The Apalachicola times

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00254

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, January 9, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 128 ISSUE 37 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Holiday Hoops, A9 Chamber after-hours at library On Thursday, Jan. 9, from 5:30 to 7 p.m., the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host a Business After Hours at the new Eastpoint branch of the Franklin County Library, 160 Hickory Dip Road. For more information call 653-9419. ‘Sock Hops & Soda Pops” this weekend The Big Bopper’s back and Murphy’s Diner is rockin’ around the clock in “Sock Hops & Soda Pops,” an outrageous, feelgood musical at the Dixie Theatre. There will be a 3 p.m. matinee on Saturday, Jan. 11. There will be evening shows at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 10 and 11. Tickets are $25. The Dixie Theatre is at 21 Avenue E in Apalachicola. For more information call 653-3200. Get ready for Jan. 18 oyster cook-off The fourth annual Oyster Cook-Off to bene t the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department will be held Saturday, Jan. 18 at Riverfront Park. Friday evening will be a preview of the oysterrelated silent auction items, along with a sampling of the Apalachicola Bay’s tasty bivalves from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday’s cookoff will start at noon, Judging and bands starts at 2 p.m. Contestants are encouraged to enter with their favorite recipe. All forms of oysters will be available to taste raw, steamed, fried. Other food items and refreshments available for purchase. Live music and dancing performances. Visit www.oystercookoff. com for more info. Bingo begins on island Winter Bingo on St. George Island began Tuesday at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 East Pine Street. The game begins at 7 p.m. and is sponsored by the St. George Island Civic Club. Cost is $1 per card. Everyone is welcome. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The developer who wants to relocate the city’s Family Dollar store to a wooded site on U.S. 98 on the western edge of Apalachicola isn’t giving up. On Friday, Panama City attorney Robert Hughes submitted a notice of appeal of the Planning and Zoning Commission’s Nov. 18 vote that gave a resounding no to a proposal to relocate the store from its current site adjacent to the Gulfside IGA to a lot that neighbors the Best Western Inn. Hughes, who represents Blue Current Development LLC, the rm of Panama City Beach’s Brett Woodward, is alleging the city’s zoning approval process was riddled with errors and impropriety, and that the city should not be allowed to reverse its April 2012 decision. The lawyer says the decision was a go-ahead for Woodward to move forward on the project and buy the land. Hughes wants the city’s board of adjustment to reverse P & Z’s denial of the special exception request, and to direct city commissioners to grant the retail specialty store exception Woodward seeks in order to construct a more than 8,300 square-foot store on 1.16 acres at U.S. 98 and Clairmont. The lawyer argues P & Z’s unanimous vote in April 2012 to con rm that “the operation is consistent within the C-3 zoning district” led to Woodward spending about $302,000 on the project, including about $245,000 for the land, $24,000 for civil design work, $9,300 for legal fees, $9,000 for architectural work, $8,500 for surveying work, and $6,000 for environmental work. In his recounting of what he says are the facts of the case, Hughes wrote that in April 2012 P & Z “of its own volition… voted unanimously to con rm that the C-3 zoning was appropriate and correct for the Family Dollar store.” He cites City Administrator Betty Webb’s Sept. 19, 2012 followup letter con rming the vote as “justi able reliance” upon which Woodward went ahead to buy the property a month later. He said Blue Current “worked diligently in late 2012 and spring of 2013 to develop its site plan in conformity with the city’s land development code.” Hughes said the company “incurred extensive obligations and expenses such that it would be highly inequitable and unjust to now prohibit (Blue Current) from proceeding with the project’s development.” He says P & Z Chairman Tom Daly’s comment at the Nov. 2013 hearing, that “the reality is we voted on something very quickly without really thinking it through at that time,” shows P & Z acted negligently, did not exercise sound judgment and was not “without wanton disregard for the company’s rights in the property.” Hughes admits in this ling the city’s land development code does not include “published criteria” as to what constitutes a retail Family Dollar appeals city decision See APPEAL A5 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A new company is promising 10 jobs in January for Carrabelle if it can nd a place to do business. On Dec. 13, Bruce McCormack, CEO of Gulf Unmanned Systems Center (GUSC), a Panama Citybased company that wants to test robot drones here, conducted a public meeting at the Carrabelle Municipal Center. McCormack said he believes Carrabelle is perfect for his proposed work because the population is small and it is surrounded by a large landmass. About 20 people gathered to hear his lecture. McCormack later said the majority of these had already submitted job applications to GUSC. GUSC intends to test only small robot drones, weighing under 55 pounds, on land, water and air. He said the testing would be unobtrusive. Most of the machines tested would be battery powered and produce a hum similar to an electric lawnmower, McCormack said. About 20 percent of the drones would be airborne, he said, and would y at 400 feet or lower and be unlikely to interfere with regular air traf c. “We will be ying over the same area Tyndall uses now,” he said. “It is Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) controlled national airspace. Nobody can y there without permission.” According to the FAA, use of unmanned aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS) was rst authorized in 1990. Since then, the agency has sanctioned use of unmanned aircraft under limited circumstances for re ghting, disaster relief, search and rescue, law enforcement, border patrol, military training, and testing and evaluation. Unmanned drones can be allowed to y at up to 50,000 feet and are not approved for use in congested airspace or over large cities. McCormack said airborne drones are mostly used to collect information. He said, using an aerial drone, it would be possible to survey Tate’s Hell in three days, compared to the three to four months required for a landbased survey. While he envisions testing aerial drones over Tate’s Hell, McCormack said the majority of these robots would be aquatic and oat or swim below the surface. These aquatic drones would be tested in state waters off the coast of Franklin County, he said. Interviewed after the meeting, Carrabelle City Attorney Dan Hartman said the city is negotiating with Centennial Bank to allow GUSC to lease the Hexaport factory on John McInnis Road near the Thompson Field airport. The 65,000 square foot structure has remained empty since Greensteel declared bankruptcy in 2009. CEO: Drone testing would bring jobs right away BRUCE MCCORMACK Editor’s note: In early November, Typhoon Haiyan, known as Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, was an exceptionally powerful Category 5 tropical cyclone that devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines, killing 5,260 people and causing many more injuries. Apalachicola resident Larry Applebee, a physician assistant who currently works as a hospitalist for IPC, took leave from this job to volunteer with Clarion Global Response, formerly IMAT (International Medical Assistance Team) as part of a crew of medical professionals from around the world who ew to the devastated region to help. He has done work like this in Haiti and other places, so he knew some of what to expect. Applebee’s team started out as with a PA, a nurse, and two paramedics, and later added four physicians and two RNs. The last two days Applebee’s team was back down to him and the RN, so he “freelanced,” traveling to Tacloban and Dagami with other groups, who provided needed medications in appreciation. Applebee found himself working with professionals from Malaysia, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands and Israel. During his work there, he kept notes with the help of his iPhone which he worked into a journal on the plane trip home. He describes his writing as “ADHD –like,” but it is startlingly clear in its detail and moving in its impact. The Times is grateful Local medico assists in the Philippines HELP IS NEEDED Clarion Global Response, a small team of emergency responders from the United States and the United Kingdom which ew immediately to the Philippines to provide essential humanitarian aid to the worse hit areas, is asking for donations as its mission is ongoing, now transitioning from the disaster phase to the recovery phase. To help, visit www.clarionglobalresponse.org. ‘A GREAT MIRACLE HAPPENED’ LARRY APPLEBEE | Special to the Times See TYPHOON A5 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Two mobile homes were destroyed by re during the last week of 2013. On Christmas Day, a doublewide home at 548 Ridge Road, near the Otter Slide Road intersection, was consumed by ames. Ashley Carr, a spokesperson for the State Fire Marshal’s of ce, said the re was ruled accidental and may have been caused by a faulty electrical outlet or space heater. She said the home was a total loss but the trailer’s owner, Julia Smith, escaped without injury. On Dec. 29, a second re occurred not far away. At about 1:15 a.m. residents of a mobile home at 38 Jefferson Street awakened to nd their home in ames. Morris “Jay” Eveland and his wife Wendy shared their home with daughter Clarissa Cruson, her husband Deven, their three children, and a niece and nephew. The families escaped from their home with nothing but the clothes they wore. Two Chihuahuas were killed in the blaze. A Red Cross spokesperson said some members of the family were barefoot. With funds donated by the Red Eastpoint res leave nine homeless See FIRES A5

PAGE 2

A2 | The Times Thursday, January 9, 2014 NOTICE It is that time again to le for your 2014 Property T ax Exemptions. If you have had any {…tƒ in your primar y residence since J tt• £ u> •u you may need to check with the Property Appraiser to see of you qualify for any of the following exemptions. The time to mak e these applications is from Januar y 1st through March 1st 2014. $922-0 $(70 -0 (702 $7-.787 $870 2 $% -8 -0 29-2 7-.787 $"27 297 $7-.820 22$' 22$"2 7/22/20 & % -8 -0 29-2 7-.787 #20 (6228/6-7 7/ 4 22-0 802 76 9.-!28-20 7-.787 2820 787297 775 "2 4 787' 22(6 720 7 62 72 4 Ag ) 9/92 7 62 -8-/67/84#/2 0-7062 -.2882 4#/2 Thursday’ s only 4 6-2 27 -. 4 62 297 82-2 0 627-2 /-88 2-62 2 & 297 "2/7-87 1 1++ + BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 †ee r€ red ic`p cet‚e} †e€‚ † › ‘ ¦¨ — ¨ › € § ¨ › ›¨ ‘£ c¨¦ ¨ ¨ § £ ¨•‘ ¨§ † › ‘ —‘ — ‘§ — ‘§— — ¨ ‘• ¨ “ ¨ `••§™ § ‘§ " t™™  – m y – “Œ h   “Œ C y¤¤ Œk£ k y ¤ ¤ ¦k£ k ~ k ] ¦ Œ¢Œ   ¢ Œ h o ¤ C ¤ $ $ N O R THWE ST F L O R I D A W A T E R M A N A G E M E NT D IST R I CT G O V ER NI N G B O A R D MEE T I N G S C HED U L E 2 0 1 4 A l l m e e ti n g s a r e s c h e d u l e d t o b e g i n a t 1 : 0 0 p m E T a t D i s t r i c t H e a d q u a r t e r s 8 1 W a t e r M a n a g e m e n t D r i v e H a v a n a F L 32 3 3 3 u n l e s s o t h e r w i s e i n d i c a t e d J a n u a r y 9 2 0 1 4 F e b r u a r y 1 3 2 0 1 4 M a r c h 1 3 2 0 1 4 A p r i l 1 0 2 0 1 4 M a y 8 2 0 1 4 J une 1 2 2 0 1 4 Jul y 1 0 2 0 1 4 A ug u st 1 4 2 0 1 4 S e p t e m b e r 1 1 2 0 1 4 G o v e r n i n g B o a r d 4 : 0 0 p m E T B ud g e t P u b l i c H e a r i n g 5 : 0 5 p m E T S e p t e m b e r 2 5 2 0 1 4 B ud g e t P u b l i c H e a r i n g 5 : 0 5 p m E T O c t o b e r 9 2 0 1 4 No v e m b e r 1 3 2 0 1 4 D e c e m b e r 1 1 2 0 1 4 T o r eserve y our seat, call 850-229-5603 “Like ” us on FREE HEAL TH SEMINARS IN JANU AR Y! Ja n. 9 S enior V ac cinations W illiam W o oler y DO F amily Medicine Ja n. 15 C auses a nd T r eatments of Sle ep A pnea James O enbrink MD E ar Nose and T hr oat Ja n. 21 P lastic Sur ger y R e c onstruc tion in C a nc er C ases T ong D uong MD P lastic Sur ger y Each will beg in a t 10:30 a.m. S acr ed Hear t Hospital on the Gulf C onf er enc e R oom A/B C all f or R eser v a tions: 229-5603 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Apalachicola police last week arrested two adult men, and two male juveniles, in connection with a series of residential and car burglaries in the city over the last several weeks. Arrested in different inci dents was 34-year-old Lance A. Flowers, 30 Gibson Road, Apala chicola, and 21-year-old Kamron Lee Barwick, 8543 Highway 386, Wewahitchka. Two young males, neither over age 15, were also arrested with Barwick, and they are being held at a juvenile jus tice facility in Tallahassee. Flowers was arrested by Apalachicola Police Ofcer Timmy Davis in connection with an incident last month at a resi dence on Tenth Street. Flowers is alleged to have broken into the house and stolen medica tions, as well as having broken into a car parked at the residence and stolen a handgun. According to Franklin County Sheriff Ofce Detective Brett Johnson, Flow ers also broke into two other vehicles that same day, parked at residences on 24th Street and Bobby Cato Street. From one car, Flowers snatched a bag full of personal items. In the other instance, Johnson said, the car alarm went off and Flowers ed. Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes said Flowers is under investigation for the at tempted break-in of two pickup trucks in the Lafayette Park area the night of Dec. 27, 2013. The chief said Flow ers has not been charged in that incident, which was thwarted by Apalachic ola Police Of cer Sgt. John “Chet” Turner who drove by the scene while patrolling the city. Flowers was taken to the Franklin County Jail on charges of burglary of an occupied dwell ing, two counts of burglary of a conveyance, grand theft of a rearm and petit theft. On a separate unrelated ar rest made by Apalachicola Po lice Ofcer Ginger Creamer, Barwick was jailed for the at tempted Dec. 31, 2013 robbery of an Apalachicola man who was riding his bicycle at the time in the area of 17th Street. Barwick was driving a truck, accompanied by the two male juveniles, when they pulled up to the victim and opened the door, throwing the man off his bicycle, said Johnson. Once the man was knocked to the ground, the three exited the vehicle and tried to rob him, said the detective. Johnson said a search of the juveniles yielded three gold watches, and a fourth one in the truck, all of which are believed to have been stolen. Barwick was taken to the county jail and charged with ag gravated battery with a deadly weapon and attempted armed robbery with a deadly weapon. The investigation into past break-ins is still pending and ofcers are asking anyone with information regarding these incidents to please contact the Apalachicola Police Department at 653-9755. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Franklin County Sherriff’s Ofce and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Dec. 30 Willie G. Dasher, Jr., 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Michael R. Holland, 54, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Dec. 31 Jimmy D. Kilgore, 36, Eastpoint, felony shing with revoked license (FWC) Kamron L. Barwick, 21, Wewahitchka, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and attempted armed robbery with a deadly weapon (APD) Joshua D. Bell, 29, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) Jan. 2 Donna J. Brandon, 49, Lanark Village, disorderly conduct (FCSO) Lance A. Flowers, 34, Apalachicola, burglary of an occupied dwelling, two counts of burglary or attempted burglary of a structure, grand theft of a rearm, and petit theft (APD) Jan. 3 Donna J. Brandon, 49, Lanark Village, violation of probation (FCSO) Bradley W. Osteen, 25, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Lonnie N. Crum, 24, Carrabelle, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Travis N. Jones, 32, Apalachicola, battery (APD) John M. Polous, 47, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Jan. 4 Robert D. Joyner, 56, Eastpoint, aggravated battery – pregnant victim (FCSO) Jan. 6 John D. Barber, 56, Eastpoint, harvesting oysters in restricted area (FWC) DON’T FALL FOR ‘ jJ URY dD UTY SCAM’ The Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce Investigations Division has received information the “jury duty scam” which has taken place in other parts of the country has hit our local area. An unknown person calls area residents claiming to be a local law enforcement ofcer. He then informs the victims that they have missed jury duty and must immediately pay a ne or face arrest. The suspect is utilizing a phone application that makes his number appear to be local. Deputies are reminding citizens that no law enforcement ofcer will ever call demanding money in this manner. Should you be contacted by someone posing as ofcer demanding money, please contact the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce at 670-8500. LOLO I S S SS W O O B O O D A A | The Times At around 2:55 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 2, the county knuckle boom truck hit one of the main ber optic cables providing Mediacom internet, telephone and cable TV service to most of the county. There were service outages all the way from 15th Street in Apalachicola to Alligator Point. Duke Power had wires running along the same street but said its power lines were undamaged. Avenue C between Fifth and Sixth Streets was blocked for several hours, and the knuckle truck was forced to remain there supporting the wires until a bucket truck and repair crew from Mediacom arrived to rehang them. A Mediacom spokesperson said that there were still outages on Sixth and 12th Streets in Apalachicola and in areas of St. George Island and Eastpoint as late as noon on Friday, Jan. 3. She said it was unclear whether those outages were related to the downed cable. Solid Waste Director Fonda Davis said the cable was damaged by a driver collecting yard debris in Apalachicola’s historic district. CC OUNTY TRUCK KNOCKS OUT CA bB LE Apalach cops nab burglary suspects KK AMRON BAR wi WI CK LL ANCE F F LO wW ERS Arrest RE RE P ORTORT Law Enforcement

PAGE 3

Local The Times | A3 Thursday, January 9, 2014 CONCER T SERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents % # $ # % & ) ) $ '" ($ *" *& '' ) ) # *% ! &' % $ # $ ( / $ $ # ( ) / ( ) / $ & # + / + 0 / # $ ( / ( / $ # % $ 1 39 1 2 t h St r e e t A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H el e n C oo k, A R N P D r I v a n B a c k e r ma n $ 6 / 0 0 # 0 0 5 3 $ 0 , 7 $ 0 6 5 7 $ " # 7 0 + % 0 $ 6 0 / 0 $ # 0 6 6 % 7 5 0 / 5 0 0 % 0 5 3 $ 6 5 / 0 0 5 6 0 3 7 $ 7 5 6 6 5 3 # 0 5 0 $ " & + 0 7 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 5 2 0 3 & 7 0 $ 0 , 6 # 0 5 0 $ ( 6 5 5 C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d a y F r i d a y 7 7 A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y 7 , 0 66 0 65 5 C a l l t o s c hed ule y o u r a p p oi nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 F l o r i d a D e pa r t m e n t o f He al t h in F r a nk l i n C o u nt y W O M E N S H E AL T H C L IN I C F r i e n d l y C a r i n g S t a T i m e s o f O p e r at ion : M o n d ay u r s d ay 7 : 3 0 a m – 6 : 0 0 p m F lor id a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h F r a n k l i n C o u n t y 1 0 6 5 t h S t r e e t C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 (8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 4 1 21 C AR R A B E L L E D E N T A L CL I N IC A cc e pt i ng : 6 5 3 5 6 0 4 5 6 / 0 2 7 4 0 3 0 2 7 4 0 4 4 0 0 / 5 5 / / 5 0 / S e r v i c e s f o r ch i l dr e n : 7 6 % 0 7 0 #0 ,6 6 0 5 3 5665 3 6 5/ 0 5 6 0 / # 0 / # # 6 5 / 5 3 0 0 # 6 0 5 , 5 6 6 0 7 0 3 0 0 5 0 2 / 6 0 6 , 5 6 6 0 6 0 0 6 6 2 / 0 5 6 + R en e e P a r r i s h D M D By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com With but a few excep tions, real estate sales data for last year showed little change from the previous year. Last week, the Realtors’ Association of Franklin and Gulf counties shared its annual Multiple Listing Service (MLS) statistics for 2013. Last year, a total of 452 properties countywide, com prising residential, commer cial and lots and land par cels, sold for $97.2 million, compared to 461 properties for $95.3 million in 2012. Residential sales were slightly up across the coun ty. In 2012, 247 properties sold for a total of $79.5 mil lion, and in 2013, 258 prop erties sold for $81.1 million. In both years, St. George Island had the lion’s share of residential sales, 112 in 2012 and 109 last year. Carrabelle had the sec ond greatest number of sales, with 67 in 2012 and 77 in 2013. The biggest jump was in Apalachicola, which saw a 33 percent increase in residential sales, from 42 to 56, and a 54 percent increase in the total sales volume, $6.8 million to $10.5 million. Eastpoint saw a slide in residential sales, from 26 in 2012 and 16 in 2013, but an increase in the average sale price, from about $173,000 to nearly $188,000. The island saw a slight decline in median sales price for residential prop erty, from $415,000 in 2012 to $410,000 in 2013. Apala chicola saw a rise in median price, from $138,000 in 2012 to $145,000 in 2013. The low est median residential price was in Carrabelle, which in creased from $95,500 in 2012 to $105,000 in 2013. The biggest sales in crease between the two years was in commercial property on St. George Is land. In 2012, there were no commercial sales there but last year there were three sales totaling $2.25 million, with the largest chunk, $1.5 million, paid for bayfront property across from Harry A’s. The property was pur chased by George Kirvin Floyd, founder and chair man of the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. Marinas brought big money both years in Car rabelle. In 2012, the Moor ings, at 1000 US 98, sold for $2.5 million, nearly 90 per cent of the overall $2.8 mil lion in commercial sales on the east end of the county. In 2013, the Carrabelle Ma rina, located almost next door at 803 US 98, sold for $560,000, the only listed commercial sale for Carra belle in the MLS statistics last year. Income from commercial sales varied little through out the entire county. In 2012, 11 sales brought in $4.03 million. Last year, even with the increase in commercial sales on the island, the total was $4.36 million, for an increase of 8 percent. Commercial sales in Carrabelle were down $2 million from the previous year, largely due to the de cline in marina sales totals. Sales of lots and land generated the least amount of income both years. In 2012, 203 sales netted $11.75 million, and in 2013, 179 sales brought in $11.74 million. The median price of un developed land increased in Carrabelle, from $10,750 to $14,000, and in St. George Island from $77,500 to $89,000. But median sales prices in Apalachicola, for about two dozen properties each year, decreased from $32,000 in 2012 to $28,000 in 2013. Eastpoint had the great est decrease in median prices for lots and land, with almost a 50 percent decline. In 2012, the median cost of an undeveloped lot in Eastpoint was $23,600, and in 2013, it was $12,850. “Activity is up a little bit. Prices are inching up,” said Gloria Salinard, association executive for the local real tors association. “Every one’s been really busy al though that doesn’t always mean there are closings. There’s lots of interest.” News BRIEFS SS PECIAL TO THE TT IMES The Carrabelle Marina was the only commercial sale on the eastern end of the county in 2013. County real estate prices still on hold From Staff Reports AA palachicola mayor plans ofce hours Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson plans regular open ofce hours in his ofce at the recently named Mayor Van W. Johnson, Sr., Recreation & Community Service Complex at 192 Coach Wagoner Blvd., site of the old Apalachicola High School. From 10 a.m. to noon and 24 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Apalachicola residents and others will have the opportunity to meet with the mayor in Suite 1 on a drop-in basis, without an appointment, to discuss whatever issues, ideas or concerns are on their minds. Residents who cannot meet on the designated days can contact Revena Ramsey at City Hall at 653-9319 or revenaramsey@cityofapalachicola. com to schedule a more convenient time.LL ibrary board to meet M M onday in CC rawfordville The Wilderness Coast Public Libraries’ Governing Board will meet at 1:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 13, at the Wakulla County Public Library, 4330 Crawfordville Highway,  Crawfordville. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, call 997-7400.FF ull moon climb at lighthouse Wednesday The January Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, Jan. 15. The sunset climb will take place from 5:30-7 p.m. and will include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 6:03 p.m., and the moon will rise at 5:55 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for association members. The Cape St. George Light is in Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. CC orrectional ofcer training starts Jan. 22 A new correctional ofcer training program will be starting Jan. 22 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe. This program is designed to prepare students for the state ofcer certication exam. Individuals who pass this exam are eligible for employment in any state, county or privately run correctional facility in Florida. The program will be conducted using the new shorter curriculum and will last approximately three months. The program will be offered during the day and will run from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily, Monday through Thursday. For more information, please call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 or email her at bburkett@gulfcoast. ed u The application deadline for Pell Grants and nancial aid is fast approaching, so please call today or come by the Gulf/Franklin Campus to pick up your application packet. MM useum to screen documentary Jan. 25 The 28th Infantry Division that trained at Camp Gordon Johnston bore the brunt of the opening drive of what was known as the “Battle of the Bulge.” On Saturday, Jan. 25, at 10:30 a.m., a documentary “The Drive to the Ardennes” will be shown in the movie theatre at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum. Produced by CGJ Member John Gaffey, the documentary will feature the valiant effort of the outnumbered 28th which slowed the advances of the Panzer Divisions speeding towards the village, Bastogne, a key objective of the Germans in their “last gasp” attempt to drive a wedge into the Allied forces and recapture the initiative on the Western Front. The documentary will last approximately one hour and free popcorn will be provided. While there is no admission fee, please remember that the museum operates on donations, and donations are welcome.

PAGE 4

By SHELLEY SWENSON Special to the Times With the beginning of a new year comes a time of re ection as well as anticipation. What was your life like in 2013? What do you plan to do differently during 2014? Would you consider some steps to get organized, be more energized and feel more ful lled? One of the things that I am going to pursue is to get organized for my end of life. Does this sound morbid? Perhaps, but it also sounds like a realistic thing each of us should do to make things easier for family members. I have only one child and few nieces and nephews. My daughter lives in the Midwest with her family in a very small house. I must come to terms with the idea that “my treasures” may not make it to her home for several different reasons. One is that her taste is different from mine. Secondly, she has little room for more things and does not have the resources for a storage unit rental. Are my things going to be sold at a rummage sale, given to charity or friends, or taken to the landfill? Although it will have little effect on me, these decisions could be difficult for her. Are there things I can do to reduce the anxiety that she will face? One of my 2014 resolutions is to develop a plan so that she will have the materials she will need to complete the process at the time of my death. This is another way of saying that I am going to write a Letter of Last Instructions, an informal document which can be one of the most helpful things I can provide. A Letter of Last Instructions is simply a letter that expresses my wishes following my death. It will provide my only child with information that she needs concerning my personal and nancial matters. UF/IFAS has published an EDIS document that outlines this process in detail. It is numbered FCS5238 and can be found at www. solutionsforyourlife. com. If you have never reviewed materials available to you through this website, you should. All aspects of family life, horticulture, agriculture and youth development are available. If you prefer, you can request a copy at the Extension Office, 66 4th Street, Apalachicola, or by calling 653-9337. Because I find it easier to complete big tasks by breaking them down into smaller units, I have developed a plan to accomplish one major aspect a month during 2014. If you feel you should do something similar, consider my plan and we can compare notes a year from now. Here are my goals divided by the months of 2014: January: Prepare a list of people to notify at the time of my death. February: Summarize the funeral arrangements I want, review those I have already made and finally, leave instructions as to the decisions that my daughter must make. This includes organ donation, autopsy, if requested, embalming, public viewing or not, body disposal and types of service and location. March: Continue with the funeral arrangements. Do I want a funeral and if so, what do I want to have happen at the funeral? What information would I like in my obituary? April: Make a list of who should be notified of the death; how many death certificates does this require? Make a list of the necessary information for the death certificate. May: Write a summary of all the locations of all personal documents including my will, birth, baptismal and marriage certificates, communion and confirmation certificates, diplomas, military papers, and others such as divorce or adoption papers. June: Develop a list of everything related to my automobiles. July: Develop a list of all financial accounts to include checking, savings, and certificate of deposits, IRAs and other financial accounts by name and institution. August: Compile a list of usernames and passwords for all of your computer and online accounts. Wow, this would be useful right now. September: Make a list of the location of any safe deposit boxes, a list of the contents and where the key is located. October: Another job that is long overdue whether living or dying is to make a list of all credit cards by issuer, number and where they are located. November: Make a complete of all debts and all funds owed to you. December: Compile a list of all homeowner information including a list of household contents and personal effects. This is a good start on developing a Letter of Last Instruction. If you and I can complete these tasks during the months of 2014, we will have accomplished a great deal. By completing this much of the task, we will be giving our family members the information needed concerning personal and financial matters. The organization of important documents will allow us to feel way ahead of where we are today. I encourage you to get started and periodically give me a call to tell me how the process is going. Further details on this subject are outlined in the EDIS publication listed above. Let me know if I can get you a copy. Shelley Swenson, a family and consumer services extension agent in Wakulla County, is part of an interim team serving Franklin County. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, January 9, 2014 A Page 4 Section Three steps toward better bear bonding To all those with bear problems: Stop whining. 1) Get a bear-proof garbage can! 2) Don’t leave pets or their food outside. 3) Leave them alone – they were here rst. John Hitron Carrabelle Has writing gone the way of the pay phone? I am sure that young children love to see their letters to Santa published in the Times. He has a subscription, doesn’t he? However, many children’s letters to Santa Claus this year were obviously scripted for them by their teachers. They looked like form letters. Maybe a computer-generated format was provided for them. What with word processors using spelling and grammar checkers, I guess old-fashioned writing with pen, pencil and paper has gone the way of the pay telephone. These compositions should have been spontaneous to provide kids an opportunity to express their own thoughts in writing. Written expression is not learned by writing something someone else tells you to do. That’s copying. Respectfully, Roy A. (Tony) Ragan Letters to the EDITOR By STEPHENIE LIVINGSTON Special to the Times Global tourism has increased fourfold over the last 30 years, resulting in human-induced seashell loss that may harm natural habitats worldwide, according to a University of Florida scientist. Appearing in the journal PLOS ONE on Jan. 8, the new study by researchers from the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus and the University of Barcelona demonstrates that increased tourism on the Mediterranean coast of Spain correlated with a 70 percent decrease in mollusk shells during the tourist season in July and August, and a 60 percent decrease in other months. Scientists fear shell removal could cause signi cant damage to natural ecosystems and organisms that rely on shells, said lead author Michal Kowalewski, the Thompson Chair of Invertebrate Paleontology at the Florida Museum. “This research is best described as a case study that evaluates shell loss due to tourism and then explores how this process may affect natural habitats,” Kowalewski said. “It’s too early to tell whether this depletion is substantial enough to trigger major environmental changes. However, our results suggest that we should not ignore this issue.” In the study, researchers conducted multiple monthly surveys from 1978 to 1981 and from 2008 to 2010 on Llarga Beach, a small stretch of shoreline on the coast of Spain. Based on area hotel sales data, researchers estimate the number of tourists visiting the beach increased threefold over the last 30 years, with most visits during the summer. Over the same time period, the number of shells on the beach decreased by more than 60 percent. The survey area has experienced no new commercial sheries or urban development since the 1970s, suggesting human activity unrelated to tourism is unlikely to have contributed substantially to the shell loss, Kowalewski said. Changes in ecosystem structure and local environmental conditions, which could potentially contribute to a natural decrease in shell numbers, were not observed, he said. Shell removal at Llarga Beach was higher during the summer, and shells were more abundant during the winter when fewer tourists visited the area. Although a popular destination, the beach is not a major tourist hot spot, and the shells found there are not beautiful, diverse or valuable to collectors. If a relationship between increased tourism and accelerated shell removal can be detected at a place not famous for its shells, it is likely that beaches known for their shells and frequented by collectors have had more substantial impact, Kowalewski said. “Although signi cant research has been done on the impacts of human activity on live shell sh, including, recreational harvesting and curio collecting, we are still lacking rigorous studies estimating the scale of shell removal by humans,” Kowalewski said. “Shells are remarkable in that they serve multiple functions in natural ecosystems, from beach stabilization to building materials for bird nests.” Shells also provide a home or attachment surface for diverse marine organisms, including algae, seagrass, sponges and other microand macro-organisms. Hermit crabs use shells as their protective armor, while sh use shells to hide from predators. These discarded exoskeletons of mollusks, including clams and oysters, are also important because most are made of calcium carbonate and in many coastal habitats they dissolve slowly and recycle back into the ocean. The study may prompt more systematic assessments of shell removal by tourists, said Geerat Vermeij, a mollusk shell expert and distinguished professor of geology with the University of California Davis, which was not involved in the study. “Molluscan shells are of prime importance to hermit crabs, and although sand beaches are not good places for such crabs, dead snail shells on mudats and rocky shores do form a primary resource for abundant hermit crabs,” Vermeij said. “More subtly, many small organisms settle on dead shells, and so removing such shells will eliminate habitats for these colonists.” Though tourismrelated shell loss may one day prove harmful, Kowalewski said more rigorous quantitative case studies are needed to fully understand the impact and develop reliable beach management practices aimed at shell protection. Some countries already recognize the negative effects of shell removal, including the Bahamas, which limits the quantity of shells tourists can export without special permits. “Humans may play a signi cant role in altering habitats through activities that many would perceive as mostly harmless, such as beachcombing and seashell collecting,” Kowalewski said. “It is important that we continue to investigate the more subtle aspects of tourismrelated activities and their impact on shoreline habitats.” Study co-authors were Rosa Domnech and Jordi Martinell with the Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat and Departament d’Estratigra a, Paleontologia i Geocincies Marines, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, in Barcelona, Spain. The study may be viewed at http://dx.plos. org/10.1371/journal. pone.0083615 The University of Florida is one of the nation’s largest public universities. A member of the Association of American Universities, UF posted research expenditures totaling $740 million in 2011. www.u edu. Study: Seashell loss because of tourism increase Prepare a letter of last instructions SHELLEY SWENSON JORDI MARTINELL | Special to The Times Located on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, Llarga beach has experienced a threefold increase in tourism since the 1970s. As a result, seashells numbers have decreased more than 60 percent.

PAGE 5

Local The Times | A5 Thursday, January 9, 2014 APPEAL from page A1 specialty store. But, he argues, rather than articulating the evidence that it relied on to makes its decision, P & Z relied on “improper, irrelevant, immaterial and inadmissible” comments of the public. Among those comments at the Nov. 2013 hearing were those of Board of Adjustment Chair Carrie Kienzle, who Hughes cites as having said that allowing the Family Dollar to be built is “a slippery slope into a cement ghetto, so let’s not go there.” The attorney also alleges that Kienzle voiced “a baseless opinion that the company somehow acted less than honestly and ‘tried to slip’ the issue of project approval during the April 2012 meeting, when in point of fact (P & Z) took action on that issue of its own volition.” The motion argues Kienzle, therefore, cannot render an impartial decision on the matter, and demands that she recuse herself from the board of adjustment process. to be able to share it with our readers ——————— Day 1: Travel. Left Tal lahassee at 5:40 a.m., which made for a busy day, leav ing from Apalachicola at 3 a.m. I had not much sleep as I worked the day before in Ocala, driving home and arriving at 12:30 a.m. The ights have gone smoothly, transfers without difculty. The airport in South Korea was very modern with all the conveniences. Asiana Airlines was great, service was superb, food tasty. I’m on the nal leg from Incheon to Cebu, wonder ing what to expect. As I ll out my customs declaration I feel nervous, an anxious anticipation as I remember previous volunteer trips. I remember a very old wom an in Haiti, who adopted us and lived on a cot in our eld hospital. Of the locals, no one knew who she was, she was obviously demented. She swept and kept the hospital clean-ish Mostly, she slept. I remember a little girl; around 10, she came in with her baby brother, an infant. She and the baby were clean, well dressed and healthy in appearance. None of our translators could not get a complaint from her. Yet she hung out with us. I asked her about her parents and I found they were both killed in the earthquake, leaving her to care for the infant. Af ter some questioning, I held her hand and told her that she was doing an excellent job taking care of her broth er and he was very healthy. She was all smiles, I think this validation is what she needed. ——————— A quick meet and greet then to Ormoc district hos pital to help in ER. Then we were dispatched to Palom pon. This is a level 1 hospital, they had critical care needs. We bought them meds when we arrived. We found they had docs coming in the next day, but no help the next 24 hours. I arranged to stay. I worked the ER, they gave me a sleep room, I stayed the night and saw a variety of ill nesses and injuries. I met a woman there who was hav ing trouble breathing. She had pneumonia, she had a small mixed breed dog at her side, she would not be separated from this mutt. I found out that she lost all of her family and was home less and alone. I worked the night, the German docs arrived at 8 a.m. and took their transportation back to Ormoc City. I met a friend from my Haiti mission: Tim, a sur gical PA, he needed help in Dagami. They left me in charge of minor surgery, pa tients with infected wounds, and the medical needs. Me and a nurse saw 20 wound infections. I sutured 12. I saw my rst tetanus. I saw a child with measles, three children with chicken pox, one with infected pox. I am amazed at the resilient, homeless, sick but always smiling. They are work ing hard at rebuilding their homes, but in the process are lacerations are common. The Germans docs arrived and I took their transporta tion back to Ormoc City, 100 kilometers away. ——————— The next day we went together as a team and manned the ER at Ormoc district hospital. Truly an in ternational affair. The ambu lance (manned by Japanese docs) brought us patients, many tuberculosis, dehydra tion, etc. Here we delivered babies. More wounds, burns. It is interesting to note how this hospital functions. They write prescriptions when they admit the patients, they give the orders to the patient and the patient buys the meds and theses meds are used during their stay. It was her that I encoun tered a 21-day-old infant in respiratory in distress. This baby was intubated the day before with a presumed RSV (respiratory syncytial virus), now with a second ary pneumonia. The tube had advanced and had to be repositioned. The baby died the next day as we were un able to transfer her to the Chinese hospital ship. This ship has ventilators, inten sive care docs, and is state of the art. We had arranged the parents to do so; they had a room on the ship. Sadly, due to politics we were unable to transfer and the baby died the next morning ——————— At our rst clinic at a lo cal church where we were assigned, we saw about 75 patients in a shortened day. There were some injuries from the typhoon and a lot of illness from the contaminat ed water and the smoke in the air from burning debris (intentionally burned for disposal). There were also several with chronic illness and a signicant number of those who were severely stressed by their circum stances who can’t sleep or who somaticize (Note: Anxi ety converted into physical symptoms). After clinic, we took a tour of the still mass of wreckage and debris. There were chil dren playing and laughing, although the smell of rot was pervasive. The smells, an order hard to describe, a combination of diesel fuel, human and animal wastes and death. The views were stunning but after a while, you just felt a waterfront. One of us com mented that it was sad that the parents had lost a baby and didn’t know where the body was. The bystanders said that the parents were probably dead too. I no lon ger felt numb, I felt a little sick… Then we moved on to Or moc, a functioning city. The economy is turning back on and the health of the people isn’t too bad. The streets are bustling with activity. Taclo ban, on the other hand, has disintegrated. There are many internally displaced persons from Tacloban in Ormoc despite the 100 kilo meter distance. ——————— I love this kind of work, wanted to stay longer. The destruction, loss of family, etc. is horrible. The peeps are noble, gracious, humble and very hard working. I es pecially liked working the shing villages, As I saw a parallel between them and our community. The 14-year-old who lost all her family and clinged to her small dog for comfort, sad, heartbreaking. In the Philippines, a great miracle happened. First came the once-in-acentury typhoon of such fe rocious strength. Next came the demonstrated resilience and faith of the Filipino peo ple. A smaller miracle, per haps; the effect on my own heart, lled with so many testaments of hope. As I return home from the Philippines at this Christ mas season. I think how the messages of the holidays are so relevant: wherever we are in the world, we have reason to be thankful, and wherever we are, we can tri umph over something that seems more powerful than we are. ——————— I am warmed by the light of these stories. This story was told me from another group in a nightly get-together. We used these as a nightly destressing. Also a few beer. Perla, the girl with the violin: A 14-year-old girl emerged from the clinic af ter being treated for a minor wound, she had a violin in hand. She was reportedly reluctant to accept any as sistance because she had to allow someone to hold her violin. She nally let a nurse hold her violin. Fi nally, someone asked if she felt like playing something. She stood up and played the Philippine national anthem to applause and hugs from those around her. Reyna: I tried to engage this young lady in conver sation, getting info on her present illness. She had a bronchitis. Seeing she didn’t want to talk, I didn’t make further attempts. It was near lunch, so we gave her something to eat. After she ate she gave me her name and said, “I’m sorry I can’t talk now. I’m still in mourning – I lost six family members.” At that point, I couldn’t talk either. ——————— We reached remote Gui uan, a village of about 45,000 that was among the rst ar eas hit by the full force of the storm. The situation here is bleak. The village has been attened -houses, medical facilities, rice elds, sh ing boats all destroyed. People are living out in the open; there are no roofs left standing in the whole of Guiuan. The needs are im mense and there are a lot of surrounding villages that are not yet covered by any aid organizations. We set up our clinic in what used to be a church with make shift tarps to keep the rain out and set about seeing patients. Saw 300 today, a variety of injuries, illness, diarrhea, upper respiratory illnesses. Today we came across a young Mary Anne Moraleta who survived the storm surges of Super Typhoon Yolanda. While hopping from house to house, howev er, she got her foot trapped between ripped off roong from her neighbor’s home. The wound has been ban daged but not cleaned. She’s scared to have it cleaned at a nearby because of the lan guage barrier. “Siguro kung Pilipino, okay ako, at least p’wede kong sabihin na dahan-dah anin,” she said. (I’d be okay if medical workers were Fili pino. At least I can tell them, please be gentle.) “Resilient” is an overused word to describe Filipinos when disaster strikes, but it’s what Matsuda would use for the victims of Yolanda. “May mga ngiti pa sa mukha nila, so medyo relieved na ako,” he said. (There are smiles on their faces so I’m a little relieved now.) But amid the widespread grief and despair, it was the extraordinary courage of the Filipinos that struck me most. On my nal day in Or moc City I saw a group of people walking back to town. It started to rain, a man looked up to the sky and asked out loud, “How much longer? How much longer?” I wished I had an answer for him. There was little I could do, little that I could give. I only had some cereal bars and crackers in my back pack. I gave these and my beef jerky and he graciously said thank you and smiled. TYPHOON from page A1 Cross and a local church, the family was temporarily housed at the Best Western Inn in Apalachicola. Cloth ing and household items were donated after a re quest for help was posted on the Franklin County Yard Sale Facebook page. Carr said the re mar shal’s ofce was not asked to investigate the Jefferson Street re. FIRES from page A1 #),..) 4)7 3. 70 .-4,)7 0,. 47-42 $ 423 ) /& # www.Sacr edH eartontheG ulf .or g 46 ),4)"4& *756 *,5,. /' "4,6 .& ..*6 "3. / 7) ).& 57* *. / 70.)-.& 4.-5,$ /'2 )8. .*46& *# 4* /' % 2 2& 6*5, "3. /' 46(),4)"4 &( "4,6(.&( ().&( 7) )8.( .*46&( 3. ). 7. 8.+ 4. .-5,*6 0,. 56-53 "*,..* 5*6 4. 60 5 7 ) 3. .-4,)7 0,. 47-42 !.4*+565*5 ".5,. / & 7.) .. / )-472 #.,4)74 57. /' ),4 .& 6.,4 563 $ ..5*6 *-563 5) )*& ..5*6 *-563 .54.*6 % *,6* N O TI CE O F PUB LI C HEARIN G T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTI O N O F AN C O UNT Y O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s g i v en t h a t o n t h e 21s t d a y o f J a n u a r y 2014 a t 11:00 a.m. (E T), in t h e co ur t r o o m a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, w hic h i s lo c a t e d a t 33 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s s h a l l co n d uc t a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a co un t y o r din a n ce en t i t le d: A n Or din a n ce o f F ra n k lin C o un t y Flo r id a P r o v idin g F o r e R e m o va l o f D e b r i s F r o m P r i va t e l y O w n e d L a n d s D ur in g e T im e Of A S t a t e o f Em er g en c y ; P r o v idin g A n E e c t i v e D a t e e p u b lic i s in v i t e d t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic h e a r in g os e p er s o n s w h o desir e t o s p e a k r ega r din g t h e ado p t io n o f t h e o r din a n ce s h a l l b e g i v en a r e a s o n a b le o p p o r t uni t y t o s p e a k. e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h, a n d m a y b e v ie w e d a t, t h e o ce o f t h e C ler k o f C o ur t a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y C o ur t h o u s e w hic h i s lo c a t e d a t 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a. e m e et in g r o o m i s h a n dic a p acces si b le; h o w e v er t h os e p er s o n s w h o m a y r e q uir e s p e ci a l a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic m e et in g m u s t m a k e a r ra n g em en ts in ad va n ce b y c a l lin g dep u t y c ler k M ic h ae l M o r o n a t 850-653-8161, x100 a t le a s t t w o b u sin es s d a ys in ad va n ce o f t h e m e et in g A n y p er s o n w h o m a y desir e t o c h a l len g e t h e o u t co m e o f t h e p u b lic m e et in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r r e co r din g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e m e et in g Coupon Expir es: 1-15-14 CODE: AP00 LARRY APPLEBEE | Special to the Times

PAGE 6

A6 | The Times Thursday, January 9, 2014 SMOKIN’ GOOD FUN ON THE ISLAND L o v e l y L UC Y L u c y i s an 8 m o n t h o l d S i b e r ian H u sk y / Y e l l o w L a b c r o s s an d sh e l o o k s l i k e e x a c t l y w hat sh e i s S h e ha s b l u e e y e s an d p o i n t e d e a r s w i t h a f u l l an d s o f t y e l l o w c o at S h e i s sm a r t an d s o c ia l an d l i k e m o s t H u sk i e s sh e l i k e s t o t a l k S h e i s h e a r t w o r m n e g at i v e sp a y e d an d r e a d y f o r h e r f o r e v er ho m e If o p e n ing y o u r ho m e t o a sh e l t e r an i m a l i s o n e o f y o u r N e w Y e a r s r e s o l u t i o n s c o m e t o t h e a d o p t i o n c e n t e r an d m e e t o u r b e a u t i f u l d o g s an d c at s W e ha v e s o m an y t hat n e e d y o u r l o v e V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e sp e r at e l y n e e d e d t o s o c ia l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s an d c at s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. OF THE WEEK PET 227.7847 Franklin County Humane Society S e e Y o u r Bu s in e s s Name a n d I n f o Her e f o r O N L Y $ 1 5 p e r w e ek $ 6 0 p e r m o n t h Ca l l T o d a y 4 51 6 4 2 2 ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! After a buffet meal cooked by James Tomlin, Apalachicola Lodge No. 76 F & AM on Dec. 28 installed of cers for the 2014 year at the lodge building at 1 Center St. Greg Wynot, who is Worshipful Master of a Masonic lodge in Greenville, of ciated at the installation ceremony. Pictured from left are Senior Warden James Tomlin, Worshipful Master Michael Shuler, Junior Warden Kevin Ward, Secretary Brent Mabry (who served as marshall) and Treasurer Carl Duncan (who served as chaplain). Not pictured are Senior Deacon James Hicks and Junior Deacon Christopher Creamer. In the inset picture are the Lesser Lights at the altar, upon which rests an open Bible. Society Special to The Times The speaker for the November meeting of the Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association, was Larry Carmichael, legislative chairman for the Florida Retired Educators Association, who provided information about House Bill 867, Parent Empowerment Bill, the Trigger Bill and House Bill 7011, a bill to close the pension plan to all new employees. The vote on the Senate oor for HB 7011 was 18 yeas to 22 nays. He also gave directions for nding elected of cials on the internet by going to the House of Representatives website, www.my oridahouse.com. The F/GREA local association is looking forward to its Jan. 21 meeting at the newly opened Franklin County Public Library in Eastpoint. Members will be discussing books they have enjoyed and making plans for the fth-grade essay contest to honor a grandparent or grandparent gure, an annual project for the group. F/GREA membership is open to any person who has retired from the education eld under the Florida Retirement System with ve years or more of service or any person who has retired from the educational system of any other state or from any privately funded or parochial school with ve or more years of service. For information, call 653-8493. On Tuesday evening, Dec. 31, Lynn Spohrer and the Coombs House Inn hosted an open house to celebrate the recovery of husband Bill Spohrer from a recent illness. She said she wished to thank the entire community for their concern and prayers during Bill’s recovery. The event featured lots of champagne and food and the “Oyster Drop,” which the Coombs House plans to make a new tradition, bigger and brighter next year. As the new year neared, a net lled with hand-painted oyster shells and silver ornaments was launched from the second-story balcony of Coombs House and greeted with cheers by celebrants as it plummeted to the lawn. FREDERICK KAHLER | The Times More than 350 people attended the annual St. George Island New Year’s Bon re on the Beach. The party has been a tradition on the island for more than 30 years. Disc jockey Wayne Thomas spun some licorice pizza for the entertainment of visitors and islanders alike, thanks to a $500 grant from the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. The re helped chase the chills away as youngsters and oldsters celebrated the end of 2013 and welcomed a brand new year. Mason Bean, president of the St. George Island Civic Club, which sponsored the bon re, said the weather was clear and perfect with a 15 mph wind from the east. L OIS SWOBODA | The Times LARRY CARMICHAEL Happy BIRTHDAY Kayten Brannan turns 1 Kayten Grace Brannan turned 1 year old on Monday, Dec. 30, 2013. Her parents are Mark Brannan and Karah Busby, and her big sister is Madilynn Brannan, all of Eastpoint. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ricky Busby and the late Tammy Yon. Her paternal grandparents are Gail Brannan of Eastpoint and Terry Brannan of Carrabelle. We love you, our sweet girl, to the moon and back! Happy birthday! Easton Johnson turns 3 Easton Brice Johnson turned 3 on Tuesday, Dec. 31. He is the son of Brett and Carrie Johnson of Apalachicola and little brother to big sister Averie Johnson. His maternal grandparents are Beckie and Ronnie Jones of Apalachicola, the late Scott Andrew McDaniel of Columbus, Ga., and Chris and Judy Grif n of Phenix City, Ala. His maternal great-grandparents are the late Steven and Inga Freeman of Midland, Ga., and C.E. “Red” and JoAnn McDaniel of Columbus, Ga. His paternal grandparents are Robbie and Marcia Johnson of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are the late Paul and Inez Johnson of Apalachicola, and Bill and Burnell Martina, also of Apalachicola. Easton is one happy, smart, fun, and loving little guy! Happy Birthday to our special big boy! We all love you so very much! Brian Lee is 3! Brian Lee Taylor, the son of Brian and Keli Taylor, turned 3 on Sunday, Jan. 5. To have a son is to be given one of life’s greatest gifts To have a son is to always have a reason to smile, laughter to share, and memories to treasure. To have a son is the best feeling in the world he is a constant source of joy, pride, gratitude and above all love that lasts a lifetime. Happy Birthday, with Love Always, Mama and Daddy Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES MASONIC LODGE INSTALLS 2014 OFFICERS Retired educators schooled in Florida laws PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times A NEW NEW YEAR TRADITION

PAGE 7

The Times | A7 Thursday, January 9, 2014 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor Faith Hope you were able to join the celebrations on New Years Eve. I had a great birthday on New Years Day. Thanks for all the phone calls, cards, gifts and the meal. Our monthly Lanark Village Association board and membership meeting on Monday, Jan. 6, was canceled. We plan to meet next Monday, Jan. 13, at Chillas Hall. Board meeting is at 6 p.m. and regular meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 8, was our season opener for Wednesday Night Bingo. Had a nice crowd and lots of fun. Try to join us next Wednesday. Doors at Chillas Hall open at 6 p.m. with bingo at 6:30 p.m. Coffee, soda and cookies available. Be watchin for ya! Be looking for you today. We will enjoy a good lunch and fellowship at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center in Carrabelle. Our faithful volunteers will serve your meal. Chow line forms at noon. The center is located on the corner of First Street and Avenue F. You bet every Friday and Sunday night we have hamburgers and pizza at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, on Oak Street. Orders taken after 5 p.m. both evenings. A donation of $6 is required for hamburgers and chips on Friday, and pizza on Sunday is a donation of $1 per slice, $8 for a whole pizza and $10 for take-out. Call your order in at 697-9998 and enjoy. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Jan. 18. A full breakfast will be ready from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Later, on Saturday night, you can join us for the January Birthday Bash at American Legion Post 82. Your food will be ready starting at 6 p.m. Have a rip-roaring good time! Then on Sunday, Jan. 19, we will gather at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. Doors open at noon. Serving beginning at 1 p.m. Hope you can make it. Bring a dish to share, a donation and your growling stomach and enjoy the afternoon with us. As always, the public is invited to all the above mentioned. Fuzzy Wuzzy came by Monday morning, so I spent the early morning out on the south lawn picking up garbage. Rats! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, coffee hour is from 9 to 11 a.m., Monday through Friday at Chillas Hall. Coffee on Thursdays is free. The gentleman from the Veterans Administration will be there for you to talk to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. The Barelds Just want to say thank you for your thoughtfulness during this time the caring cards you sent the gifts of food the special memories shared the smiles and hugs all made a difference. At times like this, it is so very comforting to know that others are thinking of you I know Wendell did appreciate family and friends and so do I. While Wendell will be so missed I can be happy in knowing he made a difference in others lives. He will be remembered fondly and at the end of the day this is what matters. With our love and thanks, The Wendell W. Bareld, Sr. Family Special to The Times Carrabelle Methodists plan Market Days Ministry Carrabelle United Methodist Church announces its 2014 Market Days Ministry. God teaches that we must care for orphans and widows in their afiction and needs. Funds derived from your donations will assist us to better serve those in need in our community. Beginning Jan. 25 and continuing on the last Saturday of each month through December, there will be 12 events full of food, music, arts and crafts, baked goods, rummage sales, rafes and more at the Curley Messer Pavilion, on Tallahassee Street in Carrabelle next to the re station. Please come and share in this Gods Ministry with us. Mark your calendar for the rst event on Saturday, Jan. 25 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the pavilion. Signs will be out with directions. For more information, contact Bonnie Myrick, fundraising chair, at 8993175 or missgalfriday@ yahoo.com. Health Department: Pregnant women should get u vaccination The Florida Department of Health in Franklin County urges pregnant women to receive the u vaccination because of the increased effects inuenza infections have on pregnant women and their babies in Florida this year. The u vaccine is the single best way to prevent u, said Marsha Lindeman, administrator of the county health department. We want to make sure people understand how important it is for pregnant women to receive the inuenza vaccination to protect themselves and their babies. The county health department recommends all individuals age 6 months and older receive the u vaccination each year. It is especially important for pregnant women to be vaccinated because of the increased risk of complications associated with contracting the u while pregnant. The u vaccination is safe and will protect the mother, her unborn child and babies during the rst months after birth. Additional u prevention steps include washing your hands often, keeping your hands away from your face and covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when sneezing and coughing. Symptoms of the u include headache, fever, severe cough, runny nose or body aches. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, see your primary care provider immediately for guidance on treatment. For more information on pregnant women and inuenza, visit www.cdc.gov/u/protect/ vaccine/pregnant.html. It is important for you and your family members to get a u vaccine every year. Flu vaccines are offered in many locations, including doctors ofces, clinics, health departments, retail stores, pharmacies, health centers and by many employers and schools. Check with your physician, the county health department or visit www.oridahealth. gov/prevention-safety-andwellness/u-prevention/ locate-a-u-shot.html to search for a location to receive a u vaccine. DOH protects, promotes and improves the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Follow us on Twitter at @HealthyFla and on Facebook. For more information about the Florida Department of Health please visit www. FloridaHealth.gov. Breastfeeding support group at health department Healthy Start has a breastfeeding support group from 11 a.m. to noon third Thursdays at the Florida Department of Health in Apalachicola. If you are interested, call Patricia Rickards at 653-2111 ext. 128 or 370-6351. Sheila Faircloth passed away Monday, Jan. 6, 2014, in Panama City. An Apalachicola native, she is survived by her daughter, Jessica Faircloth, of Defuniak Springs. No services are planned at this time. Kelley Funeral Home will be handling arrangements. Sheila Faircloth Bufford Jones, 78, of Eastpoint, went to be with Jesus in Heaven on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014. He passed away quietly in his sleep at Covenant Hospice in Bay Medical Sacred Heart Hospital in Panama City at 2:34 in the morning. Bufford was born Nov. 21, 1935, in wonderful Lynn Haven, where he lived until about age 7. He lived most of his life in his two great hometown communities of Apalachicola and Eastpoint. Bufford worked in the seafood industry shing, shrimping, oystering, crabbing, scalloping and doing all types of seasonal water work. He was also a great carpenter, boat builder and a good mechanic. Bufford loved the Lord, his family and friends. He enjoyed talking with people, freshwater shing, camping, cook-outs and potluck dinners. He loved watching television and faithfully watched Sunday church services. Bufford was preceded in death by his parents, Harrison Jones and Eva Estelle Dennis Jones. He was also preceded in death by three of his brothers, Horace Jones, Auburn Jones and Dennis Jones; and two of his sisters, Connie Jones and Brenda Jones Coulter. He was also preceded in death by a daughter, Mary Frances Howard Creamer. Survivors include two of his siblings, one sister, Ruby Jones Andrews Segree, and one brother, James Jones. Survivors also include his wife, Mary Jo Jones; and children, Chris Howard (Teresa) and Patty Howard Rickards (Joe); and his two daughters from a prior marriage, Sarah Estelle Jones Smith (Bobby) and Xuripha Mae (Bunky) Jones, (Gerry). He is survived by 11 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Bufford is also survived by many nieces and nephews and their children. Funeral services began Monday afternoon, Jan. 6, at the Kelley Funeral Home, 149 Ave. H, Apalachicola, and were ofciated by Pastor Ray Creamer of Apalachicola, Pastor Bobby Shiver of Eastpoint and Pastor Margaret Henkle of Panama City. The family received friends at the funeral home from 2 to 3 p.m., prior to the funeral service in the chapel. Interment followed at the Eastpoint Cemetery. Pallbearers were Buffords great-nephew Wesley Jones and his nephews, Chris Jones, Billy Jones, Ricky Jones, Frank Coulter and Earl Coulter. Flowers will be accepted or donations may be made in Buffords name to a favorite charity or church. Bufford Jones BUFFORD JONES Juanita Elizabeth Romano Vathis, a native of Apalachicola, went to be with Jesus on Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013. She was preceded in death by her husband, Costa Vathis, and father of her children; mother, Lilly Bryant Romano; father, Capt. S. A. Romano; brother, Sandy Romano; son, Nick Vathis; and a granddaughter, Christina Vathis She is survived by her children, John Vathis of Panama City, Mary Elizabeth Herring of Panama City Beach, George Vathis of Bellview and Theo Vathis of Tallahassee; grandchildren, Veronica Crotts Almarode of Tallahassee, Jamie Vathis of Mexico Beach, Nicky Vathis of Panama City Beach, Ricky Vathis of Chipley, Stephani Vathis of Texas, Tracy Vathis of Destin, Candice Vathis of Tampa, Michael Vathis of Tallahassee, Costa Vathis of Tallahassee, Tammy Vathis of Colorado and Christopher Vathis of Colorado; greatgrandchildren, Vernon Babich of Ocala, Michael Austin of Wewahitchka and Katlin Vathis of Mexico Beach; nieces and nephews Mary George Williams, Despina George, Alexander Vathis, Tony Romano, Carla Hight, Nick Spanolios and Jimmy Spanolios; and dear friends she considered her other daughters, Ginger Chumney Lewis, Geri Parker, Marilyn Wages, Frances Ann Monroe and Denise Putnal. Her father, Capt. Romano, was from Palermo, Sicily, a sea captain who came to Apalachicola to trade for cotton and lumber. He met Lilly Bryant and married; they raised Juanita and her brother Sandy in Apalachicola. She attended the Catholic convent and was schooled by the nuns. She later married Costa Vathis, who operated The Grill Restaurant in Apalachicola and was a state representative for Franklin County in the 40s. Juanita was his secretary. Mary Carol Creekmore was her dance instructor with her sister-in-law Helen Vathis and friend Betty Brocado as a teenager. Her hobby was corresponding through letters to her friends and family up to the time of her death. She never met a stranger and was loved by so many and will be missed forever Graveside funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 3, 2014, at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Juanita Vathis JUANIT A VA THIS Alice Aline Walden passed away Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, with her loving family by her side at the age of 82. Aline was born Jan. 25, 1931, in Carrabelle to Alice and Willie Walden. She was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle and member of First Assembly of God church. She is survived by her daughter Denise Walden Massey (and husband, William); grandson Steven Martin; niece Dianna Davis; nephew Keith Walden; nine great-nieces and three great-nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Jan. 8, at 2 p.m. at the First Assembly of God church in Carrabelle with burial in Evergreen Cemetery, the Rev. Ron Barks ofciating. Visitation was held Tuesday evening, Jan. 7, at the church. Kelley Funeral Home handling all arrangements.Alice Aline Walden GUESTBOOKS View obituaries and sign guestbooks at www. apalachtimes.com. Obituaries Card of THANKS Lanark Association to meet Monday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS

PAGE 8

Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, January 9, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu J an. 9 68 53 10 % F ri, J an. 10 69 54 10 % S a t J an. 11 70 52 60 % Sun, J an. 12 63 41 % M on, J an. 13 63 41 % T ues J an. 14 63 41 % W ed J an. 15 63 41 % Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : Special to The Times Curious about getting back to the basics by planting a garden? Have you tried with little success and know you need some basic gardening skills before you attempt it again? Do you feel that a raised bed would allow you to garden without the soil quality at your location being a factor? Are you trying to live more in tune with the environment and just don’t know how to control the pests without chemicals? Join others from across the Panhandle in a Spring into Vegetable Gardening Series for novice gardeners. UF/IFAS Extension horticulture agents will present seminars through interactive video on the topics of what to grow, Florida growing seasons, site selection, soil improvement techniques, fertilizers, pest control and speci cally how to grow tomatoes, peppers, squash and cucumbers, The workshop will be 7-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 14 through Feb. 4, in the historic Coombs Armory, 66 Fourth St., Apalachicola. To assist with the expense of the meeting, $30 per person or $45 per couple will be charged. A notebook of gardening information will be provided for each participant and refreshments will be served. Never let the cost of an Extension program keep you from attending; contact us to discuss if assistance is needed. Consider attending this gardening series and meet the additional UF/ IFAS extension agents who are now serving Franklin County. Call the county extension of ce at 653-9337 for more information or to register. By LES HARRISON Special to the Times Franklin County deer hunters will be heading to the woods shortly in hopes of a trophy rack as 2014 kicks off. The rut is forecast to peak in January for the county’s hunting areas. Tate’s Hell Wildlife Management Area has a predicted peak rut date of Jan. 11 and St. James Island of Jan. 20. Unseasonable weather may change these dates, but many Zone D hunters will be planning hunts based on these dates. Sites for deer stands should have long been identi ed and the stand erected nearby with a clear eld of re. One of the best stand locations is near a route to a food plot or feeding source. Food plots are an effective but potentially expensive method of providing food sources for deer and other species. Plots or elds are planted with grains, legumes, sun owers and other plants with high nutritional value for wildlife but may run over $1,000 to produce. The size of food plots varies according to hunter’s preferences and the requirements of the target wildlife species, but usually they are a minimum of a half to one acre to a maximum of about ve acres. An economically friendly alternative is to locate the stand near mast, edible seeds and fruit produced by indigenous trees and plants, which appeal to the deer’s dietary needs. Mast species are divided into hard mast and soft mast. Hard mast includes hard-shelled seeds like acorns, hickory nuts, chestnuts, beechnuts, walnuts, pecans and pine nuts. These seeds, which are produced in fall and winter, are typically high in fat, carbohydrates and protein. They provide an energy-rich food source important to many wildlife species during colder months when other forms of nutrition are scarce. There hard coating insures their availability all winter. Soft mast comprises soft, eshy, perishable fruits such as blackberries, cherries and persimmons. These warm-season native fruits are high in sugar, vitamins and carbohydrates, providing an important food and energy source for wildlife. Mast production for wildlife can be increased on forest property through the judicious planning and use of native plants. The two most important criteria for the success of your efforts will be the diversity menu choices for the deer and seasonal availability of food sources. To learn more read “Establishing and Maintaining Wildlife Food Sources” at http://edis.ifas.u edu/fr062 or contact your UF/IFAS Franklin County Extension Of ce at 6539337. Visit http://franklin. ifas.u .edu/ to see classes, events and information offered through the UF/IFAS Franklin County Extension Of ce. Les Harrison, the Wakulla County extension director, is part of a team serving Franklin County. During the Christmas Bird Count, I visited the Port St. Joe Airport and saw a number of interesting plants there. I couldn’t help but notice a very healthy stand of dwarf sundew creating a pretty red carpet around the drainage ditches. The sundew family, Drosera, has almost 200 species and is found on every continent except Antarctica. It is the largest family of carnivorous plants, most often found in wetlands. Carnivorous plants use the nitrogen in insect protein to supplement the poor mineral nutrition of the soil in which they grow. There are ve species of sundews in Florida: dwarf, pink, thread leaf, spoonleaf and Tracy’s sundew. All are found in Franklin County, but the dwarf sundew is the commonest by far. The plant is called sundew because of the gel-like glue on the leaves that helps the plant trap insects. Both the botanical name, from the Greek word “drosos” and the English common name sundew, roughly translate to mean “dew of the sun” and refer to the glistening drops of glue at the tip of each tentacle. Sundews are mostly perennial and form rosettes of leaves that vary in height from a quarter inch to three feet. All species of sundew are able to move their tentacles in response to contact with digestible prey. The tentacles are extremely sensitive and will bend toward the center of the leaf to bring the insect into contact with as many stalked glands as possible. The owers of sundews are held far above the leaves by a long stem. This separation of the ower from the traps once was thought to be an adaptation meant to avoid trapping potential pollinators, but recent research found insects commonly trapped by sundews are different species from their pollinators. Botanists now think the tall ower stalks probably help raise the owers to a height where they are noticeable to pollinators. The root systems of most Drosera are often only weakly developed, serving mainly to absorb water and to anchor the plant to the ground. The roots are relatively useless for nutrient uptake. Many species of sundews are self-fertile; their owers will often selfpollinate upon closing. The tiny black seeds germinate in response to moisture and light; some species also require cold. New plants also are produced in some species when specialized roots called stolons come near the soil surface or where old leaves contact the ground. Sundews were used as medicinal herbs as early as the 12th century. It has been used commonly in cough preparations in Germany and elsewhere in Europe. Sundew tea was especially recommended by herbalists for dry coughs, bronchitis, whooping cough, asthma and “bronchial cramps.” Today, Drosera is usually used to treat ailments such as asthma, coughs, lung infections and stomach ulcers. Medicinal preparations are primarily made using the roots, owers and fruitlike capsules. Because all native sundews species are protected in many parts of Europe and North America, extracts are usually prepared using cultivated fast-growing sundews. Cultivation requirements for sundews vary greatly by species. In general, they require high moisture content and full direct sunlight. Water must be very pure, and sundews should never be fertilized. The glue produced by Drosera has remarkable elastic properties and has made this genus an attractive subject in biomaterials research. Because living cells attach readily to the mucilage, research is underway to determine if it can be used by surgeons during organ transplants or hip and knee replacements. The roots of the tuberous sundews native to Australia are considered a delicacy by the aborigines. In the Scottish Highlands, purple and yellow textile dyes were prepared from sundew roots. A sundew liqueur called rosolio is still produced using sundew roots in Italy using a recipe from the 14th century. SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf/Inshore Our winter fishing is improving right now with great trout catches from the ICW canal and into the Apalachicola River System. Most anglers are reporting on good whiting catches from the beaches and state parks from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. Local rivers and creeks are still full of bream and now crappie. Extension of ce schedules vegetable gardening series Page 8 Deer hunters ready for peak season LES HARRISON | Special to the Times BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Dwarf sundew creates a red carpet around drainage ditches at the Port St. Joe Airport. Sundew a common carnivorous plant The sundew family, Drosera, has almost 200 species and is found on every continent except Antarctica. It is the largest family of carnivorous plants, most often found in wetlands.

PAGE 9

Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 S e a h a w k s s e n i o r J a m e s N e w e l l i s i n h i s r s t y e a r p l ay i n g a s g o a l k e e p e r f o r t h e b o y s s o c c e r t e a m B o t h c o a c h e s R a m o n V a l e n z u e l a a n d S t a c y K i r v i n s ay N e w e l l h a s b e e n a t r e m e n d o u s s a v e r f o r t h e t e a m H e c a m e o u t f r o m n o w h e r e w i t h s o m e n a t u r a l s k i l l t h a t h a d m a d e h i m a g r e a t k e e p e r f o r t h i s s e a s o n s a i d V a l e n z u e l a W e a r e v e r y h a p p y h a v i n g h i m o n o u r t e a m Gu l fs i de I G A P L AY E R OF T H E WE E K J a m es N e w el l CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, January 9, 2014 A Page 9 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Two Franklin County School basketball courts, one brand new, were well-used last weekend when a dozen high school teams to squared off in the Battle on the Gulf holiday hoop tournament. Attendance was modest, but the action was exciting at the quiet, well-run affair by Seahawk boys basketball coach Michael Sweatt, with help from his family. Jacksonville Bolles, a private prep school, brought its girls team, which handily won the title, completing their work Saturday night with a 5123 domination over the Lady Seahawks. Carlos Hill’s squad was runners-up in the tourney by virtue of victories over North Florida Christian and Liberty County. The other long-distance participant, Yulee, brought its boys team but they didn’t make it into the championship, which was won by Bay High School over North Bay Haven. Yulee defeated the Seahawks Friday night, one of three losses sustained by Sweatt’s squad over the course of the tourney. The Lady Seahawk tournament squad was anchored by a superb performance by junior Myesha Campbell, who had 19 points in the nal game, after a 23-point performance on Friday to lead Franklin County to a 36-31 win over North Florida Christian. Hill said he knew it would be a challenge going into the nals against the Class 4 powerhouse Bolles Lady Bulldogs, now 16-2 on the year. But, he said, the Hawks had met his expectations, to score throughout and avoid the running clock. Campbell hit 3-of-6 treys, and 5-for-12 for two-pointers, to lead the team, with junior Dyshereah Key adding four points and nine rebounds. Campbell went 10-of-16 from the oor against North Florida Christian, while Key added eight points. Sophomore Chanelle Ducker hit a three-pointer, and junior Aaliyah West a bucket. The Lady Seahawks opened the tournament Thursday with a 46-38 win over Liberty County, keyed by 19 points and 13 rebounds from Key. Campbell contributed 15 points and nine rebounds in the game, in which Franklin County led from start to nish. Freshman Tyanna Townsend scored ve points, Ducker three and senior Daiesha Carr two. Also taking part in the girls tourney were Wewahitchka and North Bay Haven. Jones nails 31 in tough loss The Seahawk varsity basketball team fell in all three of their contests, but it wasn’t without a spirited ght at last week’s hoop tourney. In their opener Thursday against North Bay Haven, the team took a 36-35 lead into the locker at halftime, but endured a bad third quarter, in which they were outscored 22-12, and went on to fall 76-65. Sophomore forward Josue Barahona nailed 4-of-6 treys to lead the team with 12 points, with eighth grade point guard Tyler Farmer adding 11. Freshman guard Tyler Howard hit 5-of-6 for 10 points, while junior Kelsey Jones and freshman Kenneth Wilson each scored nine points. Senior guard James Gordon added six, with freshman guard Marshall Sweet nailing a trey and senior guard Cameron White scoring a bucket, while leading the team with nine rebounds. Jones added six assists and six rebounds On Friday night, in the multipurpose building, the Hawks, outmanned by a taller squad, lost 52-42 to Yulee. Jones led the team with a dozen points, with White tallying 10, and leading the team with eight rebounds. Barahona hit 3-of-11 treys, for nine points. Farmer scored seven, and Sweet and Wilson each two. On Saturday night, the action got hot, in a cliffhanger against Wewahitchka. Trailing 17-7 after the rst stanza, and 27-23 at the half, the Hawks fought back with a strong third quarter, which gave them a 48-42 lead going into the nal period. With the game clock ticking down, and the Seahawks in a position to tie, Howard went high on the rim to tip in a caroming shot that had the crowd roaring. But the ref waved it off as a basket interference violation, and Sweatt displayed an unusual bout of extreme anger. The senior ref calmed the coach down, and did not throw him a technical, but the call had clearly de ated the Seahawks, who went on to succumb 69-65 to the Gators. Jones hit all three of his three-point attempts, and went 14-of-19 from the eld, to lead the team with 31 points. White had eight points, and seven rebounds, while Howard added six points and seven rebounds. Gordon and Wilson each scored ve, senior guard Wesley Norred four, Farmer three, Barahona two and senior forward Logan McLeod one. Also taking part in the boys tourney was Liberty County. WHAT IS BASKET INTERFERENCE? Basket interference is the violation of (a) touching the ball or any part of the basket while the ball is on the rim of the basket, (b) touching the ball when it’s within the cylinder extending upwards from the rim, (c) reaching up through the basket from below and touching the ball, be it inside or outside the cylinder, or (d) pulling down on the rim of the basket so that it contacts the ball before returning to its original position. There is one exception to the above: if a player dunks the ball, he may maintain contact with the ball into the cylinder and/or grab the rim (momentarily) without penalty. Girls win, boys don’t at hoop tourney The Lady Seahawks varsity girls basketball team ended 2013 at about the .500 mark, splitting their seven games. On Nov. 25, the team dominated North Florida Christian 66-33 at home, led by a blistering 18-of-23 from the eld from junior Dyshereah Key, for 39 points. Junior Myesha Campbell added 16 points, and freshman Tyanna Townsend 11. On Dec. 3 at home, the girls fell 49-34 to John Paul II. They were led by Campbell’s 14 points, with eight from Townsend, and six each for sophomore Chanelle Ducker and Key. On Dec. 5 at North Bay Haven, the girls lost 61-29. They were paced by 12 points from Campbell, 10 from Key, ve from Ducker and two from Townsend. On Dec. 6 at home, the Lady Hawks fell 59-29 to South Walton. Key led the team with 18 points and nine rebounds, while Campbell added six points and four rebounds. Senior Daeisha Carr tallied four points and nine rebounds, and Townsend a point. On Dec. 10 at home, the girls team dominated West Gadsden 63-49, paced by 32 points from Key. Campbell and Townsend each scored 11, while Ducker had ve, and junior Aaliyah West and Carr each a pair. On Dec. 13 at Bozeman, the Lady Seahawks doubled their opponent’s score, winning 82-41. Key was 19-of32 from the eld for 40 points, with Campbell adding 17, Townsend 12, Ducker nine, and Carr and West each two. On Dec. 14 at home, the girls fell 35-21 to Port St. Joe, Key managed a dozen points, Campbell seven and Townsend two. On Dec. 17 at Liberty County, the Franklin County girls won 36-21, paced by 20 points and 10 rebounds from Key. Campbell had nine points and eight rebounds, with Ducker scoring three, and Townsend and West each two. On Dec. 19 at home, the girls lost a tough 44-40 match to Blountstown. Key hit for 16 points, and Campbell 15, with Ducker adding six, Carr two and Townsend one. – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times The Lady Seahawk girls basketball team savors their runner-up trophy in last week’s holiday hoop tournament. The Seahawk boys soccer team was unable to win in December, as it elded lots of young middle school players. On Dec. 5 at home, the boys lost 5-2 to West Gadsden, with goals scored by Stephan Devaughn and Tyler Pendleton. On Dec. 12 at Freeport, the team lost 4-0, and then on Dec. 17 at Lafayette Mayo, the team fell 8-0 to the district leader. On Dec. 20 at North Bay Haven, Franklin County lost 2-0. The team was to play John Paul II on Jan. 8, and then prepares for distrcts Jan. 21, 34 and 24 at Maclay. “Some of our key players were out due to the u and injuries, and now we are playing with a younger groups of students,” said Coach Ramon Valenzuela. “We have not lost the optimism and the encouragement is still on, and the team will continue to make an effort to end the season in a good standing. “It is a tough district this year, but we’ll try our best,” he said. “We will be losing seven guys for next year, and we will make a very strong effort to come out with something better for the next season.” – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN On Dec. 20, the Lady Seahawk girls varsity soccer team traveled to North Bay Haven, to complete a home and home set of games with the nondistrict opponent. The Lady Seahawks had defeated North Bay Haven back in November, 2-1, at the Nest and were looking for another victory over the Buccaneers. However, North Bay Haven seemed a completely different team and took control of the game from the outset with a very good possession-style passing game. The Lady Buccaneers were able to control time of possession and sti ed the Lady Seahawks’ normally high offensive productivity. Only seniors Adrianna Reeder and Jessica Shields managed shots on goal in the rst half, one each. Meanwhile the Lady Buccaneers had 15 shots on goal and managed two scores in the rst half, taking a 2-0 lead into the break. “The girls were a step slower and became very predictable when they possessed the ball,” said Coach Joe Shields. “The Bucs seemed to know where we were going to pass before we did and that enabled them to dispossess our girls a bunch of times.” Down but not out, the Lady Seahawks stepped up their game and tried to reestablish control through one-touch passes in the middle third of the eld. Reeder with two, and Shields, Gracyn Kirvin and Emily Zingarelli each with one, were able to get shots off but none found the back of the net. As the game continued, North Bay Haven continued its assault on the Lady Seahawks net and added two more goals, putting the game well out of reach. “With their passing being so quick and accurate, we started chasing the ball with two and three defenders, which is completely uncharacteristic of our total team defense,” said Shields. “This left the opposite side of the eld open and they were able to dictate where the attack was going throughout the second half.” The Lady Seahawks were unable to mount any kind of successful counterattack and nally fell to North Bay Haven, 4-0. The Lady Seahawks are now 7-5-1 and traveled Wednesday to John Paul II for the last regular season match. Seahawk boys soccer struggle for wins North Bay Haven downs Lady Hawks The senior ref counsels Hawk Coach Mike Sweatt Saturday night after he vociferously challenged a basket interference call. Key’s scoring keys Lady Hawk December

PAGE 10

A10 | The Times Thursday, January 9, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 93558T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 19-2013-CA000126 HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORP III, Plaintiff vs. PHILLIP RANKIN A/K/A PHILLIP H. RANKIN; CHERRY RANKIN A/K/A CHERRY LYNN RANKIN; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 18, 2013, and entered in 19-2013-CA000126 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, is the Plaintiff and PHILLIP RANKIN A/K/A PHILLIP H. RANKIN; CHERRY RANKIN A/K/A CHERRY LYNN RANKIN; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 33 Market Street 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse Apalachicola FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 5, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, BLOCK “C”, SUN & SAND VILLAGE, UNIT TWO, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 34, AND THAT CERTAIN 1990 MOBILE HOME SITUATED ON THE PROPERTY. Any person claiming au interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of December, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By; Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 12-10117 January 2, 9, 2014 93564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192012CA 000343CAXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT1, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007OPT1, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL AND JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000343CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, is the Plaintiffand KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL; JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s).Kendall Wade as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the 2nd Floor Lobby 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on January 23, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE LOT LINE SEPARATING LOTS 58 AND 59 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE RIGHT-OFWAY OF PEACHTREE ROAD, AND RUN ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HATHCOCK ROAD, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HATHCOCK ROAD 165 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 14th day of October, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-05225 January 2, 9, 2014 93574T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-000227-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. LAUREN RENEE CAVUOTO; VICTOR M. VELAZQUEZ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LAUREN RENEE. CAVUOTO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VICTOR M. VELAZQUEZ; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 15th day of January, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. in the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 3, BLOCK 187 (NEW BLOCK 28) OF KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 19th day of November, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H # 308101 January 2, 9, 2014 93570T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000350 Section: ____ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. CYNTHIA F. BIRDEN; LARSH A. BIRDEN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA000350 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 15th day of January, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 50, CARRABELLE LANDING ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 PHILADELPHIA RD BALTIMORE, MD 21237 January 2, 9, 2014 93584T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: January 18, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Robert Schmidt Jonie Wilson Mike Horvath Xania Jones Dean Lord Before the sale date of January 18, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. January 2, 9, 2014 93606T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA -000152 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A. F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CHASE MORTGAGE FINANCE CORPORATION MULTI-CLASS MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007S3 Plaintiff, vs. FREDA M. MOORE AKA FREDA MANNING WHITE AKA FREDA MANNING MOORE AKA FREDA WHITEMOORE AKA FREDA WHITE MOORE AKA FREDA M. WHITE, et. al., Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2013-CA000152 in the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A. F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CHASE MORTGAGE FINANCE CORPORATION MULTI-CLASS MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007S3, Plaintiff, and, FREDA M. MOORE AKA FREDA MANNING WHITE AKA FREDA MANNING MOORE AKA FREDA WHITEMOORE AKA FREDA WHITE MOORE AKA FREDA M. WHITE, et. al., are Defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 2nd floor lobby of the Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 at the hour of 11:00AM on the 6th day of FEBRUARY 2014, the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. S-370 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 2520.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 40.13 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 1254) ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. S-370, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 682.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 406.78 FEET TO THE WATER`S EDGE OF THE OCHLOCKONEE RIVER FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 406.78 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. S-370, THENCE RUN WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 106.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 413.61 FEET TO THE WATER`S EDGE OF SAID OCHLOCKONEE RIVER, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIVER`S EDGE 106.07 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND FURTHER DESCRIBED BY SURVEY DATED MARCH 3, 2004, PREPARED BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC. (JOB NO. 93-345-1) LOT 1: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF COW CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO. S-370) AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 2520.31 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 40.13 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1254) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COW CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO. S-370), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 682.27 FEET TO A 3 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 415.41 FEET TO THE WATER`S EDGE OF THE OCHLOCKONEE RIVER FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID WATER`S EDGE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 415.41 FEET TO A 3 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COW CREEK ROAD (STATE ROAD NO. S-370), THENCE RUN WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 106.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1254), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 413.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #1254) LYING ON THE WATER`S EDGE OF SAID OCHLOCKONEE RIVER, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIVER`S EDGE 105.88 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 6th day of January, 2014. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: MORALES LAW GROUP, P.A. 14750 NW 77th Court Suite 303 Miami Lakes, FL 33016 service@moraleslawgroup.com File No. 13-000641 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provisoin of certain assistance. Please contact teh Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401 or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding: If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County if Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon county courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. January 9, 16, 2014 93608T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-CA-019 SYNOVUS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARK K. STEWART and SUSAN STEWART, individually, and as husband and wife; and UNKNOWN TENANT #1, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the the above named Court, will on the 5th day of February, 2014, at 11:00 a.m., ET, or as soon thereafter as is practicable, at the 2nd Floor Lobby which faces Highway 98, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described real property situate in the County of Franklin, State of Florida, to-wit: Lots 26, 27, and 28, Block J, Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida TOGETHER WITH: Two 1986 Cata mobile home units, Identification No’s. 7253A and No. 7253B. pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is listed above. At the time of sale, the successful high bidder shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The balance of the final bid shall be paid to the Clerk by 4:00 p.m. ET on the day of the sale. The successful high bid shall be exclusive of the Clerk’s registry fee and documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court, this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: CAROL A. RUEBSAMEN PHILIP A. BATES, P.A. 25 West Cedar Street, Suite 550 Post Office Box 1390 Pensacola, FL 325911390 (850) 470-0091 FL Bar No.: 380946 AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 9, 16, 2014 96821T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-00125-CC WILLIE MARY CLARK JOSEPH fka WILLIE M. DANIELS, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM LOVE AND JULIA LOVE, and all parties claiming by, through, under or against them; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other persons claiming by, through or under those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described in the complaint. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: WILLIAM LOVE AND JULIA LOVE, and all parties claiming by, through, under or against them; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other persons claiming by, through or under those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described in the complaint. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Adverse Possession and to Quiet Title the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 7 OF BLOCK 166 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY IN MOST COMMON USE. has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Donna Duncan, plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Sanders and Duncan, P.A., P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329, on or before the 10th day of February, 2014, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs’ attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of the petition. Dated this 10th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk December 19, 26, 2013 January 2, 9, 2014 97017T AMENDED NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, PATRICIA S. 96823T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-000124CC VEDELL M. BUNYON and SHANNON H. BUNYON, Plaintiffs, vs. MARY HAWKINS, and all others claiming by, through, or under MARY HAWKINS, including any unknown natural person, the unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under, or against any known or unknown person who is known to be dead or is not known to be either dead or alive, and JAMES HAWKINS, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: All parties claiming interests by, through, under, or against MARY HAWKINS, including all parties having or claiming to have any right, .title or interest in the property herein described: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title to the following property in Franklin County, Florida, described as; The Northeast one half (NE 1/2) of Lot 1, in Block 166, of the City of Apalachicola, Florida, according to the map or plat thereof in common use has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., who is attorney for plaintiffs, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32329, on or before the 20th day of January, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of the petition. Dated this 10th day of December, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk BARBARA SANDERS Attorney for Plaintiffs FL Bar No. 4442178 Sanders and Duncan, P.A. 80 Market Street P.O. Box 157 Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 bsanders@fairpoint.net jrgay@fairpoint.net December 19, 26, 2013 January 2, 9, 2014

PAGE 11

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, January 9, 2014 The Times | A11 4516553 Apalachicola Holiday Special Lot 4, Block 150 11th Street $17,500, R-1 Zoning Call 850-653-8330 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. COMMERCIAL BUILDING ON 98, RIVER VIEW, $1200 WATER INCLUDED. 2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. 3 BEDROOM 3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPS W/LIFT 2 CAR GARAGE 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 391 CARL TONS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/ MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENEDPORCH. 425/MO 6.3 BEDROOM3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPSW/LIFT 2CARGARAGEwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4516552Franklin CountyLiquor License$ 145,000.00 Seriousinquires/offersonly at:anitalln242@aol.com Apalachicola Bay Charter School seeks a Part-time Reading Interventionist for K-8th grade students. Applicants must hold valid teaching certicate. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, fax: 850-653-1857 or email: elizabethkirvin@aol.com4516430 Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266362 Text FL66340 to 56654 WALL, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 665 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOT 9 BLOCK 81 APALACHICOLA Full Legal Can be Obtained in the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 01-09S-08W-8330-0081-00 90 Name is which assessed: JIMMIE LEE RICHARDSON All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of FEBRUARY 2014, which is the 10th day of FEBRUARY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 97043T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000242 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS AND BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER AND PAMELA SCHAFFER A/KA/ PAMELA P. SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER, et. al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 18, 2013, and entered in 19-2013-CA000242 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS; BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER; PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS N/K/A PHILLIP RANKIN; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A BRENDA VAUSE; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A WHITNEY VAUSE are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 5, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 11 OF SOUTHLAND A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF THE APALACHICOLA NORTHERN RAIL ROAD. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 199.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 269.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF HATCOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A REROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE WITH THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 311.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS TOGETHER WITH A 1977 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, VIN#S: FLA58338 AND FL58339. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 January 2, 9, 2014 97045T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000050 DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM MITCHELL MARTINA, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: DESIREE F. MARTINA ALSO KNOWN AS DESIREE FRANCES MARTINA Last Known Address: 1626 Linden Rd. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Bay County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE LINE DIVIDING LOTS 42 AND 43 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN 66 FEET NORTH ALONG THE WEST RIGHT-OFWAY OF LINDEN ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING TURN LEFT AND RUN 165 FEET PARALLEL TO THE LINE DIVIDING LOTS 42 AND 43 OF SAID SUBDIVISION TO A POINT, THENCE TURN RIGHT AND RUN 264 FEET PARALLEL TO LINDEN ROAD TO THE LINE DIVIDING LOTS 42 AND 41 OF SAID SUBDIVISION, THENCE TURN RIGHT AND RUN 165 FEET ALONG THE LINE LAST MENTIONED TO THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE TURN RIGHT AND RUN 264 FEET ALONG THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINDEN ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 1626 LINDEN RD APALACHICOLA FL 32320-1372 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 17th day of December, 2013. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 PH-012183F01 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861, Fax: (850) 653-9339. January 2, 9, 2014 97083T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000061 DIVISION: SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. LESA DAIL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated December 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2013CA-000061 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK is the Plaintiff and LESA DAIL; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 5, SEASIDE COTTAGES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 128 SEASIDE COURT, EASTPOINT, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 18, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11030924 January 9, 16, 2014 97087T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000260 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTEE FOR CSMC TRUST 2011-11, acting by and through GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, as Servicing Agent 345 St. Peter Street 1100 Landmark Towers St. Paul, MN 55102, Plaintiff, vs. MARGARET A. ZUBERBUEHLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET A. ZUBERBUEHLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDWARD R. ZUBERBUEHLER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment to Foreclosure, entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK B, GULF WYNN ESTATES, UNIT #1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly known as: 2472 HIGHWAY 98 EAST, CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at 11 :00 A.M. ET, on the 5th day of February, 2014, on the 2nd Floor Lobby which faces Highway 98 at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must me a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the tune before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 9, 16, 2014 97091T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WALTON COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 09 CA 000294 SE PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC, as successor by merger with VISION BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BARBARA J. STOKES and SCOTT STOKES, husband and wife; CARRABELLE LANDINGS, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company; BISHOPS LANDINGS, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company; BISHOPS LANDINGS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a dissolved Florida nonprofit corporation; WESTCOAST LENDING GROUP, INC., a Nevada corporation; J. DONALD BOGGUS, a/k/a DONALD BOGGUS; JENNIFER BOGGUS; D&B ACQUISITIONS, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, DOZER CONSTRUCTION OF FLORIDA, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company; and CARRABELLE LANDINGS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a dissolved Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment against Defendants, CARRABELLE LANDINGS, LLC, BARBARA J. STOKES, DOZER CONSTRUCTION OF FLORIDA, LLC. WESTCOAST LENDING GROUP, INC., CARRABELLE LANDINGS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., TRUSTMARK NATIONAL BANK. BANCORPSOUTH BANK, and Any Unknown Parties in Possession of the Property, entered in the above-styled cause, I will sell at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at www.walton.realfore close.com, at the hour of 11:00 a.m C.S.T. on the 3rd day of February, 2014, the property situated in Walton County, Florida and Franklin County, Florida, described as: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT “A” The Property identified in Exhibit “A” to this Final Summary Judgment shall be sold separately on the date of the foreclosure sale as follows: EXHIBIT “A” P arcel 1: Commence at a point where the Southern boundary of State Road 20 intersects the Western boundary of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 9. Township 1 South, Range 19 West, run thence along said State Road South 7050’09” East, a distance of 203.24 feet to Point of Beginning. Run thence South 0139’29” East for a distance of 755.12 feet; thence North 8921’54” East, for a distance of 205 feet, run thence North 0139’29” West, for a distance of 680.83 feet to Southern boundary of State Road No. 20; run thence along said road North 7050’09” West, for a distance of 219.28 feet to Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 in Section 9, Township 1 South, Range 19 West, Walton County, Florida. P arcel 2: Lot 100, Carrabelle Landing, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 47, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. P arcel 3: Lot 101, Carrabelle Landing, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 47, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY LIENHOLDER CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FUNDS FROM THIS SALE, IF ANY, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 45.031(A), FLORIDA STATUTES DATED this the 23rd day of December, 2013. ALEX ALFORD Clerk of the Court By: Angelica Price Deputy Clerk January 9, 16, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j Loving TV Sports Editor & Pharmacist await 1st baby j Lyn & Robj j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL76467 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34276361 Text FL76361 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityExperience Cooks & WaitstaffDependable transportation is a must. Apply in person at Bayside Burgers, 260 Hwy 98 in Eastpoint. Web ID# 34276321 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Accepting Applications for a Full Time RESERVATIONIST Great benefits. Requires previous sales experience & excellent computer skills. Schedule varies and includes weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34276380 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL71777 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle Lease Purchase Option 700 sq ft, 1Br,, Fireplace, Washer & Dryer, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $380 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL76395 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 Home for Sale! 2bd/2ba, full acre, fenced. Close to town and boat ramps. $125,000 850-697-2176 Investment Property, 1 Block off Hwy 98 2 Br 1.5 Ba. $55,000 404-710-4078 Text FL76210 to 56654 Apalachicola Holiday Special Lt 4 Blck 150 11th st R-1 zoning. $17,500 Call 850-653-8330 Shaun Donahoe Realty

PAGE 12

Local A12 | The Times Thursday, January 9, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast & & , & & % ) 4515246 $ ( ( $ %# % %! # %# %!-' !!% % % % -%% $ +' ( %!% %% % #%# % % # # # % # # # # % %% %% % %# % !-% -% !-% # ! % 4516510 T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com Jo hn Sh el by Br ok er 80 034 475 70 85 092 747 77 ww w .s gi re al ty .c om MLS# 250325 $85,000 A palachicola C L A S S I C H I S T O R I C C O T T A G E R e a d y f o r r e n o v at i o n a n d u s e a s a b u s i n e s s o r h o m e h e a r t p i n e o o r i n g w a l l s a n d c e i l i n g s t h ro u g h o u t r a r e l y f o u n d m e t a l s h i n g l e ro o f H i s t o r i c N o r t h s i d e c o r n e r H i g h w a y 9 8 a n d 1 0 t h S t r e e t o n c e h o m e t o C ap t a i n R o b i n W a l b r i d g e o f t h e H MS B ou n t y Advertise Her e Contact The Times T oday (850) 277-7847 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248790 $116,000 St. George Island G U L F B E A C H E S L O T H i g h d u n e y l o t o n t h e n o r t h s i d e o f G u l f B e a c h D r i ve B i k e p at h a c ro s s t h e s t r e e t 3 r d l o t f ro m t h e c o r n e r o f 6 t h S t r e e t E a s t N o c l e a r i n g n e c e s s a r y l o t m e a s u r e s 1 0 0 x 1 5 0 1 / 3 a c r e H i g h ( d r y ) e l e v at i o n B u y t o b u i l d o r k e e p f o r i n ve s t m e n t L i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 T rades & Ser v ices Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) They say you can prevent an ice cream headache if you don’t let the ice cream come into contact with what? Roof of mouth, Nose, Teeth, Tongue 2) When Hitler was in power in Germany what were policemen and farmers notably not allowed to call “Adolf”? Dogs, Horses, Cows, Cats 3) There were about how many auto companies in business in the U.S. during the 1910s? 3, 10, 22, 300 4) What’s your ailment if you suffer from baker’s leg? Gout, Knock-kneed, Shin splints, Turf toe 5) From Shakespeare what’s the name of Hamlet’s mother? Victoria, Gertrude, Rosaline, Ophelia 6) A tetrapod has how many feet and/ or legs? 3, 4, 5, 6 7) In 1878 Emma M. Nutt became the world’s rst female? Railroad conductor, Sheriff, Telephone operator, Judge 8) What is rhinovirus a causative agent of? Chicken pox, Warts, Common cold, Freckles 9) “Gnosis” is the Greek word for? Bible, Knowledge, Bus, Meadow 10) From a TV “Seinfeld” episode to what country did George send off for a baldness cream? Japan, India, China, Egypt 11) The city of Paris, France, is divided into how many arrondissements or municipal boroughs? 7, 20, 32, 51 12) What was the common American coin, the nickel, originally named for? Devil, Miner, Map, River 13) The average hamburger is mostly ground “what” from a cow? Flank, Brisket, Chuck, Round 14) In 1924 what was the rst USA franchise in the National Hockey League (NHL)? Boston Bruins, Chicago Blackhawks, NY Rangers, Buffalo Sabres ANSWERS 1) Roof of mouth. 2) Horses. 3) 300. 4) Knockkneed. 5) Gertrude. 6) 4. 7) Telephone operator. 8) Common cold. 9) Knowledge. 10) China. 11) 20. 12) Devil. 13) Chuck. 14) Boston Bruins. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com