The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00245

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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Feds OK emergency loans By SCOTT CARROLL 522-5180 | @scottyknoxville scarroll@pcnh.com An economic injury declaration seeking loans for small businesses affected by the collapse of the commercial oyster industry in the Florida Panhandle was approved Friday by the U.S. Small Business Administration. The declaration was requested Oct. 23 by Gov. Rick Scott, who cited a historic decline in the oyster supply of Apalachicola Bay. Franklin, Gulf, Liberty and Wakulla counties are included in the declaration. Small businesses, small aquaculture businesses, small agriculture cooperatives and most private nonpro t organizations in those counties will be eligible for as much as $2 million in low-interest loans, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration. The group’s lead public affairs specialist in its of ce of disaster assistance, Mark Ihenacho, said affected businesses were immediately eligible to apply for the loans, but Friday it wasn’t clear how many would. The loan amount a business receives will depend on its credit history, income and insurance status, Ihenacho said. “By law, we’re required to make sure that anybody who gets the loan has the ability to repay the loan,” he said. The deadline to apply for the loans is July 31, 2014. The EIDL assistance will be made available to those businesses and owners who cannot provide for their own See LOANS A10 Haunted Halloween, A6 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com APALACHICOLA — If the size of the oyster eaters’ appetites is an accurate gauge, Saturday’s crowd at the 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival was a bellyful for the record books. A late thunderstorm Friday night, followed by an overcast morning, gave way to crisp, sunny weather, ideal for taking in a podium full of competitors guzzling mollusks. For Gerald “G” Goodman, of Southport, it came very close to eschewing chewing, and swallowing them whole, and he quickly pulled into the obvious lead in the 15-minute contest. His shaven head even drew cheers and heckles, some taunting “Kojak” that he wouldn’t keep them all down by the time County Attorney Michael Shuler blew the whistle. OYSTER INDUSTRY COLLAPSE DAYS OF GOLD Schools to celebrate Veteran’s Day The Franklin County School and Apalachicola Bay Charter School invite all veterans to a Veterans Day celebration on Monday, Nov. 11. There will be a breakfast for all veterans at 9 a.m. in the Franklin County School media center. The Veterans Day program will begin at 10 a.m. in the gymnasium. Senior Citizens Fall Fest Saturday The Fall Festival will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 102 Ave. F. Kick off holiday shopping at this event featuring local artists, vendor booths, arts and crafts, food, games and children’s activities. Call 697-3760. Lanark gumbo cook-off Saturday The St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department annual charity gumbo cookoff will be Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Lanark Village Boat Club, 2364 U.S. 98. Competition gumbo will be sold after judging. Gumbo dinners, prepared by the re ghters’ culinary staff, are available for sit-down or to-go. Prizes are $500 for rst, $250 second and $100 for third. Activities include auctions and live music. Call 567-4161 ‘Any Number Can Die’ Nov. 15-17 Get ready for the opening show in the Panhandle Players’ season when “Any Number Can Die,” a comic murder mystery by Fred Carmichael, plays Nov. 15-17 at the Dixie Theatre. Directed by Megan Lamb, the show promises laughs, gasps and surprises when the audience hears “two hoots by dusk, two bodies by dawn.” Tickets are $15 for Friday and Saturday evening, and Sunday afternoon, and can be purchased at Apalachicola’s Downtown Books, the Butler Agency in Eastpoint and Carrabelle Junction. County seeks new extension agent By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Bill Mahan, Franklin County’s extension agent for the past 20 years, was transferred to Panama City last week, with a permanent replacement expected to be hired within the next four to six months. “It is a personnel issue, and that’s all I can share at this time,” said Pete Vergot, northwest district extension director for University of Florida IFAS Extension, in a telephone interview Monday. Vergot said Mahan was transferred to the Bay County extension of ce as of Oct. 29, FLORIDA SEAFOOD FESTIVAL Enormous crowd on hand for 50th anniversary festival Sanders to senators: No Air Force in forest By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders appealed to a Florida Senate committee last month to back traditional uses, and not military exercises, in the Tate’s Hell State Forest. “All we’re asking for is to stand on your word,” she told the Senate Agriculture Committee Oct. 7. “Your handshake is a handshake; I don’t care how old it gets. The people in Franklin County wanted this land in preservation to protect traditional uses and to be able to go there.” Sanders appeared as a guest of committee chair State Sen. Bill Montford, DMonticello, whose district includes all of Franklin County. She followed an appearance on the agenda by Florida State Forester Jim Karels. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times TOP LEFT: Celebrity chef Jeff McInnis offered samples of fried shrimp seasoned with Tabasco sauce as part of booth celebrating the famed hot sauce. TOP RIGHT: King Retsyo Vance Millender and Miss Florida Seafood Morgan Martin wave from the parade. ABOVE LEFT: Headliner Kellie Pickler performs Saturday night. Pickler broke out red high heels, below, for her nale song of the same name. ABOVE RIGHT: Gerald Goodman of Southport downed 27 dozen oysters to triumph at the festival. BELOW: Dr. Photis Nichols, who practiced medicine in Apalachicola for more than 50 years, returned from Jacksonville for the parade, riding the Weems Hospital oat with Valencia Marsh, left, and Glenda Wilson. Schools to celebrate xxxxx Thursday, November 7, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 128 ISSUE 28 xxxxx Out to see Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . . A11 xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxx Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us Index See EXTENSION A5 See AIR FORCE A5 See FESTIVAL A10

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m County commissioners voted Tuesday to complete renova tions of the Fort Coombs Armory and create a new visitor center for Eastpoint over the next 11 months, at a combined cost of $300,000 to $500,000. At the county commission meeting, Commissioner Pinki Jackel reported on an in-house assessment of the former Florida Highway Patrol station in East point. For the past year, she has advocated using Tourist Devel opment Council (TDC) funds to transform the site into a visi tor center and maritime history museum. She said the building has been “abandoned and vandalized” and is in “very poor condition,” describing it as a block building with a “pretty good roof.” Jackel said it needs both cosmetic work and interior repairs. Jackel said Poloronis Con struction of Apalachicola esti mated the cost of renovation at around $120,000. “Some items are in ux,” she said. “Several items we’re not sure about until we dig around and a couple we can opt out of. We hope we can get it in at under $100,000.” In response to Chair Cheryl Sanders’ request last month for a business plan, Jackel said a $35,000 stipend previously awarded by the TDC to the East point Visitor Center would pay for “electricity, water, telephone service, postage and all other regular budgeted expenses.” Jackel said revenues for the TDC exceeded expenses for the scal year, which ended Sept. 30. She said payments promised for renovations to the Armory, and for Seafood Workers Park, formerly Lombardi Seafood, had been made. “We have $61,000 to carry for ward for the Armory,” she said. “Funding for Lombardi and the Armory will not be dipped into.” Commissioners designated the Armory as a convention cen ter in May 2011 and began reno vation of the building under the direction of architect Warren Emo, after Steve Goodman and Carl Holliday, of Indianapolis, Ind., sought to lease the building and privately fund its restoration for use as a venue for weddings. The county moved to earmark more than $230,000 for renova tions in 2011-12, with Sanders stipulating that the TDC “use any and all excess funding that is not already encumbered to reno vate the Armory and complete the Lombardi Seafood Landing project so it will satisfy the re quirements in its management plan including the completion of the maritime heritage museum” planned for the park west of Apalachicola. On Tuesday, Commissioner Noah Lockley objected to the Eastpoint project. “We need to discuss this thing rst,” he said. “We have a project open which is the Armory. We’re not nished with it. We have visi tor centers open in Carrabelle and Apalachicola. We support them. We never just took a county building and gave it to them. “I haven’t seen anybody in the audience say they support this. I have no problem furnishing them with the $35,000. We might want to check and see if it’s legal to have a private organization come in here and we furnish them with a build ing,” he said. Jackel has proposed having a not-for-prot entity run the pro posed visitor center. She noted that the St. George Island visitor center is a county-owned building managed by a not-for-prot. “I’m sure I could come up with some others,” she said. “I want to make sure we fulll our commitment to the Armory,” said Sanders. “I am in favor of (the Eastpoint Visitor Center), but I’m not sure how that’s go ing to affect the Armory and Lombardi.” Sanders said she received numerous complaints about the Armory’s lack of air conditioning after the King Retsyo Ball held there Friday night. TDC Director Curt Blair said money for the Eastpoint center could come from the TDC’s con tingency reserve. “We’re always over budget,” he said. “I can’t predict what we’re going to need for the Ar mory at this point. We’re expect ing an additional $200,000 in reve nue. We’ll have the nal numbers in December.” Lockley said, “We’re piece mealing the Armory. Last year (the TDC) said they didn’t have any money. Now they’re coming up with some.” Jackel said the Armory renovation was “a three-year project.” Lockley asked why the East point center wasn’t a three-year project too. He said the county could construct a new building of the same size for less than it will cost to renovate the highway pa trol building. Sanders said she was sur prised at the high cost of the renovation. “I thought it would be around $60,000,” she said. “I originally thought it would be around $90,000,” Jackel said. “We ran some numbers. Mr. Polo ronis was looking at the worst case.” Commissioner Smokey Par rish said he shared Lockley’s concerns. “To me it’s not quite equitable,” he said. Jackel moved the county go out for bids to renovate the high way patrol station with a cap of $100,000 on the project. The mo tion passed 3-2, with Lockley and Parrish opposed. “I have to vote for it not to exceed $100,000,” said Sanders. “That’s the only reason I go with that.” Lockley then moved the TDC provide money to nish renova tions to the Armory over the next scal year, ending Sept. 30, 2014. The motion passed unanimously. County Planner Alan Pierce said he could not be sure of the cost of completing Armory renovations. He said the county spent more than $240,000 on the project over the last scal year replacing the roof and dealing with other mois ture-related issues. Pierce said the next step would be replac ing the wiring and plumbing, and that each of these upgrades could run around $100,000. “The upgrade to the kitchen is undened,” he said. Pierce said the cost of furnish ing the building with central heat and air conditioning was also an unknown. It’ s Recruitment T ime... and WE W ANT YO U FRANKLIN COUNTY SW A T (Students W orking Ag ainst T obacco) If you are a student between the ages of 11-17 and w ould lik e to join us in the ght ag ainst Big T obacco who is constantly using their tactics to lure you, your f amily and your best friends to become lifetime users of their deadly tobacco products, then SW A T is for Y OU! (W e ha v e SW A T Clubs in Apalachicola, Eastpoint (Franklin County School) and Carrabelle) F or mor e inf ormation please call (850) 653-2111 ext 123. The T obacco-F ree F ranklin Partnership Coalition is cur rentl y looki n g f or new membe r s to he lp counte r ac t the nor malcy of tobacco us e he re i n F r ankl i n County and ach ieve our g oal of a T obacco-F ree F ranklin if y ou are i nte res ted i n jo i n i n g us to mak e F r ankl i n County a health ie r place to l i ve wor k, and play i n or woul d l ik e i nf or mati on abou t our meeti n gs, pleas e call (850) 653-2111 e xt 123. NOAH LOCK lL EY PI nN KI JACKE lL County backs Eastpoint visitor center, Armory upgrade PHOTOS BY LOIS OIS SS W OBO OBO D A A | The Times County Commissioners voted to complete revovations of the Eastpoint Visitors Center, left, and Fort Coombs Armory Convention Center.

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The Times | A3 Thursday, November 7, 2013 B l o o d Pr e s s u r e S cr e en i n g BMI Ch e c k D e n ta l I nfor m a t i on T o b a cco P r e v e n t i on I nf or m a t i on D i a b et es A w a r e ness I n f o r ma t i o n F l u S h o ts C a nce r A w a r e ness I n f o r ma t i o n O r a l C a n c er S cr e en i n g N u t r i t i on A w a r e n e s s I nfor m a t i on H e a l th y S t a r t/H e a l th y F a m i l y F ar m S h ar e T r u ck F or m or e i nfor m a t i on p l e a s e c on ta c t 850-653-2111 e xt 102 U ni t y in the C o mm uni t y H e a l th F a ir F r e e A dmiss i o n a nd O p e n t o the Pu b li c! W i l l K en dr ic k S p o r ts C o m p lex 1601 K enn et h C o p e A v e C a r ra b e l le Fl 32322 N o v e m b e r 9, 2013 f r o m 11a m-4p m Sp on s or e d B y : F l o ri d a D e p a r t me n t o f H e a l th in F r a n k lin C o un t y C l os in g the G a p P r o g r a m a nd M o un t O liv e AME C h ur ch S at u r d a y N o v em b e r 1 0 t h 1 0 a m 4 p m L A N A R K V I L L A G E B O A T C L U B & M A R I N A 2 3 6 4 U S H w y 9 8 | L a n a rk F L P R I Z E W IN NIN G G U M B O C OOK I N G S T A R T S A T 1 0 A M 5 t h AN N U AL C H AR I T Y S t J am e s / L an ark V o l u n t e er F i r e D e p ar t m en t SA V E T H E DA T E I T S A L L G R E A T G M BO C O OK OF F L I V E A U C T I ON 1 2 : 3 0 P M FU N F I L L E D R A F F L E M o n d a y N o v e m b e r 1 1 2 0 1 3 9 a m E ST a t P o r t S t J o e H i g h Sc h o o l e p u b l i c i s c o r d i a l l y in v i t e d t o t h e a n n u a l c o m m u n i t y w i de V e t e r a n s D a y C e r e m o n i e s W e s in c e r e l y h o p e t h a t y o u w i l l b e ab l e t o a t t e n d a n d j o in u s in p a y in g t r i b u t e t o a n d g i v in g h o n o r t o o u r V e t e r a ns w h o h av e g i v e n s a c r i c i a l l y t o p r e s e r v e t h e e e d o m s t h a t w e e n j o y in Am e r i c a t o d ay V e t e r a n 's D ay C e l e br a t i o n THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m Law Enforcement By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A 51-year-old Carrabelle man was arrested Saturday for at tempted murder after he alleg edly stabbed two men earlier that morning on the Carrabelle docks. David B. Keith, Sr. was arrest ed at his home, and taken to the jail about 10 a.m. Saturday morn ing. He had his rst appearance on Sunday before Circuit Judge Frank Shefeld. Keith was charged with ag gravated battery — great bodily harm, and attempted rst-degree murder, and later posted a surety bond of $40,000 for his release. According to a report by Car rabelle Police Ofcer Gary Hun nings, the incident happened sometime before 2:08 a.m. Satur day on the dock behind Fathom’s Raw Bar, 201 St. James Avenue. Hunnings said when he ar rived at the scene, there was a man lying on the ground, with several people over him. He said John Shane Evans, 40, of Crawfordville, “came up and was holding his stomach, saying that he and his friend had been stabbed. Evans had his left hand over his stomach, slightly on the left side.” After Evans held up his shirt, Hunnings said he saw “blood was coming from the wound. It looked like some of his intestines were coming out of the hole in his stomach.” Evans told the ofcer that his friend, James L. McIntyre, 23, of Sopchoppy, “was worse than he was.” Hunnings said he approached McIntyre, who “was laying on the ground covered in blood.” The ofcer said McIntyre had appar ently sustained cuts to the left forearm and left side of the stom ach, and a small cut under the left eye. Hunnings said McIntyre “was unable to talk, was very intoxicat ed and wounded very bad.” The Carrabelle police ofcer said the men had been drinking with friends at nearby Harry’s Bar, when they came upon Keith and a woman, Kimberly Ann Wal lace, 43, who were walking to wards them, Evans said McIntyre and Keith got into a “verbal altercation (be fore) Keith pulled out a knife and started slashing (McIntyre). Evans told the ofcer that Mc Intyre fell to the ground and that Keith “started kicking James in the face. “Keith then got over James and drew the knife and was go ing to stab him again,” Hunnings wrote in his report. Evans said he told Keith to stop, and then “ran up and kicked Keith in the face to stop him.” Keith then stabbed Evans in the stomach, Evans told the ofcer. Evans said Wallace yelled for Keith “to go and run,” and the man ran to his motorcycle and sped away. Hunnings notied Sheriff’s Deputy Robert Shiver to go after him. Shiver later spotted Keith driving north on Highway 67, and attempted to catch up to him, but was unable to. Shiver drove to Keith’s resi dence and saw the motorcycle abandoned in a eld not far from the house. Both men were said to be recovering from their injuries as of press time. Two wounded in Carrabelle kningDAVIdD KEITH, SR.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, November 7, 2013 A Page 4 Section Special to the Times The values of hard work, discipline and mission orientation are what employers want and what veterans have. Recognizing the tremendous value of those who have served our country, Florida Gov. Rick Scott has proclaimed November 2013 as Hire a Veteran Month. The governor’s proclamation reaf rms our commitment to those who have served our nation. Coordinated by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs, workforce partners, Workforce Florida, Inc. and the 24 regional workforce boards, including Gulf Coast Workforce Board, this initiative is designed to remind employers of the unmatched economic resource provided by our state’s veterans. “Florida is home to an estimated 1.6 million veterans, the third largest population of veterans in our nation,” said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. “Our veterans possess valuable leadership, as well as business and technical skills gained while serving their country. They are a versatile and well-trained resource for employers and Florida is fortunate to have ready access to such a highlyskilled workforce.” However, according to the Sept. 2013 Bureau of Labor Statistics Of ce of Economic Opportunity Veterans Bene ts Administration Employment Facts and Statics Report, compared to the national unemployment rate of 7.2 percent, Florida veterans ages 18-24 have an unemployment rate of 22.8 percent, and Florida veterans ages 25-34 have an unemployment rate of 12.1 percent, far above the national rates. The most recent data available for Workforce Region 4 (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) are more promising, which is a testimony to the vetfriendly business environment in the region, a trend we want to continue. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board currently works with many employers who already see the value of hiring vets. One of these is Val Johnson III, human resource manager at Lowes said, “I hire vets because there isn’t another densely populated candidate pool that consistently produces well developed professionals that are, driven, accountable, handle pressure well, and are trained leaders. I hire vets to serve the people who have already served me!” The Veterans Job Seekers Program offers a wealth of resources, including specialized a Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPS), staff who work solely with the veteran population. Veterans can work with a veteran’s employment specialist at the one stop center to receive assistance with resumes, acquire skills and education, plan a career, attend workshops, and take advantage of many other resources. THE JOBLESS PICTURE The following information, prepared last month by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, is based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 2011 American Community Survey. It is based on data from 2011, the most up-to-date statistics available for the Franklin County veterans’ labor force. • Out of 69 vets age 18 to 34, none were unemployed. • Out of 231 vets age 35 to 54, 20 were unemployed,, or 8.7 percent • Out of 195 vets age 55 to 64, none were unemployed. • Out of 495 total veterans, 20 were unemployed, or 4.0 percent Special to the Times Florida’s manatees are having a record year. Unfortunately, the records they are breaking are measured in carcasses washing ashore in our coastal communities. A “worst ever” red tide event earlier this year in southwest Florida and a lingering unusual mortality event in the Indian River Lagoon on Florida’s east coast have made it a really dif cult year to be a manatee. And to those who would argue that “we have more manatees, so we have more deaths,” let me stop you right there. The deaths we are seeing have nothing to do with the size of the manatee population. These deaths are not natural controls on a growing population. They are a loud and clear signal that our waterways are in trouble. When the 2010 manatee mortality statistics were nalized at 766, that was signi cant, frightening, and sad – several hundred more deaths than had ever been recorded in a single year, many the result of a prolonged cold weather event. It was regarded as a rare event; an anomaly. Here we are again, less than three years later, having broken that 2010 record only 10 months into the year. As of Oct. 29, 769 Florida manatees had died. Of those, 123 were stillborn, newborn, or young calves less than ve feet in length – another record, and 49 of these were found in Brevard County, at the epicenter of the unusual mortality event linked to a variety of algal blooms and loss of 47,000 acres of seagrass since 2010. There’s little question that human mistreatment of the Indian River Lagoon had a hand to play in the disastrous cascade that began in 2010. On the southwest coast, during the peak of the red tide, manatees were dying so fast that scientists didn’t have the time or resources to conduct post-mortem exams on all of them before committing them to mass graves. Red tide is another one of those natural events to which our species adds fuel to the proverbial re with our coastal nutrient runoff. If you haven’t seen and felt the effects of red tide or the algal blooms in the Indian River Lagoon, then this article might not mean very much to you. Our species has a keen ability to ignore that which we don’t see ourselves. Unfortunately, until we all, each and every one of us, accept that we’re part of the problem, and even more importantly, an integral part of the solution, there’s little hope for our canaries in the coal mines: our manatees and their imperiled habitat. Dr. Tripp has been Save the Manatee Club’s director of science and Conservation since May 2008. She received her doctorate in veterinary medical sciences from the University of Florida, where she conducted research on manatee physiology. For more information on manatees and to learn about the Club’s Adopt-A-Manatee program, go to www. savethemanatee.org. The record you don’t want to break KATIE TRIPP, PH.D. Guest Columnist Well, in this world some things change and some remain the same. Last month, the Apalachicola Municipal Library Board voted to stay in the 74 Sixth Street (Gorrie Square) location, rather than move to the former Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) building at Scipio Creek. The ANERR site had been seen by some as a positive possibility to expand the library, as the Gorrie Square location is only 1,500 square feet, and has run out of space. The new plan will be to re-purpose some areas, and weed out a lot of older books that circulate very infrequently or not at all. Weeding collections is considered an important aspect of modern public library management, keeping those books that have the highest circulation, along with classics, special collections and titles of regional interest. But, don’t worry, the majority of what you want will still be here, and what is not can be obtained through Interlibrary Loan. What you won’t nd in the library after Nov. 15 is one of our classics, Sue Cronkite. Sue is relocating further south, and plans to proactively work on manuscripts she has wanted to publish for some time. I don’t know how many users of the library realize the gem we have had in our midst, but let me tell you a little about what she has done in her time here. Sue is a dogged researcher, a person whose patience and attention to detail is beyond most people’s skills. She took all the books which refer to things in the city and surrounding areas and entered them into an Excel spreadsheet with citation documentation. The list is now more than 1,500 unique names. This allows any staff person to look up a family name for a visitor and tell them whether we have any information in published works. This has saved the librarian untold moments of that look of total blankness, when a family is not one of the prominent ones. This project has a phase two, where all the names from the Chestnut Cemetery list, electronically converted by Beth Wright, for the Apalachicola Area Historical Society, will be added. This will increase the size of the database by quite a lot, but sadly Sue will not be here to do it. Sue’s resume lists a lot of writing awards that I was not particularly aware of. I did know that she was a “newspaper woman” in a previous life and she often authored the library column with wonderful tidbits from Margaret Key’s papers and letters. At the Birmingham News alone, she was an editorial page writer, assistant state editor, night city editor, layout and makeup editor as well as a feature writer and reporter. She also has an extensive educational background in communications, English literature and psychology from a number of educational institutions. In short, she was working below her capacity here at the Apalachicola library, but offered us great resources and skills, including proofreading these columns. Her nal project has been to prepare the Harry P. Owens doctoral thesis, “Apalachicola Before 1861” into book format, print ready, which hopefully will to be out by March 2014. I don’t know what we will do without her, but we wish her every success in her next endeavors. She was hoping to slip out of town unnoticed, but I think you should come by to see her and wish her well. She will be dearly missed. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Library staying put, but losing a classic @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Clari cation In last week’s story, it should have been noted that Miss Florida Seafood, Franklin County High School junior Morgan Martin is the daughter of Teresa Ann Martin, of Apalachicola, and Henry Martin, of Destin; and the granddaughter of Betty and the late Henry Fred Stephens, of Apalachicola; and Freddie Jefferson, of Miami. Sue Cronkite at work at the library Scott proclaims November ‘Hire a Veteran Month’ “Our veterans possess valuable leadership, as well as business and technical skills gained while serving their country. They are a versatile and well-trained resource for employers and Florida is fortunate to have ready access to such a highly-skilled workforce.” Kim Bodine Executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board PATRICK M. ROSE | Save the Manatee Club

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, November 7, 2013 In December 2012, Gov. Rick Scott’s ofce and the Air Force announced a partnership agree ment in which Eglin Air Force Base would lease, for limited times throughout the year, a portion of the Tate’s Hell and Blackwater River state forests. This would be part of the landscape portion of the Gulf Regional Airspace Strate gic Initiative, a plan to create op tions in the Panhandle to relieve airspace congestion over Eglin by expanding military training opera tions to these two state forests. In his remarks opening the hear ing, Karels outlined the Florida Forest Service’s mission, stressing the “stewardship ethic” and the importance of public access to the land. “It’s called Tate’s Hell, and the name ts,” Karels said. “It’s 214,000 acres, beautiful country, very remote country, as remote as you will see in Florida. They have dwarf cypress, and they look like God mowed the top off the trees. “It’s a very beautiful place, criti cal to the estuary of Apalachicola Bay and the environment of that region of the state,” he said, de scribing how these timberlands, extending from the beach and U.S. 98 to the national forest, were ac quired some years back by the state from former owner Buckeye Cellulose Corp. Karels indicated more talks will be held with the Air Force regard ing use of Tate’s Hell. “What we’re looking at with the military, and it’s still in discussion, is that about nine months ago the commissioner signed a letter of agreement. We agreed to talk to them,” he said. “All that agreement says is, ‘We’ll talk to you. We’ll en tertain looking at opportunities.’” With air space increasingly crowded over Eglin, limits on ground-level training opportuni ties are forcing the expansion, Karels said. Blackwater has a closed-down training site, with “old rotted build ings we don’t use anymore. They want to practice urban warfare without any live rounds.” The Franklin County site would be for more wilderness training. “Tate’s Hell ts that rough stuff,” he said. “Outside of hunting season, outside of impacts to them, (we want to) try to allow them a few training missions where they come in with those special ops, they drop them off, and they come in with planes with big balloon wheels that can land on those rough roads down there, designed to drop those guys behind military lines. “Those special ops then have to go to a point 20 to 30 miles away,” Karels said. “I don’t know how they’ll make it across Tate’s Hell on foot. “It’s geared to low-impact, both to the environment and to the us ers,” he said. “We’ll have complete control if we decide to do anything, so if one of the missions has an im pact where it does something to the recreational users that’s not good, we’ll say we’re not going to do that anymore. “But we haven’t signed any thing. We’re still in the discussion stage,” Karels said. County pushes back In her comments, Sanders spe cically addressed Karel’s refer ence to hunting. “There is not a time in Tate’s Hell that is not usable season,” she said. “He’s talking about hunting season. You have hunting season. It’s sort of like people living in the centers from Miami. A lot of people go to the malls, different places like that. “Guess where we go in Frank lin County when we do our outdoor activities? The forests,” Sanders said. “That’s our mall. That’s our thing.” Sanders is the daughter of Ralph G. Kendrick, who once worked for the state forest service, served on the county commission and for whom the boardwalk to the stand of dwarf cypress trees is named. “I’m one of the old-timers here, so just give me a few minutes,” Sanders said in her introduction. “We the people of Franklin County supported the sale of over 185,000 acres to the state of Florida for conservation and preservation, all the way from the early ’90s all the way to 2002 and 2003. “We the people of Franklin County knew that we had to have a choice to utilize our land in tra ditional uses,” she said. “Or we could leave it on the tax rolls. But people of Franklin County chose, and knew, that it was worth more saving it, conserving it, then it was to have the money on the tax roll.” In recounting the circumstanc es surrounding the public scoping meeting the Air Force held at Bat tery Park in the summer, Sanders said Franklin County has been left somewhat in the darkened woods. “My fears is this: We have had no public input whatsoever with this concerning the military,” she said. “On Aug. 29, the military, Eg lin, came down to Apalachicola and met there. We knew a week prior; we didn’t know what it was about. We get up there and were told by the military….” It was here that Sanders inter jected that “I love the Florida For est Service, I love them, but we don’t need no military. “The military told the people of Franklin County ‘we will take your comments, we will listen to your comments, but we won’t answer no questions,’” Sanders contin ued. “This was the rst we heard of the state having talks with the military. “It really concerns us that due process has not taken effect and that the people of Franklin County, who supported the sale of land to the state for preservation, have not been afforded an opportunity to have their say. “The thoughts of CV 22s, big old helicopters, that just scares me,” Sanders said, referring to the Air Force’s tiltrotor aircraft, nick named the Osprey. “With 185,000 acres in Tate’s Hell, it’s everybody’s backyard in Franklin County.” with a temporary team of extension agent staffers, led by interim county direc tor Shelly Swenson, now handling his duties. “We work with the board (of county commissioners) on those decisions, but it was a personnel decision that was made,” Vergot said. “We hope to continue the extension program, and we know there are issues that extension can assist. “We’ll be doing some lis tening sessions on the most important needs,” he said. “We know there’s some ex pectation among shellsh workers and the seafood industry, so those are most likely the high priorities.” Swenson lives in Wakul la County, where she han dles family and consumer sciences and an expanded food and nutrition educa tion program and is a 4-H agent. Vergot briefed the county commission on his decision at Tuesday morning’s meet ing and was questioned very little about what had happened with Mahan. The only person to speak out was the Rev. John Sink, wearing a hat touting the century-old land grant system that gave rise to the network of extension agents throughout rural ar eas of the country. Sink said he was “ap palled” that the University of Florida had reassigned Mahan. “He focused on our seafood industry, which is the lifeblood of this county,” he said. “I’ve been in the land grant system all my life. I’m really disappointed at the university being able to do this.” The county commis sioners voted unanimously to send Mahan a thank-you for his years of service to the county, dating back to 1993. Vergot shared a packet with commissioners that indicated the University of Florida and U.S. Depart ment of Agriculture spend about $142,000 annually on the county extension ofce, including about $99,000 for agent salary and benets, and another $43,000 for ad ministrative support. The county kicks in another $68,000 per year, most of it for support staff and for the ofce space. “The board of county commissioners will have a big input,” Vergot said. “They are a substantial partner for the position.” Vergot said with several ongoing research projects on the seafood industry, with involvement from Uni versity of Florida faculty Karl Havens, Steve Otwell and several others, the uni versity has been actively involved in the county. But, he said, there’s more that needs to be done, and listening sessions in December should help the future of the county pro gram take shape. “Right now, the faculty that are there are going to be talking to clientele preparing for those,” Ver got said. “We’re looking at what we can do in the short term and then developing long-term goals and longterm plans.” He said it could be at least March or April be fore a permanent replace ment is on board. “We hope we would continue with the team with Gulf and Wakulla County people to continue to provide all that extension has to offer to the area,” Vergot said. A draft of the job de scription outlines the job’s duties and responsibilities. It notes that a master’s de gree is required, a PhD is preferred, and the degree must be from an accredited college or university. It said degrees consid ered are of marine policy, coastal management, ma rine recreation, resource development, commercial sheries, aquaculture, marine biology, resource economics or other relat ed disciplines. Extension programming experience in the commercial or rec reational sheries area is preferred. “We hope to have a full role where we’re offering all of our extension pro grams to clientele so we can meet as many needs as possible,” Vergot said. “There are a huge number of needs. There are oppor tunities in family consumer science areas. We’ve been able to bring in program assistance in our family nu trition program and people though extending the vol unteer base.” He said possible pro gram expansion includes adding the master natural ist and master gardener programs, and adding volunteers through 4H program. He said addi tional grant opportunities might be available, as well as greater outreach with the schools, such as in the case of Ray Carter in Gulf County. “We hope that Franklin County can see the chang es in extension programs in the very near future,” Vergot said. “We hope to have a bigger presence than people have seen in the past. We can’t do what we do without the county’s partnership in making this work.” Im p la nt s & C r o w ns Af f or da ble De ntu r es P ana ma Cit y P A W illia m C Kna pk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P ana ma City Squ ar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P ana ma City FL Cal l F or Inf or mat ion 188 841 516 38 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Addi tiona l f ees ma y be incur r ed depe nding on indiv idua l case s Same -da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailab le in cer t ain case s Af f or dable Dentu r es P anam a City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. G r e a t v s ot he r D en t a l p r o vi d er s Sin gle T oo th Im pla nt $ 1 7 95 D e n tu r e Im p la n ts $ 1 49 5 $ 1 8 95 Sa m e Da y Cr o wn s $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upp er Ar c h 20144-3-T4 NOW OPEN!! Flo wers & Gifts for All Occasions Cir cle E Candles Hand Cr afted Jewelr y b y Local Artists Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A Apalac hicola, FL ( 850 ) 899-1588 BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 $1,000 D O W N E A C H 2 U S 98 C O M M L O T S 5 L O T S L ANARK BEA CH 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 2 NICE L O T S 12 T H & O W E N $16,500 C/B H O M E 3 1 1 2 C O R.L O T S C I T Y $49,500 4 CIT Y L O T S OFF H W Y 67 $15,000 MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 The Panhandle Players Present “TWO HOOTS BY DUSK. TWO BODIES BY DA WN” November 15-16, 7:30 pm November 17, 3:00 pm At The Dixie Theatr e Tickets ar e $15 and may be pur chased at: Downtown Books in Apalachicola, The Butler Agency in Eastpoint, Carrabelle Junction, No Name Cafe Books & Mor e in Port St. Joe, and Caribbean Cof fee in Mexico Beach. Pr oduced in Special Arrangement with Samuel Fr ench, Inc. AIR FORCE from page A1 EXTENSION from page A1 JIM KARELS CHERYL S S ANDERS

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PU P PI E S W e h a ve 7 L ab r ad o r Re t r i ev e r m i x p up s a nd t he y a r e a l l f e m a l e T he r e a r e 4 c h o c o l a t e a nd 3 b l a c k T he y a r e on l y a b o u t 5 w e ek s o l d r i gh t n o w s o w i l l h a v e t o s t a y he r e f o r a n o t he r 3 w e ek s b e f o r e t he y c a n b e r e l e as e d b u t i f y o u w o u l d l i k e t o a do pt one c om e b y t he a do pt i on c e n t e r c h o o s e t he one t h a t s t e a l s y our he a r t a nd p l a c e a de p o s i t h o l d on he r! V o l u n t e e r s a r e de s p e r a t e l y ne e de d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l of o ur do g s a nd c a t s. W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e n p e t s. o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e pet s bB BO WB] 45 14 f or ON L Y $1 5 pe r w ee k $6 0 pe r mo nt h Ca ll T od a y oo k k Mk e‚ ‚ u ¡ ¦ F ¨  ‚ ¨¨ \} ‚ }  € R  …¡ Q‚ ¦ ‚ Society A6 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013 Iolana “Loni” Burke will celebrate her sixth birthday on Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Loni is the daughter of Jeremy and Candace Burke, of Apalachicola, and Christina Bellew, of Thomasville, Ga. Loni’s maternal grand parents are John and Sonya Bellew, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly Burke, of Apalachicola. Pa ternal great-grandparents are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant, of Apalachicola. IOLANA BURKE TO TURN 6 Neighbors in the night PHOTOS bB Y D A A VID AA D LERSTE LERSTE I N N | The Times The Halloween party at the Tapas Bar was a lively, and ghoulish, affair. Reyd Zingarelli, daughter of Jordan Zingarelli, was a little chickadee for Halloween. This group of moonshiners, David and Elizah Johnson, and their daughers Sarah Lee, Brooklyn and Adrian, could be seen roaming the historic district. The Mad Hatter, Franklin County High School culinary arts teacher Debra Fletcher, greets trick-ortreaters in Apalachicola. Jo Anne Cagle, above, and fellow witch Jamie Bivona offered an elaborate porch display in the historic district. Special to the Times The 1895 birthday of the Crooked River Lighthouse was celebrated once again Oct. 26 with a vibrant ar ray of lanterns, theatrical sketches, Irish musicians and glow-in the dark dancers. Attendance was estimated at around 350 in the historic park, the right amount of chilly, and visitors could nd a bit of warmth watching the blacksmith or the candle mak ers, or having some tasty gumbo. A rst-time feature of the fourth annual Lantern Fest was a display of handcrafted sea creature lan terns, fashioned by area artists out of papier-mch, cloth, recycled plastics, wire and lots of tiny diode light strands. Jan Neshat, Susan Campbell, Susan David and Nelle McCall made creative contributions as well as folks who took part in lan tern-making workshops. Delores Hardin, Perdita Ross, and Laurel Newman shared their craft knowl edge and a great bunch of enthu siastic “students” made awesome lanterns. The young siblings, the Strib lings, of the Irish band Killavil, from nearby Woodville performed for the rst time on a pirate ship under a lighthouse, showing off their tal ent, enthusiasm and unique instru ments featuring distinctly Celtic Uilleann pipes (softer and sweeter than the well-known bagpipes) pen ny whistles, bouzouki and the tradi tional ddle. Richard MacLean, local Lanark ian and thespian, gave a brilliant portrayal of the last keeper of the Dog Island Light, presenting a true story told by the actual keeper to the Apalachicola Times in 1902, recall ing the 1873 fall of the tower during a hurricane and the brave escape to safety. Tallahassee’s Theater with a Mission troupe celebrated Viva Florida – the 500th anniversary of the founding of Florida, with a mar velously costumed performance, presenting scenes from a 1500s work by playwright Lope de Vegas, Spain’s version of Shakespeare. The Tallahassee Community College Dance Company once again creat ed a custom dance for Lantern Fest, performed in complete darkness. Ancient craft demonstrations re mained a popular feature. John Pfund and his entourage gave a fascinating look at the skill and labor required to forge nails, hinges and all sorts of hardware. San Luis Mission’s infamous black smith, Dr. Skeeter Prather donated hand wrought hangers and hooks. Wakulla Springs State Park lent candle dipping supplies that showed how these basic household necessi ties were made in the 1900s. Sid McOmie and Kathleen Oman were right at home over a hot iron kettle. Lantern Fest glows again PHOTOS bB Y RORO D G AS AS C HE HE | Special to the Times Can you nd the TCC dancers? Everyone enjoyed learning how to dip candles. The Irish band Killavil plays acoustic around the burn barrel. Theatre with a Mission pulls the audience into the 1500s.

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Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et >{‹Œ Xt„ tq† Œo A†{ „tŒŒ 8y’‹q y $ & et ‹t t—q {t r op†’  –yo ?†rŒ r†{„ x ^’„ro ^qy†† C'=m o‚ % & '= m o‚ '" % " # & " # % "# " & R’‹Œt ‹ X‹†•{ rtr r’‹{ „x ‹tx’ o‹ qy’‹ qy Œt‹•{ qtŒ Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Joyce Ann Dykes Thomas, born in Port St. Joe on Feb. 25, 1958, to Josh and Eunice Dykes, passed away unexpectedly Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, at her family home in Apalachicola. Raised in Apalachicola, she was employed by the Florida Department of Corrections as a correctional ofcer. She is survived by her father Josh Dykes of Apalachicola; brother Clifford Dykes and his wife, Paula, of Apalachicola; two sisters, Joshlyn Miller of Panama City and Vanessa O’Neal and husband, Gary, of Hosford; a special aunt Earlene Davis of Apalachicola; close friend and companion Skeeter Paul of Apalachicola; and numerous nieces, nephews and close friends. She was preceded in death by her mother, Eunice Dykes. We will always treasure the time and memories we had with our Joyce Ann. A funeral service will be at 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, at Kelley Funeral Home. Viewing will be 5-7 p.m. today, Nov. 7, at the funeral home. Joyce Ann Dykes Thomas JOYCE ANN DYKES THOM aA S Special to the Times Relay For Life is The American Cancer Society’s signature event to raise awareness and funding to ght cancer. This year, Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe and Franklin County will come together for one amazing night to celebrate, remember and ght back at the Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast. The event will take place at 7 p.m. ET April 11, 2014, at the Port St. Joe High School Shark Stadium. This Relay will be 12 hours versus the previous 24-hour event. The American Cancer Society is seeking area volunteers — walkers, cancer survivors, caregivers, community leaders, anyone wanting to make a difference — to join their Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast. Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at an athletic track, park or other gathering area, with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. The events are held overnight to honor and mirror a cancer patient’s journey through treatment. To learn more about the Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast and how to volunteer, to sign up your team or to attend the next team party, contact Kaci Rhodes at 3487798 or kaci4005@hotmail.com or Doris Carmichael at 229-243-4449 or Doris.Carmichael@shhpens.org. “Relay For Life is all about our community uniting with the American Cancer Society and supporting its efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays,” said Kelli Jackson, Relay committee member. “Volunteers and participants who are willing to give their time and energy to this exciting event are making a commitment to let the Forgotten Coast know that cancer can be defeated.” Funds raised at Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast help the American Cancer Society to affect the lives of those touched by cancer within the community. I would like to extend a special thank you to all the Franklin County veterans who were on our oat and walked and handed out ags, candy and necklaces to the crowd. Thanks to Pam for moving us up from the rear of the parade to the middle. As for the questions from many of our local residents as to why the “local” veterans oat was behind so many out-of-town oats, I don’t know. Ask your seafood festival president and committee. I would have thought they would have been proud of their veterans and put us up front. Guess not. We got a great response from the crowd with several standing ovations and cheers. Veterans, we will do it bigger and better next year. Charles Wilson Sure had a good crowd at Chillas Hall last Saturday, Nov. 2. Thanks to those who came out and enjoyed the good breakfast, the good service and the company. See ya next month, on Dec. 7. Last Friday, Nov. 1, was opening day for the golden anniversary of the Franklin County Seafood Festival. The rain put a damper on things, but Saturday and Sunday were sunny and bright. Hope you had a good time. See you at the lunch this afternoon. The chow line forms at noon. Those of us at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center will be glad to see you. You did mark Saturday, Nov. 9, on your calendar, didn’t you? Members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will hold their annual Gumbo Cook-off on the grounds of the boat club. Hope we have another nice weekend. Enjoy! The cook-off will start at 10 a.m., and the proceeds benet St. James/ Lanark Village Volunteer Fire Department. Can you believe it’s time to start addressing Christmas cards and make out your list? Watch for the donation boxes for Toys for Tots when you go shopping. Don’t forget to sign up for our traditional Thanksgiving dinner at Chillas Hall on Thanksgiving Day. There is a sign-up sheet in the Hall. When you come over for coffee in the mornings, sign up. We’d love to have you join us. Members of the Ladies’ Guild of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church are still accepting donations for their yard sale. Most of the sale will be in the church hall, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16. Coffee and goodies will also be available. Your monthly sugar x will be ready for you any time between 9 and 11 a.m. Members of the Lanark Village Boat will be happy to serve you. Hope to see you there, on Saturday, Nov. 16. Saturday evening, Nov. 16, you can have a romping good time at the birthday bash, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 in Lanark. You can enjoy bar bingo, pull tabs, checker board, nger food and your favorite beverage. Of course, the music at the karaoke will be enjoyed with the Songbird, Ann Merrell, Shirley Cox and others. Party starts at 6 p.m. The fun starts when you dance through the door. Our block party will be Sunday, Nov. 17 at, 1 p.m. at Chillas Hall. It will be combined with our monthly covered dish. Hot dogs and hamburgers will be furnished by the Lanark Village Association. Bring a dish to share. The party will be inside and outside the Hall. Hope you can join us. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, be kind, Jesus loves you. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. From Staff ReportsEE astpoint church plans N N ov. 16 fall festival Everyone come out and join us at First Baptist Church of Eastpoint, 447 Ave. A, for our Fall Festival from 4:30-8 p.m. Nov. 16. There will be assorted games, a cake walk, face painting, hot dogs and hamburgers, lots of fun and fellowship for the entire family. For more information, call 670-8468.Lanark Boat C C lub to host N N ov. 30 bazaar The Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 30. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holiday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info, call Janet at 697-2587. Donation yoga classes continue The donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes from 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Battery Park city ofce conference room. ‘Walk with ease’ through aerobic exercise The Arthritis Foundation and the Franklin County Senior Citizens sponsor the Walk with Ease program, designed for people with or without arthritis who would like to begin a walking program to gain the benets of regular aerobic exercise. Sessions begin in November at the Apalachicola Historic Holy Family Senior Center. Groups will meet for six weeks, three times a week. Enrollment is limited to 12 people and is free. Call Donna at 323-0168 to enroll or for more information. Try text4baby Get free text messages to help keep you and your baby healthy. Signing up for text4baby takes a few minutes. 1) Grab your cell phone and text the word “BABY” to the number 511411. If you’d like to get the messages in Spanish, text “BEBE” to 511411. 2) When prompted, enter your expected due date or baby’s date of birth. 3) Put in your zip code (e.g., 90210). You will get three messages a week until your baby turns 1, timed to how far along you are in your pregnancy or how old your baby is. Sometimes we send alerts, so on certain weeks you may get an extra message. If at any time you want to cancel service, just text STOP to 511411 (or reply to one of your text4baby messages with the word STOP). For more information, go to www.text4baby.org This program is sponsored by Johnson and Johnson. Special to The Times The Bridge at Bay St. Joe honored the late Ruth Schoelles on Friday when it hosted a Hall of Fame Caf celebration at the nursing home. Schoelles was honored for her work in nding shelter for the needy during her years with the Apalachicola Housing Authority. The program recognizes outstanding accomplishments and experiences of the center’s residents. Employees, volunteers and community members also are honored. This year’s honorees also included Louie Jefferson Little Jr., a member of the Ministerial Association who makes himself available to ll in for the facility’s chaplain. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is one of 87 locations operated by Louisville, Ky.-based Signature HealthCARE. Launched in 2003, the Hall of Fame event is hosted annually by each Signature home at different times throughout the year. This year, Signature took a different approach by having each center host its Hall of Fame ceremony on the same day, creating a company-wide event. “Our residents have given so much to their hometowns and our nation, and these contributions deserve to be celebrated,” said Signature President and CEO Joe Steier. “The Hall of Fame Caf induction ceremonies are a small way for us to say thanks.” Bridge at Bay St. Joe honors Schoelles Gumbo cook-off Saturday L aA N aA RK NE wW S Jim Welsh Relay for Life to unite with Gulf County Card of Thanks: VE tT ER aA NS F lL O atAT Faith BRIEFS Obituary

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, November 7, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu N o v 7 81 53 64 % F ri, N o v 8 72 60 10 % S a t N o v 9 73 62 25 % Sun, N o v 10 78 58 23 % M on, N o v 11 76 49 17 % T ues N o v 12 76 52 0 % W ed N o v 13 77 54 1 % SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Good ounder are being caught around the old channel maker towers at the mouth of the bay. Most anglers are nding sh deeper this month because of the fall feeding patterns that are emerging. Local waters are coming back to life after the cold snap and the rain. Good reports say the Brothers and around Howard Creek are abuzz with good bream catches. Sipio Creek is also producing nice speckled trout since the cold snap. Maintaining a lawn or vegetable garden is fraught with challenges. Seemingly every creature that walks, ies or crawls has a motivation to dine on or destroy the hours of work that went into the building and grooming each unique horticultural masterpiece. Once the assault of bugs, birds and other animals is brought under control, the title wave of intruders from the plant world ensues. The weedy interlopers are a source of aggravation for every homeowners and gardener. Chief among Franklin County’s green invaders is purple nutsedge. This grass-like weed derives its name from the purple tint above the roots and the nutlike seeds it produces. Purple nutsedge, sometimes called nut-grass, is the predominant nutsedge weed species in local turfgrass. Additional, and less common, local members of the Cyperus genus in Florida include annual or water sedge, perennial and annual kyllinga, globe sedge, Texas sedge, athead sedge and cylindrical sedge. Sedges have triangularshaped, solid stems, while rush stems are round and solid. Both sedges and rushes favor a moist habitat. Because of the control expense, the most important members are purple nutsedge and, to some lesser degree, globe, Texas, annual and water sedge. These weeds generally thrive in soils which remain wet for extended periods of time because of poor drainage or excessive irrigation. Ditches, soils rich in organic material and mulched areas are ideal growing environments. The rst step in nutsedge control is to correct, if possible, the cause of continuously moist sites. Do not over-irrigate an area, and provide surface or subsurface drainage if necessary. There are weed control decisions to be considered once purple nutsedge is established in a lawn or garden. The expense and time available for control are factors that must be considered before beginning. There is the old-fashioned way to control these persistent pests, pulling by hand. It is low-cost and psychologically satisfying to jerk them out and pile them up. Unfortunately, this technique requires a commitment of time and strenuous labor, especially if weeding a large area. It will be unsuccessful if all the nutsedge’s root system is not removed and destroyed. Total root removal is dif cult at best. This sedge sends runners out from the plant and grows nuts at intervals. The runners are thin and delicate, and breakage is common. Purple nutsedge can be controlled with herbicides containing either halosulfuron or imazaquin, sold as SedgeHammer and Image, respectively. Repeat applications are required to control all the underground reproductive parts of purple nutsedge. These herbicides also control other less aggressive sedges such as cocks-comb and green kyllinga, annual sedge. They can be used in most warm-season turfgrass species. Complete coverage of weeds is necessary for greatest control potential. Even with good herbicide coverage, regrowth normally occurs from the roots and tubers, and repeat applications will be necessary. For more information on purple nutsedge, consult the UF/IFAS publication “Weed Management Guide for Florida Lawns” on the web at http://edis. ifas.u .edu/ep141. To learn more about the purple nutsedge and other lawn and garden weeds in Franklin County, contact the UF/IFAS Franklin County Extension of ce at 653-9337. Les Harrison, extension director in Wakulla County, is part of an interim team of extension agents serving Franklin County. LES HARRISON Special to The Times Purple nutsedge is common, hard to control SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Purple nutsedge is a common but hard-to-control weed in many Franklin County gardens and lawns. By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net Giant red sh have been hanging around the jetties, beaches, piers and cuts of North Florida for the last several months, and that may continue on until Thanksgiving — or not — depending on how cold the early fronts get and how rough and muddy the surf becomes. The reds are running 36 to 40 inches, true giants that are far too big to keep — the slot is 18 to 27 inches — but a whole lot of fun to exercise and release. The chance to catch a sh this big without access to a boat offers a unique opportunity. (Don’t be tempted to keep one — FWC of cers are well aware of this run of oversize spawners and have made lots of possession citations across the Panhandle in recent weeks.) Catching a giant red from shore is not a task for wimpy tackle; best choice is a big, saltwater duty spinning rig with a stout rod 7-6 to 8 feet long, loaded with plenty of 50-pound-test (or heavier) braid. The combo allows long casts, strong hook sets and plenty of power to hold the giants, and the thin diameter of the braid means you can put a lot of it on the spool — chances are you won’t have a sh cleaning you out. A Shimano 8000size spinning reel will hold 265 yards of 50-pound-test braid, and that’s likely to be adequate for the job. Best baits for the giants are live thread ns, pin sh, nger mullet or other small bait sh. They also readily take cut bait; a fresh slab of mullet or lady sh is ne. Shrimp is also good, but lots of small “junk” sh also love shrimp and are likely to nip the bait off before a red nds it. The hook needs to be adequate to the task; a size 7/0 or thereabouts will do much better than a smaller hook, and it’s wise to use circle hooks, which are less likely to be swallowed by the sh and make release dif cult. Big reds often travel in schools, and if the school doesn’t happen to be where you are, you may nd slow shing. It’s a good idea to carry two rods, one heavy rod for the big reds, which you set out in a sand spike and let soak, and a lighter rig suitable for catching other species — whiting and left-over Spanish, among others. Bull reds typically hang around until water temp gets below 65 — or until the last of the bait schools on which they feed head south. Eatin’ size red sh Early November usually produces very good shing for eating-size reds across the Panhandle as well, and these sh are mostly found inside the bays. They’re not so accessible to the shorebound angler as those along the beaches, but for those willing to wade — or with a boat or kayak, or shing with a guide — they can provide a great target. Inshore reds tend to hang around structure, so boat docks, oyster bars, submerged boat wrecks and rockpiles are all good targets. As the water gets colder, there’s also a movement of sh into the blackwater creeks that feed the bays, apparently because the dark water captures the heat of the sun better than the clearer, shallower water on the ats. Reds on the inside are suckers for live shrimp. Use the biggest shrimp you can locate, on the lightest weight you can throw — with a 2500-sized spinning reel and 10to 15-pound-test braid, you can make a good cast with a quarter-ounce or less rubber-core sinker. Add 18 inches of 25 pound test uorocarbon leader to stiffen the rig and prevent tangles — a double Uniknot will join the braid and uoro dependably. Best hooks for slot reds are 1/0 to 3/0 Kahle style, which are light enough not to kill the shrimp immediately and which tend to set themselves because of their general circle-hook structure. Odds are the shrimp will attract not only reds but keeper trout and sheepshead at this time of year — all hang around the same sort of structure and all prowl the creeks after the rst cold fronts, as well. If you can get them, either via castnet or bait trap, pin sh two to three inches long are even better baits than shrimp because they’re more durable and stay on the hook better. Larger reds love them, as do big trout. Unfortunately, you can’t buy them at most baitshops as you can shrimp. Plastic-tailed jigs are also effective for both reds and trout, particularly if you tip them with a pencil-eraser-sized slip of fresh shrimp. Jig heads in 3/16 to quarter ounce do the job, with tails in light colors 3 to 4 inches long usually best. These are bounced on bottom in a pull-and-drop motion; hits usually come on the drop. It’s a good way to explore for sh when you don’t know where they are. Once you catch a few on arti cials and the bite slows, you can often turn them on again by switching to live shrimp on bottom. Red sh in the shell Reds are excellent on the table, though as with many species the red line down the side has a strong “ shy” taste — it should be removed, along with the skin, when lleting. Or try red sh “in the shell,” which is basically cooked whole. Gut the sh and wash it thoroughly inside and out, salt and pepper the body cavity, then stuff it with lemons, limes or oranges, wrap the sh in foil, and place on medium to low grill heat. Let it cook until a fork goes in easily at the thickest part of the shoulder. The sh can now be unwrapped, a knife run down each side of the backbone just under the skin, and skin and scales lifted away. The red line can also be lifted out, along with the rib cage, and you’ve got a slab of tasty steamed meat that’s bone free. Remove the “up” side, then simply pull the backbone away to access the lower llet — hard to beat. Find the big red sh this month FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The Times Most big reds are caught on live or cut bait sh. Panhandle jetties are among the prime spots. Page 8

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The Lady Seahawks wrapped up their inaugural girls golf season on Wednesday, Oct. 30. as 12year-old seventh grader Melanie Collins represented Franklin County at the Class 1A state golf nals at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake. Collins quali ed for the state tournament as an individual the week before at the regional match in Pensacola. Collins shot 41-50 on Oct. 29, and 42-47 on the second day, for a 180 total, 36 over par, and a tie for 62nd place out of 96 golfers from all over the state. She took a two-stroke penalty on day two for hitting the wrong ball, or she would have shot 40 on the front nine. “Except for a couple of short stretches, I was happy with how I played,” said Collins. The Lady Seahawks return all golfers next year for what hopes to be another playoff run. Expected to return will be juniors Katie Seger and Calli Westbrook; freshman Megan Collins, eighth graders Marjorie Morrow, Hannah Westbrook, Harper Westbrook and Allison Yowell; and seventh grader Melanie Collins. “We have a good chance to make it to regionals again next year and I think if we work hard and improve, we can make it to state as a team,” said Coach Scott Collins. He and assistant coach Spencer Tolbert said the girls were extremely grateful to St. James Bay Golf Resort and its owner, Eddie Clark, for allowing them to use their facilities as the school’s home course. – BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, November 7, 2013 A Page 9 Section The Lady Seahawks varsity volleyball team opened with a win in the district tournament Oct. 21, but then fell the next night to eventual district champ winner South Walton. The fourth-seeded Lady Seahawks won in three straight against fth-seed Bozeman, 25-16, 25-21 and 25-21. “This was a great game for us and felt good to play well in the rst round,” said Coach Tara Klink. “Senior Morgan Mock played the best game of her career with a whopping 13 kills, four blocks, and three aces.” Adriana Butler was next in line with four kills and a block, followed by Gracyn Kirvin with three kills and Madison Newell with two kills. Scout Segree lead serving with ve aces. The Lady Seahawks fell Oct. 22 to top-seeded South Walton although the team performed better against their opponent than they had earlier in the regular season. “We have had a great year with a great group of girls,” said Klink. “I am so sad that Mock and Kirvin are graduating, but very excited to see everyone else return next season. Hilary Stanton and I have a goal to improve the program each year, so we love having the support of players, their families, and the community.” – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Lady Seahawks fall in playoffs Members of the Lady Seahawks girls golf team pose with coach Scott Collins, left, at the playoff hole at the regional tournament Oct. 22 in Pensacola. Golf team wraps up inaugural season The Nest to start up Monday The Eastpoint and Carrabelle Nest after-school program will start on Monday, Nov. 11. Registration forms are available at the Franklin County School or at the Franklin County Schools district office. The Eastpoint Nest is located at the Franklin County Learning Center; the Carrabelle Nest is located at the Carrabelle City Complex. The program adheres to the Franklin County school calendar and is operational each day school is in session until 5:30 p.m. All students must be registered before the start date of Nov. 11. If you have any questions call Sandi Hengle at 850-323-0982 Transportation board to meet Wednesday The Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Wednesday, Nov. 13 at 10 a.m. at Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include adoption of the CTC annual evaluation and regional annual performance report. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For additional information, a copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 2507 Callaway Road, Suite #200, Tallahassee FL 32303 at least five working days prior to the meeting date. Tobacco Free coalition to meet Wednesday There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Florida Department of Health in Franklin County, 139 12th Street, from 5 until 6 p.m. in the second floor conference room. Oyster farming workshop on Nov. 15 The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has tentatively scheduled a second workshop on oyster farming on Friday, Nov. 15 at the Florida State University Coastal Marine Lab at Turkey Point. Dr. John Supan, Sea Grant oyster specialist, is scheduled to be the featured speaker. Trespassing on an oyster lease highlighted actions in Franklin County by of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission during the week of Oct. 19 to 25. Of cers Gore and Allen took a complaint on an individual trespassing on an oyster lease. The two ofcers set up surveillance on the suspect vessel, and were able to determine the subject was well inside the marked lease and actively harvesting shell sh. The two of cers conducted a stop and found the subject in possession of oysters. The suspect was identi ed and has an extensive history with FWC for harvesting shell sh at night and in closed waters. The oysters were returned back to the lease and the of cers seized the oyster tongs. The suspect was issued citations for trespassing on a lease and no hull identi cation number on a vessel and given several boating safety warnings. Gore was conducting patrol when he came across subjects shing from a local bridge. He overheard the subjects being disgruntled about not catching any sh and they were going to go try to buy some. Later on, Gore was still on patrol and noticed the same subjects talking to a local sherman. He set up surveillance and observed the local sherman make a sale of a quantity of sh to the individuals he had encountered shing earlier. Gore recognized the sherman from previous encounters and the sherman also has a history of violating resource laws. Once the sale was complete, Gore moved in and conducted a stop. He obtained statements from all parties involved admitting to the unlawful sale and cited the sherman with selling sh without a retail and wholesale license and failing to keep receipts or invoices. In Liberty County, Ofcer Mims was working Ochlocknee River at Ed & Bernice’s Fish Camp. He checked two subjects who had been shing and asked if they had any luck. The subjects advised that they had almost the limit of specked perch. After a check of safety equipment and sh, the two subjects were in possession of 68 specked perch. The subjects were issued citations for over the daily bag limit of specked perch. In Leon County, Of cer Jones responded to a complaint about an individual posting an animal cruelty case on a social media site. Several emails and Wildlife Alert noti cations came into FWC Tallahassee Regional Communications Center about the incident, in which the subject is shown harassing, capturing, and killing a pigmy rattlesnake. The subject in question has criminal history with FWC and is on probation for sh and wildlife violations committed in the past. Jones interviewed the subject and obtained a confession and presented the case to the state attorney’s of ce, which in turn direct led charges for shooting a rearm from a public roadway and possessing or capturing a venomous reptile without a permit. During the week of Oct. 25 to 31, Of cer Ramos was on patrol near Dog Island and stopped a Georgia vessel with four occupants. During the sheries inspection, he found them to be in possession of 10 Spanish mackerel, four of which were undersized. Ramos issued the captain of the vessel a notice to appear for the undersized catch. Of cers Bunker, Bridwell and Geib were on patrol and boarded a shrimping vessel offshore. After the safety and administrative inspections were complete, the of cers inspected the gear and during inspection of the Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs), 10 serious violations were observed to include improper TED angles, improper oats, insuf cient size of TED opening measurements, and others. The violations were documented and have been forwarded to the National Marine Fisheries Service for consideration. Bunker, Ramos and Bridwell were aboard the Offshore Patrol Vessel “Gulf Sentry,” docked at Sun Harbor Marina in Panama City, when a small vessel was observed, at night, operating along the shoreline near and around the other vessels at Sun Harbor. Bunker told the operator to turn on his navigational lights and the operator turned the vessel and headed to shore. The three of cers launched the small tender vessel and stopped the vessel and its four occupants. The operator was identi ed and Bunker noticed signs of impairment and administered eld sobriety task. The operator showed additional signs of impairment and was arrested and transported to the Panama City Police Department where he gave breath samples of .164 BrAC and .174 BrAC, respectively. Numerous officers from the Northwest and other regions around the state participated in a multi-day targeted enforcement detail in the Eastpoint area. The focus of the detail was to ensure oysters were harvested from open areas and were properly tagged and shaded to ensure health safety compliance. Officers also focused on protecting the oyster resource by checking harvesters for undersized oysters. During three days of the detail, more than 250 commercial oyster vessels were inspected. There were 48 undersized oyster violations, 32 health safety violations and 87 boating safety violations documented. More than 1,300 pounds of oysters were seized and returned alive to the water. Gore was working in plainclothes in Eastpoint and observed a vehicle towing an oyster vessel depart from the boat ramp on the Eastpoint channel. The vessel was pouring water out the drain hole and the trailer was also dripping. The vessel did not have working trailer lights and Gore conducted a traffic stop and observed a large amount of oysters in the vessel. The driver of the vehicle and another occupant both stated that they launched to go oystering several hours earlier and harvested all the oysters during the night from the “Channel.” Both subjects said they did not cull the oysters but just put them directly into bags. All the oysters were seized and both individuals issued citations for possession of unculled oysters. Further charges will be filed with the state’s attorney for untagged oysters, failure to deliver directly to a certified dealer, night harvesting and sale of unlawfully landed product. News BRIEFS Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 L ad y S e a ha w k s e v e n t h g r ade r M e l a n i e C ol l i n s re p re s e n t e d F r a n k l in C oun t y i n t he s t a t e C l a s s 1 A g i r l s g o l f n a l s O c t 2 9 a n d 3 0 i n L a d y L a k e A f t e r w i nn i ng a p l a y o f f hol e a t t he r e g i o na ls i n P e n s ac ol a a w e e k e a r l i e r C ol l i n s b e c a m e t he y oung e s t i n d i v i d u a l q u a l i e r a t t h e s t a t e n a l s S h e s h o t 4 1 5 0 o n t h e r s t d a y a n d a 4 2 4 7 o n t h e s e c o n d d a y f o r a 1 8 0 t o t a l a n d a t i e f o r 6 2 n d p l ac e ou t o f 9 6 g ol f e r s f r o m a l l a c r o s s F l o r i d a G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R M e l a n ie C o lli n s FWC REPORT

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013 But Goodman’s constitution remained calm, and 27 dozen oysters later, his consuming style had brought him to only about 72 oysters short of the record. “The rules say you have to use a fork to get them out the cup. If he wants to swallow ’em, he can swallow ’em. That’s up to him,” said Shuler, who has volunteered for the festival for 20 years. Goodman, 41, said it was his rst time ever in an eating con test, but that he’s no stranger to savoring oysters. “I usually get a bag like every Friday, and eat a bag,” he said. Among females, Apalachico la’s Dana Taylor pulled a stunning upset of ve-time champion Angie Harnage, who downed only seven dozen and six oysters, about half of her personal best. Taylor con sumed an impressive 18 dozen. “This is it. I’m retiring. Turning 50 neat year; it’s just time,” said Harnage, who started oyster eat ing about 10 years ago on a dare from friends. “We just made it a tradition.” Tradition rebounded far off from just the oyster eating contest. The Blessing of the Fleet Fri day afternoon featured several clergymen: Father Roger Latosyn ski of St. Patrick Catholic Church; the Rev. Themo Patriotis, pastor of the UMC Cooperative Parish; the Rev. Martha Harris, vicar of Trinity Episcopal: the Rev. Scott Lolley, pastor of Living Waters Assembly of God; the Rev. Barry Hand, pastor of Mt. Zion Mission ary Baptist; Sister Jeanne Drea, a Sinsinawa Dominican nun; and Dr. John Sink, a retired Navy cap tain and Methodist minister. Chris Clark played the bagpipes, Micah Patriotis carried the crucifer and ABC School fourth-grader Nico Valenzuela tossed the memorial wreath in the water. After Florida Seafood Festival Queen Morgan Martin and King Retsyo Vance Millender arrived by shrimp boat, State Sen. Bill Montford and Apalachicola May or Van Johnson welcomed the guests. John Solomon, president of the board of directors, pre sented a plaque to Billy Spikes, who directed the rst festival in 1963. Now in the real estate busi ness in Orlando, Spikes back then was a young marketing manager for Florida Power and worked closely with city business inter est to create an attraction for visitors in the off-season. Ted Mo steller, also retired from Florida Power, is stepping down this year after more than four decades on the volunteer board. Solomon said despite a rain storm that shaved the last couple hours off Friday’s events, this weekend’s crowd was in excess of 31,000, fueled by a combination of it being the golden anniver sary, the appearance of country music star and “Dancing with the Stars” champion Kellie Pick ler on Saturday night and the weather. He said gate receipts were at least $57,000, with a record num ber of T-shirt sales. “We ordered 1,000 more T-shirts than we had in the past and sold out at 12:30 p.m.,” Solomon said. “Last year we had shirts left.” He and fellow board member Danny Gay plan to order more shirts. “We’re talking now about how we can get people what they want and the size they need and get a two-color order,” he said. “We’d like to make sure every body’s happy.” Food sales were more than robust, with Solomon estimating Franklin County Schools’ fourthgrade booth went through 1,500 pounds of fried shrimp, with the senior class frying up at least 26 gallons of oysters at its booth. The Carrabelle Church of God shucked more than 70 bags of oysters on the half-shell, while the food service workers’ booth sold out of boiled shrimp, as did the softball traveling team of its scallops and the senior class of crab claws. After an enormous morning parade down U.S. 98, Martin and Millender, a Carrabelle seafood dealer, got the oyster eating un derway about 1 p.m. by serving each other one. After that it was time for an other tradition, this time a win in the oyster shucking contest by Scotty O’Lear, an 11-time state champion and a ve-time nation al champion. The general manager of Dusty’s Oyster Bar in Panama City for the past 20 years, O’Lear was pleased to have once again taken the state title, this time by edging co-worker and returning champion Rick McCurley. “It feels good to win,” he said. “I haven’t won here in four years. It’s been a while.” O’Lear nished with a time of 2:31, helped out by getting a de duction for “the perfect tray,” a symmetrical presentation of six rows of four. Only nine of his 24 oysters were not fully cut from the shell, so he had 27 seconds added for that. Still, it was good enough to edge McCurley, and third place Robert Dafn, also a former state champion. “I had a good run on oysters,” said O’Lear. “Pop, cut, place. Pop, cut, place. Every oyster seems to rock for you. When you got one oyster that hangs you up, the competition is really tough.” The crowd continued to build all afternoon, anticipating the arrival of Pickler for the night’s featured entertainment. Pickler came on stage in heels, but after her opening number, “Little House,” she sat down on the edge of the stage, took them off and went barefoot the rest of the evening. She delighted the crowd with such songs as “Beautiful,” “Ma kin Me Fall,” “Tough,” “Stop Cheatin’,” “Where’s Tammy,” and “”Things,” before launching into her current hit, “Someone Somewhere.” She rounded off her evening with “Ring For Sale,” “White Lightning,” “My Angel,” “Wanna Be Married,” “Gypsy,” “Didn’t You Know,” “Unlock That Honky Tonk,” “I Wonder” and “Best Days.” For her encore she came out in red high heels and sang the song of the same name. After the concert, she and her entourage left on the bus back to Nashville, to swing by her house and prepare for the Nov. 6 Coun try Music Association awards. R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 T rades & Ser v ices Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM P r o f ess i o na l C o o k i e D e c o r a t o r o n S i t e w i th "ho w-t o" ins t r u c t i o ns. E v e r y thin g P r o v i d e d f o r Y o u T o D e c o r a t e Y o ur O w n C o o k i es!!! N O CH AR GE JUS T C O ME H A VE FUN! LOANS from page A1 recovery from non-govern mental sources, as deter mined by the U.S. Small Business Administration. According to back ground data accompany ing Scott’s request, area seafood dealers estimated they lost between 23 and 62 percent in revenue in 2012, compared to the year before. The decline was far less severe — in the single digits — for grocery stores and motels that provided data. Also, the seafood deal ers that provided data esti mated it would be at least two to three years before their operations would re turn to normal. The oyster shortage has been attributed to a lack of freshwater owing into Apalachicola Bay. In a news release Friday, Scott said approval of the eco nomic injury declaration was a “great victory in our ght for the Florida fami lies who rely on our com mercial oyster industry to make a living. “We will keep work ing every day to ensure that every Floridian in the Apalachicola area can sup port their families as we continue to work on behalf of this important industry,” he said. Scott’s efforts and the declaration’s approval drew praise Friday from a handful of federal, state and local ofcials. “Gov. Scott has demon strated his commitment to making sure that Florid ians in the Panhandle can keep their livelihoods by working to nd solutions for our commercial oyster industry,” said state Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahas see, whose district includes the four affected counties. “There is no doubt that today’s announcement is a step in the right direc tion, but there is still a lot of work to be done.” In Apalachicola, County Commissioner Pinki Jack el thanked the governor and the Florida Division of Emergency Management. “We must continue to ght to help the families of the Apalachicola area,” she said. Anita Grove, executive director of Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Com merce, offered thanks to the work of Scott and the approval from the Small Business Administration. “Floridians who live and work in the Apalachicola area will get help from the damage to the oyster industry and can be sure that their families and businesses are protected,” she said. FIND IT ONLINE See more photos from the 50th Florida Seafood Festival at www. apalachtimes.com PHoto OTO S BY DAVid ID AdleADLE RStein TEIN | The Times LEFT: Lots of former Miss Florida Seafood queens returned to take part in this year’s golden anniversary of the festival. RIGHT: Apalachicola’s Dana Taylor, right, pulled off an upset of ve-time champion Angie Harnage, center, by consuming 18 dozen oysters. FESTIVAL from page A1

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, November 7, 2013 The Times | A11 1118969 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS € CaRPEnTERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RaY WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS € SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace 92960T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility Act” 83.80283.809 F.S. Gulf Coast Storage LLC will sell, for cash, to the highest bidder(s) OR may opt to retain the contents of the following storage units: #139 Liberty Communications Office used for storage: Liberty Communications #111 William Wayne Webb #108 Jennifer Bairefoot #116 Bill Eaton/Jody Fitzgerald #59 Angela Crum #55 Brandy Hicks The facility will dispose of the contents at 241 Patton Dr, Eastpoint, Florida at 9:00 am November 16th, 2013. The parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Oct 31, Nov 07, 2013 92938T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 12-00007-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as Successor in Interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 on January 23, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: LOT 39 OF TARPON SHORES UNIT NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 1914.27 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 2620.31 FEET ALONG SAID ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 114.63 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST 114.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, A/K/A LOT 94 OF RIDGE ROAD. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 PLAN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ( VIN# HMST8922AGA and HMST8922BGA) PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: October 17, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 96111T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000322 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ALICIA POUNCEY A/K/A ALICIA KAYE POUNCEY Last Known Address: 1919 JONNA DRIVE, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property FRANKLIN County: Lot 39, Beacon Ridge, Phase 3, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; LESS AND EXCEPT lands as shown in Official Records Book 905, Page 319 and Official Records Book 905, Page 328 and being described as: Begin at the Southwest corner of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence commence South 89 degrees 58 minutes 41 seconds East 668.32 feet to a round 3” concrete monument (#2919); thence commence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 30 seconds East 149.18 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261); thence North 60 degrees 06 minutes 23 seconds East 1042.87 feet to an iron rod and cap (#6475); thence North 34 degrees 16 minutes 01 seconds East 60 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261); thence North 55 degrees 43 minutes 59 seconds West 19.7 feet to a said iron rod and cap (#4261); thence continue North 55 degrees 47 minutes 30 seconds West 222.42 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261) which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 49 degrees 15 minutes 21 seconds East 890.62 feet to a 4” x 4” concrete monument (#4261); thence South 42 degrees 22 minutes 39 seconds West 391.67 feet; thence North 54 degrees 47 minutes 30 seconds West 107.75 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel 1.06 acres +/-as shown on survey by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc. Revised 7/14/05. TOGETHER WITH a 2004 Nobility Kingswood 66x28 Manufactured Home, Serial Numbers N8-11583A and N8-11583B. The action was instituted in the Circuit Court. SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN, Florida; Case No. 19-2013-CA000322; and is styled 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida v. CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., ALICIA POUNCEY A/K/A ALICIA KAYE POUNCEY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALICIA POUNCEY A/K/A ALICIA KAYE POUNCEY, BEACON RIDGE HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION of 1919 Jonna Drive, Carrabelle, FL 32322 You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Sonya Daws, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 215 S. Monroe St., Suite 600, Tallahassee, FL 32301, (or 30 days from the first date of publication) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff’s interest which will be binding upon you. DATED: October 7, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Octob 96107T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 19-2012-CA000191 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-F, PLAINTIFF, VS. JOHN E. HANLIN A/K/A JOHN HANLIN, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Franklin, Florida, on December 12, 2013, at 11:00 am, Inside Front of courthouse steps (main courthouse), 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32329 for the following described property: ALL OF LOTS TWENTY-EIGHT (28), TWENTY-NINE (29), AND THIRTY (30), IN BLOCK TWO HUNDRED SIXTY-SIX (266) OF GREATER APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK “M” AT PAGE 437 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THE OFFICIAL MAP OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA ADOPTED SEPTEMBER 12, 1946 BY THE CITY COMMISSION. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: October 14, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33486 File No.11-006785-FST If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-5774401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 7, 14, 2013 96307T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING & ZONING CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Planning & Zoning will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, November 18, 2013 at 6:00 PM at the Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a special exception request relating to proposed new construction of a business on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and Clairmont Avenue (C-3 Highway Commercial), more specifically described as 1.16 Acres of Block 5 (Neels Addition) pursuant to the official zoning map of the city. The Regular scheduled monthly Planning and Zoning meeting will immediately follow. The following special exception request item will be discussed and considered: a) The applicant is proposing the new construction of a Family Dollar Store within the C-3 (Highway Commercial) zoned area located at the corner of Hwy 98 and Clairmont Avenue, more specifically described as 1.16 Acres of Block 5 (Neels Addition). The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for such use if special exception approval is granted. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey with the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. November 7, 14, 2013 96309T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 at 6 PM at the Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on two variance request relating to proposed new construction on the parcels listed below pursuant to the official zoning map of the City. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered: a) A request by the property owner on the parcel located at the alley side of Ave D and 5th street @ 68 Avenue D (R-1/Single Family Residence), more specifically described as Block 15, NW 35 ‘ x 42 ‘ of Lot 4 & SW 42 ‘x 60 ‘ of Lot 5 for: a 3 ‘ variance of the required 5 ‘ side setback and a 7 ‘ variance of the required 25 ‘ rear setbacks to add an addition to an existing nonconforming residential unit to include two new bathrooms, closet, uncovered deck and enclosed stairwell. And also a request for a 3 ‘ variance of the required 5 ‘ side setback and a 5 ‘ variance of the required 5 ‘ rear setback for the new construction of a two-story garage with 2nd floor storage. b) A request by the property owner on the parcel located on 9th Street between Bay Ave and Ave B @ 11 9th Street (R-1/Single Family Residence), more specifically described as Block 36, SE of Lot 7 & all of Lot 8 for a 5 ‘ variance of the required 5 ‘ side and 5 ‘ rear setbacks to replace an existing 7 ‘ x 10.5 ‘ non-conforming garage with construction of a 28 ‘ x 14.6 ‘ new garage and also a 5 ‘ variance of the required 5 ‘ side and 5 ‘ rear setbacks to replace an existing screened building an non-conforming tin shed with construction of a 10.5 ‘ x 29 ‘ boat shed. Both of these structures encroach at the rear of the property into the adjacent public alley right-of way approximately 6 ‘ Side setbacks requested are 0 ‘ (on the side lot line). The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when special circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey with the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. November 7, 14, 2013 Matching couch, loveseat & chair. All recline. End tables & lamps. 850-445-1212. Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado. Continuous Garage Sale Antiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL71382 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard Sale Thurs, Fri., & Sat. 9am -3pm 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL70615 to 56554 Install/Maint/Repair FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Groundskeeper/ Beach Maintenance Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Nikki Millender 66 4th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8277 JOB SUMMARY Performs a variety of unskilled to semi-skilled work in a variety of fields in the maintenance and upkeep of the public parks, grounds, buildings, athletic fields and related facilities. PRINCIPAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Mows and maintains parks and open space areas such as baseball fields, soccer fields, football fields, and beach parks; mows weeds; cleans and maintains basketball courts and nets; maintains sprinkler systems and assists in the repair and installation of sprinkler lines and heads. Drags ball fields; lines fields for games. Inspects, washes and performs routine maintenance of park drinking fountains and restrooms. Sweeps, washes, paints and repairs or replaces park tables and slabs. Performs minor semi-skilled interior building maintenance such as painting, plumbing, carpentry and other unskilled and semi-skilled trades work. Performs routine maintenance on lawn, trees, shrubs, and flowers. Carries out the seeding, fertilizing, top dressing, soil conditioning, watering, and the pest and weed control of the parks and open spaces. Maintains and adjusts specialized turf care equipment and tools, including electric motors, pumps, sprinklers, tractors, and mowers. Operates tractors, mowers, weed eaters, blowers, pressure washers, and other listed equipment as needed. Maintains current skills and knowledge in the proper and safe techniques of building and grounds maintenance functions. Collects and disposes of solid waste from buildings and grounds; picks up litter from premises. Assists in setting up and taking down equipment for various park and recreation programs, prepares facilities for park and recreation program use. Willing to work holidays, weekends, and events hosted by parks and recreation. Supervise the work of State Inmates. Other duties as required, background investigation and drug screening will be completed on selected applicant. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS Requires High Diploma or Equivalent, or two consecutive years work related experience. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures: the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must have a valid Florida Driver’s License. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for certification as an NON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such certification within 90 days or hiring. October 31st, November 7th, 2013 Web ID#: 34270669 Text FL70669 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Carrabelle, FLGulf Side 2 BD/ 1 BA, Furnished, $450mo. Plus Utilities & $450 Dep., Pets OK W/Deposit Call 850-567-3375 Text FL70881 to 56654 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft Designer, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Proof of income required. 954-816-7004 Text FL71079 to 56654 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $1300 mo + $500 dep 850-370-6001 3 Bdrm, 1 Bath Mobile Home. $600 per month 622 Ridge Rd Eastpoint 850-653-5763 Beaver Laguana Monterey 06 40ft. diesel, quad, 53k miles, exc. cond. $126,000. See at 1216 Ohio Ave. PC. 850-819-0852 or 850-235-2599 Text 70915 to 56654 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Spot Advertising works!

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Which president said, “We cannot do everything at once, but we can do something at once”? Washington, Tyler, Coolidge, LBJ 2) What was the main surveillance plane used in the Persian Gulf War? E-3 AWAC, C-140, B-2 Spirit, RM-81 3) Where was America’s rst-ever opera performed in 1735? Boston, MA; Charleston, SC; Baltimore, MD; Albany, NY 4) What state is the “Toothpick Capital of the World”? Georgia, Montana, Oregon, Maine 5) A work published without a copyright is in “what”? Tort, Public domain, Encumbrance, Binder 6) What is caprock commonly found above? Artesian well, Talus, Glacier, Iceberg 7) What soldiers used “We’re Off to See the Wizard” as a marching song in WWII? British, Australian, Canadian, Brazilian 8) During the nal “Seinfeld” each 30second advertisement sold for an estimated how much? $100K, $500K, $800K, $1.5 million 9) What did the Austrian physicist Christian Johann Doppler study? Sound waves, Global warming, Einstein’s theory, Mothman 10) Which is in the same city as Dome of the Rock and Mount Zion? Stonehenge, Wailing Wall, Christ the Redeemer, Kremlin 11) What were 19th century Latin American dictators called? Cigarillos, Ocotillos, Caudillos, Bonillos 12) During the American Revolution many brides wore what color of wedding gowns as a sign of rebellion? Red, Blue, Green, Yellow 13) When Picasso died in 1973 what was the ofcial appraised worth of his estate? $2,000; $135,000; $7 million; $250 million ANSWERS 1) Coolidge. 2) E-3 AWAC. 3) Charleston, SC. 4) Maine. 5) Public domain. 6) Artesian well. 7) Australian. 8) $1.5 million. 9) Sound waves. 10) Wailing Wall. 11) Caudillos. 12) Red. 13) $250 million. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! !! % !! # !! & # (850)22 7 -7847 | tgolden@pcnh com S O L D $$ $ John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249082 $225,000 St. George Island SEA GODDESS Light and airy 3 BR 2 B A island home pri v a te scenic fr esh w a ter pond, lar ge deck, 2nd le v el sundeck, cheer full y furnished, gr ound le v el laundry/stor a ge r oom, sh cleaning ar ea & outside sho w er under home par k ing on pad, W est Pine A v en ue Listed b y J anie Bur k e $ $ J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 7 7 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 2548790 $116,000 St. George Island GULF BEA CHES L OT H i g h d u n e y l o t o n t h e n o r t h s i d e o f G u l f B e a c h D r iv e B i k e p a t h a c r o s s t h e s t r e e t 3 r d l o t f r o m t h e c o r n e r o f 6 t h S t r e e t E a s t N o c l e a r i n g n e c e s s a r y l o t m e a s u r e s 1 0 0 x 1 5 0 1 / 3 a c r e H i g h ( d r y ) e l e v a t i o n Buy t o b u i l d o r k e e p f o r i n v e s t m e n t L i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! !! % !! # !! & # (850)22 7 -7847 | tgolden@pcnh com S O L D $$ 850-899-5104 / 850-697-9010 www .co astalr ealtyinf o .co m C he c k o u t t h i s c h a r m i n g h o m e l o c a t e d j u s t t w o d o o r s d o w n f r o m t he en t r y w a y i n t o S t J a m e s B a y G o l f C o u r s e T h i s i s a l a r g e l a n d s c a p e d l o t w i t h n i c e v i e w s o f t he ba y a n d m a t u r e t r e e s T he r e i s p l en t y o f r o o m f o r e x p a n s i o n a n d b o a t s t o r a g e T he h o m e d o e s n e e d s o m e r en o v a t i o n s b u t i s w o r t h t he e f f o r t $ $ MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com $ By TEVIS PAGE Special to the Times Last week was lled with so much preparation for seafood festival. The student body came together to x any problems on the oats and get the necessary items to the festival on time. Our very own Miss Morgan Martin showed off her true beauty accompanying Mr. Vance Millender in the parade and introducing Kellie Pickler. Our Seahawk royalty, Mr. and Miss, and Homecoming Queen and King also represented our school beautifully. Once the parade was over, the real business began, booth sales. The seniors, Take Stock in Children and many other groups were fundraising at the festival. I believe everyone got a fair share, and the customers left full and happy. The reworks display after the concert was colorful and very much enjoyed by all who attended. It really is a shame that the seafood festival only comes once a year, but I guess it’s true, the longer the wait the better the time. HAWK TALK The parade is over; time to relax The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Oct. 29 Thomas A. Arroyo, 38, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Oct. 31 Patricia A. Keil, 45, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Nov. 1 Patricia A. Keil, 45, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Phillip E. McElreavy, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Nov. 2 David B. Keith, Sr., 51, Carrabelle, aggravated battery great bodily harm, and attempted rst-degree murder (CPD) Nov. 4 Brian H. Young, 30, Crawfordville, domestic battery and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Kristopher M. Suggs, 37, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Jonathan G. Carmichael, 27, Apalachicola, failure to appear, petit theft and two counts of uttering (FCSO) Nov. 5 Bradley R. Lalonde, 40, Crawfordville failure to appear (FCSO) Arrest REP ortORT



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Feds OK emergency loansBy SCOTT CARROLL522-5180 | @scottyknoxville scarroll@pcnh.com An economic injury declaration seeking loans for small businesses affected by the collapse of the commercial oyster industry in the Florida Panhandle was approved Friday by the U.S. Small Business Administration. The declaration was requested Oct. 23 by Gov. Rick Scott, who cited a historic decline in the oyster supply of Apalachicola Bay. Franklin, Gulf, Liberty and Wakulla counties are included in the declaration. Small businesses, small aquaculture businesses, small agriculture cooperatives and most private nonpro t organizations in those counties will be eligible for as much as $2 million in low-interest loans, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration. The groups lead public affairs specialist in its of ce of disaster assistance, Mark Ihenacho, said affected businesses were immediately eligible to apply for the loans, but Friday it wasnt clear how many would. The loan amount a business receives will depend on its credit history, income and insurance status, Ihenacho said. By law, were required to make sure that anybody who gets the loan has the ability to repay the loan, he said. The deadline to apply for the loans is July 31, 2014. The EIDL assistance will be made available to those businesses and owners who cannot provide for their own See LOANS A10Haunted Halloween, A6By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com APALACHICOLA If the size of the oyster eaters appetites is an accurate gauge, Saturdays crowd at the 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival was a bellyful for the record books. A late thunderstorm Friday night, followed by an overcast morning, gave way to crisp, sunny weather, ideal for taking in a podium full of competitors guzzling mollusks. For Gerald G Goodman, of Southport, it came very close to eschewing chewing, and swallowing them whole, and he quickly pulled into the obvious lead in the 15-minute contest. His shaven head even drew cheers and heckles, some taunting Kojak that he wouldnt keep them all down by the time County Attorney Michael Shuler blew the whistle. OYSTER INDUSTRY COLLAPSE DAYS OF GOLD Schools to celebrate Veterans DayThe Franklin County School and Apalachicola Bay Charter School invite all veterans to a Veterans Day celebration on Monday, Nov. 11. There will be a breakfast for all veterans at 9 a.m. in the Franklin County School media center. The Veterans Day program will begin at 10 a.m. in the gymnasium.Senior Citizens Fall Fest SaturdayThe Fall Festival will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 102 Ave. F. Kick off holiday shopping at this event featuring local artists, vendor booths, arts and crafts, food, games and childrens activities. Call 697-3760.Lanark gumbo cook-off SaturdayThe St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department annual charity gumbo cookoff will be Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Lanark Village Boat Club, 2364 U.S. 98. Competition gumbo will be sold after judging. Gumbo dinners, prepared by the re ghters culinary staff, are available for sit-down or to-go. Prizes are $500 for rst, $250 second and $100 for third. Activities include auctions and live music. Call 567-4161Any Number Can Die Nov. 15-17Get ready for the opening show in the Panhandle Players season when Any Number Can Die, a comic murder mystery by Fred Carmichael, plays Nov. 15-17 at the Dixie Theatre. Directed by Megan Lamb, the show promises laughs, gasps and surprises when the audience hears two hoots by dusk, two bodies by dawn. Tickets are $15 for Friday and Saturday evening, and Sunday afternoon, and can be purchased at Apalachicolas Downtown Books, the Butler Agency in Eastpoint and Carrabelle Junction. County seeks new extension agentBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Bill Mahan, Franklin Countys extension agent for the past 20 years, was transferred to Panama City last week, with a permanent replacement expected to be hired within the next four to six months. It is a personnel issue, and thats all I can share at this time, said Pete Vergot, northwest district extension director for University of Florida IFAS Extension, in a telephone interview Monday. Vergot said Mahan was transferred to the Bay County extension of ce as of Oct. 29, FLORIDA SEAFOOD FESTIVAL Enormous crowd on hand for 50th anniversary festivalSanders to senators: No Air Force in forestBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders appealed to a Florida Senate committee last month to back traditional uses, and not military exercises, in the Tates Hell State Forest. All were asking for is to stand on your word, she told the Senate Agriculture Committee Oct. 7. Your handshake is a handshake; I dont care how old it gets. The people in Franklin County wanted this land in preservation to protect traditional uses and to be able to go there. Sanders appeared as a guest of committee chair State Sen. Bill Montford, DMonticello, whose district includes all of Franklin County. She followed an appearance on the agenda by Florida State Forester Jim Karels.PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesTOP LEFT: Celebrity chef Jeff McInnis offered samples of fried shrimp seasoned with Tabasco sauce as part of booth celebrating the famed hot sauce. TOP RIGHT: King Retsyo Vance Millender and Miss Florida Seafood Morgan Martin wave from the parade. ABOVE LEFT: Headliner Kellie Pickler performs Saturday night. Pickler broke out red high heels, below, for her nale song of the same name. ABOVE RIGHT: Gerald Goodman of Southport downed 27 dozen oysters to triumph at the festival. BELOW: Dr. Photis Nichols, who practiced medicine in Apalachicola for more than 50 years, returned from Jacksonville for the parade, riding the Weems Hospital oat with Valencia Marsh, left, and Glenda Wilson. Schools to celebrate xxxxxThursday, November 7, 2013 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 128 ISSUE 28 xxxxx Out to see Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . . A11 xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxxPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us Index See EXTENSION A5 See AIR FORCE A5 See FESTIVAL A10

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com County commissioners voted Tuesday to complete renovations of the Fort Coombs Armory and create a new visitor center for Eastpoint over the next 11 months, at a combined cost of $300,000 to $500,000. At the county commission meeting, Commissioner Pinki Jackel reported on an in-house assessment of the former Florida Highway Patrol station in Eastpoint. For the past year, she has advocated using Tourist Development Council (TDC) funds to transform the site into a visitor center and maritime history museum. She said the building has been abandoned and vandalized and is in very poor condition, describing it as a block building with a pretty good roof. Jackel said it needs both cosmetic work and interior repairs. Jackel said Poloronis Construction of Apalachicola estimated the cost of renovation at around $120,000. Some items are in ux, she said. Several items were not sure about until we dig around and a couple we can opt out of. We hope we can get it in at under $100,000. In response to Chair Cheryl Sanders request last month for a business plan, Jackel said a $35,000 stipend previously awarded by the TDC to the Eastpoint Visitor Center would pay for electricity, water, telephone service, postage and all other regular budgeted expenses. Jackel said revenues for the TDC exceeded expenses for the scal year, which ended Sept. 30. She said payments promised for renovations to the Armory, and for Seafood Workers Park, formerly Lombardi Seafood, had been made. We have $61,000 to carry forward for the Armory, she said. Funding for Lombardi and the Armory will not be dipped into. Commissioners designated the Armory as a convention center in May 2011 and began renovation of the building under the direction of architect Warren Emo, after Steve Goodman and Carl Holliday, of Indianapolis, Ind., sought to lease the building and privately fund its restoration for use as a venue for weddings. The county moved to earmark more than $230,000 for renovations in 2011-12, with Sanders stipulating that the TDC use any and all excess funding that is not already encumbered to renovate the Armory and complete the Lombardi Seafood Landing project so it will satisfy the requirements in its management plan including the completion of the maritime heritage museum planned for the park west of Apalachicola. On Tuesday, Commissioner Noah Lockley objected to the Eastpoint project. We need to discuss this thing rst, he said. We have a project open which is the Armory. Were not nished with it. We have visitor centers open in Carrabelle and Apalachicola. We support them. We never just took a county building and gave it to them. I havent seen anybody in the audience say they support this. I have no problem furnishing them with the $35,000. We might want to check and see if its legal to have a private organization come in here and we furnish them with a building, he said. Jackel has proposed having a not-for-prot entity run the proposed visitor center. She noted that the St. George Island visitor center is a county-owned building managed by a not-for-prot. Im sure I could come up with some others, she said. I want to make sure we fulll our commitment to the Armory, said Sanders. I am in favor of (the Eastpoint Visitor Center), but Im not sure how thats going to affect the Armory and Lombardi. Sanders said she received numerous complaints about the Armorys lack of air conditioning after the King Retsyo Ball held there Friday night. TDC Director Curt Blair said money for the Eastpoint center could come from the TDCs contingency reserve. Were always over budget, he said. I cant predict what were going to need for the Armory at this point. Were expecting an additional $200,000 in revenue. Well have the nal numbers in December. Lockley said, Were piecemealing the Armory. Last year (the TDC) said they didnt have any money. Now theyre coming up with some. Jackel said the Armory renovation was a three-year project. Lockley asked why the Eastpoint center wasnt a three-year project too. He said the county could construct a new building of the same size for less than it will cost to renovate the highway patrol building. Sanders said she was surprised at the high cost of the renovation. I thought it would be around $60,000, she said. I originally thought it would be around $90,000, Jackel said. We ran some numbers. Mr. Poloronis was looking at the worst case. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said he shared Lockleys concerns. To me its not quite equitable, he said. Jackel moved the county go out for bids to renovate the highway patrol station with a cap of $100,000 on the project. The motion passed 3-2, with Lockley and Parrish opposed. I have to vote for it not to exceed $100,000, said Sanders. Thats the only reason I go with that. Lockley then moved the TDC provide money to nish renovations to the Armory over the next scal year, ending Sept. 30, 2014. The motion passed unanimously. County Planner Alan Pierce said he could not be sure of the cost of completing Armory renovations. He said the county spent more than $240,000 on the project over the last scal year replacing the roof and dealing with other moisture-related issues. Pierce said the next step would be replacing the wiring and plumbing, and that each of these upgrades could run around $100,000. The upgrade to the kitchen is undened, he said. Pierce said the cost of furnishing the building with central heat and air conditioning was also an unknown. ItsRecruitmentTime... andWEWANT YOU!FRANKLINCOUNTYSWAT(StudentsWorkingAgainstTobacco)Ifyouareastudentbetweentheagesof11-17and wouldliketojoinusintheghtagainstBigTobacco whoisconstantlyusingtheirtacticstolureyou,your familyandyourbestfriendstobecomelifetimeusersof theirdeadlytobaccoproducts,thenSWATisforYOU! (WehaveSWATClubsinApalachicola,Eastpoint (FranklinCountySchool)andCarrabelle)Formoreinformationpleasecall (850)653-2111ext123. TheTobacco-FreeFranklinPartnership Coalition iscurrentlylookingfornew memberstohelpcounteractthenormalcy oftobaccousehereinFranklinCounty andachieveourgoalofa Tobacco-Free Franklin ifyouareinterestedinjoining ustomakeFranklinCountyahealthier placetolive,work,andplayinorwould likeinformationaboutourmeetings, pleasecall (850)653-2111ext123. NOAH LOCKlLEY PInNKI JACKEl LCounty backs Eastpoint visitor center, Armory upgrade PHOTOS BY LOIS OIS SS WOBO OBO DA A | The TimesCounty Commissioners voted to complete revovations of the Eastpoint Visitors Center, left, and Fort Coombs Armory Convention Center.

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The Times | A3Thursday, November 7, 2013 BloodPressureScreening BMICheck DentalInformation TobaccoPreventionInformation DiabetesAwarenessInformation FluShots CancerAwarenessInformation OralCancerScreening NutritionAwarenessInformation HealthyStart/HealthyFamily FarmShareTruck Formoreinformation, pleasecontact850-653-2111ext102UnityintheCommunity HealthFairFreeAdmissionandOpentothePublic!WillKendrickSportsComplex 1601KennethCopeAve Carrabelle,Fl32322November9,2013from11am-4pmSponsoredBy:FloridaDepartmentofHealthin FranklinCountyClosingtheGap ProgramandMountOliveAMEChurch Saturday,November10th 10am-4pmLANARKVILLAGEBOATCLUB&MARINA2364USHwy98|Lanark,FL PRIZEWINNING GUMBOCOOKING STARTSAT10AM5thANNUALCHARITYStJames/LanarkVolunteerFireDepartment SAVETHEDATE IT'SALLGREAT! GMBO COOK-OFF LIVEAUCTION12:30PM FUN-FILLEDRAFFLE Monday,November11,2013 9amESTatPortSt.JoeHighSchoolepubliciscordiallyinvitedtotheannual community-wideVeteran'sDayCeremonies. Wesincerelyhopethatyouwillbeabletoattendandjoinusin payingtributetoandgivinghonortoourVeteranswhohave givensacriciallytopreservetheeedomsthatweenjoyin Americatoday!Veteran'sDayCelebration THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER SKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit.CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening.DIDYOUKNOWthatstudiesshow: NOW,DIDYOUKNOW? VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet|PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-7070|www.iversmd.com ALLMAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED9am-6pm 9am-2pm Law EnforcementBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A 51-year-old Carrabelle man was arrested Saturday for attempted murder after he allegedly stabbed two men earlier that morning on the Carrabelle docks. David B. Keith, Sr. was arrested at his home, and taken to the jail about 10 a.m. Saturday morning. He had his rst appearance on Sunday before Circuit Judge Frank Shefeld. Keith was charged with aggravated battery great bodily harm, and attempted rst-degree murder, and later posted a surety bond of $40,000 for his release. According to a report by Carrabelle Police Ofcer Gary Hunnings, the incident happened sometime before 2:08 a.m. Saturday on the dock behind Fathoms Raw Bar, 201 St. James Avenue. Hunnings said when he arrived at the scene, there was a man lying on the ground, with several people over him. He said John Shane Evans, 40, of Crawfordville, came up and was holding his stomach, saying that he and his friend had been stabbed. Evans had his left hand over his stomach, slightly on the left side. After Evans held up his shirt, Hunnings said he saw blood was coming from the wound. It looked like some of his intestines were coming out of the hole in his stomach. Evans told the ofcer that his friend, James L. McIntyre, 23, of Sopchoppy, was worse than he was. Hunnings said he approached McIntyre, who was laying on the ground covered in blood. The ofcer said McIntyre had apparently sustained cuts to the left forearm and left side of the stomach, and a small cut under the left eye. Hunnings said McIntyre was unable to talk, was very intoxicated and wounded very bad. The Carrabelle police ofcer said the men had been drinking with friends at nearby Harrys Bar, when they came upon Keith and a woman, Kimberly Ann Wallace, 43, who were walking towards them, Evans said McIntyre and Keith got into a verbal altercation (before) Keith pulled out a knife and started slashing (McIntyre). Evans told the ofcer that McIntyre fell to the ground and that Keith started kicking James in the face. Keith then got over James and drew the knife and was going to stab him again, Hunnings wrote in his report. Evans said he told Keith to stop, and then ran up and kicked Keith in the face to stop him. Keith then stabbed Evans in the stomach, Evans told the ofcer. Evans said Wallace yelled for Keith to go and run, and the man ran to his motorcycle and sped away. Hunnings notied Sheriffs Deputy Robert Shiver to go after him. Shiver later spotted Keith driving north on Highway 67, and attempted to catch up to him, but was unable to. Shiver drove to Keiths residence and saw the motorcycle abandoned in a eld not far from the house. Both men were said to be recovering from their injuries as of press time.Two wounded in Carrabelle kningDAVIdD KEITH, SR.

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, November 7, 2013 APage 4SectionSpecial to the TimesThe values of hard work, discipline and mission orientation are what employers want and what veterans have. Recognizing the tremendous value of those who have served our country, Florida Gov. Rick Scott has proclaimed November 2013 as Hire a Veteran Month. The governors proclamation reaf rms our commitment to those who have served our nation. Coordinated by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs, workforce partners, Workforce Florida, Inc. and the 24 regional workforce boards, including Gulf Coast Workforce Board, this initiative is designed to remind employers of the unmatched economic resource provided by our states veterans. Florida is home to an estimated 1.6 million veterans, the third largest population of veterans in our nation, said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. Our veterans possess valuable leadership, as well as business and technical skills gained while serving their country. They are a versatile and well-trained resource for employers and Florida is fortunate to have ready access to such a highlyskilled workforce. However, according to the Sept. 2013 Bureau of Labor Statistics Of ce of Economic Opportunity Veterans Bene ts Administration Employment Facts and Statics Report, compared to the national unemployment rate of 7.2 percent, Florida veterans ages 18-24 have an unemployment rate of 22.8 percent, and Florida veterans ages 25-34 have an unemployment rate of 12.1 percent, far above the national rates. The most recent data available for Workforce Region 4 (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) are more promising, which is a testimony to the vetfriendly business environment in the region, a trend we want to continue. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board currently works with many employers who already see the value of hiring vets. One of these is Val Johnson III, human resource manager at Lowes said, I hire vets because there isnt another densely populated candidate pool that consistently produces well developed professionals that are, driven, accountable, handle pressure well, and are trained leaders. I hire vets to serve the people who have already served me! The Veterans Job Seekers Program offers a wealth of resources, including specialized a Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPS), staff who work solely with the veteran population. Veterans can work with a veterans employment specialist at the one stop center to receive assistance with resumes, acquire skills and education, plan a career, attend workshops, and take advantage of many other resources. THE JOBLESS PICTUREThe following information, prepared last month by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, Bureau of Labor Market Statistics, is based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 2011 American Community Survey. It is based on data from 2011, the most up-to-date statistics available for the Franklin County veterans labor force. Out of 69 vets age 18 to 34, none were unemployed. Out of 231 vets age 35 to 54, 20 were unemployed,, or 8.7 percent Out of 195 vets age 55 to 64, none were unemployed. Out of 495 total veterans, 20 were unemployed, or 4.0 percentSpecial to the TimesFloridas manatees are having a record year. Unfortunately, the records they are breaking are measured in carcasses washing ashore in our coastal communities. A worst ever red tide event earlier this year in southwest Florida and a lingering unusual mortality event in the Indian River Lagoon on Floridas east coast have made it a really dif cult year to be a manatee. And to those who would argue that we have more manatees, so we have more deaths, let me stop you right there. The deaths we are seeing have nothing to do with the size of the manatee population. These deaths are not natural controls on a growing population. They are a loud and clear signal that our waterways are in trouble. When the 2010 manatee mortality statistics were nalized at 766, that was signi cant, frightening, and sad several hundred more deaths than had ever been recorded in a single year, many the result of a prolonged cold weather event. It was regarded as a rare event; an anomaly. Here we are again, less than three years later, having broken that 2010 record only 10 months into the year. As of Oct. 29, 769 Florida manatees had died. Of those, 123 were stillborn, newborn, or young calves less than ve feet in length another record, and 49 of these were found in Brevard County, at the epicenter of the unusual mortality event linked to a variety of algal blooms and loss of 47,000 acres of seagrass since 2010. Theres little question that human mistreatment of the Indian River Lagoon had a hand to play in the disastrous cascade that began in 2010. On the southwest coast, during the peak of the red tide, manatees were dying so fast that scientists didnt have the time or resources to conduct post-mortem exams on all of them before committing them to mass graves. Red tide is another one of those natural events to which our species adds fuel to the proverbial re with our coastal nutrient runoff. If you havent seen and felt the effects of red tide or the algal blooms in the Indian River Lagoon, then this article might not mean very much to you. Our species has a keen ability to ignore that which we dont see ourselves. Unfortunately, until we all, each and every one of us, accept that were part of the problem, and even more importantly, an integral part of the solution, theres little hope for our canaries in the coal mines: our manatees and their imperiled habitat. Dr. Tripp has been Save the Manatee Clubs director of science and Conservation since May 2008. She received her doctorate in veterinary medical sciences from the University of Florida, where she conducted research on manatee physiology. For more information on manatees and to learn about the Clubs Adopt-A-Manatee program, go to www. savethemanatee.org.The record you dont want to break KATIE TRIPP, PH.D.Guest Columnist Well, in this world some things change and some remain the same. Last month, the Apalachicola Municipal Library Board voted to stay in the 74 Sixth Street (Gorrie Square) location, rather than move to the former Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) building at Scipio Creek. The ANERR site had been seen by some as a positive possibility to expand the library, as the Gorrie Square location is only 1,500 square feet, and has run out of space. The new plan will be to re-purpose some areas, and weed out a lot of older books that circulate very infrequently or not at all. Weeding collections is considered an important aspect of modern public library management, keeping those books that have the highest circulation, along with classics, special collections and titles of regional interest. But, dont worry, the majority of what you want will still be here, and what is not can be obtained through Interlibrary Loan. What you wont nd in the library after Nov. 15 is one of our classics, Sue Cronkite. Sue is relocating further south, and plans to proactively work on manuscripts she has wanted to publish for some time. I dont know how many users of the library realize the gem we have had in our midst, but let me tell you a little about what she has done in her time here. Sue is a dogged researcher, a person whose patience and attention to detail is beyond most peoples skills. She took all the books which refer to things in the city and surrounding areas and entered them into an Excel spreadsheet with citation documentation. The list is now more than 1,500 unique names. This allows any staff person to look up a family name for a visitor and tell them whether we have any information in published works. This has saved the librarian untold moments of that look of total blankness, when a family is not one of the prominent ones. This project has a phase two, where all the names from the Chestnut Cemetery list, electronically converted by Beth Wright, for the Apalachicola Area Historical Society, will be added. This will increase the size of the database by quite a lot, but sadly Sue will not be here to do it. Sues resume lists a lot of writing awards that I was not particularly aware of. I did know that she was a newspaper woman in a previous life and she often authored the library column with wonderful tidbits from Margaret Keys papers and letters. At the Birmingham News alone, she was an editorial page writer, assistant state editor, night city editor, layout and makeup editor as well as a feature writer and reporter. She also has an extensive educational background in communications, English literature and psychology from a number of educational institutions. In short, she was working below her capacity here at the Apalachicola library, but offered us great resources and skills, including proofreading these columns. Her nal project has been to prepare the Harry P. Owens doctoral thesis, Apalachicola Before 1861 into book format, print ready, which hopefully will to be out by March 2014. I dont know what we will do without her, but we wish her every success in her next endeavors. She was hoping to slip out of town unnoticed, but I think you should come by to see her and wish her well. She will be dearly missed. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Library staying put, but losing a classic@THE LIBRARY Caty GreeneClari cationIn last weeks story, it should have been noted that Miss Florida Seafood, Franklin County High School junior Morgan Martin is the daughter of Teresa Ann Martin, of Apalachicola, and Henry Martin, of Destin; and the granddaughter of Betty and the late Henry Fred Stephens, of Apalachicola; and Freddie Jefferson, of Miami. Sue Cronkite at work at the library Scott proclaims November Hire a Veteran MonthOur veterans possess valuable leadership, as well as business and technical skills gained while serving their country. They are a versatile and well-trained resource for employers and Florida is fortunate to have ready access to such a highly-skilled workforce.Kim Bodine Executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board PATRICK M. ROSE | Save the Manatee Club

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, November 7, 2013In December 2012, Gov. Rick Scotts ofce and the Air Force announced a partnership agreement in which Eglin Air Force Base would lease, for limited times throughout the year, a portion of the Tates Hell and Blackwater River state forests. This would be part of the landscape portion of the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative, a plan to create options in the Panhandle to relieve airspace congestion over Eglin by expanding military training operations to these two state forests. In his remarks opening the hearing, Karels outlined the Florida Forest Services mission, stressing the stewardship ethic and the importance of public access to the land. Its called Tates Hell, and the name ts, Karels said. Its 214,000 acres, beautiful country, very remote country, as remote as you will see in Florida. They have dwarf cypress, and they look like God mowed the top off the trees. Its a very beautiful place, critical to the estuary of Apalachicola Bay and the environment of that region of the state, he said, describing how these timberlands, extending from the beach and U.S. 98 to the national forest, were acquired some years back by the state from former owner Buckeye Cellulose Corp. Karels indicated more talks will be held with the Air Force regarding use of Tates Hell. What were looking at with the military, and its still in discussion, is that about nine months ago the commissioner signed a letter of agreement. We agreed to talk to them, he said. All that agreement says is, Well talk to you. Well entertain looking at opportunities. With air space increasingly crowded over Eglin, limits on ground-level training opportunities are forcing the expansion, Karels said. Blackwater has a closed-down training site, with old rotted buildings we dont use anymore. They want to practice urban warfare without any live rounds. The Franklin County site would be for more wilderness training. Tates Hell ts that rough stuff, he said. Outside of hunting season, outside of impacts to them, (we want to) try to allow them a few training missions where they come in with those special ops, they drop them off, and they come in with planes with big balloon wheels that can land on those rough roads down there, designed to drop those guys behind military lines. Those special ops then have to go to a point 20 to 30 miles away, Karels said. I dont know how theyll make it across Tates Hell on foot. Its geared to low-impact, both to the environment and to the users, he said. Well have complete control if we decide to do anything, so if one of the missions has an impact where it does something to the recreational users thats not good, well say were not going to do that anymore. But we havent signed anything. Were still in the discussion stage, Karels said.County pushes backIn her comments, Sanders specically addressed Karels reference to hunting. There is not a time in Tates Hell that is not usable season, she said. Hes talking about hunting season. You have hunting season. Its sort of like people living in the centers from Miami. A lot of people go to the malls, different places like that. Guess where we go in Franklin County when we do our outdoor activities? The forests, Sanders said. Thats our mall. Thats our thing. Sanders is the daughter of Ralph G. Kendrick, who once worked for the state forest service, served on the county commission and for whom the boardwalk to the stand of dwarf cypress trees is named. Im one of the old-timers here, so just give me a few minutes, Sanders said in her introduction. We the people of Franklin County supported the sale of over 185,000 acres to the state of Florida for conservation and preservation, all the way from the early 90s all the way to 2002 and 2003. We the people of Franklin County knew that we had to have a choice to utilize our land in traditional uses, she said. Or we could leave it on the tax rolls. But people of Franklin County chose, and knew, that it was worth more saving it, conserving it, then it was to have the money on the tax roll. In recounting the circumstances surrounding the public scoping meeting the Air Force held at Battery Park in the summer, Sanders said Franklin County has been left somewhat in the darkened woods. My fears is this: We have had no public input whatsoever with this concerning the military, she said. On Aug. 29, the military, Eglin, came down to Apalachicola and met there. We knew a week prior; we didnt know what it was about. We get up there and were told by the military. It was here that Sanders interjected that I love the Florida Forest Service, I love them, but we dont need no military. The military told the people of Franklin County we will take your comments, we will listen to your comments, but we wont answer no questions, Sanders continued. This was the rst we heard of the state having talks with the military. It really concerns us that due process has not taken effect and that the people of Franklin County, who supported the sale of land to the state for preservation, have not been afforded an opportunity to have their say. The thoughts of CV 22s, big old helicopters, that just scares me, Sanders said, referring to the Air Forces tiltrotor aircraft, nicknamed the Osprey. With 185,000 acres in Tates Hell, its everybodys backyard in Franklin County. with a temporary team of extension agent staffers, led by interim county director Shelly Swenson, now handling his duties. We work with the board (of county commissioners) on those decisions, but it was a personnel decision that was made, Vergot said. We hope to continue the extension program, and we know there are issues that extension can assist. Well be doing some listening sessions on the most important needs, he said. We know theres some expectation among shellsh workers and the seafood industry, so those are most likely the high priorities. Swenson lives in Wakulla County, where she handles family and consumer sciences and an expanded food and nutrition education program and is a 4-H agent. Vergot briefed the county commission on his decision at Tuesday mornings meeting and was questioned very little about what had happened with Mahan. The only person to speak out was the Rev. John Sink, wearing a hat touting the century-old land grant system that gave rise to the network of extension agents throughout rural areas of the country. Sink said he was appalled that the University of Florida had reassigned Mahan. He focused on our seafood industry, which is the lifeblood of this county, he said. Ive been in the land grant system all my life. Im really disappointed at the university being able to do this. The county commissioners voted unanimously to send Mahan a thank-you for his years of service to the county, dating back to 1993. Vergot shared a packet with commissioners that indicated the University of Florida and U.S. Department of Agriculture spend about $142,000 annually on the county extension ofce, including about $99,000 for agent salary and benets, and another $43,000 for administrative support. The county kicks in another $68,000 per year, most of it for support staff and for the ofce space. The board of county commissioners will have a big input, Vergot said. They are a substantial partner for the position. Vergot said with several ongoing research projects on the seafood industry, with involvement from University of Florida faculty Karl Havens, Steve Otwell and several others, the university has been actively involved in the county. But, he said, theres more that needs to be done, and listening sessions in December should help the future of the county program take shape. Right now, the faculty that are there are going to be talking to clientele preparing for those, Vergot said. Were looking at what we can do in the short term and then developing long-term goals and longterm plans. He said it could be at least March or April before a permanent replacement is on board. We hope we would continue with the team with Gulf and Wakulla County people to continue to provide all that extension has to offer to the area, Vergot said. A draft of the job description outlines the jobs duties and responsibilities. It notes that a masters degree is required, a PhD is preferred, and the degree must be from an accredited college or university. It said degrees considered are of marine policy, coastal management, marine recreation, resource development, commercial sheries, aquaculture, marine biology, resource economics or other related disciplines. Extension programming experience in the commercial or recreational sheries area is preferred. We hope to have a full role where were offering all of our extension programs to clientele so we can meet as many needs as possible, Vergot said. There are a huge number of needs. There are opportunities in family consumer science areas. Weve been able to bring in program assistance in our family nutrition program and people though extending the volunteer base. He said possible program expansion includes adding the master naturalist and master gardener programs, and adding volunteers through 4H program. He said additional grant opportunities might be available, as well as greater outreach with the schools, such as in the case of Ray Carter in Gulf County. We hope that Franklin County can see the changes in extension programs in the very near future, Vergot said. We hope to have a bigger presence than people have seen in the past. We cant do what we do without the countys partnership in making this work. Implants&CrownsAffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.WilliamC.Knapke,DDS,GeneralDentistPanamaCitySquare617West23rdStreet,PanamaCityFL CallForInformation1-888-415-1638 Feeseffectivethrough11/22/13.Additionalfeesmaybeincurred dependingonindividualcases.Same-dayCrownservicemaynot beavailableincertaincases.AffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.Ofce#:(850)872-6155. Great vs.other Dental providersSingleToothImplant$1,795Denture Implants$1,495$1,895 Same-DayCrowns$695LowerArch UpperArch20144-3-T4 NOWOPEN!!Flowers&GiftsforAllOccasions CircleECandles HandCraftedJewelry byLocalArtists BalloonBouquets51MarketSt.,SuiteA Apalachicola,FL ( 850 ) 899-1588 BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658$1,000DOWNEACH2U.S.98COMM.LOTS 5LOTSLANARKBEACH400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 2NICELOTS 12TH&OWEN,$16,500 C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,5004CITYLOTSOFF HWY67$15,000MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 ThePanhandlePlayersPresent TWOHOOTSBYDUSK.TWOBODIESBYDAWN November15-16,7:30pm November17,3:00pm AtTheDixieTheatreTicketsare$15andmaybepurchasedat: DowntownBooksinApalachicola, TheButlerAgencyinEastpoint,CarrabelleJunction, NoNameCafeBooks&MoreinPortSt.Joe, andCaribbeanCoffeeinMexicoBeach.ProducedinSpecialArrangementwithSamuelFrench,Inc. AIR FORCE from page A1 EXTENSION from page A1 JIM KARELS CHERYL S S ANDERS

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PUPPIES!Wehave7 LabradorRetrievermix pupsandtheyareall female.Thereare4 chocolateand3black. Theyareonlyabout5 weeksoldrightnowso willhavetostayherefor another3weeksbefore theycanbereleasedbutifyouwouldliketoadoptone,comebythe adoptioncenter,choosetheonethatstealsyourheartandplacea depositholdonher! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofourdogsand cats.Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofour animalsintotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytime youcansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCounty HumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogon tothewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptable pets. 4514forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday SocietyA6 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013Iolana Loni Burke will celebrate her sixth birthday on Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Loni is the daughter of Jeremy and Candace Burke, of Apalachicola, and Christina Bellew, of Thomasville, Ga. Lonis maternal grandparents are John and Sonya Bellew, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly Burke, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant, of Apalachicola. IOLANA BURKE TO TURN 6 Neighbors in the nightPHOTOS bB Y DA A VID AA DLERSTE LERSTE IN N | The TimesThe Halloween party at the Tapas Bar was a lively, and ghoulish, affair. Reyd Zingarelli, daughter of Jordan Zingarelli, was a little chickadee for Halloween. This group of moonshiners, David and Elizah Johnson, and their daughers Sarah Lee, Brooklyn and Adrian, could be seen roaming the historic district. The Mad Hatter, Franklin County High School culinary arts teacher Debra Fletcher, greets trick-ortreaters in Apalachicola. Jo Anne Cagle, above, and fellow witch Jamie Bivona offered an elaborate porch display in the historic district.Special to the TimesThe 1895 birthday of the Crooked River Lighthouse was celebrated once again Oct. 26 with a vibrant array of lanterns, theatrical sketches, Irish musicians and glow-in the dark dancers. Attendance was estimated at around 350 in the historic park, the right amount of chilly, and visitors could nd a bit of warmth watching the blacksmith or the candle makers, or having some tasty gumbo. A rst-time feature of the fourth annual Lantern Fest was a display of handcrafted sea creature lanterns, fashioned by area artists out of papier-mch, cloth, recycled plastics, wire and lots of tiny diode light strands. Jan Neshat, Susan Campbell, Susan David and Nelle McCall made creative contributions as well as folks who took part in lantern-making workshops. Delores Hardin, Perdita Ross, and Laurel Newman shared their craft knowledge and a great bunch of enthusiastic students made awesome lanterns. The young siblings, the Striblings, of the Irish band Killavil, from nearby Woodville performed for the rst time on a pirate ship under a lighthouse, showing off their talent, enthusiasm and unique instruments featuring distinctly Celtic Uilleann pipes (softer and sweeter than the well-known bagpipes) penny whistles, bouzouki and the traditional ddle. Richard MacLean, local Lanarkian and thespian, gave a brilliant portrayal of the last keeper of the Dog Island Light, presenting a true story told by the actual keeper to the Apalachicola Times in 1902, recalling the 1873 fall of the tower during a hurricane and the brave escape to safety. Tallahassees Theater with a Mission troupe celebrated Viva Florida the 500th anniversary of the founding of Florida, with a marvelously costumed performance, presenting scenes from a 1500s work by playwright Lope de Vegas, Spains version of Shakespeare. The Tallahassee Community College Dance Company once again created a custom dance for Lantern Fest, performed in complete darkness. Ancient craft demonstrations remained a popular feature. John Pfund and his entourage gave a fascinating look at the skill and labor required to forge nails, hinges and all sorts of hardware. San Luis Missions infamous blacksmith, Dr. Skeeter Prather donated hand wrought hangers and hooks. Wakulla Springs State Park lent candle dipping supplies that showed how these basic household necessities were made in the 1900s. Sid McOmie and Kathleen Oman were right at home over a hot iron kettle.Lantern Fest glows againPHOTOS bB Y RORO D GAS AS CHE HE | Special to the Times Can you nd the TCC dancers? Everyone enjoyed learning how to dip candles. The Irish band Killavil plays acoustic around the burn barrel. Theatre with a Mission pulls the audience into the 1500s.

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The Times | A7Thursday, November 7, 2013 NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 FaithJoyce Ann Dykes Thomas, born in Port St. Joe on Feb. 25, 1958, to Josh and Eunice Dykes, passed away unexpectedly Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, at her family home in Apalachicola. Raised in Apalachicola, she was employed by the Florida Department of Corrections as a correctional ofcer. She is survived by her father Josh Dykes of Apalachicola; brother Clifford Dykes and his wife, Paula, of Apalachicola; two sisters, Joshlyn Miller of Panama City and Vanessa ONeal and husband, Gary, of Hosford; a special aunt Earlene Davis of Apalachicola; close friend and companion Skeeter Paul of Apalachicola; and numerous nieces, nephews and close friends. She was preceded in death by her mother, Eunice Dykes. We will always treasure the time and memories we had with our Joyce Ann. A funeral service will be at 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, at Kelley Funeral Home. Viewing will be 5-7 p.m. today, Nov. 7, at the funeral home.Joyce Ann Dykes Thomas JOYCE ANN DYKES THOMa ASSpecial to the TimesRelay For Life is The American Cancer Societys signature event to raise awareness and funding to ght cancer. This year, Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe and Franklin County will come together for one amazing night to celebrate, remember and ght back at the Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast. The event will take place at 7 p.m. ET April 11, 2014, at the Port St. Joe High School Shark Stadium. This Relay will be 12 hours versus the previous 24-hour event. The American Cancer Society is seeking area volunteers walkers, cancer survivors, caregivers, community leaders, anyone wanting to make a difference to join their Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast. Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at an athletic track, park or other gathering area, with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. The events are held overnight to honor and mirror a cancer patients journey through treatment. To learn more about the Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast and how to volunteer, to sign up your team or to attend the next team party, contact Kaci Rhodes at 3487798 or kaci4005@hotmail.com or Doris Carmichael at 229-243-4449 or Doris.Carmichael@shhpens.org. Relay For Life is all about our community uniting with the American Cancer Society and supporting its efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays, said Kelli Jackson, Relay committee member. Volunteers and participants who are willing to give their time and energy to this exciting event are making a commitment to let the Forgotten Coast know that cancer can be defeated. Funds raised at Relay For Life of the Forgotten Coast help the American Cancer Society to affect the lives of those touched by cancer within the community. I would like to extend a special thank you to all the Franklin County veterans who were on our oat and walked and handed out ags, candy and necklaces to the crowd. Thanks to Pam for moving us up from the rear of the parade to the middle. As for the questions from many of our local residents as to why the local veterans oat was behind so many out-of-town oats, I dont know. Ask your seafood festival president and committee. I would have thought they would have been proud of their veterans and put us up front. Guess not. We got a great response from the crowd with several standing ovations and cheers. Veterans, we will do it bigger and better next year. Charles WilsonSure had a good crowd at Chillas Hall last Saturday, Nov. 2. Thanks to those who came out and enjoyed the good breakfast, the good service and the company. See ya next month, on Dec. 7. Last Friday, Nov. 1, was opening day for the golden anniversary of the Franklin County Seafood Festival. The rain put a damper on things, but Saturday and Sunday were sunny and bright. Hope you had a good time. See you at the lunch this afternoon. The chow line forms at noon. Those of us at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center will be glad to see you. You did mark Saturday, Nov. 9, on your calendar, didnt you? Members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will hold their annual Gumbo Cook-off on the grounds of the boat club. Hope we have another nice weekend. Enjoy! The cook-off will start at 10 a.m., and the proceeds benet St. James/ Lanark Village Volunteer Fire Department. Can you believe its time to start addressing Christmas cards and make out your list? Watch for the donation boxes for Toys for Tots when you go shopping. Dont forget to sign up for our traditional Thanksgiving dinner at Chillas Hall on Thanksgiving Day. There is a sign-up sheet in the Hall. When you come over for coffee in the mornings, sign up. Wed love to have you join us. Members of the Ladies Guild of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church are still accepting donations for their yard sale. Most of the sale will be in the church hall, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16. Coffee and goodies will also be available. Your monthly sugar x will be ready for you any time between 9 and 11 a.m. Members of the Lanark Village Boat will be happy to serve you. Hope to see you there, on Saturday, Nov. 16. Saturday evening, Nov. 16, you can have a romping good time at the birthday bash, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 in Lanark. You can enjoy bar bingo, pull tabs, checker board, nger food and your favorite beverage. Of course, the music at the karaoke will be enjoyed with the Songbird, Ann Merrell, Shirley Cox and others. Party starts at 6 p.m. The fun starts when you dance through the door. Our block party will be Sunday, Nov. 17 at, 1 p.m. at Chillas Hall. It will be combined with our monthly covered dish. Hot dogs and hamburgers will be furnished by the Lanark Village Association. Bring a dish to share. The party will be inside and outside the Hall. Hope you can join us. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, be kind, Jesus loves you. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry.From Staff ReportsEE astpoint church plans N N ov. 16 fall festivalEveryone come out and join us at First Baptist Church of Eastpoint, 447 Ave. A, for our Fall Festival from 4:30-8 p.m. Nov. 16. There will be assorted games, a cake walk, face painting, hot dogs and hamburgers, lots of fun and fellowship for the entire family. For more information, call 670-8468.Lanark Boat C C lub t o host N N ov. 30 bazaarThe Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 30. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holiday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info, call Janet at 697-2587.Donation yoga classes continueThe donation yoga classes are continuing at the Battery Park location despite the relocation of Kathy Jansen. Volunteers are teaching the classes from 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Battery Park city ofce conference room.Walk with ease through aerobic exerciseThe Arthritis Foundation and the Franklin County Senior Citizens sponsor the Walk with Ease program, designed for people with or without arthritis who would like to begin a walking program to gain the benets of regular aerobic exercise. Sessions begin in November at the Apalachicola Historic Holy Family Senior Center. Groups will meet for six weeks, three times a week. Enrollment is limited to 12 people and is free. Call Donna at 323-0168 to enroll or for more information.Try text4babyGet free text messages to help keep you and your baby healthy. Signing up for text4baby takes a few minutes. 1) Grab your cell phone and text the word BABY to the number 511411. If youd like to get the messages in Spanish, text BEBE to 511411. 2) When prompted, enter your expected due date or babys date of birth. 3) Put in your zip code (e.g., 90210). You will get three messages a week until your baby turns 1, timed to how far along you are in your pregnancy or how old your baby is. Sometimes we send alerts, so on certain weeks you may get an extra message. If at any time you want to cancel service, just text STOP to 511411 (or reply to one of your text4baby messages with the word STOP). For more information, go to www.text4baby.org This program is sponsored by Johnson and Johnson.Special to The TimesThe Bridge at Bay St. Joe honored the late Ruth Schoelles on Friday when it hosted a Hall of Fame Caf celebration at the nursing home. Schoelles was honored for her work in nding shelter for the needy during her years with the Apalachicola Housing Authority. The program recognizes outstanding accomplishments and experiences of the centers residents. Employees, volunteers and community members also are honored. This years honorees also included Louie Jefferson Little Jr., a member of the Ministerial Association who makes himself available to ll in for the facilitys chaplain. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is one of 87 locations operated by Louisville, Ky.-based Signature HealthCARE. Launched in 2003, the Hall of Fame event is hosted annually by each Signature home at different times throughout the year. This year, Signature took a different approach by having each center host its Hall of Fame ceremony on the same day, creating a company-wide event. Our residents have given so much to their hometowns and our nation, and these contributions deserve to be celebrated, said Signature President and CEO Joe Steier. The Hall of Fame Caf induction ceremonies are a small way for us to say thanks. Bridge at Bay St. Joe honors Schoelles Gumbo cook-off Saturday LaANaARK NEwWSJim Welsh Relay for Life to unite with Gulf County Card of Thanks: VEtTERaANS FlLOatAT Faith BRIEFS Obituary

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, November 7, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST) Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) BWOHuntingHeadquarters: CAMOARRIVINGDAILY WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Nov.781 5364% Fri,Nov.872 6010% Sat,Nov.973 6225% Sun,Nov.1078 5823% Mon,Nov.1176 4917% Tues,Nov.1276 52 0% Wed,Nov.1377 54 1% SPONSORED BY Inshore OffshoreGood ounder are being caught around the old channel maker towers at the mouth of the bay. Most anglers are nding sh deeper this month because of the fall feeding patterns that are emerging. Local waters are coming back to life after the cold snap and the rain. Good reports say the Brothers and around Howard Creek are abuzz with good bream catches. Sipio Creek is also producing nice speckled trout since the cold snap.Maintaining a lawn or vegetable garden is fraught with challenges. Seemingly every creature that walks, ies or crawls has a motivation to dine on or destroy the hours of work that went into the building and grooming each unique horticultural masterpiece. Once the assault of bugs, birds and other animals is brought under control, the title wave of intruders from the plant world ensues. The weedy interlopers are a source of aggravation for every homeowners and gardener. Chief among Franklin Countys green invaders is purple nutsedge. This grass-like weed derives its name from the purple tint above the roots and the nutlike seeds it produces. Purple nutsedge, sometimes called nut-grass, is the predominant nutsedge weed species in local turfgrass. Additional, and less common, local members of the Cyperus genus in Florida include annual or water sedge, perennial and annual kyllinga, globe sedge, Texas sedge, athead sedge and cylindrical sedge. Sedges have triangularshaped, solid stems, while rush stems are round and solid. Both sedges and rushes favor a moist habitat. Because of the control expense, the most important members are purple nutsedge and, to some lesser degree, globe, Texas, annual and water sedge. These weeds generally thrive in soils which remain wet for extended periods of time because of poor drainage or excessive irrigation. Ditches, soils rich in organic material and mulched areas are ideal growing environments. The rst step in nutsedge control is to correct, if possible, the cause of continuously moist sites. Do not over-irrigate an area, and provide surface or subsurface drainage if necessary. There are weed control decisions to be considered once purple nutsedge is established in a lawn or garden. The expense and time available for control are factors that must be considered before beginning. There is the old-fashioned way to control these persistent pests, pulling by hand. It is low-cost and psychologically satisfying to jerk them out and pile them up. Unfortunately, this technique requires a commitment of time and strenuous labor, especially if weeding a large area. It will be unsuccessful if all the nutsedges root system is not removed and destroyed. Total root removal is dif cult at best. This sedge sends runners out from the plant and grows nuts at intervals. The runners are thin and delicate, and breakage is common. Purple nutsedge can be controlled with herbicides containing either halosulfuron or imazaquin, sold as SedgeHammer and Image, respectively. Repeat applications are required to control all the underground reproductive parts of purple nutsedge. These herbicides also control other less aggressive sedges such as cocks-comb and green kyllinga, annual sedge. They can be used in most warm-season turfgrass species. Complete coverage of weeds is necessary for greatest control potential. Even with good herbicide coverage, regrowth normally occurs from the roots and tubers, and repeat applications will be necessary. For more information on purple nutsedge, consult the UF/IFAS publication Weed Management Guide for Florida Lawns on the web at http://edis. ifas.u .edu/ep141. To learn more about the purple nutsedge and other lawn and garden weeds in Franklin County, contact the UF/IFAS Franklin County Extension of ce at 653-9337. Les Harrison, extension director in Wakulla County, is part of an interim team of extension agents serving Franklin County. LES HARRISONSpecial to The TimesPurple nutsedge is common, hard to controlSPECIAL TO THE TIMESPurple nutsedge is a common but hard-to-control weed in many Franklin County gardens and lawns.By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net Giant red sh have been hanging around the jetties, beaches, piers and cuts of North Florida for the last several months, and that may continue on until Thanksgiving or not depending on how cold the early fronts get and how rough and muddy the surf becomes. The reds are running 36 to 40 inches, true giants that are far too big to keep the slot is 18 to 27 inches but a whole lot of fun to exercise and release. The chance to catch a sh this big without access to a boat offers a unique opportunity. (Dont be tempted to keep one FWC of cers are well aware of this run of oversize spawners and have made lots of possession citations across the Panhandle in recent weeks.) Catching a giant red from shore is not a task for wimpy tackle; best choice is a big, saltwater duty spinning rig with a stout rod 7-6 to 8 feet long, loaded with plenty of 50-pound-test (or heavier) braid. The combo allows long casts, strong hook sets and plenty of power to hold the giants, and the thin diameter of the braid means you can put a lot of it on the spool chances are you wont have a sh cleaning you out. A Shimano 8000size spinning reel will hold 265 yards of 50-pound-test braid, and thats likely to be adequate for the job. Best baits for the giants are live thread ns, pin sh, nger mullet or other small bait sh. They also readily take cut bait; a fresh slab of mullet or lady sh is ne. Shrimp is also good, but lots of small junk sh also love shrimp and are likely to nip the bait off before a red nds it. The hook needs to be adequate to the task; a size 7/0 or thereabouts will do much better than a smaller hook, and its wise to use circle hooks, which are less likely to be swallowed by the sh and make release dif cult. Big reds often travel in schools, and if the school doesnt happen to be where you are, you may nd slow shing. Its a good idea to carry two rods, one heavy rod for the big reds, which you set out in a sand spike and let soak, and a lighter rig suitable for catching other species whiting and left-over Spanish, among others. Bull reds typically hang around until water temp gets below 65 or until the last of the bait schools on which they feed head south.Eatin size red shEarly November usually produces very good shing for eating-size reds across the Panhandle as well, and these sh are mostly found inside the bays. Theyre not so accessible to the shorebound angler as those along the beaches, but for those willing to wade or with a boat or kayak, or shing with a guide they can provide a great target. Inshore reds tend to hang around structure, so boat docks, oyster bars, submerged boat wrecks and rockpiles are all good targets. As the water gets colder, theres also a movement of sh into the blackwater creeks that feed the bays, apparently because the dark water captures the heat of the sun better than the clearer, shallower water on the ats. Reds on the inside are suckers for live shrimp. Use the biggest shrimp you can locate, on the lightest weight you can throw with a 2500-sized spinning reel and 10to 15-pound-test braid, you can make a good cast with a quarter-ounce or less rubber-core sinker. Add 18 inches of 25 pound test uorocarbon leader to stiffen the rig and prevent tangles a double Uniknot will join the braid and uoro dependably. Best hooks for slot reds are 1/0 to 3/0 Kahle style, which are light enough not to kill the shrimp immediately and which tend to set themselves because of their general circle-hook structure. Odds are the shrimp will attract not only reds but keeper trout and sheepshead at this time of year all hang around the same sort of structure and all prowl the creeks after the rst cold fronts, as well. If you can get them, either via castnet or bait trap, pin sh two to three inches long are even better baits than shrimp because theyre more durable and stay on the hook better. Larger reds love them, as do big trout. Unfortunately, you cant buy them at most baitshops as you can shrimp. Plastic-tailed jigs are also effective for both reds and trout, particularly if you tip them with a pencil-eraser-sized slip of fresh shrimp. Jig heads in 3/16 to quarter ounce do the job, with tails in light colors 3 to 4 inches long usually best. These are bounced on bottom in a pull-and-drop motion; hits usually come on the drop. Its a good way to explore for sh when you dont know where they are. Once you catch a few on arti cials and the bite slows, you can often turn them on again by switching to live shrimp on bottom.Red sh in the shellReds are excellent on the table, though as with many species the red line down the side has a strong shy taste it should be removed, along with the skin, when lleting. Or try red sh in the shell, which is basically cooked whole. Gut the sh and wash it thoroughly inside and out, salt and pepper the body cavity, then stuff it with lemons, limes or oranges, wrap the sh in foil, and place on medium to low grill heat. Let it cook until a fork goes in easily at the thickest part of the shoulder. The sh can now be unwrapped, a knife run down each side of the backbone just under the skin, and skin and scales lifted away. The red line can also be lifted out, along with the rib cage, and youve got a slab of tasty steamed meat thats bone free. Remove the up side, then simply pull the backbone away to access the lower llet hard to beat.Find the big red sh this month FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The TimesMost big reds are caught on live or cut bait sh. Panhandle jetties are among the prime spots. Page 8

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The Lady Seahawks wrapped up their inaugural girls golf season on Wednesday, Oct. 30. as 12year-old seventh grader Melanie Collins represented Franklin County at the Class 1A state golf nals at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake. Collins quali ed for the state tournament as an individual the week before at the regional match in Pensacola. Collins shot 41-50 on Oct. 29, and 42-47 on the second day, for a 180 total, 36 over par, and a tie for 62nd place out of 96 golfers from all over the state. She took a two-stroke penalty on day two for hitting the wrong ball, or she would have shot 40 on the front nine. Except for a couple of short stretches, I was happy with how I played, said Collins. The Lady Seahawks return all golfers next year for what hopes to be another playoff run. Expected to return will be juniors Katie Seger and Calli Westbrook; freshman Megan Collins, eighth graders Marjorie Morrow, Hannah Westbrook, Harper Westbrook and Allison Yowell; and seventh grader Melanie Collins. We have a good chance to make it to regionals again next year and I think if we work hard and improve, we can make it to state as a team, said Coach Scott Collins. He and assistant coach Spencer Tolbert said the girls were extremely grateful to St. James Bay Golf Resort and its owner, Eddie Clark, for allowing them to use their facilities as the schools home course. BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, November 7, 2013 APage 9SectionThe Lady Seahawks varsity volleyball team opened with a win in the district tournament Oct. 21, but then fell the next night to eventual district champ winner South Walton. The fourth-seeded Lady Seahawks won in three straight against fth-seed Bozeman, 25-16, 25-21 and 25-21. This was a great game for us and felt good to play well in the rst round, said Coach Tara Klink. Senior Morgan Mock played the best game of her career with a whopping 13 kills, four blocks, and three aces. Adriana Butler was next in line with four kills and a block, followed by Gracyn Kirvin with three kills and Madison Newell with two kills. Scout Segree lead serving with ve aces. The Lady Seahawks fell Oct. 22 to top-seeded South Walton although the team performed better against their opponent than they had earlier in the regular season. We have had a great year with a great group of girls, said Klink. I am so sad that Mock and Kirvin are graduating, but very excited to see everyone else return next season. Hilary Stanton and I have a goal to improve the program each year, so we love having the support of players, their families, and the community. By DAVID ADLERSTEINLady Seahawks fall in playoffsMembers of the Lady Seahawks girls golf team pose with coach Scott Collins, left, at the playoff hole at the regional tournament Oct. 22 in Pensacola.Golf team wraps up inaugural seasonThe Nest to start up MondayThe Eastpoint and Carrabelle Nest after-school program will start on Monday, Nov. 11. Registration forms are available at the Franklin County School or at the Franklin County Schools district office. The Eastpoint Nest is located at the Franklin County Learning Center; the Carrabelle Nest is located at the Carrabelle City Complex. The program adheres to the Franklin County school calendar and is operational each day school is in session until 5:30 p.m. All students must be registered before the start date of Nov. 11. If you have any questions call Sandi Hengle at 850-323-0982Transportation board to meet WednesdayThe Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Wednesday, Nov. 13 at 10 a.m. at Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include adoption of the CTC annual evaluation and regional annual performance report. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For additional information, a copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 2507 Callaway Road, Suite #200, Tallahassee FL 32303 at least five working days prior to the meeting date.Tobacco Free coalition to meet WednesdayThere will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Florida Department of Health in Franklin County, 139 12th Street, from 5 until 6 p.m. in the second floor conference room.Oyster farming workshop on Nov. 15The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has tentatively scheduled a second workshop on oyster farming on Friday, Nov. 15 at the Florida State University Coastal Marine Lab at Turkey Point. Dr. John Supan, Sea Grant oyster specialist, is scheduled to be the featured speaker. Trespassing on an oyster lease highlighted actions in Franklin County by of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission during the week of Oct. 19 to 25. Of cers Gore and Allen took a complaint on an individual trespassing on an oyster lease. The two ofcers set up surveillance on the suspect vessel, and were able to determine the subject was well inside the marked lease and actively harvesting shell sh. The two of cers conducted a stop and found the subject in possession of oysters. The suspect was identi ed and has an extensive history with FWC for harvesting shell sh at night and in closed waters. The oysters were returned back to the lease and the of cers seized the oyster tongs. The suspect was issued citations for trespassing on a lease and no hull identi cation number on a vessel and given several boating safety warnings. Gore was conducting patrol when he came across subjects shing from a local bridge. He overheard the subjects being disgruntled about not catching any sh and they were going to go try to buy some. Later on, Gore was still on patrol and noticed the same subjects talking to a local sherman. He set up surveillance and observed the local sherman make a sale of a quantity of sh to the individuals he had encountered shing earlier. Gore recognized the sherman from previous encounters and the sherman also has a history of violating resource laws. Once the sale was complete, Gore moved in and conducted a stop. He obtained statements from all parties involved admitting to the unlawful sale and cited the sherman with selling sh without a retail and wholesale license and failing to keep receipts or invoices. In Liberty County, Ofcer Mims was working Ochlocknee River at Ed & Bernices Fish Camp. He checked two subjects who had been shing and asked if they had any luck. The subjects advised that they had almost the limit of specked perch. After a check of safety equipment and sh, the two subjects were in possession of 68 specked perch. The subjects were issued citations for over the daily bag limit of specked perch. In Leon County, Of cer Jones responded to a complaint about an individual posting an animal cruelty case on a social media site. Several emails and Wildlife Alert noti cations came into FWC Tallahassee Regional Communications Center about the incident, in which the subject is shown harassing, capturing, and killing a pigmy rattlesnake. The subject in question has criminal history with FWC and is on probation for sh and wildlife violations committed in the past. Jones interviewed the subject and obtained a confession and presented the case to the state attorneys of ce, which in turn direct led charges for shooting a rearm from a public roadway and possessing or capturing a venomous reptile without a permit. During the week of Oct. 25 to 31, Of cer Ramos was on patrol near Dog Island and stopped a Georgia vessel with four occupants. During the sheries inspection, he found them to be in possession of 10 Spanish mackerel, four of which were undersized. Ramos issued the captain of the vessel a notice to appear for the undersized catch. Of cers Bunker, Bridwell and Geib were on patrol and boarded a shrimping vessel offshore. After the safety and administrative inspections were complete, the of cers inspected the gear and during inspection of the Turtle Excluder Devices (TEDs), 10 serious violations were observed to include improper TED angles, improper oats, insuf cient size of TED opening measurements, and others. The violations were documented and have been forwarded to the National Marine Fisheries Service for consideration. Bunker, Ramos and Bridwell were aboard the Offshore Patrol Vessel Gulf Sentry, docked at Sun Harbor Marina in Panama City, when a small vessel was observed, at night, operating along the shoreline near and around the other vessels at Sun Harbor. Bunker told the operator to turn on his navigational lights and the operator turned the vessel and headed to shore. The three of cers launched the small tender vessel and stopped the vessel and its four occupants. The operator was identi ed and Bunker noticed signs of impairment and administered eld sobriety task. The operator showed additional signs of impairment and was arrested and transported to the Panama City Police Department where he gave breath samples of .164 BrAC and .174 BrAC, respectively. Numerous officers from the Northwest and other regions around the state participated in a multi-day targeted enforcement detail in the Eastpoint area. The focus of the detail was to ensure oysters were harvested from open areas and were properly tagged and shaded to ensure health safety compliance. Officers also focused on protecting the oyster resource by checking harvesters for undersized oysters. During three days of the detail, more than 250 commercial oyster vessels were inspected. There were 48 undersized oyster violations, 32 health safety violations and 87 boating safety violations documented. More than 1,300 pounds of oysters were seized and returned alive to the water. Gore was working in plainclothes in Eastpoint and observed a vehicle towing an oyster vessel depart from the boat ramp on the Eastpoint channel. The vessel was pouring water out the drain hole and the trailer was also dripping. The vessel did not have working trailer lights and Gore conducted a traffic stop and observed a large amount of oysters in the vessel. The driver of the vehicle and another occupant both stated that they launched to go oystering several hours earlier and harvested all the oysters during the night from the Channel. Both subjects said they did not cull the oysters but just put them directly into bags. All the oysters were seized and both individuals issued citations for possession of unculled oysters. Further charges will be filed with the states attorney for untagged oysters, failure to deliver directly to a certified dealer, night harvesting and sale of unlawfully landed product. News BRIEFS HometownProud (850)653-96954514197LadySeahawkseventh graderMelanieCollins representedFranklin CountyinthestateClass 1AgirlsgolfnalsOct.29 and30inLadyLake.After winningaplayoffholeat theregionalsinPensacolaaweekearlier,Collins becametheyoungestindividualqualieratthestate nals.Sheshot41-50on therstday,anda42-47 onthesecondday,fora 180totalandatiefor62nd placeoutof96golfers fromallacrossFlorida. GulfsideIGA STUDENTATHLETESOFTHEWEEKSPONSOR MelanieCollins FWC REPORT

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013But Goodmans constitution remained calm, and 27 dozen oysters later, his consuming style had brought him to only about 72 oysters short of the record. The rules say you have to use a fork to get them out the cup. If he wants to swallow em, he can swallow em. Thats up to him, said Shuler, who has volunteered for the festival for 20 years. Goodman, 41, said it was his rst time ever in an eating contest, but that hes no stranger to savoring oysters. I usually get a bag like every Friday, and eat a bag, he said. Among females, Apalachicolas Dana Taylor pulled a stunning upset of ve-time champion Angie Harnage, who downed only seven dozen and six oysters, about half of her personal best. Taylor consumed an impressive 18 dozen. This is it. Im retiring. Turning 50 neat year; its just time, said Harnage, who started oyster eating about 10 years ago on a dare from friends. We just made it a tradition. Tradition rebounded far off from just the oyster eating contest. The Blessing of the Fleet Friday afternoon featured several clergymen: Father Roger Latosynski of St. Patrick Catholic Church; the Rev. Themo Patriotis, pastor of the UMC Cooperative Parish; the Rev. Martha Harris, vicar of Trinity Episcopal: the Rev. Scott Lolley, pastor of Living Waters Assembly of God; the Rev. Barry Hand, pastor of Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist; Sister Jeanne Drea, a Sinsinawa Dominican nun; and Dr. John Sink, a retired Navy captain and Methodist minister. Chris Clark played the bagpipes, Micah Patriotis carried the crucifer and ABC School fourth-grader Nico Valenzuela tossed the memorial wreath in the water. After Florida Seafood Festival Queen Morgan Martin and King Retsyo Vance Millender arrived by shrimp boat, State Sen. Bill Montford and Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson welcomed the guests. John Solomon, president of the board of directors, presented a plaque to Billy Spikes, who directed the rst festival in 1963. Now in the real estate business in Orlando, Spikes back then was a young marketing manager for Florida Power and worked closely with city business interest to create an attraction for visitors in the off-season. Ted Mosteller, also retired from Florida Power, is stepping down this year after more than four decades on the volunteer board. Solomon said despite a rainstorm that shaved the last couple hours off Fridays events, this weekends crowd was in excess of 31,000, fueled by a combination of it being the golden anniversary, the appearance of country music star and Dancing with the Stars champion Kellie Pickler on Saturday night and the weather. He said gate receipts were at least $57,000, with a record number of T-shirt sales. We ordered 1,000 more T-shirts than we had in the past and sold out at 12:30 p.m., Solomon said. Last year we had shirts left. He and fellow board member Danny Gay plan to order more shirts. Were talking now about how we can get people what they want and the size they need and get a two-color order, he said. Wed like to make sure everybodys happy. Food sales were more than robust, with Solomon estimating Franklin County Schools fourthgrade booth went through 1,500 pounds of fried shrimp, with the senior class frying up at least 26 gallons of oysters at its booth. The Carrabelle Church of God shucked more than 70 bags of oysters on the half-shell, while the food service workers booth sold out of boiled shrimp, as did the softball traveling team of its scallops and the senior class of crab claws. After an enormous morning parade down U.S. 98, Martin and Millender, a Carrabelle seafood dealer, got the oyster eating underway about 1 p.m. by serving each other one. After that it was time for another tradition, this time a win in the oyster shucking contest by Scotty OLear, an 11-time state champion and a ve-time national champion. The general manager of Dustys Oyster Bar in Panama City for the past 20 years, OLear was pleased to have once again taken the state title, this time by edging co-worker and returning champion Rick McCurley. It feels good to win, he said. I havent won here in four years. Its been a while. OLear nished with a time of 2:31, helped out by getting a deduction for the perfect tray, a symmetrical presentation of six rows of four. Only nine of his 24 oysters were not fully cut from the shell, so he had 27 seconds added for that. Still, it was good enough to edge McCurley, and third place Robert Dafn, also a former state champion. I had a good run on oysters, said OLear. Pop, cut, place. Pop, cut, place. Every oyster seems to rock for you. When you got one oyster that hangs you up, the competition is really tough. The crowd continued to build all afternoon, anticipating the arrival of Pickler for the nights featured entertainment. Pickler came on stage in heels, but after her opening number, Little House, she sat down on the edge of the stage, took them off and went barefoot the rest of the evening. She delighted the crowd with such songs as Beautiful, Makin Me Fall, Tough, Stop Cheatin, Wheres Tammy, and Things, before launching into her current hit, Someone Somewhere. She rounded off her evening with Ring For Sale, White Lightning, My Angel, Wanna Be Married, Gypsy, Didnt You Know, Unlock That Honky Tonk, I Wonder and Best Days. For her encore she came out in red high heels and sang the song of the same name. After the concert, she and her entourage left on the bus back to Nashville, to swing by her house and prepare for the Nov. 6 Country Music Association awards. ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 Trades&Services Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES,TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVALALSOCLEANGUTTERSANDIRRIGATIONINSTILLATION,PLANTINGANDBEDDINGAVAILABLECALLJOE8503230741OREMAILJOES_LAWNYAHOO.COM ProfessionalCookieDecoratoron Sitewith"how-to"instructions. EverythingProvidedfor YouToDecorateYourOwn Cookies!!! NOCHARGE-JUSTCOME HAVEFUN! LOANS from page A1recovery from non-governmental sources, as determined by the U.S. Small Business Administration. According to background data accompanying Scotts request, area seafood dealers estimated they lost between 23 and 62 percent in revenue in 2012, compared to the year before. The decline was far less severe in the single digits for grocery stores and motels that provided data. Also, the seafood dealers that provided data estimated it would be at least two to three years before their operations would return to normal. The oyster shortage has been attributed to a lack of freshwater owing into Apalachicola Bay. In a news release Friday, Scott said approval of the economic injury declaration was a great victory in our ght for the Florida families who rely on our commercial oyster industry to make a living. We will keep working every day to ensure that every Floridian in the Apalachicola area can support their families as we continue to work on behalf of this important industry, he said. Scotts efforts and the declarations approval drew praise Friday from a handful of federal, state and local ofcials. Gov. Scott has demonstrated his commitment to making sure that Floridians in the Panhandle can keep their livelihoods by working to nd solutions for our commercial oyster industry, said state Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, whose district includes the four affected counties. There is no doubt that todays announcement is a step in the right direction, but there is still a lot of work to be done. In Apalachicola, County Commissioner Pinki Jackel thanked the governor and the Florida Division of Emergency Management. We must continue to ght to help the families of the Apalachicola area, she said. Anita Grove, executive director of Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, offered thanks to the work of Scott and the approval from the Small Business Administration. Floridians who live and work in the Apalachicola area will get help from the damage to the oyster industry and can be sure that their families and businesses are protected, she said. FIND IT ONLINESee more photos from the 50th Florida Seafood Festival at www. apalachtimes.com. PHoto OTO S BY DAVid ID AdleADLE RStein TEIN | The TimesLEFT: Lots of former Miss Florida Seafood queens returned to take part in this years golden anniversary of the festival. RIGHT: Apalachicolas Dana Taylor, right, pulled off an upset of ve-time champion Angie Harnage, center, by consuming 18 dozen oysters. FESTIVAL from page A1

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 7, 2013 The Times | A11 1118969 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS CaRPEnTERS PIPE WELDERS X-RaY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace 92960T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes Self Service Storage Facility Act 83.80283.809 F.S. Gulf Coast Storage LLC will sell, for cash, to the highest bidder(s) OR may opt to retain the contents of the following storage units: #139 Liberty Communications Office used for storage: Liberty Communications #111 William Wayne Webb #108 Jennifer Bairefoot #116 Bill Eaton/Jody Fitzgerald #59 Angela Crum #55 Brandy Hicks The facility will dispose of the contents at 241 Patton Dr, Eastpoint, Florida at 9:00 am November 16th, 2013. The parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Oct 31, Nov 07, 2013 92938T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 12-00007-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as Successor in Interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, ET AL., Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 on January 23, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: LOT 39 OF TARPON SHORES UNIT NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 1914.27 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 2620.31 FEET ALONG SAID ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 114.63 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST 114.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, A/K/A LOT 94 OF RIDGE ROAD. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 PLAN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ( VIN# HMST8922AGA and HMST8922BGA) PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: October 17, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 96111T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000322 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ALICIA POUNCEY A/K/A ALICIA KAYE POUNCEY Last Known Address: 1919 JONNA DRIVE, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property FRANKLIN County: Lot 39, Beacon Ridge, Phase 3, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; LESS AND EXCEPT lands as shown in Official Records Book 905, Page 319 and Official Records Book 905, Page 328 and being described as: Begin at the Southwest corner of Section 25, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence commence South 89 degrees 58 minutes 41 seconds East 668.32 feet to a round 3 concrete monument (#2919); thence commence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 30 seconds East 149.18 feet to a 4 x 4 concrete monument (#4261); thence North 60 degrees 06 minutes 23 seconds East 1042.87 feet to an iron rod and cap (#6475); thence North 34 degrees 16 minutes 01 seconds East 60 feet to a 4 x 4 concrete monument (#4261); thence North 55 degrees 43 minutes 59 seconds West 19.7 feet to a said iron rod and cap (#4261); thence continue North 55 degrees 47 minutes 30 seconds West 222.42 feet to a 4 x 4 concrete monument (#4261) which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 49 degrees 15 minutes 21 seconds East 890.62 feet to a 4 x 4 concrete monument (#4261); thence South 42 degrees 22 minutes 39 seconds West 391.67 feet; thence North 54 degrees 47 minutes 30 seconds West 107.75 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel 1.06 acres +/-as shown on survey by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc. Revised 7/14/05. TOGETHER WITH a 2004 Nobility Kingswood 66x28 Manufactured Home, Serial Numbers N8-11583A and N8-11583B. The action was instituted in the Circuit Court. SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN, Florida; Case No. 19-2013-CA000322; and is styled 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida v. CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., ALICIA POUNCEY A/K/A ALICIA KAYE POUNCEY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CECIL JOE POUNCEY, JR., UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALICIA POUNCEY A/K/A ALICIA KAYE POUNCEY, BEACON RIDGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION of 1919 Jonna Drive, Carrabelle, FL 32322 You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Sonya Daws, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 215 S. Monroe St., Suite 600, Tallahassee, FL 32301, (or 30 days from the first date of publication) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiffs interest which will be binding upon you. DATED: October 7, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Octob 96107T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 19-2012-CA000191 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-F, PLAINTIFF, VS. JOHN E. HANLIN A/K/A JOHN HANLIN, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Franklin, Florida, on December 12, 2013, at 11:00 am, Inside Front of courthouse steps (main courthouse), 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32329 for the following described property: ALL OF LOTS TWENTY-EIGHT (28), TWENTY-NINE (29), AND THIRTY (30), IN BLOCK TWO HUNDRED SIXTY-SIX (266) OF GREATER APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK M AT PAGE 437 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THE OFFICIAL MAP OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA ADOPTED SEPTEMBER 12, 1946 BY THE CITY COMMISSION. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: October 14, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33486 File No.11-006785-FST If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-5774401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 7, 14, 2013 96307T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING & ZONING CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Planning & Zoning will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, November 18, 2013 at 6:00 PM at the Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a special exception request relating to proposed new construction of a business on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and Clairmont Avenue (C-3 Highway Commercial), more specifically described as 1.16 Acres of Block 5 (Neels Addition) pursuant to the official zoning map of the city. The Regular scheduled monthly Planning and Zoning meeting will immediately follow. The following special exception request item will be discussed and considered: a) The applicant is proposing the new construction of a Family Dollar Store within the C-3 (Highway Commercial) zoned area located at the corner of Hwy 98 and Clairmont Avenue, more specifically described as 1.16 Acres of Block 5 (Neels Addition). The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for such use if special exception approval is granted. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey with the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. November 7, 14, 2013 96309T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 at 6 PM at the Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on two variance request relating to proposed new construction on the parcels listed below pursuant to the official zoning map of the City. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered: a) A request by the property owner on the parcel located at the alley side of Ave D and 5th street @ 68 Avenue D (R-1/Single Family Residence), more specifically described as Block 15, NW 35 x 42 of Lot 4 & SW 42 x 60 of Lot 5 for: a 3 variance of the required 5 side setback and a 7 variance of the required 25 rear setbacks to add an addition to an existing nonconforming residential unit to include two new bathrooms, closet, uncovered deck and enclosed stairwell. And also a request for a 3 variance of the required 5 side setback and a 5 variance of the required 5 rear setback for the new construction of a two-story garage with 2nd floor storage. b) A request by the property owner on the parcel located on 9th Street between Bay Ave and Ave B @ 11 9th Street (R-1/Single Family Residence), more specifically described as Block 36, SE of Lot 7 & all of Lot 8 for a 5 variance of the required 5 side and 5 rear setbacks to replace an existing 7 x 10.5 non-conforming garage with construction of a 28 x 14.6 new garage and also a 5 variance of the required 5 side and 5 rear setbacks to replace an existing screened building an non-conforming tin shed with construction of a 10.5 x 29 boat shed. Both of these structures encroach at the rear of the property into the adjacent public alley right-of way approximately 6 Side setbacks requested are 0 (on the side lot line). The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when special circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey with the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. November 7, 14, 2013 Matching couch, loveseat & chair. All recline. End tables & lamps. 850-445-1212. Apalachicola: Corner of Hwy 98 & Prado.Continuous Garage SaleAntiques, Fine China & Artwork, Designer Clothes. Great Prices! Thurs-Sun 9am-3pm Other times by Appt 653-3270 Text FL71382 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard Sale Thurs, Fri., & Sat. 9am -3pm 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL70615 to 56554 Install/Maint/RepairFRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENTPosition Title:Groundskeeper/ Beach MaintenanceAnnual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Nikki Millender 66 4th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8277 JOB SUMMARY Performs a variety of unskilled to semi-skilled work in a variety of fields in the maintenance and upkeep of the public parks, grounds, buildings, athletic fields and related facilities. PRINCIPAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Mows and maintains parks and open space areas such as baseball fields, soccer fields, football fields, and beach parks; mows weeds; cleans and maintains basketball courts and nets; maintains sprinkler systems and assists in the repair and installation of sprinkler lines and heads. Drags ball fields; lines fields for games. Inspects, washes and performs routine maintenance of park drinking fountains and restrooms. Sweeps, washes, paints and repairs or replaces park tables and slabs. Performs minor semi-skilled interior building maintenance such as painting, plumbing, carpentry and other unskilled and semi-skilled trades work. Performs routine maintenance on lawn, trees, shrubs, and flowers. Carries out the seeding, fertilizing, top dressing, soil conditioning, watering, and the pest and weed control of the parks and open spaces. Maintains and adjusts specialized turf care equipment and tools, including electric motors, pumps, sprinklers, tractors, and mowers. Operates tractors, mowers, weed eaters, blowers, pressure washers, and other listed equipment as needed. Maintains current skills and knowledge in the proper and safe techniques of building and grounds maintenance functions. Collects and disposes of solid waste from buildings and grounds; picks up litter from premises. Assists in setting up and taking down equipment for various park and recreation programs, prepares facilities for park and recreation program use. Willing to work holidays, weekends, and events hosted by parks and recreation. Supervise the work of State Inmates. Other duties as required, background investigation and drug screening will be completed on selected applicant. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS Requires High Diploma or Equivalent, or two consecutive years work related experience. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures: the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must have a valid Florida Drivers License. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for certification as an NON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such certification within 90 days or hiring. October 31st, November 7th, 2013 Web ID#: 34270669 Text FL70669 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Carrabelle, FLGulf Side 2 BD/ 1 BA, Furnished, $450mo. Plus Utilities & $450 Dep., Pets OK W/Deposit Call 850-567-3375 Text FL70881 to 56654 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Apalachicola -3 br, 1 ba. 261 25th Street. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $750 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft Designer, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Proof of income required. 954-816-7004 Text FL71079 to 56654 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $1300 mo + $500 dep 850-370-6001 3 Bdrm, 1 Bath Mobile Home. $600 per month 622 Ridge Rd Eastpoint 850-653-5763 Beaver Laguana Monterey 06 40ft. diesel, quad, 53k miles, exc. cond. $126,000. See at 1216 Ohio Ave. PC. 850-819-0852 or 850-235-2599 Text 70915 to 56654 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. Spot Advertising works!

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, November 7, 2013 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Which president said, We cannot do everything at once, but we can do something at once? Washington, Tyler, Coolidge, LBJ 2) What was the main surveillance plane used in the Persian Gulf War? E-3 AWAC, C-140, B-2 Spirit, RM-81 3) Where was Americas rst-ever opera performed in 1735? Boston, MA; Charleston, SC; Baltimore, MD; Albany, NY 4) What state is the Toothpick Capital of the World? Georgia, Montana, Oregon, Maine 5) A work published without a copyright is in what? Tort, Public domain, Encumbrance, Binder 6) What is caprock commonly found above? Artesian well, Talus, Glacier, Iceberg 7) What soldiers used Were Off to See the Wizard as a marching song in WWII? British, Australian, Canadian, Brazilian 8) During the nal Seinfeld each 30second advertisement sold for an estimated how much? $100K, $500K, $800K, $1.5 million 9) What did the Austrian physicist Christian Johann Doppler study? Sound waves, Global warming, Einsteins theory, Mothman 10) Which is in the same city as Dome of the Rock and Mount Zion? Stonehenge, Wailing Wall, Christ the Redeemer, Kremlin 11) What were 19th century Latin American dictators called? Cigarillos, Ocotillos, Caudillos, Bonillos 12) During the American Revolution many brides wore what color of wedding gowns as a sign of rebellion? Red, Blue, Green, Yellow 13) When Picasso died in 1973 what was the ofcial appraised worth of his estate? $2,000; $135,000; $7 million; $250 million ANSWERS 1) Coolidge. 2) E-3 AWAC. 3) Charleston, SC. 4) Maine. 5) Public domain. 6) Artesian well. 7) Australian. 8) $1.5 million. 9) Sound waves. 10) Wailing Wall. 11) Caudillos. 12) Red. 13) $250 million. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com OurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection), DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#249082$225,000St.GeorgeIslandSEAGODDESSLightandairy3BR2BAislandhome,privatescenic freshwaterpond,largedeck,2ndlevelsundeck,cheerfullyfurnished,groundlevellaundry/storageroom, shcleaningarea&outsideshower,underhomeparkingonpad,WestPineAvenue,ListedbyJanieBurke JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#2548790$116,000St.GeorgeIslandGULFBEACHESLOTHighduneylotonthenorthsideofGulfBeachDrive, Bikepathacrossthestreet.3rdlotfromthecornerof 6thStreetEast,Noclearingnecessary,lotmeasures 100x150,1/3acre,High(dry)elevation.Buytobuild orkeepforinvestment.ListedbyJohnShelby SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD 850-899-5104/850-697-9010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Checkoutthischarminghomelocatedjusttwo doorsdownfromtheentrywayintoSt.JamesBay GolfCourse.Thisisalarge,landscapedlotwithnice viewsofthebayandmaturetrees.Thereisplenty ofroomforexpansionandboatstorage.Thehome doesneedsomerenovationsbutisworththeeffort. MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,299,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com By TEVIS PAGESpecial to the Times Last week was lled with so much preparation for seafood festival. The student body came together to x any problems on the oats and get the necessary items to the festival on time. Our very own Miss Morgan Martin showed off her true beauty accompanying Mr. Vance Millender in the parade and introducing Kellie Pickler. Our Seahawk royalty, Mr. and Miss, and Homecoming Queen and King also represented our school beautifully. Once the parade was over, the real business began, booth sales. The seniors, Take Stock in Children and many other groups were fundraising at the festival. I believe everyone got a fair share, and the customers left full and happy. The reworks display after the concert was colorful and very much enjoyed by all who attended. It really is a shame that the seafood festival only comes once a year, but I guess its true, the longer the wait the better the time. HAWK TALK The parade is over; time to relaxThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Oct. 29Thomas A. Arroyo, 38, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Oct. 31Patricia A. Keil, 45, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO)Nov. 1Patricia A. Keil, 45, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Phillip E. McElreavy, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 2David B. Keith, Sr., 51, Carrabelle, aggravated battery great bodily harm, and attempted rst-degree murder (CPD)Nov. 4Brian H. Young, 30, Crawfordville, domestic battery and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Kristopher M. Suggs, 37, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Jonathan G. Carmichael, 27, Apalachicola, failure to appear, petit theft and two counts of uttering (FCSO)Nov. 5Bradley R. Lalonde, 40, Crawfordville failure to appear (FCSO) Arrest REPortORT