The Apalachicola times

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00249

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com At Monday evenings annual legislative deletion hearing, Franklin Countys wish list boiled down to one basic appeal: Help the countys seafood workers get back to making an honest living, and begin by opening up more harvesting opportunities. Unlike typical delegation hearings, during which legislators hear rst from constitutional of cers, county and city commissioners and other elected of cials, Mondays affair began with an appeal from the public, and each of the speakers stuck to a single topic: the dif culties oystermen are having in bringing home a robust harvest of legal oysters. Ive worked out there for about 20 years, and Ive seen Former APA housing director sentenced for theftBy CHRIS OLWELL747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com The former director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority was sentenced Nov. 19 after she pleaded guilty in June to stealing government funds, according to the U.S. Attorneys Of ce. Selena Noblit, 43, of Panama City, was sentenced to one year of probation, 192 hours of community service and a $100 ne for using the AHAs American Express credit card for more than $11,000 in personal expenses, then using U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funds to pay the credit card bills. Court records show she spent $24 million broadband expansion almost done By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Rural Northwest Florida soon will be home to a broadband network capable of handling 1,000 times the capacity of existing Internet service in the area. Funded by the 2009 federal stimulus package, the $24 million project will bring broadband Internet access to Franklin County and seven other underserved counties in the Panhandle, including Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Washington, Liberty and Gadsden counties. Slated for an end-ofthe-year completion, the project also will provide coverage for the south-central Florida counties of DeSoto, Hardee, Glades, Hendry, Highlands and Okeechobee and the community of Immokalee. Known as the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance, the initiative State surgeon general promotes weight lossBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com On the eve of one of Americas most indulgent holiday feasts, the states surgeon general paid a visit to Franklin County to promote healthy weight. Dr. John H. Armstrong, a Tampa trauma surgeon who was appointed surgeon general in April 2012 by Gov. Rick Scott, made an enthusiastic pitch to students Nov. 26 on behalf of the states Healthiest Weight Florida initiative, launched in January 2013. A snap of the ngers isnt going to solve this problem, Armstrong said after ticking off a series of alarming statistics of how fat Floridians have become in the last couple decades. It will take an investment over a decade, he said. Its the sum of small choices that will really make a difference. Armstrong paid an afternoon visit to the Franklin County School, escorted by Franklin County Health Department Administrator Marsha Lindeman and Operations Manager David Walker. As state surgeon general, Armstrong oversees Floridas 67 county health departments, as well as of ces for childrens medical services, medical quality assurance, disability determinations and public health laboratories. Senior Beyla Walker introduced Armstrong to an audience in the media center of her fellow members of the schools chapter of SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco). SELENA NOBLIT WHAT IS YOUR BMI?For an adult, calculate Body Mass Index by dividing your weight (in pounds) by height (in inches squared), and then multiplying the result by 703. For example, an adult who weighs 150 pounds, and is 5-foot-5 would divide 150 by 65 squared (or 4225). The result, 0.0355, would be then be multiplied by 703, which would result in a BMI of 24.96. A BMI of below 18.5 indicates a person is underweight; between 18.5 and 24.9 is normal. From 25.0 to 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30.0 and above is deemed obese. In the case of children under age 19, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the use of BMI to screen for overweight and obesity, but it is not a diagnostic tool. To determine whether a child has excess fat, further assessment, such as skinfold thickness measurement, would be needed. The adult calculator provides only the BMI number and not the BMI ageand sexspeci c percentile that is used to interpret BMI and determine the weight category for children and teens. Oystermen want summer bars openState Rep. Halsey Beshears, RMonticello, left, and State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, lead a delegation hearing on Monday.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times See SENTENCED A3 See BROADBAND A3 See OYSTERMEN A10STATE SURGEON GENERAL VISITS COUNTYPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFlorida Surgeon General Dr. John H. Armstrong addresses students at the Franklin County School. Below, Armstrong shows off his pedometer. Chewing the fat See FAT A3 VOL. 128 ISSUE 32 xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, December 5, 2013 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A11-A3 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index An Apalach Christmas, A2Island Lights celebration FridayThe annual St. George Island Island Lights will be Dec. 6, mid-island in St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile Jingle Jog starts at 4 p.m. on the bike path in front of the park. Runners should arrive a little before 4 p.m. to sign in. A $5 per runner donation is suggested. Santa is expected to arrive by re engine at 5 p.m., providing gifts to children age 10 and younger. Refreshments will be provided to all. Island Scouts will be selling hot dogs. The event is hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. For more information, watch www. sgibusinesses.com/island-lights.Santa to visit the Hill Saturday morningSanta Claus will pay a special visit to the Hill this Saturday, Dec. 7 from 10 to 11 a.m. Greet Santa in the parking lot of AJs Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 120 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. Take pictures with the jolly old elf and get a goody bag. The event is sponsored by AJs, HCOLA & SWAT.Saturday lm to remember Pearl Harbor Saturday, Dec. 7 at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, the lm Tora, Tora, Tora will be shown beginning at 10:30 a.m. Free popcorn; admission by donation. Released in 1970, the American-Japanese collaboration war lm dramatizes the Japanese reasons for the attack that brought America into the war. Scenes include archival lm taken from one of the carriers participating in the attack. Air Force to host Dec. 12 town hallThe U.S. Air Force in conjunction with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Forest Service will host a public town hall meeting on Thursday, Dec. 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Ave. The purpose of the town hall is to take questions from the public regarding the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI) and how Tates Hell State Forest may play a role in military training. For more info, call David Core, Florida Forest Service, at (850) 681-5800.

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 Formoreinformation,contacttheApalachicolaBayChamberat850-653-9419www.apalachicolabay.org CountywideHolidayEvents .org .apalachicolabay www 850-653-9419 at Chamber Bay Apalachicola the contact information, more For CONCERTSERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents CouponExpires:12-15-13CODE:AP00 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Numerous businesses reported record sales Nov. 29, as Black Friday came off without a hitch in Apalachicola this year. Record crowds sidestepped the malls and hit the downtown shopping district. With near-perfect weather, the restaurants were thronged, and several reported running out of food. Santa arrived right on time aboard the Buddys Boys shrimp boat, sporting an abbreviated goatee. The kiddies didnt mind. Pam Nobles and her dance studio students welcomed the man in red with energetic dance routines accompanied by traditional favorites like Silver Bells and Jingle Bell Rock and some newer numbers like Reindeer Pokey and Be My Star. Veterans of Black Fridays past observed fewer youngsters in line to see the jolly old elf than in previous years, but downtown retailers said there was no shortage of grown-up shoppers. The halls of the Raney House were decked with trees themed to depict music, breast cancer awareness and a woodland winter. Members of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society served mulled wine, cocoa and cookies in the carriage house. Aisha Ivey provided ddle music at Downtown Books and carolers roamed the streets beguiling shoppers. The evening ended with the lighting of the luminaries on behalf of Big Bend Hospice, bathing the streets in pale white light. Local eateries said business fell off sharply Saturday; a fact some attributed to the numerous important football games on Saturday afternoon and evening. With Black Friday behind them, several Apalachicola restaurants will close for yearly deep cleaning and renovations between now and Christmas.Hundreds ock to Apalachicolas Black Friday Chase Vasalinda, 3, told Santa he wanted a four-wheeler.PHOTOS BY LO O IS S SS WOBO OBO DA | The TimesSanta arrives aboard the shrimp boat Buddys Boys. ABOVE: Trinity Barron led the Pam Nobles dancers in a Christmas dance. BELOW: Sandi Hengle sits atop the playhouse being rafed to benet the Franklin Toy Project.

PAGE 3

LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, December 5, 2013 Fresh,GradeA, NoWaterAdded 1piece, PreviouslyFrozen 12ozpkg 10lbbag 3lbbag Gallon 4lbbag 30ozjar 16.5ozbox, ClassicVarieties 4lbbag, Individually QuickFrozen USDAInspected Fr F F Fr F F F Fr es es es s h h h h h h h G G G G G G G G G G G G G ra ra a a a a a a de de d de d d d A A A A A A A A A A A A A Sale! Save upto $2.20lb Save upto $1.40lb Save upto $2.24ea Save upto $9.00lbSliced Free Save upto $1.49ea Save upto $2.00ea Save upto $2.00 on2 Save upto $2.00ea Save upto $1.21ea Save upto $1.18 on2 Save upto 61ea DAVIDRICHSHwy71,Wewahitchka,FL,Openat6amCTCARRABELLEHwy98&7thSt.,Carrabelle,FL,Openat7amET SENTENCED from page A1the money on food, tools, childrens clothes, dental care and a theme park visit. Noblit was red as the housing authority director, a position she held about four years, in July 2012, about a month after a federal grand jury returned an indictment against her. The theft was discovered in the course of an investigation and audit conducted by HUD and the Apalachicola Housing Authority. The next month, Noblits husband delivered two checks totaling about $11,000 to AHA, according to records. Noblit told federal ofcials she always had intended to repay the money, but her nances became too co-mingled, and she lost track of how much she owed. Judge Robert L. Hinkle could have sentenced Noblit to up 10 years in prison. BROADBAND from page A1is a partnership between Opportunity Florida and the Florida Rural Heartland Economic Development Initiative, agencies that serve areas of critical economic concern in the state. Jim Brook, executive director of Opportunity Florida representing the rural Panhandle, said one of the main goals is to provide cost-effective, high-speed Internet directly to community anchor institutions, such as public schools, libraries, local governments and emergency services. It will provide additional capacity, at hopefully affordable rates, Brook said. According to data from the FRBA, only 39 percent of these rural areas have access to broadband service, yet they represent about 20 percent of Floridas land mass. The middle mile broadband network will extend the current Internet backbone to local Internet service providers that serve households and small businesses in these communities. Brook said the back-haul network is required to meet capacity requirements of up to 200 megabytes per second. Traditionally, the end result to the residential consumer would be provided by independent ISPs that traditionally sell at the last mile, Brook said. It provides a scalable, and in many cases, less costly capacity. Brook said the intention is not to compete with current providers, but simply to increase capacity. This was not a system that was put in place to replace existing services, Brook said. Were not only willing, but were obligated to negotiate with existing providers. Once the project is completed, service will be sold at a lowest reasonable cost through a network operator, Brook said, which is in the nal stages of negotiation. Within the $4.7 trillion stimulus package, $7.2 billion was designated for broadband infrastructure projects in rural areas across the country. To qualify for grants, companies must show they can provide broadband service to areas that meet any of the following: 90 percent of households have no broadband access, 50 percent have inadequate broadband coverage at speeds of less than three megabytes per second, or service is available, but less than 40 percent of the population subscribes. This was a system that was primarily developed to provide additional capacity and capacity needed to community anchor institutions, Brook said. Its trying to equalize the country in terms of access to technology. Armstrong opened his subject of weight loss by congratulating the students on their work against tobacco and recounting his own experience of getting his dad to quit smoking. Tobacco kills. Tobacco cuts life short, he said, and then told how he was in rst grade when the U.S. Surgeon Generals report on the dangers of smoking rst came out. I took the message home, said Armstrong, now in his early 50s. Dad was a smoker; he smoked a lot. Armstrong said he reveled in retelling the dangers of smoking at the dinner table (A new danger every day) and even went so far as to ush his dads cigarettes down the toilet, a step he did not recommend to the students. The upshot of the story was that Armstrongs father quit smoking cold turkey, and he has had no signs of the cancer and heart disease that often afict smokers. Armstrong said his dad recently mentioned out of the blue how his children helped him to quit smoking. It told us how important kids are in getting messages home that matter, Armstrong said. Theres another challenge we face thats cutting lives short, the challenge of weight, continued the surgeon general. He said statistics statewide indicate only about one-third of Floridians are at healthy weight. One quarter are obese, and the rest are overweight. Based on this current trend, by 2030, almost 60 percent of the states residents will be obese. Six of 10 students will be overweight or obese by the time they graduate high school, Armstrong said. Though he did not elaborate on the economics, the states website notes that the costs of care for chronic diseases from obesity alone diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and arthritis are estimated to be $34 billion over the next 17 years. It says over the next 20 years in Florida, obesity could contribute to 2.4 million new cases of type 2 diabetes 6.2 million new cases of heart disease and stroke, 5.3 million new cases of hypertension, 3.3 million new cases of arthritis and almost 1 million new cases of obesity-related cancer. Armstrong, a Princeton grad who completed medical school at the University of Virginia in 1988, said when he became a doctor 25 years ago, 10 to 12 percent of his colleagues had a challenge with their weight. Now, 33 percent are obese, Armstrong said. He said the states initiative is designed to encourage Floridians to make choices of their time and energy that favor weight loss. Adults on average spend 4 hours a day in front of the television screen, he said. The problem with being inactive is that your body remembers, slowly. How can we reshape environments? he asked. We can do it if we recognize we can support each other to make healthy choices. Were working with communities to reshape what is the norm. Armstrong said cultural change can have a dramatic impact, noting that in the 1960s, eight out of 10 men smoked cigarettes, and today it is nowhere near as prevalent. The states Healthiest Weight initiative covers a variety of priorities, including boosting the practice of breastfeeding, promoting improved nutrition and physical activity in early care and education as well as for students during the school day and after-school programs, ensuring all foods and beverages in schools meet or exceed dietary guidelines, increasing access to high-quality, affordable foods and promoting health professional awareness and counseling of patient body mass index (See inset box). Armstrong boiled down the priorities for students to three basic steps: Substitute water for sugary sodas and other drinks; substitute Fresh from Florida fruits and vegetables for processed cereals and breakfast and chips at lunch; and increase physical activities by taking stairs instead of elevators and going for walks. He even took a moment to show off the pedometer that he wears on his belt. You begin to think differently when youre in motion, he said. I know it sounds really oldfashioned, but its the old-fashioned thats going to work, he said. Were not too busy. Were making different choices. I urge you to take this message home to your parents. In response to questions from the audience, Armstrong took a dim view of the new fad of electronic cigarettes, which he described as nicotine-delivering devices. Thats a dangerous drug that contributes to blood vessel disease, he said. I believe its been introduced to hook people on nicotine. After a small reception in which fruits and vegetables were served, Armstrong and the health department ofcials headed for a tour of the schools dental clinic, where the surgeon general met the staff. At the legislative delegation hearing Monday evening, Lindeman told State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, that the clinic has served 461 patients since it opened, 366 of them age 17 or younger, and provided a total of 3,200 services. Were still struggling a little bit lling the schedule with our Medicaid population, she said. The need is larger than is accessing it right now. Access is contributing to the lack of use. We thought the doors would blow open when we opened the clinic, and they have not. Its the only one like it in the state, Lindeman said. We are talking right now about how to get more services. Were looking at additional funding or to open more chairs in Apalachicola. She said in addition to the Medicaid population, well take any child, regardless of the ability to pay. Montford responded that if you have it available to them, it may be a question of fear of the dentist. Rep. Beshears and I have that as a priority of ours. FAT from page A1

PAGE 4

USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, December 5, 2013 APage 4SectionBy Roy Lee CarterSpecial to the Times Buying a fresh tree is probably the most important piece of advice we can offer. There are a couple of reasons why a fresh tree is important. Obviously a fresh tree will last, and look better longer. Old, dried-out trees are unattractive. Also they are re hazards as well. Since most of us include electric lights in our tree decorations, its easy to see that a dried out tree becomes very dangerous. My information on purchasing and caring for Christmas trees was provided by Emeritus Extension Horticulture Specialist Dr. Robert Black, of The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). There are several ways to determine a trees freshness. Bend the needles if the tree is fresh, the needles will be supple and springy. If the tree is old, the needles will snap and break off. Bounce the trees stump on the ground to see how many needles fall. Its normal for a fresh tree to drop a few needles. But, if bouncing produces a shower of needles, put the tree back and select another. Before buying, also feel the bottom of the stump. The sap of a fresh tree is sticky. On an old stump, its hard and caked. A fresh tree also should have a pleasant fragrance one that will last through the Christmas season. The tree you select should have a good green color, be full and bushy, and have sturdy branches. Strength of branches is more a matter of the tree type than the trees age or condition. White pine and red cedar trees are well suited to the Florida climate. But, unfortunately, they both have fairly weak boughs that wont hold decorations very well. Firs, spruces, Virginia and Scotch pines on the other hand, usually have very rm branches. Since rs, spruces and Scotch pines dont grow naturally in Florida; they have to be imported from northern states. So, they usually cost a lot more than either white pines or red cedars. In addition to lower prices, Florida grown trees have another advantage. If you can get living trees balled in burlap, they can be added to the landscape after the Christmas season is over. The key to maintaining a fresh Christmas tree throughout the holiday season is giving the tree proper care from the time it is purchased until it is disposed of. Before you set up your tree, make a fresh, straight cut across the base of the tree and place the tree in a tree stand that holds at least two quarts of water. Be sure you keep the stand lled at all times. Its surprising how quickly a good-sized tree can take up a quart of water. Check the water level at least once a day. Place your tree in the coolest part of the room. Keep it away from things like replaces, heaters, air ducts, and even TV sets. The heat form these can cause the tree needles to dry out and drop off very quickly. Proper Christmas tree care is only part of the story. There are certain safety rules you should follow carefully. Never use candles or anything with an open ame on or near the tree. If youre using electric lights, check them over very carefully for loose connections and worn wires. Dont overload your electrical circuits. If you must use an extension cord, run it out of the way of foot traf c, and be sure its heavy enough for the current load. Always turn the tree lights off when you leave home or go to bed. Buying and caring for your Christmas tree may not be the weightiest problem on your mind as we move into the Christmas season. But, if you plan to have a natural Christmas tree in your home this year, youll need to give some thought to both subjects. Keep in mind that a fresh tree with good shape and sturdy branches usually will make the best tree for displaying and decorating. Make sure you keep the tree in the best possible place, and that you water it every day. Take the time to properly care for your Christmas tree, and it will reward your efforts with radiant beauty throughout the holiday season. For more information on Christmas tree care, contact the extension service 653-9337 or email rlcarter@u .edu. Roy Lee Carter, the Gulf County extension director with special emphasis on small farms and home horticulture, is assisting with the Franklin County extension service. Purchasing and caring for your Christmas tree ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension director About a month ago, someone donated a bunch of shing books. I have to make the disclaimer that I am shing challenged. If they had a book called Fishing for Dummies it would be right up my alley, oops there is a book Fishing for Dummies on Amazon. Anyway, the most interesting book addition to the collection was Floridas Fishing Legends and Pioneers by Doug Kelly. It is part of the Wild Florida Series, which includes several shing books, eco-trips and walks and other topics, some of which I have added to my wishlist. They are published by the University Press of Florida which, incidentally, will be sending books to Authors in Apalach on March 15, as part of the book vendors and publishers expansion of that event. But back to shing. As one might expect, Kellys book is full of pictures of guys, and some gals, proudly displaying their catches, like the 544pound tuna caught by Vic Dunaway in 1962. The book offers a timeline of the great shermen of Florida, a state known as a premier shing destination, born as early as the 1870s, with a number still out there catching away. Kelly has selected them to highlight techniques, equipment, and strategies, as well as legendary personalities. Other titles added to the collection include Fishermens Knots, Fishing Rigs, and How to Use Them, by Bob McNally; and Baits, Rigs and Tackle by the aforementioned Dunaway. This looks like a very practical book of every angler. Florida Sportsmans Sport Fish of Florida with color pictures of 231 species, has information on food values, methods and ranges. Finally, for those who are really into it, Fly Tying for Beginners is in spiral format to make it easy to keep the page open while using the stepby-step instructions. The author is Peter Gathercole, described on the back cover as one of Britains leading y dressers. Now theres a new term for my vocabulary. Anyway, the Apalachicola library has quite a large collection of books on shing, more than 30 nonction titles with even a couple in the Junior collection. Now, they are cataloged as nonction, but you know what they say about sh stories. In ction, a subject search offers titles which have shing as one of their themes, including Fishing for a dream: ocean lullabies and night verses in the Easy section. The library is going to be weeding books in the next few months in order to continue to t in its 1500-square foot building, but you can be sure the shing books will remain as a local interest category. Please come by and join the library (its Free) and take advantage of these wonderful resources. Adult books circulate for three weeks and can be renewed. The library hours are now 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, with some hours on Saturdays courtesy of volunteer staff. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Some shing books that didnt get away@THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Editors note: This Saturday, Dec. 7, America will observe with sad memories the 72nd anniversary of the Japanese attack that launched U.S. involvement in World War II. December 7, 1941, Japan attacked our naval base at Pearl Harbor without warning; in an act of undeclared war that peaceful Sunday morning. The planned attack in icted massive destruction on ships and countless innocent lives; as wave after wave of Japanese planes strafed and bombed everything in sight. Our nation was outraged and badly crippled by Japans merciless massacre; so we fought back in self-defense, and over three years of bloody battles, slowly regained supremacy. Then our troops invaded Okinawa, Japans last stronghold in the Paci c, and captured the island; leaving our next major offensive, the heavily forti ed mainland of Japan. With no end in sight to stop the sacri ce of innocent lives; our war-weary country felt the time was right to test our secret, the atomic bomb, on enemy sites. The bombs devastated Hiroshima like doomsday and Japan immediately conceded to our demands for unconditional surrender and all POWs set free. August 6, 1945, was the historical day the Japanese American war ceased; and today we are allies, united in pursuing world peace.Memories of war MARY WESTBERGSpecial to the TimesAs Floridians readied to gather with families and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving, State Senator Dwight Bullard (D-Cutler Bay) last week announced a new initiative which offers to create healthier food options for communities and create new commerce in the state of Florida. As families look to prepare a holiday meal with the freshest produce our state can offer, some of them wont be able to get the quality ingredients they desire in their own neighborhoods, Bullard said. With so many pockets of communities isolated as food deserts unable to purchase fresh vegetables and fruits its hard to ensure that quality nutritious foods are reaching our children and families during the year, or even the holidays. Over the past several years, the level of food desert awareness has risen signi cantly. Food deserts are de ned as areas that have a low median family income, and at least one-third of the population lives more than one mile from a supermarket. Bullards bill would allow produce suppliers who locate their businesses in these areas to be eligible for tax incentives, and encourages residents in food desert neighborhoods to start fresh food markets of their own. The bill would also require produce businesses purchase at least 15 percent of its inventory from instate companies which would help spur growth in existing Florida businesses. With such an abundance of Floridagrown produce, we want to ensure that communities throughout the state have the opportunity to enjoy these rich treasures closer to home, Bullard said. I believe that with local businesses and communities partnering together, we can provide better opportunities for the people of our state. Senator announces Food Desert bill DWIGHT BULLARD This is a good time to remind active duty service members and veterans about the many education assistance bene ts available to them through the G.I. Bill and other government programs. The Post 9/11 GI Bill is more exible and generally offers more generous bene ts. It provides up to 36 months of support for education and housing to individuals with at least 90 days of active duty after Sept. 11, 2001, or those with a service-connected disability after 30 days. An honorable discharge is required. Approved training includes undergraduate and graduate degrees, and vocational/ technical/on-thejob training, among others. You will be eligible for bene ts for 15 years from your last period of active duty of at least 90 consecutive days. This program covers 100 percent of tuition and fees for in-state students at public institutions, paid directly to the school. For those attending private or foreign schools, it will pay up to $19,198 per academic year (sometimes more in certain states). If you attend a costlier private school or a public school as a non-resident you also may be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program, where schools voluntarily fund tuition expenses exceeding the highest public in-state undergraduate rate. The institution can contribute up to 50 percent of those expenses and the Veterans Administration will match the amount. The 9/11 GI Bill also will pay a books and supplies stipend of up to $1,000 per year, and a monthly housing allowance generally comparable to the military Basic Allowance for Housing for a military pay grade E-5 with dependents, based on the ZIP code for your school. Another advantage of this newer GI Bill: Armed Forces members with at least six years service can transfer some or all of their bene ts to their spouse and/or children. To learn more about the GI Bill, visit www. gibill.va.gov. Other VAsponsored educational nancial aid programs can be found at www. gibill.va.gov/bene ts/ other_programs/index. html.GI Bill eases college costs for military families JASON ALDERMAN

PAGE 5

The Times | A5Thursday, December 5, 2013 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER SKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit.CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening.DIDYOUKNOWthatstudiesshow: NOW,DIDYOUKNOW? VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet|PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-7070|www.iversmd.com ALLMAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED9am-6pm 9am-2pm Itstimetogothroughyourclosets forthoseunwantedpairsofshoes, inreasonablecondition. Youcanbringtheshoesto CoastalFootandAnkleClinic locatedat221HWY98. DonationswillgotoFranklinsPromise andwillbedistributedatthe CommunityServiceCenter (OldApalachicolaHighSchool) at19214thStreetinApalachicola. DistributionwillbeDecember3rd and17thfrom9:00amto12:00pm. isproudtoannouncethe isnowunderway.Helpthoseinneed. Youcancall653-FEET(3338)formoreinformation.12thAnnual SHOEDRIVE BalloonBouquets51MarketSt.,SuiteA ( 850 ) 899-1588 NOTICEOFSPECIALMEETINGeBoardofCommissioners oftheNorthwestFlorida RegionalHousingAuthority willholdaSpecialMeetingon December17,2013,atthe HolidayInn&Suites,2725 GravesRoad,Tallahassee, Florida.Meetingwillbeginat 1:00p.m.E.S.T.emeeting willbeopentothepublic. BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 2NICELOTS 12TH&OWEN,$16,500 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Law EnforcementBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com The Irish Town II was raised on Monday. The 43-foot shrimp boat, built in 1970, sank early Sunday, Nov. 24 after capsizing in a gust of wind while lowering her outrigger arms. Her crew was forced to swim to safety through frigid waters on the rst cold day of winter. The Irish Town II rapidly took on water and sank in the channel, creating an impediment to navigation. Owner Kenneth Martina, arriving on the scene soon after the mishap, was able to move the boat from the channel on the same day but efforts to raise the vessel dragged on for over a week. The salvage efforts have drawn an audience along the waterfront. Workers nally succeeded in raising the Irish Town II, around dusk Monday, using a crane mounted on a barge. Once the boat was pumped out, she was towed to moorings at the Mill Pond where Martina is assessing damage to the boat. Its around $20,000, said Martina. He said he had no insurance on the boat. Im working to get the engine and the transmission running, now, he said. Ill be working on her for a year or so. The dock beside the pier was littered with a waterlogged microwave and other items of oaded from the Irish Town II. At least shes oating, said Martina. I have another shrimp boat so my brother and I can keep working. This is really more of a sideline for me and thats a good thing. Arrest REPORT Williams released to Tallahassee addressSpecial to the TimesNorman Bill Williams, a notorious sex-offender who absconded in 2011 after he was released from prison to live in woods outside Eastpoint, has completed his prison time and registered as a sexual predator living in Tallahassee. Williams was released from state custody on Sunday, and is now registered as living at 1224 Eppes Drive in Tallahassee. On Dec. 1, he completed the terms of a 30-month sentence for failing to register as a sexual predator in Sept. 2011, part of a case that drew state and national attention. At the time, Williams, 58, had just completed a seven-year sentence for sexual battery, part of a prison history that included incarceration for cocaine possession, burglary, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, grand theft of a motor vehicle and escape. Classi ed as a sexual predator, he ed Eastpoint after state probation of cials released him from prison on conditional supervision to live in the woods. Williams, who was left Sept. 24, 2011 to camp on government land off Bear Creek Road, slipped off his ankle bracelet and absconded, until he was apprehended Oct. 10 at a fuel dock in Leeville, La. An alert employee at the Leeville store had seen through Williams clumsy disguise, and soon he was extradited back to Franklin County. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe shrimp boat Irish Town II was raised using a crane mounted on a barge after it capsized last week. The Irish Town II sustained damage to the bow during the salvage operation. Inset: Owner Kenneth Martina at work aboard the Irish Town II.Irish Town II a oat again NORMAN BILL WILLIAMS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMESThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.NOV. 25Harry J. Hall, Jr., 34, Lanark Village, violation of probation (FCSO)NOV. 26Joshua L. Pilotti, 24, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO)NOV. 28Jonathan E. Cooper, 32, Apalachicola, driving while license revoked habitual (FHP) Barbara R. Buzbee, 63, Apalachicola, corruption by threats against a public servant and reckless driving (APD)NOV. 30Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Julia M. Guthrie, 43, Eastpoint, DUI (FHP)DEC. 2Alice A. Amerson, 23, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Kayla R. Langley, 29, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Derrick E. Kennedy, 41, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO)

PAGE 6

WILLIEisa2yearold creamcoloredChihuahua. Heisveryfriendlyand verysocial.Hewould makeagreatcompanion lap-dogforsomeone. Hewouldbehappiest inahomewithout youngchildrenwhere hecouldbethecenter oftheuniverse.Heis heartwormnegative,neuteredandreadyforhisforeverhome! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofourdogs andcats.Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringone ofouranimalsintotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds. Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklin CountyHumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.You maylogontothewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtoseemore ofouradoptablepets. OFTHEWEEKPET 227.7847FranklinCountyHumaneSocietySeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthCallToday4516770 isYearsLocation Coming FraserFir5to10 SocietyA6 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Franklin Countys newest Christmas tradition, the Best Dressed Dog contest, has come and gone. This years winners were Ponto and Wallye McMillan, of Carrabelle and Atlanta, the pair belonging to Lily and Zach McMillan. Ponto, a 125-pound Rottweiler was also biggest in show, but he was a good sport and remained patient throughout the judging. Ponto and Wallyes costumes were created by Rebecca McMillan, Zachs mother. She said a hot glue gun and several visits to Hobby Lobby contributed to her success. First runners-up were Heidi, a Yorkie in a pink tutu, and Bailey a terrier mix disguised as Santa. The pair belongs to Darlene Pearce, also of Carrabelle. Second runners-up were Moxie and Ray Ray, both mixed breeds, the siblings rescued from the Franklin County Animal Shelter. Returning for the second time were Laffy Taffy and Frankie Blue Eyes Nugent, an attractive pair belonging to Raquel and Michael Nugent. Carrabelle Police Chief Craig Kincaid was on hand with Gizmo, a rescue dog from Michigan, in a handsome Christmas sweater. Lovely Nina, a white standard poodle, appeared with owner Sally Heinz, of Memphis, Tenn. Shelter Director Karen Martin said the event found homes for two kittens and raised money for the humane society. She was pleased with the turnout, especially since it competed with several important football games.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove: Wallye and Ponto, with owners Lily and Zach McMillan, took rst place in the dog apparel competition. Top Right: Carrabelle Police Chief Craig Kincaid and trained attack dog Gizmo. Bottom Right: Frankie Blue Eyes, right, and Laffy Taffy prove dogs come in all shapes and sizes, as the pair returned for a second try at the countys coveted Best Dog Costume Award. Canines carry off Christmas couture Special to the TimesOn Nov. 12, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board (GCWB) celebrated 17 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon at Gulf Coast State Colleges Advanced Technology Center. This is the last time an annual meeting would be held for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, because in 2014, we will adopt a new identity, CareerSource Gulf Coast. Kimberly Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board announced, At the meeting, Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year which included: Assisting 1,016 employers recruit and hire workers Serving 60,336 walkins at the Workforce Center Connecting 7,243 individuals to employment Providing in demand training and employment services to 1,166 adults, dislocated workers, and youth under the Workforce Investment Act Helping 131 families transition from welfare to self sufciency We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, said Bodine. The GCWBs service providers include Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management, Welfare Transition, Food Stamp Employment and Training Program. Individuals who participated in programs operated by service providers as well as by the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, along with their case managers, were recognized. Successful clients recognized during the program included Food Stamp Program participant Tiffany Garrison; Workforce Training Center at Haney Technical Center participant Payton Davidson of A Superior Air Conditioning; veterans Roderick Hills of Chenega, and Scott McDonald of Engility; Kayla Warren of the Bay County Stars program; and Miranda Pilger of the Franklin County Tigers Program. Success story videos were shown at the meeting, and can be accessed at the Workforce Centers You Tube channel http://www.youtube.com/ user/mag5025 At the meeting the board approved a new slate of ofcers for 2014. Bob Swenk (Bay County) will serve as chair, with Ted Mosteller (Franklin County) as past-chair. The executive committee will include Alisa Kinsaul (Bay County), Jennifer Conoley (Bay County). John Reeves (Gulf County) and Betty Croom (Franklin County). The GCWB is a public/ private partnership chartered by the state of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Their mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic development and employment needs of the three counties.Workforce Board elects new ofcers By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival received a great deal of attention from people in high places. President John Solomon and the entire board for the festival worked extra hard to make this important anniversary special and everyone agrees they succeeded. Out of respect for their labors, this years festival received recognition from Washington as well as Tallahassee. State Senator Bill Montford (DMonticello) issued a proclamation commending the board members and volunteers who have given so generously of their time and talents throughout the years to make the festival an enduring success. The proclamation goes on to recount how Apalachicola created seafood festival to lure tourists back to US 98 after the opening of bypass route US 10. Not to be outdone, Cong. Steve Southerland (R-Panama City) read praise of the festival into the Congressional Record on Oct. 30. Southerland presented Solomon with a copy of his speech during his Nov. 22 visit to the county. Southerland praised not just the festival but also, the seafood workers he describes as the backbone of Franklin Countys economy and rich history. Praise rained down from the governors mansion as well. Governor Rick Scott and members of his cabinet issued a resolution Oct. 4, calling on all of Florida to recognize the 50th annual festival and join in the celebration. Perhaps we value most the admiration of those near and dear. Solomon and his crew also received recognition from their friends and neighbors on Oct. 8, when Apalachicola Mayor, Van Johnson and the city commission, issued a proclamation commending the festival volunteers and thanking them for their great service to the city.Florida Seafood Festival gathers recognitions Ted Mosteller of Franklin County, is past-chair of Gulf Coast Workforce Board.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesCong. Steve Southerland, right, presents Florida Seafood Festival President John Solomon with a plaque commemorating the festival.Special to the TimesOn Nov. 15, at the South Florida State College Highlands Campus in Avon Park, Joe Taylor of Apalachicola, executive director of Franklins Promise Coalition, was awarded the Outstanding Volunteer Administrator Award for his outstanding work as a manager of volunteers in the nonprot sector. The award presentation took place during the Florida Association for Volunteer Resource Managements fall forum, established to recognize innovation and a commitment to affect positive change in diverse communities. Taylor serves as the fulltime, paid director of Franklins Promise Coalition, headquartered at 192 14th Street in Apalachicola. One of Franklin Countys strengths is its volunteers. The award I was given is not about me, it is about how the community comes together to tackle challenges and improve all of our lives, said Taylor. It represents the work of every volunteer, whether it is the mom who carpools the kids to soccer practice, or the parents who help at their childs school, the generous folks who support our nonprot organizations or the community leaders who sit on numerous boards and committees.Joe Taylor, left, of Franklin Promise Coalition receives the Outstanding Volunteer Administrator award from FAVRM president, Mary Register.Taylor receives administering award oOUTsSTa ANdiDING MaANaAGEMENT

PAGE 7

The Times | A7Thursday, December 5, 2013 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService FaithIsland Lights celebration FridayThe annual St. George Island Island Lights will be Friday, Dec. 6, mid-island in St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile Jingle Jog starts at 4 p.m. on the bike path in front of the park and proceeds through the business district. All runners receive Santa hats for their heads and jingle bells for their shoes. Runners should arrive a little before 4 p.m. to sign in. A $5 per runner donation is suggested. Santa is expected at 5 p.m., arriving by re engine and providing gifts to children age 10 and younger. Refreshments including cookies, coffee, and hot chocolate will be provided to all. Island Scouts will be selling hot dogs. In the event of rain, many sturdy tents will be set up. View the lighting of the island palms at sundown. The event is hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. For more information, watch www.sgibusinesses. com/island-lights.Santa to visit the Hill on Saturday Santa Claus will pay a special visit to the Hill from 10-11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7. Greet Santa in the parking lot of AJs Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 120 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. Take pictures with the jolly old elf and get a goody bag from Santa. The event is sponsored by AJs, HCOLA & SWAT.First Baptist to have indoor yard sale SaturdayThe First Baptist Christian School will have its annual Indoor Yard Sale, just in time for Christmas, at 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, at First Baptist Church 46 Ninth St. in Apalachicola. The sale this year will benet Rachel Huckeba, who is in need of a liver transplant. There will be clothes, dishes, microwaves, toys, an exercise machine and more.Legion auxiliary to have Saturday yard saleThe American Legion Auxiliary Unit 82, 2316 Oak St., Lanark Village will have a yard sale and Boston butt sale at 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7. Pork barbecue sandwiches with baked beans will be $5 per person, starting at 11 a.m. Boston butts sold whole for $20. Proceeds from this sale will benet local veterans at Christmastime, so come on out to the Legion on Oak Street, get a bargain, a meal and a good time. Just follow the signs.Holiday Fresh Market SaturdayWhy ght the crowds and trafc at the malls? Enjoy the Holiday Fresh Market this Saturday, Dec. 7 in downtown Apalachicola. Shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from fresh seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry. For more information, call 653-9419.Fellowship Baptist to present musical on SundayFellowship Baptist Church, 10 Ellis Van Vleet St., in Apalachicola, will present His Very Own Star, a musical for Christmas, at 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8. For more information, call 653-4200.Eastpoint Christmas parade Dec. 13The county commission has voted unanimously for permission to close U.S. 98 in Eastpoint for the Eastpoint Christmas Parade, scheduled for Friday afternoon, Dec. 13.Love Center to host Dec. 14 Regal PartyOn Saturday, Dec. 14, the Love and Worship Center will host a Regal Christmas Party at the Fort Coombs Armory, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The dinner party will feature the Dream Reality Band, from Valdosta, Ga. Everyone is welcome for this festive occasion. Cost is $20 to cover expenses.Live Nativity scene Dec. 21Carrabelle Christian Center, 142 River Road, Carrabelle, will have a live nativity and depiction of the birth of Christ at 7 and 8 p.m. Dec. 21. The Word became esh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth. John 1:14Donation yoga classes continueThe donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes, 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Battery Park city ofce conference room.Son BarberThank you each member of my church family for your love, cards, visits and sincere prayers for me during my recent illness at home. I have felt the presence, peace and sustaining power of his love through it all.Eul Soon Son BarberJacqueline Houston familyThe family of Jacqueline M. Houston would like to thank the community for the love, support, cards, money, food and kind acts that were shown during our time of bereavement. May God return it back to you. Thank you.Rosamae, Demetrice and DemondFood pantryThe Franklin County Food Pantry would like to thank the ABC School staff, students and their families for their generous donation of food from their 2013 Fall Food Drive. The Franklin County Food Pantry is a 501(c)(3) organization that relies on donations of food and cash to continue its operations. Food is distributed twice a month to an average of 350 families, our neighbors in need. To make donations you can mail a check to the Franklin County Food Pantry 192 14th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320. Call pantry coordinator Lori Switzer at 6533930 to make a food donation or to help out as a volunteer. Had a great time Thanksgiving Day at our annual dinner. One hundred of us gathered together, broke bread and had a good time visiting. Our very own Dot Bless received a gift of appreciation for all her work. Dot then thanked all of us who helped her make it happen. Had a few cancellations earlier, but they were soon replaced by others. In years past, the late Bob Barnhill would slip out after dinner and go over to his and Jeans house and turn on the outside Christmas lights. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve breakfast at Chillas Hall. The doors will open at 8:30 a.m. and close at 11 a.m. Your donation of $5 will ll your plate with pancakes, French toast casserole, eggs, bacon or sausage, juice and coffee. Come on over this Saturday, Dec. 7, and get a good start on the day. Later on Saturday, you can dance the night away at the Senior Center with Jim the disc jockey and have a good time with all your friends and neighbors. We are shooting for the season opener of Wednesday Night Bingo in January. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Dec. 14, when the Parade of Lights will shove off at dusk on the Carrabelle River. I still remember the rst one they had. Our monthly covered dish luncheon will be Sunday, Dec. 15, at Chillas Hall. Serving will begin at 1 p.m. You can still enjoy hamburger night on Friday and pizza on Sunday. Eat in or take out at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Orders are taken from 5-7 p.m. both nights. Yum! Yum! Its beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and when youre out and about dont forget to drop in the Toys for Tots donation boxes and shop locally. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, its better to give than to receive. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LAnNArRK neNEWsSJim WelshBreakfast Saturday morning, dance at night AAAA meeMEETinING schedSCHEDUleLEFor more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDA A Y7:30-8:30 p.m.: Closed AA, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St.TU TU ESDAA YNoon to 1 p.m.: Open, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St.W W EDNESDAA Y6-7 p.m.: Womens AA, Closed, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church7:30-8:30 p.m.: Mens AA, Closed, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal ChurchT T HUURSDAA YNoon to 1 p.m.: Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church7:30-8:30 p.m.: Open AA, St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive FRIDA A Y5:30-6:30 p.m.: AA Happy Hour, Open, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension SATU ATURDAA Y7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Speakers Meeting, Open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr.5:30-6:30 p.m.: Discussion Group: Alligator Point Mission By The Sea SU UNDAA Y7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Big Book Study, Open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church Faith briefsBRIEFS Cards of TTHAANKKS LOIS SW W OBODA A | The Times

PAGE 8

Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, December 5, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Nov.2861 45 0% Fri,Nov.2960 48 0% Sat,Nov.3064 5310% Sun,Dec.163 5510% Mon,Dec.269 48 0 % Tues,Dec.368 47 0 % Wed,Dec.468 47 0 % SantasOutdoorHeadquarters! HolidayGiftsforChildren HugeTrainSetDemo Guns&Ammo By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charternet Capt. Mike Parker, Birmingham, Ala., native, is an angler extraordinaire. But these days hes a Floridian in all but college football. Parker and his wife, Capt. Marguerite Parker, have been running his Silver King charter service for more than a decade here, out of what is arguably the worlds largest charter boat harbor, just east of the Destin/Fort Walton Beach bridge on U.S. 98. I joined Capt. Mike for a four-hour ounder charter on a visit there last week, right on time for the annual run of these tasty at sh. The sh come out of Choctawhatchee Bay on the rst cold fronts of fall and stay on the nearshore reefs until at least Christmas, Parker said. A couple of good anglers can put a limit in the boat anytime we get reasonable weather during that period. Flounder are bottom sh, thus their doormat design; they lie on the bottom partially covered with sand until a minnow or shrimp comes too near, then lunge out and devour it, locking down with a set of inward slanted teeth that are very dif cult to escape for potential prey or for the thumb of an unwary angler trying to remove a hook!WHERE TO LOOKThe ounders here most are southern ounder but with a mix of smaller gulf ounder as well come out of the bays into the Gulf to spawn anywhere between Mobile Bay and Apalachicola Bay when water temperature drops in fall, typically in late October, continuing to late December. The sh come in waves on the fronts, and where there are none today there might be dozens or hundreds tomorrow. They mostly gather near the passes, as well as on nearshore reefs at depths of 40 to 100 feet rarely any farther offshore. Fortunately, the deep water is close in along Panhandle beaches, so gaining access is no problem for those with boats seaworthy enough to get them safely through the inlets. The most abundant schools are found near the passes because thats where the sh come from, and where theyll return in spring. Some anglers do well by simply drifting the buoy line on falling water. And its possible to pick up enough for dinner by shing from the inlet jetties the sh sometimes hang on the sand just off the rocks, as well as at the point where the jetty falls away into the dredged portion of the pass. Southern ounder get big, to 20 pounds and more than 30 inches long. Gulf ounder max out around 6 pounds and 25 inches. But most anglers catch sh 13 to 16 inches, pan-sized but not trophy-sized. Thats ne with Mike Parker. A 15-inch ounder is about the best eating there is in the Gulf, he said. And you dont have to mess with lleting it; just cut off the head and clean out the body cavity, scale it and youre ready to coat it with breadcrumbs and pan-fry; the skin lifts off when youre done and the meat then comes away clean from the bones. This cleaning method also works great if you oven-broil the sh just score the skin on the up side, drizzle a bit of melted butter over it and broil until the tail turns up toward the heat super tasty and pretty healthy, too.FISHING TECHNIQUEMost anglers use a sliding weight above a swivel, with a 2to 3-foot leader running to a 1/0 Kahle style semi-circle hook. The barb of these hooks is turned inward, which helps to keep the lip-hooked bait sh from ipping off. The weight is varied, from as little as 1 ounce nearshore or in slow current to as much as 4 ounces in deep water and strong currents you use the least that will give a rm feel for bottom. Light spinning tackle is generally adequate the same stuff youd use for trout or sheepshead inside the bays, with braided line of 10 to 15 pound test. The braid gives a much better feel for the soft take of the ounder and also gives a better hook-set. The universal bait is bull minnows, which are known as gulf killi sh by biologists. Most baitshops here stock the minnows during ounder season, selling them at about $4.50 per dozen. Theyre about 3 inches long and very hardy. Lots of people want these, and the supply is limited you have to get to most shops early if you want a good supply. Its possible to catch killi sh in standard bait traps with a funneltype lid theyll swim in for both fresh shrimp and cut mullet baits. They can also be seined or castnetted in tidal creeks and around oyster bars. They readily stay alive in a standard baitwell, and you can even keep a couple dozen alive in a ow-through portable bucket. Theyre far tougher than shrimp, stay on the hook despite baitstealers like pin sh and lizard sh, and can live for days in the livewell if not put to use. They are ounder candy a ounder might turn down almost any other bait, but it will never pass up a lively killi sh. The shing tactic is simple: Just drift with the outgoing tide in the ow of the inlets, with the bait dragging bottom. The ounder will take it from there. The bite will be familiar to you if youve done any freshwater bass shing it sometimes feels much like a largemouth latching on to a Carolina rig. At other times, though, the bait just seems to get heavy theres a resistance there but no other action until you set the hook. One good tip from Mike Parker is this: Watch the rod tip. Sometimes it will start bouncing and twitching even though you dont feel anything in the handle. When the tip bounces, set the hook with a steady, upward sweep not too hard or you may tear the hook out, but just get good pressure and help the hook dig in. Where you catch one you might catch a dozen on that same 50-foot stretch of bottom, so it pays to motor back uptide and re-drift a productive spot. And if you miss a sh, just drop the bait right back to the bottomif the bait was not knocked off, the ounder might well come right back and get hooked. The ght of the average 12to 16-inch ounder is not notable, but youre not here for the battle, youre here for dinner. To put the larger ones in the boat, its essential to have a long-handled landing net theyre frequently lightly hooked, and some will surely ip off at the last moment if you dont put the net under them. Biologists say the ounder stay in the Gulf pretty much throughout the winter, but the prime shing time is de nitely the months leading up to the New Year after that, slower metabolism and a scattering out of the schools makes shing slower. The sh return to the bays in March and April, where they settle on channel edges, in sloughs and anywhere they might run into killi sh on a regular basis. The limit is 10 daily over 12 inches long. Both southern ounder and gulf ounder are included in the daily bag theres no separate bag for each species, so no need to be able to tell them apart. (It aint easy.) No license is needed if you sh with a guide or from a pay-entry pier, or if youre a Florida resident over 65. For more information, call 850837-2028 or visit www. shingdestin.com SPECIAL TO THE TIMESFlounder are bottom sh, thus their doormat design; they lie on the bottom partially covered with sand until a minnow or shrimp comes too near, then lunge out and devour it, locking down with a set of inward slanted teeth that are very dif cult to escape for potential prey or for the thumb of an unwary angler trying to remove a hook!Christmas comes early when the ounder run is onPage 8 Outdoors BRIEF SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay BottomTrout and ounder are holding around the creek runoffs in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Neap tides have allowed more bait sh to move up in the canal, in turn bringing the trout and game sh to follow. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in these waters this week as well. Most local creeks and streams are still holding good amounts of bream and now some crappie. The crappie bite should improve this week because of the cold weather and rain. St. Vincent hunting season underwayThe 2013-14 hunting season on St. Vincent Island began with the archery hunt Nov. 20 to 24. The annual Sambar deer hunt is scheduled for Dec. 4-8 and the primitive weapons hunt will take place January 22-24, 2014. Public hunting of whitetailed deer, Sambar deer, feral hogs, and raccoons is permitted on 11,400 acres of St. Vincent Island. Access onto St. Vincent Island is restricted to the Indian Pass and West Pass campsites. Entry during the Sambar deer hunt is restricted to the eastern end of the island at the West Pass campsite. All hunters, regardless of age must possess a refuge permit. Youth hunters (younger than 16 years) must be supervised by a permitted adult at least 21 years of age, and must remain in sight and normal voice contact of the adult. Each adult may supervise only one youth. Some permits to hunt on St. Vincent are issued by lottery. Applications may be submitted at any license agent or tax collector or online at www. .wildlifelicense.com/start.php Up to ve hunters can apply as a group. To apply as a group, one person must rst apply as group leader, indicate they are creating a group, and enter the hunt choice for the group, and submit their $5 application fee. The group leader will be given a group number (prints on receipt) that must be given to the group members. Each group member must then indicate the group they are joining and submit a $5 application fee. Applicants may check the website after June 25 for results. Sambar permits not paid for by August 1 will be offered rst come August 6 given for unsuccessful applicants.

PAGE 9

CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, December 5, 2013 ASection SKATEBOARD PARK HOSTS SATURDAY EVENTEnjoy an early Christmas skateboarding experience this Saturday, Dec 7 at the Justin B. Grif n Skate Park, adjacent to the former Apalachicola High School. Why look any further for your Christmas wishes? Journeys of SGI skateboard department will have all of your skateboarding needs, with sales 20 percent layaway on all products. At 10:30 a.m., there will be a dedication of sign and garden, with a safety and protection course at 11 a.m., and demo skate classes at noon. At 1 p.m. will be a lesson on how to build your own ramp, and at 2 p.m. prize and ramp giveaways. Plenty of food, drink and music, plus free skateboard and accessories giveaways. Parents are strongly suggested to attend! To learn more, call 927-3259 or visit the Facebook page. Donate a plant for the agpole garden or a toy for the Franklin County Sheriff Toy Drive. Proceeds from food and drink to be donated to JBG Skate Park. Sports BRIEFSpecial to The TimesOn Nov. 23, the Lady Seahawks girls varsity soccer team hosted Freeport in a District 1A match, and came away with a 7-0 victory. The Lady Seahawks were on re from the opening whistle and were able to overpower the Bulldogs with an onslaught of scoring. The scoring opened on an unassisted goal by freshman Allie Kirvin. Moments later, off a cross from senior Jessica Shields, Allie Kirvin scored a second goal. To complete her hat trick, she scored her third goal of the match off a rebounded shot which ricocheted off the near post. Freshman Emily Zingarelli scored off a pass from Shields and senior Gracyn Kirvin scored, unassisted, to make the score 5-0 at the half. We had 23 shots on goal in the rst half alone, coach Joe Shields said. Everyone saw opportunities and wanted to take shots, which is a good thing, but I had to rein them in, so we could take this opportunity to work on stringing together passes, which would set up goals in future matches. The carnage continued in the second half with 19 shots on goal from various Lady Seahawks and the total shots on goal by individual players escalated: Senior captain Adrianna Reeder, with seven, senior captain Deborah Dempsey four, junior Katie Seger ve, and Shields nine. Before the nal whistle, Gracyn Kirvin added two more goals, one unassisted on a breakaway and one from a Shields cross, to close out the Bulldogs, 7-0. This was another match in which I was able to substitute liberally and give girls game experience, Shields said. As an example, freshmen Chelsea Register and Myranda McLeod were able to come in the game and each one was able to take a couple shots on goal. The Lady Seahawks, undefeated at home, took a 5-2 record into the Thanksgiving break. They hosted Rutherford High School at home on Tuesday. They play host to West Gadsden today, and on Dec. 10, they travel to Rutherford. On Dec. 12, they will be at Freeport. YEARBOOK STAFF | Special to The TimesSenior captain Adrianna Reeder takes aim in action against FreeportLady Seahawks blank Freeport 7-0By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Former Franklin County Seahawk quarterback Dalin Modican has made quite a name for himself so far this season playing college football. After a year at Independence Community College in Independence, Kansas, during which he did not play football, the 2011 FCHS grad, who played for coach Josh Wright, took the eld this year as a red-shirted freshman for Florida Tech, in Melbourne. The Panthers are a newly instituted Division II program, and a member of the Gulf South Conference. Modican, a 180-pound, 511 wide receiver, has played in 11 of the teams 12 regular season games, and is fourth on the list of pass receivers. He caught 28 tosses, for 227 yards, an average of just over eight yards per catch, and nearly 21 yards per game. In the teams 55-28 loss to North Alabama at home Nov. 9, Modican caught a 26yard touchdown pass from quarterback Bobby Vega to complete a nine-play, 65-yard drive that closed the gap to 3421 with about 11 minutes left in the third quarter. Modican, son of Kenny Wilson and Claudine KelloggWilson, of Apalachicola, had one of his best games of the season against North Alabama, snaring seven passes for 60 yards. Modicans season has been one of steady gains as a receiver. In his rst game, a 23-19 loss at Newberry Sept. 12, he had one reception for eight yards. And then, a week later, in the teams 45-3 loss at home against 16th-ranked West Alabama, he snared a pair of receptions, a two-yarder and a six-yarder. Modican continued to boost his performance, when on Sept. 28 against Delta State in Cleveland, Miss., he caught two passes for 26 yards, a 19-yarder and a seven-yarder. He didnt gure into the box score in the teams 52-14 loss Oct. 5 against top-ranked Valdosta State, but he was in the middle of the action a week later in the teams narrow 4541 loss against Ave Maria. In that game, Modican had three receptions for 32 yards for 5, 8 and 19 yards, and each for a rst down. Modican caught three passes for 14 yards in Florida Techs 28-24 win against Shorter Oct. 19. The passes were for ve yards, six yards and rst down, and three yards. On Oct. 26, Florida Tech downed Warner 37-3, and Modican snared one reception from Vega for ve yards and a rst down into Warner territory at the 48-yard line. A week later, in the Panthers 28-14 loss to West Georgia in Carrollton, Ga, Modican pulled down four passes for 22 yards. On Nov. 16, in the teams 173 win at home against Webber International, Modican caught two consecutive 13-yard passes in the first quarter, both for first downs. On Nov. 23, when Florida Tech downed Alderson Broaddus 32-20 in an away game in Philippi, W.Va., Modican caught three passes for 26 yards, the longest a 14-yarder. Midway through the third quarter, Modican was stopped on a two-point conversion run try. Modican is majoring in business administration. While at FCHS, he caught the schools first passing touchdown and had the first interception in school history. He forced 10 fumbles in one year as a defensive back, and was twice selected AllBig Bend First Team as a defensive back. Modican also helped the basketball team, coached by Fred Drake, advance to the Class A final four and was a Gulf Coast All-Star.Page 9 Modican shines in Florida Tech back eldDALIN MODICAN $00000FS45TRIMMEREasy-to-use,well-balancedtrimmer forhomeowneruse GETGEAREDUPwithprotectiveapparelandaccessories. $00000MS170CHAINSAWDesignedforoccasionalwood-cutting tasksaroundthehome Includesmanyoftheexcellentdesign featuresofourprofessionalmodels Anti-vibrationsystemforcomfortableoperation Barlengthsmayvarybyregion. $00000BG55 HANDHELDBLOWERProvenhandheldbloweratanaffordableprice THISHOLIDAY GIVESOMETHINGDEPENDABLE STIHLusa.com Availableatparticipatingdealerswhilesupplieslast.2011STIHL $17995 $14995 $16995St.JoeRent-All7061stSt. PortSt.Joe,FL850-227-2112"WESELLTHEBESTANDREPAIRTHEREST" HometownProud (850)653-96954514197LadySeahawkfreshmanAllieKirvinandsenior GracynKirvineachscoredthreetimesinthe girlssoccerteam's7-0victoryathomeNov.23 againstFreeport.Bothplayerswereinvolvedin totalteamdefenseandassistedwithkeeping theballintheFreeportendoftheeldforthe majorityofthegame. GulfsideIGA STUDENTATHLETESOFTHEWEEKSPONSOR AllieKirvin GracynKirvin GOING FOR GOAL

PAGE 10

LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 Trades&Services Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines News BRIEFSa major decline in the oysters in the past 10 years, Jesse Page told State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello. We need to get the summer bars open. Its killing us. I dont think people catching small oysters have anything to do with it. Theres a lot of people suffering, and weve got a gold mine sitting out there, Im asking for six to eight weeks, open em, he said. They open that up out there and people can go to work like myself. I dont want a handout. Later in the meeting, when all ve county commissioners appeared together to speak, Commissioner William Massey made a formal appeal to the legislators to talk with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission about opening up more bars during December. They need to hear in the next few days, he said. As of Wednesday morning, the FWC had taken no action to open up additional bars. Shannon Hartseld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, took to Facebook to quell rumors the summer bars were opening this week. We as the board have put in a proposal asking that they open these bars for a few weeks to help everyone out because times are terrible, he wrote. We are trying everything possible to get help for our fellow seafood workers and their families. Just as soon as we hear something, and we hope we get a response soon, we will let everyone know. Page also voiced concern about the recent stepped-up law enforcement efforts on bay waters, intended to stem the tide of undersized and illegally harvested oysters owing into oyster houses. Theyre harassing people left and right, he said. They cant afford to feed their kids, much less pay a ticket. Next to speak was Dustin Varnes, who questioned why more than $4 million in BP money earmarked for oyster reef research isnt going toward reshelling. Why are we putting $4 million back in the bay if weve already done it? Why cant we put it into a shelling program? he asked. Were not asking for a handout; we want to work. Oystering is a hard job; we work hard for our money. We just need help buddy, we need help. Im about to lose everything Ive got. In his appeal to legislators to back a plan to open up more of the bay for harvesting, Hartseld said the state has said it would be a health risk. If you could nd out a little more about it, were looking for anything that would help ourselves out, he said. During the BP oil spill, they opened the entire bay. Water sampling wasnt an issue; they just opened it. Hartseld urged legislators to seek an appropriation to help the bay after the session opens March 14. Both Montford and Beshears said they are continuing to work on the countys behalf. We want to help anybody who wants to help themselves, Beshears said. Do not think for onehalf a second it falls on deaf ears. Were paddling that boat as fast as we can. Its unfortunate thats its had to be an industry collapse for anyone to pay attention. The governors been down here several times, its on his radar, he said. Just hang in there. This is a unique problem, unlike any other in the country. The problem weve been having is weve run out of time. We will stay on top of it. Montford encouraged the seafood workers to continue to speak out. Dont sit back and be quiet. Keep on doing what youre doing, he said. We all know we have a problem out there. People as far as Miami know the problem up here. This is not a north Florida problem, its a Florida problem. When the county commissioners came forward to speak, Commissioner Smokey Parrish addressed what he said was too much authority being invested in FWC. Thats a very serious issue. There has to be checks and balances, he said. You give a lot of authority to one group that answers to nobody. Parrish appealed for help to the oyster industry. The state of Florida has to step up. We need to get some help down here, he said. Why cant we all work together and get something for these guys? He also called for the reopening of the Bay City Work Camp, a position that was supported later in the meeting by Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook and City Administrator Betty Webb. Commissioner Pinki Jackel spoke briey, thanking the legislators for their work as a bipartisan team. We appreciate your putting the bay at the forefront, she said. We hope you all will do something hopefully sooner rather than later. Commissioner Noah Lockley spoke at length, telling the legislators that since he began working on that water in 1969, this is the worse Ive seen. Now its worse, and its going to take time for it to get better. Its not going to happen overnight. Its going to take three to ve years to get this right. This thing is affecting a whole lot of people, he said. One of our biggest workforces is seafood, and were losing it. Lockley faulted FWC for ignoring the problem of undersized oysters and now cracking down hard. They sit down and let people come in with little oysters. They didnt enforce it. They do their job, but they should have been doing it all the time, he said. He also took issue with the fact that Adam Putnam, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture since 2011, has yet to visit the county. Hes not been down, Lockley said. I havent seen him, not the whole time hes been in ofce. He needs to show his face. Chairman Cheryl Sanders asked for better communication from state ofcials. We have all these projects going on. We need a little bit better communication levels than what we had, she said. She also defended herself against attacks regarding her stance against the Air Force using Tates Hell for military exercise, an issue that will be revisited on Dec. 12 at a public hearing in Apalachicola. It may not seem very important to a lot of people, she said. If you do not sh or hunt, you dont use the forest, you dont understand what were talking about. That doesnt bother me. Sanders closed by asking that the state not hand down any more unfunded mandates. Leave us just as harmless as you found us, she said. The legislators heard from Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson and Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper, with their remarks mainly warm greetings and appreciation for past assistance. Superintendent Nina Marks asked for funding help with vocational training and learning academies and said the districts wish list includes curriculum expansion into child care, allied medical professions, marine studies and junior ROTC. We need the funding to help make the classes what they need to be, she said. We need to be able to feed our children back into the community because they do want to stay here. Marks also called for a transition period of at least two years for full implementation of the Common Core standards and appealed for more exibility in setting the school calendar. We can start earlier and get through with a full semester before the Christmas holidays, she said. We need more time on the clock. The legislators also heard from Joe Taylor, director of the Franklins Promise Coalition, who introduced members of the Bridges to Circles program, an effort to provide the skills to people to help them better manage the workforce demands and their own nances. Marcia Lindeman, administrator of the county health department, and Gina Moore, who oversees the anti-tobacco program, provided details of the anti-smoking effort, the dental clinic and other functions of the health department. OYSTERMEN from page A1 DAVI I D ADLERS ERS TEI EI N | The TimesCounty Commissioner Smokey Parrish speaks out, with his colleagues. SSaturday lm to remember Pearl Harbor On Saturday, Dec. 7, at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, the lm Tora, Tora, Tora will be shown in the movie room. Released in 1970, the American-Japanese collaboration war lm dramatizes the Japanese reasons for the attack that brought America into the war. Some scenes are archival lm taken from one of the carriers participating in the attack. The lm, directed by Richard Fleischer, stars an ensemble cast, including Martin Balsam, Joseph Cotten, S Yamamura, E. G. Marshall, James Whitmore and Jason Robards. The title, which in Japanese means Tiger, was the code word used to indicate that complete surprise had been achieved. There will be one showing beginning at 10:30 a.m. Free popcorn will be available. Admission at the museum is by donation. IIsland reghters annual meeting Dec. 14The annual meeting of the St George Island Volunteer Fire Department will be at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 14 at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave., St George Island. An agenda will be available for review on Wednesday, Dec. 11, at the rehouse. The public is invited to attend and participate in accordance with applicable governing documents. A light lunch will follow the business meeting.Loan assistance available Dec. 17The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host one-on-one technical assistance sessions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17, where a representative from the FAMU Small Business Development Center and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity will be on hand to address questions and to provide information to small business owners in completing the Small Business Administrations Economic Injury Disaster Loan application. An Economic Injury Disaster Loan Declaration was approved by the SBA in response to a commercial shery failure determination for the Apalachicola Bay Area. The chamber ofces are at 122 Commerce St. Applicants may apply for an SBA loan online using the Electronic Loan Application via SBAs secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ ela. Applications and program information are available by calling the SBAs Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (1-800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing), or by emailing disastercustomerservice@sba. gov. Applications also can be downloaded from www.sba.gov. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. The deadline to return economic injury applications is July 31, 2014.Dameron named emergency coordinatorTress Reynolds Dameron is the new Franklin County Emergency Management coordinator. Dameron, an Apalachicola High School graduate with an associates degree in general studies, works as a veterinary technician. Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said Dameron has completed FEMA Incident Command System certication and her Professional Development Certicate, so she is eligible to be paid out of grant funds. Brownell said Dameron has attended several training session and exercises and helped with planning for the animal needs of Franklin County and the humane society.

PAGE 11

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, December 5, 2013 The Times | A11 96649T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 16, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: See Exhibit A PARCEL 1: LOTS 1 TO 10, SHELL BAY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF DOC SEA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY; FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2897.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 56 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 571.37 FEET, SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 71.47 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 49 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 66.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 139.22 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 46 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 23.21 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 11.86 FEET, SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 48.10 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 22.42 FEET TO AN IRON ROD LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUN96625T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000271 SEC.:________ THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-45 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-45, Plaintiff, vs. HOYT THOMPSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012CA000271 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 Inside the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: THE SOUTHWESTERLY 90 FEET OF LOT 6 (OR THE 90 FEET OF SAID LOT NUMBER 6 ADJOINING 13 STREET), AND ALL OF LOT 7, IN BLOCK 85, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT SAID CITY NOW IN GENERAL USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 21st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96645T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, W. E. SALMON, INC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1462 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOTS 7 & 8 BLOCK A CARRABELLE ET AL Full Legal Can be Obtained in the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Courts Office PARCEL NO: 29-07S-04W-4170-000A-00 70 Name is which assessed: ROBERT & PATRICIA EDWARDS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of JANUARY 2014, which is the 6th day of January 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 25th day of November, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Dec. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013 96617T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA000061 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES B. MITCHELL, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated November 28, 2012 and pursuant to Order rescheduling foreclosure sale entered September 23, 2013, both entered in Case No. 192009CA 000061 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CHARLES B. MITCHELL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES B. MITCHELL N/K/A PATTY MITCHELL; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SGI LIMITED PARTNERSHIP; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby in FRANKLIN County, Florida, at 11AM, on the 12th day December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, RESORT VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Street Address: LOT 4 RESORT VILLAGE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 22nd day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy-Clerk If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding or other court service, program, or activity, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Requests for accommodations may be presented on this form, in another written format, or orally. Please complete the attached form and return it to: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4430 as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or other court activity. Submitted by: MOSKOWITZ, MANDELL, SALIM & SIMOWITZ, P.A. 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 Primary E-mail: relit@mmsslaw.com Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96613T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-75-CP Division_________ IN RE: ESTATE OF JACK EDWARD WHITE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jack Edward White, deceased, whose date of death was October 31, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 28, 2013. Personal Representative: Kimberly Dawn Robinson 4258A Maxwell Road Antioch, TN 37013 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96611T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 13000166CA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FNMA) Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 29, 2013, and entered in Case No. 13000166CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FNMA) is Plaintiff and FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 8th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: All that certain parcel of land situated in the County Franklin, State of Florida, being known and designated as Lot 15 Block A of BAYWOOD ESTATES (unrecorded): Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 17, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and run North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 17 (as monumented) a distance of 553.11 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along said South boundary 587.43 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 01 degrees 14 minutes 33 seconds East 413.23 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Baywood Drive, said point lying on a curve concave to the Southerly, thence run Easterly along said right-of-way boundary and along the arc of said curve with a radius of 419.16 feet, through a central angle of 21 degrees 57 minutes 46 seconds, for an arc distance of 160.67 feet, the chord of said arc being North 89 degrees 14 minutes 24 seconds East 159.69 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the point of tangency, thence run South 79 degrees 46 minutes 43 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 430.62 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 50 minutes 07 seconds West 347.44 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH a perpetual non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as described in Official Records Book 628, Page 488 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of October, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Rd, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates. com File No.: 13-00882 LBPS Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96605T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000254 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 107 Southern Blvd., Suite 203 Savannah, GA 31405 Plaintiff, vs. J. MARK MCGILL A/K/A MARK MCGILL, and MYRA MCGILL A/K/A MYRA B. MCGILL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Calhoun County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK B, RANGE 10, PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly known as: 501 AVENUE D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the 8th day of January, 2014, at 11 :00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must me a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 93276T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013CP000031 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BELA THOMAS BROWN, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the administration of the Estate of BELA THOMAS BROWN, deceased; Case No.: 2013CP000031 is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 33, Apalachicola, Florida 32301. The Personal Representative of the Estate is ROBERT D. RAMOS, whose address is 615 Pineland Avenue, Belair, Florida 33756 All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney and the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured; the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to the Personal Representative. All persons interested in the Estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THIRTY DAYS FROM RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may have the challenges the validity of the decedents Will, the qualifications of the Personal Representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. DATED this 25th day of November, 2013. s/Larry K. White Larry K. White, Esq ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER FL BAR NO. 0194456 1367 E. Lafayette Street, Suite A Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 577-3230-Phone (850) 727-4525-Fax larrykwhite@lkwlaw.net December 5, 12, 2013

PAGE 12

A12| The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS DARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 3: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 WEST, 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U. S. HIGHWAY 98 SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 47, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET, (CHORD BEING SOUTH 54 WEST 1153.75 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET, (CHORD BEING SOUTH 44 WEST 905.74 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 14, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 735.79 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 50 WEST 733.78 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 43 EAST, 33.07 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 EAST FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 120.23 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 44 EAST 120.22 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 43 EAST 182.78 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTH 55 WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 79.61 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 WEST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 42.77 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 43 WEST 156.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY 6, 2004 AND BEARING JOB NUMBER 02-404 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 WEST, 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT ON THE CENTERLINE OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 47 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 54 WEST, 1153.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 30 WEST, 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 44 WEST 905.74 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 57 WEST, 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 14 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 735.79 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 50 WEST, 733.78 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 43 EAST 33.70 FEET TO A RE-BAR ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-BAR LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 120.22 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 45 EAST, 120.21 FEET TO ROD AND CAP; THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 EAST, 153.33 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 121.40 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 43 WEST, 132.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 4: PARCEL 1; A PART OF PARCEL 4 COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 39 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 250.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 39 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 13.65 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3869.74 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.49 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 40 EAST 118.49 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 WEST 310.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 WEST 132.20 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 309.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2; A PART OF PARCEL 4 COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 WEST 311.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 70.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 44 WEST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 311.95 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 105.10 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 WEST 311.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY 10, 2005 AND BEARING JOB NUMBER 00-581 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 39 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 250.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 39 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 13.65 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3869.74 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.49 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 40 EAST 118.49 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 WEST 415.24 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 WEST 311.95 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 179.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 309.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 5: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 EAST 471.89 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 80 EAST 357.18 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 EAST 772.73 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NUMBER 98, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 80 WEST 538.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1465.39 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 50 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1308.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1904.15 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 916.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 57 WEST 42.26 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 290.02 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 56 WEST 289.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 367.77 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 47 WEST 367.52 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 WEST 400.12 FEET TO A POINT OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 407.83 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 47 EAST 407.57 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 EAST 400.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 EAST, 835.50 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 55 WEST, 1592.21 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 WEST, 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 43 WEST, 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 WEST, 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 12 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 700.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.20 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 40 WEST 60.20 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST, 405.37 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.01 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 44 EAST, 60.01 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST, 409.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 6: A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS: BEGIN AT A POINT IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST WHERE THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF U.S. LIGHT HOUSE RESERVATION INTERSECTS THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. 98) AND FROM SAID POINT RUN NORTH TO THE CENTER OF STATE ROAD 30; THENCE RUN WESTERLY FOLLOWING THE CENTER LINE OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 4,274 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY 33 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A POINT, WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHEASTERLY 370 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG ST. GEORGE SOUND 60 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTHWEST 250 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD; THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG SAID ROAD BOUNDARY LINE 60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCEL OF LAND FRONTING 60 FEET ON ST GEORGE SOUND AND RUNNING BACK THE SAME WIDTH TO STATE ROAD 30 AND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE SOUTH HALF OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, STATE OF FLORIDA. PARCEL 7: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 52 EAST 1500.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 351.02 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 WEST 311.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 44 WEST 104.45 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 70.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475); THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6476) THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 WEST 70.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 8: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 EAST 835.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 55 WEST 1607.83 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 43 WEST 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 WEST 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 102.07 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 56 WEST 102.06 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 WEST 130.74 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 WEST 250.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 43 WEST 395.81 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 65 WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 276.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 65 WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 134.39 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470) MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SHELL BAY, A SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 38 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL BAY A DISTANCE OF 279.51 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470); THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY 30.13 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470); THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 EAST 328.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID NON-TANGENT CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 32.88 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 41 EAST 32.88 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING A POINT OF NON-TANGENT COMPOUND CURVE; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID COMPOUND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 94.65 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 47 EAST 94.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261); THENCE RUN NORTH 43 WEST 593.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 9: COMMENCE AT A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF DOC SEA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2897.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 45 WEST 571.37 FEET; SOUTH 40 WEST 71.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 49 EAST 66.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 46 EAST 30.90 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 50 WEST 43.91 FEET; SOUTH 40 WEST 35.52 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160); THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 46 WEST 23.21 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 79.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 10: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 52 EAST 1500.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 351.02 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 53.70 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 LYING 50.00 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 39 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 263.65 FEET TO A POINT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2914.70 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.46 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 40 EAST 118.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 WEST 415.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475); THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST 104.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF SHELL BAY COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 421.03 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 2914.70 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 105.16 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 43 WEST 105.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 11: LANDS IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING THE FOLLOWING SURVEY: BEGIN AT AN IRON STAKE 4274 FEET WEST OF U.S. LIGHTHOUSE RESERVATION AND CALL THIS THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; NOW TRAVEL SOUTHEAST A DISTANCE OF 370 FEET TO THE HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE WESTWARD ALONG HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET; THENCE NORTHWEST A DISTANCE OF 287 FEET, MORE OR LESS, AT SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 10; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD 10 A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO PLACE OF BEGINNING. ALL IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY THAT CERTAIN RECENT SURVEY DATED JUNE 25, 2001 BEARING JOB NUMBER 01-318 BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 EAST 471.89 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 80 EAST 357.18 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 EAST 772.73 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 80 WEST 538.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1465.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1308.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 29 WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1904.15 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 916.90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 57 WEST 42.26 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 13 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 657.79 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 WEST 97.02 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 128.29 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE AS FOLLOWS; SOUTH 61 WEST 78.27 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 60 WEST 128.52 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 57.11 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 40 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 77.38 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.34 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 122.62 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 41 EAST 122.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 12: A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE UNITED STATE LIGHTHOUSE RESERVATION, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN THENCE WESTERLY FOLLOWING THE CENTERLINE OF THE 66 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 30, ALSO KNOWN AS STATE ROAD 10 AND U.S. HIGHWAY 98, A DISTANCE OF 4154 FEET; THENCE TURN A RIGHT ANGLE AND RUN A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY, WHICH POINT IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE TURN A RIGHT ANGLE AND RUN TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS TO A POINT FROM WHICH A LINE RUN NORTHWESTERLY WILL BE 50 FEET FROM AND PARALLEL TO SAID LAST LINE; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG A LINE 50 FEET FROM AND PARALLEL SAID TO LAST LINE TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO.30 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCEL OF LAND FRONTING 50 FEET ON SAID STATE ROAD NO.30 AND RUNNING BACK TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 WEST 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98 SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 47 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 54 WEST 1153.75 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 44WEST 905.74 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 566.40 FEET(CHORD BEING SOUTH 52 WEST 565.48 FEET); THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 33.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 45 WEST 50.00 FEET); THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 44 EAST 191.37 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 46 EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 50.01 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 44 WEST 191.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 13: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 EAST, 835.50 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 55 WEST, 1592.21 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 WEST, 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 43 WEST, 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 WEST, 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 12 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 700.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.20 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 40 WEST 60.20 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 EAST, 405.37 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.01 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 44 EAST, 60.01 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 44 WEST, 409.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 14: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 835.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 55 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 1607.83 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 21 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 43 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 704.90 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 24 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 102.07 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 56 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 102.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 130.74 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 DEGREES WEST 145.14 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 104.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 121.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 254.45 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 49 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 254.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 206.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 375.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 75.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 15: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1500.00

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, December 5, 2013 The Times | A13 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experiencedSales ManagerWho will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. Communicates and advocates the companys vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solutions ROI for the client. Requirements: Bachelors degree or comparable experience. Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. Successful record of team building and leadership. Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266362 Text FL66340 to 56654 SalesSales RepsHalifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience.Territories Available In: Panama City Chipley Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 1117562 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS CaRPEnTERS MaCHInIST PIPE WELDERS X-RaY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. 252 WEST PINE STREET. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650.00/MO. INCLUDES WATER AND ELECTRIC UP TO 2 00.00/MO.2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO 3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO 4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 39 CARLTO NS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1.4BR,3 BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDEDWITH BOAT SLIPwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL71777 to 56654 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-227-7234 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom handicap and nonhandicap units. Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer Text FL72436 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL73867 to 56654 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle Lease Purchase Option 900 sq ft, 1Br, Open Plan, Fireplace Washer & Dryer, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $380 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL74084 to 56654 St. George Island, 3 Br 2 Bath, Furnished Contemporary Home, with Gulf View, 12 month Lease, $1,600 mo, w/o utilities, 813-631 0344 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $73,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Carrabelle/Eastpoint: 1600 Sq Ft Doublewide, renovated Mobile Home /w Grandmother Unit, Stone Fireplace, Jacuzzi, Secluded, 1.5 Wooded Acres, Near Beach, $115k Negotionable 954-816-7004 Sales/Business Dev.Commissioned Sales PositionExperienced, FL licensed Real Estate sales associate to take over 100 leads for Carrabelle & Lanark Village, MUST know Carrabelle real estate market & live in the area, some closing support & training as needed. Contact John Shelby, Broker St. George Island Realty 850-899-0108 Web Id 34273054 Admin/ClericalFRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENTPosition Title:Library Assistant/Permanent/Part TimeClosing Date: 12/11/13 Annual Salary: $10.00 hour/26.00 hours per week Contact: Anne Birchwell, Director Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Rd. Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone (850) 670-8151 Remit Applications to : Franklin County Clerk of Courts 33 Market Street /Suite 203 Apalachicola, FL 32320 The Franklin County Board of commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required; Ability to operate library equipment, i.e. copiers, faxes, scanning; Customer service, sequencing skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work in a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Qualifications High School Diploma. Associates or Bachelors preferred. Library experience helpful. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and flexible. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards are necessary. Assignment will require travel/work at both library branches. Web Id 34273522 Text FL73522 to 56654 4514078ExperiencedWaitress / CashierPositive Attitude a Must!Submit Resume to: PO Box 172 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Apalachicola: 46 9th St., (First Baptist Church Christian School.), Dec 7th 8am-TillIndoor & Outdoor Yard SaleT o benefit Rachel Huckeba (liver trans plant) Microwaves, Exercise machines, kitchen items, clothes, This and That T ext FL74194 to 56654 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado.Continuous Garage SaleAntiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL73693 to 56654 Carrabelle: 2171 Kentucky Ave. Go 4 miles East of Carrabelle on Rte 98 Turn left on Carolina, left on Kentucy, and follow signs. RAIN OR SHINE Saturday, Dec. 7th 8am til 4pmMulti Family Garage SaleLarge variety of nice items!Text FL74067 to 56654 GUN SHOWDec 7th & 8th Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL73915 to 56654 GUN SHOW Fort Walton FAIRGROUNDSDecember 7th & 8th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL72381 to 56654 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 53.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 59.72 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 39 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 190.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD MARKED (#4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 309.52 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 190.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 311.38 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Counts I and III entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DEER PARTNERS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company; LIGHTHOUSE POINT PROPERTIES, INC., a dissolved Florida Corporation; and McKISSACK PROPERTIES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, Defendants, and the docket number of which is: 2011 CA 000412. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Melissa Holley Painter, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of November, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MELISSA HOLLEY PAINTER FL Bar No. 0144177 Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse Suite 800, 125 West Romana St. P. O. Box 13010 Pensacola, FL 325913010 Tel: (850) 434-9200 Fax: (850) 432-7340 Attorney for Plaintiff December 5, 12, 2013 ADOPT: AStay Home Mom, Prof Dad, Travel awaitCarolyn & Chris 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachacola 107 5th st Sat Morning December 7thYard SaleNumerous Items including clothes, scrubs, and much more! Text FL 74131 to 56654

PAGE 14

A14 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 ABC School HONOR RROLL OurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection), DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#249989$599,000StGeorgeIslandLARGEGULFVIEWHOME5BRplusofce,41/2BA,2ndLRwithwetbar,autolights inhall&stairwells,Elevator,HugeKitchen,Laundry,VisualIntercom,ScreenedSpaTub,landscapedon2lotswith palmtrees,underhouseworkareawithsink&storage, StormShutters,EastPineAvenue. JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#249387$75,000St.GeorgeIslandISLANDCORNERLOTLargesanddunesandabundantnativevegetation,this"high anddry"cornerlotislocatedinthequietGulfBeaches neighborhood,lotmeasures100x160,Gulfviewislikely fromhouseonpilings.WestPineAve&EastSawyerSt, ListedbyMichaelBillings. MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,299,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com MLS#249979$135,000 1967thSt. Apalachicola,FL32320 Wellmaintained4bedroom/1bathhomelocatedin NorthHistoricDistrict.Separatebuildingonproperty couldbeconvertedintoaguestcottage.Conveniently locatedneardowntownshopsandrestaurants.MarySeymour,JeffGallowayRealEstate 850-728-8578 MLS#250658$10,000 118MarinersWaySouth Carrabelle,FL32322 Greatlotatanunbelievablepricelocatedclosetothe CarrabelleRiverinthegatedcommunityofMariners Landing.Enjoythecommunitypoolandboatramp access.Shortsalelistingwithlenderactivelyworking withthesellertogetthispropertysold!MarySeymour,JeffGallowayRealEstate 850-728-8578 4514260 $398,900 Reduced! By TEVIS PAGESpecial to the Times Students and teachers alike enjoyed their ve-day break with their families and friends. The Take Stock in Children held a Thanksgiving dinner at the Holy Family community center on the Hill in Apalachicola last Wednesday. This week started rather roughly. Teachers are not allowed to decorate their rooms for the holiday season and it disheartened students in the high and middle school. A representative from the Florida Student Financial Aid ofce came on Monday, Dec. 2, and talked to the seniors and juniors. Her appearance was much appreciated. The rest of the week will be spent on preparation for semester nals which will fall on Dec. 19 and 20. Both days will be early dismissal. We enjoyed our Thanksgiving break, but we are now looking forward to Christmas break. The break will start on Dec. 23 and end on Jan 3.First gradeRR R R AMSDELLAA ll A A s: Gracyn Paul, EvieMorgan Price, Malichi Rivera, Promise Suddeth and Mabry WallaceA A / B: Zach Aikens, Josh Dykes, Hannah Hooten, Addyson Kent, Shlok Patel, Jazmyn Pavon and Joel TaylorHH BAROODYAA ll A A s: Issy Nations, Micahlyn ONeal and Krista VarnesA A / B: Alonna Brown, Ben Butler, Maleah Croom, Breahna Fleming, Zariah Harvey, Mya Huckeba, Taylen Kendrick, Clayton Martina, Shaylee Martina, Khali McNair and Marquis PenamonSS econd gradeSS H H ERRINGTONAA ll A A s: Peyton Blackburn, Nathaniel Bolinger, CJ C onway, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Taylor Mallon, Malic ONeal, Charlie Ramsdell, Weston Taranto, Aubrie Thompson and Jostyn TiptonA A / B: Hannah Grace Abel and Cody AbercrombieJ. M M ALLONAA ll A A s : Taylor PendletonA A / B : Esteban Bernabe, Trinity Creamer, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Alexcia McNair, Isabella Price, Kylie Proctor, Cassandra Robertson, Emma Rowland and Kiana WeeksTThird gradeW. MMARTINAAAll AAs: Lucy Neill, Owen Poloronis, River Sheridan, Mark WillisA A /B: Mitchell Adkins, Don Davis, Miranda Diaz, Arav Patel, Mahaley Shuler, Trinity TaylorTT MMOSESAAll AAs: Eric Lau, Kylah Ross, Jackson SegreeA A /B: Kendall Hill and Jayden NicholsFourth gradeLL. BOCKELMANAAll AAs: Meredith Alford, Dylan Grifn, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Rory Ramsdell, John Sanders and Nico ValenzuelaA A /B: Carson Davis, Myia Maxwell, Brooklyn ONeal, Gracie SmithMM. LLEEAAll AAs: Weston Bockelman, Ella Friedman, Andrew Monod and Genevieve MontgomeryA A /B: Caleb Abel, Lanie Allen, Colin Amison, Lauren Conway, Jeremy Shuler, Tate Stanley, Jaelyn TiptonFifth gradeJ. AAMMONSAAll AAs: Camille Davis, Alex Joanos, Livia MonodA A /B: Cody Cassidy, Devin Daniels, Stanley Gay and Kaylee HicksLL. POLORONISAAll AAs: Abby Johnson, Brycin Huckeba, Jack VailA A /B: Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Dorian Fleming, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clinton Rester, Madalyn Thompson, Caden Turrell, Jarvis TurrellSSixth gradeKKAREN WARDAAll AAs: Cade JunoA A /B: Bailey Herrington, Jayden Justice, Krista Kelley, Kalahn Kent, Nash Ramsdell, Sophia Robertson, Hannah Sweet, Chandler WrayBRANT BANKSAAll AAs: Alyssa Robinson, Drake StanleyA A /B: Tanner Amison, Isaiah Barber, Janacia Bunyon, Camille WilliamsSSeventh gradeTT ANYA JOANOSAAll AAs: Kevin Flores-Perez, Hailey Gay, MikalinHuckeba, Alexus Johnson, Sophia Kirvin, Jack RamsdellA A /B: Madison Coulter, Daijon Penamon, Bryce Kent, Haley Scott, Brandon TarantoAANNA KKEELAAll AAs: Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McL emore, Conner Messer, Karolynn Myers, Becca WillisA A /B: Angel Henning, Cameron WynnEEighth gradeMMELANIE CCOpPELANDAAll AAs: Brooke MartinaA A /B: Mia Cummings, Kyle Dasher, Sallie Rose PaulTT ARA WARDAAll AAs: Michaela Cassidy, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Faith Sapp, Lucas SasnettA A /B: Christian Amison, Katelynn Denney, Nick Joanos, Savannah Montgomery, Andrew Nguyen, Madison Smith HAHA WKK TALKTALK GINAGINA TARANTOTARANTO | Special to the TimesMs. Bockelmans fourth-grade class gathered the most in the ABC Schools schoolwide food drive, which brought in to the food pantry 2,710 nonperishable food items. SchoolsTT rivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. 1) Reportedly where is Dimmitts Auto Salvage that really uses the red pickup truck from older TVs Sanford and Son? CA, NV, IN, FL 2) Whom did Bjorn Born defeat in the nals on winning his rst imbledon? Nastase, Vilas, Orantes, Connors 3) When did the last eyewitness to Lincolns assassination pass away? 1890, 1904, 1938, 1956 4) What golf club was invented by Gene Sarazen? Putter, 1-wood, 6-iron, Sand wedge 5) Who was the rst Chinese to win the Nobel Prize in Literature? Nicholas Tse, Jia Dao, Gao Xingjian, Stanley Ho 6) In Greek mythology what goddess cuts the thread of life? Herculia, Atropos, Lacheis, Randama 7) What was the horses name of President John Tyler? Ladystone, Cottonmouth, Sentry, The General 8) Where is the (Rotten) Sneakers Hall of Fumes? Milwaukee, Madison, Montpelier, Miami 9) What rock group was originally The New Yardbirds? Led Zeppelin, ELO, Steppenwolf, Toto 10) Who was the rst pole vaulter to clear 17 feet? Pennel, Stones, Funnel, Duvall ANSWERS 1) IN. 2) Nastase. 3) 1956. 4) Sand wedge. 5) Gao Xingjian. 6) Atropos. 7) The General. 8) Montpelier. 9) Led Zeppelin. 10) Pennel. Students prepare for next weeks semester nals



PAGE 1

By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com At Monday evening’s annual legislative deletion hearing, Franklin County’s wish list boiled down to one basic appeal: Help the county’s seafood workers get back to making an honest living, and begin by opening up more harvesting opportunities. Unlike typical delegation hearings, during which legislators hear rst from constitutional of cers, county and city commissioners and other elected of cials, Monday’s affair began with an appeal from the public, and each of the speakers stuck to a single topic: the dif culties oystermen are having in bringing home a robust harvest of legal oysters. “I’ve worked out there for about 20 years, and I’ve seen Former APA housing director sentenced for theft By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com The former director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority was sentenced Nov. 19 after she pleaded guilty in June to stealing government funds, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Of ce. Selena Noblit, 43, of Panama City, was sentenced to one year of probation, 192 hours of community service and a $100 ne for using the AHA’s American Express credit card for more than $11,000 in personal expenses, then using U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funds to pay the credit card bills. Court records show she spent $24 million broadband expansion almost done By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Rural Northwest Florida soon will be home to a broadband network capable of handling 1,000 times the capacity of existing Internet service in the area. Funded by the 2009 federal stimulus package, the $24 million project will bring broadband Internet access to Franklin County and seven other underserved counties in the Panhandle, including Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Washington, Liberty and Gadsden counties. Slated for an end-ofthe-year completion, the project also will provide coverage for the south-central Florida counties of DeSoto, Hardee, Glades, Hendry, Highlands and Okeechobee and the community of Immokalee. Known as the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance, the initiative State surgeon general promotes weight loss By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com On the eve of one of America’s most indulgent holiday feasts, the state’s surgeon general paid a visit to Franklin County to promote healthy weight. Dr. John H. Armstrong, a Tampa trauma surgeon who was appointed surgeon general in April 2012 by Gov. Rick Scott, made an enthusiastic pitch to students Nov. 26 on behalf of the state’s Healthiest Weight Florida initiative, launched in January 2013. “A snap of the ngers isn’t going to solve this problem,” Armstrong said after ticking off a series of alarming statistics of how fat Floridians have become in the last couple decades. “It will take an investment over a decade,” he said. “It’s the sum of small choices that will really make a difference.” Armstrong paid an afternoon visit to the Franklin County School, escorted by Franklin County Health Department Administrator Marsha Lindeman and Operations Manager David Walker. As state surgeon general, Armstrong oversees Florida’s 67 county health departments, as well as of ces for children’s medical services, medical quality assurance, disability determinations and public health laboratories. Senior Beyla Walker introduced Armstrong to an audience in the media center of her fellow members of the school’s chapter of SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco). SELENA NOBLIT WHAT IS YOUR BMI? For an adult, calculate Body Mass Index by dividing your weight (in pounds) by height (in inches squared), and then multiplying the result by 703. For example, an adult who weighs 150 pounds, and is 5-foot-5 would divide 150 by 65 squared (or 4225). The result, 0.0355, would be then be multiplied by 703, which would result in a BMI of 24.96. A BMI of below 18.5 indicates a person is underweight; between 18.5 and 24.9 is normal. From 25.0 to 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30.0 and above is deemed obese. In the case of children under age 19, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the use of BMI to screen for overweight and obesity, but it is not a diagnostic tool. To determine whether a child has excess fat, further assessment, such as skinfold thickness measurement, would be needed. The adult calculator provides only the BMI number and not the BMI ageand sexspeci c percentile that is used to interpret BMI and determine the weight category for children and teens. Oystermen want summer bars open State Rep. Halsey Beshears, RMonticello, left, and State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, lead a delegation hearing on Monday. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times See SENTENCED A3 See BROADBAND A3 See OYSTERMEN A10 STATE SURGEON GENERAL VISITS COUNTY PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Florida Surgeon General Dr. John H. Armstrong addresses students at the Franklin County School. Below, Armstrong shows off his pedometer. Chewing the fat See FAT A3 VOL. 128 ISSUE 32 xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, December 5, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A11-A3 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index An Apalach Christmas, A2 Island Lights celebration Friday The annual St. George Island Island Lights will be Dec. 6, mid-island in St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile “Jingle Jog” starts at 4 p.m. on the bike path in front of the park. Runners should arrive a little before 4 p.m. to sign in. A $5 per runner donation is suggested. Santa is expected to arrive by re engine at 5 p.m., providing gifts to children age 10 and younger. Refreshments will be provided to all. Island Scouts will be selling hot dogs. The event is hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. For more information, watch www. sgibusinesses.com/island-lights. Santa to visit the Hill Saturday morning Santa Claus will pay a special visit to the Hill this Saturday, Dec. 7 from 10 to 11 a.m. Greet Santa in the parking lot of AJ’s Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 120 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. Take pictures with the jolly old elf and get a goody bag. The event is sponsored by AJ’s, H’COLA & SWAT. Saturday lm to remember Pearl Harbor Saturday, Dec. 7 at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, the lm “Tora, Tora, Tora” will be shown beginning at 10:30 a.m. Free popcorn; admission by donation. Released in 1970, the American-Japanese collaboration war lm dramatizes the Japanese reasons for the attack that brought America into the war. Scenes include archival lm taken from one of the carriers participating in the attack. Air Force to host Dec. 12 town hall The U.S. Air Force in conjunction with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Forest Service will host a public town hall meeting on Thursday, Dec. 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Ave. The purpose of the town hall is to take questions from the public regarding the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI) and how Tate’s Hell State Forest may play a role in military training. For more info, call David Core, Florida Forest Service, at (850) 681-5800.

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 For more information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at 850-653-9419 www .apalachicolabay .org + ) ( ) ( * $ * #' #% Countywide Holiday Events 3 … g ~g mwym„~g 8w‰ y‹ € g ‹ 8q~qk‰ g y„‚ L„ ”A    :q mA Dy‹ „‰ ym :„ • ‚  „ • ‚ 3 … g ~g mwym„~g .org .apalachicolabay www 850-653-9419 at Chamber Bay Apalachicola the contact information, more For CONCER T SERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents Coupon Expir es: 12-15-13 CODE: AP00 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Numerous businesses reported record sales Nov. 29, as Black Friday came off without a hitch in Apalachicola this year. Record crowds sidestepped the malls and hit the downtown shopping district. With near-perfect weather, the restaurants were thronged, and several reported running out of food. Santa arrived right on time aboard the “Buddy’s Boys” shrimp boat, sporting an abbreviated goatee. The kiddies didn’t mind. Pam Nobles and her dance studio students welcomed the man in red with energetic dance routines accompanied by traditional favorites like “Silver Bells” and “Jingle Bell Rock” and some newer numbers like “Reindeer Pokey” and “Be My Star.” Veterans of Black Fridays past observed fewer youngsters in line to see the jolly old elf than in previous years, but downtown retailers said there was no shortage of grown-up shoppers. The halls of the Raney House were decked with trees themed to depict music, breast cancer awareness and a woodland winter. Members of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society served mulled wine, cocoa and cookies in the carriage house. Aisha Ivey provided ddle music at Downtown Books and carolers roamed the streets beguiling shoppers. The evening ended with the lighting of the luminaries on behalf of Big Bend Hospice, bathing the streets in pale white light. Local eateries said business fell off sharply Saturday; a fact some attributed to the numerous important football games on Saturday afternoon and evening. With Black Friday behind them, several Apalachicola restaurants will close for yearly deep cleaning and renovations between now and Christmas. Hundreds ock to Apalachicola’s Black Friday Chase Vasalinda, 3, told Santa he wanted a four-wheeler.PHOTOS BY LO O I S S SS W OBO OBO DA | The Times Santa arrives aboard the shrimp boat Buddy’s Boys. ABOVE: Trinity Barron led the Pam Nobles dancers in a Christmas dance. BELOW: Sandi Hengle sits atop the playhouse being rafed to benet the Franklin Toy Project.

PAGE 3

Local The Times | A3 Thursday, December 5, 2013 ) 2 :Fr esh, Gr ade A, No W a t er A dded 1:1 "98:1 78/9 1 1, ) 2 :3 5 22 3 22 ) 3 5 22 22 :1 piec e Pr e viously Fr o z en 108; 9 ", 1 812 o z pk g 9 1 1 9 ":8/ 10 ,/ 10 lb bag 1 1 3 lb bag ( 1:: 8 G allon "71 & ,:1 & 161,-:1 8: 4 lb bag : 1 0 "6, 30 o z jar ",1 + ,81 16.5 o z bo x, Clas sic V arieties /, 81 ,9 1 8 4 lb bag, Individually Quick Fr o z en 86 USD A Inspect ed '7:1 113 # 101:8 "$ #$ ( Fr F F Fr F F F Fr es es es s h h h h h h h G G G G G G G G G G G G G ra ra a a a a a a de de d de d d d A A A A A A A A A A A A A S al e! "1 ", 0, ",:1 1/ 1;-1 7 :. '78:1 ":81 ,8/71/9 S a ve up t o $2.20 lb S a ve up t o $1.40 lb S a ve up t o $2.2 4 ea Sa v e up t o $9 00 lb Slic ed Fr ee Sa v e up t o $1.4 9 ea Sa v e up t o $2. 00 ea Sa v e up t o $2. 00 on 2 Sa v e up t o $2. 00 ea S a ve up t o $1.21 ea Sa v e up t o $1. 18 on 2 Sa v e up t o 6 1 ¢ ea 0 % 1/ 1;-1 7 (. D A VID RICH’S Hwy 71, Wewahitchka, FL, Open at 6 am CT CARRABELLE Hwy 98 & 7th St., Carrabelle, FL, Open at 7 am ET SENTENCED from page A1 the money on food, tools, chil dren’s clothes, dental care and a theme park visit. Noblit was red as the housing authority director, a position she held about four years, in July 2012, about a month after a federal grand jury returned an indict ment against her. The theft was discovered in the course of an investigation and audit con ducted by HUD and the Apala chicola Housing Authority. The next month, Noblit’s husband delivered two checks totaling about $11,000 to AHA, according to records. Noblit told federal ofcials she al ways had intended to repay the money, but her nances became too co-mingled, and she lost track of how much she owed. Judge Robert L. Hinkle could have sentenced Noblit to up 10 years in prison. BROADBAND from page A1 is a partnership between Op portunity Florida and the Florida Rural Heartland Economic Development Ini tiative, agencies that serve areas of critical economic concern in the state. Jim Brook, executive di rector of Opportunity Florida representing the rural Pan handle, said one of the main goals is to provide cost-effec tive, high-speed Internet di rectly to “community anchor institutions,” such as public schools, libraries, local gov ernments and emergency services. “It will provide additional capacity, at hopefully afford able rates,” Brook said. According to data from the FRBA, only 39 percent of these rural areas have access to broadband service, yet they represent about 20 percent of Florida’s land mass. The “middle mile” broad band network will extend the current Internet backbone to local Internet service pro viders that serve households and small businesses in these communities. Brook said the back-haul network is required to meet capacity require ments of up to 200 megabytes per second. “Traditionally, the end result to the residential con sumer would be provided by independent ISPs that tradi tionally sell at the last mile,” Brook said. “It provides a scalable, and in many cases, less costly capacity.” Brook said the intention is not to compete with current providers, but simply to in crease capacity. “This was not a system that was put in place to re place existing services,” Brook said. “We’re not only willing, but we’re obligated to negotiate with existing providers.” Once the project is com pleted, service will be sold at a lowest reasonable cost through a network operator, Brook said, which is in the nal stages of negotiation. Within the $4.7 trillion stimulus package, $7.2 billion was designated for broad band infrastructure projects in rural areas across the country. To qualify for grants, com panies must show they can provide broadband service to areas that meet any of the fol lowing: 90 percent of house holds have no broadband access, 50 percent have inad equate broadband coverage at speeds of less than three megabytes per second, or service is available, but less than 40 percent of the popula tion subscribes. “This was a system that was primarily developed to provide additional capacity and capacity needed to com munity anchor institutions,” Brook said. “It’s trying to equalize the country in terms of access to technology.” Armstrong opened his subject of weight loss by congratulat ing the students on their work against tobacco and recounting his own experience of getting his dad to quit smoking. “Tobacco kills. Tobacco cuts life short,” he said, and then told how he was in rst grade when the U.S. Surgeon General’s re port on the dangers of smoking rst came out. “I took the message home,” said Armstrong, now in his ear ly 50s. “Dad was a smoker; he smoked a lot.” Armstrong said he reveled in retelling the dangers of smoking at the dinner table (“A new dan ger every day”) and even went so far as to ush his dad’s cigarettes down the toilet, a step he did not recommend to the students. The upshot of the story was that Armstrong’s father quit smoking cold turkey, and he has had no signs of the cancer and heart disease that often afict smokers. Armstrong said his dad re cently mentioned “out of the blue” how his children helped him to quit smoking. “It told us how important kids are in getting messages home that matter,” Armstrong said. “There’s another challenge we face that’s cutting lives short, the challenge of weight,” continued the surgeon general. He said statistics statewide indicate only about one-third of Floridians are at healthy weight. One quarter are obese, and the rest are overweight. Based on this current trend, by 2030, almost 60 percent of the state’s residents will be obese. “Six of 10 students will be overweight or obese by the time they graduate high school,” Arm strong said. Though he did not elaborate on the economics, the state’s website notes that the costs of care for chronic diseases from obesity alone — diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and arthritis — are estimated to be $34 billion over the next 17 years. It says over the next 20 years in Florida, obesity could contribute to 2.4 million new cases of type 2 diabetes 6.2 million new cases of heart disease and stroke, 5.3 mil lion new cases of hypertension, 3.3 million new cases of arthritis and almost 1 million new cases of obesity-related cancer. Armstrong, a Princeton grad who completed medical school at the University of Virginia in 1988, said when he became a doctor 25 years ago, 10 to 12 percent of his colleagues had a challenge with their weight. “Now, 33 percent are obese,” Armstrong said. He said the state’s initiative is designed to encourage Floridians to make choices of their time and energy that favor weight loss. “Adults on average spend 4 hours a day in front of the televi sion screen,” he said. “The prob lem with being inactive is that your body remembers, slowly. “How can we reshape envi ronments?” he asked. “We can do it if we recognize we can sup port each other to make healthy choices. We’re working with com munities to reshape what is the norm.” Armstrong said cultural change can have a dramatic im pact, noting that in the 1960s, eight out of 10 men smoked ciga rettes, and today it is nowhere near as prevalent. The state’s Healthiest Weight initiative covers a variety of prior ities, including boosting the prac tice of breastfeeding, promoting improved nutrition and physical activity in early care and educa tion as well as for students during the school day and after-school programs, ensuring all foods and beverages in schools meet or ex ceed dietary guidelines, increas ing access to high-quality, afford able foods and promoting health professional awareness and counseling of patient body mass index (See inset box). Armstrong boiled down the priorities for students to three basic steps: Substitute water for sugary sodas and other drinks; substitute “Fresh from Florida” fruits and vegetables for pro cessed cereals and breakfast and chips at lunch; and increase physical activities by taking stairs instead of elevators and going for walks. He even took a moment to show off the pedometer that he wears on his belt. “You begin to think differently when you’re in motion,” he said. “I know it sounds really oldfashioned, but it’s the old-fash ioned that’s going to work,” he said. “We’re not too busy. We’re making different choices. I urge you to take this message home to your parents.” In response to questions from the audience, Armstrong took a dim view of the new fad of elec tronic cigarettes, which he de scribed as “nicotine-delivering devices. “That’s a dangerous drug that contributes to blood vessel disease,” he said. “I believe it’s been introduced to hook people on nicotine.” After a small reception in which fruits and vegetables were served, Armstrong and the health department ofcials headed for a tour of the school’s dental clinic, where the surgeon general met the staff. At the legislative delegation hearing Monday evening, Linde man told State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, that the clinic has served 461 pa tients since it opened, 366 of them age 17 or younger, and provided a total of 3,200 services. “We’re still struggling a little bit lling the schedule with our Medicaid population,” she said. “The need is larger than is ac cessing it right now. Access is contributing to the lack of use. We thought the doors would blow open when we opened the clinic, and they have not. “It’s the only one like it in the state,” Lindeman said. “We are talking right now about how to get more services. We’re looking at additional funding or to open more chairs in Apalachicola.” She said in addition to the Medicaid population, “we’ll take any child, regardless of the abil ity to pay.” Montford responded that “if you have it available to them, it may be a question of fear of the dentist. Rep. Beshears and I have that as a priority of ours.” FAT from page A1

PAGE 4

USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, December 5, 2013 A Page 4 Section By Roy Lee Carter Special to the Times Buying a fresh tree is probably the most important piece of advice we can offer. There are a couple of reasons why a fresh tree is important. Obviously a fresh tree will last, and look better longer. Old, dried-out trees are unattractive. Also they are re hazards as well. Since most of us include electric lights in our tree decorations, it’s easy to see that a dried out tree becomes very dangerous. My information on purchasing and caring for Christmas trees was provided by Emeritus Extension Horticulture Specialist Dr. Robert Black, of The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). There are several ways to determine a tree’s freshness. Bend the needles if the tree is fresh, the needles will be supple and springy. If the tree is old, the needles will snap and break off. Bounce the tree’s stump on the ground to see how many needles fall. It’s normal for a fresh tree to drop a few needles. But, if bouncing produces a shower of needles, put the tree back and select another. Before buying, also feel the bottom of the stump. The sap of a fresh tree is sticky. On an old stump, it’s hard and caked. A fresh tree also should have a pleasant fragrance – one that will last through the Christmas season. The tree you select should have a good green color, be full and bushy, and have sturdy branches. Strength of branches is more a matter of the tree type than the tree’s age or condition. White pine and red cedar trees are well suited to the Florida climate. But, unfortunately, they both have fairly weak boughs that won’t hold decorations very well. Firs, spruces, Virginia and Scotch pines on the other hand, usually have very rm branches. Since rs, spruces and Scotch pines don’t grow naturally in Florida; they have to be imported from northern states. So, they usually cost a lot more than either white pines or red cedars. In addition to lower prices, Florida grown trees have another advantage. If you can get living trees balled in burlap, they can be added to the landscape after the Christmas season is over. The key to maintaining a fresh Christmas tree throughout the holiday season is giving the tree proper care from the time it is purchased until it is disposed of. Before you set up your tree, make a fresh, straight cut across the base of the tree and place the tree in a tree stand that holds at least two quarts of water. Be sure you keep the stand lled at all times. It’s surprising how quickly a good-sized tree can take up a quart of water. Check the water level at least once a day. Place your tree in the coolest part of the room. Keep it away from things like replaces, heaters, air ducts, and even TV sets. The heat form these can cause the tree needles to dry out and drop off very quickly. Proper Christmas tree care is only part of the story. There are certain safety rules you should follow carefully. Never use candles or anything with an open ame on or near the tree. If you’re using electric lights, check them over very carefully for loose connections and worn wires. Don’t overload your electrical circuits. If you must use an extension cord, run it out of the way of foot traf c, and be sure it’s heavy enough for the current load. Always turn the tree lights off when you leave home or go to bed. Buying and caring for your Christmas tree may not be the weightiest problem on your mind as we move into the Christmas season. But, if you plan to have a natural Christmas tree in your home this year, you’ll need to give some thought to both subjects. Keep in mind that a fresh tree with good shape and sturdy branches usually will make the best tree for displaying and decorating. Make sure you keep the tree in the best possible place, and that you water it every day. Take the time to properly care for your Christmas tree, and it will reward your efforts with radiant beauty throughout the holiday season. For more information on Christmas tree care, contact the extension service 653-9337 or email rlcarter@u .edu. Roy Lee Carter, the Gulf County extension director with special emphasis on small farms and home horticulture, is assisting with the Franklin County extension service. Purchasing and caring for your Christmas tree ROY LEE CARTER County extension director About a month ago, someone donated a bunch of shing books. I have to make the disclaimer that I am shing challenged. If they had a book called “Fishing for Dummies” it would be right up my alley, oops there is a book “Fishing for Dummies” on Amazon. Anyway, the most interesting book addition to the collection was “Florida’s Fishing Legends and Pioneers” by Doug Kelly. It is part of the “Wild Florida” Series, which includes several shing books, eco-trips and walks and other topics, some of which I have added to my wishlist. They are published by the University Press of Florida which, incidentally, will be sending books to “Authors in Apalach” on March 15, as part of the book vendors and publishers expansion of that event. But back to shing. As one might expect, Kelly’s book is full of pictures of guys, and some gals, proudly displaying their catches, like the 544pound tuna caught by Vic Dunaway in 1962. The book offers a timeline of the great shermen of Florida, a state known as a premier shing destination, born as early as the 1870s, with a number still out there catching away. Kelly has selected them to highlight techniques, equipment, and strategies, as well as legendary personalities. Other titles added to the collection include “Fishermen’s Knots, Fishing Rigs, and How to Use Them,” by Bob McNally; and “Baits, Rigs and Tackle” by the aforementioned Dunaway. This looks like a very practical book of every angler. Florida Sportsman’s “Sport Fish of Florida” with color pictures of 231 species, has information on food values, methods and ranges. Finally, for those who are really into it, “Fly Tying for Beginners” is in spiral format to make it easy to keep the page open while using the stepby-step instructions. The author is Peter Gathercole, described on the back cover as “one of Britain’s leading y dressers.” Now there’s a new term for my vocabulary. Anyway, the Apalachicola library has quite a large collection of books on shing, more than 30 nonction titles with even a couple in the Junior collection. Now, they are cataloged as nonction, but you know what they say about sh stories. In ction, a subject search offers titles which have shing as one of their themes, including “Fishing for a dream: ocean lullabies and night verses” in the Easy section. The library is going to be “weeding” books in the next few months in order to continue to t in its 1500-square foot building, but you can be sure the shing books will remain as a local interest category. Please come by and join the library (it’s Free) and take advantage of these wonderful resources. Adult books circulate for three weeks and can be renewed. The library hours are now 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, with some hours on Saturdays courtesy of volunteer staff. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Some shing books that didn’t get away @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Editor’s note: This Saturday, Dec. 7, America will observe with sad memories the 72nd anniversary of the Japanese attack that launched U.S. involvement in World War II. December 7, 1941, Japan attacked our naval base at Pearl Harbor without warning; in an act of undeclared war that peaceful Sunday morning. The planned attack in icted massive destruction on ships and countless innocent lives; as wave after wave of Japanese planes strafed and bombed everything in sight. Our nation was outraged and badly crippled by Japan’s merciless massacre; so we fought back in self-defense, and over three years of bloody battles, slowly regained supremacy. Then our troops invaded Okinawa, Japan’s last stronghold in the Paci c, and captured the island; leaving our next major offensive, the heavily forti ed mainland of Japan. With no end in sight to stop the sacri ce of innocent lives; our war-weary country felt the time was right to test our secret, the atomic bomb, on enemy sites. The bombs devastated Hiroshima like doomsday and Japan immediately conceded to our demands for unconditional surrender and all POWs set free. August 6, 1945, was the historical day the Japanese American war ceased; and today we are allies, united in pursuing world peace. Memories of war MARY WESTBERG Special to the Times As Floridians readied to gather with families and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving, State Senator Dwight Bullard (D-Cutler Bay) last week announced a new initiative which offers to create healthier food options for communities and create new commerce in the state of Florida. “As families look to prepare a holiday meal with the freshest produce our state can offer, some of them won’t be able to get the quality ingredients they desire in their own neighborhoods,” Bullard said. “With so many pockets of communities isolated as ‘food deserts’ – unable to purchase fresh vegetables and fruits it’s hard to ensure that quality nutritious foods are reaching our children and families during the year, or even the holidays.” Over the past several years, the level of food desert awareness has risen signi cantly. Food deserts are de ned as areas that have a low median family income, and at least one-third of the population lives more than one mile from a supermarket. Bullard’s bill would allow produce suppliers who locate their businesses in these areas to be eligible for tax incentives, and encourages residents in food desert neighborhoods to start fresh food markets of their own. The bill would also require produce businesses purchase at least 15 percent of its inventory from instate companies which would help spur growth in existing Florida businesses. “With such an abundance of Floridagrown produce, we want to ensure that communities throughout the state have the opportunity to enjoy these rich treasures closer to home,” Bullard said. “I believe that with local businesses and communities partnering together, we can provide better opportunities for the people of our state.” Senator announces ‘Food Desert’ bill DWIGHT BULLARD This is a good time to remind active duty service members and veterans about the many education assistance bene ts available to them through the G.I. Bill and other government programs. The Post 9/11 GI Bill is more exible and generally offers more generous bene ts. It provides up to 36 months of support for education and housing to individuals with at least 90 days of active duty after Sept. 11, 2001, or those with a service-connected disability after 30 days. An honorable discharge is required. Approved training includes undergraduate and graduate degrees, and vocational/ technical/on-thejob training, among others. You will be eligible for bene ts for 15 years from your last period of active duty of at least 90 consecutive days. This program covers 100 percent of tuition and fees for in-state students at public institutions, paid directly to the school. For those attending private or foreign schools, it will pay up to $19,198 per academic year (sometimes more in certain states). If you attend a costlier private school – or a public school as a non-resident – you also may be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program, where schools voluntarily fund tuition expenses exceeding the highest public in-state undergraduate rate. The institution can contribute up to 50 percent of those expenses and the Veteran’s Administration will match the amount. The 9/11 GI Bill also will pay a books and supplies stipend of up to $1,000 per year, and a monthly housing allowance generally comparable to the military Basic Allowance for Housing for a military pay grade E-5 with dependents, based on the ZIP code for your school. Another advantage of this newer GI Bill: Armed Forces members with at least six years’ service can transfer some or all of their bene ts to their spouse and/or children. To learn more about the GI Bill, visit www. gibill.va.gov. Other VAsponsored educational nancial aid programs can be found at www. gibill.va.gov/bene ts/ other_programs/index. html. GI Bill eases college costs for military families JASON ALDERMAN

PAGE 5

The Times | A5 Thursday, December 5, 2013 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m I t ’ s t im e t o g o t hr o ug h y o ur c los ets f o r t h os e un wa n t e d p a ir s o f s h o es, in r e a s o n a b le co n di t io n. Y o u c a n b r in g t h e s h o es t o C o a s t a l F o o t a n d A n k le C linic lo c a t e d a t 221 HWY 98. D o n a t io n s w i l l g o t o F ra n k lin ’ s P r o mi s e a n d w i l l b e di s t r i b u t e d a t t h e C o mm uni t y S er v ice C en t er (O ld A p a l ac hico l a H ig h S c h o o l) a t 192 14t h S t r e et in A p a l ac hico l a. Di s t r i b u t io n w i l l b e D e cem b er 3r d a n d 17t h f r o m 9:00a m t o 12:00p m. i s p r o ud t o a nn o un ce t h e i s n o w un der wa y H e l p t h os e in n e e d Y ou can call 653-FEET (3338) for more infor mation. 12th Annual SHO E DRIV E 0 ( -) ) 00 &&$&0( $'0( $' $)(' ((0 % &$0 Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A $0$& ,-&0$ ( 850 ) 899-1588 ( ( $ '$ (& )1 # () (,1( 0 (( ,-+ )) -&0'-+ ,( )00 0-( ) -0/ ) (, ( +-) -(1 $' (00.((0 N O TI CE O F S P ECI AL MEE TIN G e B o a r d o f C o mmi s sio n er s o f t h e N o r t h w es t Flo r id a R eg io n a l H o u sin g A u t h o r i t y w i l l h o ld a S p e ci a l M e et in g o n D e cem b er 17, 2013, a t t h e H o lid a y I nn & S ui t es, 2725 G ra v es R o ad T a l l a h a s s e e Flo r id a. M e et in g w i l l b eg in a t 1:00 p .m. E.S.T e m e et in g w i l l b e o p en t o t h e p u b lic. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Law Enforcement By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m The Irish Town II was raised on Monday. The 43-foot shrimp boat, built in 1970, sank early Sunday, Nov. 24 after capsizing in a gust of wind while lowering her outrigger arms. Her crew was forced to swim to safety through frigid waters on the rst cold day of winter. The Irish Town II rapidly took on water and sank in the channel, creating an impediment to navigation. Owner Kenneth Martina, arriving on the scene soon after the mishap, was able to move the boat from the channel on the same day but efforts to raise the vessel dragged on for over a week. The salvage efforts have drawn an audience along the waterfront. Workers nally succeeded in raising the Irish Town II, around dusk Monday, using a crane mounted on a barge. Once the boat was pumped out, she was towed to moorings at the Mill Pond where Martina is assessing damage to the boat. “It’s around $20,000,” said Martina. He said he had no insurance on the boat. “I’m working to get the engine and the transmission running, now,” he said. “I’ll be working on her for a year or so.” The dock beside the pier was littered with a waterlogged microwave and other items of oaded from the Irish Town II. “At least she’s oating,” said Martina. “I have another shrimp boat so my brother and I can keep working. This is really more of a sideline for me and that’s a good thing.” Arrest REPORT Williams released to Tallahassee address Special to the Times Norman Bill Williams, a notorious sex-offender who absconded in 2011 after he was released from prison to live in woods outside Eastpoint, has completed his prison time and registered as a sexual predator living in Tallahassee. Williams was released from state custody on Sunday, and is now registered as living at 1224 Eppes Drive in Tallahassee. On Dec. 1, he completed the terms of a 30-month sentence for failing to register as a sexual predator in Sept. 2011, part of a case that drew state and national attention. At the time, Williams, 58, had just completed a seven-year sentence for sexual battery, part of a prison history that included incarceration for cocaine possession, burglary, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, grand theft of a motor vehicle and escape. Classi ed as a sexual predator, he ed Eastpoint after state probation of cials released him from prison on conditional supervision to live in the woods. Williams, who was left Sept. 24, 2011 to camp on government land off Bear Creek Road, slipped off his ankle bracelet and absconded, until he was apprehended Oct. 10 at a fuel dock in Leeville, La. An alert employee at the Leeville store had seen through Williams’ clumsy disguise, and soon he was extradited back to Franklin County. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The shrimp boat Irish Town II was raised using a crane mounted on a barge after it capsized last week. The Irish Town II sustained damage to the bow during the salvage operation. Inset: Owner Kenneth Martina at work aboard the Irish Town II. Irish Town II a oat again NORMAN BILL WILLIAMS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, the Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. NOV. 25 Harry J. Hall, Jr., 34, Lanark Village, violation of probation (FCSO) NOV. 26 Joshua L. Pilotti, 24, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) NOV. 28 Jonathan E. Cooper, 32, Apalachicola, driving while license revoked – habitual (FHP) Barbara R. Buzbee, 63, Apalachicola, corruption by threats against a public servant and reckless driving (APD) NOV. 30 Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Julia M. Guthrie, 43, Eastpoint, DUI (FHP) DEC. 2 Alice A. Amerson, 23, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Kayla R. Langley, 29, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Derrick E. Kennedy, 41, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO)

PAGE 6

WI LLI E i s a 2 y ear o l d c r eam c o lo r e d C h i huahua H e i s v er y f r ien dly a n d v e r y soci a l H e w o u l d mak e a g r ea t c o m p an i o n l a p d o g f or s o me o n e H e w o u l d be h a p p i e s t i n a h o m e w i t h o u t y o ung c h i ld r en w h er e h e c o u l d be t h e c e n t e r of t he u n i v e r s e He i s h e a r t w o r m n e g a t i v e n e u t e r e d a n d r e a d y f o r h i s f o r e v e r h o m e V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s pe ra t e l y n e e d e d t o soci a l i z e a l l o f o u r d og s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a ys l oo k i n g f o r pe o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r a n i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o be f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s An y t i m e y o u c an s p ar e w o u l d b e g r ea t l y ap p r e c i a t e d. C a l l Ka r e n a t 6 7 0 -8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d et a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F ra n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a n e Soci et y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R oa d 6 5 i n E a s tp o i n t Y o u m a y l og o n t o t h e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n pet s o r g t o s e e m o r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. OF THE WEEK PET 227.7847 Franklin County Humane Society S e e Y o u r Bu s in e s s Name a n d I n f o Her e f o r O N L Y $ 1 5 p e r w e ek $ 6 0 p e r m o n t h Ca l l T o d a y 4 51 6 7 7 0 is Y e a r ’ s L o c a t i o n C o m i ng F r a s e r F i r 5 t o 10 Society A6 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Franklin County’s newest Christmas tradition, the Best Dressed Dog contest, has come and gone. This year’s winners were Ponto and Wallye McMillan, of Carrabelle and Atlanta, the pair belonging to Lily and Zach McMillan. Ponto, a 125-pound Rottweiler was also biggest in show, but he was a good sport and remained patient throughout the judging. Ponto and Wallye’s costumes were created by Rebecca McMillan, Zach’s mother. She said a hot glue gun and several visits to Hobby Lobby contributed to her success. First runners-up were Heidi, a Yorkie in a pink tutu, and Bailey a terrier mix disguised as Santa. The pair belongs to Darlene Pearce, also of Carrabelle. Second runners-up were Moxie and Ray Ray, both mixed breeds, the siblings rescued from the Franklin County Animal Shelter. Returning for the second time were Laffy Taffy and Frankie Blue Eyes Nugent, an attractive pair belonging to Raquel and Michael Nugent. Carrabelle Police Chief Craig Kincaid was on hand with Gizmo, a rescue dog from Michigan, in a handsome Christmas sweater. Lovely Nina, a white standard poodle, appeared with owner Sally Heinz, of Memphis, Tenn. Shelter Director Karen Martin said the event found homes for two kittens and raised money for the humane society. She was pleased with the turnout, especially since it competed with several important football games. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above: Wallye and Ponto, with owners Lily and Zach McMillan, took rst place in the dog apparel competition. Top Right: Carrabelle Police Chief Craig Kincaid and trained attack dog Gizmo. Bottom Right: Frankie Blue Eyes, right, and Laffy Taffy prove dogs come in all shapes and sizes, as the pair returned for a second try at the county’s coveted Best Dog Costume Award. Canines carry off Christmas couture Special to the Times On Nov. 12, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board (GCWB) celebrated 17 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon at Gulf Coast State College’s Advanced Technology Center. “This is the last time an annual meeting would be held for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, because in 2014, we will adopt a new identity, CareerSource Gulf Coast.” Kimberly Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board announced, At the meeting, Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year which included: • Assisting 1,016 employers recruit and hire workers • Serving 60,336 walkins at the Workforce Center • Connecting 7,243 individuals to employment • Providing in demand training and employment services to 1,166 adults, dislocated workers, and youth under the Workforce Investment Act • Helping 131 families transition from welfare to self sufciency “We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers,” said Bodine. The GCWB’s service providers include Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management, Welfare Transition, Food Stamp Employment and Training Program. Individuals who participated in programs operated by service providers as well as by the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, along with their case managers, were recognized. Successful clients recognized during the program included Food Stamp Program participant Tiffany Garrison; Workforce Training Center at Haney Technical Center participant Payton Davidson of A Superior Air Conditioning; veterans Roderick Hills of Chenega, and Scott McDonald of Engility; Kayla Warren of the Bay County Stars program; and Miranda Pilger of the Franklin County Tigers Program. Success story videos were shown at the meeting, and can be accessed at the Workforce Center’s You Tube channel http://www.youtube.com/ user/mag5025 At the meeting the board approved a new slate of ofcers for 2014. Bob Swenk (Bay County) will serve as chair, with Ted Mosteller (Franklin County) as past-chair. The executive committee will include Alisa Kinsaul (Bay County), Jennifer Conoley (Bay County). John Reeves (Gulf County) and Betty Croom (Franklin County). The GCWB is a public/ private partnership chartered by the state of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Their mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic development and employment needs of the three counties. Workforce Board elects new ofcers By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival received a great deal of attention from people in high places. President John Solomon and the entire board for the festival worked extra hard to make this important anniversary special and everyone agrees they succeeded. Out of respect for their labors, this year’s festival received recognition from Washington as well as Tallahassee. State Senator Bill Montford (DMonticello) issued a proclamation “commending the board members and volunteers who have given so generously of their time and talents throughout the years to make the festival an enduring success.” The proclamation goes on to recount how Apalachicola created seafood festival to lure tourists back to US 98 after the opening of bypass route US 10. Not to be outdone, Cong. Steve Southerland (R-Panama City) read praise of the festival into the Congressional Record on Oct. 30. Southerland presented Solomon with a copy of his speech during his Nov. 22 visit to the county. Southerland praised not just the festival but also, the seafood workers he describes as the “backbone of Franklin County’s economy and rich history.” Praise rained down from the governor’s mansion as well. Governor Rick Scott and members of his cabinet issued a resolution Oct. 4, calling on all of Florida to recognize the 50th annual festival and join in the celebration. Perhaps we value most the admiration of those near and dear. Solomon and his crew also received recognition from their friends and neighbors on Oct. 8, when Apalachicola Mayor, Van Johnson and the city commission, issued a proclamation commending the festival volunteers and thanking them for their great service to the city. Florida Seafood Festival gathers recognitions Ted Mosteller of Franklin County, is past-chair of Gulf Coast Workforce Board. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Cong. Steve Southerland, right, presents Florida Seafood Festival President John Solomon with a plaque commemorating the festival. Special to the Times On Nov. 15, at the South Florida State College Highlands Campus in Avon Park, Joe Taylor of Apalachicola, executive director of Franklin’s Promise Coalition, was awarded the Outstanding Volunteer Administrator Award for his outstanding work as a manager of volunteers in the nonprot sector. The award presentation took place during the Florida Association for Volunteer Resource Management’s fall forum, established to recognize innovation and a commitment to affect positive change in diverse communities. Taylor serves as the fulltime, paid director of Franklin’s Promise Coalition, headquartered at 192 14th Street in Apalachicola. “One of Franklin County’s strengths is its volunteers. The award I was given is not about me, it is about how the community comes together to tackle challenges and improve all of our lives,” said Taylor. “It represents the work of every volunteer, whether it is the mom who carpools the kids to soccer practice, or the parents who help at their child’s school, the generous folks who support our nonprot organizations or the community leaders who sit on numerous boards and committees. Joe Taylor, left, of Franklin Promise Coalition receives the Outstanding Volunteer Administrator award from FAVRM president, Mary Register. Taylor receives administering award oO UT sS T a A N diDI NG M aA N aA GEMENT

PAGE 7

The Times | A7 Thursday, December 5, 2013 Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 R. Micha el Whale y P astor _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice Faith Island Lights celebration Friday The annual St. George Island Island Lights will be Friday, Dec. 6, mid-island in St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile “Jingle Jog” starts at 4 p.m. on the bike path in front of the park and proceeds through the business district. All runners receive Santa hats for their heads and jingle bells for their shoes. Runners should arrive a little before 4 p.m. to sign in. A $5 per runner donation is suggested. Santa is expected at 5 p.m., arriving by re engine and providing gifts to children age 10 and younger. Refreshments including cookies, coffee, and hot chocolate will be provided to all. Island Scouts will be selling hot dogs. In the event of rain, many sturdy tents will be set up. View the lighting of the island palms at sundown. The event is hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. For more information, watch www.sgibusinesses. com/island-lights. Santa to visit the Hill on Saturday Santa Claus will pay a special visit to the Hill from 10-11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7. Greet Santa in the parking lot of AJ’s Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 120 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. Take pictures with the jolly old elf and get a goody bag from Santa. The event is sponsored by AJ’s, H’COLA & SWAT. First Baptist to have indoor yard sale Saturday The First Baptist Christian School will have its annual Indoor Yard Sale, just in time for Christmas, at 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, at First Baptist Church 46 Ninth St. in Apalachicola. The sale this year will benet Rachel Huckeba, who is in need of a liver transplant. There will be clothes, dishes, microwaves, toys, an exercise machine and more. Legion auxiliary to have Saturday yard sale The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 82, 2316 Oak St., Lanark Village will have a yard sale and Boston butt sale at 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7. Pork barbecue sandwiches with baked beans will be $5 per person, starting at 11 a.m. Boston butts sold whole for $20. Proceeds from this sale will benet local veterans at Christmastime, so come on out to the Legion on Oak Street, get a bargain, a meal and a good time. Just follow the signs. Holiday Fresh Market Saturday Why ght the crowds and trafc at the malls? Enjoy the Holiday Fresh Market this Saturday, Dec. 7 in downtown Apalachicola. Shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from fresh seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry. For more information, call 653-9419. Fellowship Baptist to present musical on Sunday Fellowship Baptist Church, 10 Ellis Van Vleet St., in Apalachicola, will present “His Very Own Star,” a musical for Christmas, at 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8. For more information, call 653-4200. Eastpoint Christmas parade Dec. 13 The county commission has voted unanimously for permission to close U.S. 98 in Eastpoint for the Eastpoint Christmas Parade, scheduled for Friday afternoon, Dec. 13. Love Center to host Dec. 14 ‘Regal Party’ On Saturday, Dec. 14, the Love and Worship Center will host a Regal Christmas Party at the Fort Coombs Armory, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The dinner party will feature the “Dream Reality Band,” from Valdosta, Ga. Everyone is welcome for this festive occasion. Cost is $20 to cover expenses. Live Nativity scene Dec. 21 Carrabelle Christian Center, 142 River Road, Carrabelle, will have a live nativity and depiction of the birth of Christ at 7 and 8 p.m. Dec. 21. “The Word became esh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” John 1:14 Donation yoga classes continue The donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes, 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Battery Park city ofce conference room. Son Barber Thank you each member of my church family for your love, cards, visits and sincere prayers for me during my recent illness at home. I have felt the presence, peace and sustaining power of his love through it all. Eul Soon “Son” Barber Jacqueline Houston family The family of Jacqueline M. Houston would like to thank the community for the love, support, cards, money, food and kind acts that were shown during our time of bereavement. May God return it back to you. Thank you. Rosamae, Demetrice and Demond Food pantry The Franklin County Food Pantry would like to thank the ABC School staff, students and their families for their generous donation of food from their 2013 Fall Food Drive. The Franklin County Food Pantry is a 501(c)(3) organization that relies on donations of food and cash to continue its operations. Food is distributed twice a month to an average of 350 families, our neighbors in need. To make donations you can mail a check to the Franklin County Food Pantry 192 14th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320. Call pantry coordinator Lori Switzer at 6533930 to make a food donation or to help out as a volunteer. Had a great time Thanksgiving Day at our annual dinner. One hundred of us gathered together, broke bread and had a good time visiting. Our very own Dot Bless received a gift of appreciation for all her work. Dot then thanked all of us who helped her make it happen. Had a few cancellations earlier, but they were soon replaced by others. In years past, the late Bob Barnhill would slip out after dinner and go over to his and Jean’s house and turn on the outside Christmas lights. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve breakfast at Chillas Hall. The doors will open at 8:30 a.m. and close at 11 a.m. Your donation of $5 will ll your plate with pancakes, French toast casserole, eggs, bacon or sausage, juice and coffee. Come on over this Saturday, Dec. 7, and get a good start on the day. Later on Saturday, you can dance the night away at the Senior Center with Jim the disc jockey and have a good time with all your friends and neighbors. We are shooting for the season opener of Wednesday Night Bingo in January. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Dec. 14, when the Parade of Lights will shove off at dusk on the Carrabelle River. I still remember the rst one they had. Our monthly covered dish luncheon will be Sunday, Dec. 15, at Chillas Hall. Serving will begin at 1 p.m. You can still enjoy hamburger night on Friday and pizza on Sunday. Eat in or take out at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Orders are taken from 5-7 p.m. both nights. Yum! Yum! It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and when you’re out and about don’t forget to drop in the Toys for Tots donation boxes and shop locally. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, it’s better to give than to receive. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LA nN A rR K neNE W sS Jim Welsh Breakfast Saturday morning, dance at night AAAA meeMEE T inIN G schedSCHED U leLE For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MOND AA Y 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Closed AA, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St.TU TU ESD AA Y Noon to 1 p.m.: Open, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. W W EDNESD AA Y 6-7 p.m.: Women’s AA, Closed, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Men’s AA, Closed, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal ChurchT T H UU RSD AA Y Noon to 1 p.m.: Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Open AA, St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive FRID AA Y 5:30-6:30 p.m.: AA Happy Hour, Open, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension S ATUATURD AA Y 7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Speakers Meeting, Open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Discussion Group: Alligator Point Mission By The Sea S UU ND AA Y 7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Big Book Study, Open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church Faith briefsBRIEFS Cards of T T H AA N KK S LOIS SW W OBODA A | The Times

PAGE 8

Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, December 5, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu N o v 28 61 45 0 % F ri, N o v 29 60 48 0 % S a t N o v 30 64 53 10 % Sun, Dec 1 63 55 10 % M on, Dec 2 69 48 0 % T ues Dec 3 68 47 0 % W ed Dec 4 68 47 0 % Santa’s O utdoor H eadquarters! Holida y Gifts f or Childr en Hug e Tr ain Set Demo Guns & Ammo By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charternet Capt. Mike Parker, Birmingham, Ala., native, is an angler extraordinaire. But these days he’s a Floridian in all but college football. Parker and his wife, Capt. Marguerite Parker, have been running his Silver King charter service for more than a decade here, out of what is arguably the world’s largest charter boat harbor, just east of the Destin/Fort Walton Beach bridge on U.S. 98. I joined Capt. Mike for a four-hour ounder charter on a visit there last week, right on time for the annual run of these tasty at sh. “The sh come out of Choctawhatchee Bay on the rst cold fronts of fall and stay on the nearshore reefs until at least Christmas,” Parker said. “A couple of good anglers can put a limit in the boat anytime we get reasonable weather during that period.” Flounder are bottom sh, thus their doormat design; they lie on the bottom partially covered with sand until a minnow or shrimp comes too near, then lunge out and devour it, locking down with a set of inward slanted teeth that are very dif cult to escape for potential prey — or for the thumb of an unwary angler trying to remove a hook! WHERE TO LOOK The ounders here — most are southern ounder but with a mix of smaller gulf ounder as well — come out of the bays into the Gulf to spawn anywhere between Mobile Bay and Apalachicola Bay when water temperature drops in fall, typically in late October, continuing to late December. The sh come in waves on the fronts, and where there are none today there might be dozens or hundreds tomorrow. They mostly gather near the passes, as well as on nearshore reefs at depths of 40 to 100 feet — rarely any farther offshore. Fortunately, the deep water is close in along Panhandle beaches, so gaining access is no problem for those with boats seaworthy enough to get them safely through the inlets. The most abundant schools are found near the passes because that’s where the sh come from, and where they’ll return in spring. Some anglers do well by simply drifting the buoy line on falling water. And it’s possible to pick up enough for dinner by shing from the inlet jetties — the sh sometimes hang on the sand just off the rocks, as well as at the point where the jetty falls away into the dredged portion of the pass. Southern ounder get big, to 20 pounds and more than 30 inches long. Gulf ounder max out around 6 pounds and 25 inches. But most anglers catch sh 13 to 16 inches, pan-sized but not trophy-sized. That’s ne with Mike Parker. “A 15-inch ounder is about the best eating there is in the Gulf,” he said. “And you don’t have to mess with lleting it; just cut off the head and clean out the body cavity, scale it and you’re ready to coat it with breadcrumbs and pan-fry; the skin lifts off when you’re done and the meat then comes away clean from the bones.” This cleaning method also works great if you oven-broil the sh — just score the skin on the “up” side, drizzle a bit of melted butter over it and broil until the tail turns up toward the heat — super tasty and pretty healthy, too. FISHING TECHNIQUE Most anglers use a sliding weight above a swivel, with a 2to 3-foot leader running to a 1/0 Kahle style semi-circle hook. The barb of these hooks is turned inward, which helps to keep the lip-hooked bait sh from ipping off. The weight is varied, from as little as 1 ounce nearshore or in slow current to as much as 4 ounces in deep water and strong currents — you use the least that will give a rm feel for bottom. Light spinning tackle is generally adequate — the same stuff you’d use for trout or sheepshead inside the bays, with braided line of 10 to 15 pound test. The braid gives a much better feel for the soft take of the ounder and also gives a better hook-set. The universal bait is bull minnows, which are known as gulf killi sh by biologists. Most baitshops here stock the minnows during ounder season, selling them at about $4.50 per dozen. They’re about 3 inches long and very hardy. Lots of people want these, and the supply is limited — you have to get to most shops early if you want a good supply. It’s possible to catch killi sh in standard bait traps with a funneltype lid — they’ll swim in for both fresh shrimp and cut mullet baits. They can also be seined or castnetted in tidal creeks and around oyster bars. They readily stay alive in a standard baitwell, and you can even keep a couple dozen alive in a ow-through portable bucket. They’re far tougher than shrimp, stay on the hook despite baitstealers like pin sh and lizard sh, and can live for days in the livewell if not put to use. They are ounder candy — a ounder might turn down almost any other bait, but it will never pass up a lively killi sh. The shing tactic is simple: Just drift with the outgoing tide in the ow of the inlets, with the bait dragging bottom. The ounder will take it from there. The bite will be familiar to you if you’ve done any freshwater bass shing — it sometimes feels much like a largemouth latching on to a Carolina rig. At other times, though, the bait just seems to get “heavy” — there’s a resistance there but no other action until you set the hook. One good tip from Mike Parker is this: “Watch the rod tip. Sometimes it will start bouncing and twitching even though you don’t feel anything in the handle. When the tip bounces, set the hook with a steady, upward sweep — not too hard or you may tear the hook out, but just get good pressure and help the hook dig in.” Where you catch one you might catch a dozen on that same 50-foot stretch of bottom, so it pays to motor back uptide and re-drift a productive spot. And if you miss a sh, just drop the bait right back to the bottom—if the bait was not knocked off, the ounder might well come right back and get hooked. The ght of the average 12to 16-inch ounder is not notable, but you’re not here for the battle, you’re here for dinner. To put the larger ones in the boat, it’s essential to have a long-handled landing net — they’re frequently lightly hooked, and some will surely ip off at the last moment if you don’t put the net under them. Biologists say the ounder stay in the Gulf pretty much throughout the winter, but the prime shing time is de nitely the months leading up to the New Year — after that, slower metabolism and a scattering out of the schools makes shing slower. The sh return to the bays in March and April, where they settle on channel edges, in sloughs and anywhere they might run into killi sh on a regular basis. The limit is 10 daily over 12 inches long. Both southern ounder and gulf ounder are included in the daily bag — there’s no separate bag for each species, so no need to be able to tell them apart. (It ain’t easy.) No license is needed if you sh with a guide or from a pay-entry pier, or if you’re a Florida resident over 65. For more information, call 850837-2028 or visit www. shingdestin.com SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Flounder are bottom sh, thus their doormat design; they lie on the bottom partially covered with sand until a minnow or shrimp comes too near, then lunge out and devour it, locking down with a set of inward slanted teeth that are very dif cult to escape for potential prey — or for the thumb of an unwary angler trying to remove a hook! Christmas comes early when the ounder run is on Page 8 Outdoors BRIEF SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Bottom Trout and ounder are holding around the creek runoffs in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Neap tides have allowed more bait sh to move up in the canal, in turn bringing the trout and game sh to follow. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in these waters this week as well. Most local creeks and streams are still holding good amounts of bream and now some crappie. The crappie bite should improve this week because of the cold weather and rain. St. Vincent hunting season underway The 2013-14 hunting season on St. Vincent Island began with the archery hunt Nov. 20 to 24. The annual Sambar deer hunt is scheduled for Dec. 4-8 and the primitive weapons hunt will take place January 22-24, 2014. Public hunting of whitetailed deer, Sambar deer, feral hogs, and raccoons is permitted on 11,400 acres of St. Vincent Island. Access onto St. Vincent Island is restricted to the Indian Pass and West Pass campsites. Entry during the Sambar deer hunt is restricted to the eastern end of the island at the West Pass campsite. All hunters, regardless of age must possess a refuge permit. Youth hunters (younger than 16 years) must be supervised by a permitted adult at least 21 years of age, and must remain in sight and normal voice contact of the adult. Each adult may supervise only one youth. Some permits to hunt on St. Vincent are issued by lottery. Applications may be submitted at any license agent or tax collector or online at www. .wildlifelicense.com/start.php Up to ve hunters can apply as a group. To apply as a group, one person must rst apply as group leader, indicate they are creating a group, and enter the hunt choice for the group, and submit their $5 application fee. The group leader will be given a group number (prints on receipt) that must be given to the group members. Each group member must then indicate the group they are joining and submit a $5 application fee. Applicants may check the website after June 25 for results. Sambar permits not paid for by August 1 will be offered rst come August 6 given for unsuccessful applicants.

PAGE 9

CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, December 5, 2013 A Section SKATEBOARD PARK HOSTS SATURDAY EVENT Enjoy an early Christmas skateboarding experience this Saturday, Dec 7 at the Justin B. Grif n Skate Park, adjacent to the former Apalachicola High School. Why look any further for your Christmas wishes? Journeys of SGI skateboard department will have all of your skateboarding needs, with sales 20 percent layaway on all products. At 10:30 a.m., there will be a dedication of sign and garden, with a safety and protection course at 11 a.m., and demo skate classes at noon. At 1 p.m. will be a lesson on how to build your own ramp, and at 2 p.m. prize and ramp giveaways. Plenty of food, drink and music, plus free skateboard and accessories giveaways. Parents are strongly suggested to attend! To learn more, call 927-3259 or visit the Facebook page. Donate a plant for the agpole garden or a toy for the Franklin County Sheriff Toy Drive. Proceeds from food and drink to be donated to JBG Skate Park. Sports BRIEF Special to The Times On Nov. 23, the Lady Seahawks girls varsity soccer team hosted Freeport in a District 1A match, and came away with a 7-0 victory. The Lady Seahawks were on re from the opening whistle and were able to overpower the Bulldogs with an onslaught of scoring. The scoring opened on an unassisted goal by freshman Allie Kirvin. Moments later, off a cross from senior Jessica Shields, Allie Kirvin scored a second goal. To complete her hat trick, she scored her third goal of the match off a rebounded shot which ricocheted off the near post. Freshman Emily Zingarelli scored off a pass from Shields and senior Gracyn Kirvin scored, unassisted, to make the score 5-0 at the half. “We had 23 shots on goal in the rst half alone,” coach Joe Shields said. “Everyone saw opportunities and wanted to take shots, which is a good thing, but I had to rein them in, so we could take this opportunity to work on stringing together passes, which would set up goals in future matches.” The carnage continued in the second half with 19 shots on goal from various Lady Seahawks and the total shots on goal by individual players escalated: Senior captain Adrianna Reeder, with seven, senior captain Deborah Dempsey four, junior Katie Seger ve, and Shields nine. Before the nal whistle, Gracyn Kirvin added two more goals, one unassisted on a breakaway and one from a Shields’ cross, to close out the Bulldogs, 7-0. “This was another match in which I was able to substitute liberally and give girls game experience,” Shields said. “As an example, freshmen Chelsea Register and Myranda McLeod were able to come in the game and each one was able to take a couple shots on goal.” The Lady Seahawks, undefeated at home, took a 5-2 record into the Thanksgiving break. They hosted Rutherford High School at home on Tuesday. They play host to West Gadsden today, and on Dec. 10, they travel to Rutherford. On Dec. 12, they will be at Freeport. YEARBOOK STAFF | Special to The Times Senior captain Adrianna Reeder takes aim in action against Freeport Lady Seahawks blank Freeport 7-0 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Former Franklin County Seahawk quarterback Dalin Modican has made quite a name for himself so far this season playing college football. After a year at Independence Community College in Independence, Kansas, during which he did not play football, the 2011 FCHS grad, who played for coach Josh Wright, took the eld this year as a red-shirted freshman for Florida Tech, in Melbourne. The Panthers are a newly instituted Division II program, and a member of the Gulf South Conference. Modican, a 180-pound, 5’11” wide receiver, has played in 11 of the team’s 12 regular season games, and is fourth on the list of pass receivers. He caught 28 tosses, for 227 yards, an average of just over eight yards per catch, and nearly 21 yards per game. In the team’s 55-28 loss to North Alabama at home Nov. 9, Modican caught a 26yard touchdown pass from quarterback Bobby Vega to complete a nine-play, 65-yard drive that closed the gap to 3421 with about 11 minutes left in the third quarter. Modican, son of Kenny Wilson and Claudine KelloggWilson, of Apalachicola, had one of his best games of the season against North Alabama, snaring seven passes for 60 yards. Modican’s season has been one of steady gains as a receiver. In his rst game, a 23-19 loss at Newberry Sept. 12, he had one reception for eight yards. And then, a week later, in the team’s 45-3 loss at home against 16th-ranked West Alabama, he snared a pair of receptions, a two-yarder and a six-yarder. Modican continued to boost his performance, when on Sept. 28 against Delta State in Cleveland, Miss., he caught two passes for 26 yards, a 19-yarder and a seven-yarder. He didn’t gure into the box score in the team’s 52-14 loss Oct. 5 against top-ranked Valdosta State, but he was in the middle of the action a week later in the team’s narrow 4541 loss against Ave Maria. In that game, Modican had three receptions for 32 yards – for 5, 8 and 19 yards, and each for a rst down. Modican caught three passes for 14 yards in Florida Tech’s 28-24 win against Shorter Oct. 19. The passes were for ve yards, six yards and rst down, and three yards. On Oct. 26, Florida Tech downed Warner 37-3, and Modican snared one reception from Vega for ve yards and a rst down into Warner territory at the 48-yard line. A week later, in the Panthers’ 28-14 loss to West Georgia in Carrollton, Ga, Modican pulled down four passes for 22 yards. On Nov. 16, in the team’s 173 win at home against Webber International, Modican caught two consecutive 13-yard passes in the first quarter, both for first downs. On Nov. 23, when Florida Tech downed Alderson Broaddus 32-20 in an away game in Philippi, W.Va., Modican caught three passes for 26 yards, the longest a 14-yarder. Midway through the third quarter, Modican was stopped on a two-point conversion run try. Modican is majoring in business administration. While at FCHS, he caught the school’s first passing touchdown and had the first interception in school history. He forced 10 fumbles in one year as a defensive back, and was twice selected AllBig Bend First Team as a defensive back. Modican also helped the basketball team, coached by Fred Drake, advance to the Class A final four and was a Gulf Coast All-Star. Page 9 Modican shines in Florida Tech back eld DALIN MODICAN $ 000 00 F S 4 5 T R I M M E R E a sy t o u se w e l l b al an c e d tr i m m e r f o r h o m e o w n e r u s e G E T GE A R E D U P w i t h p r o t e c t i v e a p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r i e s $ 000 00 M S 1 7 0 C H A I N S A W D e s i g n e d f o r o c c a s i o n a l w o o d c u t t i n g t a s k s a r o u n d t h e h o m e I n c l u d e s m a n y of t h e e x c e l l e n t d e s i g n f e a t u r e s of o u r p r of e s s i o n a l m o d e l s A n t i v ib ra t i on s y s t e m f or c o m f or t a b l e o p e ra t i on B a r l e n g t h s m a y v a r y b y r e g i o n $ 000 00 BG 5 5 H A N D H EL D B L O W ER P r ov e n h a n d h e l d b l o we r a t a n a f f o r d a b l e p r i c e T H I S HO LI D A Y G IV E S O ME T H IN G D EP EN D A B L E ST I H Lu s a c om A v a i l a b l e a t p a r t i c i p a t i n g d e a l e r s w h i l e s u p p l i e s l a s t 2 0 1 1 S T I H L $ 17 9 95 $ 14 9 95 $ 16 9 95 S t J o e R e n t A ll 70 6 1 st St P o r t S t J o e F L 8 5 0 -2 2 7 -2 1 1 2 W E S E L L T H E B E S T A N D R E P A I R T H E R E S T Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 L a d y S e a h a w k f r e s h m a n A l l i e K i r v i n a n d s e n i o r G r a c y n K i r v i n e a c h s c o r e d t h r e e t i m e s i n t h e g i r l s s o c c e r t e a m s 7 0 v i c t o r y a t h o m e N o v 2 3 a g a i n s t F r e e p o r t B o t h p l a y e r s w e r e i n v o l v e d i n t o t a l t e a m d e f e n s e a n d a s s i s t e d w i t h k e e p i n g t h e b a l l i n t h e F r e e p o r t e n d o f t h e e l d f o r t h e m a j o r i t y o f t h e g a m e G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R A llie K i r v i n G r a c y n K ir v in GOING FOR GOAL

PAGE 10

Local A10 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 T rades & Ser v ices Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % News BRIEFS a major decline in the oysters in the past 10 years,” Jesse Page told State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello. “We need to get the summer bars open. It’s killing us. I don’t think people catching small oysters have anything to do with it. “There’s a lot of people suffer ing, and we’ve got a gold mine sit ting out there, I’m asking for six to eight weeks, open ’em,” he said. “They open that up out there and people can go to work like myself. I don’t want a handout.” Later in the meeting, when all ve county commissioners ap peared together to speak, Com missioner William Massey made a formal appeal to the legislators to talk with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis sion about opening up more bars during December. “They need to hear in the next few days,” he said. As of Wednesday morning, the FWC had taken no action to open up additional bars. Shan non Hartseld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Work ers Association, took to Facebook to quell rumors the summer bars were opening this week. “We as the board have put in a proposal asking that they open these bars for a few weeks to help everyone out because times are terrible,” he wrote. “We are trying everything possible to get help for our fellow seafood work ers and their families. Just as soon as we hear something, and we hope we get a response soon, we will let everyone know.” Page also voiced concern about the recent stepped-up law enforcement efforts on bay wa ters, intended to stem the tide of undersized and illegally har vested oysters owing into oyster houses. “They’re harassing people left and right,” he said. “They can’t afford to feed their kids, much less pay a ticket.” Next to speak was Dustin Var nes, who questioned why more than $4 million in BP money ear marked for oyster reef research isn’t going toward reshelling. “Why are we putting $4 million back in the bay if we’ve already done it? Why can’t we put it into a shelling program?” he asked. “We’re not asking for a handout; we want to work. Oystering is a hard job; we work hard for our money. We just need help buddy, we need help. I’m about to lose everything I’ve got.” In his appeal to legislators to back a plan to open up more of the bay for harvesting, Hartseld said the state has said it would be a health risk. “If you could nd out a little more about it, we’re looking for anything that would help our selves out,” he said. “During the BP oil spill, they opened the en tire bay. Water sampling wasn’t an issue; they just opened it.” Hartseld urged legislators to seek an appropriation to help the bay after the session opens March 14. Both Montford and Beshears said they are continuing to work on the county’s behalf. “We want to help anybody who wants to help themselves,” Bes hears said. “Do not think for onehalf a second it falls on deaf ears. We’re paddling that boat as fast as we can. It’s unfortunate that’s it’s had to be an industry collapse for anyone to pay attention. “The governor’s been down here several times, it’s on his radar,” he said. “Just hang in there. This is a unique problem, unlike any other in the country. The problem we’ve been having is we’ve run out of time. We will stay on top of it.” Montford encouraged the seafood workers to continue to speak out. “Don’t sit back and be quiet. Keep on doing what you’re doing,” he said. “We all know we have a problem out there. People as far as Miami know the prob lem up here. This is not a north Florida problem, it’s a Florida problem.” When the county commis sioners came forward to speak, Commissioner Smokey Parrish addressed what he said was too much authority being invested in FWC. “That’s a very serious issue. There has to be checks and bal ances,” he said. “You give a lot of authority to one group that an swers to nobody.” Parrish appealed for help to the oyster industry. “The state of Florida has to step up. We need to get some help down here,” he said. “Why can’t we all work together and get something for these guys?” He also called for the reopen ing of the Bay City Work Camp, a position that was supported later in the meeting by Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook and City Administrator Betty Webb. Commissioner Pinki Jackel spoke briey, thanking the legis lators for their work as a bipar tisan team. “We appreciate your putting the bay at the forefront,” she said. “We hope you all will do something hopefully sooner rather than later.” Commissioner Noah Lockley spoke at length, telling the legis lators that since he began work ing on that water in 1969, “this is the worse I’ve seen. Now it’s worse, and it’s going to take time for it to get better. It’s not going to happen overnight. It’s going to take three to ve years to get this right. “This thing is affecting a whole lot of people,” he said. “One of our biggest workforces is seafood, and we’re losing it.” Lockley faulted FWC for ig noring the problem of under sized oysters and now cracking down hard. “They sit down and let people come in with little oys ters. They didn’t enforce it. They do their job, but they should have been doing it all the time,” he said. He also took issue with the fact that Adam Putnam, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture since 2011, has yet to visit the county. “He’s not been down,” Lockley said. “I haven’t seen him, not the whole time he’s been in ofce. He needs to show his face.” Chairman Cheryl Sanders asked for better communication from state ofcials. “We have all these projects going on. We need a little bit better communication levels than what we had,” she said. She also defended herself against attacks regarding her stance against the Air Force us ing Tate’s Hell for military exer cise, an issue that will be revisit ed on Dec. 12 at a public hearing in Apalachicola. “It may not seem very impor tant to a lot of people,” she said. “If you do not sh or hunt, you don’t use the forest, you don’t understand what we’re talking about. That doesn’t bother me.” Sanders closed by asking that the state not hand down any more unfunded mandates. “Leave us just as harmless as you found us,” she said. The legislators heard from Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson and Property Appraiser Rhon da Skipper, with their remarks mainly warm greetings and ap preciation for past assistance. Superintendent Nina Marks asked for funding help with vo cational training and learning academies and said the district’s wish list includes curriculum ex pansion into child care, allied medical professions, marine studies and junior ROTC. “We need the funding to help make the classes what they need to be,” she said. “We need to be able to feed our children back into the community because they do want to stay here.” Marks also called for a transi tion period of at least two years for full implementation of the Common Core standards and ap pealed for more exibility in set ting the school calendar. “We can start earlier and get through with a full semester before the Christ mas holidays,” she said. “We need more time on the clock.” The legislators also heard from Joe Taylor, director of the Franklin’s Promise Coalition, who introduced members of the Bridges to Circles program, an effort to provide the skills to peo ple to help them better manage the workforce demands and their own nances. Marcia Lindeman, admin istrator of the county health department, and Gina Moore, who oversees the anti-tobacco program, provided details of the anti-smoking effort, the dental clinic and other functions of the health department. OYSTERMEN from page A1 DAVI I D ADLERS ERS T EI EI N | The Times County Commissioner Smokey Parrish speaks out, with his colleagues. SS aturday lm to remember Pearl Harbor On Saturday, Dec. 7, at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, the lm “Tora, Tora, Tora” will be shown in the movie room. Released in 1970, the American-Japanese collaboration war lm dramatizes the Japanese reasons for the attack that brought America into the war. Some scenes are archival lm taken from one of the carriers participating in the attack. The lm, directed by Richard Fleischer, stars an ensemble cast, including Martin Balsam, Joseph Cotten, S Yamamura, E. G. Marshall, James Whitmore and Jason Robards. The title, which in Japanese means “Tiger,” was the code word used to indicate that complete surprise had been achieved. There will be one showing beginning at 10:30 a.m. Free popcorn will be available. Admission at the museum is by donation. II sland reghters’ annual meeting Dec. 14 The annual meeting of the St George Island Volunteer Fire Department will be at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 14 at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 E. Pine Ave., St George Island. An agenda will be available for review on Wednesday, Dec. 11, at the rehouse. The public is invited to attend and participate in accordance with applicable governing documents. A light lunch will follow the business meeting. Loan assistance available Dec. 17 The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host “one-on-one” technical assistance sessions from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17, where a representative from the FAMU Small Business Development Center and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity will be on hand to address questions and to provide information to small business owners in completing the Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan application. An Economic Injury Disaster Loan Declaration was approved by the SBA in response to a commercial shery failure determination for the Apalachicola Bay Area. The chamber ofces are at 122 Commerce St. Applicants may apply for an SBA loan online using the Electronic Loan Application via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ ela. Applications and program information are available by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (1-800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing), or by emailing disastercustomerservice@sba. gov. Applications also can be downloaded from www.sba.gov. Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. The deadline to return economic injury applications is July 31, 2014. Dameron named emergency coordinator Tress Reynolds Dameron is the new Franklin County Emergency Management coordinator. Dameron, an Apalachicola High School graduate with an associate’s degree in general studies, works as a veterinary technician. Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said Dameron has completed FEMA Incident Command System certication and her Professional Development Certicate, so she is eligible to be paid out of grant funds. Brownell said Dameron has attended several training session and exercises and helped with planning for the animal needs of Franklin County and the humane society.

PAGE 11

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, December 5, 2013 The Times | A11 96649T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 16, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: See Exhibit A PARCEL 1: LOTS 1 TO 10, SHELL BAY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF DOC SEA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY; FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2897.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 56 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 571.37 FEET, SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 71.47 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 49 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 66.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 139.22 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 46 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 23.21 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 11.86 FEET, SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 48.10 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 22.42 FEET TO AN IRON ROD LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUN96625T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000271 SEC.:________ THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-45 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-45, Plaintiff, vs. HOYT THOMPSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012CA000271 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 Inside the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: THE SOUTHWESTERLY 90 FEET OF LOT 6 (OR THE 90 FEET OF SAID LOT NUMBER 6 ADJOINING 13 STREET), AND ALL OF LOT 7, IN BLOCK 85, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT SAID CITY NOW IN GENERAL USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 21st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96645T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, W. E. SALMON, INC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1462 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOTS 7 & 8 BLOCK A CARRABELLE ET AL Full Legal Can be Obtained in the Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 29-07S-04W-4170-000A-00 70 Name is which assessed: ROBERT & PATRICIA EDWARDS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of JANUARY 2014, which is the 6th day of January 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 25th day of November, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Dec. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013 96617T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA000061 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES B. MITCHELL, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated November 28, 2012 and pursuant to Order rescheduling foreclosure sale entered September 23, 2013, both entered in Case No. 192009CA 000061 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CHARLES B. MITCHELL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES B. MITCHELL N/K/A PATTY MITCHELL; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SGI LIMITED PARTNERSHIP; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby in FRANKLIN County, Florida, at 11AM, on the 12th day December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, RESORT VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Street Address: LOT 4 RESORT VILLAGE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 22nd day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy-Clerk If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding or other court service, program, or activity, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Requests for accommodations may be presented on this form, in another written format, or orally. Please complete the attached form and return it to: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4430 as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or other court activity. Submitted by: MOSKOWITZ, MANDELL, SALIM & SIMOWITZ, P.A. 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 Primary E-mail: relit@mmsslaw.com Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96613T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-75-CP Division_________ IN RE: ESTATE OF JACK EDWARD WHITE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jack Edward White, deceased, whose date of death was October 31, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 28, 2013. Personal Representative: Kimberly Dawn Robinson 4258A Maxwell Road Antioch, TN 37013 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96611T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 13000166CA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FNMA”) Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 29, 2013, and entered in Case No. 13000166CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FNMA”) is Plaintiff and FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 8th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: All that certain parcel of land situated in the County Franklin, State of Florida, being known and designated as Lot 15 Block “A” of BAYWOOD ESTATES (unrecorded): Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 17, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and run North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 17 (as monumented) a distance of 553.11 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along said South boundary 587.43 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 01 degrees 14 minutes 33 seconds East 413.23 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Baywood Drive, said point lying on a curve concave to the Southerly, thence run Easterly along said right-of-way boundary and along the arc of said curve with a radius of 419.16 feet, through a central angle of 21 degrees 57 minutes 46 seconds, for an arc distance of 160.67 feet, the chord of said arc being North 89 degrees 14 minutes 24 seconds East 159.69 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the point of tangency, thence run South 79 degrees 46 minutes 43 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 430.62 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 50 minutes 07 seconds West 347.44 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH a perpetual non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as described in Official Records Book 628, Page 488 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of October, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Rd, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates. com File No.: 13-00882 LBPS Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96605T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000254 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 107 Southern Blvd., Suite 203 Savannah, GA 31405 Plaintiff, vs. J. MARK MCGILL A/K/A MARK MCGILL, and MYRA MCGILL A/K/A MYRA B. MCGILL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Calhoun County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK B, RANGE 10, PICKETT’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly known as: 501 AVENUE D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the 8th day of January, 2014, at 11 :00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must me a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 93276T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013CP000031 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BELA THOMAS BROWN, Deceased. AMENDED NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the administration of the Estate of BELA THOMAS BROWN, deceased; Case No.: 2013CP000031 is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 33, Apalachicola, Florida 32301. The Personal Representative of the Estate is ROBERT D. RAMOS, whose address is 615 Pineland Avenue, Belair, Florida 33756 All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney and the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured; the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to the Personal Representative. All persons interested in the Estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THIRTY DAYS FROM RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may have the challenges the validity of the decedent’s Will, the qualifications of the Personal Representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. DATED this 25th day of November, 2013. s/Larry K. White Larry K. White, Esq ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER FL BAR NO. 0194456 1367 E. Lafayette Street, Suite A Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 577-3230-Phone (850) 727-4525-Fax larrykwhite@lkwlaw.net December 5, 12, 2013

PAGE 12

A12| The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS DARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 3: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0039’19” WEST, 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U. S. HIGHWAY 98 SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4729’55”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET, (CHORD BEING SOUTH 5405’28” WEST 1153.75 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 3020’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2726’ FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET, (CHORD BEING SOUTH 4403’30” WEST 905.74 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5746’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1442’57”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 735.79 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 5025’02” WEST 733.78 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 4318’17” EAST, 33.07 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0225’57” EAST FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 120.23 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4451’18” EAST 120.22 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4318’17” EAST 182.78 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5550’01” WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 79.61 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6020’31” WEST, ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 42.77 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 4318’17” WEST 156.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY 6, 2004 AND BEARING JOB NUMBER 02-404 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0039’19” WEST, 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT ON THE CENTERLINE OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4729’55” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5405’28” WEST, 1153.75 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 3020’30” WEST, 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2726’00” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4403’30” WEST 905.74 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5746’30” WEST, 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1442’57” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 735.79 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5025’02” WEST, 733.78 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 4318’17” EAST 33.70 FEET TO A RE-BAR ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-BAR LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0225’57” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 120.22 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4554’12” EAST, 120.21 FEET TO ROD AND CAP; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4317’57” EAST, 153.33 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5458’50” WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 121.40 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4318’17” WEST, 132.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 4: PARCEL 1; A PART OF PARCEL 4 COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 250.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 13.65 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3869.74 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0145’16”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.49 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4044’48” EAST 118.49 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 310.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4019’17” WEST 132.20 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 309.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2; A PART OF PARCEL 4 COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4443’08” WEST 311.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 4019’17” EAST 70.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 4013’27” EAST 311.95 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 105.10 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4019’17” WEST 311.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JANUARY 10, 2005 AND BEARING JOB NUMBER 00-581 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 250.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 13.65 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3869.74 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0145’16”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.49 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4044’48” EAST 118.49 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 415.24 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4013’27” WEST 311.95 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 4019’17” EAST 179.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 309.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 5: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’00” EAST 471.89 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 8056’55” EAST 357.18 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1954’24” EAST 772.73 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NUMBER 98, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 8056’22” WEST 538.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1465.39 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5010’36” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1308.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 2945’56” WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1904.15 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 916.90 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 5721’17” WEST 42.26 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0544’04” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 290.02 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5605’56” WEST 289.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0716’18” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 367.77 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4736’37” WEST 367.52 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4432’48” WEST 400.12 FEET TO A POINT OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.70 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0705’09” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 407.83 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4741’58” EAST 407.57 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 3845’57” EAST 400.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST, 835.50 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5103’27” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5501’43” WEST, 1592.21 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2945’56” WEST, 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4320’41” WEST, 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5721’17” WEST, 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1210’44” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 700.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0102’45” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.20 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4045’03” WEST 60.20 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4438’07” EAST, 405.37 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0111’11” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.01 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4431’17” EAST, 60.01 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4438’07” WEST, 409.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 6: A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS: BEGIN AT A POINT IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST WHERE THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF U.S. LIGHT HOUSE RESERVATION INTERSECTS THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. 98) AND FROM SAID POINT RUN NORTH TO THE CENTER OF STATE ROAD 30; THENCE RUN WESTERLY FOLLOWING THE CENTER LINE OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 4,274 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY 33 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A POINT, WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHEASTERLY 370 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG ST. GEORGE SOUND 60 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTHWEST 250 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD; THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG SAID ROAD BOUNDARY LINE 60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCEL OF LAND FRONTING 60 FEET ON ST GEORGE SOUND AND RUNNING BACK THE SAME WIDTH TO STATE ROAD 30 AND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE SOUTH HALF OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, STATE OF FLORIDA. PARCEL 7: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4443’08” WEST 311.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 4444’17” WEST 104.45 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 4013’27” EAST 70.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475); THENCE RUN SOUTH 4444’20” EAST 104.57 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6476) THENCE RUN SOUTH 4019’17” WEST 70.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 8: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST 835.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5103’27”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 5517’40” WEST 1607.83 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2945’56” WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 4320’41” WEST 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5721’17” WEST 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0146’24”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 102.07 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 5628’05” WEST 102.06 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 3045’57” WEST 130.74 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5114’03” WEST 250.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4346’56” WEST 395.81 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6515’31” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 276.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 6513’10” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 134.39 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470) MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SHELL BAY, A SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 38 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4330’05” EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL BAY A DISTANCE OF 279.51 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470); THENCE RUN SOUTH 4334’22” EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY 30.13 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #2470); THENCE RUN SOUTH 4323’08” EAST 328.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID NON-TANGENT CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0034’16”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 32.88 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4103’59” EAST 32.88 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING A POINT OF NON-TANGENT COMPOUND CURVE; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID COMPOUND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0138’40” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 94.65 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4731’46” EAST 94.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261); THENCE RUN NORTH 4326’58” WEST 593.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 9: COMMENCE AT A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF DOC SEA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2897.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1118’56”, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 572.30 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 4556’57” WEST 571.37 FEET; SOUTH 4023’30” WEST 71.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4936’30” EAST 66.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4023’30” WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4621’48” EAST 30.90 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 5014’57” WEST 43.91 FEET; SOUTH 4038’46” WEST 35.52 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160); THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 4621’48” WEST 23.21 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 4023’30” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 79.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 10: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 5202’00” EAST 1500.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4006’00” EAST 351.02 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4442’42” WEST 53.70 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 LYING 50.00 FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 3949’56” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 263.65 FEET TO A POINT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 2914.70 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0219’43” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 118.46 FEET, CHORD BEING NORTH 4059’47” EAST 118.45 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 4444’20” WEST 415.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475); THENCE RUN NORTH 4018’10” EAST 104.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF SHELL BAY COURT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4449’25” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 421.03 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 2914.70 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0204’02” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 105.16 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 4311’40” WEST 105.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 11: LANDS IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING THE FOLLOWING SURVEY: BEGIN AT AN IRON STAKE 4274 FEET WEST OF U.S. LIGHTHOUSE RESERVATION AND CALL THIS THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; NOW TRAVEL SOUTHEAST A DISTANCE OF 370 FEET TO THE HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE WESTWARD ALONG HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET; THENCE NORTHWEST A DISTANCE OF 287 FEET, MORE OR LESS, AT SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 10; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD 10 A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO PLACE OF BEGINNING. ALL IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY THAT CERTAIN RECENT SURVEY DATED JUNE 25, 2001 BEARING JOB NUMBER 01-318 BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST 471.89 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 8056’55” EAST 357.18 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1954’24” EAST 772.73 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 8056’32” WEST 538.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1465.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5110’36” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1308.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 2945’56” WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1904.15 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 916.90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5721’17” WEST 42.26 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1300’22” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 657.79 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 0021’01” WEST 97.02 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 4431’10” EAST 128.29 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE AS FOLLOWS; SOUTH 6127’43” WEST 78.27 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 6035’09” WEST 128.52 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE RUN NORTH 4431’10” WEST 57.11 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98; THENCE RUN NORTH 4005’26” EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 77.38 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.34 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0228’53” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 122.62 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4119’54” EAST 122.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 12: A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE UNITED STATE LIGHTHOUSE RESERVATION, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND RUN THENCE WESTERLY FOLLOWING THE CENTERLINE OF THE 66 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 30, ALSO KNOWN AS STATE ROAD 10 AND U.S. HIGHWAY 98, A DISTANCE OF 4154 FEET; THENCE TURN A RIGHT ANGLE AND RUN A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY, WHICH POINT IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE TURN A RIGHT ANGLE AND RUN TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS TO A POINT FROM WHICH A LINE RUN NORTHWESTERLY WILL BE 50 FEET FROM AND PARALLEL TO SAID LAST LINE; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG A LINE 50 FEET FROM AND PARALLEL SAID TO LAST LINE TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO.30 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING A PARCEL OF LAND FRONTING 50 FEET ON SAID STATE ROAD NO.30 AND RUNNING BACK TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0039’19” WEST 1280.42 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98 SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 1432.39 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4729’55” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1187.46 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 5405’28” WEST 1153.75 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 3020’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 742.36 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1909.86 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2726’ FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 914.44 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 4403’30”WEST 905.74 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5746’30” WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 51.65 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2864.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1119’41” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 566.40 FEET(CHORD BEING SOUTH 5206’40” WEST 565.48 FEET); THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 4429’02” EAST 33.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 2831.79 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0100’42” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET (CHORD BEING SOUTH 4557’07” WEST 50.00 FEET); THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 4429’02” EAST 191.37 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND; THENCE RUN NORTH 4621’18” EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 50.01 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 4429’02” WEST 191.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 13: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 0000’12” EAST, 835.50 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5103’27” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 5501’43” WEST, 1592.21 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 2945’56” WEST, 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT; THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2735’21” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4320’41” WEST, 704.90 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 5721’17” WEST, 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1210’44” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 700.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0102’45” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.20 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 4045’03” WEST 60.20 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 4438’07” EAST, 405.37 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2897.70 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 0111’11” FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.01 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 4431’17” EAST, 60.01 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 4438’07” WEST, 409.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 14: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 835.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1865.39 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 51 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1662.29 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 55 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 1607.83 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 743.89 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1478.14 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 21 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 711.75 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 43 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 704.90 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 35.03 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 24 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 102.07 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 56 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 102.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 130.74 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 DEGREES WEST 145.14 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 104.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 121.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 3297.79 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 15 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 254.45 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 49 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 254.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 43 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 206.73 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 375.86 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 75.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 15: COMMENCE AT A TERRA COTTA CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 35 (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 1087.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1500.00

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, December 5, 2013 The Times | A13 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266362 Text FL66340 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 1117562 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS € CaRPEnTERS € MaCHInIST PIPE WELDERS € X-RaY WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS € SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. 252 WEST PINE STREET. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650.00/MO. INCLUDES WATER AND ELECTRIC UP TO 2 00.00/MO.2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO 3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO 4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 391 CARLTO NS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1.4BR,3 BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDEDWITH BOAT SLIPwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL71777 to 56654 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-227-7234 Eastpoint Apartments Accepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom handicap and nonhandicap units. Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer” Text FL72436 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL73867 to 56654 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle Lease Purchase Option 900 sq ft, 1Br, Open Plan, Fireplace Washer & Dryer, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $380 month. 954-816-7004 Text FL74084 to 56654 St. George Island, 3 Br 2 Bath, Furnished Contemporary Home, with Gulf View, 12 month Lease, $1,600 mo, w/o utilities, 813-631 0344 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $73,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Carrabelle/Eastpoint: 1600 Sq Ft Doublewide, renovated Mobile Home /w Grandmother Unit, Stone Fireplace, Jacuzzi, Secluded, 1.5 Wooded Acres, Near Beach, $115k Negotionable 954-816-7004 Sales/Business Dev.Commissioned Sales PositionExperienced, FL licensed Real Estate sales associate to take over 100 leads for Carrabelle & Lanark Village, MUST know Carrabelle real estate market & live in the area, some closing support & training as needed. Contact John Shelby, Broker St. George Island Realty 850-899-0108 Web Id 34273054 Admin/Clerical FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Library Assistant/ Permanent/Part TimeClosing Date: 12/11/13 Annual Salary : $10.00 hour/26.00 hours per week Contact: Anne Birchwell, Director Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Rd. Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone (850) 670-8151 Remit Applications to : Franklin County Clerk of Courts 33 Market Street /Suite 203 Apalachicola, FL 32320 The Franklin County Board of commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required; Ability to operate library equipment, i.e. copiers, faxes, scanning; Customer service, sequencing skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work in a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Qualifications High School Diploma. Associates or Bachelor’s preferred. Library experience helpful. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and flexible. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards are necessary. Assignment will require travel/work at both library branches. Web Id 34273522 Text FL73522 to 56654 4514078 Experienced Waitress / Cashier Positive Attitude a Must! Submit Resume to: PO Box 172 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW Apalachicola: 46 9th St., (First Baptist Church Christian School.), Dec 7th 8am-TillIndoor & Outdoor Yard SaleT o benefit Rachel Huckeba (liver trans plant) Microwaves, Exercise machines, kitchen items, clothes, This and That T ext FL74194 to 56654 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL73693 to 56654 Carrabelle: 2171 Kentucky Ave. Go 4 miles East of Carrabelle on Rte 98 Turn left on Carolina, left on Kentucy, and follow signs. RAIN OR SHINE Saturday, Dec. 7th 8am til 4pm Multi Family Garage Sale Large variety of nice items! Text FL74067 to 56654 GUN SHOW Dec 7th & 8th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL73915 to 56654 GUN SHOW Fort Walton FAIRGROUNDSDecember 7th & 8th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL72381 to 56654 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 351.02 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 53.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 59.72 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 39 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 190.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD MARKED (#4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 309.52 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 190.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 311.38 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Counts I and III entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DEER PARTNERS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company; LIGHTHOUSE POINT PROPERTIES, INC., a dissolved Florida Corporation; and McKISSACK PROPERTIES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, Defendants, and the docket number of which is: 2011 CA 000412. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Melissa Holley Painter, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 19th day of November, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MELISSA HOLLEY PAINTER FL Bar No. 0144177 Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse Suite 800, 125 West Romana St. P. O. Box 13010 Pensacola, FL 325913010 Tel: (850) 434-9200 Fax: (850) 432-7340 Attorney for Plaintiff December 5, 12, 2013 j j ADOPT: j j AStay Home Mom, Prof Dad, Travel awaitj Carolyn & Chris j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachacola 107 5th st Sat Morning December 7th Yard SaleNumerous Items including clothes, scrubs, and much more! Text FL 74131 to 56654

PAGE 14

A14 | The Times Thursday, December 5, 2013 ABC School HONOR RR OLL O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 249989 $599,000 St George Island LAR GE GULF VIEW HOME 5 B R p l u s o f c e 4 1 / 2 B A 2 n d L R w i t h w e t b a r a u t o l i g h t s i n h a l l & s t a i r w e l l s E l e v at o r H u g e K i t c h e n L a u n d r y V i s u a l I n t e r c o m S c r e e n e d Sp a T u b l a n d s c ap e d o n 2 l o t s w i t h p a l m t r e e s u n d e r h o u s e w o r k a r e a w i t h s i n k & s t o r a g e S t o r m S h u t t e r s E a s t P i n e A ve n u e J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 249387 $75,000 St. George Island ISLAND CORNER L OT L a r g e s a n d d u n e s a n d a b u n d a n t n at i ve ve g e t at i o n t h i s h i g h a n d d r y c o r n e r l o t i s l o c at e d i n t h e q u i e t G u l f B e a c h e s n e i g h b o r h o o d l o t m e a s u r e s 1 0 0 x 1 6 0 G u l f v i e w i s l i k e l y f ro m h o u s e o n p i l i n g s W e s t P i n e A ve & E a s t S a w y e r S t L i s t e d b y M i c h a e l B illi n g s MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com MLS# 249979 $135,000 196 7th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 W ell maintained 4 bedroom / 1 ba th home loca ted in North Historic District. Separa te building on property could be converted into a guest cotta ge. Conveniently loca ted near do wnto wn shops and restaurants. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 250658 $10,000 118 Mariners W ay South Carrabelle, FL 32322 Grea t lot a t an unbelievable price loca ted c lose to the Carrabelle River in the ga ted community of Mariners Landing. Enjo y the community pool and boa t ramp access. Short sale listing with lender actively working with the seller to get this property sold! Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 4514260 "&&"+ "&& % ) * % % % % % % % % % % % % % # % ) # % # ( % ) % $ ! ( # # % # % * % # % % # # # % # % # % $398,900 R educ ed! By TEVIS PAGE Special to the Times Students and teachers alike enjoyed their ve-day break with their families and friends. The Take Stock in Children held a Thanksgiving dinner at the Holy Family community center on the Hill in Apalachicola last Wednesday. This week started rather roughly. Teachers are not allowed to decorate their rooms for the holiday season and it disheartened students in the high and middle school. A representative from the Florida Student Financial Aid ofce came on Monday, Dec. 2, and talked to the seniors and juniors. Her appearance was much appreciated. The rest of the week will be spent on preparation for semester nals which will fall on Dec. 19 and 20. Both days will be early dismissal. We enjoyed our Thanksgiving break, but we are now looking forward to Christmas break. The break will start on Dec. 23 and end on Jan 3. First gradeRR R R AMSDELLAA ll A A s: Gracyn Paul, EvieMorgan Price, Malichi Rivera, Promise Suddeth and Mabry WallaceA A /B: Zach Aikens, Josh Dykes, Hannah Hooten, Addyson Kent, Shlok Patel, Jazmyn Pavon and Joel TaylorHH BAROODYAA ll A A s: Issy Nations, Micahlyn O’Neal and Krista VarnesA A /B: Alonna Brown, Ben Butler, Maleah Croom, Breahna Fleming, Zariah Harvey, Mya Huckeba, Taylen Kendrick, Clayton Martina, Shaylee Martina, Khali McNair and Marquis PenamonSS econd gradeSS H H ERRINGTONAA ll A A s: Peyton Blackburn, Nathaniel Bolinger, CJ Conway, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Taylor Mallon, Malic O’Neal, Charlie Ramsdell, Weston Taranto, Aubrie Thompson and Jostyn TiptonA A /B: Hannah Grace Abel and Cody AbercrombieJ. M M ALLONAA ll A A s : Taylor PendletonA A /B : Esteban Bernabe, Trinity Creamer, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Alexcia McNair, Isabella Price, Kylie Proctor, Cassandra Robertson, Emma Rowland and Kiana WeeksTT hird grade W. MM ARTINAAA ll AA s : Lucy Neill, Owen Poloronis, River Sheridan, Mark WillisA A /B: Mitchell Adkins, Don Davis, Miranda Diaz, Arav Patel, Mahaley Shuler, Trinity TaylorTT MM OSES AA ll AA s : Eric Lau, Kylah Ross, Jackson Segree A A /B : Kendall Hill and Jayden Nichols Fourth grade LL BOCKELMAN AA ll AA s : Meredith Alford, Dylan Grifn, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Rory Ramsdell, John Sanders and Nico ValenzuelaA A /B : Carson Davis, Myia Maxwell, Brooklyn O’Neal, Gracie Smith MM LL EE AA ll AA s: Weston Bockelman, Ella Friedman, Andrew Monod and Genevieve MontgomeryA A /B: Caleb Abel, Lanie Allen, Colin Amison, Lauren Conway, Jeremy Shuler, Tate Stanley, Jaelyn Tipton Fifth grade J. AA MMONS AA ll AA s: Camille Davis, Alex Joanos, Livia Monod A A /B: Cody Cassidy, Devin Daniels, Stanley Gay and Kaylee Hicks LL POLORONIS AA ll AA s: Abby Johnson, Brycin Huckeba, Jack VailA A /B: Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Dorian Fleming, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clinton Rester, Madalyn Thompson, Caden Turrell, Jarvis TurrellSS ixth grade KK AREN WARDAA ll AA s: Cade Juno A A /B: Bailey Herrington, Jayden Justice, Krista Kelley, Kalahn Kent, Nash Ramsdell, Sophia Robertson, Hannah Sweet, Chandler Wray BRANT BANKS AA ll AA s: Alyssa Robinson, Drake Stanley A A /B: Tanner Amison, Isaiah Barber, Janacia Bunyon, Camille WilliamsSS eventh grade TT ANYA JOANOSAA ll AA s: Kevin Flores-Perez, Hailey Gay, MikalinHuckeba, Alexus Johnson, Sophia Kirvin, Jack RamsdellA A /B: Madison Coulter, Daijon Penamon, Bryce Kent, Haley Scott, Brandon TarantoAA NNA KK EEL AA ll AA s: Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer, Karolynn Myers, Becca WillisA A /B: Angel Henning, Cameron WynnEE ighth grade MM ELANIE CC O pP ELAND AA ll AA s: Brooke Martina A A /B: Mia Cummings, Kyle Dasher, Sallie Rose PaulTT ARA WARDAA ll AA s: Michaela Cassidy, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Faith Sapp, Lucas SasnettA A /B: Christian Amison, Katelynn Denney, Nick Joanos, Savannah Montgomery, Andrew Nguyen, Madison Smith HAHA W KK TALKTALK GINAGINA TARANTOTARANTO | Special to the Times Ms. Bockelman’s fourth-grade class gathered the most in the ABC School’s schoolwide food drive, which brought in to the food pantry 2,710 nonperishable food items. Schools TT rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. 1) Reportedly where is Dimmitt’s Auto Salvage that really uses the red pickup truck from older TV’s “Sanford and Son”? CA, NV, IN, FL 2) Whom did Bjorn Born defeat in the nals on winning his rst imbledon? Nastase, Vilas, Orantes, Connors 3) When did the last eyewitness to Lincoln’s assassination pass away? 1890, 1904, 1938, 1956 4) What golf club was invented by Gene Sarazen? Putter, 1-wood, 6-iron, Sand wedge 5) Who was the rst Chinese to win the Nobel Prize in Literature? Nicholas Tse, Jia Dao, Gao Xingjian, Stanley Ho 6) In Greek mythology what goddess cuts the thread of life? Herculia, Atropos, Lacheis, Randama 7) What was the horse’s name of President John Tyler? Ladystone, Cottonmouth, Sentry, The General 8) Where is the (Rotten) Sneakers “Hall of Fumes”? Milwaukee, Madison, Montpelier, Miami 9) What rock group was originally “The New Yardbirds”? Led Zeppelin, ELO, Steppenwolf, Toto 10) Who was the rst pole vaulter to clear 17 feet? Pennel, Stones, Funnel, Duvall ANSWERS 1) IN. 2) Nastase. 3) 1956. 4) Sand wedge. 5) Gao Xingjian. 6) Atropos. 7) The General. 8) Montpelier. 9) Led Zeppelin. 10) Pennel. Students prepare for next week’s semester nals