The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00250

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The last two months of the 2012-13 scal year tapered off, but the Tourist Development Council bed tax revenues still managed to nish almost 7 percent ahead of last year. Final numbers for the scal year showed that revenues totaled about $978,000, 6.8 percent ahead of last year’s $916,000 total. This increase of about $62,000 yielded the best year on record since the 2 percent bed tax began in 2005. TDC How the year went 2011-12 2012-13 Difference Change October $48,383 $53,543 $5,160 10.67% November $34,441 $40,334 $5,892 17.10% December $21,597 $21,510 $86 0.00% January $30,392 $33,657 $3,264 10.74% February $52,045 $49,365 $2,679 -5.15% March $66,597 $80,880 $14,282 21.44% April $81,641 $90,242 $8,601 10.53% May $140,203 $115,589 -$24,614 -17.52% June $143,805 $195,838 $52,032 36.18% July $140,000 $153,197 $13,197 9.43% August $93,912 $86,742 -$7,169 -7.63% September $63,037 $57,170 -$5,866 -9.30% County to get millions for parks, ramps, shoreline By DAVID ADLERSTEIN AND MATTHEW BEATON 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s shoreline and bay and seven of its parks and boat ramps will be the big bene ciaries as the county landed millions of dollars in proposed Gulf Coast restoration projects last week. The of cial announcement came Friday during an event at the Panama City Marina. The money comes as part of a 2011 BP settlement, which yielded $1 billion for early restoration projects. The dollars unveiled Dec. 6 were part of phase III of early restoration projects In May, the state announced $58 million in phase III projects, but then got an extra $88 million, with 28 proposed projects bene ting Florida’s eight counties most affected by the oil spill. Alabama, Florida Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas all received $100 million, while federal agencies received $200 million, and $300 million was set aside for additional state-proposed restoration projects. The projects are part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process. Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Herschel Vinyard was on hand Friday to tout the NRDA projects and what they could accomplish. “The philosophy that I have is: For us to have a healthy economy … you’ve got to have a healthy environment,” he said. “Nowhere else is this exhibited as much as right here in the Panhandle, where the economy is so tied to the natural beauty that we have.” Franklin County’s parks and boat ramps would get $1.78 million and Bald Apalachicola leaders cited for service By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Two longtime leaders of Apalachicola city government were surprised by honors at the regular city commission meeting Dec. 3. Mayor Van Johnson was speechless after his colleagues voted unanimously to rename the former Apalachicola High School campus, now operating as a center for community services, after him. At the conclusion of the meeting, longtime city commissioner Jimmy Elliott received a framed resolution by the Florida League of Cities in recognition of his 30 years of service as an elected of cial. At the meeting’s outset, Teachers to get $1,860 pay hike By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com County teachers at both the Apalachicola Bay Charter and Franklin County schools will receive a boost in their take-home pay this school year of about $1,700. By a 4-1 vote, with School Board Member David Hinton dissenting, the school board on Dec. 5 rati ed a one-year addendum to the existing three-year contract that will grant teachers at Franklin County School a $1,860 raise this school year, which translates to a net $1,662. The only teachers who won’t be getting the raise will be those in their rst year at the school. The reason for this is that when Gov. Rick Scott last spring earmarked additional school funding for raises statewide, it was specied they were to go to teachers who have been determined to have been evaluated as effective or highly effective during the 2012-13 school year. This statewide boost in funding also was sent to charter schools, and as a result, teachers at the ABC School, who are not part of the district’s collective bargaining unit, also will be getting raises. ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said 20 charter school teachers and three administrators will be getting a raise of about $1,700 in annual take-home pay. She said the decision to give the raises was made by the charter school board, based on INSIDE New contract makes changes to supplemental contracts, A5 Union, board ratify contract TDC revenues rise almost 7 percent for year PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN| the Times Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson sits in his of ce at the building that soon will bear his name. Below, City Commissioner Jimmy Elliott is presented a pin for his service by Sharon Berrian, associate director for membership development for Florida League of Cities Inc. See MILLIONS A5 See TDC A5 See CONTRACT A5 CITY LEADERS RECOGNIZED The honored few Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 See HONORED A9 Speaking to Santa, A2 VOL. 128 ISSUE 33 Air Force to host town hall tonight The United States Air Force in conjunction with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Forest Service will host a public town hall meeting tonight from 6-8 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Ave. The purpose of the town hall is to take questions from the public and provide answers regarding the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI) and how Tate’s Hell State Forest may play a role in support of low impact military training. For more info, call David Core, Florida Forest Service, at (850) 681-5800. Boat Parade of Lights Saturday Carrabelle’s Marine Street will be glowing with lights Saturday, and the River Walk is the place for watching the decked out boat regatta. Stroll with old friends, make some new ones, sip cider, and see Santa. Fun for the whole family! Vendors will be on Marine Street at 5 p.m. The Boat Parade will begin about 7 p.m. Fireworks will follow the boats. Santa will be at the Pavilion from 5-7 p.m. Community groups will be selling festival food, hot dogs, hamburgers, chicken ngers and Christmas goodies. Local vendors will have unique gifts. Shops in Carrabelle will be open! Entertainment by “Swiftwater” on stage on Marine St. Winners and awards will be announced at C-Quarters Marina after the parade, where music will be provided by Debbie Jordan. Free workshop on monarch butter ies Dr. Richard Rubino will speak from 5-6 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 18, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Nature Center 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Volunteers are needed to gather research data for the second annual Northern Gulf Coast Monarch Butter y Count. The project runs through January and February; just observe when you can, record data, and report it. Potential participants and just-plain-curious folks are both welcome to attend Rubino’s lecture xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, December 12, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, December 12, 2013 % "" " % " $ ') ?5 # 1%1 &1 >7 5 ? 3 3 <7 ? ? 7 : ? C 4C ? 3 7 3 B 7 6 4? 6 : >7 3 47 7: 7 7 5 76 @ 75 ? 35 5 6 3 5 7 ? > > 7 B 3 7 5 ? : ? 5 3 ? 4? 6 3 5 A3 <7 3 6 >7 3 B ? 5 3 4B 7 65 C 7 # & 5 7 7 = 3 1&# 1 5A ?B? < 5 ? & ! 3 ? < ? 6 35 A 3< 7 3 7 3 3 ? B 34 B 7 : C > 7 5 ? 3 3 < 7 # B 73 7 53 B B ) 3 3 7 ) 5 3 >7 5 ? 3 3 < 7 ::? 5 7 1 8 8 3 B 3 6 ? 5B 7, 3B B 3> 3 77, B ? 63 & & &2 3 % 2 % 1 8 7 C 3 ?B @ 3 4? B ? 7 # 5 C @ 3 7 5 4? B ? 7 # 5 C # # ? 6 6 3 6 7 : C 3 5 7 6 7 ? 7 6 : 3 B B 3 5 A3 <7 7 1, # ) 7 3 B 7 6 4? 6 >3 B B 47 7 5 7 ? 7 6 4B ? 5 B 7 3 6 3 B 6 >7 : B B ? < 63 7 3 6 B 5 3 ? .,. 4 + $ ) 24 2 2 / *3 *, 1 2 3 2 4 4 2 2 1 *4 + ) . $ *3 *, 1 2 3 *$ 3 2 * >? @ 7 5 ? 3 7 67 3 B B 67 6 @ 7 5 3 6 C 5 C B ? > >7 + ) 7 3 C 7 : 3 4 7 67 3 B 3 ? 35 5 7 < 3 6 ? < > 7 /' 7 3? B ? < 3< 7 ( 3 7 9 : 3 AB ? B ? 63 >7 + # ) # 7 3 C 7 : C C 7 5 7 5 C ? 5 7 7 B C 7 6C ? ? 3 ? ? ? 6? < 3 ? 3 B : 6? < : >? @ 7 5 7 C 7 $ # = 8 &%%2 # >7 + # ) # 7 3 C 7 : ? < 3 6 + 43 7 7 B C 7 C C ? 7 7 B C 7 B 5 A 3 < 3 C ? ? 6? < 3 ? 3 B : 6? < : >? @ 7 5 3 5 $ 11 =$ 8 1 2# >7 5 ? 3 3 <7 7 7 7 >7 ? <> 3 ? 7 3 ? 7 7 47 ? 7 7 : >7 7 # Coupon Expir es: 12-31-13 CODE: AP00 P ic tur e P er f ec t F r ame S hop GO IN G O U T O F B US INESS P ic t ur e P er f e c t F ra m e S h o p 223 R eid A v e P o r t S t. J o e a n k Y o u t o a l l o ur l o y a l c u st o me rs o v e r the p ast 21 y e a rs! W e ha v e s o l d o ur b ui l din g a nd w i l l b e r e t ir in g a t the e nd o f thi s y e a r! A l l R e d di-M ad e fr a mes & P r e-c ut M a ts a r e H ALF P RI CE! W e w a n t t o w e l c o me Be ac h R e a lt y t o thi s l o c a t i o n! By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com This year’s celebra tion of Santa Claus on St. George Island was low-key but homey, and very much in the holiday spirit. Organizer Beth Brinkley said her committee decided to downsize the gifts dis tributed to youngsters at the celebration and donate more of the money raised to the Franklin Toy Project in view of hard times for many county families. Children who visited Santa this year received re usable backpacks given by the St. George Island Busi ness Association. Each pack contained fruit, candy and trinkets. There was also free cocoa and cook ies for good little girls and boys. Brinkley said about 100 children came to see Santa this year, signicantly down from a peak of more than 300 two years ago. “We had good com ments from the kids who did attend,” said Brinkley. “They were very excited to get their packs.” Two years ago, the cel ebration ran short of toys, forcing a last-minute trip to the Dollar General in East point. This year, there were actually some left over. Brinkley said leftover baked goods were donated to the Holy Family Senior Center and leftover fruit was given to the Apalachic ola Food Bank. Once again, Santa’s faithful helper Chris Greggs, an employee of Resort Vacation Rentals, rode the re engine to Lighthouse Park. Brinkley said she wished to thank all of the island businesses who do nated to make the celebra tion possible. In addition to buying treats for the kiddies, some money was spent to repair and upgrade the holiday lighting at the center of the island this year. A homey holiday on the Island HO, hH O, hH O ON T hH E HILL Photos by LOILOI S SWO O B O O DA | The Times Brooklyn Pumphrey of Eastpoint was content on Santa’s knee but her brother Jordan needed a little cajoling by mom Samantha Carpenter to join in the festivities. Photos by DAVI I D ADLE LE RSTEIN TEIN | The Times Arriving on an Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department truck, Santa Claus paid a special visit to the Hill Saturday morning, listening to children’s wishes in the parking lot of AJ’s Neighborhood Bar and Grill. The event, sponsored by AJ’s, H’COLA, SWAT and Centennial Bank, featured music provided by Mayor Van Johnson. Each of the children left with a goody bag lled with fresh fruit, and hopes for a Merry Christmas. Children are clockwise, from top, are Breona O’Neal, Kloe Walker and 6-month old Tamina King.

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H o l i d ay Dea d l i n es C h r i s t ma s W e e k W e d n e s d a y D e c e m b e r 1 8 t h b y 2 p m S ant a L e t t e r s W e d n e s d a y D e c e m b e r 1 8 t h b y 2 p m N e w Y e a r s W e e k M o n d a y D e c e m b e r 3 0 t h b y 2 p m e S t a r a n d T i m e s w i s h y o u a l l a v e r y h ap p y a n d h e a l t h y h o l i d a y s e a s o n T o a l l o w o u r st a t o e n j o y t h e h o l i d a y w i t h t h e i r f a m i l i e s t h e f o l l o w i n g e a r l y d e a d l i n e s h a v e be e n s e t P l e a s e r e s e r v e y o u r s p a c e e a r l y W e ap p r e c i at e y o u r b u s i n e s s a n d l o o k f o r w a r d t o w o r k i n g w i t h y o u n e x t y e a r Countyw ide Holiday Events 3 … g ~g mwym„~g 8w‰ y‹ € g ‹ 8q~qk‰ g y„‚ L„ ”A    :q mA Dy‹ „‰ ym :„ • ‚  „ • ‚ 3 … g ~g mwym„~g † ‰ s r u z q  s ‰ ; l p 7 1 £ R ‹ Ÿ › R Ÿ ‰ ‚ – ~ Œ „ ‰ ” ” ‰ ‚ ~ Ÿ Ÿ ~ „ y w m  m T • m ‹ 9 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com It wasn’t St. Nick arriving early on the roof of the CVS pharmacy in Apalachicola on Sunday night. A man carrying prescription drugs was arrested early Monday morning after police spotted him climbing down a ladder at the rear of the store located at 139 Avenue E. The subject, Marcus Dewayne Kelley, 38, of Bristol, was ordered to come down to the ground, where he was handcuffed, placed in custody and transported to the Franklin County jail. At approximately 3 a.m., Apalachicola Police Ofcer Ginger Creamer responded to a dispatch call reporting that a breaking and entering was in progress, after the store’s security company contacted the dispatcher. Together with Creamer, Sheriff Deputies Chase Richards and Kevin Shuman arrived on the scene, after being advised the suspect was wearing a white t-shirt and most likely entered through the roof. The intruder was still inside the CVS pharmacy store when police arrived. The three ofcers spotted Kelley on the CVS roof attempting to climb down a ladder onto the rooftop of a storage shed located at the rear of the store. The ofcers on scene were joined by Sheriff Ofce Sgt. Goldie Harris and the scene was investigated and photographed. It was determined Kelley used ladders stolen from Ron Smith. who lives a block from the CVS, to mount the roof. Local contractor Erin Rodriguez, who also lives within a few blocks of the store, said Kelley was apprehended with a tool satchel from Rodriguez’s truck. He said metal cutters, pliers and a hammer from the tool kit were used to cut through the CVS roof. Investigating ofcers estimated there was several thousand dollars in damage to the building. Rodriguez said he was impressed with the efciency and professionalism of both the city and county police ofcers involved in the investigation. He said they awakened him at around 4 a.m. to identify his equipment and the tools were quickly returned to him. According to the police report, Kelley gained entrance through the roof and ceiling of the pharmacy and removed multiple bottles of hydrocodone tablets. At 9 a.m. Monday morning, CVS staffers were cleaning the oor at the site of the break in, where a large portion of the suspended ceiling in front of the pharmacist’s counter was missing. A small hole was visible in the roof. In addition to two counts of grand theft of the medication and possession of burglary of tools, Kelley is also being charged with resisting ofcer without violence, burglary of a structure, possession of a controlled substance and criminal mischief. On July 8, Kelley, also known as “Fixit,” was sentenced in Franklin County Circuit Court to two years’ probation for committing felony battery in a July 6, 2012 incident. According to a blog posting by Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, Kelley had recently been released from the Liberty County Jail in Bristol. Drug store burglar nabbed on the roof LOIS SWOBODA | The Times CVS employee John Goodman points to the hole in the roof where Kelley entered the drug store. M aA RCU sS DE waWA YNE KE llLL EY Robin Myers, the assis tant state attorney in Apala chicola, left his position last month. According to Carol Houck, human re source administrator for Willie Meggs, the state attorney for the 2nd Judicial Circuit, Myers resigned Nov. 5 for personal reasons. Apalachicola’s other assistant state attorney, Jared Pat terson, will now become the ofce’s lead attorney, Houck said. A young female attor ney is expected to join the ofce Monday. Moving into Patter son’s position will be Emily Frazier, who will begin Monday. Houck said Frazier is new to the state attorney’s ofce, af ter graduating in May from the University of Florida’s College of Law. Houck holds a bachelor’s of science degree in psychology from the University of Cen tral Florida, and has worked for the Agency for Health Care Administration and the guardian ad litem program. Myers leaves position RobiROBI N MYER sS The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Dec. 3: James E. Pilotti, 27, Apalachicola, assault on a law enforcement ofcer (FCSO) Dec. 4: Samuel S. Harris, 29, Clarksville, violation of probation (FCSO) Dec. 6: Joshua L. Pilotti, 24, Apalachicola, resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Dec. 7: Timothy J. Carpenter, 21, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Dec. 8: Johnathyn D. Crum, 21, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Dec. 9: Roland M. Schoelles, 48, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Marcus D. Kelley, 38, Bristol, two counts of grand theft, resisting officer without violence, burglary of a structure, possession of burglary tools, possession of a controlled substance and criminal mischief (APD) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO). Arrest REP oO RT G oO VERN mM ENT oO FF iI CE sS a A NN oO UNCE H olidaOLIDA Y C losiLOSI N gsGS Carrabelle City Hall will be closed Dec. 24 25 and will be open only until noon on New Year’s Eve. It will be closed on New Year’s Day. Apalachicola city ofces will be closed Dec. 24 -26, as well as New Year’s Day. The Franklin County Courthouse also will be closed Dec. 24 26 and New Year’s Day. The Apalachicola Municipal Library will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Dec. 24 and 26, and closed on Christmas Day and New Year’s Days. The county libraries in Eastpoint and Carrabelle will be closed Dec. 24 -26 and on New Year’s Day. Law Enforcement The Times | A3 Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Some 47 million Americans live in poverty, and a key reason is the decline of the minimum wage. First established under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, the nationwide minimum wage was designed to lift millions of American workers out of poverty and to stimulate the economy. Unfortunately, however, it was not indexed to in ation, and big businesses -hostile from the start -fought, often successfully, to prevent congressional action to raise it. As a result, over the past 40 years, the purchasing power of the minimum wage has fallen sharply. If Congress had kept the minimum wage in pace with in ation over this period, it would today be $10.74. But, in fact, it is $7.25 -about two-thirds of its previous purchasing power. A major consequence is that increasing numbers of workers and their families live in poverty. The annual salary of a full-time American worker employed at $7.25 per hour is $15,080 -less than the of cial federal government poverty level for a family of two. The poverty level for a family of four is $23,550 -considerably beyond what a minimumwage worker earns. At the same time, the rich have grown far richer. Between 1968 and 2012, as the minimum wage declined in value, the top 1 percent of households doubled their share of the nation’s income. The typical CEO of a big business received a 16 percent raise in 2012 -to $15.1 million. That year, the pay of Wal-Mart’s CEO, Mike Duke, rose 14 percent, to $20.7 million. By contrast, Walmart -the largest employer in the United States -pays its sales associates an average wage of $8.81 an hour. It is much the same story at McDonald’s, which employs large numbers of low wage workers. In 2012, the CEO of McDonald’s was paid $27.7 million. Although his income roughly tripled in 2012, the income of McDonald’s fast food workers remained abysmal. Thanks to this pattern, the U.S. now has the most unequal distribution of income in the industrialized world. Another consequence of keeping the minimum wage low is that, by underpaying workers, corporations are shifting the real costs of doing business to the general public. According to a study released by the University of California and the University of Illinois, 52 percent of America’s fast food workers receive assistance from public programs thanks to their poverty-level wages. As a result, taxpayers are contributing $7 billion per year to pick up the cost of supporting these workers. The study estimates that public assistance to McDonald’s workers alone amounts to $1.2 billion a year -the equivalent of onefth of that corporation’s annual pro ts. Taxpayers are also paying enormous amounts to support the impoverished employees of Walmart and other giant companies. Many people have recognized the negative consequences of letting the minimum wage dwindle to insigni cance. Twenty states and the District of Columbia have raised their minimum wages higher than the $7.25 federal rate. Congress is currently considering the Fair Minimum Wage Act that would gradually raise the minimum wage to $10.10 in three steps and then index it to the cost of living. In addition, more than 120 cities across the United States have adopted “living wage” ordinances that require employers bene tting from publicly funded service contracts or economic development subsidies to pay wages higher than the state or federal minimums. Taking matters into their own hands, desperate workers in low-wage establishments, such as Walmart, McDonald’s, Burger King, and Wendy’s have begun staging walkouts, demanding higher wages. This August, workers protested at nearly 1,000 fast-food restaurants in more than 50 cities, demanding $15 per hour. Polls also show that the overwhelming majority of the American people support raising the minimum wage. So why not do it? The major objection trumpeted by the corporations and their apologists is that raising the minimum wage would lead to a loss of jobs. But sophisticated studies by economists have reported little or no effect on employment of raising the minimum wage. Summarizing the studies earlier this year, Paul Krugman -the Nobel Prize-winning economist -declared: “The great preponderance of the evidence ... points to little if any negative effect of minimum wage increases on employment.” Why is this the case? One reason is that, with a higher wage, workers stay on the job longer, thus increasing labor ef ciency and decreasing the cost of recruitment and retraining. Another is that two-thirds of minimum wage workers are employed by large businesses, which can easily afford higher wages (though they’d rather not pay them). Walmart, for example, had $469 billion in sales and $17 billion in pro ts in 2012. The number of jobs, however, is not really the crucial issue. What is the crucial issue is the kind of jobs. Another objection is that low-wage workers are mostly teenagers, who don’t have to support a family. But people over the age of 20 constitute more than 88 percent of the 30 million American workers who would receive a raise if the federal minimum wage were increased to $10.10 an hour. These are adults -many of them married and, also, parents. Still another objection is that, in a struggling economy, raising the minimum wage would be bad for business. But, in fact, consumer spending drives 70 percent of the economy, and those at the lower end of the economic spectrum, out of necessity, spend a larger portion of their income than do the wealthy. And so it makes good sense to raise the minimum wage to a level that adequately supports working Americans and their families. Dr. Lawrence Wittner (http://lawrenceswittner. com) is professor of history emeritus at SUNY/ Albany and writes for PeaceVoice. By Heidi Liss Radunovich, PhD Special to the Times When we think of the holidays, we often think about family, togetherness, giving, and celebrating. While the holiday season should be a time of enjoyment, there are many events associated with the season that can cause stress. First, traveling during the winter season can be challenging. Traf c, crowded airports, ight delays, bad weather, and unhappy children can leave us feeling tired and stressed. During the holiday season, we often feel a need to spend more money than we can truly afford, spend more time on seasonal projects than what we have, and attend more events than we really should. If we choose not to overextend ourselves, then we may feel guilty about our inability to do more. There are also family gatherings that could mean more togetherness than we are accustomed to and may entail many people grouped in small spaces for long periods of time. Finally, with so much happening, little time is left to take care of ourselves, and our physical and emotional resources may become depleted. While some stress can help motivate us to be productive, too much stress can harm our health and reduce our enjoyment of the season. Ways to manage stress during the holidays 1. Plan Ahead and Get Organized: Many of us are so busy with our daily lives that we often don’t feel as though we have time to plan ahead for the holidays. Taking care of things ahead of time, such as shopping for gifts and completing holiday cards, reduces your workload as you near the holidays, but many people don’t have that option. Here are some ways to plan and get organized. Even if your time for doing things in advance is limited, doing things a few minutes every day can help save time and reduce stress as the holidays approach. For example, having lists of what to buy and from where can prevent multiple trips to the same store. Ultimately, taking a small amount of time now for planning can mean a big savings in time and stress in the future. Create lists of everything that needs to be done and bought, and create a schedule for the coming weeks to break down what you will do and when. It can be reassuring to see that you can manage all of the work that needs to be done. If your schedule shows that you will be unable to nish everything in time, however, then skip the lower priority items on your list. Set a budget for your Christmas shopping, and plan how much you can spend for each person on your list. If you keep your spending limited to what you can afford, then you’ll feel much less stressed later. 2. Set Realistic Expectations: Many of the images we see in movies and on TV can lead us to believe that a “perfect” holiday is realistic, and we may feel pressured to expect too much from ourselves, others, and the holiday itself. Rather than expecting your holiday to be “perfect,” focus on the real meaning of the season. The ultimate goal is to enjoy quality time with the people you care about. Here are some ways to keep your expectations in check: Remember that life is full of things that go wrong, and anticipating perfection can lead to disappointment. Instead, expect that things won’t be perfect, and view the problems that occur as an opportunity for a good story in the future. Remind yourself that it is OK if people don’t always get along, if there are travel delays, or if the dcor or food options aren’t perfect. Focus on enjoying the positive moments as much as possible. Finally, take time to really think about what events you will attend (or host) and for how long, keeping in mind that sometimes less is more. Trying to attend every party or spend every possible moment with family might not always be the best plan, and it can leave you stressed and unhappy. 3. Take Care of Yourself: When we’re feeling stressed we’re much more likely to neglect our needs, but that is when we need to take care of ourselves the most. Making sure we eat healthy foods, exercise, get plenty of rest, and relax helps bolster us and renews our physical and emotional resources. Here are some ways to take care of yourself during the holidays: Minimize indulgence. During the holidays, it is tempting to eat too much unhealthy food, drink too much alcohol, skip the exercise, and stay up too late. Although a little indulgence is ok, forgetting to take care of ourselves day after day leaves us physically and emotionally drained and unable to handle the stressors that will come our way. If you enjoy trying all the different goodies at a party, make sure to just try a little bit of each. Focus on the healthier foods, such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and lean meats. You may also want to ask yourself if you are truly hungry or simply eating because food is available. If you are up late one night because of a party or gift-wrapping session, make sure you go to bed early the next night. Increase your physical activity by walking after meals and taking stairs rather than elevators. Even walking in the mall can be a great source of exercise. Finally, take some time for yourself, even if it’s only a few minutes while you’re lying in bed in the morning. Hot baths or showers are relaxing, and reading can be a great escape. Some people also nd meditation helpful. There may even be seasonal rituals that help you feel centered and relaxed, such as singing or lighting candles. Everyone is different, so you will need to gure out what activity provides a good way for you to take a break and decompress. Making sure we eat healthy foods, exercise, get plenty of rest, and relax helps bolster us and renews our physical and emotional resources. 4. Manage Your Thoughts: The way you think about things can have a big impact on how stressful an event is for you. If you experience the same event as someone else, but you both have different thoughts about it, then that can affect the way you feel. Once we are upset, it can be hard to think of things differently, but trying to take another perspective can help. For example, if a clerk at the airport is rude, rather than taking it personally, you could think that maybe this person is having a bad day. Finally, reframing the dif culties in a more positive way can help us have a sense of gratitude. For example, even though it’s annoying to get a at tire when you’re getting ready to leave, it’s better than it happening on the road or highway where it could cause an accident. Remember that the better you’re able to manage your thoughts, the more you’ll enjoy yourself. Heidi Liss Radunovich is an assistant professor and human development specialist, for the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, UF/IFAS Extension. How to manage your stress throughout the holiday season HEIDI RADUNOVICH Guest Columnist USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, December 12, 2013 A Page 4 Section Raising the inadequate minimum wage to an acceptable level Expanded ballpark will disrupt peace and quiet To the honorable county commissioners of Franklin County, we would like to go on record as stating that we are vehemently opposed to the rezoning and expansion of D.W. Wilson County Ballpark that is adjacent to our home. The proposed expansion of the fence will be approximately 40 feet from our fence. This expansion will create a noise factor that will disrupt our right to peace and quiet. The U.S. Supreme Court has recognized the rights of residents to maintain their privacy, and quiet enjoyment of one’s property. The Florida Constitution, Article 11, Section 7 states “it shall be the policy of the state to conserve and protect its natural resources and scenic beauty. Adequate provisions shall be made by law for the abatement of air and water pollution and excessive and unnecessary noise.” We know that you will want to take into consideration our civil rights, and the fact that we have lived here all of our lives as an integral part of the community! Perhaps a better location for the ballpark expansion would be a Battery Park, where the noise would not be a problem, and be a draw for locals and tourists. It could possibly increase tourism and create jobs and money for the county, especially if some public areas for children and pets were added. We have attempted to communicate with different member of our county commission to no avail. The county attorney has not returned our calls and we have expressed our concerns as this relates to the Franklin County Code of Ordinances. In general terms, Section 14-4 line 7 states “Streets, roads, parks or other public areas must be given distinctive designations that are in harmony with existing similar facilities, and do not duplicate or con ict with existing designations.” The expansion of the Ball Park within 40 feet of our home would be a detriment that would diminish the quality of our lives with the noise it would create. We implore you to look for another location for the expansion. Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Rickards Apalachicola LAWRENCE WITTNER Guest Columnist Letter to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, December 12, 2013 Point State Park $470,800, with another $262,989 for a Sand Beach boardwalk and improvements at Cash Bayou. Speci cally in Apalachicola, the county parks and boat ramps would go toward additional docks at the existing Abercrombie boat launch facility; and an enhancement to Seafood Workers Landing at the former Lombardi property of existing parking and adjacent tie-up docks, as well as an existing onsite building to serve as an information center and dockmaster of ce. In Eastpoint, Indian Creek Park would construct restroom facilities; connect them to an existing central wastewater facility nearby; and renovate the existing boat ramp, bulkhead and parking area at the boat launch facility. Also, new restrooms and a holding tank would be constructed at the existing public Eastpoint Fishing Pier. At Cash Bayou and Sand Beach north of Eastpoint, there would be construction of a boardwalk on the quarter-mile Sand Beach interpretive trail and the construction of a shing and wildlife observation structure and associated parking at Cash Bayou. On St. George Island, new restrooms and a holding tank would be built, and the existing bulkhead renovated, at the St. George Island Fishing Pier. At Bald Point State Park in Alligator Point, construction would be made of picnic pavilions, boardwalks and a restroom with an associated aerobic treatment system and drain eld. Also, a boardwalk and oating dock for use as a canoe/ kayak launch would be constructed at the park. Another $775,605 in NRDA monies will go to the Florida Cat Point Living Shoreline project, designed to address adverse effects of the spill on the productivity of the sea bottom and salt marsh habitats. The project seeks to foster reef development and salt marsh habitat by constructing breakwaters and planting salt marsh vegetation. The project intends to expand on an existing breakwater on-site of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Of ce Complex and Nature Center in Eastpoint. The area has been the location of previous successful living shorelines projects. Breakwaters would be constructed to protect the embayment and the created salt marsh habitat. The living shoreline technique will be employed along approximately onethird of a mile of shoreline and create approximately one acre of salt marsh habitat. Another multimilliondollar chunk of money will go toward four regional projects in the Panhandle, and Franklin County gures into these in a big way. A proposed $5.37 oyster cultch placement project would take place in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Bay and Franklin counties, by placing cultch material for the settling of oyster larvae and oyster colonization in the three bays. Apalachicola Bay would include placing 18,000 cubic yards of cultch material over a 90-acre area. Pensacola Bay and St. Andrews Bay would include placing 12,000 cubic yards of cultch material over 60 acres in each bay system. The proposed $2.69 million Florida Seagrass Recovery Project primarily will be located in St. Joseph Bay Aquatic Preserve in Gulf County, with potential additional sites in Alligator Harbor Aquatic Preserve and St. Andrews Aquatic Preserve in Bay County. The rst step of the project would be surveying and mapping the seagrass scarring in the three aquatic preserves. The next step would involve placement of sediment tubes across two acres of seagrass propeller scars. The nal step would involve the placement of bird stakes in the project area to facilitate restoration. Additionally, a boater outreach and education component of the project will install shallow seagrass area signage, update existing signage and buoys where applicable, and install educational signage and provide educational brochures about best practices for protecting seagrass habitats at popular boat ramps in St. Joseph Bay, Alligator Harbor and St. Andrews Bay. Another $2.89 million scallop enhancement for increased recreational shing opportunity would be implemented in Bay, Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, and possibly Okaloosa and Walton counties. Scallop populations in Gulf and Franklin counties may be enhanced if deemed appropriate to reduce the risk of collapse in currently harvested areas. The phase III projects haven’t been nalized yet. There are two more public meetings to gather feedback: Jan. 28 in Pensacola and Jan. 29 in Panama City. The public comment period ends Feb. 4. If all goes according to plan, the nal agreement will be inked with BP in June, and the money will start owing in the summer. Projects vary in length, with the longest running about ve years, state of cials said. ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! N O TI CE O F S P ECI AL MEE TIN G e B o a r d o f C o mmi s sio n er s o f t h e N o r t h w es t Flo r id a R eg io n a l H o u sin g A u t h o r i t y w i l l h o ld a S p e ci a l M e et in g o n D e cem b er 17, 2013, a t t h e H o lid a y I nn & S ui t es, 2725 G ra v es R o ad T a l l a h a s s e e Flo r id a. M e et in g w i l l b eg in a t 1:00 p .m. E.S.T e m e et in g w i l l b e o p en t o t h e p u b lic. is Y e a r ’ s L o c a t i o n C o m i ng F r a s e r F i r 5 t o 10 STANDARDIZING THE SUPPLEMENTALS The new contract makes several changes to the list of supplemental contracts, with many of the details to be further reviewed by the school board early next year. • A new supplemental position for Flag Corps was created with $500 to be added to this new position. The board will create a new job description for this position. • The supplement for the Odyssey of the Mind advisor will double, from $750 to $1,500. • The athletic director and head football coach each will receive a supplement equal to 14 percent of a starting teacher’s $32,960 base salary, or $4,614. • The head girls and boys basketball coaches will receive 10 percent of base salary, or $3,296. • The head volleyball, softball and baseball coaches each will receive 9 percent of base salary, or $2,966. • The head boys and girls soccer coaches each will receive 8 percent of base salary, or $2,637. • The head track and eld and cheerleading coaches, as well as assistant varsity and middle school football coaches, each will receive 6 percent of base salary, or $1,978. • The assistant varsity boys, and middle school girls and boys, basketball coaches, as well as assistant coaches of volleyball, softball and baseball, each will get 5.5 percent of base salary, or $1,813. • The head girls golf coach, and weightlifting coach, each will get 5 percent of base salary, or $1,648. • The assistant boys and girls soccer coaches will each get 4 percent of base salary, of $1,318. • The middle school volleyball, softball and baseball coaches, as well as the assistant track and eld coach, each will receive 3.5 percent of base salary, or $1,154. • The middle school cheerleading coach will receive 3 percent of base salary, or $989. • The clock operators and ticket collectors at athletic events will continue to be paid $25 per event. CONTRACT from page A1 discussion of her recommendations. She said it was decided that any rst-year teachers at the school who taught last year in Florida were eligible for the raises. Rati cation of the contract addendum by the school board came after two of them questioned why none of the non-instructional support staff would be receiving raises. “I’m very much concerned about (that),” Hinton said. “I cannot believe there’s not a salary increase for everyone concerned.” School Board Chair Jimmy Gander said it was his understanding the matter was out of the board’s hands, because the school board was not legally entitled to shift the money to support staffers. “We have a choice now to approve it or not to approve it,” Hinton said. “Is it the union that does not want to share with support staff?” Board Member Teresa Ann Martin asked. Cathy Wood, who leads the local teacher’s union, took issue with the term “sharing” and said it was the teachers union’s determination the money was to go strictly for “evaluated instructional personnel.” She said the school district could have, but chose not to, extend about $18,000 of its own funds for a raise to support staff. This, she contended, was despite having approved two recent additional hires at a pay rate above their predecessors. “We furloughed last year. We already helped the cause,” Wood said. Wood said about 60 teachers at the school were slated to be granted the raise, which covers the period from July 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014. She estimated the raise would cost a total of about $129,000. Wood said all teachers and support staff, whether or not they were members of the union, were eligible to cast ballots on the contract Dec. 3. She said about 97 percent of the teaching staff voted yes, while about 80 percent of the support staff were in favor of the deal. Talks between the teachers, who were assisted by Florida Education Association staffer Paul Burdett, and the administration, assisted by Tallahassee labor attorney Leonard Dietzen, had been ongoing for much of the calendar year. Wood represented the local rank-andle among the teachers, and Tammy Sasnett represented the support staff. In addition to the pay hike, the deal approves changes to the sick leave policy and health insurance reimbursement. Wood said both sides agreed there needed to be changes that would make it easier for employees to transfer sick leave to co-workers. The board plans to now adopt a revised sick leave policy in keeping with Florida statutes. In addition, Wood said, the school board agreed to pay all current employees $2,500 if an employee who now has health insurance with the school district decides to disenroll from the school board’s policy and obtain health insurance through another carrier, such as a spouse’s plan. Upon proof of new insurance, the school board agreed to pay the $2,500 annually in 24 payments on a prorata basis. The two sides also agreed to a revision to the “differentiated pay plan,” which entails more than $64,000 in supplemental contracts granted to various coaches and extracurricular activity sponsors. TDC from page A1 of cials said this represented a revenue increase of more than $3 million for Franklin County lodging companies alone, as well as a boost to other tourist-related businesses. The increase in collections came despite drops in monthly revenues for both August and September. In August, revenue collections from overnight accommodation providers slid about 7.6 percent, from about $94,000 in 2012 to almost $87,000 this year, which is still the second best August on record. In September, revenues dropped by 9.3 percent, from $63,000 in 2012 to about $57,000 this year, which is slightly below the total in September 2011. The best month of this scal year was in June, which brought in a whopping $196,000 in bed tax revenues, a 36 percent hike over the year before, when it ran about $144,000. The biggest drop came in May, which yielded only about $116,000, about $25,000 less than the year before, and only the fourth best May on record. With the exception of a slight drop in the 2008-9 scal year, TDC revenues have increased every year since the tax was put into place in 2005, beginning with about $698,000 in its rst complete scal year of existence. Franklin County’s tourism marketing efforts are currently funded through a 2 percent tourism tax collected from visitors by lodging providers countywide. Commissioners have shelved a proposal to double the bed tax to 4 percent, which would bring in approximately $800,000 more per year to TDC coffers. MILLIONS from page A1 SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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C L A R E N C E i s a n 8 w e e k o l d t e r r i e r / C h i huahua an d i s so m e k i n d o f c u t e H e i s s o c i al an d hap p y an d h a s an at t i t u d e H e h a s n o i d e a h e o n l y w e i g h s 3 p o u n d s T h i s l i t t l e g u y w i l l be a s m a l l d og a n d w i l l m a k e a g r e a t pet f o r s o me o n e l o o k i n g t o a d op t a p o r t a b l e p u p V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s pe ra t e l y n e e d e d t o soci a l i z e a l l o f o u r d og s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a ys l oo k i n g f o r pe o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r a n i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o be f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s An y t i m e y o u c an s p ar e w o u l d b e g r ea t l y ap p r e c i a t e d. C a l l Ka r e n a t 6 7 0 -8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d et a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F ra n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a n e Soci et y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R oa d 6 5 i n E a s tp o i n t Y o u m a y l og o n t o t h e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n pet s o r g t o s e e m o r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. OF THE WEEK PET 227.7847 Franklin County Humane Society S e e Y o u r Bu s in e s s Name a n d I n f o Her e f o r O N L Y $ 1 5 p e r w e ek $ 6 0 p e r m o n t h Ca l l T o d a y 4 51 6 7 9 8 I t ’ s t im e t o g o t hr o ug h y o ur c los ets f o r t h os e un wa n t e d p a ir s o f s h o es, in r e a s o n a b le co n di t io n. Y o u c a n b r in g t h e s h o es t o C o a s t a l F o o t a n d A n k le C linic lo c a t e d a t 221 HWY 98. D o n a t io n s w i l l g o t o F ra n k lin ’ s P r o mi s e a n d w i l l b e di s t r i b u t e d a t t h e C o mm uni t y S er v ice C en t er (O ld A p a l ac hico l a H ig h S c h o o l) a t 192 14t h S t r e et in A p a l ac hico l a. Di s t r i b u t io n w i l l b e D e cem b er 3r d a n d 17t h f r o m 9:00a m t o 12:00p m. i s p r o ud t o a nn o un ce t h e i s n o w un der wa y H e l p t h os e in n e e d Y ou can call 653-FEET (3338) for more infor mation. 12th Annual SHO E DRIV E BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Society A6 | The Times Thursday, December 12, 2013 By J ACOB L. DILLON Special to the Times An Eastpoint native, attached to Navy Recruiting District Houston, received national recognition by receiving an award from Navy Recruiting Command Nov. 20. Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Thomas Bosarge, the nuclear programs coordinator for NRD Houston, beat out 25 other contenders and was recognized as the Navy’s Nuclear Field Coordinator of the Year for the 2013 scal year. Bosarge has been in the Navy for nearly 11 years. As the nuclear programs coordinator for NRD Houston, he ensures the proper screening and processing of all nuclearquali ed Navy applicants for 43 recruiting stations in Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas. Bosarge is humbled and thankful for receiving this honor. “This is truly an honor, being able to say I made it to the top is an experience I will always treasure,” he said. “I would like to thank all the people who made this possible, from the recruiters that nd the applicants, to the classi ers, processors, and shipping clerks who ensure the records are error free. And a special thanks to my Navy Recruiting Command nuclear chain of command, as well as my immediate chain of command for the continuous leadership and mentorship they all provide.” Bosarge passes this mentorship and leadership down to the young men and women he puts into the Navy’s nuclear programs. “The favorite part of my job is getting to interact with the youth of today, they are the future of the Navy,” he said. “I tell all of them to set themselves up for the future and be the best they can be. I tell them to not let people stand in the way and keep you down, rise above them and do not let an opportunity pass you by.” Bosarge enlisted in the U.S. Navy in Jan. 2003. Following 18 months of training at Navy Nuclear Power Training Command “A” School in Charleston, SC, where he progressed through Power School and Prototype as the class leader, he was assigned to the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in Norfolk, Va. He rose quickly through the ranks and completed his nuclear and warfare quali cations a full six months ahead of his peers and was advanced to petty of cer second class. In June 2006, Bosarge reported to the PCU George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) were he was assigned to be the reactor electrical division repair parts petty of cer. There he built from nothing a supply process that would pave the way for supplies and parts to be ordered and stored in divisional spaces. After the successful completion of the rst Operational Reactor Safety Examination exam, he was promoted to petty of cer rst class and handpicked to immediately become the department command career counselor for more than 400 sailors. At the end of his tour he directly contributed to the command earning two consecutive retention excellence awards and was given the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for his actions. In Jan. 2011, Bosarge was assigned to be the nuclear coordinator for NRD Houston. He led a struggling program from the brink of failure to a passing grade in only ve months. He then pushed this momentum to bring the nuclear program where he nished 2012 as the No. 3 nuclear coordinator in the nation while performing community outreach programs and nishing his associate’s degree. Currently he has held the No. 1 nuclear coordinator position for the last three months. He is responsible for 13 nuclear trained recruiters and an average of 80 future sailors at any given time. He is also the STEM program coordinator for the command and the Tiger Den Leader for Pack 1005 for the Boy Scouts of America. Bosarge has been married to Melia Bosarge for the last seven years; they have three beautiful kids Zachary, 6, Jasmine Bosarge, 5, and Cameron, 1. Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jacob L. Dillon is a public affairs of cer with Navy Recruiting District Houston. Bosarge named Navy’s Nuclear Field Coordinator of the Year Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class JACOB L. DILLON | U.S. Navy Left: Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Thomas Bosarge, left, attached to Navy Recruiting District Houston, left, and Lt. Cmdr. Jaye Jones, a city outreach of cer for Navy Recruiting Command, instruct a student on how to operate an underwater remote-operated vehicle at TechStreet Houston, Nov. 20, at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. Right: Electrician’s Mate 1st Class Thomas Bosarge, the nuclear programs coordinator for Navy Recruiting District Houston, explains the fundamentals of nuclear power to Houstonarea educators during an Educator Orientation Visit brief on Nov. 19, at NRD Houston headquarters. Ms. Sharon Soderholm is proud to announce the upcoming graduation of her daughter, Chelsea Cheyene Soderholm, from Florida State University. On Friday, Dec. 13, Chelsea will be conferred with her bachelor’s degree in criminology, from FSU’s School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Chelsea is a 2009 graduate of Franklin County High School, and a 2012 graduate of Tallahassee Community College. While a student at FSU, Chelsea was a member of Lambda Alpha Epsilon, and recently completed her internship with the Leon County Sheriff’s Of ce. She will begin classes next month at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy. Her future plans include a career in law enforcement, eventually becoming an agent with either FDLE, or the FBI’s Special Victims Unit. A career in law enforcement has been a longtime dream of Chelsea’s. Her family has been blessed to be a part of this journey, and looks forward to seeing her realize her goals. Congratulations, Chelsea! We all love you. Soderholm to graduate from FSU Friday CONGRATULATIONS Happy BIRTHDAY Sorensens to mark golden wedding anniversary Ann and Billy Sorensen, of Eastpoint, will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Friday. The Sorensens were married on Dec. 13, 1963 in Apalachicola. The Sorensens have two sons, William Arlen and wife Andrea Sorensen, of Eastpoint, their son William Joseph and wife Alexis Sorensen, and grandchildren Drew, Desire and Michael; and Charles Sorensen, of Georgia; and granddaughters Chelsea and Chloe. Billy Sorensen is a retired commercial shermen, and nearing age 72, he continues to work in the bay. Wife Ann is retired from the seafood industry as well. Happy ANNIVERSARY Mariah Miller turns 3 Mariah Miller turned 3 years old on Tuesday, Dec. 10. Mariah is the daughter of Jacqueline and Maurice Miller, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Patricia Jones, of Apalachicola, and Robert Ward, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Brenda Benjamin, of Apalachicola, and the late Herbert Miller. Friends and family will celebrate Mariah’s birthday with a party for her this Saturday, Dec. 14, at 4 p.m. at the game room. John Talon Mathes turns 4 John Talon Mathes celebrated his fourth birthday on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, with family and friends. John Talon is the son of Parrish Johnson and Justin Mathes. Grandparents are Darren and Chimene Johnson, of Eastpoint, and Riley and Joyce Mathes, of Carrabelle. Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, December 12, 2013 Wendell W. Bareld Sr., 71, died Sunday, Dec. 1, 2013, at Weems Memorial Hos pital. He was born Sept. 15, 1942, in Apalachicola to James and Flor ida Bareld. He married Shirley Rosalis Bareld on March 3, 1963, and she survives. Also surviving are his mother Florida Vause Bareld, of Apalachicola; two sons Wendell W. Bareld, Jr., of Eastpoint, Charles (Frieda) Bareld of Lakeland, and Lori Ramsey of Tupelo, Miss; nine grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; one sister Virginia (Her bert) Duggar of Apala chicola; one brother Darrel Bareld (Judy) of Lakeland; nieces, neph ews, and cousins. Wendells father, James Marvin Bareld preceded him in death. Wendell gradu ated from Chapman High School and continued his education with CSX Continuing Education programs. He served in the Florida National Guard. Wendell was a long time resident of Lakeland, where he lived since leav ing his childhood home in Apalachicola in 1970. He loved Franklin County this was his home. He and Shirley planned to return home when retired and they did in July 2009. His career with CSX Corporation covered a span of 30 years. He was an excellent rail road man and his many friends there were always remembered. He was a leader. He was the ultimate handy man at home an excellent painter and a good mechanic and was always ready to help oth ers x it. He loved fam ily, friends, and animals. He was proud of others accomplishments and never envious. An avid fan of Jeopardy and his tory, he would answer the questions immediately. He loved the bay, the rivers, and the gulf. A devoted husband, father, son, brother, and uncle and a loyal friend and condant, he was someone to de pend upon he cared for others. He was so loved and will be so missed. The visitation was from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Kelley Fu neral Home. The funeral service followed at 2 p.m. on Thursday Dec. 5 at the Eastpoint Church of God. The Rev. Scott Shiver of ciated. The burial was at Magnolia Cemetery. Wendell W. Bareld Sr. WENDELL W. BARFIELD SR. Obituary Hope you enjoyed your breakfast last Saturday at Chillas Hall. The members of the Lanark Village Golf Club were glad to see you and thank you for your sup port. We will be looking forward to serving you on Sat urday, JaN. 4. In the meantime, have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. A good full breakfast will be ready for you Saturday, Dec. 14 at the Lanark Vil lage Boat Club. The break fast is a week early this month. Breakfast will be gin at 9 a.m. and a donation of $5 will be collected at the door. The Christmas Party at the boat club will be next Saturday for members and guests only. Later this Sat urday evening, Dec. 14, you can enjoy the Parade of Lights on the Car rabelle River. The parade will start at dusk. Our monthly covered dish lun cheon will be Sunday, Dec. 15 at Chillas Hall. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. and chow line forms at 1 p.m. All you need is a dish to share, a donation and your growling stomach. See ya there! Many years ago our late friend and neighbor, Roscoe Dally, started the tradition of having smoked turkey on Christmas morning. In his memory, the tradition con tinues and Bob Dietz has hosted it every year since. The doors open at Chill as Hall 8:30 to 11 a.m. Come on over. Enjoy a sandwich or two and have a great Christmas morning. Thanks to Ken LaPaz who did the smoking. Doesnt the outside and inside of Chillas Hall look great? Dot Bless and her help ers put up the decorations. There are two huge can dy canes at the entrance to the Village on Heffernan Drive and US 98. Thanks guys and Cheryl. Our next lunch at the Se nior Center will be Thurs day, Dec. 19. This will be our Christ mas dinner and there will be no more lunches until further notice. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remem ber, Santas making his list and checking it twice, so be good! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Dont miss Parade of Lights this Saturday Faith BRIEFSEastpoint Christmas parade Friday The Eastpoint Christmas Parade is slated to come down U.S. 98 beginning at 4 p.m. this Friday afternoon, Dec. 13. Bring your golf cart, convertible, pick-up truck or boat. The parade ends at the Pavillon on Patton Drive where Santa Claus will arrive by oyster boat. There will be caroling and Santa will listen to childrens wishes.Love Center hosts Royal Party Saturday This Saturday, Dec. 14, the Love and Worship Center will host a Royal Christmas Party at the Fort Coombs Armory, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The dinner party will feature the Dream Reality Band, from Valdosta, Ga. The Hot Flashes from Pam Nobles Studio will also perform. Everyone welcome for this festive occasion. Donations of $20 are asked to cover expenses.Live Nativity scene Dec. 21 in Carrabelle Carrabelle Christian Center, 142 River Road, Carrabelle, invites you to a live nativity and depiction of the birth of Christ on Saturday, Dec. 21 at 7 and 8 p.m. The Word became esh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth. John 1:14 Join us to celebrate the true meaning of Christmas!Donation yoga classes continue The donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes, held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. every Wednesday at the Battery Park city ofce conference room. Covenant Word to host chili supper Saturday The Covenant Word Christian Center, 158 12th Street in Apala chicola, will have its Filling Station Outreach Ministry to host a free chili supper this Saturday, Dec. 14 from 3 to 5 p.m. in front of the ABC School, at 98 12th Street in Apalachicola. Come out and enjoy a hot, tasty meal of chili, rice and cornbread, fel lowship and prayer. A representative from the Clos ing the Gap program will be on hand to give tops on nutrition and healthy eating. They will also be giving away clothing, shoes and small toys. All are welcome and everything is free. Photos of Carrabelle families sought The Carrabelle History Museum, at 106 Avenue B, SE, is collecting family photos. Historical Society President Ta mara Allen said the museum is creat ing a database to aid in genealogical research and the pictures would be part of the accumulated information. For more information, call 6972141. Three Servicemen seeks Vietnam stories The Three Servicemen Detail South is seeking stories of service in Vietnam to post on its webpage, www. threeservicemenstatuesouth.org. This can be a story told by the vet eran or a memory of a veteran who is deceased. If you have a story to tell, please contact Lois Swoboda at 6535857.A letter to heaven Dear Mom, You should see me now. I am a big girl now. Im studying my lessons hard and I want you to be proud of me when I walk down the aisle to graduate. I miss you so much as you miss me. My daddy and my grandparents are taking good care of me, so dont worry about me. Im ne. From your beloved daughter, Tanaya Harris In Loving MEMORY Tionne Rochelle Special to the Times Library nes hanging over your head? No need to worry any longer. The Fine Forgiveness for Non-Perishable Foods program has begun at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle branches of the Franklin County Public Library. For every nonperishable food item (canned or boxed) you bring in, get $1 off of nes on your library record. The libraries will be accepting items from now until Dec. 18. The holidays are a good time to support our local food bank. And wouldnt it be great to start off the New Year with a clean record at the county library? Bring your nonperishable food items to the Eastpoint branch, at 160 Hickory Dip Road, or to the Carrabelle branch at 311 St. James Ave. The county library will be expanding hours and services with the new year. One of our upcoming events includes a ventriloquist show to be held at both branch libraries. Miguel and his Amigos will entertain us on Friday Dec. 20 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch, and Saturday, Dec. 21 from 11 a.m. to noon at the Carrabelle branch. Also, if youre looking for something to do over the Christmas break bring the kids to the Eastpoint branch on Friday, Jan. 3 for our rst Cinema Day. Well be viewing Disneys Monsters University starting at 3:30 p.m. The Carrabelle branch will be showing Despicable Me 2 on Thursday, Dec. 19 at 3 p.m. All events are free of charge. We now have computer workshops at both library branches on a monthly basis. Bring any computer questions you have, no matter how big or small, and Carly from Wilderness Coast Public Libraries will be happy to assist you. The next workshop is at the Eastpoint branch on Tuesday, Dec. 17 from noon to 5 p.m. Bring your own computer or e-reader or sign up to use one of the library computers. The county library staff would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy and Healthy New Year! Food donations lessen library nesAA meeting schedule The following is the updated schedule for Al coholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 6532000.M ONDAY 7:30-8:30 p.m. Closed AA, Apalachicola, Trin ity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth StreetTU E S DAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, Noon1 p.m. Open Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First Street, 7:30-8:30 p.m.W EDNE S DAY Apalachicola, Trin ity Episcopal Church, 6-7 p.m. Womens AA, Closed, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Mens AA, ClosedTHU R S DAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, Noon-1 p.m. St. George Island Unit ed Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr., 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open AA FRIDAY Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 5:306:30 p.m. AA Happy Hour, Open Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 7:30-8:30 p.m.S A TU RDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr., 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speakers Meeting, Open Alligator Point Mission By The Sea, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discussion GroupSU NDAY Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 7:308:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open God grant me the se renity to accept the things I cannot change, the cour age to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference. AA MEETINGS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, December 12, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Santa’s O utdoor H eadquarters! Holida y Gifts f or Childr en Hug e Tr ain Set Demo Guns & Ammo Page 8 Special to the Times An Apalachicola River expedition designed to promote Florida conservation will arrive here on Saturday for a reception at the Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce. The reception for the general public at the of ces at 122 Commerce St. is expected to run from 10 a.m. to noon. Expedition Florida 500 (XF500) is a modern-day exploration of Florida’s coastline, waterways and aquatic ecosystem, as seen through the eyes of the waterman. This year is the state’s 500th anniversary since Ponce de Leon landed on Florida’s coastline in 1513, which is being commemorated statewide with Viva Florida 500. In celebration of this momentous occasion, Mother Ocean has partnered with the Florida Department of State, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Quiksilver Waterman Collection, Tahoe SUP and various others to embark on a yearlong journey combining the best of exploration, adventure, stewardship, science and sport. Mother Ocean’s founder, Justin Riney, completed circumnavigating Florida on a stand up paddleboard in July and has been exploring the inland waterways during the second half of the project. He is leading the movement for the entire 365 days and is spending Days 339 through 348 in a collaborative exploration of the Apalachicola River. Kristian Anders Gustavson, director of research and explorations of Below The Surface, will be joining Riney on the Apalachicola River to launch The Riverview Project. Live Oak Production Group’s Elam Stoltzfus will be lming the journey. Mother Ocean’s Expedition Florida 500 primary goal is to highlight the importance of stewardship efforts as they relate to Florida’s coastlines and waterways, and to share the rich history and culture of the state. Below The Surface’s Riverview Project is creating the leading visual platform to establish baselines and aggregate data on hydrologic structure, function and changes while illustrating how waterway recreation can lead to better protection of America’s waterways and other natural resources. The team will be traveling in a 30-foot Voyager canoe hand-shaped by John Ruskey of Quapaw Canoe Company. Live Oak Production Group will be lming the expedition from the water, with award-winning Elam Stoltzfus who, for the past 25 years, has documented diverse aspects of Florida’s natural resources, which include estuaries, rivers, swamps and aquatic preserves. Early in November, a number of Franklin County residents received what appeared to be a fairly frightening notice, in the mail, informing them their drinking water contained trihalomethanes (THM), a group of chemicals with a long name unfamiliar to the average consumer of tap water. In spite of reassurances in the letter that the situation is not an emergency, many people found the information worrying. What’s the truth? Is the water safe to drink? THM is a by-product of the process by which our drinking water is puri ed. It is created when chlorine, a disinfectant, combines with naturally occurring chemicals in the ground water, i.e. dissolved soil. In 2002, the federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection set tougher standards for the level of THM acceptable in drinking water. Any time the amount of THM is higher than the legal limit, the agency providing the water to the public must report the excess to it’s customers, even if the amount of THM is only slightly higher than the acceptable limit. Our county drinking water exceeds the legal limit by only a tiny amount. In Apalachicola over the last year, on the average, the drinking water contained 82.33 parts per billion (ppb) of THM. That is less than three parts per billion higher than the legal limit of 80 ppb. Not parts per million, parts per billion. It takes very sensitive equipment to even detect the difference. One THM many people are familiar with is chloroform, which has been used as an anesthetic. At the high levels of concentration required to induce unconsciousness, chloroform can cause acute reactions in humans including irregular heartbeat, liver and kidney damage and redness and blistering of the skin. Exposure might possibly increase rates of certain cancers and cause a miscarriage or damage an unborn child as well. The effects of THM are expected to be similar to chloroform; however, the level of exposure to inhaled chloroform that can cause injury is 1,500 ppb or more. This is much higher than the 82 ppb found in our water. Toxicologists tell us the poison is in the dose. Even pure water is dangerous if too much is consumed. According to the EPA, 80 ppb is only 20 percent (onefth) of the amount of THM considered safe for consumption over a lifetime. So is there a risk in consuming tap water here? Perhaps a very slight one, if the water is consumed over many years, but THM in our tap water is probably not something to lose sleep over. SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore/Bottom Trout and flounder are holding around the creek run-offs in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Neap tides have allowed more bait fish to move up in the canal, in turn bringing the trout and game fish to follow. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in these waters this week as well. As cooler weather sets in, local area fishing should heat up. The trout bite should improve as old man winter sets in and is here to stay. Good local areas are going to be in the Intercoastal Waterway Canal. Deep holes around Black’s Island and deeper waters around Eagle Harbor. The metal channel markers will be holding large number of sea bass and whiting as the cold weather persists. Florida waterway expedition to arrive Saturday There’s nally a chill and certain festiveness in the air as most of us try to take time off from work to enjoy spending quality time with family and friends and re ect on the passing year. Children will be out of school on winter break soon, and while the holiday season is upon us, so are several traditional hunting opportunities. The second phase of waterfowl and coot season comes in statewide Dec. 7 and runs through Jan. 26. In addition to the usual hunting license and permit requirements, duck hunters also must have a Florida waterfowl permit ($5) and a federal duck stamp ($15). The daily bag limit on ducks is six, but you need to know your ducks before you pull the trigger, because there are different daily limits for each species. For instance, within the six-bird limit there may be only one black duck, one mottled duck and one fulvous whistling-duck. Only two of your six-bird limit may be canvasbacks, pintails, redheads or scaup, and three may be wood ducks. And you may have no more than four scoters or four mallards (of which only two may be female) in your bag. All other species of ducks can be taken up to the sixbird limit, except harlequin ducks. The daily limit on coots is 15, and there’s a ve-bird limit on mergansers, only two of which may be hooded. When hunting waterfowl, hunters may use only nontoxic shotgun shells. Only iron (steel), bismuthtin and various tungstenalloys are permissible. For something different, try woodcock hunting. Woodcock season again runs Dec. 18 – Jan. 31. Woodcocks are excellent game birds because they hold well for pointing bird dogs and provide a challenging shot when ushed. The daily bag limit is three. The third phase of mourning and white-winged dove season opens Dec. 14 and runs through Jan. 12. The daily bag limit is 15 birds. From November on, the shooting hours for all migratory birds are onehalf hour before sunrise to sunset. However, you must get a no-cost migratory bird permit where you purchase your hunting license before you hunt any of these birds. The only rearm you can use to hunt migratory game birds is a shotgun, no larger than 10-gauge. Shotguns must be plugged to a threeshell capacity (magazine and chamber combined). Bows also are legal. Arti cial decoys and manual or mouth-operated bird calls also are legal. You may hunt migratory game birds over an agricultural eld if the crop was planted by regular agricultural methods. However, don’t even think about “sweetening” the eld by scattering agricultural products over it – or anywhere near it – or you could wind up in serious trouble. It doesn’t matter if you aren’t the one who scattered the bait. If you knew or should have known that such bait was present, you’re accountable under federal law. Some other things you can’t do while hunting migratory game birds include using ri es, pistols, crossbows, traps, snares, nets, sinkboxes, swivel guns, punt guns, battery guns, machine guns, sh hooks, poisons, drugs, explosive substances, live decoys and recorded bird calls, sounds or electrically ampli ed bird-call imitations. It is also against the law to shoot from a moving automobile or boat and herd or drive birds with vehicles or vessels. Bobcat and otter hunting season always runs Dec. 1 – March 1, and there’s no daily bag or season limit on either species. Like foxes, bobcats may be chased year-round with dogs, but possessing rearms during the closed season, between March 2 and Nov. 30, is prohibited. On a few wildlife management areas, bobcats and otters may not be taken. December has the hunting opportunities you’re looking for, whether you are upland-bird hunting, shooting ducks on the pond or taking that big cat as he slips up behind an unsuspecting fawn. Florida Outdoors Tony Young FWC Media Relations Coordinator TONY YOUNG Outta’ The Woods December is lled with holiday hunting traditions WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu Dec 12 57 51 10 % F ri, Dec 13 65 59 20 % S a t Dec 14 67 60 70 % Sun, Dec 15 65 45 % M on, Dec 16 65 45 % T ues Dec 17 65 45 % W ed Dec 18 65 44 % JUSTIN RINEY | Special to the Times A look at the Below the Surface crew in the Quapaw Canoe with their gear. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda What about trihalomethanes in drinking water?

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, December 12, 2013 A Section City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb addressed the commissioners as a private citizen, requesting the community service center be renamed the Mayor Van W. Johnson, Sr. Recreation and Community Service Complex. “A youth center was a campaign promise of the mayor, and we now have that out there, and the mayor also has an of ce out there,” she said. “We’re setting a trend in that area. It’s the rst time I know of that a mayor has had an of ce.” The request met with unanimous approval by the commissioners. “You kept that from me,” Johnson told Webb. In an interview Tuesday at his of ce at the community services building, the mayor said he was virtually speechless at the time. “I’m still trying to grasp it all,” he said. “I was surprised, honored and de nitely surprised.” Portions of the former high school campus deeded ve years ago by the school board to the city include the school building, eld house and gymnasium. Leased to the city were the football eld and softball and baseball diamonds. Since that time, the campus has been used as a one-stop shop for community services provided by nonpro t organizations and city youth recreation activities. Current occupants include the Franklin’s Promise Coalition, food pantry, Gulf Coast Workforce Board, the Capital Area Community Action Agency, the Franklin County Public Library Tigers Program, BP Claims of ce, the city’s Project Impact afterschool and summer enrichment programs, the city’s KUT (Kids United Together) youth program and several other nonpro t community organizations. “I don’t want it to be about me,” Johnson said. “Let the name of it be secondary to the services provided out here. I’m more proud of what we have to offer here than anything.” Johnson said he plans to establish regular part-time of ce hours after the rst of the year. At the conclusion of the meeting, Sharon Berrian, associate director for membership development for Florida League of Cities Inc. read a special proclamation approved in August at the FLC annual meeting and signed by FLC President P.C. Wu and attested to by FLC Executive Director Michael Sittig. The resolution of the FLC board of directors honors Elliott for 30 years of elected service and commends him “for his unsel sh commitment to municipal leadership and governance.” It notes that several terms in of ce “is a high compliment voters give to an of cial, and with these years of experience comes a strengthening of wisdom, discernment and strong leadership skills that brings tremendous value to the municipal governments of Florida.” After the reading of the resolution, Elliott said it has been “a privilege and an honor to serve. My ancestors go back a ways in this town.” The longtime city commissioner, whose tenure was interrupted several times over the years by service aboard with the Army National Guard, said “the group I have right now is one of the best I’ve ever had. Everybody is just a good team.” Elliott’s colleague on the city commission, Mitchell Bartley, said, “I’ve enjoyed the three terms, going on four, I’ve been with you. I hope you serve another 30 years.” Elliott re ected that, “I think I’ve been through about every situation.” He recalled that after his rst election, he was asked on his mail route why it was he had won, and he replied that “it was God’s will and the voice of the people. “I’ve always said that, as to what my decisions were, I’ve always considered what God would want me to do,” he said. “I’ve had relatives mad at me and friends mad at me. I always do what I think is right for everybody. That’s the way I’ve always been, and I hope that’s the way I’ve always stayed.’ He said as members of the city commission, “we don’t always agree on stuff. That’s what government is all about. I think this commission has done pretty well. It is a great small town to live in, and I’ve always been proud of it.” Elliott, whose military service stretches back to the tail end of Vietnam, said “God’s been good to me. I’ve seen a lot of things, good and bad, and met a lot of different people. America is the best place for an opportunity to succeed if you try hard enough.” Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 L ad y S e a ha w k j un io r g oa l k e e p e r M ac e y Hun t m ade a t o t a l o f 2 0 s a v e s i n t h e D e c 3 s o c c e r m a t c h a g a i n s t R u t h e r f o r d w i t h 1 1 o f t h o s e c o m i n g i n t h e s e c o n d h a l f H e r c o m p o s u r e i n t h e n e t a l l o w e d t h e L a d y S e a h a w k s t o r e m a i n c o m p e t i t i v e u p u n t i l t h e n a l w h i s t l e. S h e w a s a l s o a c t i v e i n s t a r t i n g t h e c oun t e r a t t ack e i t he r b y t h r o w i ng o r p un t i ng t he ba l l w i de t o a w i n g b a c k s o h e r t e a m m a t e s c o u l d b e g i n m o v i n g t h e b a l l u p t h e e l d G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R M a ce y H u nt Page 9 HONORED from page A1 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com After a winning season, Franklin County’s middle school boys basketball team fell in the post-season Monday. The boys fell 44-36 to second seed Tolar Monday night in Blountstown. Under the direction of coach Jeremy Williams, the team nished with a record of 12-6. “We came out at and got down by 14,” said Williams. “In the last ve minutes they started playing defense, and we got within six in the fourth quarter. But we didn’t generate much offense tonight. The team was led by eighth grader Tyler Farmer, who put up 21 points before he fouled out with a minute left. The squad nished the regular season Friday at Wakulla, where Farmer hit the game-winning free throw with one second left for a 5251 victory. The point guard nished with a season-high 29 points. The middle school team also includes eighth grader Nathan Jones, who at 6’3” is the team’s leading rebounder, and who, like Farmer, saw some action playing varsity. Eighth grader Landon Nash, and seventh graders Jake Patterson, Rufus Townsend and Jan Lowe, have all seen action at the junior varsity level. Other members of the middle school team include eighth graders Johnny Jones, Mikalin Huckeba, Eric Sowell, Elijah DeCourcey and Rory Countryman; seventh graders Daijon Penamon, Tyrell Green, Keondre Sewell, and Dalin Sheridan; sixth grader Jonathan Jones and fth graders Josh Farmer, Lamarius Martin and Clint Rester. The team opened the season with ve straight wins, beginning with a 33-30 triumph on Oct. 28 at Port St. Joe; a 46-22 win at home Oct. 29 against Altha; a 39-31 win at home Nov. 1 against Port St. Joe; and a 45-8 win at home against Wewahitchka Nov. 4, in which Nathan Jones poured in 14 points. Following a Nov. 7 forfeit by Hosford, the team traveled to Tolar Nov. 8 and came away with a 48-28 defeat. The Franklin County boys won 44-34 at Altha Nov. 11, but then sustained three straight losses: a 54-19 loss at Blountstown Nov. 12, a 47-31 loss at home Nov. 14 against Wakulla; and a 50-45 loss to Chipley Nov. 16 in the opening game of a tournament at Port St. Joe. The middle school boys went on to beat River Springs 48-45 in overtime, after Nathan Jones put up a buzzerbeater to tie the game at the end of regulation, and then Tyler Howard carried the team during the overtime. The boys ended the tourney by trouncing Wewahitchka. On Nov. 18 at home against Blountstown, the young Seahawks lost 51-38 but got back on track Nov. 21 at Wewahitchka, with a 38-33 win by the middle schooler’s B team. On Dec. 2 at home against Tolar, Farmer’s 19 points helped the team secure a 39-37 win. Williams said the team’s ability to limit Tolar’s leading scorer to just two points in the second half helped secure the win. On Dec. 3 at home, the team dominated Hosford 54-14. “We had a pretty good season, except we would come out at in our losses and wouldn’t play good defense,” said Williams. “We let a team do whatever they wanted to do. By the time we got ready to play, it was too late.” PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times TOP: Brandon Loy of Tallahassee took rst in the Jingle jog, and his sister Mattie took second. ABOVE: Islander Robert Goulet and best friends Finn and Indy were among the many dog and owner teams to run the Jingle Jog. Jinglers jog on St. George Island It was a perfect afternoon for a stroll, and about 25 people joined in the fun at the annual Jingle Jog Fun Run on St. George Island on Friday. Both two-footed and four-footed joggers jingled around the course with their coveted bells, Santa hats and antlers. First across the mark was Brandon Loy, 10, of Tallahassee. Right behind him was his 7-year-old sister Mattie. Brandon said this is the third run in which he and his sister have participated. The youngsters are grandchildren of island resident Judy Shultz. “It’s a fun thing,” organizer Charolette Bacher said. “We don’t keep time, and we don’t give prizes.” —By LOIS SWOBODA Special to The Times On Dec. 3, the Lady Seahawks girls varsity soccer team hosted the Rutherford High School Lady Rams. The Lady Seahawks quickly realized they were in a dog ght as the teams were pretty evenly matched. Both squads attempted to control the middle third of the eld and were adept at looking to stretch the eld, both wide and long, trying to catch the other’s defense out of position and score on quick counter-attacks. The possession style of passing by the Seahawks seemed the difference early on, but both goal keepers were busy, with Seahawk junior goalie Macey Hunt having to make nine saves in the rst half. Franklin County had nine shots on goal in the rst half, three from senior captain Adrianna Reeder, four from senior Jessica Shields, and one each from senior Deborah Dempsey and freshman Allie Kirvin. “The ladies are really starting to see each other; getting better at nding feet and when pressed, switching elds,” said Coach Joe Shields. “I thought the passing was superb in the rst half.” The stiff play continued after the water break and at the half, both teams were deadlocked, 0-0. Following the half, the Rams started sending long, through balls, behind the Lady Seahawk defense, in hopes of acquiring a breakaway goal. Hunt was forced to make 11 saves in the second half. The scoreless string was broken when a Lady Ram nally got past the last Lady Seahawk back and scored from point-blank range. “The ladies seemed to take a more defensive posture following that goal,” said Coach Shields. “Although we still had some shots of our own, we got out of our offensive scoring mindset and started playing not to get scored on again.” Freshman Emily Zingarelli had two shots on goal, and Reeder, Shields and Kirvin each one, in the second half but none found the back of the net. Another defensive breakdown later in the match led to an additional goal by the Lady Rams, and a 2-0 win over the Lady Seahawks. On Dec. 5, the Lady Seahawks hosted the West Gadsden Lady Panthers. The Lady Seahawks were possession oriented from the opening whistle and dominated through some fantastic passing and receiving amongst the entire team. Shooting on frame was at a premium with the passing/ possession established. Allie Kirvin scored twice; Shields scored twice and senior Gracyn Kirvin scored once, off an assist from Reeder, who also had four shots on goal. Additionally, Zingarelli had two shots on goal. At the half, the Lady Seahawks held a 5-0 lead. “The offensive production is at a premium when the girls string multiple passes together, especially near the 18-yard box,” said Coach Shields, “I was so pleased with their efforts.” Aside from the offensive prowess, eighth graders Allie Zingarelli and Michaela Cassidy, and seniors Brook Pittman and Ally Millender were fantastic in their fullback positions, redirecting multiple dispossessions back into the opposing third of the eld and all of them being in the right place at the right time, to thwart the Panthers’ drives on goal. The Lady Seahawks carried their dominating style of play into the second half. Field substitutes freshmen Kitana Peralta, Myranda McLeod and Chelsea Register, as well as sophomore goalkeeper, Jessica Schmidt, entered the match and the Seahawks didn’t skip a beat. Emily Zingarelli scored twice, once unassisted and once off an assist from Gracyn Kirvin. Then, before the last water break the Lady Seahawks mercy ruled the Panthers on a rst-ever goal by Register off an assist from Shields, for an 8 – 0 victory. “The substitutes received valuable playing time, made some great passes and of course, it was nice that Chelsea scored her rst high school soccer goal,” said Shields. “This is the kind of game that builds us up for the push into the second half of the season.” Lady Seahawks battle Rutherford, dominate West Gadsden Middle school hoopsters complete winning year

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, December 12, 2013 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 T rades & Ser v ices Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Senior center to remain open The Franklin County Senior Center will remain open for normal activities, except lunch, despite most of the volunteers having the u. For access at other times, call Ed Pattillo at 766-3887. The center will have a chili booth open during the Riverfront Festival on Saturday. The centers only dinner this month will be the annual Christmas lunch at noon Thursday, Dec. 19. Island reghters annual meeting Saturday The annual meeting of the St George Island Volunteer Fire Department will be at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 14, at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave., St George Island. An agenda is available for review at the rehouse. The public is invited. A light lunch will follow the business meeting. Full moon climb Monday at lighthouse The December Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Monday, Dec. 16. The sunset climb will take be 5-6:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 5:43 p.m., and the moon will rise at 5:28 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island. Reservations are recommended at 927-7745. Schools to host Christmas program Tuesday Franklin County School will host Common Core Parent Night and the elementary school Christmas program Let It Be Christmas at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17, in the multipurpose building. Refreshments will be served. The Christmas program will start after the presentation. Loan application assistance available Tuesday The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host assistance sessions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at 122 Commerce St. A representative from the FAMU Small Business Development Center and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity will be on hand to address questions and provide information to small business owners in completing the Small Business Administrations Economic Injury Disaster Loan application. An Economic Injury Disaster Loan Declaration was approved by the SBA in response to a commercial shery failure determination for the Apalachicola Bay area. The deadline to return economic injury applications is July 31, 2014. County commission to meet Tuesday in Carrabelle The Dec. 17 county commission meeting will be at 10 a.m. at the public meeting room at the Carrabelle Municipal Center, 1001 Gray Ave. Legion to have Dec. 19 covered dish dinner The Willoughby Marks American Legion Post 106 will have a covered dish dinner at 6 p.m. Dec. 19. All veterans are welcome. Carrabelle expands EDC On Dec. 5, Carrabelle commissioners voted unanimously to add two atlarge seats to Carrabelles Economic Development Council, as requested by EDC Director David Butler. He said he already knew of one person interested in serving on the board, who has attended all of the meetings. We have seven members now, Butler said. But the representative of The St. Joe Company never attends. Th EDC meets at 4:30 p.m. rst Thursdays, before the regular city meeting. Anyone interested in serving on Carrabelles EDC should write a letter volunteering to City Manager Courtney Millender at 1001 Gray Ave.. Carrabelle, FL 32322. All applicants must be reviewed by the seated EDC. Participants sought for Wide Area Search class Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell is seeking participants for a Wide Area Search Class, to be held in Franklin County, Jan. 28-30. At least 30 students must enroll for FEMA to bring the instructors from Texas here to teach the class. The course is applicable to jurisdictions that would need to conduct wide area searches because of a natural disaster or terrorist incident. Participants will learn practical search methods and skills in order to perform systematic searches over a large affected area. If you are interested, please enroll at www.oridadisaster.org/ or contact Brownell at 653-6748. Fowler donates Bald Point lot On Dec. 3, the county commission voted unanimously to action to accept a donation by Florence Fowler of her lot on Bald Point, known as Penn Point Unit 7, Lot 32. County Planner Alan Pierce said he had inspected the property, which is seaward of the state coastal control line. Fowler is unable to get a permit from the state to stop the erosion on the property, so she donated it rather than continue to pay taxes on a lot she cannot use. Lockley named to canvassing board County Commissioner Noah Lockley has been named to the county canvassing board for 2014. Chairman Cheryl Sanders served on the board in 2013 but cannot serve in a year during which she will stand for election. As a member of the board, Lockley will represent the county at a one-day workshop on election law changes held by the Florida State Association of Supervisor of Elections in Orlando on Jan. 31. News BRIEFS

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, December, 12, 2013 The Times | A11 93308T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO:12000377CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CARLTON JACKSON, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated November 26, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12000377CA of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN COUNTY Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and CARLTON JACKSON, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at Inside Front Lobby of the FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 23rd day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 1 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 2, BLOCK 128 (E-10), OF PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachiacola, FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, this 27th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By; Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION c/o Phelan Hallinan, PLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Cteek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-700 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 12, 19, 2013 93276T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013CP000031 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BELA THOMAS BROWN, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the administration of the Estate of BELA THOMAS BROWN, deceased; Case No.: 2013CP000031 is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 33, Apalachicola, Florida 32301. The Personal Representative of the Estate is ROBERT D. RAMOS, whose address is 615 Pineland Avenue, Belair, Florida 33756 All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney and the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured; the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to the Personal Representative. All persons interested in the Estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THIRTY DAYS FROM RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may have the challenges the validity of the decedent’s Will, the qualifications of the Personal Representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. DATED this 25th day of November, 2013. s/Larry K. White Larry K. White, Esq ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER FL BAR NO. 0194456 1367 E. Lafayette Street, Suite A Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 577-3230-Phone (850) 727-4525-Fax larrykwhite@lkwlaw.net December 5, 12, 2013 93332T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000140 Section: ______ THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY13, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006HY13 Plaintiff, v. JAMES FROST, JR.; VICKI LYNN FROST; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CENTENNIAL BANK AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA000140 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin cpunty, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 16th day of January, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND ON ST. GEORGE ISLAND LYING AND BEING IN PARTIAL SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 AT PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY; THENCE RUN ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 2 THE FOLLOWING THREE (3) COURSES: NORTH 18 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 150.00 FEET; SOUTH 71 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET; AND NORTH 18 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 410.00 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 300; THENCE RUN ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 300 THE FOLLOWING FIVE (5) COURSES: NORTH 71 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 416.89 FEET; ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT (RADIUS OF 5729.58 FEET, CHORD OF 599.03, CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 74 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST) 599.31 FEET; NORTH 77 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 2778.82 FEET; ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT (RADIUS OF 5729.58 FEET, CHORD OF 934.07 FEET, CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST) 935.11 FEET; AND NORTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 994.93 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 50.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY R.O.W. OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 300, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 502.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 127.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 367.55 FEET TO THE M.H.W. LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID M.H.W. LINE NORTH 59 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 113.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 14.54 FEET, THENCE LEAVING THE SAID M.H.W. LINE PROCEED SOUTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 385.94 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 127.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SUBJECT TO A 10’ EASEMENT ON THE SOUTHERN PROPERTY BOUNDARY. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVERAND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO-WIT: A PARCEL OF LAND ON ST. GEORGE ISLAND LYING AND BEING IN PARTIAL SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT #2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 AT PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY; THENCE RUN ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT #2 THE FOLLOWING THREE (3) COURSES: NORTH 18 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 150.0 FEET; SOUTH 71 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 20.0 FEET; AND NORTH 18 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 410.0 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 300; THENCE ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 300 THE FOLLOWING FIVE (5) COURSES: NORTH 71 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 416.89 FEET; ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT (RADIUS OF 5,729.58 FEET, CHORD OF 599.03 FEET, CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 74 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST) 599.31 FEET; NORTH 77 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 2778.82 FEET; ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT (RADIUS OF 5729.58 FEET, CHORD OF 934.07 FEET, CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 72 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST) 935.11 FEET; AND NORTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 994.93 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 180.18 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 300; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 492.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 63.5 FEET; THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 20.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 147.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 20.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 63.5 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 21 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 492.0 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 20.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MORRIS, HARDWICK, SCHNEIDER, LLC, ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 December 12, 19, 2013 93338T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.:19-2011CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA-000489 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Christopher B. Morris, Nancy Morris„ Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in on the 2nd Floor Lobby Franklin County, Florida at on the 2nd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this, 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com File No. WB -11-95114 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. December 12, 19, 2013 93340T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000414CAXXXX DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR WASHINGTON MUTUAL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES WMALT SERIES 2006-5, Plaintiff, vs. ADAM LEE TEAT, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192012CA000414C of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which U.A. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank, National Association as trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage PassThrough Certificates WMALT Series 2006-5, is the Plaintiff and Adam Lee Teat, Alecia Marie Ward, United States of America, are defendants, the Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on, the Franklin County Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Franklin County, Florida at on the 5th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 9 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN WEST 859.67 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 110.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED # 1999) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 145.18 FEET TO A RE-ROD, (MARKED #1999), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 302.98 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKER #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 145.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #1999), THENCE RUN EAST 302.99 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 2 TEATS ROAD, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com File No. WB-10-58570 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this procceding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suitc 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 6538861; Fax:(850)6539339. December 12, 19, 2013 93348T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA000478 SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD K. HOWELL; SUNTRUST BANK; RONALD K HOWELL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered May 9, 2012 in Civil Case No. 2009CA-000478 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, wherein SUNTRUST BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD K. HOWELL;, SUNTRUST BANK;, RONALD K HOWELL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S), are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 8th day of January, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 3, Block “D”, Unit 2, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, per Map or Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 15, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Waxwell As Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. December 12, 19, 2013 93350T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 2012CA314 HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. MARK ZONDERVAN, individually, LENARD JEZIORSKI, individually, CENTENNIAL BANK, an ARKANSAS BANKING CORPORATION, M&L PLUMBING, INC., a Florida corporation, HIDDEN HARBOR PROPERTY OWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC., a non-profit Florida corporation and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, by and through the FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on January 16, 2014, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 14, Block B of HIDDEN HARBOR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 34-37, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. This Notice dated this 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 12, 19, 2013 93352T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 19-2012-CA000217 Section:_______ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES A. BOONE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES, MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Reset Foreclosure Sale dated November 25, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000217 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 23rd day of January, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 14, BLOCK B OF RESERVE AS MAGNOLIA RIDGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 1-3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CORRECTED AFFIDAVIT AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 833, PAGE 436 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577. 4401; at least 7 days

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A12 | The Times Thursday, December, 12, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at APALACHICOLA, Florida this 26th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk MORRIS, HARDWICK, SCHNEIDER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 5110 EISENHOWER BLVD, SUITE 302A, TAMPA, FL 33634 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 December 12, 19, 2013 96645T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, W. E. SALMON, INC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1462 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOTS 7 & 8 BLOCK A CARRABELLE ET AL Full Legal Can be Obtained in the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 29-07S-04W-4170-000A-00 70 Name is which assessed: ROBERT & PATRICIA EDWARDS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of JANUARY 2014, which is the 6th day of January 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 25th day of November, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Dec. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013 93358T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-000293-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ANA D. JOHNSON A/K/A ANA DAVIS JOHNSON; LANARK VILLAGE ASSOCIATION, INC.; CHRISTOPHER L. JOHNSON A/K/A CHRISTOPHER LOGAN JOHNSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of foreclosure dated the 19th day of November, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-000293CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and ANA D. JOHNSON A/K/A ANA DAVIS JOHNSON and CHRISTOPHER L. JOHNSON A/K/A CHRISTOPHER LOGAN are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 52, OF BLUEWATERBAY, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, AT PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodatin in order to participate in thei proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 Spouth Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577. 4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 19th day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 10-55836 December 12, 19, 2013 96649T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 16, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: See Exhibit A PARCEL 1: LOTS 1 TO 10, SHELL BAY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF DOC SEA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY; FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2897.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 56 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 571.37 FEET, SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 71.47 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 49 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 66.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 139.22 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 46 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 23.21 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 11.86 FEET, SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 48.10 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 22.42 FEET TO AN IRON ROD LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 3: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0039’19” WEST, 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U. S. HIGHWAY 98 SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4729’55”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET, (CHORD BEING SOUTH 5405’28” WEST 1153.75 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 3020’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2726’ FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET, (CHORD BEING SOUTH 4403’30” WEST 905.74 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5746’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1442’57”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 735.79 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 5025’02” WEST 733.78 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 4318’17” EAST, 33.07 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0225’57” EAST FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 120.23 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4451’18” EAST 120.22 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4318’17” EAST 182.78 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5550’01” WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 79.61 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6020’31” WEST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 42.77 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 4318’17” WEST 156.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY 6, 2004 AND BEARING JOB NUMBER 02-404 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0039’19” WEST, 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT ON THE CENTERLINE OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4729’55” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5405’28” WEST, 1153.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 3020’30” WEST, 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2726’00” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4403’30” WEST 905.74 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5746’30” WEST, 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1442’57” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 735.79 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5025’02” WEST, 733.78 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 4318’17” EAST 33.70 FEET TO A RE-BAR ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-BAR LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0225’57” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 120.22 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4554’12” EAST, 120.21 FEET TO ROD AND CAP; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4317’57” EAST, 153.33 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5458’50” WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 121.40 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4318’17” WEST, 132.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 4: PARCEL 1; A PART OF PARCEL 4 COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 250.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 13.65 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3869.74 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0145’16”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.49 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4044’48” EAST 118.49 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 310.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4019’17” WEST 132.20 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 309.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2; A PART OF PARCEL 4 COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4443’08” WEST 311.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 4019’17” EAST 70.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 4013’27” EAST 311.95 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 105.10 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4019’17” WEST 311.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY 10, 2005 AND BEARING JOB NUMBER 00-581 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 250.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 13.65 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3869.74 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0145’16”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.49 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4044’48” EAST 118.49 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 415.24 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4013’27” WEST 311.95 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 4019’17” EAST 179.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 309.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 5: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’00” EAST 471.89 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 8056’55” EAST 357.18 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1954’24” EAST 772.73 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NUMBER 98, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 8056’22” WEST 538.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1465.39 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5010’36” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1308.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 2945’56” WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1904.15 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 916.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 5721’17” WEST 42.26 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0544’04” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 290.02 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5605’56” WEST 289.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0716’18” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 367.77 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4736’37” WEST 367.52 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4432’48” WEST 400.12 FEET TO A POINT OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0705’09” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 407.83 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4741’58” EAST 407.57 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 3845’57” EAST 400.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST, 835.50 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5103’27” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5501’43” WEST, 1592.21 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2945’56” WEST, 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4320’41” WEST, 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5721’17” WEST, 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1210’44” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 700.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0102’45” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.20 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4045’03” WEST 60.20 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4438’07” EAST, 405.37 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0111’11” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.01 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4431’17” EAST, 60.01 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4438’07” WEST, 409.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 6: A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS: BEGIN AT A POINT IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST WHERE THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF U.S. LIGHT HOUSE RESERVATION INTERSECTS THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. 98) AND FROM SAID POINT RUN NORTH TO THE CENTER OF STATE ROAD 30; THENCE RUN WESTERLY FOLLOWING THE CENTER LINE OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 4,274 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY 33 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A POINT, WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHEASTERLY 370 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG ST. GEORGE SOUND 60 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTHWEST 250 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD; THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG SAID ROAD BOUNDARY LINE 60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCEL OF LAND FRONTING 60 FEET ON ST GEORGE SOUND AND RUNNING BACK THE SAME WIDTH TO STATE ROAD 30 AND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE SOUTH HALF OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, STATE OF FLORIDA. PARCEL 7: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4443’08” WEST 311.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 4444’17” WEST 104.45 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 4013’27” EAST 70.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475); THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6476) THENCE RUN SOUTH 4019’17” WEST 70.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 8: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST 835.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5103’27”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 5517’40” WEST 1607.83 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2945’56” WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 4320’41” WEST 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5721’17” WEST 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0146’24”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 102.07 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 5628’05” WEST 102.06 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 3045’57” WEST 130.74 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5114’03” WEST 250.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4346’56” WEST 395.81 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6515’31” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 276.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 6513’10” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 134.39 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470) MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SHELL BAY, A SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 38 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4330’05” EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL BAY A DISTANCE OF 279.51 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470); THENCE RUN SOUTH 4334’22” EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY 30.13 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470); THENCE RUN SOUTH 4323’08” EAST 328.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID NON-TANGENT CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0034’16”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 32.88 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4103’59” EAST 32.88 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING A POINT OF NON-TANGENT COMPOUND CURVE; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID COMPOUND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0138’40” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 94.65 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4731’46” EAST 94.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261); THENCE RUN NORTH 4326’58” WEST 593.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 9: COMMENCE AT A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF DOC SEA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2897.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1118’56”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 4556’57” WEST 571.37 FEET; SOUTH 4023’30” WEST 71.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4936’30” EAST 66.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4023’30” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4621’48” EAST 30.90 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 5014’57” WEST 43.91 FEET; SOUTH 4038’46” WEST 35.52 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160); THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 4621’48” WEST 23.21 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 4023’30” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 79.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 10: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 LYING 50.00 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 263.65 FEET TO A POINT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2914.70 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0219’43” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.46 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4059’47” EAST 118.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 415.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475); THENCE RUN NORTH 4018’10” EAST 104.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF SHELL BAY COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4449’25” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 421.03 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 2914.70 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0204’02” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 105.16 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 4311’40” WEST 105.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 11: LANDS IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING THE FOLLOWING SURVEY: BEGIN AT AN IRON STAKE 4274 FEET WEST OF U.S. LIGHTHOUSE RESERVATION AND CALL THIS THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; NOW TRAVEL SOUTHEAST A DISTANCE OF 370 FEET TO THE HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE WESTWARD ALONG HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET; THENCE NORTHWEST A DISTANCE OF 287 FEET, MORE OR LESS, AT SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 10; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD 10 A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO PLACE OF BEGINNING. ALL IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY THAT CERTAIN RECENT SURVEY DATED JUNE 25, 2001 BEARING JOB NUMBER 01-318 BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST 471.89 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 8056’55” EAST 357.18 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1954’24” EAST 772.73 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 8056’32” WEST 538.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1465.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5110’36” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1308.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 2945’56” WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1904.15 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 916.90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5721’17” WEST 42.26 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1300’22” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 657.79 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 0021’01” WEST 97.02 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 4431’10” EAST 128.29 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE AS FOLLOWS; SOUTH 6127’43” WEST 78.27 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 6035’09” WEST 128.52 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE RUN NORTH 4431’10” WEST 57.11 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 4005’26” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 77.38 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.34 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0228’53” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 122.62 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4119’54” EAST 122.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 12: A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE UNITED STATE LIGHTHOUSE RESERVATION, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN THENCE WESTERLY FOLLOWING THE CENTERLINE OF THE 66 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 30, ALSO KNOWN AS STATE ROAD 10 AND U.S. HIGHWAY 98, A DISTANCE OF 4154 FEET; THENCE TURN A RIGHT ANGLE AND RUN A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY, WHICH POINT IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE TURN A RIGHT ANGLE AND RUN TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS TO A POINT FROM WHICH A LINE RUN NORTHWESTERLY WILL BE 50 FEET FROM AND PARALLEL TO SAID LAST LINE; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG A LINE 50 FEET FROM AND PARALLEL SAID TO LAST LINE TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO.30 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCEL OF LAND FRONTING 50 FEET

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, December, 12, 2013 The Times | A13 4516517 Experienced Waitress / Cashier Positive Attitude a Must! Submit Resume to: PO Box 172 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Political Science Adjuncts:Primary purpose of this Part Time position is to teach credit courses in political science described in the college catalog. Additional functions include: Holding o ce hours for students, attending orientation sessions, professional development sessions, submitting all required documentation by published deadlines, and submitting grades via Lighthouse by deadline. Minimum Quali cations: Masters degree with at least 18 graduate level semester credit hours in Political Science. Copies of Transcripts must be submitted with a GCSC application. **Applicants may apply direct to Social Sciences Chair. Open till lled. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Gulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of any federally protected class in its programs, activities or employment. GCSC Equity O cer (850) 872-3866. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.872.3866 1117572 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS € MACHINIST € HEAvy EqUIPMENT MECHANICS € PIPE WELDERS € X-RAy WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS € SHIPPING/RECEIvINGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266362 Text FL66340 to 56654 ON SAID STATE ROAD NO.30 AND RUNNING BACK TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0039’19” WEST 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98 SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4729’55” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 5405’28” WEST 1153.75 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 3020’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2726’ FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 4403’30”WEST 905.74 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5746’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1119’41” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 566.40 FEET(CHORD BEING SOUTH 5206’40” WEST 565.48 FEET); THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 4429’02” EAST 33.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0100’42” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 4557’07” WEST 50.00 FEET); THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4429’02” EAST 191.37 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 4621’18” EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 50.01 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 4429’02” WEST 191.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 13: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST, 835.50 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5103’27” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5501’43” WEST, 1592.21 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2945’56” WEST, 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4320’41” WEST, 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5721’17” WEST, 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1210’44” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 700.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0102’45” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.20 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4045’03” WEST 60.20 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4438’07” EAST, 405.37 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0111’11” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.01 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4431’17” EAST, 60.01 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4438’07” WEST, 409.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 14: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 835.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 55 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 1607.83 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 21 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 43 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 704.90 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 24 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 102.07 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 56 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 102.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 130.74 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 DEGREES WEST 145.14 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 104.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 121.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 254.45 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 49 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 254.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 206.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 375.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 75.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 15: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 53.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 59.72 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 39 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 190.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD MARKED (#4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 309.52 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 190.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 311.38 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Counts I and III entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DEER PARTNERS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company; LIGHTHOUSE POINT PROPERTIES, INC., a dissolved Florida Corporation; and McKISSACK PROPERTIES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, Defendants, and the docket number of which is: 2011 CA 000412. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Melissa Holley Painter, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of November, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MELISSA HOLLEY PAINTER FL Bar No. 0144177 Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse Suite 800, 125 West Romana St. P. O. Box 13010 Pensacola, FL 325913010 Tel: (850) 434-9200 Fax: (850) 432-7340 Attorney for Plaintiff December 5, 12, 2013 96755T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-000253 CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 201 S. Broad Street P.O. Box 240 Cairo, GA 39828 Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. GALLOWAY, KIMBERLY J. GALLOWAY, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, and FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 4, SEASIDE COTTAGES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the 15th day of January, 2014, at 11 :00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the 2nd Floor Lobby, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must me a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk December 12,19, 2013 96785T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-77-CP Division: PROBATE IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE RUSSELL CROFTON, JR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of George Russell Crofton, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was October 7th, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is December 12, 2013. Personal Representative: Elizabeth Wilson Crofton 1819 Mount Sinai Court Tucker, GA 30084 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net December 12, 19, 2013 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL73693 to 56654 GUN SHOW Tallahassee NORTH FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDSDecember 14th & 15th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL74739 to 56654 Legal Legal Secretary Busy law firm seeking legal secretary. Send resumes to: PO Box 692, Panama City, FL 32402. Web ID#: 34274888 Medical/Health RN’sJoin the rewarding field of correctional nursing! You’ll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at Franklin Correctional Facility in Carrabelle, FL. We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time and PRN RN’s. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more! For more info, contact: Tracy Mazuranic 1-800-222-8215 x9553 tracy .mazuranic@cori zonhealth.com or Quick Apply online (under the job opportunities link). www .corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR Sales/Business Dev.Commissioned Sales PositionExperienced, FL licensed Real Estate sales associate to take over 100 leads for Carrabelle & Lanark Village, MUST know Carrabelle real estate market & live in the area, some closing support & training as needed. Contact John Shelby, Broker St. George Island Realty 850-899-0108 Web Id 34273054 FOR LEASE: Convenient Store with Gas station. Bay County. Great location! Will be branded Chevron. Available very soon. Major investment required. Serious inquiries only. Ware Oil & Supply Company.850-584-6666 ext 407 Eastpoint Apartments Accepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom handicap and nonhandicap units. Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer” Text FL72436 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL73867 to 56654 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle Lease Purchase Option 900 sq ft, 1Br, Open Plan, Fireplace Washer & Dryer, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $380 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL74084 to 56654 Carrabelle/Eastpoint: 1600 Sq Ft Doublewide, renovated Mobile Home /w Grandmother Unit, Stone Fireplace, Jacuzzi, Secluded, 1.5 Wooded Acres, Near Beach, $115k Negotionable 954-816-7004 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper.For Fast Results, Call 747-5020 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. COMMERCIAL BUILDING ON 98, RIVER VIEW, $1200 WATER INCLUDED. 2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. 3 BEDROOM 3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPS W/LIFT 2 CAR GARAGE 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 391 CARL TONS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/ MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENEDPORCH. 425/MO 6.3 BEDROOM3 BATH HOUSE ON RIVER/3 BOAT SLIPSW/LIFT 2CARGARAGEwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, December 12, 2013 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 250738 $139,000 St George Island INCRED I B L E GU L F V I EW L OT L o o k i n g o ve r & a ro u n d s m a l l g ro u n d l e ve l h o u s e s t o w a r d t h e s o u t h e a s t i s t h e G U L F 1 / 3 a c r e 2 n d t i e r l o t a d d i t i o n a l l l d i r t n o t r e q u i r e d r e c e n t c o m p a r a b l e s a l e at $ 1 3 6 0 0 0 r i g h t o n t h e b i k e p at h q u i c k a c c e s s t o t h e b e a c h b o a r d w a l k W e s t G u l f B e a c h D r i ve J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 2449082 $225,000 St. George Island SEA GODDESS L i g h t a n d a i r y 3 B R 2 B A i s l a n d h o m e p r i v at e s c e n i c f r e s h w at e r p o n d l a r g e d e c k 2 n d l e ve l s u n d e c k c h e e r f u l l y f u r n i s h e d g ro u n d l e ve l l a u n d r y / s t o r a g e ro o m s h c l e a n i n g a r e a & o u t s i d e s h o w e r u n d e r h o m e p a r k i n g o n p a d W e s t P i n e A ve n u e L i s t e d b y J a n i e B u rk e "&"&,, "&& % ) $ ( ( $ %# % %! # %# %!-' !!% % % % -%% $ +' ( %!% %% % #%# % % # # # % # # # # % %% %% % %# % !-% -% !-% # ! % Advertise Her e Contact The Star T oday (850) 277-7847 So much to do before 2013 wraps up By TEVIS PAGE Special to the Times First and foremost, I sincerely apologize for the discrepancies in last week’s paper. The school will be administering semester exams on Dec. 19 and 20, and students will be dismissed from school at 12:30 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 20, and return on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014. The school year is starting to speed up tremendously, and all the days are beginning to run together. Teachers are planning for semester exams and students are planning for the long break. Poinsettias that were sold by the senior class arrived last Thursday, Dec. 5, and another shipment arrived earlier this week. The senior class took a eld trip to Gulf Coast State College in Panama City on Tuesday to tour the campus. It was educational and enlightening. The juniors recently took a trip to Florida State University and had a blast! There is so much to do in so little time. Today, Dec. 12, there will be Algebra I endof-course exam retakes, and the Franklin County School Band’s Christmas Concert will begin at 7 p.m. By LOIS IS S S WOBODA A 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com Apalachicola Regional Airport now employs two fulltime aircraft mechanics. On Dec. 5, Taylor New man, CEO of Crystal Air, the rm that became xed base operator for the air port in October 2012, told county commissioners some changes are in progress at the airport. said hangar occupancy has increased from 65 to 80 percent. Newman said Crystal Air is actively seek ing a permanent tenant for the large corporate hangar, which is now being leased out on a short-term piece meal basis for storage of boats, cars and airplanes. The airport employs cer tied aviation maintenance technicians John Moore of Port St. Joe and B.J. Neshat of Eastpoint to maintain and repair aircraft. Newman said use of the airport during the spring and summer was less than ex pected because of inclement weather, but unusually heavy trafc during the fall helped make up for reduced income during the high season. County Planner Alan Pierce said Crystal Air would need to take more responsi bility for mowing and main taining airport grounds in the upcoming year because the county could not contin ue to maintain the grounds. Newman said additional landscaping is planned for the airport. “We are trying to increase our front porch ap peal,” he said. Commissioner Pinki Jackel expressed concern that the airport didn’t have a dedicated Web page. “I am very disappointed that one year after (Crystal Air began managing the air port) when I Google it, I’m sent straight to the county website,” she said. “A web site can be gotten up in a week, and we have plenty of people in the county who can help you do that. People use search engines to plan their travel.” Jackel urged Newman to become more involved in the community and join both chambers of commerce. “On a report card basis, there’s a lot of improvements to be made. I think you’re doing a better job than what was go ing on,” she said. On Monday, the Web prob lem had been corrected, and typing Apalachicola Region al Airport into a search en gine brought the researcher to the dedicated Web page. Newman said Crystal Air recently purchased a car for use as a short-term rental or a crew car. He said Hertz continues to have rental cars available at the airport, but Thrifty no longer has cars there. He said Crystal Air plans to acquire its own eet of several rental cars. “We plan to keep it as economical as possible,” he said. “They may be several years old, but they will be well maintained and good for local use.” Newman said Crystal is looking for a qualied airport manager to head airport op erations here. The airport is scheduled to receive more than $1 mil lion in public funding during 2014. At the county meeting, commissioners voted unani mously to accept $270,000 from the Florida Depart ment of Transportation to upgrade the condition of the runways. Pierce told commission ers that early next year, FDOT would provide the county with an additional $1.2 million to build a new taxiway that will connect the county’s undeveloped industrial park, adjacent to the airport, to the runway. This will make the industrial park have airport access and make it more desirable for aviation-related uses, he said. “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Studies have shown that what color scheme in the kitchen makes cooks more creative? White, Green, Blue, Yellow 2) What were the rst and middle names of “Doc” Holiday? Ben Franklin, John Henry, Jake Earl, Thomas Wyatt 3) From the comic strip, what’s the name of Li’l Abner’s pig? Salomey, Sam, Sutter, Simpleton 4) What type of gentleman is a caballero, one who is? In church, Tipping big, Giving up seat, On horseback 5) It was not until what date that divorce became legal in Ireland? 1954, 1969, 1986, 1997 6) How many selfportraits were painted by Rembrandt van Rijn? 1, 11, 62, 202 7) Regarding the egg itself, what makes turkey eggs so rubbery when cooked? Less air, No yolks, Less water, So small 8) Which old movie cowboy used a 15-foot bullwhip as his main weapon? Tom Mix, Lash La Rue, Gene Autry, William Boyd 9) Boysenberries are a cross between blackberries and which other? Cranberries, Strawberries, Raspberries, Blueberries 10) Which of these lived past the ending of World War II? W. C. Fields, Thomas Edison, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Woodrow Wilson 11) From folklore what’s nearby if a candle ame suddenly turns blue? Cat, Extraterrestrial, Ghost, Witch 12) During an hourlong coffee break, friends will statistically touch each other how many times if in conversation? 2, 4, 6, 8 13) What was the last name of Joan and Jane, TV’s original “Doublemint Twins”? Holliday, Foster, Boyd, Wofford 14) Who was “The dirty little coward” who shot and killed Jesse James? Bob Ford, Dick Liddell, Clell Miller, Jim Cummins ANSWERS 1) Green. 2) John Henry. 3) Salomey. 4) On horseback. 5) 1997. 6) 62. 7) Less water. 8) Lash La Rue. 9) Raspberries. 10) W. C. Fields. 11) Ghost. 12) 2. 13) Boyd. 14) Bob Ford. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com HAWK TALK AA ircraft maintenance returns to A A palach airport LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Taylor Newman addressed the county commission Dec. 5.