The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00248

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, November 28, 2013 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Board frets over capital outlay fundsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com As it has watched revenues decrease and expenditures remain high, the Franklin County School Board is taking a closer look at how much in capital outlay funds it plans to transfer this year to the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. No nal decision has been made, but there has been talk of cutting back by as much as half the 5 percent annual allocation, which this year would amount of $82,126 if the full amount were shared. At the Nov. 7 meeting, the board reviewed a report from Shannon Venable, director of nancial services, that detailed how much has been brought in and spent over the last three years of the half-mill capital monies. Each year, the district spends about $1.5 million for payment on the long-term loan that funded the construction of the consolidated school. In 2010-11, the district spent another $930,000, so expenditures that year exceeded revenue by about a half-million dollars. In 2011-12, the district spent $4.36 million on capital improvement projects, almost $1.5 million more than revenue. Last year, expenditures of $2.1 million exceeded revenue by about $400,000. Still, the fund balance as of July 2013 stood at about $3.5 million, about equally split in unspent money from the 201112 and 2012-13 scal years. Venable said based on the districts First-In, FirstOut accounting method, the money rst received will be spent rst, so she projects that during the upcoming scal By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com WATERSOUND The St. Joe Co. announced an agreement Nov. 7 to sell more than twothirds of its Northwest Florida landholdings. The agreement outlines the sale of 382,834 acres of rural timberland to Utah-based company AgReserves Inc. for $565 million, leaving St. Joe with about 184,000 acres of land, primarily between Tallahassee and Destin. This sale of timberland will help the company concentrate on its core business activity of real estate development in Northwest Florida, St. Joe Chief Executive Of cer Park Brady said in a company news release. The proceeds from the sale will provide the company with signi cant liquidity and numerous opportunities to create long-term value for our shareholders. The 380,000 acres almost half the size of Bay County to be sold include a majority of the companys timberlands in Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla counties. The transaction would not include any of St. Joes existing resort, residential or commercial real estate developments or any sites that might be used for similar developments in the future, according to St. Joe. One of the companys most recent endeavors includes partnership in Pier Park North, a roughly 360,000-square-foot shopping center on U.S. 98 across from Pier Park in Panama City Beach. The development is slated to open next spring.By ZACK McDONALD747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The rst wave of relief is on its way after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the form of $15.7 million along the Panhandle, of cials announced Nov. 14. Projects to be funded in Franklin County include Apalachicola Bay oyster restoration, elimination of light pollution on sea turtle nesting beaches and enhanced assessment for recovery of Gulf of Mexico sheries. This is a big step in helping industries that have been particularly hard hit by the oil spill and the economy, said U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida. Hopefully we can do a lot more in the next few years. Over the next ve years, $356 million will go toward state and federal projects in Florida that are developed by the agencies, according to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. The announcement represents the initial obligation of funds available to support 22 projects in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas from the rst payments received by the Gulf Fund. This is the rst release, said Doc Kokal, director of community relations with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. There will be others this year. Kokal said within the next few months, the next round of funds will start, and decisions on those projects will be decided during the summer. Once the U.S. Department of Justice releases the funds to the Oyster industry to see $4.19 millionDEEPWATER HORIZON SETTLEMENTPHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesDespite windy frigid conditions, Apalachicola watermen toiled all day to move the Irish Town II out of the channel. On the right, diver Marty Davis can be seen attaching rope to the Irish Town II. Below, friends and family of Kenneth Martina, owner of Irish Town II and III, watched from the dock as the workers struggled to move the big boat. St. Joe sells 380,000 acres in $565 million deal INSIDEPilot questions St. Joe ag exemption, A6 IRISH TOWN II CAPSIZESCrews working to salvage vesselBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Disaster was narrowly averted Sunday when a shrimp boat capsized in Apalachicola, forcing her crew to swim to safety. At about 5:30 a.m., Dale Davis and Kevin Martina set out for a days work on the bay in the Irish Town II, a shrimp boat owned by Martinas brother Kenneth. The watermen paused in the channel directly in front of Carolines Dining on the River restaurant and began to lower the outrigger arms of the trawler, walking them gradually down when a gust of wind caught the doors and capsized the boat. NOAA forecaster Claudia McDermott said the wind was at 19 knots with gusts of 24 knots at the time the 43-foot Irish Town II was overturned. Davis and Kevin Martina clung to the boat brie y, but driven by the cold, they swam to shore, climbing out of the river at Leavins Seafood. They called for help and received a ride back to their vehicles at Scipio Creek. The Irish Town II rapidly took on water and sank in the channel, creating an impediment to navigation. Kenneth Martina arrived on the scene about 7 a.m. in his second shrimp boat, the Irish Town III. He was joined on the scene by Capt. Arthur Hollenbeck in his shrimp boat Classy Lady. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Of cer Steven Cook, who was on the scene observing the attempt to Shrimp boat sinks Talk about soccer! A11 VOL. 128 ISSUE 31See BOAT A2 See BOARD A13 See ST. JOE A6 See OYSTER A6 Apalachicola Christmas celebration FridayThe Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29. Santa will arrive on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, where he will hear childrens Christmas wishes, and carolers will sing. The Raney House Museum will be decorated in holiday greenery and open late for tours that tell about the citys early history. Lanark Boat Club to host Saturday bazaarThe Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holiday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info, call Janet at 697-2587.Saturday tea to bene t animalsOn Saturday, Nov. 30, the Bowery Art Gallery and Studio, 149 Commerce St. in Apalachicola, will host an afternoon tea from 4-6:30 p.m. featuring a trunk show of wearable art. Featured artists include Elaine Kozlowsky and Ann Seaton, who will showcase crochet and knits, and Tracy Jones and Georgia and Debbi Clifford with their handcrafted jewelry. Light refreshments will be served. Five percent of all sales will bene t the Franklin County Humane Society.Main Street mixer SaturdayOn Saturday, Nov. 30, Historic Apalachicola Main Street will host a mixer for area businesses and residents from 6-8 p.m. at the Center for History, Culture and the Arts, 86 Water St. Complimentary hors doeuvres and refreshments will be provided. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A15

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A number of fundraisers are in the works to benefit the county library system. On Nov. 13, the advisory board for Franklin County Public Library welcomed three newly elected members: Melonie Inzetta of Eastpoint, Linda Thurman of St. George Island and Kathleen Oman of Carrabelle. Returning is Treasurer Uta Hardy of Apalachicola. Anna Carmichael gave a presentation on fundraising efforts. Ongoing is the sale of personalized bricks and pavers. The Souper Book and Bread Sale will happen again in 2014. In the spring will be a third annual Putt Putt golf tournament at the Red Pirate; weekend book sales are planned at Sometimes Its Hotter on St. George Island. Anyone wishing to donate books or audiobooks for the sale can drop them off from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday at the librarys administrative offices at 160 Hickory Dip Road in Eastpoint. Carmichael also said she hopes to make the county library more of a presence in both Apalachicola and Carrabelle and plans to place booths at more county events. Library Board Chairman Denise Butler said the nomination committee interviewed 11 applicants for the job of county library director and recommended Anne Birchwell to the county commission. Birchwell was hired Nov. 18. Joyce Estes, who spearheaded fundraising efforts for the new Eastpoint branch, said though the interior of the new Hickory Dip Branch in Eastpoint is complete, major work remains on the landscape and parking lot. In collaboration with the Apalachicola Bay and Riverkeeper, a nature trail is planned for the seven acres of land surrounding the library. Ornamental plantings also are envisioned in front of the building and around the parking lot. Estes said she hopes some kind of pervious surface can be used for the parking lot and entry road to minimize runoff. Margot Posten, a coastal training specialist for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, gave a presentation on a rain gardens. This technology allows runoff from impervious surfaces, such as the roof of a building to be stored for use in irrigation. Posten said roughly 30,000 gallons of water would run off the 5,000-square-foot roof of the library annually. In a rain garden, the plants benefit from this runoff and purify the water before it re-enters the groundwater system. The garden will cost between $15,000 and $30,000 to construct. Posten said she already has rain barrels, donated by Coca-Cola, that can be used to collect runoff at the library. She said a rain garden could feature educational kiosks on topics like water pollution, rain barrels and plant based purification systems. My goal is to continue enhancing the property and maintain the area in back of the building as protected wetlands, Estes said. The library sits in the watershed for Indian Creek, which empties into the bay through Indian Creek Park. Anne Birchwell, a veteran of Franklin Countys library system, is the new library director. After a nal meeting on Nov. 18, the nominating committee of the Franklin County library board recommended Birchwell for the position. Chairman Denise Butler said she was one of 11 applicants. The committee consisted of Sondra Furbee of Apalachicola, Kate Aguiar of St. George Island and Christine Hinton of Lanark Village. Early in the nomination process, Butler stressed the importance of having countywide representation on the team that would choose the new library director. On Nov. 19, Butler told county commissioners the committees recommendation, and they voted unanimously to promote Birchwell to her new position. The audience erupted into applause when the motion passed. Before the promotion, Birchwell was employed full-time as an assistant librarian. She has worked for the library system for more than six years. Most recently, she has been employed at the Carrabelle branch. Birchwell, who lives in Carrabelle, will divide her time between both branches. Before working for the county library, she was employed by Franklin County Literacy and the Wilderness Coast Library. Birchwell holds a bachelors degree in library science and has committed to completing her masters degree over the next two years. Birchwell, who will begin her new job on Monday, replaces Glenda Ondracek, who retired Oct. 31. The county commission has budgeted $35,000 for the directors position. Butler said the library board would now advertise for a part-time assistant librarian. By LOIS SWOBODA retrieve the boat, said he did not see or smell any spilled fuel during the attempted salvage operation. The two boats and their crews labored most of the day Sunday to move the trawler onto shallower bottom and out of the channel. Diver Marty Davis braved the frigid water to attach lines to the distressed vessel. For much of the day Sunday, a crowd of onlookers both on the docks and in Carolines watched as Kenneth Martina, Hollenbeck and their crews used their skill and knowledge to shift the boats position. At times, the salvagers appeared to be walking on the water as they stepped onto the side of the sunken vessel. At about 2 p.m., pulling in tandem, the Classy Lady and Irish Town III attempted to drag the sunken boat out of the channel and seemed to be making good progress when the ropes snapped. After heavier line was obtained, a second attempt was successful. The side of the Irish Town II was just visible above the choppy surface of the river on Monday morning. Montez Davis, wife of Dale Davis, said her husband and the Martinas were on the water working to salvage the Irish Town II at about 10 a.m. Monday.Working in tandem, the Classy Lady and the Irish Town III hauled the Irish Town II into shallower water.LOIS SS WOBODA | The Times BOAT from page A1County libraries plan fundraisers Birchwell appointed new library directorAANNIE BBIRCHWEllLL

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, November 28, 2013 197Highway98Eastpoint(850)670-4334 10 % % % 01 01 takean additional 45 % 45 45 45 45 45 % % HOT BUYSofregularprices,saleprices&evendiscontinuedprices!BLACKFRIDAYONLYexcludes iComfort 01 01 01 % % YONLY AFRIDCK BLA Dahlonega 93sofa$298reg.399.95113789 whilesupplieslast matchingloveseat &rockerreclineravailable lowest priceever xbox360Kinect gamingsystem$528reg.$659.95 110461games mayvary 46LED115440$528reg.$859.95 HOT BUY 35 % 53 53 % % % % % % % 53 53 % OFF THO THO THO THO THO BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 53 53 53 % % % % % % % % OVER 13.3tablet$378reg.$499.95887003 AZPEN HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 30 % 03 03 % % % OFFFREEtabletcase $49.95value HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 20 % 02 02 % % % OFF HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 25 % 52 52 52 52 52 % % OFF 30 % % % 30 30 30 diningrooms &dinettes 45 % % % 45 45 45 adult&youth bedrooms HOT BUY BUY BUY 25 % 52 52 % % OFF BUY BUY 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 over11.6touch notebook115398$458reg.$649.95 17laptop115399$748reg.$999.95 kidsreclinersstartingat $99.95 112167 115337 MossyOak princess JohnDeere105648 HOT BUYkitchenplayset$59.95110641 boysATV$199.95115213 girl sATV$199.95115212current wallart,mirrors, silktrees,orals&tabletop decorativeitems 35 % saveupto$638.93 accentchair$98reg.149.95whilesupplieslastSPECIAL HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 34 % 43 43 43 % % % % 43 % 43 % OFF HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 45 % 54 54 54 OFFregularsetpricemyrstplayhouse$99.95115226 25cu.ft. $1698113174reg.$1999.95 $ $ HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 15 % 51 51 51 51 % % % % % OFF $448 reg.$559.95 OPTIONS HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 20 % 02 02 % % % % % OFF 8qt.slowcooker$29.95reg.$49.95115268stainlesssteel panset$94.95reg.$119.95111601 HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 30 % 03 03 % % % % OFF HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 20 % 02 02 % % % % OFF K-cupbrewer $139.95reg.$199.95115264 HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 30 % 03 03 % % % OFF 46Smart LED$898reg.$1199.95114940 25 % 52 52 52 52 52 % % % OFF 52 52 52 52 52 % % % HOT BUY blu-rayhometheater $198 111743 blu-ray home blu-ray home HOT BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 20 % 02 02 % 02 % 02 02 % 02 % OFF NOCreditRefused*

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, November 28, 2013 ASectionSpecial to The TimesThe Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce has announced its participation in this years Small Business Saturday, taking place Saturday, Nov. 30. Small Business Saturday is a day dedicated to strengthening the community by supporting local small businesses. Now in its fourth year, Small Business Saturday serves as the ceremonial kickoff to the holiday shopping season for small businesses across the United States. Small Business Saturday supporters reported spending more than $5.5 billion at independently owned businesses last year. The Apalachicola Bay Chamber recognizes the importance of supporting small business in Franklin County, the jobs they help create and the culture they instill in local communities. According to the U.S. Small Businesses Administration, as of 2012, small businesses nationwide accounted for 64 percent of net new private-sector jobs created and 99.7 percent of all employer rms. Nov. 30 marks the fourth annual Small Business Saturday, a day to support the local businesses that create jobs, boost the economy and preserve neighborhoods around the country. Small Business Saturday was created in 2010 in response to small business owners most pressing need: more customers. As of Dec. 31, 2012, more than 3.2 million Facebook users liked the Small Business Saturday pages. Just last year, 350-plus advocacy organizations, 150-plus corporations and elected of cials in all 50 states and Washington D.C., declared their support for Small Business Saturday. The following proclamation was issued out of New York City on Oct. 3, 1789, by the thenpresident of the United States of America George Washington. It wasnt until 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday. Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his bene ts, and humbly to implore his protection and favor and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness. Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the bene cent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanksfor his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nationfor the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late warfor the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyedfor the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately institutedfor the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us. and also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctuallyto render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyedto protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concordTo promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease of science among them and usand generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.George Washington A THANKSGIVING POEMThe 28th of November, 2013 we will celebrate Thanksgiving Day; The historical holiday began in 1620, and continues until today. We thank those courageous Pilgrims for our freedom of faith. It started when some devout English men defected from the United Kingdom. They left Southampton and sailed across the ocean on the May ower to the new world for religious freedom. The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock just before night; in a strange land where Indians had established squatters rights and de nitely didnt want the white man on their site. The early settlers were hardy with nerves like leather; and they stood their ground hoping the Indians would mellow. But things got worse before they got better; until the natives came to realize these foreigners were nice fellows. In due time on a bright night under a harvest moons light; after an overdose of strong wine and some puffs on a peace pipe; they made friends of their foe, and staggered to their tents high as a kite. The next day, sick with a hangover, they went as agreed; to celebrate like blood brothers with a lavish feast. They brought a bounty from the elds, the hunters brought wild meat; and they set the table with all the vittles ready to eat. They gathered around the table in the crisp, cool weather; lifted their glass to honor their friendship forever; and gave thanks before they ate their rst meal together. Happy Thanksgiving,Mary Westberg By MARLENE WINTERSSpecial to the Times In a local restaurant this week, I saw an elderly lady reading the newspaper and put it down seemingly in disgust. I thought how true it is that every time you pick up a newspaper, all you read about is negativism, such as murder, hatred, AIDS, abuse, abortion, wars, storms, burnings and the list goes on and on. How nice it would be to pick up the morning paper and read something good for a change. But believe it or not, not everything is bad! There are still many things to be thankful for. Here are a few things I can think of: The privilege to worship God at home and at church. The air we breathe, a house to live in. A babys smile (Yes, some are still allowed to be born). A job I enjoy working at, the lovely strains of an orchestra. The look of appreciation radiating from an elderly persons eyes whenever you do anything for them. The smell of a rose. The privilege of being able to see. I have a friend who was born without eye sockets. Being able to hear, smell, taste, feel and walk. The joy of visiting with friends. The look of utter joy from one of my piano students performing a piece at rst they thought was impossible. The thrill of riding the water log ride at Six Flags Over Texas. A considerate boss. The privilege of being a Christian and being proud of it. The joy of picking up the phone and saying hi to mom and dad. The opportunity of calling into the radio station in the early morning and voicing my opinion about different topics. The joy and fun of trying new recipes. The privilege of being married to a wonderful man for 28 years. The joy of having three children all in college now. Still having both parents alive, at ages 89 and 84. The squeal of delight from a child opening his Christmas present when it was exactly what he wanted. Being allowed in a restaurant to bow my head and offering prayer for my food. Listening and watching my 89year-old father sing bass in a quartet. The beauty in Kansas of the waves of golden wheat rippling in the wind knowing that soon I will grind some of that very wheat into our and then make my own bread with it. The joy of watching Jumper Cable, my seven pound Chihuahua dog play with our cat. Police protection. Having a doctor and hospital to go to whenever needed. The awesome sounds of a CD player. The privilege of sitting down to my piano and playing whatever I want to for my own enjoyment. Shall I name more? I certainly could. There is so much in our world today to be thankful for. It is true that we cannot avoid some of the negative things. But let us be grateful for the blessing we do enjoy! What are you thankful for? Marlene Winters resides in Spring eld, Mo., and is the sister of Lois Long, the former pastor of the Living Waters Assembly of God church. The rst Thanksgiving proclamation Page 4 First, replant the oyster bedsThis letter is in response to the articles published in the Apalachicola Times newspaper on Oct. 3 Oystermen plead for help, and on Oct. 17 New oyster lease riles county. First, it is no secret that the state of Georgia will continue to withhold more and more freshwater from the Apalachicola River, regardless of any civil litigation between the states. Second, oyster hatcheries and farming oysters only bene t the person growing and purchasing the oysters. They do nothing to help the public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay to reproduce oysters for harvesting on a long-term effect. Third, we dont need our government of cials spending millions of taxpayer dollars to create program for scientists to study the water ecology, water science or oyster science in the Apalachicola Bay when we already know that many of the public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay are not producing a suf cient stock of oysters for harvesting during their seasonal term because they are being starved of the proper amount of freshwater needed from the Apalachicola River to consistently reproduce oysters. However, what would help the oystermen and the public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay to consistently reproduce oysters on a long-term effect is for our government of cials to create a program that would issue monetary payments to the oystermen on a steady basis to replant all of the public oyster beds closest to the freshwater owing from the tributaries of the Apalachicola River into the Apalachicola Bay. This would allow these public oyster beds a much better chance to receive a proper amount of freshwater from the Apalachicola River to reproduce oysters for harvesting during their seasonal term, when the Apalachicola River is owing at its lowest and highest water levels. At the same time, while the oystermen are harvesting oysters from those public oyster beds during their seasonal term, such would help the oysters on the other public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay that are being starved of freshwater not to be overharvested, and they would have a better chance to reproduce oysters for harvesting in the future. Lastly, this is not a x-all solution to the oyster industry in Franklin County, but it seems logical to me that we should concentrate rst on replanting, on a large scale, the public oysters beds in the Apalachicola Bay closest to the freshwater owing from the tributaries of the Apalachicola River to ensure that those oyster beds receive a proper amount of freshwater to reproduce oysters, when the Apalachicola River is owing at its lowest and highest water levels. Sincerely,Michael Wade Bar eldA native oysterman of Franklin CountyNice to have happy feeling at libraryThank you, Franklin County Commissioners, so much for promoting Anne Birchwell to the position of director of the two Franklin County public libraries. It is so nice to have a cohesive environment for both libraries to operate smoothly. Its wonderful to have a happy feeling in the library after all the con ict. Again, thank you, commissioners,Sharon RiderCarrabelle Letters to the EDITORWhat are you thankful for? Chamber supports Small Business Saturday

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The Times | A5Thursday, November 28, 2013The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.NOV. 19Billy Dalton, 38, Eastpoint, driving while license revoked habitual (FCSO) James E. West, 52, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO)NOV. 20Dylan E. Nunez, 22, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) Michael B. Stephens, 39, Carrabelle, failure to appear (FCSO) Kevin L. Williams, 22, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO)NOV. 21Justin D. Massey, 23, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Gary M. Engard, 56, Alligator Point, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO)NOV. 22Earl L. Carpenter, 33, Crawfordville, unemployment compensation fraud (FCSO) Jefferson A. Yancey, 22, Carrabelle, grand theft (FCSO)NOV. 23Monica S. Stanton, 46, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO)NOV. 24Harry J. Hall, Jr., 34, Lanark Village, domestic battery, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver, possession of paraphernalia, burglary of a dwelling, criminal mischief and possession of cannabis (FCSO)Delegation hearing set for MondayThe Franklin County Legislative Delegation will be holding a public hearing in Apalachicola, Florida, on Monday, Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. The hearing will be held in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 37 Forbes Street, Apalachicola. All residents and elected ofcials are invited to attend. This hearing will allow the citizens the opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments for the upcoming 2014 Legislative Session. For more information, call (850) 487-5003 or email Marcia Mathis at mathis. marcia@senate.govExtra security planned for V V r ooman ParkOn Nov. 19, Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender asked county commissioners for permission to purchase security cameras for Vrooman Park in Eastpoint. We are continually having vandalism there, she said. The park received more than $13,000 in repairs following damage from a waterspout this spring. Millender said 20 feet of the new fence was attened by a truck or four-wheeler earlier this month. Fortunately, parks and recreation had materials on hand that enabled the repairs to be done in-house. It was the third time this year weve had vandalism, there, Millender said. She said she had priced security cameras at $160 each. Commissioner Pinki Jackel suggested the sheriffs ofce might have cameras on hand they could lend, but urged Millender to take whatever steps were needed to secure the property. I move you do what you need to. A camera is cheaper than the equipment and repairs, said Jackel. The motion passed unanimously. The commission also told Millender to ask the sheriffs ofce to have patrols visit the park more frequently.Car seats, booster, safety belts save livesWith the holidays approaching and plans for visiting family and friends in full swing, its a good time to remind everyone of the importance of using your seat belt while riding in a vehicle, including making sure children are properly secured in a car seat or booster seat. A recent seat belt survey by the Florida Department of Transportation shows that approximately 90 percent of drivers in Florida are using their seat belts. While the statistics are encouraging, unfortunately ten percent of Florida motorists are still not buckling up. This time of year can be hectic and in our rush to get everything done, it can be easy to overlook some necessary safeguards, said Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Executive Director Julie Jones. Whether its a trip across town to go shopping or a trip across the state to see relatives, its important to take that extra minute before driving off to ensure that everyone in the vehicle is buckled up and secure for the journey. Florida law requires the use of seat belts by drivers of motor vehicles and all children riding in a vehicle under the age of 18. FLHSMV and FDOT recommend: Buckle Up. A seatbelt is your vehicles most important safety feature. Use a car seat for children under age 3 for every trip, even if you are just going down the street. Make sure all car and booster seats you use are crash-tested and federally-approved. Select a car seat based on your childs age and size, and always follow the manufacturers directions. Keep children in the back seat, at least through age 12. When used with THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER SKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit.CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening.DIDYOUKNOWthatstudiesshow: NOW,DIDYOUKNOW? VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet|PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-7070|www.iversmd.com ALLMAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED9am-6pm 9am-2pm BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 2NICELOTS 12TH&OWEN,$16,500 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 FeaturingLocalArtisans LanarkVillage BoatClub9am~1pm LUNCHSoup,Sandwich,Drink&Dessert$5 Tickets$10-CallJanetforfurther infoat697-2587 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Franklin Countys unemployment rate has held steady at 5 percent for the past two months, as the workforce continues to shrink going into the offseason. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate for September and October stood at 5.0 percent, a drop of two-tenths of 1 percent, down from 5.2 percent in August. The unemployment rolls shed 25 people since the summer, dropping from 283 to 258 people in search of work. This decrease in unemployment occurred as the workforce shrank by 287 people, from 5,462 to 5,175. The current work force comprises 200 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,375 workers and the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 6.2 percent. Franklin Countys September/ October jobless picture placed it at sixth best in the state, behind Monroe County, at 3.8 percent, Walton at 3.9 percent, Okaloosa, at 4.4 percent, Alachua at 4.7 percent and St. Johns at 4.9 percent. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates have relatively high proportions of government employment. Franklin had the lowest jobless rate in the tri-county Gulf Coast Workforce region, which averaged 6.0 percent in September/October 1.6 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 7.6 percent, and 0.6 percentage points below the Oct. 2013 state rate of 6.6 percent. Bay Countys jobless rate fell from 6.3 to 6.0 percent, while Gulf Countys dropped from 6.9 to 6.7 percent. Out of a labor force of 96,935, there were 5,840 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Locally, we are seeing positive indicators including growing job opportunities in the manufacturing sector, said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. We are also seeing many jobs being created as the retail industry ramps up their seasonal hiring. The Panama City metro area lost the most jobs over the year of all metro areas in Florida. The metro area also lost the most jobs in trade, transportation, and utilities and leisure and hospitality.Jobless rate hits 5% as workforce shrinks seat belts, air bags work well to protect teenagers and adults. However, air bags can be very dangerous to children, particularly those riding in rearfacing car seats, and to preschool and young school-aged children who are not properly restrained. Soon-to-be parents should buy their infant car seat before having the baby so you are ready to bring home the new addition to your family safely. Replace a car seat if the vehicle has been in a moderate to severe crash to ensure a continued high level of protection. More information and additional safety tips can be found at http://www.hsmv.gov/ fhp/CPS/ or http://www. dot.state..us/safety/2AP rograms/O O ccupantProtection.shtm Law BRIeEFsS Arrest RepEPORT Law Enforcement

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 BF SDOSTHLProductsupto ScagMowersupto SnapperMowersupto NewGolfCartsupto UsedGolfCartsupto$60o $900o $400o $500o $200oST.JOERENT-ALLNURSERYANDSUPPLY7061st (850)227-2112FRIDAYNOV.th SATURDAYNOV.thEHS OldFashionChristmasBM PSK Formoreinformation,contacttheApalachicolaBayChamberat850-653-9419www.apalachicolabay.org CountywideHolidayEvents .org .apalachicolabay www 850-653-9419 at Chamber Bay Apalachicola the contact information, more For CONCERTSERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents NFWF, they will be transferred to the groups recipients and then partners who will perform the work, Kokal said. The University of Florida and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will receive about $4.19 million over five years for the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Restoration project. On Nov. 19, the FWCs Jim Estes said the grant will be used to test different methods to make oyster reefs more resilient and productive. The grant will identify nine sites, 1 to 2 acres in size, around the bay where different densities of shell will be put out, and the resulting spatfall and oyster recovery will be measured. County Planner Alan Pierce said this study will give FWC a better idea of how much shell to use in different areas, if and when a much larger $52 million restoration project receives funding. The FWC also will receive about $1.5 million for an elimination of light pollution on sea turtle nesting beaches project along Walton, Gulf and Franklin counties. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will be receiving $3 million for an enhanced assessment for recovery of Gulf of Mexico fisheries. The monies also will be spent on comprehensive Panhandle Coastal Bird Conservation ($3.2 million), stormwater improvements in Pensacola ($2.1 million) and management and restoration of coastal habitat in Pensacola Bay ($1.7 million). In early 2013, a U.S. District Court approved two plea agreements resolving certain criminal charges against BP and Transocean related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Provisions within the pleas direct a total of $2.544 billion to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation over a five-year period. The announcement reects the goals outlined in a company ling with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission earlier this year, which disclosed St. Joe was exploring opportunities to sell timberland. The form cited rural land holdings as not strategic to the companys core real estate development activities. St. Joe ofcials said the ling that the company has been gradually moving away from timber farming and paper production for the past two decades. The purchasing company, AgReserves, is a tax-paying afliate of the Mormon Church and has been involved in agricultural operations in Florida for more than 60 years. AgReserves Board Chairman Paul Genho said the company intends to continue using the land for agricultural purposes. AgReserves has demonstrated its commitment to wise land stewardship and prudent resource management during more than 60 years of ranching and agricultural operations in east central Florida, Genho said. We will apply that same commitment and expertise to managing the property we are acquiring in Floridas Panhandle. The announcement also was praised by Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, who said the agreement reects a long-term investment in the states timber and cattle industries. Im proud that a global agriculture company, like AgReserves Inc., continues to believe in Florida as the right place to grow their business, Putnam said. The transaction is expected to close early next year.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com At the Nov. 19 county commission meeting, Mark Nobles, a pilot, told commissioners he has noticed something missing. Trees. Nobles, manager of Carrabelles Thompson Field, said he has own over the county on a regular basis for 32 years. He said when The St. Joe Company closed its Port St. Joe paper mill in 1996, it gated the access roads to its vast landholdings, denying public access to the private property. At the time, I thought it was due to illegal dumping, Nobles said. In retrospect, I believe they really didnt want the public to know what was going on. Nobles said the company has harvested large amounts of timber from the property since the gates were put in place and not replanted the land with trees. Theres a lot of trees missing that cant be seen from the road, Nobles said. He questioned whether the land should qualify for the greenbelt agricultural tax exemption under Florida law, because it is not being replanted, According to a webpage maintained by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation, this law says properties that are bonade agricultural operations are taxed according to the use value of those operations, rather than the development value. Landowners qualifying for the greenbelt exemption pay a fraction of what other landowners in the same area are assessed. The St. Joe Company now pays about $122 an acre in taxes annually in Franklin County, according to Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper. Nobles said he has been unable to determine for how long land continues to qualify for the exemption when a crop is harvested but not replanted. Nobles suggested to commissioners that an audit be performed to determine if the county is owed back taxes and whether a portion of the land recently purchased by AgReserves, a Utah land holding rm, should be eligible for the exemption. He said land in eight counties, including Franklin, has been stripped of trees. Nobody in the property appraisers ofce has had access to the land. You dont notice this if you dont y over it, Nobles said. He offered to take any of the commissioners on a ight to view the empty land. Chairman Cheryl Sanders said she shared Nobles concerns and that she had brought up the greenbelt exemption during rezoning hearings when St. Joe proposed to develop much of their land in eastern Franklin County. Sanders said company representatives maintained they continued to be entitled to the exemption until the land was actually developed. Development plans later were canceled. Commissioners voted unanimously to ask Skipper to perform an audit and determine if the status of the land has changed. In a telephone interview Monday, Skipper said she has thus far determined that as long as St. Joe shows intent to replant the pine trees or to enter into another agricultural venture, they remain entitled to the exemption. She said AgReserves would receive the benet of the exemption for 2014, but to continue to receive it after that, they would need to apply on their own to the property appraisers ofce and prove their intent to continue the agricultural use of the land. ST. JOE from page A1 OYSTTER from page A1 Pilot questions St. Joe ag exemption Theres a lot of trees missing that cant be seen from the road ... Nobody in the property appraisers ofce has had access to the land. You dont notice this if you dont y over it.Mark Nobles manager, Thompson Field

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, November 28, 2013 TAYLOR'SBUILDINGSUPPLYSIGNATUREHOUSEWAREDISHES20%OFF LARGESTSELECTION Bestpricinginthecounty! 15%OFFAllRegularPricedItems!18qt.Nesco RoasterOven$59.99 Toolset Logbasket$59.99 SanPietro(3pc) HighBistro$169.99 TravelMugSet$9.998pcEcolutionNon-stickCookware$59.99 4pcMilwaukee Toolset$274.99 AllChristmasTrees SoldatourCost!NORAINCHECKS! !ytnuoe chn tg inicirt pseB !ytnuoe chn tg inicirt pseB Patton UtilityHeater$19.99 25%OFF ALLPLANTS! HURRYINWHILE SUPPLIESLAST!BLACKFRIDAYSALE!!! EILHN WY IRRUH FRIDAY-287:30-5:30 &SATURDAY29|8:00-5:00pm

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A8 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com On Friday, Nov. 15, a score of friends and admirers gathered in Benedict Hall to bid farewell to Sue Cronkite. Cronkite has been a xture at the Apalachicola library for three years, organizing historical material, aiding in research and preparing documents for publication. Cronkite worked on Jimmie Nichols Apalachicola Diary. While at the library SHE compiled an index of people referenced in books on the area to aid in genealogical research. Thats a real accomplishment for the library, said librarian Caty Greene. Most recently she has been working on Apalachicola before 1861, by retired University of Mississippi professor Harry P. Owens. The work was originally written as Owens doctoral dissertation at Florida State University, and is soon to be published jointly by the library and the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Cronkite has also worked on books with regional historian Marlene Womack. The candlelight supper was hosted by Greene and library board chair Susan Clementson. As the courses were served, each guest in turn told the story of their relationship with Cronkite and praised her for her patience, intelligence, diligence and compassion. A journalist for many years as she raised her family alone, Cronkite moved to Apalachicola around 2000 to be near her daughter Mary Lynn Rodgers. A former reporter and editor at the Birmingham News, she worked as a writer for the Times for a few years. She now plans to relocate to the Clearwater area where she will live next door to her daughter Alda Thomas and grandchildren Erin Rodgers, and Michael and Merri Rose Fink. Cronkite said she would undertake a new adventure. She plans to write a book about a woman who hosts her own wake. She said she will frequently return to Apalachicola and plans to release the novel here once it is published. CHRISTMASKITTENS!Whatdo tabbycatsandChristmashave incommon?Morethanyou maythink.Thatiswhyweare makingourveryspecialtabby kittensavailableforadoption throughthemonthofDecember foronly$50.00.Readon.... Oneofthemostdistinctivefeaturesseenincommononalltabbycatsisthe"M" ontheirforeheads.Legendhasitthattheoriginofthe"M"hastodowiththe Maryandthetabbycatinthemanger ItseemsthatthebabyJesuswascoldandfussingandMaryaskedthemanger animalstomoveinclosertowarmhim.Themangerwassimplytoosmallto accomplishthatbutaalittletabbycatcamein,nestlednexttothebabyand comfortedHimwithpurringandwarmth.Marywassogratefulshebestowedher owninitial"M"onthecat'sforehead. Nowthatyouknowhowspecialtabby'sreallyare,pleasecometotheadoption centerandadoptyourveryownChristmaskitten.Whatablessingitwouldbefor bothyourfamilyandthekitten! SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthCallToday THEFRANKLINCOUNTYADVISORYBOARDOF ADJUSTMENTWILLHOLDAPUBLICHEARINGON WEDNESDAY,DECEMBER4,2013,AT10:00A.M., INTHECOUNTYCOMMISSIONMEETINGROOMOF THEFRANKLINCOUNTYCOURTHOUSEANNEXTO CONSIDERTHEFOLLOWINGVARIANCES,APPEALS ANDSPECIALEXCEPTIONS:PUBLICNOTICE1-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORAVARIANCETOCONSTRUCTASINGLEFAMILYHOUSEANDOPENDECK25FEETINTO THECRITICALHABITATZONEAND15FEETINTOTHEFRONT SETBACKLINEOFFOFLAKEVIEWDRIVEONPROPERTYDESCRIBEDASLOTS98AND99,SOUTHERNDUNESSUBDIVISION, ALLIGATORPOINT,FRANKLINCOUNTY,FLORIDA.REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYSTANBROWN,AGENTFORXINCHEN,ANDJUDITY FOURNIER,BUYERANDSELLER,THEBOARDOFCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERSACTING ASTHEBOARDOFADJUSTMENTWILLADDRESS THISREQUESTATTHEIRREGULARMEETINGON TUESDAY,DECEMBER17,2013. *Personswishingtocommentmaydosoin personorinwritingtotheFranklinCounty Planning&ZoningDepartment,34Forbes Street,Suite1,Apalachicola,FL32320. Transactionsofthishearingwillnotbe recorded,personswishingtorecordthe proceedingsmustmakethenecessary arrangementsforrecording. isYearsLocation Coming FraserFir5to10 SocietyLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesChester is 10On Nov. 15, Chester Bacher celebrated his 10th birthday at the WaterStreet Hotel surrounded by several dozen of his closest friends. Light hors doeuvres and cocktails were served. (Its OK. Hes 70 in dog years.) Chester is a well-known resident of St. George Island and will be familiar to many as the subject of an early Happy Endings column. He was adopted from the Franklin County Humane Society by Joe and Charolette Bacher. He has two canine siblings, Candy and Tamale who spent Friday evening at Happy Houndz in Eastpoint so Chester could be king for a day. Happy birthday, Chester! Special to the TimesAt the Nov. 19 Florida Cabinet meeting, Shawn Shattuck was presented the Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Award by Governor Rick Scott and Volunteer Florida CEO Chester Spellman. It is an honor to present the Champion of Service Award to Shawn today for his volunteer leadership and dedication to Florida families, said Scott. His work turned tragedy into triumph, and I applaud his efforts to help others overcome similar challenging situations. After losing his job as an oysterman due to challenges faced by Franklin Countys commercial seafood industry, Shattuck volunteered with Franklins Promise Coalitions A Hand Up: Volunteer Emergency Assistance Program, an emergency assistance fund established to provide unemployed residents assistance with utilities and basic needs. While volunteering at the coalition, Shattuck helped with a variety of projects, including Toys for Tots, Running for the Bay, and local food pantries. On March 1, 2013, he started his own business, Shawns Honey-Do Services, LLC where he offers services in tiling, moving, lawn care, carpentry, and painting. He continues to volunteer throughout the community and is currently working with Franklins Promise as a volunteer leader for the Reach Back program, which helps others in the community reach their full potential. Studies have shown that volunteering can be an excellent pathway to employment, with volunteers being 27 percent more likely to nd employment than non-volunteers, said Spellman. I congratulate Shawn on his service and encourage all unemployed Floridians to consider volunteering as a way to garner skills while strengthening communities. The Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Award honors individuals and groups for their outstanding volunteer efforts. For more information about the Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Awards, visit http://tinyurl.com/lmj2lla.Shawn Shattuck receives Champion of Service awardMEREDYTH HOPE HALL | Special to the TimesAttending the Cabinet meeting are, from left, Chief Financial Ofcer Jeff Atwater, Volunteer Florida CEO Chester Spellman, Joe Taylor, Nancy Paine, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Gov. Rick Scott, Shawn Shattuck and his wife Miranda, Liz Wood, Ann Kent, and Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Adam Putnam. Another adventure for Mama Sue ApalaPALAChiHIColaOLA LibraryIBRARY NeedsEEDS VolOLUNteersTEERSThe Apalachicola Municipal library has been left very short-handed by the departure of Sue Cronkite, said librarian Caty Greene. If you have some time on your hands and would like to help, contact her at 653-8436. The library is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Wednesday and Saturday, the library is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesSue Cronkite with great-nieces Angel, left, and Amber Hennings.

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The Times | A9Thursday, November 28, 2013The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000.MONDAY7:30-8:30 p.m.: Closed AA session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St.TUESDAYNoon to 1 p.m.: Open session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St.WEDNESDAY6-7 p.m.: Womens AA, closed session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Mens AA, closed session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal ChurchTHURSDAYNoon to 1 p.m.: Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Open session, St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E. Gulf Beach DriveFRIDAY5:30-6:30 p.m.: AA Happy Hour, open session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the AscensionSATURDAY7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Speakers Meeting, open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Discussion Group, Alligator Point Mission By The SeaSUNDAY7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference. R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 With the heavy cooking and baking season upon us, arent you glad to see some of the canned goods companies have gone to pulltab lids? Be nice if they all would. Well now, looks like we will have a good Thanksgiving dinner at Chillas Hall. We have 96 signed up thus far. Lanark Village Association members are free. A donation of $5 is required for nonmembers. We will line up to be served at 1 p.m. See ya there! I know youre itching to join the crowd tomorrow, Black Friday. Dont forget the donation boxes for Toys for Tots. Happy shopping! You will be able to pick up some small gifts and decorations at the Holiday Bazaar at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Doors will open at 9 a.m. The soup and sandwich lunch will be served at noon. Our thrift shop is decorated, and many Christmas items are in stock. The thrift store is open Tuesday through Saturday 8-11 a.m. Drop by and have a cup of coffee, or just look around and shoot the breeze. Last Saturday, Nov. 23, the family and friends gathered at the First Baptist Church to celebrate the short life of our friend Cody Diorio. Pray for Codys eternal peace and for strength for the family. We have been friends ever since they moved to the Village. The gavel will fall at 7 p.m. to open the December meeting of the Lanark Village Association. The board will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2, at Chillas Hall. Try to be there! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember Keep Christ in Christmas! Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Faith LanarANARK newsNEWSJim WelshFrom Staff ReportsApalachicola Christmas celebration FridayThe Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29. Merchants will be open late, and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets lined with luminaries and lled with holiday spirit. Santa will arrive on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. Santa will hear childrens Christmas wishes, and carolers will sing. The Raney House Museum will be decorated in holiday greenery and specially decorated trees and open late for tours with docents to tell visitors about the citys early history. Lanark Boat Club to host Saturday bazaarThe Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holiday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info, call Janet at 697-2587.Small Business Saturday Nov. 30Come shop small independently owned stores on national Small Business Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 30 in Apalachicola. Art, jewelry, home dcor, food or antiques, youll nd the perfect gifts, minus the crowds and the hassle of going to the mall. When you spend your dollars locally, more of your money circulates in the community, creating a more vibrant, sustainable economy that employs your family and neighbors. Whether it is a hardware store, restaurant, bookstore or a shop downtown, of every $100 spent in a locally owned, independent store, $68 returns to the community through taxes, payroll and other expenditures Santa will also be in town from 1-3 p.m. to visit with his furry friends. Bring your camera and take your pets picture with Santa for a donation to the Franklin County Humane Society. Pet costume contest is at 3 p.m. with special treats for dogs.Beshears to distribute blankets on MondayState Rep. Halsey Beshears, RMonticello, will be in Apalachicola on Monday, Dec. 2, to distribute wool blankets donated by nonprot Farm Share. This event will be 10 a.m. to noon at Beshears ofce at 78 11th St., Suite 5. All are encourage everyone to come by and pick up a blanket. Island Lights celebration Dec. 6The annual St. George Island Lights celebration will be Dec. 6, mid-island in St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile Jingle Jog starts at 4 p.m. on the bike path in front of the park and proceeds through the business district. Its a fun run, and everyone is welcome. All runners receive Santa hats for their heads and jingle bells for their shoes. Runners should arrive a little before 4 p.m. to sign in. A $5 per runner donation is suggested at the run. Santa is expected at 5 p.m., arriving by re engine and providing gifts to children age 10 and younger. Refreshments including cookies, coffee and hot chocolate will be provided to all. Island Scouts will be selling hot dogs. In the event of rain, many sturdy tents will be set up. View the lighting of the island palms at sundown. The event is hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. For more information, watch www.sgibusinesses. com/island-lights.Holiday Fresh Market Dec. 7Why ght the crowds and trafc at the malls? Enjoy the Holiday Fresh Market on Dec. 7 in downtown Apalachicola. Shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy hand-crafted Apalachicola specialties from fresh seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry. For more information, call 653-9419.Eastpoint Christmas parade Dec. 13On Nov. 5, the county commission voted unanimously to ask the Florida Department of Transportation for permission to close U.S. 98 in Eastpoint for the Eastpoint Christmas Parade, scheduled for Friday afternoon, Dec. 13.Donation yoga classes continueThe donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes from 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Battery Park city ofce conference room. A memorial service for Dan R. Rodney Robison will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 30, at the First United Methodist Church of Carrabelle. Rodney, a Carrabelle native, passed away at 84 on Sept. 29 in Scottsdale, Ariz. A lifelong Methodist, he attended the Carrabelle United Methodist Church, where he gave his heart to the Lord. He was ordained in 1955 in full connection of the Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church. He served as a chaplain in the Air Force and as a minister in various Methodist churches. Jackie McMillan will ofciate at the memorial service.Dan Rodney RobisonBrazil Dail Carmichael was born Jan. 2, 1935, in Steinhatchee. He passed away surrounded by his family Friday, Nov. 1, 2013, at his home in Eastpoint, at 78. Dail was a U.S. Air Force veteran and a business owner, working in the oil and seafood industries for many years. He is survived by his wife, Frances Carmichael; children, Michael Carmichael (Sherry), John Peewee Carmichael (Anna), Jesse Carmichael (Doris), Penny Sutton (Stacy), and Charles Carmichael (Becky); brother, Greg Carmichael; 18 grandchildren, and 10 great-grandchildren; and stepchildren, Karen Orihuela, Frank David Carmichael (Susan) and Terri Lynn Gonzalez (Michael). Funeral services were Sunday, Nov. 3, graveside in Eastpoint Cemetery with the Rev. Scott Shiver ofciating. Kelley Funeral Home assisted in handling arrangements.Brazil Dail Carmichael Obituaries SUBMISSIONSSubmit obituaries to news@apalachtimes. com. View obituaries and leave condolences at www.apalachtimes.com. AA ScheduleCHEDULE Faith briefsBRIEFSLooking forward to a great Thanksgiving

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SelectNameBrandItems DrasticallyReduced. WhileSupplieslast!! NoRainchecks, LimitedSupply, BlackFridayOnly, Nov.29,2013 Sun.7am-5pm Manyotheritems discountedthrough theweekend; whilesupplieslast. 121U.S.98,PortSt.Joe,FL32456~877-216-9600 WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Nov.2861 45 0% Fri,Nov.2960 48 0% Sat,Nov.3064 5310% Sun,Dec.163 5510% Mon,Dec.269 48 0 % Tues,Dec.368 47 0 % Wed,Dec.468 47 0 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, November 28, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay BottomTrout and ounder are holding around the creek runoffs in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Neap tides have allowed more bait sh to move up in the canal, in turn bringing the trout and game sh to follow. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in these waters this week as well. Most local creeks and streams are still holding good amounts of bream and now some crappie. The crappie bite should improve this week because of the cold weather and rain. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com One of the loveliest sights in our area is the purple muhly grass shimmering on the dunes in the fall. I can remember when a sea of the stuff greeted you when you arrived on St. George Island. You can still enjoy those shimmering purple owers although the wild population is greatly reduced. Muhly grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) is a native to Florida and is a fall favorite for Florida landscapes. This native grass forms clumps of very ne blue-green foliage that explodes with color in October and adds texture to the garden all year long. It grows to heights of two to three feet with a spread of two to three feet. Muhly grass is exceptionally droughttolerant but tolerates periodic ooding during the warm months, so it is good for wetlands. It prefers full sun to part shade and does best in average to dry soil where there is very good drainage. This plant does not tolerate winter wetness well. This is a great plant for xeriscapes. Muhly grass is rated hardy in USDA Zones 6-11. Best of all, this plant requires almost no perpetual maintenance as long as its basic watering needs are met, and it is usually free of pests and disease. You should cut back dormant growth in winter before new growth begins to emerge in early spring. In addition to its attractive appearance and popularity as an ornamental grass, purple muhly grass is also important to a variety of wildlife. It is used for shelter or as a nesting site for some species of birds and mammals. It is also highly attractive to several species of ladybugs that help control pests in areas where purple muhly grass is planted or naturally occurs. Muhly grass is unpalatable to deer so it can be useful where deer munching on the landscape are a problem. Muhly is also referred to as sweetgrass and was used to weave baskets in the coastal Carolinas for generations. Visitors my still occasionally encounter a booth displaying these baskets on the roadside. Muhly baskets have an attractive fresh odor and a pale green patina. Native Americans also used it to scent their personal ornaments. A hybrid form called Pink Flamingos has shown up in the nursery trade the last couple of years. It is said to be a hybrid. It forms a threeto four-foot mound with distinctly spear-shaped plumes and is spectacular in late fall. The genus Muhlenbergia is named for Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1753-1815), who was a German-educated Lutheran minister and the rst president of Franklin College, now Franklin and Marshall College in Pennsylvania. He is most famous for his work in the eld of botany but was also an accomplished chemist and mineralogist. He is credited with classifying and naming 150 species of plants in his 1785 work Index Flora Lancastriensis, which led to great advances in the study of plants and earned him the distinction as Americas rst outstanding botanist.SPECIAL TO THE TIMESVisitor Sam Smith shows a black drum he caught shing with Capt. Chris Robinson in October. Smith also caught island red and puppy red sh. Email your catches to timesoutdoors@star .com. Last week, Apalachicola had a pair of exotic visitors on a mission to help the environment. Husband and wife Eric and Chanita Darsonval spent several days cruising the watershed in their light sport amphibian aircraft, Phibee, a bright green, opentopped two-seater. Darsonval was born in Algeria, raised in France and immigrated to the U.S., where he recently retired after many years working as an airborne re ghter. His new job is to raise awareness about plastic pollution in the environment. He plans to travel coastal areas and river deltas and offer people the opportunity to view their landscape from the air and see for themselves the amount of trash littering our waterways. Darsonval said he was at the beginning of his crusade and stopped off here on his way to South Florida. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesGag grouper harvest closes in most Gulf watersGag grouper will close for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state waters Dec. 4, with the last day of harvest being Dec. 3. All Gulf federal waters will close Dec. 3, with the last day of harvest being Dec. 2. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties were open from April 1 through June 30 and were not open during the July 1 through Dec. 3 season. Monroe County is also excluded because it follows Atlantic rules for gag grouper. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages marine sh from the shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico. These closures are an effort to help rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf back to strong sustainable levels. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Grouper.Venting tool requirement removed in Gulf watersSoon, Florida anglers no longer will be required to have and use a venting tool when shing for reef sh in Gulf of Mexico state waters. During its Nov. 21 meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission removed the requirement in Gulf state waters, making state regulations consistent with rules in federal waters. By removing this rule, anglers now have the freedom to determine how to best maximize survival of released reef sh using devices they feel are appropriate, depending on the circumstances. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council removed the requirement to have and use a venting tool in Gulf federal waters earlier this year. These changes will take effect as soon as possible. Another notice will be issued to let the public know when these changes take effect. When sh are brought quickly to the surface from deep water, the change in pressure can cause gases within the shs swim bladder to expand. This condition is called barotrauma and can cause damage to internal organs and reduce the likelihood a sh will survive when returned to the water. Typically, sh suffering from barotrauma must be treated if they are to survive and swim back down to deep water. Venting tools are used to treat barotrauma by allowing gases to escape from a shs body cavity. Descending devices, which bring sh back down to deeper waters, are another, more recently developed option that can also be used to increase survival rates among sh with barotrauma. Maximizing post-release survival of sh is important in marine sheries management because it means more sh survive to potentially reproduce and be harvested in the future. While venting tools can still be a useful way to increase chances of survival after being released, sh do not always need to be vented. Venting tools were required in Gulf state and federal waters since 2008. This requirement was intended to increase survival rates of released red snapper, but applied to all species of Gulf reef sh. These tools are not required in Atlantic state or federal waters. The use of non-stainless steel, non-offset circle hooks and dehooking devices will still be required in state and federal Gulf waters when shing for reef sh. These tools minimize handling times for reef sh, which aids in survival of the sh upon release. To learn more about recognizing barotrauma, and what to do, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Catch and Release. Information about reef sh gear rules is available under Recreational Regulations. Outdoors BRIEFS HITTING THE DRUM Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES POLLUTION FIGHTERS VISIT FRANKLIN COUNTY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesMuhly grass is displayed as a specimen clump at the home of Heather Mapp.Colorful muhly grass a beauty to behold

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, November 28, 2013 ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity girls basketball team has gotten off to a strong start, winning three of its rst four games. Under the direction of coach Carlos Hill, the team lost its opener at Blountstown, and has reeled off three straight wins, over John Paul II, Wewahitchka and Aucilla Christian. The team is anchored by senior Daeisha Carr, and juniors Dyshereah Key, Aaliyah West, Myesha Campbell, Trinity Henderson and Dasia Davis. Sophomore Chanelle Ducker, and freshmen Tyanna Townsend and Natasia Robinson round out the lineup. In the Nov. 15 opener at Blountstown, Franklin County was outscored in each of the four quarters. Trailing 19-12 at the half, the Lady Seahawks were blown out in the third quarter, 19-7, and went on to sustain a 49-24 defeat. The team was led by Keys 11 points, with seven from Townsend, four from Campbell and one from Davis. The Lady Hawks got on the winning track at John Paul II on Nov. 18, as they eked out a 37-36 win. Trailing 28-19 after three quarters, Franklin County outscored their opponents 18-8 in the nal quarter to manage the win. Key poured in 18 points, with eight from Townsend, six from Campbell and ve from Ducker. The Lady Seahawks secured a 30-26 win at Wewa Nov. 21 in a close, tightly fought contest. Key led the team with 13 points and seven rebounds, while Campbell pitched in 10 points and HometownProud (850)653-96954514197SeniormidelderGrahamKirvin, theSeahawkboyssoccerteam's leadingscorerthisseason,drove hometwogoalsinFranklin County's6-0shutoutofPortSt. JoeNov.21,andscoredthelone goalinSaturday1-1tieathome againstFreeport.Unfortunately, Kirvinsustainedaninjurytohis rightanteriorcruciateligament andisexpectedtobeoutof actionforthenextfourtosix weeks."Heisourmostcapable playertobeabletoscore,"said coachRamonValenzuela."He hastheskills." GulfsideIGA STUDENTATHLETESOFTHEWEEKSPONSOR GrahamKirvin $00000FS45TRIMMEREasy-to-use,well-balancedtrimmer forhomeowneruse GETGEAREDUPwithprotectiveapparelandaccessories. $00000MS170CHAINSAWDesignedforoccasionalwood-cutting tasksaroundthehome Includesmanyoftheexcellentdesign featuresofourprofessionalmodels Anti-vibrationsystemforcomfortableoperation Barlengthsmayvarybyregion. $00000BG55 HANDHELDBLOWERProvenhandheldbloweratanaffordableprice THISHOLIDAY GIVESOMETHINGDEPENDABLE STIHLusa.com Availableatparticipatingdealerswhilesupplieslast.2011STIHL $17995 $14995 $16995St.JoeRent-All7061stSt. PortSt.Joe,FL850-227-2112"WESELLTHEBESTANDREPAIRTHEREST" Page 11By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks varsity boys basketball team won two games last week, traveling to Wewahitchka Nov. 21 to down the Gators, and then defeating Aucilla Christian at home Friday night. But on Monday night, the team fell at Altha 47-43. Against Wewa, the team was paced by 12 rebounds and 20 points from point guard Kelsey Jones, who had 23 points, and would have had more had he sunk better than 8-of-18 free throws. In fact, the team shot just 16-of-44 from the charity stripe, a measly 36 percent, to make the game closer than it was. We couldnt make free throws, said coach Mike Sweatt. With three treys, Josue Barahona had nine points, as did Kenneth Wilson. Nathan Jones and Tyler Howard each kicked in ve points, with James Gordon adding three, and two each from Cameron White, Marshal Sweet and Tyler Farmer. Howard and White each had seven rebounds. The team made up for the poor shooting on Friday night, as they shot 23-of-56 from the free throw line, paced by Jones, who was 13-of-16 from the charity stripe, including 9-of-10 in the fourth quarter to help seal the 5744 win over Aucilla. Jones added 23 points for the game, and seven rebounds, while Wilson had 11 points and ve rebounds. White had nine points and 13 rebounds, with two treys and a total of eight points from Barahona. Howard and Gordon each added a pair,. On Monday night, the Seahawks fell 47-43, after being up 41-40 with a minute left to play. But Altha went on a 5-0 run. All we needed was one stop and we couldnt get it, said Sweatt. We overhelped and gave them a twoand a three-pointer. Jones made two free throws, but others missed some wide open shots. We didnt make the shot, said Sweatt. We have fought hard, we gave everything we had, from the rst guy to last guy, said Sweatt of his teams recent play. How we worked hard on defense is the difference in those games. Our defensive rebounding is not up to par, he said. Were not able to compete in this district if we dont rebound. We have to play fast more times than not, said Sweatt. Senior Logan McLeod, nursing a ligament tear, returned to the lineup Monday night, but saw limited action as he ratchets up his game.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesDyshereah Key, left, Daeisha Carr, and Trinity Henderson, on ground, scramble for the ball against Aucilla.Lady Seahawks win three of four See THREE A12DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesDeborah Dempsey charges the ball.Lady Seahawks down St. JoeSpecial to the TimesThe Lady Seahawks girls varsity soccer team reeled off three wins last week, highlighted by a 4-2 victory Nov. 21 against District 1A rival Port St. Joe. Their only loss came Nov. 16 at Rocky Bayou, after a win over North Bay Haven the night before. On Nov. 21 at Port St. Joe, the Lady Seahawks, aggressive from the opening whistle, generated multiple shots on goal, opening with a corner kick from senior Jessica Shields that senior Gracyn Kirvin headed into the net. We practice defending the corner kick quite frequently in practice and I know Gracyn has the capability to make that shot, it was well executed, said coach Joe Shields. The Lady Seahawks controlled the time of possession in the rst half with speed, deft passing and a swarming, team defense that allowed most of the play to be in the Sharks half of the eld. It seemed every time the Sharks made headway towards the Seahawk goal, someone would dispossess a pass or toe-poke the ball away. I thought Allie Zingarelli came up big for us in numerous situations, said coach Shields. An injury to senior Marlyn Lee, who after the match was evaluated and cleared by a doctor to return to action See SEAHAWKS A12Seahawks down Wewa, AucillaAbove, Mike Sweatt directs his players during a break. Left, Cameron White has emerged as a key rebounder for the Hawks.Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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A12 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013in a week, caused a cease in the action for a few minutes but freshman Myranda McLeod lled in nicely as a defender. A ne pass from Shields to junior Katie Seger, late in the half, enabled Seger drive a ball past the Shark net minder, and put the Lady Seahawks up by two, going into the half. My big concern was that the girls would let up, so I told them to keep being aggressive on the ball and keep stringing together passes, said coach Shields. Taking the coachs words to heart, a few minutes into the second half, freshman Emily Zingarelli got loose just inside the 18-yard box and tried to shoot on frame when she was knocked down by a Shark player. This resulted in a penalty kick opportunity, that Shields buried in the lower left corner of the net to give the Seahawks a 3-0 lead. Moments before the water break, senior captain Deborah Dempsey dribbled through multiple Sharks on her way to an unassisted goal, making it 4-0. However, as with any rivalry game the Sharks would not go down quietly and continued pressing their attack. A foul inside the Hawks 18-yard box resulted in a penalty kick which junior goalkeeper Macey Hunt was unable to save and put the Sharks on the board 4-1. Minutes later, a corner kick by the Sharks ew over Hunts head and was shot into the net by another Shark, making the game 4-2. The Seahawk defense stiffened as the Hawks returned to their possession game, with Seger, Kirvin, Shields and senior captain Adrianna Reeder all having shots on goal before the nal whistle sounded. In all, the Hawks controlled the ball for two-thirds of the game. This was their most complete game to date, said Coach Shields. The girls did many things right and few things wrong, so I was very pleased with their efforts this evening. On Nov. 19, the Lady Seahawks traveled to West Gadsden and won handily 10-2 after the game was called due to the eight-goal mercy rule. Franklin County jumped all over the Panthers from the opening whistle and dominated both sides of the ball. With a blitzkrieg of shooting, Reeder scored twice; Kirvin scored twice off two assists from Shields, who also scored once; and Dempsey scored off an assist from Seger, for a 6-0 halftime lead. Others making attempts on goal were two from Emily Zingarelli, and one each from Seger and McLeod. I was kind of torn, said Coach Shields, I wanted everyone to score but I also wanted them to work on stringing together multiple one and two-touch passes, as this will help us going forward this season. Possession soccer is going to be key for us, to staying competitive in this district. After the break, the coach substituted liberally, allowing multiple Lady Seahawks to receive playing time. With new defenders on the pitch, the Seahawks were a little more vulnerable to a couple of errant through balls by the Panthers and were scored on twice prior to the last water break. Back-up net minder Jessica Schmidt had three saves. Senior Ally Millender and Kirvin each scored one goal to make it 8-2 prior to the last 20 minutes of play. The subs made some little defensive mistakes but I knew that once the game condition jitters went away they would settle down, said coach Shields. Reeder was able to get off two attempts, and senior Brook Pittman made a goal attempt, but as the clock wound down, freshman Allie Kirvin and eighth grader Allie Zingarelli each found the back of the net, for the 10-2 win. This is the kind of game that gives all the girls condence, that if we execute properly we can score goals, Shields said. On Nov. 15 and 16, the Lady Seahawks had back-to-back matches with North Bay Haven and Rocky Bayou, with the Friday night match with the North Bay Haven Buccaneers a real nail biter before Franklin County came away with a narrow 2-1 victory at the Nest. Reeder led all shooters with four attempts in the rst half; and Emily Zingarelli and Seger each had an attempt, but it was Shields who rst found the back of the net for a 1-0 Lady Seahawks lead. The defense was solid right up until the end of the rst half when the Buccaneers scored an equalizer to knot the game at 1-all. Up until that point, net minder Hunt had made seven saves. The Buccaneers were much more aggressive in the second half and Hunt was forced to make 11 saves, two of which were spectacular. Gracyn Kirvin made a couple of shot attempts in the second half, along with Shields, but it was the right foot of Emily Zingarelli that was the game changer, as she scored following the last water break. Although heavy pressure from the Buccaneers continued, the Seahawks were able to preserve the win in a hard fought tilt. The following morning, the Lady Seahawks travelled to Niceville to play Rocky Bayou, in only their second away game this season. Unfortunately, the fatigue from Fridays game spilled over into Saturdays game and the Lady Seahawks performed with a lackluster effort after a three-and-ahalf-hour bus ride. Unable to string passes together, the offense did not click like the previous evening and only Reeder and Emily Zingarelli were able to launch any signicant offensive re power in the rst half. The underlying problem came as the Lady Seahawks could not seem to get on track with playing a cohesive team defense and unfortunately yielded a goal in each half to go down in defeat 2-0. Reeder led all attempts with four shots on goal, followed by two from Emily Zingarelli and one from Gracyn Kirvin. Hunt had 10 saves as the Lady Seahawk net minder. Sports Grant ed Request ed Reduce d Request ed Withdra wnor settled Residential00066 Commercial00022 Industrialand miscellaneous00000 Agriculturalor classifieduse00000 High-water recharge00000 Historic commercialor nonprofit00000 Business machineryand equipment00011 Vacantlotsand acreage00000 00099 AMENDEDTAXIMPACT OFVALUEADJUSTMENT BOARD FranklinCounty TaxYear2013 GrantedRequestedReducedRequested Withdrawn or settled CouponExpires:12-15-13CODE:AP00 seven rebounds. Townsend contributed ve points and seven rebounds, while Ducker added two points. On Friday night at home, the Lady Seahawks coasted to a 51-28 victory over Aucilla Christian. Both Key and Campbell were in double-digits, with Key putting in 23 points and pulling down six rebounds, while Campbell tallied 20 points and nine rebounds. Townsend added eight points and two rebounds. THREE from page A11 SEAHAWKsS from page A11By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The Seahawks varsity boys soccer team had a good week last week, notching their rst win of the season, at Port St. Joe Nov. 21, and then tying Freeport at home Saturday. But not all the news was good. Senior midelder Graham Kirvin, the teams leading scorer, suffered a ligament injury and will be out four to six weeks, said coach Ramon Valenzuela. Because of the injury, Valenzuela opted to protect the 1-1 tie Saturday and drop two players as fullbacks, defending the goal in the second half. Populating this years squad, now with a record of 1-4-3, are seniors James Harris, James Bailey, James Newell, Stefan DeVaughn, Alex Causey and Christian Jones; juniors Austin Carter, Chandler White, Logan Allen, Chase Taranto and Lloyd Smith; sophomores Jacob Montgomery, Josh Patriotis and Walker De Vaughn; and freshmen Max Davis and Tyler Pendelton. Members of the middle school team include eighth graders Jack Harris, Davis McGee, Yanni Pateritsas, Micah Patriotis, Matthew Turner, Brandon Taranto, Lucas Sasnett and Bailey Herrington. Team statistician is Zoe Lance In Port St. Joe Nov. 21, the Tiger Sharks were missing some key players due to postseason football play, and the Seahawks took advantage, winning 6-0. I think we played very well that day, said Valenzuela, who is assisted by Stacy Kirvin. We went to play, we were denitely more excited, to prepare to win. We didnt lower any of our guard during the game, he said.. The boys played 110 percent; they played hard. Kirvin and Patriotis each scored a pair of goals, with Pendleton and Harris each adding one. At home Saturday, Kirvin scored the lone goal of the rst half, before he was sidelined by injury. In the rst half we played very well, said Valenzuela. For some reason the boys were tired and we lowered our guard quickly in the second half. In the rst half we were playing closer to their goal all the time and we missed some good opportunities. The score marked the third 1-1 tie of the year for the Seahawks. That was the same result against North Bay Haven at home Nov. 15, and at Rocky Bayou the following day. The team opened with a 3-1 loss at Rickards Nov. 4, a 4-1 loss to Maclay Nov. 7, a 4-3 loss at home to John Paul II Nov. 12; and a 5-2 loss at West Gadsden Nov. 19, in which Causey and Kirvin each scored a goal. We have won just one game yet, said Valenzuela. The boys are preparing for the tournament. This is all about preparation for the tournament. Even though we are in a tough district this year, and lost some key players, its been tougher this year, he said. The team is one of seven schools in District 1 in Class 1As Region 1, which comprises 30 high schools, each with a student population of between 46 and 408. District challengers include John Paul II, Mayo Lafayette, Maclay, Port St. Joe and Niceville Rocky Bayou Christian.Seahawks down St. Joe for rst win

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, November 28, 2013 year, the district will exhaust the entire $1.8 million from 2011-12, most of it on the school loan, and the remaining $254,000 transferred to the general fund to cover property and casualty insurance and maintenance. After that, the district has budgeted spending some of the $1.7 million unspent from 2012-13. If the $1.13 million budgeted for capital expenditures this year, including 5 percent for the ABC School, is spent, plus another $56,000 for remaining maintenance and insurance costs, the district would have a nal ending balance of about $2.16 million, more than $1.3 million less than the balance at the start of the scal year. This is in part due to the diminished tax revenue, which this year is anticipated to be $1.6 million, more than $350,000 less than was the case four years ago. Its obvious we cant continue the same pattern, said School Board Member Pam Shiver. What can we do to stop this pattern? Superintendent Nina Marks said continued energy savings needs to occur on the main campus to less the burden to capital outlay. If we continue this pattern we will take money out of the general operating fund, said Board Chair Jimmy Gander. The capital fund is still depleting. Bud Hayes, chair of the ABC School board of directors, said he, the ABC Schools nance director Dean Vail, ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson, Venable and Gander have been meeting regularly. It had been indicated that they wanted to cut our capital outlay down to 2.5 percent. I appeared at that meeting and they said lets talk about it, that it was premature at this point, said Hayes. We agreed to sit down and talk. We have had very cooperative talks in which both sides have presented their positions, he said. I dont think its any secret that the school district has some issues that they need to resolve. This has kind of opened up a whole new dialogue for our cooperative spirit. Hayes said that when the charter school moved into Chapman Elementary School a few years ago, obtaining the buildings and a footprint about one foot around with the district retaining the rest, the buildings had been vacant for a number of years. We took it over, and there was a lot of neglected maintenance, he said. Built in 1976, the school was one of the rst solarpowered buildings in Florida, but the solar power has not functioned for several decades. We have a solar panel on the gym, which was done though a Progress Energy grant, Hayes said. It (solar power) is always something in the back of our mind wed like to do. He said the school has spent capital outlay money on upgrades to the heating and air conditioning system, some plumbing, and repairs of deteriorating portions of the building. We still have some infrastructure problems, some moisture problems from lack of upkeep, Hayes said. We need a new air handler and new cooler for the school, and we need some cosmetic work done, on tile for the ceiling. Were not short of needs by any means. Hayes said one possible use of the money could be to clean up some paving and improve parking, which often spills out into nearby grass during busy times at the school. We want environmentally sound parking around the area, Hayes said. We have got some possibilities, we got some estimates on prospective parking spaces, and maybe some beautication of the yard. He said the ABC School board has managed to reduce its power bill considerably, by about 700 kilowatt hours per month, which should add up to several thousand dollars in annual savings. Our energy conservation program started to pay off, said Hayes. Weve had a lot of remedial work done, found old things that were totally not working, and did some insulation in classrooms. Here we have cost savings by someone whos not waiting for things to break, he said. BOARD from page A1 ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 Trades&Services Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines NOTICEOFADOPTIONOF CITYORDINANCETheCityCommissionoftheCityofApalachicolawillholdapublichearingforthepurpose ofreceivingcitizenscommentsonthefollowingproposedordinance: ORDINANCENO.2013-06 ANORDINANCEOFTHECITYOFAPALACHICOLA,FRANKLINCOUNTY, FLORIDAESTABLISHINGASLOWDOWN,MINIMUMWAKEZONETO REGULATETHEWAKECREATEDBYBOATS,VESSELSANDWATERCRAFT PROPELLEDORPOWEREDBYMACHINERYONSCIPIOCREEK,STARTING ATTHECONFULENCEOFTHEAPALACHICOLARIVERANDSCIPIOCREEK PROCEEDINGNORTHONSCIPIOCREEKTOAPOINT100FEETNORTH OFMILLPONT,ANDPROVIDINGANOPERATIONSTANDARDFORBOATS, VESSELS,ANDWATERCRAFTINTHESLOWDOWN,MINIMUMWAKE ZONE;PROVIDINGFINDINGS;PROVIDINGDEFINITIONS;PROVIDINGFOR EXEMPTIONS;PROVIDINGFORTHEPOSTINGOFSIGNS;PROVIDINGFOR ENFORCEMENTANDPENALTIES;PROVIDNGFORAUTHORIZATIONOF CITYOFFICIALS;PROVIDINGSEVERABILITY;ANDPROVIDNGFORAN EFFECTIVEDATE. ThepublichearingwillbeheldintheApalachicolaCommunityCenter,#1BayAvenue, Apalachicola,Floridaat6:00PMonTuesday,December3,2013.Allinterestedpartiesare encouragedtoappearandbeheardwithrespecttothisproposedordinance. FRANKLINCOUNTYTOURISTDEVELOPMENTCOUNCIL NOTICEOFPUBLICMEETINGSCHEDULECHANGETHEFOLLOWINGMEETINGSHAVEBEEN CANCELEDDUETOTHEHOLIDAYS:Wednesday,December4,2013-3:00PMBoardMeeting Wednesday,December18,2013-1:30PMCommitteeMeetingHAVEBEENCANCELLEDREGULARSCHEDULEDMEETINGSWILL RESUMEONJANUARY8,2014 TheseareOPENpublicmeetingsandtwoormore CountyCommissionersmayattend. News BRIEFSTour of island homes offered FFriday Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty is hosting an Open House Tour from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29. We are featuring a diverse selection of at least seven homes, all on St. George Island, said Rose Drye, broker-manager at Shimmering Sands. Our low-key, no pressure selfguided tour will include beachfront, bayfront, canalfront, and interior properties. We are even including a xer-upper in our line-up. A real estate professional will be at each home to answer questions about the property, nancing availability, and rental potential. Stop by the Prudential Shimmering Sands ofce at 123 East Gulf Beach Drive to pick up property yers and a map for the self-guided tour, and to visit some or all of the open houses at your own pace. Maps and yers also can be emailed upon request by calling 927-2666.Dec. 7 lm relates Pearl Harbor At 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, the lm Tora, Tora, Tora will be shown in the movie room. Released in 1970, the American-Japanese collaboration war lm dramatizes the Japanese reasons for the attack that brought America into the war. Some of the scenes are actual archival lm taken from one of the carriers participating in the attack. The lm was directed by Richard Fleischer and stars an ensemble cast, including Martin Balsam, Joseph Cotten, S. Yamamura, E. G. Marshall, James Whitmore and Jason Robards. The title, which In Japanese means Tiger, was the codeword used to indicate that complete surprise had been achieved. Free popcorn will be available. Admission at the museum is by donation. IIsland reghters annual meeting Dec. 14The annual meeting of the St George Island Volunteer Fire Department will be at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 14 at the Jay Abbott Firehouse 324 E. Pine Ave., St George Island. An agenda will be available for review on Dec. 11 at the rehouse. The public is invited to attend and participate in accordance  with applicable governing documents. A light lunch will follow the business meeting.  Photos of Carrabelle families soughtThe Carrabelle History Museum, at 106 Ave. B, SE is collecting family photos. Historical Society President Tamara Allen said the museum is creating a database to aid in genealogical research and the pictures would be part of the accumulated information. For more information, call 697-2141.Three SServicemen seeks Vietnam storiesThe Three Servicemen Detail South is seeking stories of service in Vietnam to post on its webpage, www.three servicemenstatuesouth. org. This can be a story told by the veteran or a memory of a veteran who is deceased. If you have a story to tell, call Lois Swoboda at 653-5857.Cook reappointed to transportation boardOn Nov. 19, county commissioners voted unanimously to reappoint Apalachicola City Commissioner Frank Cook as chair of the Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Board. EEOC awarded grant for new roofAt the Nov. 19 county commission meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce said the county has been awarded Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds to repair the roof on the Emergency Operations Center. The federal programs fund projects designed to reduce or eliminate losses from future disasters. The emergency operations center roof was damaged in June 2012 during Tropical Storm Debby. It drips on my head when it rains, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell told commissioners, who voted unanimously to accept the grant. Pierce said repairs would cost approximately $98,000. The grant funds will provide $73,600 and the county will provide $24,500 from its contingency fund. The hip roof will be constructed of 26 gauge PBR roof panels designed to withstand winds of up to 140 miles per hour. Brownell said the planning and zoning ofce would seek bids for the work in the near future.November Pancreatic Cancer MonthAt the Nov. 19 county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to recognize November as Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month in response to a request submitted by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. An estimated 38,460 people will die of pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2013, and of those 2770 are Floridians. Pancreatic cancer will afict more than 45,000 people each year; 73 percent will die within one year of diagnosis, and 94 percent will die within ve years.

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A14 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 A14| The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Thanksgiving HolidayClassified In-column D E AD LI N E SThe Port St. Joe Star and The Apalachicola/Carrabelle TimesTo Run Thursday, November 28 5:00 pm 93126T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192009CA000624XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-19 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-19, Plaintiff, vs. TAMMIE KELLEY, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, DECEASED; ALINA HOWINGTON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. I; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 30, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000624XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CWALT, INC ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-19 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 200719 is Plaintiff and TAMMIE KELLEY, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, DECEASED; ALINA HOWINGTON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. I; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, 11:00 a.m, on the January 9, 2014, following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT NUMBER 5 IN ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 3 AND A PART OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLATS THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK I, AT PAGES 25 TO 28, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF, AND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLOR-IDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850-653-8861 or 1-800 -955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on October 31, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954)564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1162-74787 November 21, 28, 2013 93152T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 13-204-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH LYNN RAFFIELD, et al.; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, entered in Case No. 13-204-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Deborah Lynn Raffield f/k/a Deborah R. Lett f/k/a Deborah L. Aikens f/k/a Deborah Raffield Lolley, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby, 2nd Floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on December 18, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBIT A Commence at a point marking the intersection of the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Old State Road No: 10 with the West boundary of the East half of the Northwest quarter of Fractional Section 11, Township 9 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida, thence run South 00 degrees 02 minutes 34 seconds West along the West boundary of the East half of the Northwest quarter of said Fractional Section 11 a distance of 707.68 feet to a re-rod (marked #1999), thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds East 400.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the Northerly right-of-way boundary of Pine Avenue, said point also marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 100.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 seconds East 142.33 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds West 100.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 seconds West 142.33 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.325 acres, more or less. Together with a 1997 REDM mobile home, ID #FLA14611173A, Title #73305835 and a 1997 REDM mobile home, ID #FLA14611173B, Title #73305834. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 25th day of September, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 21, 28, 2013 96447T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192013CA 000014CAXXXX GENERAL MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff(s), vs. JOHN BECKER BOATENREITER, et. al. Defendant(s)/ NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 30, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192013CA 000014CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and JOHN BECKNER BOATENREITER AND UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash are held at 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 9th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, 395.98 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 104 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LANDS HEREBY CONVEYED, AND FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 26 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST 500 FEET TO A POINT ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO NORTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 100 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST 500 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES WEST 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; SAID LANDS HEREBY CONVEYED BEING ALSO DESCRIBED AS LOT 65 OF THAT CERTAIN UNRECORDED MAP OR PLAT OF DOG ISLAND G ULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, AS HEREINABOVE REFERRED TO, SAID PLAT DATED MARCH 1948, AND PREPARED BY L.G. FLANAGAN, LAND SURVEYOR, FOR TALLAHASSEE AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, A FLORIDA CORPORATION and commonly known as: 694 GULF SHORE DR, DOG ISLAND, FL 32322 IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 31st day of October, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON, Clerk, Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq./FL Bar# 549452 Laura L. Walker, Esq./FL Bar# 509434 Daniel F. Martinez, II, Esq./FL Bar# 438405 Kalei McElroy Blair, Esq./FL Bar#44613 Jennifer Lima Smith/FL Bar # 984183 GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, FL 33607 (813)443-5087 In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in the proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, FRANKLIN County, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, County Phone 850653-8861 EXT. 106 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. File# 678280.2025 November 21, 28, 2013 96479T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2012-CA-000282 GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CAREY M. SHEPHARD, ET. AL. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE AS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated September 17, 2013 entered in Civil Case No.: 19-2012-CA000282, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, is Plaintiff, and CAREY M. SHEPARD; LINDA J. SUAREZ; USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK (USAA FSB); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM This is the honor roll for the rst nine weeks grading period at the First Baptist Christian School. In the case of the rst and second grades, the honor roll is for the second six-week grading period.FIRST GRADEAA/B: Dex TeatSSECOND GRADEAAll AA s: Caden AllenA A /B: Brayden Barwick, Ethan Kembro, Emma WhiteTTHIRD GRADEAAll AA s: Olivia BarineauA A /B: Riley ONeal and Skylar LayneFOURTH GRADEAAll AA s: Genesis JonesA A /B: Cameron Nash, Carter Kembro, Sophia SalmanFIfFTH GRADEAA/B: Eva StricklandSSIXTH GRADEAA/B: Lydia StricklandSSEVENTH GRADEAAll AA s: Adria ValenzuelaA A /B: Talyn ArnettEEIGHTH GRADEAAll AA s: Jordan AlexanderA A /B: Logan Arnett, Nathan JonesFRESHMANAAll AA s: Noah StricklandA A /B: Tyler Banks, Hunter Butler, Emily Gay, Anna Smith, Katy Spann, Ali ValenzuelaSSOPHOMORESAA/B: Skylah ObeeSSENIORSAA/B: Ashley Butler, Brandy Parker First Baptist Christian School Honor Rolls Franklin County Elementary SchoolFIRST GRADEAAll AA s: Cammie Rae Gilbert, Dezmonae Sanders, Jordan Barber, Josiah Friddle, Kamora Harris, Layla Dixon, Lilianna Michelle Joiner, Loghan Carver, Nathan Rotella, Robert Ernest Romero, Rosa Isabel Pascual Juan, Christian Daughtry, Christopher Creek, Kassidy Denney and Bradley Page.A A /B: Hunter Ard, Sy Bartlett, Dalton Kale Barrack, Serenity Cassell, Ayla Derico, Dominic Durbin, Nyashia Evans, Jasmine Gray, Sarah Marie Ham, Michael Hill, Sheldon James, Charity Larkin, Daniel Lively, Jesus PelicoLopez, Harmony Malone, Emmanuel Marcum, Adrionna Martin, Ajaylen McNair, Madison Millender, Asya Owens, Lester Owens, Ernest Romero, Christopher Russell, Shianne Shaw, Estela Peralta-Virbes and Shianne WardSSECOND GRADEAAll AA s: Lonnie ONeal, Chase Millender, Corbin Pritchard, Denim Chastain, Evan Faith Ogden, Hannah Creamer, Imani Ison, Nathaniel March, Onamae Millender, William Chipman, Xavier Glass, Mason Pace and Braden ShiverA A /B: Michelle Weisz, Mckenna Young, Aryauna Jade Benjamin, Logan Lee Bentley, Laelah Carranza, Denim Chastain, Marcus Clayton, Kaden Downing, Bradlynn Hutchins, Natalie Gibbens, Bricyn Kennedy, Kayleigh Leonard, Rebecca Mahon, Reid Nix, Emily Patterson, Erick Manuel Romero, Alonah Segree, Gavin Shelley, Jesse WhittedTTHIRD GRADEAAll AA s: Alondra Jimenez, Grace Carroll, Kylie Rudd and Lucy Edwards.A A /B: Aubree SwangoMoore, Autumn Loesch, Brittany Grace Lynn Wright, Cloey Malone, Emaleigh Segree, Emily Fichera, Ethan Shirley, Jaylan Prince, Jesse Parker Mock, Kaiden Faison, Kelsey Lynn Martina, Marissa Elizabeth Gilbert, Matthew Gordon, Parker Ryland Martina, Sarai Crumbliss, September Ferrell, Tashawn Jones, Tariah Jones, Ellis BilingsleyFOURTH GRADEAAll AA s: Casandra Gibbens, Rachel Rudd, Steven Garrison Cook,A A /B: Rebecca Shiver, Trinity Barron, Alexis Wheetley, Annie Smith, Ariel Andrews, Audry Yowell, Brantly Richards, Brendon Polous, Brianna Sutcliffe, Sydney Shuman, Christian Kyler Custer, Grace Patterson, JachobEarl Thompson, Kristen Chavonne Stancil, Larry Winchester, Maddison Whitten, Brooke ONeal, Michael Melton, Lee Roberts, Robert Nessly, Sarah Jalynn Segree, Savannah Sage BrannanFIfFTH GRADEAAll AA s: Charlee Winchester, Francisco Bernabe Juan, Hollie Larkin, Katie Newman, Hope Granger, Shirah Pelt, William Austin Gray, Tressie EdwardsA A /B: Blake Chastain, Destanie Rose Proctor, Ethan Anderson, Cole Shelley, Camron Evans, Stephen Malone, Tiauana Benjamin, Kerry Garner, Lorne Eli Whaley, Makayla VarnerFRESHMENAAll AA s: Astrid Ramirez, Holly Chambers, Jackson Copley, Jayla Alley, Kacey Howard, Ann Reeder, Melody Hateld, Thomas Copley, Tyanna Townsend, Allie Kirvin, Emily CrosbyA A /B: Alexis Segree, Bianca Huber, Chelsea Register, Emily Zingarelli, Eve Bond, Jaylon Gainer, Jill Diestelhorst, Kimberly Boone, Reese Hersey, Levi Spruill, Logan Crosby, Mallorie Shiver, Maxwell Davis, Mercedes Rice, Tia Cummings, Tyler Pendleton and Zachary MaySSOPHOMORESAA/B: Adam Hames, Amber Henning, Brandon Walker, Hunter Segree, Jacob Montgomery, Jacquelyn Ramsey, John White, Kendrick Hunter, Krista Martina, Maliek Rhodes, Dallas Shiver, Trinity Hardy, Ursula CountrymanJUNIORSAAll AA s: Aaliyah West, Austin Carter, Chaseon Taranto, Samantha Marxsen, Brooke Frye, A A /B: Amanda Anthony, Chandler White, Logan Allen, Myesha Campbell, Grant Smith, Robyn Segree, Tressie BuffkinSSENIORSAAll AA s: Amber Adkins, Austin Martina, Josie Turner, Lea Venable and Tevis Page.A A /B: Alex Causey, Ashley Carroll, Cameron White, Cynthia Duncan, Heather Holton, James Newell, James Harris, James Bailey, Jathan Martin, Jennifer Stratton, Leonard Ward, Logan McLeod, Morgan Mock, Myel DeCourcey, Samantha Everson, Shannon FullerSSIXTH GRADEAAll AA s: Kt NesslyA A /B: Brandon Farr, Chasity Ard, Chloe E Owens, Jacob Shirley, Jesse Adam Ray, Keondre Sewell, Mikel Register, Nicolas Hutchins, ShyneAdam Jace FairclothSSEVENTH GRADEAAll AA s: Jessica RuddA A /B: Aracely Gallegos, Beyla Walker, Charles Cassell, Hannah Hogan, Kiana Foley, Makenzie Shuman, Matthew Hunter Kelley, Melanie Collins, Michael Bentley, Peyton Millender, Fisher Edwards, Tonnor SegreeEEIGHTH GRADEAAll AA s: Josie KrissA A /B: Ana Aguilar, Chance White, Dalyn Sheridan, Jake Paterson, Marjorie Morrow, Matthew Turner, Morgan Anderson, Tylyn Gillikin Franklin County Middle School Franklin County High School

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 28, 2013 The Times | A15 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. 252 WEST PINE STREET. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650.00/MO. INCLUDES WATER AND ELECTRIC UP TO 200.00/MO.2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO 3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO 4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 39 CARLTO NS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1.4BR,3 BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDEDWITH BOAT SLIPwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4514078ExperiencedWaitress / CashierPositive Attitude a Must!Submit Resume to: PO Box 172 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 1117529 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS CaRPEnTERS MaCHInIST PIPE WELDERS X-RaY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace SalesSales RepsHalifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience.Territories Available In: Panama City Chipley Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendant (s). MARCIA M. JOHNSON, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 am., at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32329, on the 12th day of December, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 216 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SAID CITY IN GENERAL USE. This property is located at the street address of: 374 21ST AVENUE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 27, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 Email: docservice@ erwlaw.com IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if ,he time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. FILE # 8377ST-41040 November 21, 28, 2013 96605T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000254 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 107 Southern Blvd., Suite 203 Savannah, GA 31405 Plaintiff, vs. J. MARK MCGILL A/K/A MARK MCGILL, and MYRA MCGILL A/K/A MYRA B. MCGILL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Calhoun County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK B, RANGE 10, PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly known as: 501 AVENUE D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the 8th day of January, 2014, at 11 :00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must me a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96611T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 13000166CA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FNMA) Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 29, 2013, and entered in Case No. 13000166CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FNMA) is Plaintiff and FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 8th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: All that certain parcel of land situated in the County Franklin, State of Florida, being known and designated as Lot 15 Block A of BAYWOOD ESTATES (unrecorded): Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 17, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and run North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 17 (as monumented) a distance of 553.11 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along said South boundary 587.43 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 01 degrees 14 minutes 33 seconds East 413.23 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Baywood Drive, said point lying on a curve concave to the Southerly, thence run Easterly along said right-of-way boundary and along the arc of said curve with a radius of 419.16 feet, through a central angle of 21 degrees 57 minutes 46 seconds, for an arc distance of 160.67 feet, the chord of said arc being North 89 degrees 14 minutes 24 seconds East 159.69 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the point of tangency, thence run South 79 degrees 46 minutes 43 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 430.62 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 50 minutes 07 seconds West 347.44 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH a perpetual non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as described in Official Records Book 628, Page 488 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of October, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Rd, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates. com File No.: 13-00882 LBPS Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96613T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-75-CP Division_________ IN RE: ESTATE OF JACK EDWARD WHITE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jack Edward White, deceased, whose date of death was October 31, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 28, 2013. Personal Representative: Kimberly Dawn Robinson 4258A Maxwell Road Antioch, TN 37013 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96617T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA000061 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES B. MITCHELL, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated November 28, 2012 and pursuant to Order rescheduling foreclosure sale entered September 23, 2013, both entered in Case No. 192009CA 000061 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CHARLES B. MITCHELL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES B. MITCHELL N/K/A PATTY MITCHELL; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SGI LIMITED PARTNERSHIP; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby in FRANKLIN County, Florida, at 11AM, on the 12th day December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, RESORT VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Street Address: LOT 4 RESORT VILLAGE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 22nd day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy-Clerk If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding or other court service, program, or activity, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Requests for accommodations may be presented on this form, in another written format, or orally. Please complete the attached form and return it to: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4430 as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or other court activity. Submitted by: MOSKOWITZ, MANDELL, SALIM & SIMOWITZ, P.A. 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 Primary E-mail: relit@mmsslaw.com Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96625T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000271 SEC.:________ THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-45 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-45, Plaintiff, vs. HOYT THOMPSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012CA000271 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 Inside the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: THE SOUTHWESTERLY 90 FEET OF LOT 6 (OR THE 90 FEET OF SAID LOT NUMBER 6 ADJOINING 13 STREET), AND ALL OF LOT 7, IN BLOCK 85, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT SAID CITY NOW IN GENERAL USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 21st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 ADOPT: AStay Home Mom, Prof Dad, Travel awaitCarolyn & Chris 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado.Continuous Garage SaleAntiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL71382 to 56654 Admin/ClericalPart Time ReceptionistBusy law firm seeking PT Receptionist. Send resumes to PO Box 327 Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34272996 Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route DriverAverage 10 stops. Home base Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID# 34272333Text FL72333 to 56654 Admin/ClericalFRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENTPosition Title:Library Assistant/Permanent/Part TimeClosing Date: 12/11/13 Annual Salary: $10.00 hour/26.00 hours per week Contact: Anne Birchwell, Director Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Rd. Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone (850) 670-8151 Remit Applications to : Franklin County Clerk of Courts 33 Market Street /Suite 203 Apalachicola, FL 32320 The Franklin County Board of commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required; Ability to operate library equipment, i.e. copiers, faxes, scanning; Customer service, sequencing skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work in a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Qualifications High School Diploma. Associates or Bachelors preferred. Library experience helpful. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and flexible. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards are necessary. Assignment will require travel/work at both library branches. Web Id 34273522 Text FL73522 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler Caregiversare needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/ AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34273112 Text FL73112 to 56654 Medical/HealthFranklin Co. Domestic Violence CounselorFor Refuge House Region 1. Franklin County. If youre interested, please visit our website at: www.refugehouse.com to see the postion description. Contact Charlotte Arons at 850-922-6062 for information. Web ID 34271630 Sales/Business Dev.Commissioned Sales PositionExperienced, FL licensed Real Estate sales associate to take over 100 leads for Carrabelle & Lanark Village, MUST know Carrabelle real estate market & live in the area, some closing support & training as needed. Contact John Shelby, Broker St. George Island Realty 850-899-0108 Web Id 34273009 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL71777 to 56654 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-227-7234 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom handicap and nonhandicap units. Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer Text FL72436 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft, L/P Opt, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Proof of income required. 954-816-7004 Text FL71079 to 56654 St. George Island, 3 Br 2 Bath, Furnished Contemporary Home, with Gulf View, 12 month Lease, $1,600 mo, w/o utilities, 813-631 0344 3 Bdrm, 1 Bath Mobile Home. $600 per month 622 Ridge Rd Eastpoint 850-653-5763 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $73,000. Call (850) 524-1257 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#249957$129,000StGeorgeIslandSECONDTIERLOTLocatedonthesouthsideofEastGulfBeachDrive,directly onthebikepath,onlyonelotawayfromthecornerof6th Streetforquickbeachaccess,thislotis1/3acre,measuring 100x150,buildnoworholdasinvestment. ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#250325$95,000ApalachicolaCLASSICHISTORICCOTTAGEReadyforrenovationanduseasabusinessorhome,heart pineooring,walls,andceilingsthroughout,rarelyfound metalshingleroof,HistoricNorthside,cornerHighway98 and10thStreet,oncehometoCaptainRobinWalbridgeof theHMSBounty. OurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection), DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast MLS#249258$139,000 31RexBuzzettSt. Apalachicola,FL32320 PRICEREDUCEDonthisnicelyremodeled3 bedroom/2bathhomeinaquietareaofApalachicola sittingon4citylots.Greatpropertyfor1sttimehome buyerorinvestment.MarySeymour,JeffGallowayRealEstate 850-728-8578 MLS#249088$275,000 401St.JamesAve.#10 Carrabelle,FL32322 Fisherman'sGetaway!Beautiful2bedroom/2bath unitinRiversideatCarrabelle.Unitcomeswith adesignatedboatslipwith10,000lb.boatlift. Currentlytheleastexpensiveriverfronttownhome availableinCarrabelle..MarySeymour,JeffGallowayRealEstate 850-728-8578 BRINGANOFFER! By Tevis PageSpecial to the Times Last week was a doozy. Students and teachers were participating in a school wide door contest for Parent Appreciation Day on Thursday, Nov. 21. A myriad of parents made appearances and the kids loved it! Yearbook put together slideshows to showcase what the activities the students have participated in since the beginning of the year. Along with the parents appreciation, progress reports went out. Many students were surprisingly pleased, while some were disheartened. It is almost scary to know that the semester is winding to an end. As last week drew to a screeching halt, the high school cheerleaders threw an amazing pep rally. Basketball and soccer players were presented before the reenactment of the cowboys and Indians. The cheerleaders were Indians and Sammy the Seahawk was the cowboy. It was such a great way to end the week. Now this week is short and full of quizzes and tests. It is amazing how when there is a short week, how much more work you have to do. Even though we are not looking forward to the tests, we are looking forward to the fiveday weekend. Thanks, Seahawks!Progress reports, pep rally and 5-day break HAWK TALKTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Benjamin Franklin unsuccessfully proposed what bird to be our national symbol? Eagle, Turkey, Pigeon, Swan 2) Thanksgiving is currently observed in the U.S. on what number Thursday in November? 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th 3) What year did the Pilgrims rst come to North America? 1492, 1510, 1620, 1776 4) Which John was rst governor of the Plymouth Colony? Smith, Carver, Standish, Adams 5) What was the 1st colonial agreement forming a government, the Mayower what? Charter, Declaration, Compact, Ordinance 6) Which William served as religious leader of the Plymouth Colony? Penn, Brewster, Hawthorne, Poe 7) What was the Native Americans clothing mainly made from during this era? Tobacco leaves, Water lilies, Animal skins, Tree bark 8) What Plymouth military advisor was remembered in Longfellows poem, The Courtship of? Horatio Alger, Jack Smith, George Strait, Miles Standish 9) Who mainly cared for the Pilgrims beer kegs on their New World journey? Samuel Adams, John Alden, Jacob Astor, John Smith 10) What Patuxet Indian saved the rst Pilgrims from starving? Pinto, Wampano, Squanto, Simba 11) A wild turkey has a eld of vision of about how many degrees? 170, 220, 270, 320 12) About how many tons does the real Plymouth Rock weigh? 2, 4, 6, 8 13) A pumpkin is perhaps described as a? Fruit, Vegetable, Protein, starch 14) What state produces the most pumpkins? Florida, Georgia, Texas, Illinois ANSWERS 1) Turkey. 2) 4th. 3) 1620. 4) Carver. 5) Compact. 6) Brewster. 7) Animal skins. 8) Miles Standish. 9) John Alden. 10) Squanto. 11) 270. 12) 4. 13) Fruit. 14) Illinois. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com MaARINE laLAB OffFFERS DEC. 4 OYStTER wWORkKShHOPAn Introduction to Oyster Culture Gear and Suppliers Workshop will be 1-4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab, 3618 Coastal Highway 98, St. Teresa, The introductory workshop is being offered by the University of Florida IFAS Cooperative Extension Service in partnership with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Aquaculture. Topics to be introduced in this introductory workshop on intensive oyster cultivation are hands-on discussion of oyster culture gear types advantages, disadvantages, costs, and considerations for siting, deployment, and operational management; where to buy culture gear and oyster seed; information on suppliers; and an overview of oyster aquaculture activities in Louisiana. The workshop is free. To ensure there are enough handouts available, conrm your attendance with Portia Sapp, FDACS Division of Aquaculture, 488-5471, Portia. Sapp@FreshfromFlorida.com; or Leslie Sturmer, UF IFAS Shellsh Aquaculture Extension Program, 352-543-5057, LNST@u.edu.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, November 28, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Board frets over capital outlay funds By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com As it has watched revenues decrease and expenditures remain high, the Franklin County School Board is taking a closer look at how much in capital outlay funds it plans to transfer this year to the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. No nal decision has been made, but there has been talk of cutting back by as much as half the 5 percent annual allocation, which this year would amount of $82,126 if the full amount were shared. At the Nov. 7 meeting, the board reviewed a report from Shannon Venable, director of nancial services, that detailed how much has been brought in and spent over the last three years of the half-mill capital monies. Each year, the district spends about $1.5 million for payment on the long-term loan that funded the construction of the consolidated school. In 2010-11, the district spent another $930,000, so expenditures that year exceeded revenue by about a half-million dollars. In 2011-12, the district spent $4.36 million on capital improvement projects, almost $1.5 million more than revenue. Last year, expenditures of $2.1 million exceeded revenue by about $400,000. Still, the fund balance as of July 2013 stood at about $3.5 million, about equally split in unspent money from the 201112 and 2012-13 scal years. Venable said based on the district’s “First-In, FirstOut” accounting method, the money rst received will be spent rst, so she projects that during the upcoming scal By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com WATERSOUND — The St. Joe Co. announced an agreement Nov. 7 to sell more than twothirds of its Northwest Florida landholdings. The agreement outlines the sale of 382,834 acres of rural timberland to Utah-based company AgReserves Inc. for $565 million, leaving St. Joe with about 184,000 acres of land, primarily between Tallahassee and Destin. “This sale of timberland will help the company concentrate on its core business activity of real estate development in Northwest Florida,” St. Joe Chief Executive Of cer Park Brady said in a company news release. “The proceeds from the sale will provide the company with signi cant liquidity and numerous opportunities to create long-term value for our shareholders.” The 380,000 acres — almost half the size of Bay County — to be sold include a majority of the company’s timberlands in Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla counties. The transaction would not include any of St. Joe’s existing resort, residential or commercial real estate developments or any sites that might be used for similar developments in the future, according to St. Joe. One of the company’s most recent endeavors includes partnership in Pier Park North, a roughly 360,000-square-foot shopping center on U.S. 98 across from Pier Park in Panama City Beach. The development is slated to open next spring. By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — The rst wave of relief is on its way after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the form of $15.7 million along the Panhandle, of cials announced Nov. 14. Projects to be funded in Franklin County include Apalachicola Bay oyster restoration, elimination of light pollution on sea turtle nesting beaches and enhanced assessment for recovery of Gulf of Mexico sheries. “This is a big step in helping industries that have been particularly hard hit by the oil spill and the economy,” said U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida. “Hopefully we can do a lot more in the next few years.” Over the next ve years, $356 million will go toward state and federal projects in Florida that are developed by the agencies, according to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. The announcement represents the initial obligation of funds available to support 22 projects in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas from the rst payments received by the Gulf Fund. “This is the rst release,” said Doc Kokal, director of community relations with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. “There will be others this year.” Kokal said within the next few months, the next round of funds will start, and decisions on those projects will be decided during the summer. Once the U.S. Department of Justice releases the funds to the Oyster industry to see $4.19 million DEEPWATER HORIZON SETTLEMENT PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Despite windy frigid conditions, Apalachicola watermen toiled all day to move the Irish Town II out of the channel. On the right, diver Marty Davis can be seen attaching rope to the Irish Town II. Below, friends and family of Kenneth Martina, owner of Irish Town II and III, watched from the dock as the workers struggled to move the big boat. St. Joe sells 380,000 acres in $565 million deal INSIDE Pilot questions St. Joe ag exemption, A6 IRISH TOWN II CAPSIZES Crews working to salvage vessel By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Disaster was narrowly averted Sunday when a shrimp boat capsized in Apalachicola, forcing her crew to swim to safety. At about 5:30 a.m., Dale Davis and Kevin Martina set out for a day’s work on the bay in the Irish Town II, a shrimp boat owned by Martina’s brother Kenneth. The watermen paused in the channel directly in front of Caroline’s Dining on the River restaurant and began to lower the outrigger arms of the trawler, walking them gradually down when a gust of wind caught the doors and capsized the boat. NOAA forecaster Claudia McDermott said the wind was at 19 knots with gusts of 24 knots at the time the 43-foot Irish Town II was overturned. Davis and Kevin Martina clung to the boat brie y, but driven by the cold, they swam to shore, climbing out of the river at Leavin’s Seafood. They called for help and received a ride back to their vehicles at Scipio Creek. The Irish Town II rapidly took on water and sank in the channel, creating an impediment to navigation. Kenneth Martina arrived on the scene about 7 a.m. in his second shrimp boat, the Irish Town III. He was joined on the scene by Capt. Arthur Hollenbeck in his shrimp boat Classy Lady. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Of cer Steven Cook, who was on the scene observing the attempt to Shrimp boat sinks Talk about soccer! A11 VOL. 128 ISSUE 31 See BOAT A2 See BOARD A13 See ST. JOE A6 See OYSTER A6 Apalachicola Christmas celebration Friday The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29. Santa will arrive on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, where he will hear children’s Christmas wishes, and carolers will sing. The Raney House Museum will be decorated in holiday greenery and open late for tours that tell about the city’s early history. Lanark Boat Club to host Saturday bazaar The Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holiday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info, call Janet at 697-2587. Saturday tea to bene t animals On Saturday, Nov. 30, the Bowery Art Gallery and Studio, 149 Commerce St. in Apalachicola, will host an afternoon tea from 4-6:30 p.m. featuring a trunk show of wearable art. Featured artists include Elaine Kozlowsky and Ann Seaton, who will showcase crochet and knits, and Tracy Jones and Georgia and Debbi Clifford with their handcrafted jewelry. Light refreshments will be served. Five percent of all sales will bene t the Franklin County Humane Society. Main Street mixer Saturday On Saturday, Nov. 30, Historic Apalachicola Main Street will host a mixer for area businesses and residents from 6-8 p.m. at the Center for History, Culture and the Arts, 86 Water St. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and refreshments will be provided. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A15

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A number of fundraisers are in the works to benefit the county library system. On Nov. 13, the advisory board for Franklin County Public Library welcomed three newly elected mem bers: Melonie Inzetta of Eastpoint, Linda Thurman of St. George Island and Kath leen Oman of Carrabelle. Returning is Treasurer Uta Hardy of Apalachicola. Anna Carmichael gave a presentation on fundrais ing efforts. Ongoing is the sale of personalized bricks and pavers. The “Souper Book and Bread Sale” will happen again in 2014. In the spring will be a third annual Putt Putt golf tournament at the Red Pirate; weekend book sales are planned at Sometimes It’s Hotter on St. George Island. Anyone wishing to donate books or audiobooks for the sale can drop them off from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Fri day at the library’s adminis trative offices at 160 Hickory Dip Road in Eastpoint. Carmichael also said she hopes to make the county library more of a presence in both Apalachicola and Carrabelle and plans to place booths at more county events. Library Board Chair man Denise Butler said the nomination committee interviewed 11 applicants for the job of county library director and recommended Anne Birchwell to the coun ty commission. Birchwell was hired Nov. 18. Joyce Estes, who spear headed fundraising ef forts for the new Eastpoint branch, said though the interior of the new Hickory Dip Branch in Eastpoint is complete, major work re mains on the landscape and parking lot. In collaboration with the Apalachicola Bay and River keeper, a nature trail is planned for the seven acres of land surrounding the library. Ornamental plant ings also are envisioned in front of the building and around the parking lot. Es tes said she hopes some kind of pervious surface can be used for the parking lot and entry road to minimize runoff. Margot Posten, a coastal training specialist for the Apalachicola National Es tuarine Research Reserve, gave a presentation on a rain gardens. This technol ogy allows runoff from im pervious surfaces, such as the roof of a building to be stored for use in irrigation. Posten said roughly 30,000 gallons of water would run off the 5,000-square-foot roof of the library annually. In a rain garden, the plants benefit from this run off and purify the water be fore it re-enters the ground water system. The garden will cost between $15,000 and $30,000 to construct. Posten said she already has rain barrels, donated by Coca-Cola, that can be used to collect runoff at the library. She said a rain garden could feature educational kiosks on topics like water pollution, rain barrels and plant based purification systems. “My goal is to con tinue enhancing the prop erty and maintain the area in back of the building as protected wetlands,” Estes said. The library sits in the watershed for Indian Creek, which empties into the bay through Indian Creek Park. Anne Birchwell, a veteran of Franklin County’s library system, is the new library director. After a nal meeting on Nov. 18, the nominating committee of the Franklin County library board rec ommended Birchwell for the posi tion. Chairman Denise Butler said she was one of 11 applicants. The committee consisted of Son dra Furbee of Apalachicola, Kate Agu iar of St. George Island and Christine Hinton of Lanark Village. Early in the nomination process, Butler stressed the importance of having countywide representation on the team that would choose the new library director. On Nov. 19, Butler told county commissioners the committee’s recommendation, and they voted unanimously to promote Birchwell to her new position. The audience erupted into applause when the mo tion passed. Before the promotion, Birchwell was employed full-time as an assis tant librarian. She has worked for the library system for more than six years. Most recently, she has been employed at the Carrabelle branch. Birchwell, who lives in Carra belle, will divide her time between both branches. Before working for the county library, she was employed by Franklin County Literacy and the Wilderness Coast Library. Birchwell holds a bachelor’s de gree in library science and has com mitted to completing her master’s degree over the next two years. Birchwell, who will begin her new job on Monday, replaces Glenda Ond racek, who retired Oct. 31. The county commission has budgeted $35,000 for the director’s position. Butler said the library board would now advertise for a part-time assistant librarian. — By LOIS SWOBODA retrieve the boat, said he did not see or smell any spilled fuel during the at tempted salvage operation. The two boats and their crews la bored most of the day Sunday to move the trawler onto shallower bottom and out of the channel. Diver Marty Davis braved the frigid water to attach lines to the distressed vessel. For much of the day Sunday, a crowd of onlookers both on the docks and in Caroline’s watched as Kenneth Martina, Hollenbeck and their crews used their skill and knowledge to shift the boat’s position. At times, the sal vagers appeared to be walking on the water as they stepped onto the side of the sunken vessel. At about 2 p.m., pulling in tandem, the Classy Lady and Irish Town III attempted to drag the sunken boat out of the channel and seemed to be making good progress when the ropes snapped. After heavier line was obtained, a second attempt was successful. The side of the Irish Town II was just vis ible above the choppy surface of the river on Monday morning. Montez Davis, wife of Dale Davis, said her husband and the Martinas were on the water working to salvage the Irish Town II at about 10 a.m. Monday. Working in tandem, the Classy Lady and the Irish Town III hauled the Irish Town II into shallower water.LOIS SS WOBODA | The Times BOAT from page A1 County libraries plan fundraisers Birchwell appointed new library directorAA NNIE BB IRCHWE llLL

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, November 28, 2013 197 Highw ay 98 Eastpoint (850) 670-4334 1 0 % % % & 0 1 0 1 .+ t ak e an additional 45 % & 45 45 .' ,& 45 45 45 % % HO T BUYS of r egular pr ices sale pr ices & e v en discontinued pr ices! BLA CK FRID A Y ONL Y excludes iComf or t 0 1 0 1 0 1 % % Y ONL Y A FRID CK BLA Dahlonega 93” sof a $ 298 r eg. 399.95 113789 w hile supplies last m atching lo v eseat & r oc k er r ecliner av aila ble lo w est pr ice e v er xbo x 360 Kinect g aming system $ 528 r eg. $659.95 110461 g ames may v ar y 46” L E D 115440 $ 528 r eg. $859.95 HO T BUY 3 5 % 5 3 5 3 % % % % % % % 5 3 5 3 % OFF T HO T HO T HO T HO T HO BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 5 3 5 3 5 3 % % % % % % % % O VER 13.3” ta blet $ 378 r eg. $499.95 887003 % ,"($' ( '! $!' %'AZPEN HO T BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 3 0 % 0 3 0 3 % % % OFF FREE ta blet case $49.95 v alue HO T BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 2 0 % 0 2 0 2 % % % OFF HO T BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 2 5 % 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 % % OFF 30 % % % & J^^ e 30 30 30 .' ,& dining rooms & dinettes 45 % % % & J^^ e 45 45 45 .' ,& adult & y outh bedrooms HO T BUY BUY BUY 2 5 % 5 2 5 2 % % OFF BUY BUY 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 5 2 o v er 11.6” touch notebook 115398 $ 458 r eg. $649.95 $.! + 99 8 # 13 + 92 7 $ ' + 99 0;38 + 92 3; 13 93/23 17” la ptop 115399 $ 748 r eg. $999.95 kids r ecliner s star ting a t $ 99.95 112167 115337 Mossy Oak pr incess John Deer e 105648 HO T BUY kitchen play set $ 59.95 110641 bo ys A TV $ 199.95 115213 g ir l s A TV $ 199.95 115212 curr ent w all ar t, mirror s silk tr ees or als & ta bletop decora tiv e items 35 % sav e up to $ 638.93 & accent chair $ 98 r eg. 149.95 # w hile suppli es last SPECIA L #)$ % "#(" % HO T BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 3 4 % 4 3 4 3 4 3 % % % % 4 3 % 4 3 % OFF HO T BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY 4 5 % 5 4 5 4 5 4 OFF r egular set pr ice m y r st playho use $ 99.95 115226 25 cu. ft. 318 2 93 /; / 3 913
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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, November 28, 2013 A Section Special to The Times The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce has announced its participation in this year’s Small Business Saturday, taking place Saturday, Nov. 30. Small Business Saturday is a day dedicated to strengthening the community by supporting local small businesses. Now in its fourth year, Small Business Saturday serves as the ceremonial kickoff to the holiday shopping season for small businesses across the United States. Small Business Saturday supporters reported spending more than $5.5 billion at independently owned businesses last year. The Apalachicola Bay Chamber recognizes the importance of supporting small business in Franklin County, the jobs they help create and the culture they instill in local communities. According to the U.S. Small Businesses Administration, as of 2012, small businesses nationwide accounted for 64 percent of net new private-sector jobs created and 99.7 percent of all employer rms. Nov. 30 marks the fourth annual Small Business Saturday, a day to support the local businesses that create jobs, boost the economy and preserve neighborhoods around the country. Small Business Saturday was created in 2010 in response to small business owners’ most pressing need: more customers. As of Dec. 31, 2012, more than 3.2 million Facebook users “liked” the Small Business Saturday pages. Just last year, 350-plus advocacy organizations, 150-plus corporations and elected of cials in all 50 states and Washington D.C., declared their support for Small Business Saturday. The following proclamation was issued out of New York City on Oct. 3, 1789, by the thenpresident of the United States of America George Washington. It wasn’t until 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday. Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his bene ts, and humbly to implore his protection and favor— and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness. Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the bene cent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be— That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks—for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation—for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war—for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed—for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted—for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us. and also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions— to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually—to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed—to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord—To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease of science among them and us—and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789. George Washington A THANKSGIVING POEM The 28th of November, 2013 we will celebrate Thanksgiving Day; The historical holiday began in 1620, and continues until today. We thank those courageous Pilgrims for our freedom of faith. It started when some devout English men defected from the United Kingdom. They left Southampton and sailed across the ocean on the May ower to the new world for religious freedom. The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock just before night; in a strange land where Indians had established squatters’ rights and de nitely didn’t want the white man on their site. The early settlers were hardy with nerves like leather; and they stood their ground hoping the Indians would mellow. But things got worse before they got better; until the natives came to realize these foreigners were nice fellows. In due time on a bright night under a harvest moon’s light; after an overdose of strong wine and some puffs on a peace pipe; they made friends of their foe, and staggered to their tents high as a kite. The next day, sick with a hangover, they went as agreed; to celebrate like blood brothers with a lavish feast. They brought a bounty from the elds, the hunters brought wild meat; and they set the table with all the vittles ready to eat. They gathered around the table in the crisp, cool weather; lifted their glass to honor their friendship forever; and gave thanks before they ate their rst meal together. Happy Thanksgiving, Mary Westberg By MARLENE WINTERS Special to the Times In a local restaurant this week, I saw an elderly lady reading the newspaper and put it down seemingly in disgust. I thought how true it is that every time you pick up a newspaper, all you read about is negativism, such as murder, hatred, AIDS, abuse, abortion, wars, storms, burnings and the list goes on and on. How nice it would be to pick up the morning paper and read something good for a change. But believe it or not, not everything is bad! There are still many things to be thankful for. Here are a few things I can think of: The privilege to worship God at home and at church. The air we breathe, a house to live in. A baby’s smile (Yes, some are still allowed to be born). A job I enjoy working at, the lovely strains of an orchestra. The look of appreciation radiating from an elderly person’s eyes whenever you do anything for them. The smell of a rose. The privilege of being able to see. I have a friend who was born without eye sockets. Being able to hear, smell, taste, feel and walk. The joy of visiting with friends. The look of utter joy from one of my piano students performing a piece at rst they thought was impossible. The thrill of riding the water log ride at Six Flags Over Texas. A considerate boss. The privilege of being a Christian and being proud of it. The joy of picking up the phone and saying hi to mom and dad. The opportunity of calling into the radio station in the early morning and voicing my opinion about different topics. The joy and fun of trying new recipes. The privilege of being married to a wonderful man for 28 years. The joy of having three children all in college now. Still having both parents alive, at ages 89 and 84. The squeal of delight from a child opening his Christmas present when it was exactly what he wanted. Being allowed in a restaurant to bow my head and offering prayer for my food. Listening and watching my 89year-old father sing bass in a quartet. The beauty in Kansas of the waves of golden wheat rippling in the wind knowing that soon I will grind some of that very wheat into our and then make my own bread with it. The joy of watching “Jumper Cable,” my seven pound Chihuahua dog play with our cat. Police protection. Having a doctor and hospital to go to whenever needed. The awesome sounds of a CD player. The privilege of sitting down to my piano and playing whatever I want to for my own enjoyment. Shall I name more? I certainly could. There is so much in our world today to be thankful for. It is true that we cannot avoid some of the negative things. But let us be grateful for the blessing we do enjoy! What are you thankful for? Marlene Winters resides in Spring eld, Mo., and is the sister of Lois Long, the former pastor of the Living Waters Assembly of God church. The rst Thanksgiving proclamation Page 4 First, replant the oyster beds This letter is in response to the articles published in the Apalachicola Times newspaper on Oct. 3 “Oystermen plead for help,” and on Oct. 17 “New oyster lease riles county.” First, it is no secret that the state of Georgia will continue to withhold more and more freshwater from the Apalachicola River, regardless of any civil litigation between the states. Second, oyster hatcheries and farming oysters only bene t the person growing and purchasing the oysters. They do nothing to help the public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay to reproduce oysters for harvesting on a long-term effect. Third, we don’t need our government of cials spending millions of taxpayer dollars to create program for scientists to study the water ecology, water science or oyster science in the Apalachicola Bay when we already know that many of the public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay are not producing a suf cient stock of oysters for harvesting during their seasonal term because they are being starved of the proper amount of freshwater needed from the Apalachicola River to consistently reproduce oysters. However, what would help the oystermen and the public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay to consistently reproduce oysters on a long-term effect is for our government of cials to create a program that would issue monetary payments to the oystermen on a steady basis to replant all of the public oyster beds closest to the freshwater owing from the tributaries of the Apalachicola River into the Apalachicola Bay. This would allow these public oyster beds a much better chance to receive a proper amount of freshwater from the Apalachicola River to reproduce oysters for harvesting during their seasonal term, when the Apalachicola River is owing at its lowest and highest water levels. At the same time, while the oystermen are harvesting oysters from those public oyster beds during their seasonal term, such would help the oysters on the other public oyster beds in the Apalachicola Bay that are being starved of freshwater not to be overharvested, and they would have a better chance to reproduce oysters for harvesting in the future. Lastly, this is not a x-all solution to the oyster industry in Franklin County, but it seems logical to me that we should concentrate rst on replanting, on a large scale, the public oysters beds in the Apalachicola Bay closest to the freshwater owing from the tributaries of the Apalachicola River to ensure that those oyster beds receive a proper amount of freshwater to reproduce oysters, when the Apalachicola River is owing at its lowest and highest water levels. Sincerely, Michael Wade Bar eld A native oysterman of Franklin County Nice to have happy feeling at library Thank you, Franklin County Commissioners, so much for promoting Anne Birchwell to the position of director of the two Franklin County public libraries. It is so nice to have a cohesive environment for both libraries to operate smoothly. It’s wonderful to have a happy feeling in the library after all the con ict. Again, thank you, commissioners, Sharon Rider Carrabelle Letters to the EDITOR What are you thankful for? Chamber supports Small Business Saturday

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The Times | A5 Thursday, November 28, 2013 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. NOV. 19 Billy Dalton, 38, Eastpoint, driving while license revoked habitual (FCSO) James E. West, 52, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) NOV. 20 Dylan E. Nunez, 22, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) Michael B. Stephens, 39, Carrabelle, failure to appear (FCSO) Kevin L. Williams, 22, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) NOV. 21 Justin D. Massey, 23, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Gary M. Engard, 56, Alligator Point, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) NOV. 22 Earl L. Carpenter, 33, Crawfordville, unemployment compensation fraud (FCSO) Jefferson A. Yancey, 22, Carrabelle, grand theft (FCSO) NOV. 23 Monica S. Stanton, 46, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) NOV. 24 Harry J. Hall, Jr., 34, Lanark Village, domestic battery, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver, possession of paraphernalia, burglary of a dwelling, criminal mischief and possession of cannabis (FCSO) Delegation hearing set for Monday The Franklin County Legislative Delegation will be holding a public hearing in Apalachicola, Florida, on Monday, Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. The hearing will be held in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 37 Forbes Street, Apalachicola. All residents and elected ofcials are invited to attend. This hearing will allow the citizens the opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments for the upcoming 2014 Legislative Session. For more information, call (850) 487-5003 or email Marcia Mathis at mathis. marcia@senate.gov Extra security planned for V V rooman Park On Nov. 19, Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender asked county commissioners for permission to purchase security cameras for Vrooman Park in Eastpoint. “We are continually having vandalism there,” she said. The park received more than $13,000 in repairs following damage from a waterspout this spring. Millender said 20 feet of the new fence was attened by a truck or four-wheeler earlier this month. Fortunately, parks and recreation had materials on hand that enabled the repairs to be done in-house. “It was the third time this year we’ve had vandalism, there,” Millender said. She said she had priced security cameras at $160 each. Commissioner Pinki Jackel suggested the sheriff’s ofce might have cameras on hand they could lend, but urged Millender to take whatever steps were needed to secure the property. “I move you do what you need to. A camera is cheaper than the equipment and repairs,” said Jackel. The motion passed unanimously. The commission also told Millender to ask the sheriff’s ofce to have patrols visit the park more frequently. Car seats, booster, safety belts save lives With the holidays approaching and plans for visiting family and friends in full swing, it’s a good time to remind everyone of the importance of using your seat belt while riding in a vehicle, including making sure children are properly secured in a car seat or booster seat. A recent seat belt survey by the Florida Department of Transportation shows that approximately 90 percent of drivers in Florida are using their seat belts. While the statistics are encouraging, unfortunately ten percent of Florida motorists are still not buckling up. “This time of year can be hectic and in our rush to get everything done, it can be easy to overlook some necessary safeguards,” said Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Executive Director Julie Jones. “Whether it’s a trip across town to go shopping or a trip across the state to see relatives, it’s important to take that extra minute before driving off to ensure that everyone in the vehicle is buckled up and secure for the journey.” Florida law requires the use of seat belts by drivers of motor vehicles and all children riding in a vehicle under the age of 18. FLHSMV and FDOT recommend: • Buckle Up. A seatbelt is your vehicle’s most important safety feature. • Use a car seat for children under age 3 for every trip, even if you are just going down the street. • Make sure all car and booster seats you use are crash-tested and federally-approved. • Select a car seat based on your child’s age and size, and always follow the manufacturer’s directions. • Keep children in the back seat, at least through age 12. When used with THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 F ea tu r i ng L o c a l A r t i s a n s L a n ar k V i l l a g e B o a t C l u b 9 a m ~ 1 p m LU N C H So u p S a n d w i c h D r i n k & D e s s e r t $ 5 T i c k e t s $ 1 0 C a l l Ja n e t f o r f u r t h e r i n f o a t 6 9 7 2 5 8 7 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Franklin County’s unemploy ment rate has held steady at 5 percent for the past two months, as the workforce continues to shrink going into the offseason. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the county’s jobless rate for September and October stood at 5.0 percent, a drop of two-tenths of 1 percent, down from 5.2 percent in August. The unemployment rolls shed 25 people since the summer, dropping from 283 to 258 people in search of work. This decrease in unemployment occurred as the workforce shrank by 287 people, from 5,462 to 5,175. The current work force comprises 200 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,375 workers and the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 6.2 percent. Franklin County’s September/ October jobless picture placed it at sixth best in the state, behind Monroe County, at 3.8 percent, Walton at 3.9 percent, Okaloosa, at 4.4 percent, Alachua at 4.7 percent and St. Johns at 4.9 per cent. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates have relatively high proportions of government employment. Franklin had the lowest job less rate in the tri-county Gulf Coast Workforce region, which averaged 6.0 percent in Septem ber/October 1.6 percentage points lower than the region’s year ago rate of 7.6 percent, and 0.6 per centage points below the Oct. 2013 state rate of 6.6 percent. Bay County’s jobless rate fell from 6.3 to 6.0 percent, while Gulf County’s dropped from 6.9 to 6.7 percent. Out of a labor force of 96,935, there were 5,840 unem ployed Gulf Coast residents. “Locally, we are seeing posi tive indicators including growing job opportunities in the manufac turing sector,” said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. “We are also seeing many jobs being cre ated as the retail industry ramps up their seasonal hiring.” The Panama City metro area lost the most jobs over the year of all metro areas in Florida. The metro area also lost the most jobs in trade, transportation, and utili ties and leisure and hospitality. Jobless rate hits 5% as workforce shrinks seat belts, air bags work well to protect teenagers and adults. However, air bags can be very dangerous to children, particularly those riding in rearfacing car seats, and to preschool and young school-aged children who are not properly restrained. • Soon-to-be parents should buy their infant car seat before having the baby so you are ready to bring home the new addition to your family safely. • Replace a car seat if the vehicle has been in a moderate to severe crash to ensure a continued high level of protection. More information and additional safety tips can be found at http://www.hsmv.gov/ fhp/CPS/ or http://www. dot.state..us/safety/2APrograms/O O ccupantProtection.shtm Law BRI eE F sS Arrest R epEP ORT Law Enforcement

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 B F S D O ST H L P r o d u c t s u p t o S c a g M o w e rs u p t o S n a p p e r M o w e rs u p t o N e w G o l f C a r t s u p t o U s e d G o l f C a r t s u p t o $ 6 0 o $ 9 0 0 o $ 4 0 0 o $ 5 0 0 o $ 2 0 0 o S T J O E R E N T A L L NUR S E R Y A N D S UP P L Y 7 0 61 st ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 2 11 2 F R I D AY N OV th S A TU R D A Y N O V th E H S O l d F a s h i o n C h r i s t m a s # # B # # M P S K " $ $ $ For more information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at 850-653-9419 www .apalachicolabay .org + ) ( ) ( * $ * #' #% Countywide Holiday Events 3 … g ~g mwym„~g 8w‰ y‹ € g ‹ 8q~qk‰ g y„‚ L„ ”A    :q mA Dy‹ „‰ ym :„ • ‚  „ • ‚ 3 … g ~g mwym„~g .org .apalachicolabay www 850-653-9419 at Chamber Bay Apalachicola the contact information, more For CONCER T SERIES Apalachicola Area Historical Society Presents NFWF, they will be transferred to the group’s recipients and then “partners” who will per form the work, Kokal said. The University of Florida and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will receive about $4.19 million over five years for the Apalachicola Bay Oys ter Restoration project. On Nov. 19, the FWC’s Jim Estes said the grant will be used to test different meth ods to make oyster reefs more resilient and produc tive. The grant will identify nine sites, 1 to 2 acres in size, around the bay where dif ferent densities of shell will be put out, and the resulting spatfall and oyster recovery will be measured. County Planner Alan Pierce said this study will give FWC a better idea of how much shell to use in different areas, if and when a much larger $52 million restoration project receives funding. The FWC also will receive about $1.5 million for an elim ination of light pollution on sea turtle nesting beaches project along Walton, Gulf and Franklin counties. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will be receiving $3 million for an enhanced assessment for recovery of Gulf of Mexico fisheries. The monies also will be spent on comprehensive Panhandle Coastal Bird Conservation ($3.2 million), stormwater improvements in Pensacola ($2.1 million) and management and restoration of coastal habitat in Pensaco la Bay ($1.7 million). In early 2013, a U.S. Dis trict Court approved two plea agreements resolving certain criminal charges against BP and Transocean related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Provisions within the pleas direct a total of $2.544 billion to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation over a five-year period. The announcement reects the goals outlined in a company ling with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission earlier this year, which disclosed St. Joe was exploring opportunities to sell timberland. The form cited rural land holdings as “not stra tegic to the company’s core real estate development activities.” St. Joe ofcials said the ling that the company has been grad ually moving away from timber farming and paper production for the past two decades. The purchasing company, AgReserves, is a tax-paying af liate of the Mormon Church and has been involved in agri cultural operations in Florida for more than 60 years. AgReserves Board Chairman Paul Genho said the company in tends to continue using the land for agricultural purposes. “AgReserves has demon strated its commitment to wise land stewardship and prudent resource management during more than 60 years of ranch ing and agricultural opera tions in east central Florida,” Genho said. “We will apply that same commitment and exper tise to managing the property we are acquiring in Florida’s Panhandle.” The announcement also was praised by Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, who said the agreement re ects a long-term investment in the state’s timber and cattle industries. “I’m proud that a global agriculture company, like AgReserves Inc., continues to believe in Florida as the right place to grow their business,” Putnam said. The transaction is expected to close early next year. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com At the Nov. 19 county commis sion meeting, Mark Nobles, a pi lot, told commissioners he has noticed something missing. Trees. Nobles, manager of Carra belle’s Thompson Field, said he has own over the county on a regular basis for 32 years. He said when The St. Joe Company closed its Port St. Joe paper mill in 1996, it gated the access roads to its vast landholdings, deny ing public access to the private property. “At the time, I thought it was due to illegal dumping,” Nobles said. “In retrospect, I believe they really didn’t want the public to know what was going on.” Nobles said the company has harvested large amounts of tim ber from the property since the gates were put in place and not replanted the land with trees. “There’s a lot of trees miss ing that can’t be seen from the road,” Nobles said. He questioned whether the land should qualify for the green belt agricultural tax exemption under Florida law, because it is not being replanted, According to a webpage maintained by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation, this law says properties that are bonade ag ricultural operations are taxed according to the “use value” of those operations, rather than the “development value.” Landowners qualifying for the greenbelt exemption pay a frac tion of what other landowners in the same area are assessed. The St. Joe Company now pays about $122 an acre in taxes annually in Franklin County, according to Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper. Nobles said he has been un able to determine for how long land continues to qualify for the exemption when a crop is har vested but not replanted. Nobles suggested to com missioners that an audit be per formed to determine if the coun ty is owed back taxes and wheth er a portion of the land recently purchased by AgReserves, a Utah land holding rm, should be eligible for the exemption. He said land in eight counties, including Franklin, has been stripped of trees. “Nobody in the property ap praiser’s ofce has had access to the land. You don’t notice this if you don’t y over it,” Nobles said. He offered to take any of the commissioners on a ight to view the empty land. Chairman Cheryl Sanders said she shared Nobles’ con cerns and that she had brought up the greenbelt exemption dur ing rezoning hearings when St. Joe proposed to develop much of their land in eastern Franklin County. Sanders said company rep resentatives maintained they continued to be entitled to the exemption until the land was ac tually developed. Development plans later were canceled. Commissioners voted unani mously to ask Skipper to perform an audit and determine if the status of the land has changed. In a telephone interview Monday, Skipper said she has thus far determined that as long as St. Joe shows intent to replant the pine trees or to enter into an other agricultural venture, they remain entitled to the exemp tion. She said AgReserves would receive the benet of the exemp tion for 2014, but to continue to receive it after that, they would need to apply on their own to the property appraiser’s ofce and prove their intent to continue the agricultural use of the land. ST. JOE from page A1 OYS TT ER from page A1 Pilot questions St. Joe ag exemption “There’s a lot of trees missing that can’t be seen from the road ... Nobody in the property appraiser’s ofce has had access to the land. You don’t notice this if you don’t y over it.” Mark Nobles manager, Thompson Field

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, November 28, 2013 TA Y L O R S BU I L D I NG S U P P L Y S I G N A T U R E H O U S E W A R E D I S H E S 2 0 % O F F L A R G E ST S E L E CT I O N B e s t p r i c i n g i n t h e c o u n t y 1 5 % O FF A l l R e g u lar P r i c e d It e m s 1 8 qt Ne s c o Roa s t e r O v e n $ 5 9. 9 9 T o ols et Lo g b a sk et $ 5 9. 9 9 S a n P i e t r o( 3 p c ) H i gh B is t r o $ 16 9 9 9 T r a v el M ug Se t $ 9. 9 9 8 p c E c o l u t i o n N o n -st i c k Co o k w a r e $ 5 9. 9 9 4 p c Mi l w a uk e e T o ols et $ 2 74 9 9 A ll C h r i s t m a s T r e e s S o l d a t o u r C o s t N O R A I N CH E C K S ! y t n u o e c h n t g i n i c i r t p s e B y t n u o e c h n t g i n i c i r t p s e B P a t to n U t ili t y H e a t e r $ 19 9 9 2 5% O F F A L L P LAN T S H U R R Y I N W H IL E S U PPL I E S L A ST B L A C K FR I D A Y S A L E ! E IL H N W Y I R R U H F R I D A Y 2 8 7 : 3 0 5 : 3 0 & S A T U R D A Y 2 9 | 8 : 0 0 5 : 0 0 p m

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A8 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com On Friday, Nov. 15, a score of friends and admirers gathered in Benedict Hall to bid farewell to Sue Cronkite. Cronkite has been a xture at the Apalachicola library for three years, organizing historical material, aiding in research and preparing documents for publication. Cronkite worked on Jimmie Nichols’ ‘Apalachicola Diary.’ While at the library SHE compiled an index of people referenced in books on the area to aid in genealogical research. “That’s a real accomplishment for the library,” said librarian Caty Greene. Most recently she has been working on “Apalachicola before 1861,” by retired University of Mississippi professor Harry P. Owens. The work was originally written as Owens’ doctoral dissertation at Florida State University, and is soon to be published jointly by the library and the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Cronkite has also worked on books with regional historian Marlene Womack. The candlelight supper was hosted by Greene and library board chair Susan Clementson. As the courses were served, each guest in turn told the story of their relationship with Cronkite and praised her for her patience, intelligence, diligence and compassion. A journalist for many years as she raised her family alone, Cronkite moved to Apalachicola around 2000 to be near her daughter Mary Lynn Rodgers. A former reporter and editor at the Birmingham News, she worked as a writer for the Times for a few years. She now plans to relocate to the Clearwater area where she will live next door to her daughter Alda Thomas and grandchildren Erin Rodgers, and Michael and Merri Rose Fink. Cronkite said she would undertake a new adventure. She plans to write a book about a woman who hosts her own wake. She said she will frequently return to Apalachicola and plans to release the novel here once it is published. C H R I S T M A S K IT T E N S W hat d o t a b b y c at s an d C h r i s t m a s ha v e i n c o m m o n ? M o r e t han y o u m a y t h i n k T hat i s w h y w e a r e m a k i n g o u r v e r y sp e c ia l t a b b y k i t t ens a v a il ab le f o r ad o p t i o n t h r o ugh t he mon t h of D e c e m b e r f o r o n l y $ 5 0 0 0 R e a d o n. . O n e o f t h e m o s t d i s t i n c t i v e f e at u r e s s e e n i n c o m m o n o n a l l t a b b y c at s i s t h e M o n t h e i r f o r e h e a d s L e g e n d ha s i t t hat t h e o r i g i n o f t h e M ha s t o d o w i t h t h e M a r y an d t h e t a b b y c at i n t h e m an g e r I t s e e m s t hat t h e b a b y J e s u s w a s c o l d an d f u s si n g an d M a r y a sk e d t h e m an g e r an i m a l s t o m o v e i n c l o s e r t o w a r m h i m T h e m an g e r w a s si m p l y t o o sm a l l t o a c c o m p l i sh t hat b u t a a l i t t l e t a b b y c at c am e i n n e s t l e d n e x t t o t h e b a b y an d c o m f o r t e d H i m w i t h p u r r i n g an d w a r m t h. M a r y w a s s o g r at e f u l sh e b e s t o w e d h e r o w n i n i t ia l M o n t h e c at s f o r e h e a d N o w t hat y o u k n o w h o w sp e c ia l t a b b y s r e a l l y a r e p l e a s e c o m e t o t h e a d o p t i o n c e n t e r an d a d o p t y o u r v e r y o w n C h r i s t m a s k i t t e n. W hat a b l e s si n g i t w o u l d b e f o r b o t h y o u r f am i l y an d t h e k i t t e n ookkMk S e e Y o u r Bu s in e s s Name a n d I n f o Her e f o r O N L Y $ 1 5 p e r w e ek $ 6 0 p e r m o n t h Ca l l T o d a y T H E F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y A D V I S O R Y B O A R D O F A D J U S T M E N T W I L L H O L D A P U B L IC H E A R I NG O N W E D N E S D A Y D E CE M B E R 4 2 0 1 3 A T 1 0 : 0 0 A M., I N T H E C O U N T Y C O M M I S S IO N M E E T I NG R O O M O F T HE F R A NK LI N C O U N T Y C O U R T H O U SE A NNE X TO C O N S I D E R T H E F O L L O W I NG V A R I A N CE S A P P E A L S A ND S P E C I A L E X CE P T IO N S: PU B L I C N O TI C E 1 C O N S I D E R A T I O N O F A R E Q U E S T F O R A V A R I A N C E T O C O N S T R U C T A S I N G L E F A M I L Y H O U S E A N D O P E N D E C K 2 5 F E E T I N T O T H E C R I T I C A L H A B I T A T Z O N E A N D 1 5 F E E T I N T O T H E F R O N T S E T B A C K L I N E O F F O F L A K E V I E W D R I V E O N P R O P E R T Y D E S C R I B E D A S L O T S 9 8 A N D 9 9 S O U T H E R N D U N E S S U B D I V I S I O N A L L I G A T O R P O I N T F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y F L O R I D A R E Q U E S T S U B M I T T E D B Y S T A N B R O W N A G E N T F O R X I N C H E N A N D J U D I T Y FO U R N IER BU Y ER A N D S EL L ER T H E B O A R D O F C O U N T Y C O M M I S S IO N E R S A C T I NG A S T H E B O A R D O F A D J U S T M E N T W I L L A D D R E S S T HI S R E Q U E S T A T T H E I R R E G U L A R M E E T I NG O N T U E S D A Y D E C E M B E R 1 7 2 0 1 3 P e r s o n s w is h i ng t o c o m m e n t m a y do s o i n p e r s o n o r i n w r it i ng t o t he F r a n k l i n C oun t y P l a nn i ng & Z o n i ng D e p a r t m e n t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e et S u it e 1 A p a l a c h i c ol a F L 3 2 3 2 0 T r a n s a c t i o n s o f t h is he a r i ng w i l l no t b e r e c o rde d p e r s o n s w is h i ng t o r e c o rd t he p r o c e e d i ng s m u s t m a k e t he ne c e s s a r y a r r a ng e m e n t s f o r r e c o rd i ng is Y e a r ’ s L o c a t i o n C o m i ng F r a s e r F i r 5 t o 10 Society LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Chester is 10 On Nov. 15, Chester Bacher celebrated his 10th birthday at the WaterStreet Hotel surrounded by several dozen of his closest friends. Light hors d’oeuvres and cocktails were served. (It’s OK. He’s 70 in dog years.) Chester is a well-known resident of St. George Island and will be familiar to many as the subject of an early Happy Endings column. He was adopted from the Franklin County Humane Society by Joe and Charolette Bacher. He has two canine siblings, Candy and Tamale who spent Friday evening at Happy Houndz in Eastpoint so Chester could be king for a day. Happy birthday, Chester! Special to the Times At the Nov. 19 Florida Cabinet meeting, Shawn Shattuck was presented the Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Award by Governor Rick Scott and Volunteer Florida CEO Chester Spellman. “It is an honor to present the Champion of Service Award to Shawn today for his volunteer leadership and dedication to Florida families,” said Scott. “His work turned tragedy into triumph, and I applaud his efforts to help others overcome similar challenging situations.” After losing his job as an oysterman due to challenges faced by Franklin County’s commercial seafood industry, Shattuck volunteered with Franklin’s Promise Coalition’s “A Hand Up: Volunteer Emergency Assistance Program,” an emergency assistance fund established to provide unemployed residents assistance with utilities and basic needs. While volunteering at the coalition, Shattuck helped with a variety of projects, including Toys for Tots, Running for the Bay, and local food pantries. On March 1, 2013, he started his own business, “Shawn’s Honey-Do Services, LLC” where he offers services in tiling, moving, lawn care, carpentry, and painting. He continues to volunteer throughout the community and is currently working with Franklin’s Promise as a volunteer leader for the “Reach Back” program, which helps others in the community reach their full potential. “Studies have shown that volunteering can be an excellent pathway to employment, with volunteers being 27 percent more likely to nd employment than non-volunteers,” said Spellman. “I congratulate Shawn on his service and encourage all unemployed Floridians to consider volunteering as a way to garner skills while strengthening communities.” The Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Award honors individuals and groups for their outstanding volunteer efforts. For more information about the Volunteer Florida Champion of Service Awards, visit http://tinyurl.com/lmj2lla Shawn Shattuck receives Champion of Service award MEREDYTH HOPE HALL | Special to the Times Attending the Cabinet meeting are, from left, Chief Financial Ofcer Jeff Atwater, Volunteer Florida CEO Chester Spellman, Joe Taylor, Nancy Paine, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Gov. Rick Scott, Shawn Shattuck and his wife Miranda, Liz Wood, Ann Kent, and Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services Adam Putnam. Another adventure for ‘Mama Sue’ A palaPALAC hiHI C olaOLA L ibraryIBRARY N eedsEEDS V olOL UN teersTEERS The Apalachicola Municipal library “has been left very short-handed by the departure of Sue Cronkite,” said librarian Caty Greene. If you have some time on your hands and would like to help, contact her at 653-8436. The library is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Wednesday and Saturday, the library is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Sue Cronkite with great-nieces Angel, left, and Amber Hennings.

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The Times | A9 Thursday, November 28, 2013 The following is the updated schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000. MONDAY 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Closed AA session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth St. TUESDAY Noon to 1 p.m.: Open session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension, 110 NE First St. WEDNESDAY 6-7 p.m.: Women’s AA, closed session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Men’s AA, closed session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church THURSDAY Noon to 1 p.m.: Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Open session, St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive FRIDAY 5:30-6:30 p.m.: AA Happy Hour, open session, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church 7:30-8:30 p.m.: Carrabelle, Church of the Ascension SATURDAY 7:30-8:30 p.m.: AA Speakers Meeting, open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Discussion Group, Alligator Point Mission By The Sea SUNDAY 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, open, Eastpoint First United Methodist Church God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference. >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ !"# # "# $! #4 ,1 4 '" !% *0/+00 ,/ 4 ) "# $" & &!" # % !" #4 -,.5 $ #$' 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 1.11 !" !" 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 44 .11 $ # 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 444444 /.11 "' + 3 &! $! 2 44444 44444 444444 444444 444444 444444 4444 /.11 "' + 3 $# # 4 444 4 2 444444 444444 444444 44444 /.11 3 !" # 2 R. Micha el Whale y P astor _yt a„{tr Oty†r {Œ 8y’‹qy tŒ †v >‹o„~ {„ 8†’„ etq†‚t h†’ >{‹Œ a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy †v 4ˆo oqy{q† o e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qt ' o‚ t•t‹ ^’„r o ^’„r o ^qy†† ' o‚ 9m m y ^ 4ˆooq y{q†o mSC mS v’‚qoˆ ooqyEx q†‚„ t XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ 8o‹‹o ptt a„{ tr Oty† r{Œ 8y’ ‹qy e†‹Œy {ˆ ^t‹•{ qtŒ '=m o‚ ^’„r o ^qy†† C'S o‚ 8ttp‹ ot ]tq†•t ‹ O†„r oŒ 9C ˆ‚ A R< 4•t 6 8o‹‹op tt C9S 9A XoŒ† ‹' G’{t ^tˆy t„Œ t†– Œy{ˆ A†’‹ A < ?’v 6toqy 9‹ CA9 =Sm ––– Œx{’ ‚q†‹x XoŒ† ‹' ]t• _yt‚† Xo‹{† {Œ % ( % !% %% *% % ( % !% %" % !* $ # & % & !* %" # & % ) % ) Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 With the heavy cooking and baking season upon us, aren’t you glad to see some of the canned goods companies have gone to pulltab lids? Be nice if they all would. Well now, looks like we will have a good Thanksgiving dinner at Chillas Hall. We have 96 signed up thus far. Lanark Village Association members are free. A donation of $5 is required for nonmembers. We will line up to be served at 1 p.m. See ya there! I know you’re itching to join the crowd tomorrow, Black Friday. Don’t forget the donation boxes for Toys for Tots. Happy shopping! You will be able to pick up some small gifts and decorations at the Holiday Bazaar at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Doors will open at 9 a.m. The soup and sandwich lunch will be served at noon. Our thrift shop is decorated, and many Christmas items are in stock. The thrift store is open Tuesday through Saturday 8-11 a.m. Drop by and have a cup of coffee, or just look around and shoot the breeze. Last Saturday, Nov. 23, the family and friends gathered at the First Baptist Church to celebrate the short life of our friend Cody Diorio. Pray for Cody’s eternal peace and for strength for the family. We have been friends ever since they moved to the Village. The gavel will fall at 7 p.m. to open the December meeting of the Lanark Village Association. The board will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2, at Chillas Hall. Try to be there! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember … Keep Christ in Christmas! Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Faith L anarANAR K newsNEWS Jim Welsh From Staff Reports Apalachicola Christmas celebration Friday The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29. Merchants will be open late, and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets lined with luminaries and lled with holiday spirit. Santa will arrive on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. Santa will hear children’s Christmas wishes, and carolers will sing. The Raney House Museum will be decorated in holiday greenery and specially decorated trees and open late for tours with docents to tell visitors about the city’s early history. Lanark Boat Club to host Saturday bazaar The Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holiday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info, call Janet at 697-2587. Small Business Saturday Nov. 30 Come shop small independently owned stores on national Small Business Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 30 in Apalachicola. Art, jewelry, home dcor, food or antiques, you’ll nd the perfect gifts, minus the crowds and the hassle of going to the mall. When you spend your dollars locally, more of your money circulates in the community, creating a more vibrant, sustainable economy that employs your family and neighbors. Whether it is a hardware store, restaurant, bookstore or a shop downtown, of every $100 spent in a locally owned, independent store, $68 returns to the community through taxes, payroll and other expenditures Santa will also be in town from 1-3 p.m. to visit with his furry friends. Bring your camera and take your pet’s picture with Santa for a donation to the Franklin County Humane Society. Pet costume contest is at 3 p.m. with special treats for dogs. Beshears to distribute blankets on Monday State Rep. Halsey Beshears, RMonticello, will be in Apalachicola on Monday, Dec. 2, to distribute wool blankets donated by nonprot Farm Share. This event will be 10 a.m. to noon at Beshears’ ofce at 78 11th St., Suite 5. All are encourage everyone to come by and pick up a blanket. Island Lights celebration Dec. 6 The annual St. George Island Lights celebration will be Dec. 6, mid-island in St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile Jingle Jog starts at 4 p.m. on the bike path in front of the park and proceeds through the business district. It’s a fun run, and everyone is welcome. All runners receive Santa hats for their heads and jingle bells for their shoes. Runners should arrive a little before 4 p.m. to sign in. A $5 per runner donation is suggested at the run. Santa is expected at 5 p.m., arriving by re engine and providing gifts to children age 10 and younger. Refreshments including cookies, coffee and hot chocolate will be provided to all. Island Scouts will be selling hot dogs. In the event of rain, many sturdy tents will be set up. View the lighting of the island palms at sundown. The event is hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. For more information, watch www.sgibusinesses. com/island-lights. Holiday Fresh Market Dec. 7 Why ght the crowds and trafc at the malls? Enjoy the Holiday Fresh Market on Dec. 7 in downtown Apalachicola. Shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy hand-crafted Apalachicola specialties from fresh seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry. For more information, call 653-9419. Eastpoint Christmas parade Dec. 13 On Nov. 5, the county commission voted unanimously to ask the Florida Department of Transportation for permission to close U.S. 98 in Eastpoint for the Eastpoint Christmas Parade, scheduled for Friday afternoon, Dec. 13. Donation yoga classes continue The donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes from 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Battery Park city ofce conference room. A memorial service for Dan R. “Rodney” Robison will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 30, at the First United Methodist Church of Carrabelle. Rodney, a Carrabelle native, passed away at 84 on Sept. 29 in Scottsdale, Ariz. A lifelong Methodist, he attended the Carrabelle United Methodist Church, where he gave his heart to the Lord. He was ordained in 1955 in full connection of the Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church. He served as a chaplain in the Air Force and as a minister in various Methodist churches. Jackie McMillan will ofciate at the memorial service. Dan Rodney Robison Brazil Dail Carmichael was born Jan. 2, 1935, in Steinhatchee. He passed away surrounded by his family Friday, Nov. 1, 2013, at his home in Eastpoint, at 78. Dail was a U.S. Air Force veteran and a business owner, working in the oil and seafood industries for many years. He is survived by his wife, Frances Carmichael; children, Michael Carmichael (Sherry), John “Peewee” Carmichael (Anna), Jesse Carmichael (Doris), Penny Sutton (Stacy), and Charles Carmichael (Becky); brother, Greg Carmichael; 18 grandchildren, and 10 great-grandchildren; and stepchildren, Karen Orihuela, Frank David Carmichael (Susan) and Terri Lynn Gonzalez (Michael). Funeral services were Sunday, Nov. 3, graveside in Eastpoint Cemetery with the Rev. Scott Shiver ofciating. Kelley Funeral Home assisted in handling arrangements. Brazil Dail Carmichael Obituaries SUBMISSIONS Submit obituaries to news@apalachtimes. com. View obituaries and leave condolences at www.apalachtimes.com. AA S cheduleCHEDULE Faith briefsBRIEFS Looking forward to a great Thanksgiving

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Se l e c t N a m e B r a n d I t e m s Dr a s t i c a l ly R e d u c e d W h i le S up p l ie s la s t ! N o R a in c h e c k s, Li mi t e d S u p p ly B l a c k F r i d a y O n ly N o v 2 9 2 0 1 3 S u n 7 a m 5 p m Ma n y o t h e r i t e m s d i s c o u nt e d t hr o u g h t h e w e e ke n d ; w h i le s up p l ie s la s t 1 2 1 U S 9 8 P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 ~ 8 7 7 2 1 6 9 6 0 0 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu N o v 28 61 45 0 % F ri, N o v 29 60 48 0 % S a t N o v 30 64 53 10 % Sun, Dec 1 63 55 10 % M on, Dec 2 69 48 0 % T ues Dec 3 68 47 0 % W ed Dec 4 68 47 0 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, November 28, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Bottom Trout and ounder are holding around the creek runoffs in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Neap tides have allowed more bait sh to move up in the canal, in turn bringing the trout and game sh to follow. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in these waters this week as well. Most local creeks and streams are still holding good amounts of bream and now some crappie. The crappie bite should improve this week because of the cold weather and rain. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com One of the loveliest sights in our area is the purple muhly grass shimmering on the dunes in the fall. I can remember when a sea of the stuff greeted you when you arrived on St. George Island. You can still enjoy those shimmering purple owers although the wild population is greatly reduced. Muhly grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) is a native to Florida and is a fall favorite for Florida landscapes. This native grass forms clumps of very ne blue-green foliage that explodes with color in October and adds texture to the garden all year long. It grows to heights of two to three feet with a spread of two to three feet. Muhly grass is exceptionally droughttolerant but tolerates periodic ooding during the warm months, so it is good for wetlands. It prefers full sun to part shade and does best in average to dry soil where there is very good drainage. This plant does not tolerate winter wetness well. This is a great plant for xeriscapes. Muhly grass is rated hardy in USDA Zones 6-11. Best of all, this plant requires almost no perpetual maintenance as long as its basic watering needs are met, and it is usually free of pests and disease. You should cut back dormant growth in winter before new growth begins to emerge in early spring. In addition to its attractive appearance and popularity as an ornamental grass, purple muhly grass is also important to a variety of wildlife. It is used for shelter or as a nesting site for some species of birds and mammals. It is also highly attractive to several species of ladybugs that help control pests in areas where purple muhly grass is planted or naturally occurs. Muhly grass is unpalatable to deer so it can be useful where deer munching on the landscape are a problem. Muhly is also referred to as sweetgrass and was used to weave baskets in the coastal Carolinas for generations. Visitors my still occasionally encounter a booth displaying these baskets on the roadside. Muhly baskets have an attractive fresh odor and a pale green patina. Native Americans also used it to scent their personal ornaments. A hybrid form called “Pink Flamingos” has shown up in the nursery trade the last couple of years. It is said to be a hybrid. It forms a threeto four-foot mound with distinctly spear-shaped plumes and is spectacular in late fall. The genus Muhlenbergia is named for Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1753-1815), who was a German-educated Lutheran minister and the rst president of Franklin College, now Franklin and Marshall College in Pennsylvania. He is most famous for his work in the eld of botany but was also an accomplished chemist and mineralogist. He is credited with classifying and naming 150 species of plants in his 1785 work “Index Flora Lancastriensis,” which led to great advances in the study of plants and earned him the distinction as America’s rst outstanding botanist. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Visitor Sam Smith shows a black drum he caught shing with Capt. Chris Robinson in October. Smith also caught island red and puppy red sh. Email your catches to timesoutdoors@star .com. Last week, Apalachicola had a pair of exotic visitors on a mission to help the environment. Husband and wife Eric and Chanita Darsonval spent several days cruising the watershed in their light sport amphibian aircraft, “Phibee,” a bright green, opentopped two-seater. Darsonval was born in Algeria, raised in France and immigrated to the U.S., where he recently retired after many years working as an airborne re ghter. His new job is to raise awareness about plastic pollution in the environment. He plans to travel coastal areas and river deltas and offer people the opportunity to view their landscape from the air and see for themselves the amount of trash littering our waterways. Darsonval said he was at the beginning of his crusade and stopped off here on his way to South Florida. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Gag grouper harvest closes in most Gulf waters Gag grouper will close for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state waters Dec. 4, with the last day of harvest being Dec. 3. All Gulf federal waters will close Dec. 3, with the last day of harvest being Dec. 2. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties were open from April 1 through June 30 and were not open during the July 1 through Dec. 3 season. Monroe County is also excluded because it follows Atlantic rules for gag grouper. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages marine sh from the shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico. These closures are an effort to help rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf back to strong sustainable levels. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on “Saltwater,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Gulf Grouper.” Venting tool requirement removed in Gulf waters Soon, Florida anglers no longer will be required to have and use a venting tool when shing for reef sh in Gulf of Mexico state waters. During its Nov. 21 meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission removed the requirement in Gulf state waters, making state regulations consistent with rules in federal waters. By removing this rule, anglers now have the freedom to determine how to best maximize survival of released reef sh using devices they feel are appropriate, depending on the circumstances. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council removed the requirement to have and use a venting tool in Gulf federal waters earlier this year. These changes will take effect as soon as possible. Another notice will be issued to let the public know when these changes take effect. When sh are brought quickly to the surface from deep water, the change in pressure can cause gases within the sh’s swim bladder to expand. This condition is called barotrauma and can cause damage to internal organs and reduce the likelihood a sh will survive when returned to the water. Typically, sh suffering from barotrauma must be treated if they are to survive and swim back down to deep water. Venting tools are used to treat barotrauma by allowing gases to escape from a sh’s body cavity. Descending devices, which bring sh back down to deeper waters, are another, more recently developed option that can also be used to increase survival rates among sh with barotrauma. Maximizing post-release survival of sh is important in marine sheries management because it means more sh survive to potentially reproduce and be harvested in the future. While venting tools can still be a useful way to increase chances of survival after being released, sh do not always need to be vented. Venting tools were required in Gulf state and federal waters since 2008. This requirement was intended to increase survival rates of released red snapper, but applied to all species of Gulf reef sh. These tools are not required in Atlantic state or federal waters. The use of non-stainless steel, non-offset circle hooks and dehooking devices will still be required in state and federal Gulf waters when shing for reef sh. These tools minimize handling times for reef sh, which aids in survival of the sh upon release. To learn more about recognizing barotrauma, and what to do, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Catch and Release.” Information about reef sh gear rules is available under “Recreational Regulations.” Outdoors BRIEFS HITTING THE DRUM Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES POLLUTION FIGHTERS VISIT FRANKLIN COUNTY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Muhly grass is displayed as a specimen clump at the home of Heather Mapp. Colorful muhly grass a beauty to behold

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, November 28, 2013 A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity girls basketball team has gotten off to a strong start, winning three of its rst four games. Under the direction of coach Carlos Hill, the team lost its opener at Blountstown, and has reeled off three straight wins, over John Paul II, Wewahitchka and Aucilla Christian. The team is anchored by senior Daeisha Carr, and juniors Dyshereah Key, Aaliyah West, Myesha Campbell, Trinity Henderson and Dasia Davis. Sophomore Chanelle Ducker, and freshmen Tyanna Townsend and Natasia Robinson round out the lineup. In the Nov. 15 opener at Blountstown, Franklin County was outscored in each of the four quarters. Trailing 19-12 at the half, the Lady Seahawks were blown out in the third quarter, 19-7, and went on to sustain a 49-24 defeat. The team was led by Key’s 11 points, with seven from Townsend, four from Campbell and one from Davis. The Lady Hawks got on the winning track at John Paul II on Nov. 18, as they eked out a 37-36 win. Trailing 28-19 after three quarters, Franklin County outscored their opponents 18-8 in the nal quarter to manage the win. Key poured in 18 points, with eight from Townsend, six from Campbell and ve from Ducker. The Lady Seahawks secured a 30-26 win at Wewa Nov. 21 in a close, tightly fought contest. Key led the team with 13 points and seven rebounds, while Campbell pitched in 10 points and Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 S en i o r m i d e l der G r a ha m K i r v i n t h e S e a h a w k b o y s s o c c e r t e a m s l e a d i n g s c o r e r t h i s s e a s o n d r o v e h o m e t w o g o a l s i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y s 6 0 s h u t o u t o f P o r t S t J o e N o v 2 1 a n d s c o r e d t h e lo n e g o a l i n S a t u r d a y ‚ 1 1 t i e a t h o m e a g a i ns t F r ee p o r t U n f o r t u n a t e l y K i r v i n su s t a i n e d a n i n j u r y t o h i s r i g h t a n t e r io r c r uc i a t e l i g a m e n t a n d i s e x p e c t e d t o b e o u t o f a c t io n f o r t h e n e x t f o u r t o s i x w ee k s H e i s o u r m o s t c a p a b l e p l a y e r t o b e a b l e t o s c o r e s a i d c o a c h R a m o n V a le nzu el a H e ha s t he s k i l ls G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R G r a h a m K ir v in $ 000 00 F S 4 5 T R I M M E R E a sy t o u se w e l l b al an c e d tr i m m e r f o r h o m e o w n e r u s e G E T GE A R E D U P w i t h p r o t e c t i v e a p p a r e l a n d a c c e s s o r i e s $ 000 00 M S 1 7 0 C H A I N S A W D e s i g n e d f o r o c c a s i o n a l w o o d c u t t i n g t a s k s a r o u n d t h e h o m e I n c l u d e s m a n y of t h e e x c e l l e n t d e s i g n f e a t u r e s of o u r p r of e s s i o n a l m o d e l s A n t i v ib ra t i on s y s t e m f or c o m f or t a b l e o p e ra t i on B a r l e n g t h s m a y v a r y b y r e g i o n $ 000 00 BG 5 5 H A N D H EL D B L O W ER P r ov e n h a n d h e l d b l o we r a t a n a f f o r d a b l e p r i c e T H I S HO LI D A Y G IV E S O ME T H IN G D EP EN D A B L E ST I H Lu s a c om A v a i l a b l e a t p a r t i c i p a t i n g d e a l e r s w h i l e s u p p l i e s l a s t 2 0 1 1 S T I H L $ 17 9 95 $ 14 9 95 $ 16 9 95 S t J o e R e n t A ll 70 6 1 st St P o r t S t J o e F L 8 5 0 -2 2 7 -2 1 1 2 W E S E L L T H E B E S T A N D R E P A I R T H E R E S T Page 11 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks varsity boys basketball team won two games last week, traveling to Wewahitchka Nov. 21 to down the Gators, and then defeating Aucilla Christian at home Friday night. But on Monday night, the team fell at Altha 47-43. Against Wewa, the team was paced by 12 rebounds and 20 points from point guard Kelsey Jones, who had 23 points, and would have had more had he sunk better than 8-of-18 free throws. In fact, the team shot just 16-of-44 from the charity stripe, a measly 36 percent, to make the game closer than it was. “We couldn’t make free throws,” said coach Mike Sweatt. With three treys, Josue Barahona had nine points, as did Kenneth Wilson. Nathan Jones and Tyler Howard each kicked in ve points, with James Gordon adding three, and two each from Cameron White, Marshal Sweet and Tyler Farmer. Howard and White each had seven rebounds. The team made up for the poor shooting on Friday night, as they shot 23-of-56 from the free throw line, paced by Jones, who was 13-of-16 from the charity stripe, including 9-of-10 in the fourth quarter to help seal the 5744 win over Aucilla. Jones added 23 points for the game, and seven rebounds, while Wilson had 11 points and ve rebounds. White had nine points and 13 rebounds, with two treys and a total of eight points from Barahona. Howard and Gordon each added a pair,. On Monday night, the Seahawks fell 47-43, after being up 41-40 with a minute left to play. But Altha went on a 5-0 run. “All we needed was one stop and we couldn’t get it,” said Sweatt. “We overhelped and gave them a twoand a three-pointer.” Jones made two free throws, but others missed some wide open shots. “We didn’t make the shot,” said Sweatt. “We have fought hard, we gave everything we had, from the rst guy to last guy,” said Sweatt of his team’s recent play. “How we worked hard on defense is the difference in those games. “Our defensive rebounding is not up to par,” he said. “We’re not able to compete in this district if we don’t rebound. “We have to play fast more times than not,” said Sweatt. Senior Logan McLeod, nursing a ligament tear, returned to the lineup Monday night, but saw limited action as he ratchets up his game. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Dyshereah Key, left, Daeisha Carr, and Trinity Henderson, on ground, scramble for the ball against Aucilla. Lady Seahawks win three of four See THREE A12 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Deborah Dempsey charges the ball. Lady Seahawks down St. Joe Special to the Times The Lady Seahawks girls varsity soccer team reeled off three wins last week, highlighted by a 4-2 victory Nov. 21 against District 1A rival Port St. Joe. Their only loss came Nov. 16 at Rocky Bayou, after a win over North Bay Haven the night before. On Nov. 21 at Port St. Joe, the Lady Seahawks, aggressive from the opening whistle, generated multiple shots on goal, opening with a corner kick from senior Jessica Shields that senior Gracyn Kirvin headed into the net. “We practice defending the corner kick quite frequently in practice and I know Gracyn has the capability to make that shot, it was well executed,” said coach Joe Shields. The Lady Seahawks controlled the time of possession in the rst half with speed, deft passing and a swarming, team defense that allowed most of the play to be in the Sharks’ half of the eld. It seemed every time the Sharks made headway towards the Seahawk goal, someone would dispossess a pass or toe-poke the ball away. “I thought Allie Zingarelli came up big for us in numerous situations,” said coach Shields. An injury to senior Marlyn Lee, who after the match was evaluated and cleared by a doctor to return to action See SEAHAWKS A12 Seahawks down Wewa, Aucilla Above, Mike Sweatt directs his players during a break. Left, Cameron White has emerged as a key rebounder for the Hawks. P hotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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A12 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 in a week, caused a cease in the action for a few minutes but freshman Myranda McLeod lled in nicely as a defender. A ne pass from Shields to junior Katie Seger, late in the half, enabled Seger drive a ball past the Shark net minder, and put the Lady Seahawks up by two, going into the half. “My big concern was that the girls would let up, so I told them to keep being aggres sive on the ball and keep stringing together passes,” said coach Shields. Taking the coach’s words to heart, a few minutes into the second half, freshman Em ily Zingarelli got loose just inside the 18-yard box and tried to shoot on frame when she was knocked down by a Shark player. This resulted in a penalty kick opportunity, that Shields buried in the lower left corner of the net to give the Seahawks a 3-0 lead. Moments before the water break, se nior captain Deborah Dempsey dribbled through multiple Sharks on her way to an unassisted goal, making it 4-0. However, as with any rivalry game the Sharks would not go down quietly and continued pressing their attack. A foul inside the Hawks’ 18-yard box re sulted in a penalty kick which junior goal keeper Macey Hunt was unable to save and put the Sharks on the board 4-1. Minutes later, a corner kick by the Sharks ew over Hunt’s head and was shot into the net by an other Shark, making the game 4-2. The Seahawk defense stiffened as the Hawks returned to their possession game, with Seger, Kirvin, Shields and senior cap tain Adrianna Reeder all having shots on goal before the nal whistle sounded. In all, the Hawks controlled the ball for two-thirds of the game. “This was their most complete game to date,” said Coach Shields. “The girls did many things right and few things wrong, so I was very pleased with their efforts this evening.” On Nov. 19, the Lady Seahawks traveled to West Gadsden and won handily 10-2 after the game was called due to the eight-goal mercy rule. Franklin County jumped all over the Pan thers from the opening whistle and dominat ed both sides of the ball. With a blitzkrieg of shooting, Reeder scored twice; Kirvin scored twice off two assists from Shields, who also scored once; and Dempsey scored off an as sist from Seger, for a 6-0 halftime lead. Others making attempts on goal were two from Em ily Zingarelli, and one each from Seger and McLeod. “I was kind of torn,” said Coach Shields, “I wanted everyone to score but I also wanted them to work on stringing together multiple one and two-touch passes, as this will help us going forward this season. Possession soccer is going to be key for us, to staying competi tive in this district.” After the break, the coach substituted liberally, allowing multiple Lady Seahawks to receive playing time. With new defenders on the pitch, the Seahawks were a little more vulnerable to a couple of errant through balls by the Panthers and were scored on twice prior to the last water break. Back-up net minder Jessica Schmidt had three saves. Senior Ally Millender and Kirvin each scored one goal to make it 8-2 prior to the last 20 minutes of play. “The subs made some little defensive mistakes but I knew that once the game condition jitters went away they would settle down,” said coach Shields. Reeder was able to get off two attempts, and senior Brook Pittman made a goal at tempt, but as the clock wound down, fresh man Allie Kirvin and eighth grader Allie Zingarelli each found the back of the net, for the 10-2 win. “This is the kind of game that gives all the girls condence, that if we execute properly we can score goals,” Shields said. On Nov. 15 and 16, the Lady Seahawks had back-to-back matches with North Bay Haven and Rocky Bayou, with the Friday night match with the North Bay Haven Buc caneers a real nail biter before Franklin County came away with a narrow 2-1 victory at the Nest. Reeder led all shooters with four at tempts in the rst half; and Emily Zingarelli and Seger each had an attempt, but it was Shields who rst found the back of the net for a 1-0 Lady Seahawks’ lead. The defense was solid right up until the end of the rst half when the Buccaneers scored an equalizer to knot the game at 1-all. Up until that point, net minder Hunt had made seven saves. The Buccaneers were much more ag gressive in the second half and Hunt was forced to make 11 saves, two of which were spectacular. Gracyn Kirvin made a couple of shot attempts in the second half, along with Shields, but it was the right foot of Em ily Zingarelli that was the game changer, as she scored following the last water break. Although heavy pressure from the Bucca neers continued, the Seahawks were able to preserve the win in a hard fought tilt. The following morning, the Lady Se ahawks travelled to Niceville to play Rocky Bayou, in only their second away game this season. Unfortunately, the fatigue from Friday’s game spilled over into Saturday’s game and the Lady Seahawks performed with a lackluster effort after a three-and-ahalf-hour bus ride. Unable to string passes together, the of fense did not click like the previous evening and only Reeder and Emily Zingarelli were able to launch any signicant offensive re power in the rst half. The underlying prob lem came as the Lady Seahawks could not seem to get on track with playing a cohesive team defense and unfortunately yielded a goal in each half to go down in defeat 2-0. Reeder led all attempts with four shots on goal, followed by two from Emily Zingarelli and one from Gracyn Kirvin. Hunt had 10 saves as the Lady Seahawk net minder. Sports & #8 & /0 8 & A 7 / /! 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B 7 3 6! =3> 1 3B 7 % > @> 3 5 @7 A % =7 # 8 ; A 7 @ 1 3B 7 > 5 =37A % =7 # #$ / / A M E N DE D T A X I M P A C T O F V A L U E A D J U S T M E N T B OA R D F r a nk l in C o u nt y T a x Y e a r 2 0 1 3 G r a n te d R e q u e s t e d R e d u c e d R e q u e s t e d W i t h d r aw n or s et t l e d Coupon Expir es: 12-15-13 CODE: AP00 seven rebounds. Townsend contrib uted ve points and seven rebounds, while Ducker added two points. On Friday night at home, the Lady Seahawks coasted to a 51-28 victory over Aucilla Christian. Both Key and Campbell were in double-digits, with Key putting in 23 points and pulling down six rebounds, while Campbell tal lied 20 points and nine rebounds. Townsend added eight points and two rebounds. THREE from page A11 SEAHAWKsS from page A11 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com The Seahawks varsity boys soccer team had a good week last week, notching their rst win of the season, at Port St. Joe Nov. 21, and then tying Freeport at home Saturday. But not all the news was good. Senior midelder Gra ham Kirvin, the team’s lead ing scorer, suffered a ligament injury and will be out four to six weeks, said coach Ramon Valenzuela. Because of the injury, Va lenzuela opted to protect the 1-1 tie Saturday and drop two players as fullbacks, defend ing the goal in the second half. Populating this year’s squad, now with a record of 1-4-3, are seniors James Harris, James Bailey, James Newell, Stefan DeVaughn, Alex Causey and Christian Jones; juniors Austin Carter, Chandler White, Logan Al len, Chase Taranto and Lloyd Smith; sophomores Jacob Montgomery, Josh Patriotis and Walker De Vaughn; and freshmen Max Davis and Ty ler Pendelton. Members of the middle school team include eighth graders Jack Harris, Davis McGee, Yanni Pateritsas, Micah Patriotis, Matthew Turner, Brandon Taranto, Lu cas Sasnett and Bailey Her rington. Team statistician is Zoe Lance In Port St. Joe Nov. 21, the Tiger Sharks were missing some key players due to postseason football play, and the Seahawks took advantage, winning 6-0. “I think we played very well that day,” said Valenzu ela, who is assisted by Stacy Kirvin. “We went to play, we were denitely more excited, to prepare to win. “We didn’t lower any of our guard during the game,” he said.. “The boys played 110 percent; they played hard.” Kirvin and Patriotis each scored a pair of goals, with Pendleton and Harris each adding one. At home Saturday, Kirvin scored the lone goal of the rst half, before he was side lined by injury. “In the rst half we played very well,” said Valenzuela. “For some reason the boys were tired and we lowered our guard quickly in the second half. In the rst half we were playing closer to their goal all the time and we missed some good opportunities.” The score marked the third 1-1 tie of the year for the Seahawks. That was the same result against North Bay Haven at home Nov. 15, and at Rocky Bayou the fol lowing day. The team opened with a 3-1 loss at Rickards Nov. 4, a 4-1 loss to Maclay Nov. 7, a 4-3 loss at home to John Paul II Nov. 12; and a 5-2 loss at West Gadsden Nov. 19, in which Causey and Kirvin each scored a goal. “We have won just one game yet,” said Valenzuela. “The boys are preparing for the tournament. This is all about preparation for the tournament. “Even though we are in a tough district this year, and lost some key players, it’s been tougher this year,” he said. The team is one of seven schools in District 1 in Class 1A’s Region 1, which com prises 30 high schools, each with a student population of between 46 and 408. District challengers include John Paul II, Mayo Lafayette, Ma clay, Port St. Joe and Niceville Rocky Bayou Christian. Seahawks down St. Joe for rst win

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, November 28, 2013 year, the district will exhaust the entire $1.8 million from 2011-12, most of it on the school loan, and the remain ing $254,000 transferred to the general fund to cover property and casualty insur ance and maintenance. After that, the district has budgeted spending some of the $1.7 million un spent from 2012-13. If the $1.13 million budgeted for capital expenditures this year, including 5 percent for the ABC School, is spent, plus another $56,000 for re maining maintenance and insurance costs, the district would have a nal ending balance of about $2.16 mil lion, more than $1.3 million less than the balance at the start of the scal year. This is in part due to the dimin ished tax revenue, which this year is anticipated to be $1.6 million, more than $350,000 less than was the case four years ago. Its obvious we cant continue the same pattern, said School Board Member Pam Shiver. What can we do to stop this pattern? Superintendent Nina Marks said continued en ergy savings needs to occur on the main campus to less the burden to capital outlay. If we continue this pat tern we will take money out of the general operat ing fund, said Board Chair Jimmy Gander. The capital fund is still depleting. Bud Hayes, chair of the ABC School board of di rectors, said he, the ABC Schools nance director Dean Vail, ABC School Prin cipal Chimene Johnson, Venable and Gander have been meeting regularly. It had been indicated that they wanted to cut our capital outlay down to 2.5 percent. I appeared at that meeting and they said lets talk about it, that it was premature at this point, said Hayes. We agreed to sit down and talk. We have had very co operative talks in which both sides have presented their positions, he said. I dont think its any secret that the school district has some issues that they need to resolve. This has kind of opened up a whole new dia logue for our cooperative spirit. Hayes said that when the charter school moved into Chapman Elementary School a few years ago, ob taining the buildings and a footprint about one foot around with the district re taining the rest, the build ings had been vacant for a number of years. We took it over, and there was a lot of neglected maintenance, he said. Built in 1976, the school was one of the rst solarpowered buildings in Flori da, but the solar power has not functioned for several decades. We have a solar panel on the gym, which was done though a Prog ress Energy grant, Hayes said. It (solar power) is always something in the back of our mind wed like to do. He said the school has spent capital outlay money on upgrades to the heating and air conditioning sys tem, some plumbing, and repairs of deteriorating portions of the building. We still have some in frastructure problems, some moisture problems from lack of upkeep, Hayes said. We need a new air handler and new cooler for the school, and we need some cosmetic work done, on tile for the ceiling. Were not short of needs by any means. Hayes said one possible use of the money could be to clean up some paving and improve parking, which often spills out into nearby grass during busy times at the school. We want environmen tally sound parking around the area, Hayes said. We have got some possibilities, we got some estimates on prospective parking spaces, and maybe some beautica tion of the yard. He said the ABC School board has managed to re duce its power bill consider ably, by about 700 kilowatt hours per month, which should add up to several thousand dollars in annual savings. Our energy conserva tion program started to pay off, said Hayes. Weve had a lot of remedial work done, found old things that were totally not working, and did some insulation in classrooms. Here we have cost sav ings by someone whos not waiting for things to break, he said. BOARD from page A1 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 T rades & Ser v ices Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines NO TICE OF ADOPTION OF CITY ORDIN ANCE The City Commission of the City of Apalachicola will hold a public hearing for the purpose of recei ving citizen s comments on the follo wing proposed ordinance: ORDIN ANCE NO. 2013-06 AN ORDIN ANCE OF THE CITY OF AP ALA CHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORID A EST ABLISHING A SLO W DO WN, MINIMUM W AKE ZONE T O REGULA TE THE W AKE CREA TED BY BO A TS, VESSELS AND W A TERCRAFT PR OPELLED OR PO WERED BY MA CHINER Y ON SCIPIO CREEK, ST AR TING A T THE CONFULENCE OF THE AP ALA CHICOLA RIVER AND SCIPIO CREEK PR OCEEDING NOR TH ON SCIPIO CREEK T O A POINT 100 FEET NOR TH OF MILL PONT AND PR O VIDING AN OPERA TION ST AND ARD FOR BO A TS, VESSELS, AND W A TERCRAFT IN THE SLO W DO WN, MINIMUM W AKE ZONE; PR O VIDING FINDINGS; PR O VIDING DEFINITIONS; PR O VIDING FOR EXEMPTIONS; PR O VIDING FOR THE POSTING OF SIGNS; PR O VIDING FOR ENFORCEMENT AND PEN AL TIES; PR O VIDNG FOR A UTHORIZA TION OF CITY OFFICIALS; PR O VIDING SEVERABILITY ; AND PR O VIDNG FOR AN EFFECTIVE D A TE. The public hearing will be held in the Apalachicola Community Center #1 Bay A v enue, Apalachicola, Florida at 6:00 PM on T uesday December 3, 2013. All interested parties are encouraged to appear and be heard with respect to this proposed ordinance. FR A N K L I N C OUN T Y T OUR I S T D E V E L O P M E N T C OUN C I L N O T I CE O F P U B L I C M E E T ING S CH ED U L E CH A NG E T HE F O L L O W I N G M EE T I N G S H A V E B EE N C A NC E L E D D U E T O T H E HOL I D A Y S : W ed n es d a y D e c em ber 4 2 0 1 3 3 : 0 0 P M B o a r d M e e t i n g W ed n es d a y D e c em ber 1 8 2 0 1 3 1 : 3 0 P M C o m m i t t e e M e e t i n g H A V E B EE N C A N C EL L ED R E GUL A R S C HE D UL E D M E E TI NG S W I L L RE S U M E O N J A N U A R Y 8 2 0 1 4 T h e s e a re O P E N p u b l i c m e e t i n g s a n d t w o o r m o re C o un t y C om m i s si o n er s m a y a t t en d. News BRIEFS Tour of island homes offered Friday Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty is hosting an Open House Tour from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 29. We are featuring a diverse selection of at least seven homes, all on St. George Island, said Rose Drye, broker-manager at Shimmering Sands. Our low-key, no pressure selfguided tour will include beachfront, bayfront, canalfront, and interior properties. We are even including a xer-upper in our line-up. A real estate professional will be at each home to answer questions about the property, nancing availability, and rental potential. Stop by the Prudential Shimmering Sands ofce at 123 East Gulf Beach Drive to pick up property yers and a map for the self-guided tour, and to visit some or all of the open houses at your own pace. Maps and yers also can be emailed upon request by calling 927-2666. Dec. 7 lm relates Pearl Harbor At 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, the lm Tora, Tora, Tora will be shown in the movie room. Released in 1970, the American-Japanese collaboration war lm dramatizes the Japanese reasons for the attack that brought America into the war. Some of the scenes are actual archival lm taken from one of the carriers participating in the attack. The lm was directed by Richard Fleischer and stars an ensemble cast, including Martin Balsam, Joseph Cotten, S. Yamamura, E. G. Marshall, James Whitmore and Jason Robards. The title, which In Japanese means Tiger, was the codeword used to indicate that complete surprise had been achieved. Free popcorn will be available. Admission at the museum is by donation. Island reghters annual meeting Dec. 14 The annual meeting of the St George Island Volunteer Fire Department will be at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 14 at the Jay Abbott Firehouse 324 E. Pine Ave., St George Island. An agenda will be available for review on Dec. 11 at the rehouse. The public is invited to attend and participate in accordance with applicable governing documents. A light lunch will follow the business meeting. Photos of Carrabelle families sought The Carrabelle History Museum, at 106 Ave. B, SE is collecting family photos. Historical Society President Tamara Allen said the museum is creating a database to aid in genealogical research and the pictures would be part of the accumulated information. For more information, call 697-2141.Three Servicemen seeks Vietnam stories The Three Servicemen Detail South is seeking stories of service in Vietnam to post on its webpage, www.three servicemenstatuesouth. org. This can be a story told by the veteran or a memory of a veteran who is deceased. If you have a story to tell, call Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. Cook reappointed to transportation board On Nov. 19, county commissioners voted unanimously to reappoint Apalachicola City Commissioner Frank Cook as chair of the Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Board. EOC awarded grant for new roof At the Nov. 19 county commission meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce said the county has been awarded Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds to repair the roof on the Emergency Operations Center. The federal programs fund projects designed to reduce or eliminate losses from future disasters. The emergency operations center roof was damaged in June 2012 during Tropical Storm Debby. It drips on my head when it rains, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell told commissioners, who voted unanimously to accept the grant. Pierce said repairs would cost approximately $98,000. The grant funds will provide $73,600 and the county will provide $24,500 from its contingency fund. The hip roof will be constructed of 26 gauge PBR roof panels designed to withstand winds of up to 140 miles per hour. Brownell said the planning and zoning ofce would seek bids for the work in the near future. November Pancreatic Cancer Month At the Nov. 19 county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to recognize November as Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month in response to a request submitted by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. An estimated 38,460 people will die of pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2013, and of those 2770 are Floridians. Pancreatic cancer will afict more than 45,000 people each year; 73 percent will die within one year of diagnosis, and 94 percent will die within ve years.

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A14 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 A14 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Thanksgiving Holiday Classified In-column D E AD LI N E S The Port St. Joe Star and The Apalachicola/Carrabelle Times To Run Thursday, November 28 'XH)ULGD\1RYHPEHU 5:00 pm &DOORU RUYLVLWXVRQOLQHDW HPHUDOGFRDVWPDUNHWSODFHFRP 7KHFODVVLILHGGHSDUWPHQW ZLOOEHFORVHG7KXUVGD\1RYHPEHU :HZLOORSHQ)ULGD\ 1RYHPEHUDWDP 93126T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192009CA000624XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-19 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-19, Plaintiff, vs. TAMMIE KELLEY, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, DECEASED; ALINA HOWINGTON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. I; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated October 30, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000624XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CWALT, INC„ ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-19 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 200719 is Plaintiff and TAMMIE KELLEY, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, DECEASED; ALINA HOWINGTON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. I; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, 11:00 a.m, on the January 9, 2014, following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT NUMBER 5 IN ALLIGATOR POINT, A SUBDIVISION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 3 AND A PART OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLATS THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK I, AT PAGES 25 TO 28, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF, AND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLOR-IDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850-653-8861 or 1-800 -955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on October 31, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954)564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1162-74787 November 21, 28, 2013 93152T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 13-204-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH LYNN RAFFIELD, et al.; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, entered in Case No. 13-204-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Deborah Lynn Raffield f/k/a Deborah R. Lett f/k/a Deborah L. Aikens f/k/a Deborah Raffield Lolley, and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby, 2nd Floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. on December 18, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBIT A Commence at a point marking the intersection of the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Old State Road No: 10 with the West boundary of the East half of the Northwest quarter of Fractional Section 11, Township 9 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida, thence run South 00 degrees 02 minutes 34 seconds West along the West boundary of the East half of the Northwest quarter of said Fractional Section 11 a distance of 707.68 feet to a re-rod (marked #1999), thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds East 400.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the Northerly right-of-way boundary of Pine Avenue, said point also marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 100.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 seconds East 142.33 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes 49 seconds West 100.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run South 00 degrees 00 minutes 11 seconds West 142.33 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.325 acres, more or less. Together with a 1997 REDM mobile home, ID #FLA14611173A, Title #73305835 and a 1997 REDM mobile home, ID #FLA14611173B, Title #73305834. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 25th day of September, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 21, 28, 2013 96447T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192013CA 000014CAXXXX GENERAL MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff(s), vs. JOHN BECKER BOATENREITER, et. al. Defendant(s)/ NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 30, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192013CA 000014CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and JOHN BECKNER BOATENREITER AND UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash are held at 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 9th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, 395.98 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 104 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LANDS HEREBY CONVEYED, AND FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 26 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST 500 FEET TO A POINT ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO NORTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 100 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST 500 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES WEST 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; SAID LANDS HEREBY CONVEYED BEING ALSO DESCRIBED AS LOT 65 OF THAT CERTAIN UNRECORDED MAP OR PLAT OF DOG ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, AS HEREINABOVE REFERRED TO, SAID PLAT DATED MARCH 1948, AND PREPARED BY L.G. FLANAGAN, LAND SURVEYOR, FOR TALLAHASSEE AIRCRAFT CORPORATION, A FLORIDA CORPORATION and commonly known as: 694 GULF SHORE DR, DOG ISLAND, FL 32322 IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 31st day of October, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON, Clerk, Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq./FL Bar# 549452 Laura L. Walker, Esq./FL Bar# 509434 Daniel F. Martinez, II, Esq./FL Bar# 438405 Kalei McElroy Blair, Esq./FL Bar#44613 Jennifer Lima Smith/FL Bar # 984183 GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, FL 33607 (813)443-5087 “In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in the proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, FRANKLIN County, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, County Phone 850653-8861 EXT. 106 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service”. File# 678280.2025 November 21, 28, 2013 96479T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2012-CA-000282 GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CAREY M. SHEPHARD, ET. AL. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE AS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated September 17, 2013 entered in Civil Case No.: 19-2012-CA000282, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, is Plaintiff, and CAREY M. SHEPARD; LINDA J. SUAREZ; USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK (USAA FSB); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM This is the honor roll for the rst nine weeks grading period at the First Baptist Christian School. In the case of the rst and second grades, the honor roll is for the second six-week grading period. FIRST GRADE AA /B: Dex TeatSS ECOND GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Caden Allen A A /B: Brayden Barwick, Ethan Kembro, Emma WhiteTT HIRD GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Olivia Barineau A A /B: Riley O’Neal and Skylar Layne FOURTH GRADEAA ll AA ’s: Genesis Jones A A /B: Cameron Nash, Carter Kembro, Sophia Salman FI fF TH GRADE AA /B: Eva Strickland SS IXTH GRADE AA /B: Lydia StricklandSS EVENTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Adria ValenzuelaA A /B: Talyn ArnettEE IGHTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Jordan Alexander A A /B: Logan Arnett, Nathan Jones FRESHMAN AA ll AA ’s: Noah Strickland A A /B: Tyler Banks, Hunter Butler, Emily Gay, Anna Smith, Katy Spann, Ali ValenzuelaSS OPHOMORES AA /B: Skylah Obee SS ENIORS AA /B: Ashley Butler, Brandy Parker First Baptist Christian School Honor Rolls Franklin County Elementary School FIRST GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Cammie Rae Gilbert, Dezmonae Sanders, Jordan Barber, Josiah Friddle, Kamora Harris, Layla Dixon, Lilianna Michelle Joiner, Loghan Carver, Nathan Rotella, Robert Ernest Romero, Rosa Isabel Pascual Juan, Christian Daughtry, Christopher Creek, Kassidy Denney and Bradley Page.A A /B: Hunter Ard, Sy Bartlett, Dalton Kale Barrack, Serenity Cassell, Ay’la Derico, Dominic Durbin, Nyashia Evans, Jasmine Gray, Sarah Marie Ham, Michael Hill, Sheldon James, Charity Larkin, Daniel Lively, Jesus PelicoLopez, Harmony Malone, Emmanuel Marcum, Adrionna Martin, Ajaylen McNair, Madison Millender, Asya Owens, Lester Owens, Ernest Romero, Christopher Russell, Shianne Shaw, Estela Peralta-Virbes and Shianne WardSS ECOND GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Lonnie O’Neal, Chase Millender, Corbin Pritchard, Denim Chastain, Evan Faith Ogden, Hannah Creamer, Imani Ison, Nathaniel March, Onamae Millender, William Chipman, Xavier Glass, Mason Pace and Braden Shiver A A /B: Michelle Weisz, Mckenna Young, Aryauna Jade Benjamin, Logan Lee Bentley, Laelah Carranza, Denim Chastain, Marcus Clayton, Kaden Downing, Bradlynn Hutchins, Natalie Gibbens, Bricyn Kennedy, Kayleigh Leonard, Rebecca Mahon, Reid Nix, Emily Patterson, Erick Manuel Romero, Alonah Segree, Gavin Shelley, Jesse WhittedTT HIRD GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Alondra Jimenez, Grace Carroll, Kylie Rudd and Lucy Edwards.A A /B: Aubree SwangoMoore, Autumn Loesch, Brittany Grace Lynn Wright, Cloey Malone, Emaleigh Segree, Emily Fichera, Ethan Shirley, Jaylan Prince, Jesse Parker Mock, Kaiden Faison, Kelsey Lynn Martina, Marissa Elizabeth Gilbert, Matthew Gordon, Parker Ryland Martina, Sarai Crumbliss, September Ferrell, Ta’shawn Jones, Tariah Jones, Ellis Bilingsley FOURTH GRADEAA ll AA ’s: Casandra Gibbens, Rachel Rudd, Steven Garrison Cook,A A /B: Rebecca Shiver, Trinity Barron, Alexis Wheetley, Annie Smith, Ariel Andrews, Audry Yowell, Brantly Richards, Brendon Polous, Brianna Sutcliffe, Sydney Shuman, Christian Kyler Custer, Grace Patterson, JachobEarl Thompson, Kristen Chavonne Stancil, Larry Winchester, Maddison Whitten, Brooke O’Neal, Michael Melton, Lee Roberts, Robert Nessly, Sarah Jalynn Segree, Savannah Sage Brannan FI fF TH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Charlee Winchester, Francisco Bernabe Juan, Hollie Larkin, Katie Newman, Hope Granger, Shirah Pelt, William Austin Gray, Tressie EdwardsA A /B: Blake Chastain, Destanie Rose Proctor, Ethan Anderson, Cole Shelley, Camron Evans, Stephen Malone, Tiauana Benjamin, Kerry Garner, Lorne Eli Whaley, Makayla Varner FRESHMEN AA ll AA ’s: Astrid Ramirez, Holly Chambers, Jackson Copley, Jayla Alley, Kacey Howard, Ann Reeder, Melody Hateld, Thomas Copley, Tyanna Townsend, Allie Kirvin, Emily Crosby A A /B: Alexis Segree, Bianca Huber, Chelsea Register, Emily Zingarelli, Eve Bond, Jaylon Gainer, Jill Diestelhorst, Kimberly Boone, Reese Hersey, Levi Spruill, Logan Crosby, Mallorie Shiver, Maxwell Davis, Mercedes Rice, Tia Cummings, Tyler Pendleton and Zachary May SS OPHOMORES AA /B: Adam Hames, Amber Henning, Brandon Walker, Hunter Segree, Jacob Montgomery, Jacquelyn Ramsey, John White, Kendrick Hunter, Krista Martina, Maliek Rhodes, Dallas Shiver, Trinity Hardy, Ursula Countryman JUNIORS AA ll AA ’s: Aaliyah West, Austin Carter, Chaseon Taranto, Samantha Marxsen, Brooke Frye, A A /B: Amanda Anthony, Chandler White, Logan Allen, Myesha Campbell, Grant Smith, Robyn Segree, Tressie BuffkinSS ENIORS AA ll AA ’s: Amber Adkins, Austin Martina, Josie Turner, Lea Venable and Tevis Page.A A /B: Alex Causey, Ashley Carroll, Cameron White, Cynthia Duncan, Heather Holton, James Newell, James Harris, James Bailey, Jathan Martin, Jennifer Stratton, Leonard Ward, Logan McLeod, Morgan Mock, Myel DeCourcey, Samantha Everson, Shannon FullerSS IXTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Kt Nessly A A /B: Brandon Farr, Chasity Ard, Chloe E Owens, Jacob Shirley, Jesse Adam Ray, Keondre Sewell, Mikel Register, Nicolas Hutchins, ShyneAdam Jace FairclothSS EVENTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Jessica RuddA A /B: Aracely Gallegos, Beyla Walker, Charles Cassell, Hannah Hogan, Kiana Foley, Makenzie Shuman, Matthew Hunter Kelley, Melanie Collins, Michael Bentley, Peyton Millender, Fisher Edwards, Tonnor SegreeEE IGHTH GRADE AA ll AA ’s: Josie Kriss A A /B: Ana Aguilar, Chance White, Dalyn Sheridan, Jake Paterson, Marjorie Morrow, Matthew Turner, Morgan Anderson, Tylyn Gillikin Franklin County Middle School Franklin County High School

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, November 28, 2013 The Times | A15 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.com 1. 252 WEST PINE STREET. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650.00/MO. INCLUDES WATER AND ELECTRIC UP TO 200.00/MO.2. 419 PIRATES LANDING. 1BR/1BA, CONDO. 750/MO 3. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BR/ 1BA. 550/MO 4. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 5. 703D SE THIRD ST. 3BR,2BA 800/MO. 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 7. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E7. 4BR, 3BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDED WITH BOAT SLIP 8. 391 CARLTO NS, L ANARK VILLAGE. 1BR/1BA 650/MO UTILITIES INCLUDEDOFFICE BUILDING ON 98, $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 2. 419PIRATESLANDING. 1BR/1BA,CONDO. 750/MO 4.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1BR/1BA. SCREENED PORCH. 425/MO 6. PICKETS LANDING CONDO E1.4BR,3 BA 2000.00/MO. UTILITIES INCLUDEDWITH BOAT SLIPwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4514078 Experienced Waitress / Cashier Positive Attitude a Must! Submit Resume to: PO Box 172 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 1117529 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS € CaRPEnTERS € MaCHInIST PIPE WELDERS € X-RaY WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS € SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendant (s). MARCIA M. JOHNSON, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 am., at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32329, on the 12th day of December, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 216 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SAID CITY IN GENERAL USE. This property is located at the street address of: 374 21ST AVENUE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 27, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 Email: docservice@ erwlaw.com IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if ‘,he time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. FILE # 8377ST-41040 November 21, 28, 2013 96605T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000254 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 107 Southern Blvd., Suite 203 Savannah, GA 31405 Plaintiff, vs. J. MARK MCGILL A/K/A MARK MCGILL, and MYRA MCGILL A/K/A MYRA B. MCGILL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Calhoun County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK B, RANGE 10, PICKETT’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly known as: 501 AVENUE D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the 8th day of January, 2014, at 11 :00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must me a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96611T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 13000166CA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FNMA”) Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 29, 2013, and entered in Case No. 13000166CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FNMA”) is Plaintiff and FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCES ELIZABETH MILLENDER A/K/A FRANCES E. MILLENDER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE SECOND FLOOR LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 8th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: All that certain parcel of land situated in the County Franklin, State of Florida, being known and designated as Lot 15 Block “A” of BAYWOOD ESTATES (unrecorded): Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 17, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and run North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 17 (as monumented) a distance of 553.11 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue North 89 degrees 09 minutes 53 seconds West along said South boundary 587.43 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run North 01 degrees 14 minutes 33 seconds East 413.23 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Baywood Drive, said point lying on a curve concave to the Southerly, thence run Easterly along said right-of-way boundary and along the arc of said curve with a radius of 419.16 feet, through a central angle of 21 degrees 57 minutes 46 seconds, for an arc distance of 160.67 feet, the chord of said arc being North 89 degrees 14 minutes 24 seconds East 159.69 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261) lying on the point of tangency, thence run South 79 degrees 46 minutes 43 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 430.62 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 50 minutes 07 seconds West 347.44 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH a perpetual non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress as described in Official Records Book 628, Page 488 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of October, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Rd, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates. com File No.: 13-00882 LBPS Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96613T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-75-CP Division_________ IN RE: ESTATE OF JACK EDWARD WHITE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jack Edward White, deceased, whose date of death was October 31, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 28, 2013. Personal Representative: Kimberly Dawn Robinson 4258A Maxwell Road Antioch, TN 37013 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96617T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA000061 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES B. MITCHELL, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated November 28, 2012 and pursuant to Order rescheduling foreclosure sale entered September 23, 2013, both entered in Case No. 192009CA 000061 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CHARLES B. MITCHELL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES B. MITCHELL N/K/A PATTY MITCHELL; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SGI LIMITED PARTNERSHIP; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby in FRANKLIN County, Florida, at 11AM, on the 12th day December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4, RESORT VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Street Address: LOT 4 RESORT VILLAGE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 22nd day of November, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy-Clerk If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding or other court service, program, or activity, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Requests for accommodations may be presented on this form, in another written format, or orally. Please complete the attached form and return it to: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4430 as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or other court activity. Submitted by: MOSKOWITZ, MANDELL, SALIM & SIMOWITZ, P.A. 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 Primary E-mail: relit@mmsslaw.com Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 96625T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000271 SEC.:________ THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-45 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-45, Plaintiff, vs. HOYT THOMPSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012CA000271 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 Inside the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: THE SOUTHWESTERLY 90 FEET OF LOT 6 (OR THE 90 FEET OF SAID LOT NUMBER 6 ADJOINING 13 STREET), AND ALL OF LOT 7, IN BLOCK 85, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT SAID CITY NOW IN GENERAL USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 21st DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Nov. 28, Dec. 5, 2013 j j ADOPT: j j AStay Home Mom, Prof Dad, Travel awaitj Carolyn & Chris j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL71382 to 56654 Admin/Clerical Part Time Receptionist Busy law firm seeking PT Receptionist. Send resumes to PO Box 327 Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34272996 Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route Driver Average 10 stops. Home base Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID# 34272333Text FL72333 to 56654 Admin/Clerical FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Library Assistant/ Permanent/Part TimeClosing Date: 12/11/13 Annual Salary : $10.00 hour/26.00 hours per week Contact: Anne Birchwell, Director Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Rd. Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone (850) 670-8151 Remit Applications to : Franklin County Clerk of Courts 33 Market Street /Suite 203 Apalachicola, FL 32320 The Franklin County Board of commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required; Ability to operate library equipment, i.e. copiers, faxes, scanning; Customer service, sequencing skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work in a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Qualifications High School Diploma. Associates or Bachelor’s preferred. Library experience helpful. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and flexible. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards are necessary. Assignment will require travel/work at both library branches. Web Id 34273522 Text FL73522 to 56654 Education Infant/Toddler Caregivers are needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/ AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34273112 Text FL73112 to 56654 Medical/Health Franklin Co. Domestic Violence Counselor For Refuge House Region 1. Franklin County. If you’re interested, please visit our website at: www.refugehouse.com to see the postion description. Contact Charlotte Arons at 850-922-6062 for information. Web ID 34271630 Sales/Business Dev.Commissioned Sales PositionExperienced, FL licensed Real Estate sales associate to take over 100 leads for Carrabelle & Lanark Village, MUST know Carrabelle real estate market & live in the area, some closing support & training as needed. Contact John Shelby, Broker St. George Island Realty 850-899-0108 Web Id 34273009 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL71777 to 56654 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-227-7234 Eastpoint Apartments Accepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom handicap and nonhandicap units. Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer” Text FL72436 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft, L/P Opt, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Proof of income required. 954-816-7004 Text FL71079 to 56654 St. George Island, 3 Br 2 Bath, Furnished Contemporary Home, with Gulf View, 12 month Lease, $1,600 mo, w/o utilities, 813-631 0344 3 Bdrm, 1 Bath Mobile Home. $600 per month 622 Ridge Rd Eastpoint 850-653-5763 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $73,000. Call (850) 524-1257 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, November 28, 2013 J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 249957 $129,000 St George Island SECOND TIER L OT L o c at e d o n t h e s o ut h s i d e o f E a s t G u l f B e a c h D r i ve d i r e c t l y o n t h e b i k e p at h o n l y o n e l o t a w a y f ro m t h e c o r n e r o f 6 t h S t r e e t f o r q u i c k b e a c h a c c e s s t h i s l o t i s 1 / 3 a c r e m e a s u r i n g 1 0 0 x 1 5 0 b u i l d n o w o r h o l d a s i n ve s t m e n t T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 250325 $95,000 A palachicola CLASSIC HIST ORIC COTT A GE R e a d y f o r r e n o v at i o n a n d u s e a s a b u s i n e s s o r h o m e h e a r t p i n e o o r i n g w a l l s a n d c e i l i n g s t h ro u g h o u t r a r e l y f o u n d m e t a l s h i n g l e ro o f H i s t o r i c N o r t h s i d e c o r n e r H i g h w a y 9 8 a n d 1 0 t h S t r e e t o n c e h o m e t o C ap t a i n R o b i n W a l b r i d g e o f t h e H MS B ou n t y O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast MLS# 249258 $139,000 31 Re x Buzzett St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 PRICE REDUCED on this nicely remodeled 3 bedroom/2 ba th home in a quiet area of A palachicola sitting on 4 city lots. Grea t property for 1st time home buyer or investment. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 249088 $275,000 401 St. James A ve. #10 Carrabelle, FL 32322 F isherman's Geta way! Beautiful 2 bedroom/2 ba th unit in Riverside a t Carrabelle. Unit comes with a designa ted boa t slip with 10,000 lb. boa t lift. Currently the least expensive river front to wn home a vailable in Carrabelle. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 !! !! % BRING AN OFFER! " ( % % # % " # ( " " ( ( " " ( ( % # " & & % ( # " # ( $ % % By Tevis Page Special to the Times Last week was a doozy. Students and teachers were participating in a school wide door contest for Parent Appreciation Day on Thursday, Nov. 21. A myriad of parents made appearances and the kids loved it! Yearbook put together slideshows to showcase what the activities the students have participated in since the beginning of the year. Along with the parents’ appreciation, progress reports went out. Many students were surprisingly pleased, while some were disheartened. It is almost scary to know that the semester is winding to an end. As last week drew to a screeching halt, the high school cheerleaders threw an amazing pep rally. Basketball and soccer players were presented before the reenactment of the cowboys and Indians. The cheerleaders were Indians and Sammy the Seahawk was the cowboy. It was such a great way to end the week. Now this week is short and full of quizzes and tests. It is amazing how when there is a short week, how much more work you have to do. Even though we are not looking forward to the tests, we are looking forward to the fiveday weekend. Thanks, Seahawks! Progress reports, pep rally and 5-day break HAWK TALK “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Benjamin Franklin unsuccessfully proposed what bird to be our national symbol? Eagle, Turkey, Pigeon, Swan 2) Thanksgiving is currently observed in the U.S. on what number Thursday in November? 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th 3) What year did the Pilgrims rst come to North America? 1492, 1510, 1620, 1776 4) Which “John” was rst governor of the Plymouth Colony? Smith, Carver, Standish, Adams 5) What was the 1st colonial agreement forming a government, the Mayower “what”? Charter, Declaration, Compact, Ordinance 6) Which “William” served as religious leader of the Plymouth Colony? Penn, Brewster, Hawthorne, Poe 7) What was the Native Americans’ clothing mainly made from during this era? Tobacco leaves, Water lilies, Animal skins, Tree bark 8) What Plymouth military advisor was remembered in Longfellow’s poem, “The Courtship of”? Horatio Alger, Jack Smith, George Strait, Miles Standish 9) Who mainly cared for the Pilgrims’ beer kegs on their New World journey? Samuel Adams, John Alden, Jacob Astor, John Smith 10) What Patuxet Indian saved the rst Pilgrims from starving? Pinto, Wampano, Squanto, Simba 11) A wild turkey has a eld of vision of about how many degrees? 170, 220, 270, 320 12) About how many tons does the real Plymouth Rock weigh? 2, 4, 6, 8 13) A pumpkin is perhaps described as a? Fruit, Vegetable, Protein, starch 14) What state produces the most pumpkins? Florida, Georgia, Texas, Illinois ANSWERS 1) Turkey. 2) 4th. 3) 1620. 4) Carver. 5) Compact. 6) Brewster. 7) Animal skins. 8) Miles Standish. 9) John Alden. 10) Squanto. 11) 270. 12) 4. 13) Fruit. 14) Illinois. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com M aA RINE laLA B O ffFF ERS DEC. 4 OYS tT ER wW OR kK S hH OP An “Introduction to Oyster Culture Gear and Suppliers Workshop” will be 1-4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab, 3618 Coastal Highway 98, St. Teresa, The introductory workshop is being offered by the University of Florida IFAS Cooperative Extension Service in partnership with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Division of Aquaculture. Topics to be introduced in this introductory workshop on intensive oyster cultivation are hands-on discussion of oyster culture gear types — advantages, disadvantages, costs, and considerations for siting, deployment, and operational management; where to buy culture gear and oyster seed; information on suppliers; and an overview of oyster aquaculture activities in Louisiana. The workshop is free. To ensure there are enough handouts available, conrm your attendance with Portia Sapp, FDACS Division of Aquaculture, 488-5471, Portia. Sapp@FreshfromFlorida.com; or Leslie Sturmer, UF IFAS Shellsh Aquaculture Extension Program, 352-543-5057, LNST@u.edu.