The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00253

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, January 2, 2014 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 128 ISSUE 36 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Swing Band Saturday at Dixie What an exciting way to start the season! Making their Dixie Theatre debut, this Tallahassee Swing Band ensemble has been playing the ‘40s, ‘50s and ‘60s classics and more for 24 years! Join us on Saturday, Jan. 4 and tap, dance and sway to your heart’s content. Tickets are $25. The Dixie Theatre is at 21 Avenue E in Apalachicola. For more information call 653-3200. Bingo starts Tuesday on island Winter Bingo on St. George Island will begin on Tuesday, Jan. 7 at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 East Pine Street. The game begins 7 p.m. and is sponsored by the St. George Island Civic Club. Cost is $1 per card. Everyone is welcome. ‘Sock Hops & Soda Pops’ next weekend The Big Bopper’s back and Murphy’s Diner is rockin’ around the clock in “Sock Hops & Soda Pops,” an outrageous, feel-good musical at the Dixie Theatre. There will be 3 p.m. matinees on Wednesday, Jan. 8 and Saturday, Jan. 11. There will be evening shows at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday Jan. 10 and 11. Tickets are $25. The Dixie Theatre is at 21 Avenue E in Apalachicola. For more information call 653-3200. Chamber luncheon to bene t estuary The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host two events in January. On Wednesday, Jan. 8, the monthly luncheon will take place at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve at noon. A low country boil will be served and pro ts bene t the Friends of the Reserve. On Thursday, Jan. 9, there will be a Business After Hours at the new Eastpoint branch of the Franklin County Library, 160 Hickory Dip Road, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. For more information call 653-9419. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Kim Crum had unexpected guests on Christmas Eve. The Lanark Village woman had planned to spend the evening with her mother, but around 8:30 p.m., she returned to her home on Parker St. to retrieve a forgotten item. Crum said she heard something in the living room, where the sliding glass doors were slightly open because they do not shut properly. Sticking through the crack between the glass doors was a nose, and the nose was attached to a large black bear. In fact, Crum said there were two adult bears on her front patio. When Crum retreated to the back door hoping to make her escape, she found a bear cub picking through the remains of the shed she uses to store her garbage. Crum said she had previous dealings with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission over the bears frequenting Lanark. The FWC advised her to use the plywood shed to store garbage, she said. On Christmas Eve, she telephoned the Wildlife Alert hot line (888-404-3922) to ask that an of cer be sent to help her. The dispatcher at the FWC of ce was no help, Crum said, and told her there was no FWC of cer on call. “Excuse me, you mean to tell me you don’t have nobody on call?” Crum said she asked the operator. “It’s Christmas Eve, and they want to be with their family, too,” Villager beset by three bears Two stars from the East pay a visit See BEARS A12 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Eastpoint’s Elaine and Hank Kozlowsky welcomed a pair of international students from China into their home over the Christmas holidays and the two young ladies had interesting things to say about China, school and the United States. Tansy and Jada are both from China and are international students studying in New England but there the resemblance ends. Jada, whose real name is Ziyu Jin, is 17 years old. She is a junior in high school and has been studying English for 10 years. Her father is the CEO of an engineering rm and her mother works in an of ce. Back home in Nanjing, near Shanghai in the north of China, she has her own driver. At her current home in Massachusetts, she is about to take her driver’s license exam. She is a serious girl budding in to womanhood and hates to be photographed. Jada plans to pursue a career in medicine or psychology. Tansy, whose actual name is Yuqing Yao is 15 and grew up in Guangzhou near Hong Kong. She has studied English for seven years. She is vivacious and likes to be photographed. Her mother is a homemaker and her father is an entrepreneur with multiple investments including a home design rm, a karaoke business, a massage clinic and a retail sunglass business. She is unsure about learning to drive. “I don’t know about cars,” she said. Tansy hopes to attend college in business studies. Both girls live in Hingham, Mass. with a host family, Sandy and John Kozlowsky and their 13-year-old daughter Sophia. John Kozlowsky is the nephew of Elaine and Hank. “I received an email asking if we would be willing to house an international student and it was really close to the start of the school year,” Sandy Kozlowsky said. “We said here are some kids that really need a place to stay.” Sandy said she and John also hoped the arrangement would allow Sophia, an only child, to experience having sisters. After just a few exchanges via Skype, a service that allows users to communicate by voice using a microphone, and video by using a webcam, Jada and Tansy arrived in Massachusetts. For both girls, it was their rst visit to the US. Sandy, herself an educator, said she admired the girls’ pluck. “What I nd commendable is young ladies leaving their families while still children and moving in with a new family after Skyping only a few times,” she said. See VISIT A12 Bye-bye to a tumultuous It was quite a year, full of ups and downs, successes and failures. Fortunately, there were no murders, but there were tragedies, enough to sadden the community for years to come. It was a slow, steady year of economic growth, but it was full of disappointments as well. The bay nearly completely collapsed, as witnessed by our top story of the year. But with an in ux of federal monies, from government as well as BP, the future looked to right itself. The drought has run its course, and industry ofcials expect a rebound in years to come. With hopes for an even better 2014, here are our Top Ten stories of the year. May God bless you, your families and the entire community in the months ahead. Bye-bye to a tumultuous It was quite a year, full of ups and downs, sucBut with an in ux of federal monies, from gov2013 Famed Apalachicola High School coach Bill Wagoner passed away this year. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times A Civil War weekend, organized by the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, included a reenactment of the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times The “Fishy Fashion Show” at the Carrabelle Riverfront Festival was again a hilarious hit. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times The public bathrooms in Apalachicola’s downtown were completed and opened in 2013. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times The Veterans Day celebration at Franklin County School drew scores of veterans from throughout the county. PHIL COALE | Special to the Times It was an exciting year, but often full of disappointments, for Franklin County sports teams this year.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, January 2, 2014 NOTICE It is that time again to le for your 2014 Property T ax Exemptions. If you have had any {…tƒ in your primar y residence since J tt• £ u> •u you may need to check with the Property Appraiser to see of you qualify for any of the following exemptions. 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T h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e d o e s n o t p r o v i d e o r p r e p a r e s u c h r e c o r d p u r s u a n t t o F S S e c t i o n 2 8 6 .0 1 0 5 I n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h t h e A m e r i c a n s w i t h D i s a b i l i t i e s A c t p e r s o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s n e e d i n g a s p e c ia l ac c o m m o dat io n t o pa r t i c i pa t e i n t he s e p r o c e e d i ng s s hou l d c o n t ac t t he c i t y C le r k at 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 2 o r b y c a l l i n g ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 n o l a t e r t h a n t h r e e d a y s p r i o r t o t h e p r o c e e d i n g s By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com It was a year of some huge re-thinking for Apalachicola Bay, a time when the state’s leading politicians decided time was running short for saving a struggling industry. In August, a crew of Florida’s most powerful leaders gathered at the water’s edge in Apalachicola and brought out the heavy artillery in the state’s long simmering water wars with Georgia and Alabama. The unusual visit by Governor Rick Scott, and both U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio came less than a day after the state received the go-ahead on the request for a commercial shery failure it rst sought nearly a year ago. U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker declared a failure for the oyster shery along the entire west coast of Florida, which is primarily centered in Apalachicola Bay. Nelson, a Democrat, and Rubio, the Republican junior senator, sat side by side before a packed audience in the courthouse annex as they conducted a rare Senate subcommittee eld hearing on the adverse effects that diminished river ows have had on the oyster industry in Apalachicola Bay. The buzz that followed the two-hour hearing in which both the Army Corps of Engineers’ water management policies and the ever-increasing water consumption by users upriver drew a hefty share of harsh criticism was still in the air at lunchtime when Scott announced plans to le suit in the U.S. Supreme Court to halt Georgia’s “unchecked and growing consumption of water.” Apalachicola, which rst went to court over the matter several years ago, would later sign on with the state’s legal team. In assuming the lead role at the hearing, part of a subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, Nelson blasted the Corps’ persistence stance that it can only consider congressionally authorized purposes, such as ood control, navigation, energy and environmental impact, when it allocates water. Ricky Banks, the vice president of the seafood workers association, spoke eloquently of the oystermen’s plight. “In Atlanta, they’re going to keep having babies. They’re going to keep needing more and more water,” he said. “Let Atlanta stop watering their grass a little bit.” “What we have here is a system being run by man that was created by God,” he said. “When man steps in he has a way of messing things up. Man made this disaster, man can x this disaster. Man needs to do his job.” Talk of aquaculture steps up Consideration of an alternate future for harvesting oysters in Franklin County waters began in June, when Scott and the Florida Cabinet approved an expansion of the use of two aquaculture leases in Alligator Harbor held by the Spring Creek Oyster Company, a Crawfordville-based company owned by the Lovel family. The approval allowed Spring Creek to use the full water column for oyster harvesting in cages suspended above the bottom, a space richer in nutrients, protected from predators and more easily accessible to the leaseholders. Franklin County commissioners had reviewed the Lovels’ proposal, and raised some questions, although they lacked authority to approve or deny the proposed modi cations. In October, the Florida Cabinet approved a single oyster farming lease in the Apalachicola Bay, and Franklin County of cials and an oystermen representative aren’t happy about it. Andrew Arnold applied for the lease, located in St. George Sound, part of the Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, and the county commissioners were not too pleased with the Cabinet’s decision. Cal Knickerbocker, head of the state’s aquaculture division, said the state has received two additional requests by clam leaseholders in Alligator Harbor to use the full water column. He reiterated the state has no plans to move forward with large-scale aquaculture in Apalachicola Bay. Franklin County Seafood Workers Association President Shannon Hartseld was beyond concerned about the approved lease for Apalachicola Bay and downright mad. “It will not help us at all,” he said. Harts eld worried farming oysters will hurt the industry because there’s no money to be made. Startup costs are $15,000 to $20,000, but a lease yields no more Urgency, aquaculture confront the bay TOP 10 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Leaders of the local seafood industry discuss the subject of aquaculture at a meeting in Apalachicola. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Air Force hit a brick wall when it proposed to conduct war games in Tate’s Hell State Forest. During two meetings held to discuss an Air Force proposal, opponents raised numerous questions and objections to the project. The military use of state property was proposed by Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI), a plan to create options in the Panhandle to relieve Eglin Air Force Base’s crowded airspace. At the August 29 scoping meeting, about 200 area residents were shocked to learn that in Oct. 2012, the Air Force signed an agreement giving the go-ahead for the military to use about 400,000 acres in Tate’s Hell State Forest and in the Blackwater River State Forest for military exercises. Outcry against the war games was practically universal at that meeting, with only David Butler of Carrabelle offering limited support. “If you’re doing anything that will help create jobs here, obviously I’m for it,” he said. Attendees at the formal scoping meeting were offended on being told the Air Force representatives would not answer questions because it was against policy. Military spokesmen read a script explaining that increased air traf c has become a problem over Eglin and additional space is needed to conduct nonhazardous training for special forces stationed there. Non-hazardous training consists of groups of fewer than 20 individuals dropping from aircraft or conducting covert land maneuvers, without the use of live ammunition. Activities would also include groups of up to 70 soldiers camping in the forest for up to a week at a time. In addition to existing helipads belonging to the Florida Forestry Service, the Air Force wants to use forest roads as runways for xed wing aircraft. The Air Force also wants to deploy trailer-mounted, temporary and mobile radar, telemetry and training emitters to simulate an integrated air defense system. Col. Shawn Moore, commander of the 96th Civil Engineer Group conducted the rst meeting. After numerous speakers condemned the proposed war games, he appeared visibly shaken. County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, who lives near Tate’s Hell, was among the speakers and expressed strong opposition to the maneuvers. Air Force, county wrangle over war games wrangle over war games TOP 10 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Bad news landed in the county’s lap in July with the announcement the Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola would close. Christopher Atkins, warden of Carrabelle’s Franklin Correctional Institution (FCI), which oversees Bay City, said the Florida Department of Corrections is running a multimillion dollar de cit, and that other camps would be closing as well to help stanch the red ink. The Bay City inmates, of which there were 282 as of June 2011, are “moving to brand new camps with lower operating costs,” he said. ““Nobody will be losing their job. We are hiring more staff for an additional dorm at FCI and there will be promotion opportunities.” The DOC also closed facilities in Brevard and Glades counties, and opened work camps in Union, Liberty and FCI. The closure of Bay City, and the opening of the new FCI work camp, would gain between 10 and 14 additional jobs. Bay City employed about 67 correctional of cers, as of March 2011. County Commission Chair Cheryl Sanders noted the county had written several letters asking Bay City not be closed. The biggest concern over the closure was voiced at the Apalachicola city commission meeting, when City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb said the city received $134,000 in water and sewer revenue from Bay City during the 2012-13 scal year. “It’s going to be a really tough budget year,” she said. A reverter clause in place when the county rst gave the land to the state in 1989 would mean the land and buildings would be deeded back to the county once the closure was complete. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson said he met with Dr. Frederick Humphries, president emeritus of Florida A & M University, who thought a good idea would be to use the site as a marine science academy that could draw scholars and students from around the country to do research. Work camps consolidated into one TOP 10 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Carrabelle’s Franklin Correctional Institution Work Camp. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Air Force Col. Shawn Moore speaks to the audience at the August scoping meeting. See AQUACULTURE A9 See WAR GAMES A9

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, January 2, 2014 CONCER T SERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents ) , #' *% +' -% -) ** , ($ )* ( & -( ! #$ $ $ )* ( BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 †ee r€ red ic`p cet‚e} †e€‚ † › ‘ ¦¨ — ¨ › ` § ¨ › ›¨  ‘£ c¨ ¦ ¨ ¨ § £ ¨•‘ ¨ §" † › ‘ —‘ — ‘§ — ‘§ — — ¨ ‘• ¨ “ ¨ `••  §™ § ‘ § " t™™   – m y – “Œ h   “Œ C y¤¤ Œk£ k y ¤ ¤ ¦k£ k ~ k ] ¦ Œ¢Œ   ¢ Œ h o ¤ C ¤ $ $ T o r eserve y our seat, call 850-229-5603 “Like ” us on FREE HEAL TH SEMINARS IN JANU AR Y! Ja n. 9 S enior V ac cinations W illiam W o oler y DO F amily Medicine Ja n. 15 C auses a nd T r eatments of Sle ep A pnea James O enbrink MD E ar Nose and T hr oat Ja n. 21 P lastic Sur ger y R e c onstruc tion in C a nc er C ases T ong D uong MD P lastic Sur ger y Each will beg in a t 10:30 a.m. S acr ed Hear t Hospital on the Gulf C onf er enc e R oom A/B C all f or R eser v a tions: 229-5603 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com It has been a turbulent year for the county library system with a new building dedicated and a change of leadership. In March, controversial correspondence from Library Director Glenda Ondracek to Carrabelle Branch Manager Tonia Chisolm led the library advisory board to ordered con ict resolution training for the entire library staff including volunteers. The incident triggering the decision occurred at the April 16 county meeting. During a report on the status of the new Eastpoint library building, Commissioner Noah Lockley asked library board member Anna Carmichael about working conditions at the libraries after receiving copies of the letters from newly elected commissioner William Massey. Retired Postmaster Judi Stokowski of Apalachicola led the training sessions. In September, Ondracek informed the board she would retire on Oct. 31 and the search began for a new library director. Sondra Furbee, of Apalachicola, Christine Hinton of St. James and Kate Aguilar of St. George Island were tapped to assess candidates for the position and make a recommendation to the county board. On Nov. 19, Library Board Chair Denise Butler recommended Anne Birchwell, who was already employed full-time as an assistant librarian, for the position. Commissioners voted unanimously to accept the recommendation and Birchwell began her new duties on November 25. Eastpoint got a new library this year. On October 22, after eight years of fundraising, the 5,000-squarefoot Vulcan steel building housing more than 17,000 books was dedicated. The nal chapter in the saga of Eastpoint’s library didn’t come without a ght. During July budget hearings, the library board told commissioners rent on the new building would increase $1,700 monthly over the rent for the old library storefront. Commissioners Smokey Parrish, Cheryl Sanders and Lockley all objected to the increase. “I have a problem with the way this whole thing is going down. It more or less seems to me is that they were going to do this grand thing for the community in Eastpoint, but we had no ability to have design input. We did not agree to fund the library and now we’re looking at mortgage payments,” said Parrish. Lockley took the harshest stance, suggesting that the county stick to its $1,000 a month rental payment, and that the Friends of the Library consider selling off portions of the 13-acre tract on which the library is located to raise additional funds. His suggestion was not met with support from his colleagues. The large plot of land was deeded to the library by the Northwest Florida Water Management District with the understanding that the wetlands be preserved. The area is part of the headwater of Indian Creek, which empties into Apalachicola Bay. In the end, the county did accept the increased rent. As almost her nal act as director, Ondracek welcomed 150 celebrants to the library dedication. Joyce Estes, who spearheaded fundraising efforts for the new Eastpoint branch, said that, while the interior is complete, major work remains on the landscape and parking lot. New Eastpoint library opens TOP 10 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Joyce Estes presents Glenda Ondracek with a bouquet at the library opening. TDC bed tax hike falters TOP 10 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Franklin County Tourist Development Council (TDC) failed in a bid to double the bed tax in 2013, listened to criticism from shing guides and fought over a vacant seat on the TDC board. At their regular April 3 meeting of the TDC, Director Curt Blair and Chair Pinki Jackel began a push to double the 2 percent bed tax collected by local shortterm lodging providers. Blair opened the meeting by cautioning that, “Without an in ux of funds, we are set for what we can do for the rest of the scal year.” He bemoaned the loss of funding from BP after the oil spill crisis passed. Jackel distributed information on the growth of tourism in the county and the bed tax charged in surrounding counties to TDC members. She argue the existing bed tax had led to an increase of 60 percent in tourist activities and allowed the TDC to distribute $2 million to not for pro t organizations. “If we have done all this with the 2 percent we collect, what can we do with more? If we increase it by 2 percent, that will be an additional $800,000 per year,” she said. Jackel received universal support from the TDC board members. The TDC had two possible routes to win approval for the tax hike, it could be voted on by the public or it could be approved by the county commission. Board members chose the latter route. Because of the size of the increase, the measure would require a super majority vote of at least 4-1 to pass. A TDC report issued in July showed the county had experienced the strongest spring ever for tourism. Blair held workshops in Apalachicola and Carrabelle promoting the increased tax and was met with limited public backing. Most island lodging providers supported the tax hike but hotel owners in other parts of the county were less enthusiastic. Jimmy Mosconis, owner of the Bay City Lodge was openly opposed. He called the existing 2 percent bed tax “taxation without representation. It hasn’t helped me one iota and I want out of it,” he said. Jackel said the purpose of doubling the tax was to “promote year round sustainability.” She also began to promote the idea of an Eastpoint Visitor Center that would occupy the old highway patrol of ce on US 98. At the Sept.r 3 county meeting, Jackel moved rst to double the tax and then to increase it by one percent. Both motions died for lack of a second. Commissioners then voted 4-1 to take the question of doubling the tax to a public referendum, with Commissioner Noah Lockley opposed. It proved to be too late to add the proposal to the November docket and no date has been set for the referendum. Lockley then moved to bring the administration of the Tourist Development Council in-house and dismiss Blair but the motioned failed by a 3-2 vote, with Commissioners Cheryl Sanders, William Massey and Jackel opposed. Without additional funds, the TDC changed its marketing strategy and purchased advertising space in ten publications and other target media chosen by the not for pro ts who had applied for TDC support. Under the new policy, each organization awarded funding receives $500 for advertising development and ads for fundraising events are displayed in the TDC’s chosen venues at no additional cost to the fundraising organization. At the November 5 county meeting, commissioners voted 3-2 to create the Eastpoint Visitor Center with Lockley and Parrish opposed. Blair said TDC contingency funds could be used for the renovation. In August, Alice Collins who had been a member of the TDC since its inception Left: Walter Armistead. Right: Lynn Wilson Spohrer. See TDC A5

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, January 2, 2014 A Section Page 4 Raise minimum wage by starting your own business The most effective way for Mr. Lawrence Wittner and Paul Krugman to see that employees in some industries get higher than the “inadequate minimum wage” is for them to start a business of their own, out of their own personal capital (not grants, not bureaucratic funds), hire away some of those getting “inadequate” compensation, and pay them more out of their own pocket. Only then do they earn the right to ponti cate their superior attitude of socioeconomic justice. Frank Venable By STEPHENIE LIVINGSTON Special to The Times Using the largest dated evolutionary tree of owering plants ever assembled, a new study suggests how plants developed traits to withstand low temperatures, with implications that humaninduced climate change may pose a bigger threat than initially thought to plants and global agriculture. The study appearing Sunday, Dec. 22 in the journal Nature and coauthored by University of Florida scientists shows many angiosperms, or owering plants, evolved mechanisms to cope with freezing temperatures as they radiated into nearly every climate during prehistoric times. Researchers found the plants likely acquired many of these adaptive traits prior to their movement into colder regions. The study also suggests some modern angiosperms, including most owering plants, trees and agricultural crops, may not have the traits needed to rapidly respond to humaninduced climate change, said study co-author Pam Soltis, a distinguished professor and curator of molecular systematics and evolutionary genetics at the Florida Museum on the UF campus. “Only some plants were able to make the adjustments to survive in cold climates,” said Soltis, who also is a member of the UF Genetics Institute. “In fact, some had traits used for other purposes that they co-opted for cold tolerance. The results have implications for plant response to climate change -some plant lineages, including many crops, will not have the underlying genetic attributes that will allow for rapid responses to climate change.” Early owering plants are thought to have been woody -meaning they maintain a prominent stem above ground across years and changing weather conditions, such as a maple tree -and restricted to warm, wet, tropical environments. But they have since put down roots in colder climates, dominating large swaths of the globe where freezing occurs. How they managed this expansion has long vexed researchers searching for plants’ equivalent to the winter parka. “Until now, we haven’t had a compelling narrative about how leaf and stem traits have evolved to tolerate cold temperatures,” said lead author Amy Zanne, assistant professor of biology in George Washington University’s Columbian College of Arts and Sciences who earned her doctorate at UF. “Our research gives us this insight, showing us the ‘whens,’ ‘hows’ and ‘whys’ behind plant species’ trait evolution and movements around the globe.” Zanne continued: “Freezing is a challenge for plants. Their living tissues can be damaged. It’s like a plant’s equivalent to frostbite. Their waterconducting pipes can also be blocked by air bubbles as water freezes and thaws. So over time, if plants moved into colder climates, they’ve had to gure out how to get around these problems.” Identifying evolutionary adaptations to these problems and likely paths to them required the team to build two sets of data. Researchers rst created a database of 49,064 species, recording whether each maintains a stem aboveground over time, loses or keeps its leaves, has been exposed to freezing, and the width of its water-carrying pathways. Researchers combined the information with a dated evolutionary tree of 32,223 plant species and modeled the evolution of species’ traits and climate over time, which identi ed the order of evolutionary events. “We can determine the relative order of events without a dated tree, but the dated tree allows us to say exactly when something happened, so that we can correlate the events with geological events, like big changes in Earth’s temperature,” Soltis said. Using this “timetree,” researchers identi ed three repeated evolutionary shifts they believe owering plants made to ght the cold. Plants either dropped their leaves seasonally, shutting down the pathways that would normally carry water between roots and leaves; developed thinner water-conducting pathways, allowing them to keep their leaves while reducing the risk of air bubbles developing during freezing and thawing; or avoided the cold seasons altogether as herbs, losing aboveground stems and leaves and retreating as seeds, or storing organs underground, such as tulips or potatoes. “Angiosperms were not successful until they got the adaptation to drop their leaves,” said study co-author Doug Soltis, a Florida Museum distinguished professor with appointments in UF’s biology department and the UF Genetics Institute. “Sometimes the trait evolves for some other purpose, and then the organism is able to adapt and use it for something new.” Researchers found that woody plants most often became herbs or developed thinner pathways before moving into freezing climates, while plants that dropped their leaves usually did so after moving into freezing climates. But the changes did not occur rapidly, Pam Soltis said. “Some of these changes were probably not as simple as we once thought,” she said. “Adjusting to big shifts in their environments is probably not easy for plants to do.” The researchers plan to use the ndings to explore other aspects of plants’ evolutionary history, including examining how they respond to environmental changes other than freezing temperatures. “The onset of freezing temperatures did not affect the entire world, but only certain habitats became colder,” Pam Soltis said. “Certain lineages could not move into the cold, but were able to persist unaffected by the cold in warmer areas. With climate change that is human-induced, all habitats will be affected over a short period of time, and plants and other organisms will have to adapt quickly if they are to survive.” Stephenie Livingston is a writer with the University of Florida. A ‘Dear John’ letter to St. Augustine grass Dear St. Augustine Grass, I know we’ve been together for a long time. When I rst let you into my life, it seemed like a good idea you looked great and I was getting a lot of pressure to start a relationship with you. But now, I look out my window and see you sprawled out across my yard and I realize that you’re high maintenance, you drink too much, and you have an unhealthy relationship with the landscapers — I see them give you those chemicals. What I’m saying is that it’s not me, it’s you, and ... I’m going native. Yes, this is the right decision. I’ve been talking to my friends the manatees, dolphins, sh, and birds and they agree with me — we’re all sooo over you.” It’s that time of year to start pondering New Year’s resolutions. One fantastic thing you can do for Florida’s environment is to convert your yard to Florida-Friendly Landscaping. This cuts down on water use, which protects Florida’s rivers and aquifer; reduces fertilizer use, which protects our coastal waters; and provides habitat for wildlife. If you live in an apartment complex or an HOA that just won’t budge, install a rain barrel, a compost bin, and plant native species of owers, trees, and shrubs in those areas over which you do have control, and talk to your neighbors and the management about making changes to the property that could result in less grass, mowing, fertilizer, and water use, and ultimately, lower maintenance fees. The University of Florida IFAS Extension of ces can help provide tips and resources. Find your local of ce at solutionsforyourlife.u .edu/map The website www. oridayards.org also contains great information. Our individual choices DO make a difference. If we all resolve to do a little more, we’ll make a big difference for this beautiful state we call home. Dr. Katie Tripp is director of science and conservation for the Save the Manatee Club headquartered in Maitland. www. savethemanatee.org DR. KATIE TRIPP Letter to the EDITOR Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES UF study: Plants slow to adapt to climate change ERIC ZAMORA | Florida Museum of Natural History Florida Museum of Natural History researchers Pam and Doug Soltis, co-authors of a new study published in the journal Nature, are pictured with various owering plants. SIMON URIBE-CONVERS | Special to The Times As angiosperms radiated into freezing environments, a number of traits, including small vascular conduits, likely facilitated their success in the cold. Pictured here are deciduous sugar maple leaves as winter approaches at the University of Idaho Arboretum in Moscow, Idaho. Special to The Times Consumer sentiment among Floridians was unchanged in December at 77, the same as the revised November reading, according to a new University of Florida survey. “Much as we expected, the consumer sentiment index remained at in December,” said Chris McCarty, director of UF’s Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. “It is now apparent that the sharp drop in con dence in October was largely a response to the U.S. government shutdown, and perhaps more importantly, the threat of the U.S. defaulting on its debt.” According to the December survey, respondents’ overall view that they are better off nancially than a year ago fell two points to 67, but their expectations for their nancial situations a year from now rose six points, to 80. Con dence in the nation’s economy over the coming year dropped two points to 74, while trust in its performance over the next ve years was unchanged, at 76. Finally, respondents’ consensus over whether now is a good time to buy a big-ticket item such as a washing machine fell four points, to 88. Improving economic conditions might be contributing to Florida’s sustained consumer con dence, McCarty said. For example, the Gross Domestic Product, the most basic measure of the U.S. economy, was revised up for the third quarter to 4.13 percent, although three quarters of the growth was due to increased inventories. The economy is also adding jobs. The Florida unemployment rate declined again in November, down .3 percent to 6.4 percent, which is lower than the U.S. rate of 7 percent. An estimated 2,000 people who left the labor force permanently or stopped looking for work, however, made the Florida unemployment gure look better than it is, McCarty said. “As the recovery takes hold, we expect the unemployment rate to increase somewhat as some of these discouraged workers start looking for jobs again,” McCarty said. The housing market is also improving with the median price of a single-family home in Florida increasing $900 from October to November to $169,900 -the rst monthly increase since July. Prices are up 13.3 percent from the previous year. However, residential values might not rise as much in 2014. “For one thing, those in charge of federal programs that helped to sustain the recovery will use the good economic news as an opportunity to begin backing away from such support,” McCarty said. The Federal Reserve, for example, will reduce its purchase of treasuries and mortgage-backed securities, which will increase mortgage interest rates. In addition, the FHA plans to lower the cap it will cover for home loans from $729,750 to $625,500. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will raise guarantee fees to lenders, which will be passed on to borrowers. “All of this adds up to additional expenses for buyers,” McCarty said. “While housing price gains thus far are solid and not likely to decline, they will not be the same driver of the recovery as they have been.” Holiday spending is weaker than last year. “This is a combination of deep discounting by retailers and a very short holiday season compared to last year due to the lateness of Thanksgiving,” McCarty said. “Retailers’ attempts to capture an extra day by opening on Thanksgiving might have helped, but will not fully counteract the short season.” Details of the December survey can be found at www.bebr.u .edu/cci. Florida consumer con dence unchanged in December

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Com mu n i t y R e d e v e l op m e n t A g enc y ( C R A ) N o t i c e o f M ee t i n g T h e C i t y o f C a r r a be l l e R ed e v e l o p m en t A g enc y ( C R A ) w i l l co n d u c t a m e e t i n g s c h ed u l ed f o r 5 : 0 0 p m E S T o n J a n u a r y 7 2 0 1 3 a t C i t y H a l l C a r r a be l l e M u n i c i p a l C o m p l e x 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v en u e C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 T h e p u r p os e o f t h e m e e t i n g w i l l be t o r e vi e w a n d o bt a i n p u b l i c i n p u t o n t h e d r a f t C o m m u n i t y R ed e v e l o p m en t P l a n u p d a t e T h i s m e e t i n g w i l l be t h e s e co n d m e e t i n g i n a s eri es f o r t h i s p u r p os e P u b l i c p a r t i c i p a t i o n co m m en t a n d r e co m m en d a t i o ns a r e enco u r a g ed A d r a f t C R A P l a n u p d a t e i s a v a i l a b l e f o r r e vi e w o n t h e C i t y w eb s i t e a t m y ca r r a be l l e co m a n d a t C i t y H all A n y i n t er es t ed per so n m a y co n t a c t t h e C i t y C l erk a t 8 5 0 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 w i t h q u es t i o ns r e g a r d i n g t h i s N o t i c e o r t h e C R A m e e t i n g d u ri n g n o r m a l b u s i n es s h o u r s 8: 3 0 a m t h r o u g h 4 : 3 0 p m Mo n d a y t h r o u g h F ri d a y a t t h e C a r r a be l l e M u n i c i p a l C o m p l e x 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v en u e C a r r a be l l e F L 3 2 3 2 2 S P E C I A L R E Q UI R E M E N T S : I f y o u r eq u i r e s pe c i a l a i d o r s er vi c es a s a d d r es s ed i n t h e A m eri ca n D i s a b i l i t i es A c t p l e a s e co n t a c t t h e C i t y C l erk ’ s O f c e n o l es s t h a n v e ( 5 ) d a y s p ri o r t o t h e a b o v e s t a t ed h e a ri n g d a t e Ci t y o f C ar r ab e l l e N o t i c e o f C h a n g e o f M ee t i n g D a t e T h e Ci t y o f C a r r a b e l l e w i l l r e s c h e d u l e i t s r e g u l a r m e et i n g t o J a n u a r y 9 2 0 1 3 a t Ci t y H a l l C a r r a b e l l e M u n i c i p a l C o m p l e x 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e n u e C a r r a b e l l e F L 32 32 2 a t 6 : 0 0 A n y i nt e r e s t e d p e r s o n m a y c o nt a c t t h e Ci t y Cl e r k a t 8 5 0 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 w i t h q u e s t i o n s r e g a r d i n g t h i s N o t i c e d u ri n g n o rm a l b u s i n e s s h o u r s 8 : 3 0 a m t h r o u g h 4 : 3 0 p m Mo n d a y t h r o u g h F ri d a y a t t h e C a r r a b e l l e M u n i c i p a l C o m p l e x 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e n u e C a r r a b e l l e F L 32 32 2 S P E C I A L R E Q U I R E M E N T S : I f y o u r e q u i r e spec i a l a id or s e r v i c e s a s a d d r e s s e d i n t h e A m e ri c a n D i sa b i l i t i e s A c t p l e a s e c o nt a c t t h e Ci t y Cl e r k ’ s O f c e n o l e s s t h a n v e ( 5 ) d a y s p ri o r t o t h e a b o v e s t a t e d m e et i n g d a t e By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At a routine foreclosure sale at the county courthouse in May, one of Apalachicola’s most legendary historic homes added to its legend. The Key House, once owned in the 1930s by famed novelist Alexander Key and his wife Margaret, and now worth in the neighborhood of $1 million, was sold for a mere $1,000 to Port St. Joe real estate investor David T. Ethridge, after representatives of the bank holding the mortgage failed to show up. But no sooner was the May 16 foreclosure sale complete, attorneys for the bank moved to vacate the sale on the grounds Ethridge’s bid was “clearly an ‘unconscionably inadequate’ price caused solely by the mistake” of the bank’s agent, JMT Management. Ethridge had paid the $1,000 to the clerk of courts of ce, but the bank’s motion put a freeze on the sale until it could be heard by Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey. When she was reassigned to Tallahassee, the case was to be heard by Circuit Judge George S. Reynolds III. Reynolds continued the case until Sept. 24, when Ethridge and the bank would have their day in court to decide the future of the three-story Victorian gem adjacent to Lafayette Park. The drama was shortlived, though, when after a brief hearing, attorneys for Capital Bank (successor to TIB Bank), and Ethridge himself, agreed on a settlement of $35,000 to vacate the sale. “This is a fascinating case,” said Reynolds, in accepting the settlement. “I’m glad you all reached agreement. A settlement is always better.” The bank’s attorney asked that the December 2013 foreclosure sale date be moved up, and after a brief recess, Reynolds ordered a new sale scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 31. Reynolds’ selection of Halloween for the sale may have been more than a coincidental choice for the veteran judge, especially since the 1894 Queen Anne style home was home to Key, a well-known author and illustrator whose novels include “Island Light,” “The Wrath and the Wind,” and “Night on Witch Mountain,” later made into a Disney movie. The couple divorced in the 1940s, and Margaret, also an author, lived in the home at Avenue C and 12th street with her sister until they were well into their 90’s. Margaret died in 1996 and directed in her will that upon the sale of her estate, proceeds be given to the Apalachicola Municipal Library board, of which she was a long time member. About $350,000 plus interest resulted from the bequest, after the home was acquired in 1998 by Naples physician Dr. Gregory and Sally Leach. By Nov. 2012, however, the home had fallen into foreclosure, complicated by the bankruptcy of one of the home’s several owner entities. At that new Halloween foreclosure sale, the bank as expected got the property for its $350,100 outstanding mortgage, and had to pay only $2,400 for the dock stamps to have the new deed recorded. It also covered the back taxes of slightly more than $47,000 on the house and three other lots. There was only other step to be made nal, and that was getting Ethridge his $1,000 back. After a brief hearing late last year, it was returned to him. Key House adds another legend TOP 10 A view of the legendary Key House, built in 1894 out of heart pine and black cypress by August Mohr, superintendent of the Cypress Lumber company. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On September 3, incumbent Carrabelle City Commissioner Brenda La Paz topped the eld of ve as she was returned to of ce, with political newcomer Audrey Olivia Massey winning a tight battle for the second seat. Massey is the granddaughter of Mayor Curley Messer. La Paz, 58, gathered 214 votes, easily topping the eld in the non-partisan election, while Massey, 41, edged out incumbent City Commissioner Cal Allen, 75, by two votes, 173 to 171, to take the second seat. Nikki Mock Millender, 36, nished in fourth place, with 108 votes, while Franklin Daniels, 52, picked up 58 votes. A total of 375 registered Carrabelle voters cast ballots in the election. Both La Paz and Massey are now set to each serve four-year terms. They were sworn into of ce after the Sept. 5 city commission meeting. La Paz said high on her agenda is working to make sure the city’s Community Redevelopment Area is brought into compliance with Florida statute, and can assist in downtown revitalization. Massey said she is eager to get to her top priority – helping to bolster what the city can offer its youth. “First thing I really want to work on is getting a grant and get something for our youth, and get some jobs in here, which is not only what the city of Carrabelle needs but what the whole county needs,” Massey said. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The 2013-14 school year for the Franklin County Schools was, as they say, a rebuilding year. Eric Bidwell began his rst full year as principal, with Kris Bray as his second, and Eddie Joseph and Al London his lieutenants. Bidwell said numbers were at 932, up by 47 from the 885 students who nished last year. Apalachicola Bay Charter School Chimene Johnson also saw an increase at the charter school, up by 40 new students to an enrollment of 350 in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. With the closure at the end of last year of the Learning Academy, which addressed credit recovery for students who had fallen behind in their work, those teachers were moved to the main campus to assume new teaching assignments. The Apalachicola Bay Charter School swam against the statewide current, as it posted its second consecutive A grade, and fourth in the last ve years. The grade for the kindergarten through eighth grade school was achieved even as the number of A schools throughout the state dropped sharply, from 1,242 in 2012 to 760 this past year. The number of A schools went from being 48 percent of the total number of schools, to 29 percent, a decline of nearly 20 percentage points. “We were extremely proud that we maintained the A status and A ranking,” said Johnson. “I feel like it comes from the support of our volunteer board of directors, our students, our staff, our parents, who all focus on the mission of our school, to reach the child’s social and academic potential. On the sports front, the year saw the departure of football coach Josh Wright, whoi left for a job in Panama City. “It’s a new look,” said coach Aaron York, 31, who replaced Wright. “We’re installing discipline rst and character. That’s our foundation. We tell them ‘If you don’t have these, you can’t win.’” Offensive coordinator is newcomer Scott Collins, who taught 11 years at Wakulla High School and teaches middle school social studies. He became the school’s baseball coach as well as coach of a newly created girls golf team. The year saw a minor scandal in the schools when a Franklin County parent questioned the conduct of high school teachers who administer the 10th grade state writing test. The district invalidated ve tests, and issued a statement March 6 that said “a breach of security was reported. The invalidation is the result of documented, unauthorized help or suggestions made during the test by the administrator of the test.” School nances were again an issue, as the district sought to cut a million dollars in the budget. School employees rallied to protect their jobs, and there were no staff reductions. By year’s end, jobs were saved, and county teachers at both schools got a boost in their annual take-home pay of about $1,700. La Paz, Massey win in Carrabelle TOP 10 Brenda La Paz, right, and Olivia Massey are swon in by Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer. New faces greet school year TOP 10 Left: Eric Bidwell. Right: Josh Wright. Local The Times | A5 Thursday, January 2, 2014 TDC from page A2 in 2004, announced she would step down freeing up a seat. Three candidates vied for the position, Lynn Wilson Spohrer, who owns the Coombs House Inn in Apalachicola and a rental houses in Eastpoint and on St. George Island; Walter Armistead, owner of the Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island and Suncoast Vacation Rentals; and Segul Patel, general manager of the Best Western Inn in Apalachicola. Spohrer, president of a registered corporation called the “Guest Lodging Association of Franklin County,” made a presentation to the TDC board and asked them to dedicate a TDC board seat to a representative of a hotel, motel, inn or bed and breakfast. She argued that lodging providers in Apalachicola had never held a TDC seat while Collins, CEO of Collins Vacation Rentals and Diana Prickett rental manager for Resort Vacation Rentals had both been seated on the board for multiple two-year terms. After two meetings, the TDC board voted 6-2 to recommend Armistead with Frank Cook and Beverly Hewitt opposed. The county commissioners voted unanimously to approve the TDC recommendation.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, January 2, 2014 P I P a nd m a n y o t he r s l i k e he r h a v e b e e n wa i t i n g a nd wa i t i n g f o r t he i r f o r e v e r h om e I n o r de r t o e n c o ur a g e y o u t o a do pt w e h a v e wa i v e d t he a do pt i on f e e f o r our a d u l t c a t s a nd r e d u c e d t he a do pt i on f e e f o r o ur t a b b y k i t t e n s t o on l y $ 2 5 0 0 P l e as e c on s ide r a do pt i n g one of o ur f i ne f e l i ne s. T he y a r e f u l l y v e t t e d a nd s p a y e d / ne u t e r e d a nd w i l l m a k e y o ur N E W Y E A R t he b e s t y e a r y e t V o l u n t e e r s a r e de s p e r a t e l y ne e de d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l of o ur do g s a nd c a t s. W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e n p e t s. o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. OF THE WEEK PET 227.7847 Franklin County Humane Society S e e Y o u r Bu s in e s s Name a n d I n f o Her e f o r O N L Y $ 1 5 p e r w e ek $ 6 0 p e r m o n t h Ca l l T o d a y 4 5 1 6 5 95 Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A ( 850 ) 899-1588 Society LOIS SWOBODA | The Times On Thursday, Dec. 19, at the Franklin County Senior Center Christmas party, Jim Welsh, right, chaplain of the Sons of the Legionnaires Camp Gordon Johnston Post 82 presented Senior Center President Ed Pattillo with a check for $100 on behalf of his organization. The money will be used to support senor center programs. S oO N sS oO F LEG ioIO NN aiAI RE sS HE lL P sS EN ioIO R sS SPECial IAL T o O THE TiTI MEs S The Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma International Society just completed its Avon sales campaign to raise funds for community service projects. One of the project goals is to give Grant-in-Aid awards to teacher interns. The current intern receiving a $100 award is Apalachicola High School graduate Tyler Fulmer, above left, who did his student teaching with Donna Barber’s fourth grade classroom. He is shown receiving his check from Delta Kappa member Laura King. FF UTURE TE aA CHER RECE iI VE sS GR aA NT-iI NaidAID SPECial IAL T o O THE TiTI MEs S Franklin County Middle School students will have their Photo-Literacy portfolios on display in the school’s media center this Wednesday, Jan. 8 from 1:20 to 4 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Please come and see the beautiful photography. Photos will also be on exhibit at the Franklin County Public Library’s Eastpoint branch from Jan. 10-31. MiddlMIDDL E sS CH oolOOL ER sS T oO PRE sS ENT PH oO T oO EXH ibiIBI T Special to the Times The Ilse Newell for the Perform ing Arts concert series of the Apala chicola Area Historical Society and the Historic Apalachicola Foundation are teaming up to present a concert of sacred music at St. Patrick Catho lic Church this Wednesday, Jan. 8. The concert will feature the Uni versity of Notre Dame Folk Choir be ginning with Vespers at 5:30 p.m. A reception will follow the concert. From British Columbia to Flor ida, from Edinburgh, Scotland to the shores of Ireland, this choir has traveled the world and brought their repertoire to thousands of Chris tians. Their four-part harmony, inge nious blend of guitar, organ, instru ments and percussion, and reverent diversity of style have allowed them to sing for World Youth Day, on the stage in Dublin, and in parishes throughout the United States. Published exclusively through World Library of Chicago, their songs are now sung in many houses of prayer throughout the Englishspeaking world. The St. George Inn is providing housing for most of the 50 students who will be coming, and the women of Trinity Episcopal Church and St. Patrick’s are working together to provide the dinner reception fol lowing the concert. Martha Harris, rector of Trinity, and Father Roger Latosynski and Sister Jeanne of St. Patrick’s are conducting the ecu menical Vesper service preceding the concert. The church is located at 27 Sixth Street in Apalachicola. Everyone is welcome and contributions will be accepted at the door. Notre Dame Folk Choir in concert Wednesday GG ETT iI NG THR oO UGH CC HR isIS TM asAS Apalachicola’s First Pentecostal Holiness Church presented an original work Dec. 21 and 22 called “Help Me Get Through Christmas,” written and directed by Terry Tipton. The show featured singing, dancing and lots of funny lines, as it deftly illustrated the challenges of balancing the stresses of the holiday with the joy of the season. The true meaning of the holiday came through when Santa Claus was saved, and when the father of the family returned at the end from military service overseas. For more photos, visit The Times Facebook page.PP H o O T os OS bB Y DAV V ID ADLER ER S TE TE I N N | The Times Olive (Brenda Cummings), center, objects to Nate (Joshua Odom), bouncing the ball in the church, as Doris (Linda Thompson), listens at left. ABOVE: Terry Tipton plays keyboards for show he authored. LEFT: Holly Chambers dances to “Don’t Save It All for Christmas Day.” Mrs. Gladys (Marie Lee), left, talks with Karen (Chanda Abel). Katie Abel, right, and Kalahn Kent dance to “Jesus, Born on This Day.”

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The Times | A7 Thursday, January 2, 2014 Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 R. Micha el Whale y P astor _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice The following is a list of people whose obituaries appeared in the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times in 2013. They are listed based on the month in which they appeared in the newspaper. January Lloyd Shiver Gladys Quigg Carmi Ward Maydell Norris Margie Keith Jeannette Meyer Bill Dodd Celena Hevner Hollis Fleeman Sharon Mangham Red Murray Helen Prophater February Yvonne Money Connie Flowers Marion Millender Tommy Chumney Kristian Jackson Stanley McIntyre Mary Nichols Joshua Phipps Jean Quaranta Bobby Siprell Avon Blanchard John Clower Billy Shiver Robert Stock Annie Mae Flowers Steve Herndon Debbie Sutcliffe March Bobbie Jean Watson Terry Adamick Ruth Martin Colley Houston Miller Marjorie White Rudolph Buzier Sharon Hall Eulice Kelley Gene Surber Marjorie Thompson Patricia Fleeman Bill Wagoner April Hazel Allmand Arthur Hutchinson John Lewis Anita Townsend Luey Bryant Anthony Cesaroni Louis McCaskill Sara Walters Carl Mayo May Buddy Hefner Roy Horton Andy Stewart Ferris “Doc” Hathcock Hayward O’Neal Odom Edith Edwards Richard Miller Jessie McKenna Kelley Shiver Skeet Creekmore Ruby Gay Arlean Robinson Charles Youngblood Chris Anderson Patricia Brown Thomas Knight Billy Moses Oliver Nash John Page Demetris James June Dorcas Bodenheimer Red Anthony Judith Bos Charles Gay Gary Shiver Steven White Lonnie Cooper Michael Lee Creek, Sr. Michael Hendels Mona Moon July Frank Brown Fred Jetton Joe Manzanares Princess Jones Bill Lunsford Judy Donaldson Maurice Gunter August Brandon Creamer Robert Nute George Dykes John McKnight Ben Watkins Phyllis Bishop Cheryl Boatwright Charles Hardy Ann Anderson Frances Eden eld Eddie Moses September Christina Getz Stanley Furtak Curtis Padgett Deb King John Webb Deena Adlerstein Marilyn Snyder Carmia Lee Tammie Reagan October Jennifer Falk Dan Robison Al Thacker Francis Ponder Lucia Ponder Frank Rodney Sonya Russell Russell Crofton Nellie Parrish Lilli McIver November Joyce Thomas Fred Babb Jack Massey Cody Diorio Richard Hodge Stephen Travis Helen Vathis Brazil Carmichael December Wendell Bar eld Francis Ward In MEMORIAM CHERYL BOATWRIGHT CHARLES HARDY LILLI MCIVER RUSSELL CROFTON ARTHUR HUTCHINSON JOYCE THOMAS DEB KING FRED BABB JACK MASSEY CODY DIORIO FRANK RODNEY FRANCIS PONDER JENNIFER FALK JOHN WEBB WENDELL BARFIELD FRANCIS WARD MARJORIE THOMPSON BEN WATKINS BRANDON CREAMER BILL LUNSFORD FRED JETTON CHARLES GAY OLIVER NASH SKEET CREEKMORE FERRIS “DOC” HATHCOCK RICHARD HODGE SHARON HALL RUDOLPH BUZIER COLLEY HOUSTON RUTH MARTIN TERRY ADAMICK BILLY SHIVER JOSHUA PHIPPS MARION MILLENDER VONNE MONEY STEPHEN TRAVIS We all got a nice surprise Christmas Eve. The Village Carolers came around and sang carols for us. The late Roscoe Dally would have been pleased with the crowd we had at Chillas Hall on Christmas morning. Hope you enjoyed the smoked turkey sandwiches and the goodies. Roscoe started the tradition many years ago. To keep his tradition and his memory with us, Bob Dietz continued on with the smoked turkey. There will be two New Year’s Eve celebrations here in the village. Many of us will gather at Chillas Hall to ring in the new year. Doors will be open at 8 p.m. Ron Vice will play the music and there will be many snacks for you to enjoy. Bring your favorite snack to share, your beverage of choice, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze and party hearty! A $5 donation will be required. The Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will be rocking with Greg K and the Krewe at the karaoke. Finger food will be available and Deb and Kim will be there to serve your drinks at the bar. Have a great New Year’s Eve. The party starts at 8 p.m. also. There will be the annual black-eyed pea lunch at the Lanark Village Boat Club New Year’s Day, starting at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4 is First Saturday Breakfast at Chillas Hall. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. and members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be glad to serve you. Your donation of $5 will be collected inside. See ya there! Mark your calendars for Wednesday, Jan. 8. We will have the season opener of the Wednesday Night Bingo at Chillas Hall. Doors will at 6 p.m. with bingo at 6:30 p.m. Coffee, soft drinks and cookies will be available. Come on over and have a fun evening. Lunch at the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center will resume on Thursday, Jan. 9. Minimum donation is $4, to be collected at the desk. Chow line forms at noon. We will pick up food from the Food Bank also on Thursday. Of course we can enjoy hamburgers and chips on Fridays, and pizza on Sundays, at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Orders will be taken from 5 to 7 p.m. both nights. Eat in or take out. Enjoy! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, contrary to popular opinion, God’s last name is not damn. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Welcome the new year with parties, peas LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Carrabelle United Methodist Church announces its 2014 Market Days Ministry. God teaches that we must care for orphans and widows in their af iction and needs. Funds derived from your donations will assist us to better serve those in need in our community. Beginning Saturday, Jan. 25 and continuing on the last Saturday of each month through December, there will be 12 events full of food, music, arts and crafts, baked goods, rummage sales, raf es and more at the Curley Messer Pavilion, on Tallahassee Street in Carrabelle next to the re station. Please come and share in this “God’s Ministry” with us. Mark your calendar for the rst event on Saturday, Jan. 25 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the pavilion. Signs will be out with directions. For more information, contact Bonnie Myrick, fundraising chair, at 899-3175 or e-mail missgalfriday@yahoo. com. Faith BRIEF Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES THE APALACHICOLA TIMES THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Carrabelle Methodists plan ‘Market Days Ministry’ Faith

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Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, January 2, 2014 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Local Waters Local area waters are chilly as the winter weather finally sets in. Good reports from the Sea wall at St. Joe Marina are coming in daily of trout, red fish, and even some pompano. Most Anlgers are using artificial baits such as gulp or D.O.A. shrimp in a pink or measles color. Some bigger trout have been caught in the ICW canal in St. Joe as well this week and this should hold true for the next few weeks as long as the weather holds. By TOM BAIRD Special to The Times With winter we have the opportunity to see new visitors on St. Joseph Bay – both feathered and otherwise. Flotillas of ducks can be seen resting and feeding in the bay, wintering loons arrive; various shore birds like avocets make an appearance, and large ocks of white pelicans move in. Whether you are a birder or not, you don’t need expensive binoculars, spotting scopes, or a telephoto lens to appreciate the white pelicans. These are really big birds and their groups on the bay are easily seen. The white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) differs from our familiar brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) in several ways. For one, they do not make aerial dives on their food like our brown pelicans. White pelicans feed while on the water surface, often in large cooperative groups to corral sh. They breed inland far to the north and migrate to the Paci c coast or the Gulf of Mexico or as far south as Panama. They do not rest on the open ocean, but prefer bays and estuaries. They also build nests on the ground, as opposed to our brown pelicans that build two foot nests of sticks and grass in mangroves or other offshore island vegetation. The white pelican is also bigger than the brown having a wingspan second only to the California condor, and a body measuring 50–70 inches long compared to 42–54 inches long for the brown. In late spring and summer white pelicans breed in large colonies on islands in remote freshwater lakes in Canada, although some breeding colonies can be found as far south as Wyoming and northeastern California. During the breeding season, the normally yellow bill turns bright orange and a attened “horn” is grown on the upper bill. Of the eight species of pelicans worldwide, this is the only species to grow a “horn”. After mating and the eggs are laid, these pelicans loose the horn and the bill returns to its normal color. They gather to begin their migration south in September and October. We can easily see these colonies in winter not only on St. Joseph Bay, but also in St. Vincent Sound and on the arti cially maintained freshwater ponds in St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge to our east. Past use of DDT affected the reproduction of both white and brown pelicans. Despite improvements in recent decades, nevertheless, the brown pelican has disappeared in parts of its former range. Pesticides washing into coastal waters still threaten these birds, as well as habitat destruction. Both species are killed by entanglement in discarded shing gear, especially mono lament shing line. Boating disturbances and starvation during unusually cold winters add to population reduction of both species while in our bays. Nevertheless, both species are stable and slightly increasing in recent years following the drastic declines in mid-twentieth century from agricultural use of DDT. Recently an avocet was spotted in the marsh. Even if you are not a birder – and this writer is not – the avocet will get your attention. (This elicited a whispered “Holy Cow!” by this observer.) This is the long-legged shorebird with the long, thin upturned bill. In pro le this bird has a Bob Hope ski nose aspect. Although not related at all – other than being birds –the American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) has a lot of life strategies similar to white pelicans. They breed well to the north in Saskatchewan, Minnesota, and interior Washington State, although some breeding colonies can be found as far south as California and Texas. They migrate in winter to the California coast, the Gulf coast, and around Florida. They are a rare visitor to Atlantic coast marshes as well. Here similarities end, because avocets are waders when looking for a meal. When feeding, they go along the marsh shore sweeping the bill from side to side stirring up small crustaceans. On bays and estuaries, they will also feed on exposed mud ats at low tide. This is a fairly tall bird – up to 20 inches – with blue legs. We do not get to see this bird with its pleasing rust colored spring and summer plumage on its head and neck. But in its winter plumage of light grey head and black on white body it is hard to miss. However, it is that slender, black, up-turned bill that makes it immediately eye catching. Avocet eggs were once harvested on their breeding colonies and they were hunted to near extinction in parts of their former range along the Atlantic coast. Nevertheless, habitat destruction, especially the loss of wetlands in the western U.S., has most hurt the avocet population. Even if you are not an avid birder, and like me, prefer to just observe those birds with the good manners to stand or feed out in the open where they can be seen, winter is the time to see some truly remarkable visitors. If you are a birder, this area of the Florida coast is a birder’s paradise in winter, with excellent viewing opportunities on St. Joseph Bay, St. Vincent Sound, St. Vincent Island and Apalachicola. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge is only a short drive to the east, with its fresh and saltwater habitats and viewing platforms. Birders visit there from all over the country in winter. Audubon Christmas Bird Counts in this area record impressive totals of migrating birds – both in number and variety. With good places to stay and good places to eat, this is an ideal place to add some birds to your life list. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu J an. 2 63 42 % F ri, J an. 3 63 42 % S a t J an. 4 63 42 % Sun, J an. 5 63 42 % M on, J an. 6 63 42 % T ues J an. 7 63 42 % W ed J an. 8 63 42 % Winter birds of the bays Left: A white pelican. Middle: The brown pelican. Right: An American avocet. Christmas cactus is the common name for a number of cactus varieties in the genus Schlumbergera. Other members of the same group are known as Thanksgiving cactus, Easter cactus, crab cactus and holiday cactus. The ancestors of all of these originated in the cloud forest of Brazil at altitudes of 2000 to 9000 feet above sea level. Plants are epiphytic or lithophytic, meaning they grow on moss-covered tree branches or in rock crevices, often in small pockets of soil formed from decayed leaves and other vegetation. Most species of Schlumbergera have stems that resemble leaf-like pads joined one to the other with owers that appear at the joints and tips of the stems. In Brazil, the genus is referred to as Flor de Maio (May ower) because they ower in that month in the southern hemisphere. Specimens of the wild cactus were collected in the early 1800s and taken to Europe where they were hybridized with each other and with other cactus varieties resulting in the current wide array of colors, foliage form and bloom period. Blooms rang in color from red, rose, purple and lavender to peach, orange, cream, white and metallic gold. The natural distribution of Schlumbergera species has become confused because European cultivars were deliberately introduced into some areas by the Brazilian Agricultural Department, including the Parque Nacional da Serra dos "rgos where many of the cultivated Christmas cactus ancestors were collected. Flowers of many Christmas cacti exhibit different colors depending on the temperature during bud formation and growth. Temperatures below 57 F produce pink tones in normally white and yellow cultivars, and deepen the color in pink and red cultivars. The availability of iron to the plant has also been suggested to affect ower color. Christmas cacti are adapted for pollination by hummingbirds including tubular owers with abundant nectar, and colors towards the red end of the spectrum. Most species require cross-pollination from a separate plant to set seed. The fruits of Schlumbergera do not open spontaneously when ripe, and appear to be adapted for distribution by birds, which eat the seeds and pulp contained in the fruit. The holiday cacti grow best in light shade. Full sunlight is bene cial during fall and winter, but bright sun during the summer months can make plants look pale and yellow. Ideal spring and summer growth occurs at temperatures between 70 to 80 F. During the fall, these cacti depend upon shorter day lengths of eight to 10 hours and cooler temperatures to set their ower buds. Do not let temperatures rise above 90 F once the ower buds are set in the fall. Continuous warm temperatures can cause ower buds to drop. Fourteen hours or more of continuous darkness each day is required before ower bud set will occur. Long nights should be started about the middle of September and continued for at least six continuous weeks. If your plants live on a windowsill, consider moving them to the closet each night. Pinch back the stems in early June to promote branching and more terminals for more owers. Water only when the soil is dry to the touch. The holiday cacti are tolerant of dry, slightly under-watered conditions during the spring and summer. It’s ok if the stems shrink a little. Do not let the soil become waterlogged, especially during the dark days of winter. Never let water stand in the saucer beneath the pot. Fertilize plants monthly when the days are growing longer but when they begin to shorten stop. I use orchid fertilizer on mine. Some experts recommend a dose of Epsom salts in the summer especially if the green begins to fade. The holiday cacti ower best when kept somewhat pot bound. Repotting is necessary only about once every three years. Christmas cactus BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Special to The Times With a $5 donation, people can receive a manatee or sea turtle decal from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. This year’s decals celebrate the presence of manatees and sea turtles 500 years ago in Florida when Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon landed on this peninsula and named it La Florida, land of owers. People can order the decals online at MyFWC.com/ ManateeSeaTurtleDecals or get them at the county tax collectors’ of ces. Decal donations support conservation of manatees and sea turtles, including research, rescue, rehabilitation and management efforts. Go to BuyaPlate.com. For more on manatees, go to MyFWC.com/Manatee. For more on sea turtles, go to MyFWC.com/SeaTurtle. Manatee, turtle decals support conservation

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, January 2, 2014 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com If the size of the oyster eaters’ appetites are an accurate gauge, this year’s crowd at the 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival was a bellyful for the record books. A late thunderstorm Friday night, followed by an overcast morning, gave way to crisp, sunny weather, ideal for taking in a podium full of competitors guzzling mollusks. Gerald “G” Goodman, of Southport, ate 27 dozen oysters to win the oyster eating contest, just 72 oysters short of the record. “The rules say you have to use a fork to get them out the cup. If he wants to swallow ‘em, he can swallow ‘em. That’s up to him,” said Michael Shuler, who oversaw the completion. Among females, Apalachicola’s Dana Taylor, pulled a stunning upset of ve-time champion Angie Harnage, who downed only seven dozen and six oysters, about half of her personal best. Taylor consumed an impressive 18 dozen. Reigning over the golden anniversary of the Florida Seafood Festival were two musicians a young trombone-playing pixie and a young-at-heart bassplaying seafood dealer. Franklin County High School junior Morgan Martin, 16, has long played rst trombone in the Seahawk band, and now leads the musicians as drum major. Her King Retsyo, Vance Millender, a seafood dealer with deep ties to the industry, plays tenor sax and bass guitar for the rock band Locomotive. Together, they sound just the right notes that the seafood industry that is Franklin County’s heritage and lifeblood shall long endure. “It will go as far as we can take it,” said Martin, daughter of Teresa Ann Martin of Apalachicola and Henry Martin of Destin Millender is a prime example of the type of people Martin is talking about, a Carrabelle native, grandson to Braxton Millender, who started the business in 1942 and then handed it down to his son Farris Millender. After Martin and Millender arrived by shrimp boat, State Sen. Bill Montford and Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson welcomed the guests. John Solomon, president of the board of directors, presented a plaque to Billy Spikes, who directed the rst festival in 1963. Now in the real estate business in Orlando, Spikes back then was a young marketing manager for Florida Power, and worked closely with city business interest to create an attraction for visitors in the off-season. Ted Mosteller, also retired from Florida Power, stepped down this year after more than four decades on the volunteer board. Solomon said despite a rainstorm that shaved the last couple hours off Friday’s events, this weekend’s crowd was in excess of 31,000, fueled by a combination of it being the golden anniversary, the appearance of county music and Dancing with the Stars champion Kellie Pickler Saturday night, and the weather. He said gate receipts were at least $57,000, with a record number of t-shirt sales. After that it was time for another tradition, this time a win in the oyster shucking contest by Scotty O’Lear, an 11-time state champion and a ve-time national champion. The crowd continued to build all afternoon, anticipating the arrival of Pickler for the night’s featured entertainment. Pickler came on stage in heels, but after her opening number, “Little House,” she sat down on the edge of the stage and took them off, and went barefoot the rest of the evening. She delighted the crowd with such songs as “Beautiful,” “Makin Me Fall,” “Tough,” “Stop Cheatin’,” “Where’s Tammy,” and “”Things,” before launching into her current hit, “Someone Somewhere.” She rounded off her evening with “Ring For Sale,” “White Lightning,” “My Angel,” “Wanna Be Married,” “Gypsy,” “Didn’t You Know,” “Unlock That Honky Tonk,” “I Wonder” and “Best Days.” For her encore she came out in red high heels and sang the song of the same name. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At a public hearing in November, packed with the project’s opponents, Apalachicola’s Planning and Zoning Commission gave a resounding no to a proposal to relocate the city’s Family Dollar store to a wooded site on U.S. 98 on the western edge of town, adjacent to the Best Western Inn. By voice vote that sounded unanimous, P and Z decided against granting a special exception to the existing C-3 zoning so as to allow Panama City Beach’s Brett Woodward to construct a more than 8,300-square foot store on 1.16 acres at U.S. 98 and Clairmont. Woodward told P & Z he had provided a full set of plans for the project in Nov. 2012, when he came for site approval to put in the Family Dollar store. “We want to relocate from the existing location because of poor visibility and more convenience associated with it,” he said. Woodward said he submitted the project through the proper city channels, “tweaked the plan multiple times based on comments we received,” and now sought a special exception for specialty retail. That category had invited much concern among the community when it was determined last year the project had to go through a special exception process, since it was not a permitted use under C-3. “I think you have to be careful how you construe specialty retail,” said Daly. At a P & Z meeting in April 2012 had voted unanimously “to con rm that this project would t into C-3 zoning.” City Administrator Betty Webb followed up on that meeting ve months later with a Sept. 19, 2012 letter to Woodward summarizing P & Z’s actions. Later, a more thorough reading of the land use regulations indicated that the project needed vetting through the special exception process, and by then community opposition, led by contiguous neighbors, had begun to gel. Speaking on behalf of neighbors to the property, Sandy Howze, a former mayor and building inspector, asked P & Z to pay attention to speci cs required of special exceptions. He said a dollar store, which is not mentioned anywhere in the land use code, would require a determination of specialty retail. He also noted the April 2012 P & Z meeting item, when it was voted to determine the proposal was consistent with zoning, was on the agenda for the issue of signage. Several other audience members, when they rose to speak, accused the developer of this apparent subterfuge. In an interview following the meeting, when he voiced disappointment with P & Z’s decision, Woodward took issue with that accusation, and said he came to P & Z in earnest because he thought a possible limitation on the size of signage would kill the deal from the outset. He said he had not intended to ask for a zoning decision at that time, but that after P & Z unanimously endorsed the overall plan, he assumed the matter was resolved and asked Webb to put the determination in writing, typical of developers who may need such documentation for nancing. Carrie Kienzle, who heads the board of adjustment, said P & Z’s actions in April 2012 were in keeping with a tradition of being accommodating. “When people come to us, we don’t want to jump the gun. They try to be nice, they try to be genteel,” she said. “It was my understanding the discussion was about a sign. This is a slippery slope to a cement ghetto.” Just before the vote, Daly said that “it’s unfortunate that we’ve created this back and forth. We voted on something very quickly without thinking it through at that time. Bet we never did approve a special exception. “The bottom line is we don’t think it’s a good t, a specialty store would not generate the kind of traf c that a Family Dollar would. I don’t think it’s right for this community; it creates more traf c in a place that doesn’t need more traf c.” A golden year for seafood festival TOP 10 City says no to Family Dollar TOP 10 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Miss Florida Seafood Morgan Martin and King Retsyo Vance Millender DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Dr. Photis Nichols, who practiced medicine in Apalachicola for more than 50 years, returned from Jacksonville for the parade, riding the Weems Hospital oat with Valencia Marsh, left, and Glenda Wilson. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times A view of the proposed site for the Family Dollar store. AQUACULTURE from page A2 than $12,000 and $16,000 a year, he said, and oystermen already make $36,000 to $60,000 annually. Knickerbocker said the National Academy of Sciences is undertaking a yearlong, baywide study “trying to determine a path forward, a future for the bay. They’re looking for permanent xes, rather than short-term temporary issues.” Oystermen plead for help Beset by a dwindling harvest, oystermen continued to appeal for steps to be taken to boost the supply of oysters in Apalachicola Bay. A majority of the membership of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association backed two proposals, to create a locally-owned hatchery at the county-owned Lombardi Seafood Park that would help in seeding the bay, and to make changes in the management plan for bay closures that would protect against overharvesting. One bright spot that emerged was several oystermen who said they’re beginning to see growth in the oysters they’re catching, especially since the amount of freshwater coming down the river is increasing for the rst time in years. At the county’s annual legislative delegation hearing in December, the oystermen asked that the state open up the summer bars on an emergency basis, but the state said no. The second meeting held Dec. 12 was hosted by the Air Force and the Florida Forest Service jointly. Military uniforms were notably absent at the town hall type get together and questions were encouraged. Eglin was represented by two civilian representatives, Mike Penland, deputy director for range and airspace sustainment at Eglin Air Force Base, and John Mathers, project director for GRASI. State Forester Jim Karels led this meeting. The audience was told that questions raised by Sanders had prompted organization of a second discussion. Ken Weber, Tate’s Hell State Forest’s rst manager, said no decision had been made about military use of the forest. He said the town hall meeting was to discuss a memo of understanding that might lead to a memo of agreement. The meeting’s organizers openly admitted December meeting was an attempt to undo damage from the rst discussion. “The last scoping meeting was not that great,” said Penland. A dozen speakers expressed concern that war games in the forest would lead to chemical and noise pollution, restrict use of air space by private citizens and emergency aircraft and interfere with other forest activities including ecotourism, which is of growing importance to the regional economy. Once again, opposition to the proposed military use was universal among speakers. Karels assured the audience there would be continued discussion of the proposal and no decision had been made to allow military exercises in Tate’s Hell. WAR GAMES from page A2 Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 S e a h a w k s e n i o r C a m e r o n W h i t e h a s b e e n a c o n s i s t e n t s c o r e r f o r t h e b o y s v a r s i t y b a s k e t b a l l t e a m a v e r a g i n g m o r e t h a n s e v e n p o i n t s a g a m e H e i s a v e r a g i n g a b o u t 3 3 p e r c e n t f r o m t h e e l d a n d 5 4 p e r c e n t f r o m t h e f r e e t h r o w l i n e W h i t e h a s s n a r e d a n a v e r a g e o f b e t t e r t h a n e i g h t r e b o u n d s a g a m e a n d i s t h e t e a m s l e a d i n g r e b o u n d e r H e a l s o a v e r a g e s m o r e t h a n t w o a s s i s t s p e r g a m e a n d m o r e t h a n o n e s t e a l p e r g a m e Gu l fs i de I G A P L AY E R OF T H E WE E K C a me r on W h i t e

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A10 | The Times Thursday, January 2, 2014 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 T rades & Ser v ices Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % A10 | The Times Thursday, January 2, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 93490T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2011-CA000169 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, PLAINTIFF, vs. RAESHELLE LARAE REESE, ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 17, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA-000169 in the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC was the Plaintiff and RAESHELLE LARAE REESE, ET AL., the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Franklin St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 on the 8th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT A 5 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN S01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS W ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION A DISTANCE OF 2476.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #0340); THENCE RUN S 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 11 SECONDS E 767.58 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #0340) LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT (HATHCOCK ROAD) AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 919, PAGE 52 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN S 09 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS W ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 59.67 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE S09 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS W ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 127.24 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN S 83 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 03 SECONDS W 391.54 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160); THENCE RUN N 05 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS E 102.96 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED # 7160); THENCE RUN N 80 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 17 SECONDS E 404.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO a 60.00 foot ingress and egress easement lying over and across the Easterly 30.00 feet thereof as recorded in Official Records Book 919, Page 52; also in Official records Book 921, Page 576 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2010 FLEETWOOD Manufactured Home, I.D. Nos. GAFL907A/B58648-ET31. Tax ID: 330808000000100040 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: November 7, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Stephen M. Huttman Attorney for Plaintiff Pendergast & Morgan, P.A. 115 Perimeter Center Place South Terraces Suite 1000 Atlanta, GA 30346 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm. 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 26, 2013 January 2, 2014 93558T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 19-2013-CA000126 HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORP III, Plaintiff vs. PHILLIP RANKIN A/K/A PHILLIP H. RANKIN; CHERRY RANKIN A/K/A CHERRY LYNN RANKIN; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 18, 2013, and entered in 19-2013-CA000126 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, is the Plaintiff and PHILLIP RANKIN A/K/A PHILLIP H. RANKIN; CHERRY RANKIN A/K/A CHERRY LYNN RANKIN; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 33 Market Street 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse Apalachicola FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 5, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, BLOCK “C”, SUN & SAND VILLAGE, UNIT TWO, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 34, AND THAT CERTAIN 1990 MOBILE HOME SITUATED ON THE PROPERTY. Any person claiming au interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of December, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By; Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 12-10117 January 2, 9, 2014 93564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192012CA 000343CAXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT1, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007OPT1, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL AND JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000343CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, is the Plaintiffand KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL; JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s).Kendall Wade as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the 2nd Floor Lobby 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on January 23, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE LOT LINE SEPARATING LOTS 58 AND 59 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE RIGHT-OFWAY OF PEACHTREE ROAD, AND RUN ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HATHCOCK ROAD, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HATHCOCK ROAD 165 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 14th day of October, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850. 577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-05225 January 2, 9, 2014 93570T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000350 Section: ____ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. CYNTHIA F. BIRDEN; LARSH A. BIRDEN; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA000350 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 15th day of January, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 50, CARRABELLE LANDING ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida Special to The Times Apalachicola po lice ofcers arrested and charged a Car rabelle man Satur day afternoon after nding crack cocaine in his car after stop ping him for running a stop sign. Apalachicola Police Chief Bob by Varnes said Robert Brennan Lemuel Walden, 21, was stopped by Apalachicola Police Ofcer Timothy Davis at about 4:15 p.m. after Walden failed to obey a stop sign at the intersection of 24th Av enue and Earl King Street. After the stop, Deputy Jody Martina, with the sheriff’s of ce’s K-9 Unit, used his service dog to conduct a search around the vehicle, and was alerted to the presence of drugs, Varnes said. A search of the vehicle yield ed about ve or six pieces of crack cocaine hidden inside a cigarette box, with an estimated street value of about $400, Var nes said. Ofcers said that during the search Walden held an infant child in his arms, and that once drugs were uncovered, he tossed the child on the car seat, grabbed the drugs and ed the vehicle on foot. Sheriff’s deputies and Apala chicola police ofcers caught up with Walden after a 100-yard foot chase. Martina commanded Walden to stop, and then employed a Taser to subdue him after he be came violent, ghting and biting the ofcers, Varnes said. Walden was arrested and booked into the Franklin County Jail on possession of a controlled substance, tampering with evi dence, battery on a law enforce ment ofcer, resisting arrest with violence, corruption by threat and child abuse. BRENNAN WALDEN Carrabelle man busted with drugs after trafc stop The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Franklin County Sherriff’s Ofce and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.DD ec. 26 Mickel D. Ross, 42, Inverness, Pinellas County warrant for withholding child support (FWC)DD ec. 27 William J. Heierman, 39, Crawfordville, using a rearm while under the inuence and possession of cannabis (FWC)DD ec. 28 Robert B. Walden, 21, Lanark Village, possession n of a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence, battery on a law enforcement ofcer, resisting ofcer with violence, corruption by threats against a public servant, and child abuse (FCSO)DD ec. 29 Willie G. Dasher, Jr., 35, Eastpoint, battery, DUI an driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, January 2, 2014 The Times | A11 4516553 Apalachicola Holiday Special Lot 4, Block 150 11th Street $17,500, R-1 Zoning Call 850-653-8330 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. COMMERCIAL BUILDING ON 98, RIVER VIEW, $1200 WATER INCLUDED. 2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. 3 BEDROOM 3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPS W/LIFT 2 CAR GARAGE 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 391 CARL TONS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/ MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENEDPORCH. 425/MO 6.3 BEDROOM3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPSW/LIFT 2CARGARAGEwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4516552Franklin CountyLiquor License$ 145,000.00 Seriousinquires/offersonly at:anitalln242@aol.com 2 AKC Male and Female English Bulldog puppies for adoption. Trying to nd a good home for them. Interested contact Larryrooker887@ yahoo.com ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARDWICK SCHNEIDER ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 PHILADELPHIA RD BALTIMORE, MD 21237 January 2, 9, 2014 93586T NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF AN COUNTY ORDINANCE Notice is given that on the 21st day of January, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (ET), in the courtroom at the Courthouse Annex, which is located at 33 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners shall conduct a public hearing to consider adopting a county ordinance entitled: An Ordinance of Franklin County, Florida Providing For The Removal of Debris From Privately Owned Lands During The Time Of A State of Emergency; Providing An Effective Date. The public is invited to attend the public hearing. Those persons who desire to speak regarding the adoption of the ordinance shall be given a reasonable opportunity to speak. The proposed ordinance is on file with, and may be viewed at, the office of the Clerk of Court at the Franklin County Courthouse, which is located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida. The meeting room is handicap accessible; however, those persons who may require special assistance to attend the public meeting must make arrangements in advance by calling deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8161, x100 at least two business days in advance of the meeting. Any person who may desire to challenge the outcome of the public meeting is responsible for recording a verbatim transcript of the meeting. Pub:January 2, 9, 2014 93574T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-000227-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. LAUREN RENEE CAVUOTO; VICTOR M. VELAZQUEZ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LAUREN RENEE. CAVUOTO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VICTOR M. VELAZQUEZ; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 15th day of January, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. in the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 3, BLOCK 187 (NEW BLOCK 28) OF KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 19th day of November, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Monica D. Shepard Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H # 308101 January 2, 9, 2014 93584T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: January 18, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Robert Schmidt Jonie Wilson Mike Horvath Xania Jones Dean Lord Before the sale date of January 18, 2014, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. January 2, 9, 2014 95971T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000131-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL W. BYRD, JR., ET AL., Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013 and the Order Granting Consent Motion to Continue and Rescheduled Foreclosure sale dated November 20, 2013, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, Inside the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32329, at 11:00 a.m. EST on January 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.rn. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Parcels 1 and 2 located in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 7, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO.5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; Lot 5 and 6, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page (s) 16-17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; Parcel 3 located in Leon County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 598.0 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 210.85 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 523.75 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF A TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 90, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID TRACT 209.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 915.57 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. NO. 90 (STATE ROAD NO. 10), THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 24 MINUTES WEST (BEARING BASE) ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 815.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1176.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 203.48 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 196.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 24 SECONDS WEST 312.81 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE FROM A TANGENT BEARING OF NORTH 64 DEGREES, 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 177.17 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 32 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 309.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: December 16, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk December 26, 2013 January 2, 2014 96821T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-00125-CC WILLIE MARY CLARK JOSEPH fka WILLIE M. DANIELS, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM LOVE AND JULIA LOVE, and all parties claiming by, through, under or against them; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other persons claiming by, through or under those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described in the complaint. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: WILLIAM LOVE AND JULIA LOVE, and all parties claiming by, through, under or against them; and all unknown natural persons, if alive, and if dead, or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other persons claiming by, through or under those unknown natural persons; and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or any other person claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant; and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants or parties or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described in the complaint. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Adverse Possession and to Quiet Title the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 7 OF BLOCK 166 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY IN MOST COMMON USE. has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Donna Duncan, plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Sanders and Duncan, P.A., P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329, on or before the 10th day of February, 2014, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs’ attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of the petition. Dated this 10th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk December 19, 26, 2013 January 2, 9, 2014 97043T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000242 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS AND BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER AND PAMELA SCHAFFER A/KA/ PAMELA P. SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER, et. al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 18, 2013, and entered in 19-2013-CA000242 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS; BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER; PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS N/K/A PHILLIP RANKIN; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A BRENDA VAUSE; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A WHITNEY VAUSE are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 5, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 11 OF SOUTHLAND A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF THE APALACHICOLA NORTHERN RAIL ROAD. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 199.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 269.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF HATCOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A REROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE WITH THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 311.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS TOGETHER WITH A 1977 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, VIN#S: FLA58338 AND FL58339. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 January 2, 9, 2014 96823T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-000124CC VEDELL M. BUNYON and SHANNON H. BUNYON, Plaintiffs, vs. MARY HAWKINS, and all others claiming by, through, or under MARY HAWKINS, including any unknown natural person, the unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under, or against any known or unknown person who is known to be dead or is not known to be either dead or alive, and JAMES HAWKINS, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: All parties claiming interests by, through, under, or against MARY HAWKINS, including all parties having or claiming to have any right, .title or interest in the property herein described: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title to the following property in Franklin County, Florida, described as; The Northeast one half (NE 1/2) of Lot 1, in Block 166, of the City of Apalachicola, Florida, according to the map or plat thereof in common use has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., who is attorney for plaintiffs, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32329, on or before the 20th day of January, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of the petition. Dated this 10th day of December, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk BARBARA SANDERS Attorney for Plaintiffs FL Bar No. 4442178 Sanders and Duncan, P.A. 80 Market Street P.O. Box 157 Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 bsanders@fairpoint.net jrgay@fairpoint.net December 19, 26, 2013 January 2, 9, 2014 97017T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, PATRICIA S. WALL, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 665 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOTS 9 & 10 BLOCK 81 APALACHICOLA Full Legal Can be Obtained in the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 01-09S-08W-8330-0081-00 90 Name is which assessed: JIMMIE LEE RICHARDSON All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of FEBRUARY 2014, which is the 10th day of FEBRUARY 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 19th day of December, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 97045T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000050 DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM MITCHELL MARTINA, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: DESIREE F. MARTINA ALSO KNOWN AS DESIREE FRANCES MARTINA Last Known Address: 1626 Linden Rd. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Bay County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE LINE DIVIDING LOTS 42 AND 43 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN 66 FEET NORTH ALONG THE WEST RIGHT-OFWAY OF LINDEN ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING TURN LEFT AND RUN 165 FEET PARALLEL TO THE LINE DIVIDING LOTS 42 AND 43 OF SAID SUBDIVISION TO A POINT, THENCE TURN RIGHT AND RUN 264 FEET PARALLEL TO LINDEN ROAD TO THE LINE DIVIDING LOTS 42 AND 41 OF SAID SUBDIVISION, THENCE TURN RIGHT AND RUN 165 FEET ALONG THE LINE LAST MENTIONED TO THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE TURN RIGHT AND RUN 264 FEET ALONG THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINDEN ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 1626 LINDEN RD APALACHICOLA FL 32320-1372 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 17th day of December, 2013. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 PH-012183F01 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861, Fax: (850) 653-9339. January 2, 9, 2014 Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on January 31, 2014 for Foreclosure Prevention Grants. These funds will be used to help prevent mortgage foreclosure for the adversely impacted Seafood Workers of Franklin County due to the Gulf Fisheries Failure. Funding will be provided to bring delinquent mortgage payments current. Applicants must show that they make their living on the bay by producing the following: A) A current oyster harvester’s license or a letter from their employer stating that the applicant’s income has been substantially reduced due to the Gulf Fisheries Failure. B) Trip tickets from the last year showing that 80% of their annual income was derived from the bay or pay stubs/tax returns from their employment. C) Applicants must be engaged in the Employ Florida Market Place or show proof of employment. Applicants will be served on a first come, first served basis if they meet all of the selection criteria. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL76467 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34276361 Text FL76361 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityExperience Cooks & WaitstaffDependable transportation is a must. Apply in person at Bayside Burgers, 260 Hwy 98 in Eastpoint. Web ID# 34276321 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Accepting Applications for a Full Time RESERVATIONIST Great benefits. Requires previous sales experience & excellent computer skills. Schedule varies and includes weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34276380 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle Lease Purchase Option 700 sq ft, 1Br,, Fireplace, Washer & Dryer, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $380 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL76395 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 Investment Property, 1 Block off Hwy 98 2 Br 1.5 Ba. $55,000 404-710-4078 Text FL76210 to 56654 Apalachicola Holiday Special Lt 4 Blck 150 11th st R-1 zoning. $17,500 Call 850-653-8330 Shaun Donahoe Realty These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, January 2, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com Reduced! 29,000 850-899-5104 / 850-697-9010 www .co astalr ealtyinf o .co m E n j o y g r e a t v i e w s o f S t G e o r g e I s l a n d f r o m t h i s s p e c t a c u l a r b e a c h f r o n t l o t O v e r a n a c r e a n d a l m o s t 6 0 0 f e e t d e ep t h i s l o t p r o v i d e s a n i c e w o o d e d b u f f e r f r o m H w y 9 8 T he r e i s a w i d e w h i t e s a n d y b e a c h w i t h s a n d d u n e s a n d n a t u r a l v e g e t a t i o n T h i s i s o n e o f t he m o s t b e a u t i f u l s t r e t c he s o f b e a c h o n t he m a i n l a n d John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249989 $559,000 St. George Island LAR GE GULF VIEW HOME 5 B R p l u s o f c e 4 B A 2 n d L R w i t h w e t b a r a u t o l i g h t s i n h a l l & s t a i r w e l l s E l e v at o r H u g e K i t c h e n L a u n d r y V i s u a l I n t e r c o m S c r e e n e d Sp a T u b l a n d s c ap e d o n 2 l o t s w i t h p a l m t r e e s u n d e r h o u s e w o r k a r e a w i t h s i n k & s t o r a g e S t o r m S h u t t e r s E a s t P i n e A ve n u e Advertise Her e Contact The Times T oday (850) 277-7847 Y OUR HOMET OWN NEWSP APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS APER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS OWN NEWSP OUR HOMET Y T HE T IME S & C arrabelle A palachicola J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 250853 $89,900 St. George Island DR Y INTERIOR L OT T h i s r e m a r k a b l e l o t m a y e ve n p ro v i d e G u l f a n d B a y v i e w s f ro m 2 n d s t o r y at o p p i l i n g s L a r g e w e l l e s t a b l i s h e d p i n e t r e e s & o a k t r e e s a n d a w i d e v a r i e t y o f u p l a n d ve g e t at i o n f o u n d o n l y o n t h e d r i e s t o f l o t s l i k e c a c t u s & r e i n d e e r m o s s W e s t P i n e A ve n u e Crum said the woman replied. “I’d like to be home with my family instead of being trapped here by two bears at my front door and one at my back,” Crum said. Crum said the FWC dis patcher told her to get a pan and bang it to frighten the bears on her front porch away. She said she was bang ing the pan while still on the phone to FWC, but the bears didn’t retreat. Crum said she then told the dispatcher she was go ing to call a local television station about the situation. After she did so and the story was aired, Crum said FWC ofcers arrived the next day and set up an elec tric fence around the small shed where she stores her garbage until the regular Monday trash pick-up. Crum said the fence didn’t work, and the bears tore the door open again the day after Christmas. She said she since has learned that Ricky Banks of Eastpoint, a wildlife con trol technician, was on call on Christmas Eve and had dealt with another bear problem earlier that day. Terry Martin, an act ing lieutenant for the FWC, said FWC records show the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce dispatched an ofcer to Crum’s apartment at 9:13 p.m. Dec. 24 to deal with the bear. Crum said there is noth ing unusual about having bears around her apart ment. She said they come every night around 11 p.m. but on Christmas Eve, they were unusually early. She said earlier this year, she let her Chihuahua “Dodger” out into the yard and heard him barking. Crum said when she ran out, a bear cub had Dodger in its mouth and was about to carry the dog away. Crum shouted at the cub, which then dropped Dodger. The tiny dog was so trau matized by the experience, he refused to leave the house for several days, Crum said. “All he would do is shake,” she said, noting that Dodger was otherwise unhurt. She said bears have torn all the screens from the house next door. Crum said she believes the bears might be attracted by cat food left around her apartment. She said one neighbor has a cat door on his porch so the felines can access food there. Crum said a bear entered the porch to steal cat treats in the past, and FWC was not called. Crum said bears have also broken a neighbor’s truck window to obtain gar bage stored in the cab. BEARS from page A1 VISIT from page A1 Both girls are now at tending a private all-girl Catholic school. Tansy has taken up residence in the Kozlowsky guest room and Jada has the nished basement for her digs. “It’s the biggest room in the house,” Jada said. Sophia, who also has a room of her own, attends a Montessori school where her mother works as an ad ministrator. She said she has enjoyed having Jada and Tansy as “sisters.” “It was weird going from an only child to having two sisters,” she said. “It’s not only them learning our cul ture, we are learning about them too.” Sophia said she has learned only a few words of Chinese and does not plan to go to school in China. John Kozlowsky, patri arch to this bevy of beau ties, said, “I have my own bathroom now. It’s a lot of fun. The house is always busy. It’s always been busy but there’s a nice energy in the house now.” Elaine Kozlowsky said having the girls visit “has been the most fun for Christmas we’ve had. They are just delightful. We had cookie ghts last night and decorated ornaments for the Kozlowsky family tree.” What to Jada and Tansy have to say? They both agreed that the U.S. is clean and uncrowded com pared to home. “The sky is blue here,” said Tansy. “My city has so much manufacturing there is always smog. It is so pretty to see the trees and the ocean.” Jada said that in Nan jing, one could barely see the stars. Although Jada’s family is well-off, they live in an apartment, not a house. Tansy said her family shares a “tiny condomini um.” “People in the United States don’t have a good idea of what it’s like in Chi na,” said Jada. “They think China is a place that is very old, but, actually China has many places that are very new; many big, new cities.” She used her cell phone to show off a slide show of her homeland. Both girls said Ameri cans have no concept of the size of China. “I look at going there and I want to see the Great Wall and the ceramic war riors but they are so far apart,” Sandy Kozlowsky said, Jada said the trip be tween the two tourist at tractions would take two or three hours by air. She said she had seen the Great Wall, which lies in the north, but not the warriors. Tansy said she had seen the warriors, a more south ern destination, but not the Great Wall. Asked if Christmas is celebrated in China the girls said young people cel ebrate because it is a rea son for a party. They said, in the large cities, the streets are deco rated for Christmas in the shopping districts. Although they attend a Catholic school here, nei ther girl is a Christian. They said they attend monthly Mass at school but participate in no reli gious activity back home with their family in China. Jada said extended families are much closer in China. Her family makes two visits a year to her grandparents who live sev eral hours away. Tansy said her grand parents live near her home and are visited on a weekly basis. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times An electric fence installed by FWC failed to discourage the bears from digging through Kim Crum’s garbage. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times N O TI CE O F PUB LI C HEARIN G T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTI O N O F AN C O UNT Y O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s g i v en t h a t o n t h e 21s t d a y o f J a n u a r y 2014 a t 11:00 a.m. (E T), in t h e co ur t r o o m a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, w hic h i s lo c a t e d a t 33 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s s h a l l co n d uc t a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a co un t y o r din a n ce en t i t le d: A n Or din a n ce o f F ra n k lin C o un t y Flo r id a P r o v idin g F o r e R e m o va l o f D e b r i s F r o m P r i va t e l y O w n e d L a n d s D ur in g e T im e Of A S t a t e o f Em er g en c y ; P r o v idin g A n E e c t i v e D a t e e p u b lic i s in v i t e d t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic h e a r in g os e p er s o n s w h o desir e t o s p e a k r ega r din g t h e ado p t io n o f t h e o r din a n ce s h a l l b e g i v en a r e a s o n a b le o p p o r t uni t y t o s p e a k. e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h, a n d m a y b e v ie w e d a t, t h e o ce o f t h e C ler k o f C o ur t a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y C o ur t h o u s e w hic h i s lo c a t e d a t 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a. e m e et in g r o o m i s h a n dic a p acces si b le; h o w e v er t h os e p er s o n s w h o m a y r e q uir e s p e ci a l a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic m e et in g m u s t m a k e a r ra n g em en ts in ad va n ce b y c a l lin g dep u t y c ler k M ic h ae l M o r o n a t 850-653-8161, x100 a t le a s t t w o b u sin es s d a ys in ad va n ce o f t h e m e et in g A n y p er s o n w h o m a y desir e t o c h a l len g e t h e o u t co m e o f t h e p u b lic m e et in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r r e co r din g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e m e et in g