at 11:00 a.m., pursuant to the terms of the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure and in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of December, 2103. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk ADA AccommodationsIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401. January 23, 30, 3014 j j ADOPTION: j j Loving TV Sports Editor & Pharmacist await 1st baby j Lyn & Robj j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL76467 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard SaleThurs, Fri., & Sat 9am -3pm @ Ruth Crosby 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL77081 to 56554 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL February 15th & 16th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572) General Admission $6 850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34276361 Text FL76361 to 56654 Sales/Business Dev Pawnbroker Would you like to make $14-$18 per hour working 4 days a week with health insurance? We are looking for energetic, friendly, hard working team members interested in long-term employment. We offer sales commissions. Performance rewards, Referral bonuses, Professional development, Flexible schedule, & Health Ins. after 90 days. If you are active and outgoing, we can train. Must be 18, physically fit, and HSD/GED. Drug Free. NO criminal background, Valid FLDL. Check us out at dansp awn.com and apply in person at 1314 Bayview Ave, Mon-Fri, 10am to 4pm or call for an appointment (850) 481-1115 Web ID#: 34277424 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle Lease Purchase Option 700 sq ft, 1Br,, Fireplace, Washer & Dryer, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $380 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL76395 to 56654 Home for Sale! Carrabelle 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced. Close to town and boat ramps. $125,000 850-697-2176 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, January 23, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast Advertise Her e Contact The Times T oday (850) 277-7847 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola 4 51 6 2 1 4 J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 250854 $72,000 St. George Island Y O U R P I E C E O F T H E I S L A N D 1 / 3 a c r e i n t h e q u i e t p a r t o f t h e i s l a n d j u s t o n e l o t i n f ro m t h e c o r n e r o f 1 0 t h S t r e e t & W e s t B a y S h o r e D r i ve e a s y b e a c h a c c e s s j u s t 3 s h o r t b l o c k s d o w n 1 0 t h S t r e e t t o G u l f A N D e a s y b a y a c c e s s t o p u b l i c p a rk j u s t d o w n B a y S h o r e D r i ve L i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com 4 5 16 2 16 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249082 $225,000 St. George Island S E A G O D DE S S L i g h t a n d a i r y 3 B R 2 B A i s l a n d h o m e p r i v at e s c e n i c f r e s h w at e r p o n d l a r g e d e c k 2 n d l e ve l s u n d e c k c h e e r f u l l y f u r n i s h e d g ro u n d l e ve l l a u n d r y / s t o r a g e ro o m s h c l e a n i n g a r e a & o u t s i d e s h o w e r u n d e r h o m e p a r k i n g o n p a d W e s t P i n e A ve n u e L i s t e d b y J a n i e B u rk e 4516215 29,000 $(( + $(( 4516218 REDUCED MAK E AN OFF ER & -' ) ) & " % -' # " % ' * ' % ' -' ' % Kim Hawkins Davis CP A 850-653-6875 T rades & Ser v ices R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D • 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E NC E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) What color appeared the most often in Elvis Presley’s song titles? Green, Blue, Red, White 2) Of these choices what is borscht soup almost always made with? Turnips, Eggplants, Peanuts, Beets 3) What part of a hook “hooks” the sh? Eye, Barb, Shank, Gap 4) Of these snakes which is not poisonous? Rattler, Taipan, Python, Cobra 5) What’s the smallest number of chickens to be called a ock? 3, 4, 5, 6 6) What was the number of times Abraham Lincoln actually slept in the “Lincoln Bedroom” of the White House? Zero, 3, 7, Hundreds 7) Which baseball team introduced tri-color caps to the major leagues? Athletics, Padres, Astros, Expos 8) What term may apply to pizza and certain automotive wheels? Cornicione, Deep dish, Marinara, Levain 9) Whose logo includes three tuning forks? Triumph, Volvo, Yamaha, Peugeot 10) “Murphy’s Law” was born on Edwards Air Force Base in 1949, but what was Murphy’s rst name? Michael, Mae, Edward, Sal 11) What state capital is located nearest to its state’s geographical center? Columbia, SC; Little Rock, AR; Sacramento, CA; Atlanta, GA 12) The mortality rate from heart attacks of those in law enforcement is what percent higher than the general population? 25, 43, 65, 82 13) A giraffe’s tongue is how many inches long on average? 6, 12, 18, 24 14) Which of these teams did Babe Ruth not play for? Dodgers, Braves, Red Sox, Yankees ANSWERS 1) Blue. 2) Beets. 3) Barb. 4) Python. 5) 3. 6) Zero. 7) Expos. 8) Deep dish. 9) Yamaha. 10) Edward. 11) Little Rock, AR. 12) 82. 13) 18. 14) Dodgers. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com