The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00244

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Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, October 31, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Reigning over the golden anniversary of the Florida Seafood Festival this weekend will be two musicians: a young trombone-playing pixie and a young-atheart bass-playing seafood dealer. Franklin County High School junior Morgan Martin, 16, long has played rst trombone in the Seahawk band and now leads the musicians as drum major. Her King Retsyo, Vance Millender, a seafood dealer with deep ties to the industry, plays tenor sax and bass guitar for the rock band Locomotive. Together, they sound just the right notes — that the seafood industry that is Franklin County’s heritage and lifeblood shall long endure. “It will go as far as we can take it,” said Martin, daughter of Teresa Ann Martin of Apalachicola and Henry Martin of Destin. “It’s up to the people and what we can do to help and continue to help our industry build,” she said. “It’s really up to the people. I want Judge rules against net restrictions By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com A state lawmaker is weighing in on the ght between mullet shermen and the state agency that regulates them. State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, ripped the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission last week in response to the agency’s decision to appeal a circuit court judge’s ruling that lifts restrictions on mullet shermen’s nets. ”I’m disappointed to see that the state is going to appeal the process,” he said. “They should be nding a way to work with the shermen rather than to continue on with more litigation and wasting taxpayer money.” Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford ruled Oct. 22 in Leon County that FWC regulations on net mesh size — how large the holes are — must be stopped. The FWC currently requires no larger than a 2-inch mesh, but shermen say that’s too small to let undersized sh out of the net, which die and, in turn, reduce future populations. And Beshears wholeheartedly agrees with that. “The shermen never disagreed with the size of the net; they only Festival headliner prepares for her 4th album By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Country music artist Kellie Pickler has a pretty good idea of the woman she is. A happily married rising star, counting down to the Nov. 11 release of her fourth studio album, “The Woman I Am,” Pickler re ected lightheartedly this week on her life these days. About the man by her side, the “children” she’s raising and how it’s all come together for the small town North Carolina beauty queen, as she’s waltzed to worldwide television fame through “American Idol” and “Dancing with the Stars,” to a critically acclaimed third album that has her compared to a blossoming version of country music’s soulful greats. “I kind of have kids; they’re called my band,” she joked Monday afternoon during a telephone call in downtown New York City, where she’s on a radio tour promoting her upcoming release. “I have to pay child support,” Pickler pointed out, as her band members carried on in the background. Set to appear Saturday evening at Apalachicola’s Battery Park, at a concert highlighting the 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival, Pickler at age 27 has convinced critics she’s for real, packing even more to her artistry than the grace she’s shown as reigning champion of ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” with her partner, four-time champion Derek Hough. “I love that I was able to tie in two of my passions,” she said. “It’s really neat to be able to tell a story through the power of dance.” Ever since her rst album, “Small Town Girl,” debuted seven years ago, Pickler’s career has been on a steady trajectory upward, her most recent album, “100 Proof,” achieving critical acclaim, None hurt in school bus accident By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com None of the 44 schoolchildren aboard a Franklin County school bus was injured Thursday afternoon when a hitand-run driver sideswiped the bus when it was parked along U.S. 98 in Eastpoint. According to a report prepared by Florida Highway Patrol Deputy Daniel Quiles, the bus, driven by Carrie Frye, 42, was parked on the north shoulder of the westbound lane, about 164 feet west of Jefferson Street, when the mishap occurred about 2:30 p.m. Oct. 24. A 1995 Cadillac Deville, traveling west, was seen sideswiping the left side of the bus and then continuing on. None of the schoolchildren was injured as a result of the crash, and they were transferred to a second bus to complete their delivery home. Franklin County Deputy James Ward made contact with the driver, Joe L. Morales, 43, of 328 Old Ferry Dock Road. The report said Morales admitted to driving the Cadillac and that the keys were found in his pocket and the damage to the vehicle was consistent with damage to the bus. The report said Wendy M. Smith, 40, of Eastpoint, was a passenger in the car. Ward returned Morales to the scene of the accident. He was then arrested on charges of failure to drive within a single lane, no license tag, no proof of insurance, driving while license suspended or revoked and leaving the scene of a crash, and transported to the Franklin County Jail. HALSEY BESHEARS JOE MORALES DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Florida Seafood Festival Queen Morgan Martin and King Retsyo Vance Millender look out over the Carrabelle River. The woman Kellie is 50TH FLORIDA SEAFOOD FESTIVAL A festival t for a king Whether it’s the cool breeze blowing or the fence going up around Battery Park, or even the ags going up along the historic parade route on Highway 98, whatever it is makes you have that little tingle inside knowing what is about to happen. It is the Florida Seafood Festival’s 50th anniversary at Battery Park in Apalachicola. For 50 years, members of the community have made sure a festival was held each year on the rst weekend of November at Battery Park, celebrating our heritage and industry that have made this such a great community. This year, not being any different, 12 members of the volunteer board of directors of the festival Martin, Millender make royal music See KELLIE A3 JOHN SOLOMON Special to The Times See NETS A5 See FESTIVAL A5 See MUSIC A3 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 VOL. 128 ISSUE 27 Florida Seafood Festival schedule FRIDAY, NOV. 1 10 a.m.: Park opens (no admission charge). Booths open. Noon to 3:30 p.m.: Musical entertainment, main stage 4 p.m.: Blessing of the Fleet 4 p.m.: Arrival of King Retsyo and Miss Florida Seafood 2013 5-10:30 p.m.: Musical entertainment 8 p.m.: Tim Dugger 9 p.m.: King Retsyo Ball (Fort Coombs Armory) 10:30 p.m.: Park closes SATURDAY, NOV. 2 7 a.m.: Registration for Red sh Run (at Gibson Inn) 8 a.m.: Start of Red sh Run 10 a.m.: Gates open ($5 admission, kids under 12 free) 10 a.m.: Parade starts (U.S. 98) Noon to 1 p.m.: Musical entertainment, main stage 15 p.m.: Blue crab races (at the top of each hour) 1 p.m.: Oyster shucking contest 1:15 p.m.: Oyster eating contest 3-7:45 p.m.: Musical entertainment 8 p.m.: Headliner entertainer Kellie Pickler, followed by reworks display 11 p.m.: Park closes Senior Citizens Fall Fest Nov. 9 The Fall Festival will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 9 at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 102 Ave. F. Kick off holiday shopping at this event featuring local artists, vendors and activities. For information, call 697-3760. Lanark gumbo cook-off Nov. 9 The St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department Annual Charity Gumbo Cook Off will be Nov. 9 at the Lanark Village Boat Club, 2364 U.S. 98. Competition gumbo will be sold after judging. Gumbo dinners are available for sitdown or to-go orders. For information, call 567-4161. Don’t forget to turn your clocks back Sunday, Nov. 3

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 31, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com Samuel Augustus Floyd, who arrived in Apalachicola in 1840, has left a treasure for local historians. During 1872, he kept a diary of his life in Apalachicola. The following story is based on an excerpt from that diary. In March 1872, Floyd, then 32, was active in lo cal politics and living in a boarding house, possibly one occupying the now empty lot adjacent to the Raney House. There was lots of fun and excitement in Apalachicola in those days. At a city meeting, a tipsy young Mr. Hunter knocked down “a negro who had ap propriated his father’s seat” while the elder Hunter was speaking to the assembly. Marshall Gillen attempted to come between the men and became embroiled in the ght himself. “The utmost confusion prevailed for some minutes but order was restored by frequent calls from the chair,” Floyd wrote. Local politics, it seems, has hardly changed. That same month, Floyd purchased the city’s rst croquet set, delivered from Columbus, Ga., at a cost of $5.25. A croquet club was quickly formed. Mrs. Pohlman hosted a “Pop” on April 9. Floyd at tended but wrote that he “felt badly and didn’t enjoy it much.” What he did enjoy was ve “havanahs,” cigars giv en to him by Richardson, another Roan boarding house resident. Floyd must have had a taste for tobacco because the diary describes at length a tobacco pouch sent to Floyd by Miss M. R. F. The pouch was made of rich material and “admira bly” embroidered. Floyd must have had a taste for the ladies, too. He wrote that at the Pohl man Pop, he kissed a young lady named Carrie “after a protracted scufe.” He ob served his own behavior was very rude but balanced by Carrie’s prudishness. Earlier in the month, he escorted Misses Mena and Jane to see off the “St. Clair” which was car rying some Apalachicola residents to northerly destinations. He was the sole male participant in a six-part croquet match on April 17, siding with Misses Ella King and Teresa against the Misses Baker and Phe na Pohlman. The party n ished after dark, and Floyd escorted the young ladies home. Seems the local lassies were full of fun. Floyd re counts how Ella Wakeeld attempted to play a trick on her cousin Georgia Bryant involving eas. Ella, who Floyd describes as “a mod el of conventional dignity,” collected a vial of eas over several weeks. One after noon, after being teased by Georgia, Ella rushed at her with the vial up her sleeve. Georgia whirled Ella onto a bed, and the stopper of the vial was popped out, releas ing the eas on the bodice of Georgia’s dress. Floyd wrote that “the effect on Miss Bryant, who naturally loved a joke, can be best imagined.” During April, a story of a supernatural nature unfolded in the pages of Floyd’s diary. On April 13, over break fast, Mrs. Easton, Floyd’s housekeeper, informed him that the entire house hold had been awakened the previous evening by a ghost. This leads one to spec ulate on Floyd’s where abouts on the night of April 12, since he apparently was not awakened with every body else, but that would be another story. In any case, Easton re counted that she and Cap tain Davis, another resi dent of the boarding house, had heard someone calling in distress. Floyd encountered Da vis at a local lumber mill later in the morning. “I asked him about it thinking, of course, that he would make light of it. To my surprise, Davis became very grave, when I ban tered him,” wrote Floyd. “(He) said that he did hear a most distinct wail as if a child were crying in dis tress and thought of get ting up to inquire if Mrs. Easton’s infant was ill.” Other witnesses to the haunting reported hearing a ghostly pattering of feet. Floyd undertook to in vestigate the phenomenon and came up with a less than ghostly cause for the spooky sounds. A neigh bor’s child had come down with the whooping cough, causing the “cries of dis tress,” and the pattering of feet was produced by stray goats congregating in an abandoned cotton ware house across the street from the Roan boarding house. Floyd, born March 17, 1846, in Camden County, Ga., enlisted into the Sec ond Florida Infantry at age 16 in Jacksonville. He was the nephew of Robert Floyd, who served in the Florida Legislature in the 1840s and 1850s. Before coming to Apala chicola, Floyd worked in the lumber trade in Jack sonville and along the Georgia coast. He was ap pointed log and timber in spector for Franklin Coun ty in 1872, the year of this ghost story. He served as a Franklin County represen tative in the Florida House of Representatives in 1877 and the city tax assessor. In 1883, he was elected sheriff of Franklin County. He died in Atlanta on June 20, 1902, and was re turned to Apalachicola and buried in Magnolia Ceme tery on June 23. According to the Times, hundreds of people attended the popu lar Mr. Floyd’s funeral. 1 3 5 A v e n u e G A p a l a c h i c o l a F L 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 5 3 W h at Do P at i e n t s L i k e M os t A b o u t W e e m s ? V er y G ene r o u s V e r y P r o m p t a n d C a r i n g T he P er s o n o n P er s o n C o n t a c t F a s t K i n d a n d V e r y S u p p o r t i v e S t a f f a n d D r a r e S o K i n d C l ea n a n d C o u r te o us I h i g h l y r ec o m me n d W ee m s. . a g r e a t h o s p i t a l a n d g r e a t s t a f f THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m FRID A Y NO V 1 ST 10:00am P ark O pens ( N o A dmission C har ge) B ooths O pen 12:003:30 Music al Ent er tainment M ain S tage 4:00pm Blessing of the F leet 4:00pm Arriv al of K ing R etsy o V ance Millender and Miss F lorida S eaf ood 2013 Mor gan M ar tin 5-10:30pm Music al Ent er tainment 8:00pm T im D ugger 9:00pm K ing R etsy o Ball ( F or t C oombs A rmo y) 10:30pm P ark C loses SA TURD A Y NO V 2 ND 7:00am R egistra tion f or R ed sh Run (F r on t S t eps of G ibson Inn) 8:00am S tar t of R ed sh Run 10:00am G a t es O pen ($5.00 admission C har ge & k ids Under 12 F r ee) 10:00am P arade S tar ts (H w y 98) 12:00 1:00 Music al Ent er tainment M ain S tage 1:00-5:00pm Blue C rab Races (a t the T op of E ach H our) (k ids under 12) 1:00pm O y st er S huck ing C ont est 1:15pm O y st er Ea ting C ont est 3pm-7:45pm Music al Ent er tainment 8:00pm H eadliner Ent er tainer K ellie Pickler dir ec tly f ollo w ed b y L ar ge F ir ew orks D ispla y 11:00pm P ark C loses w w w oridaseaf o o df estiv al .c om fea turing Delicious S eaf o o d A r ts & C r af ts Exhibits S eaf o o d Rela t ed E v en ts and Music al En t er tainmen t Coupon Expir es: 11-15-13 CODE: AP00 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Apalachicola Area Historical Society’s twice yearly Ghost Walk haunted Chestnut Cemetery on Saturday night as a dozen volunteers portrayed famous citizens of the city who now reside for eternity in the graveyard. The walk was attended by about 300 people and raised more than $1,400, raising the total to more than $8,000 over the past three years in funds earmarked for cemetery improvements. Above, ABC School fourth-grader Livia Monod portrays Freda Julia Flatauer, the plucky daughter of Apalachicola businessman Adolph Flatauer. Young Freda was crippled from falling off an ice wagon when she was little and later died of typhoid fever in 1910 at age 15. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Samuel Augustus Floyd’s nal resting place is in Magnolia Cemetery. Ghosts, goats and Georgia’s eas WH oO ’ sS aA F redaREDA gG H ostsOSTS ?

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, October 31, 2013 including the coveted title of the No. 1 Country Album of The Year by Rolling Stone magazine. But Pickler isn’t letting it go to her head, even taking a moment to rue the album didn’t achieve nancial success commensurate with the view of critics such as USA Today, which cheered it as “a pretty fantastic country record.” “I don’t know. I guess it wasn’t as popular as I thought it was,” she said. “It wasn’t radio-friendly.” Six of the album’s 11 songs she co-wrote, and one of them, “Mother’s Day,” she collaborated on with her husband, songwriter Kyle Jacobs. Three years ago, she eloped to a private island in the Caribbean to marry Jacobs, a songwriter under contract with Nashville’s Curb Music Publishing. This week, Jacobs was holed up in a songwriters retreat at Blackberry Farm in the foothills of Tennessee’s Smoky Mountains. But when he’s not in the studio, he’ll join her on the road, and that’s a special time for her. “I love it,” she said. “We actually like each other. I know that’s surprising. “My greatest treasure is my husband. He’s my best friend; I would absolutely be lost without him,” Pickler said. “I don’t think you have to have a bad marriage to be a great artist. I don’t think that has anything to do with it. I’ve denitely experienced heartache in different ways, and I can pull from that.” As for children, Pickler said she and Jacobs are raising four canines: Pixie, a Chinese crested hairless from Arkansas; Mumu, a black and white Chihuahua from Portland, Ore.; Maddie, part pit bull and part Labrador retriever from Minnesota; and Tina, a Maltese from California. Despite the stress of being apart, Pickler was clear about knowing where her heart lies. “I would never do anything to tarnish what we have. He is my best friend; he’s No. 1,” she said. “He is a safe place for me to come to. I would never, ever, ever jeopardize what we have. “The most sacred thing and important to me is my marriage,” Pickler said. “What we have is my greatest treasure. I’m not a fool.” Like the barefoot style she shows in the music video with Hough that features her upcoming album’s lead single “Someone Somewhere Tonight,” Pickler is stepping with sure feet through the intensity of her fame. “I think regardless if you’re a singer or you’re a waitress or you work at a bank, there’s always somebody watching you,” she said. “You’d be surprised; people are always watching you.” “To me I’m not perfect. I’ve never met anyone that’s perfect…” she said, stopping suddenly to acknowledge the raised hand of her guitarist, before correcting herself. “Other than Drew my guitar player.” “I just love my life. I don’t think you can go through life trying to please everyone,” Pickler said. “I am the only person that has to live with me. I think it’s important. I’m happy with myself. “It’s so hard to be something you’re not. That’s a fulltime job. I already got a fulltime job.” As for the fulltime job she brings to the stage, Pickler is promising “nothing fancy” for Saturday night. “It’s just me and my band. We just get out there and we play music and we have a good time,” she said. “We’ll do some songs from my rst three albums, throwing in some new songs off the new album.” She’s not familiar with eating oysters, but Pickler, a vegetarian for the past ve years, does plan I’m sampling the seafood. “I do love sh, I’m a piscetarian,” she said. “That’s the only type of meat I eat.” Beyond to the demands of her busy career, Pickler has taken the time for some personal outreach. On Sept. 2, 2012, she shaved her head on Good Morning America in support of her friend, Summer Holt Miller, who started chemotherapy after breast surgery. “She’s doing good,” Pickler said. “She’s handled all of this with such grace.” Since 2007, Pickler has done seven tours with the USO, performing before more than 30,000 troops in eight different countries. “I love doing it; it’s something I nd so much joy in, that I can take a little piece of home to our servicemen and women,” she said. “The thing about country music is it’s about life,” Pickler said. “Someone, somewhere, someone is experiencing love and heartache. We’ve all experienced those things. I think it’s really neat you can put your life in the form of a song, whether it’s a sad song or a love song. As long as you’re making people feel something.” to believe it will never die out and we can have this festival for the next 50 years.” Millender is a prime example of the type of people Martin is talking about, a Carra belle native, grandson to Braxton Millender, who started the business in 1942 and then handed it down to his son Farris Millender. After he graduated from Carrabelle High School in 1971 and then did two years of vocational training before returning to his roots, Vance Millender joined the busi ness, interrupted only by a three-year Navy stint from 1974 to 1977, including time in the Pacic aboard the USS Enterprise, CVN-65, the world’s rst nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. He returned to Carrabelle and working with his dad in 1973, the same year he mar ried high school sweetheart, the former Vir ginia Dale McMillan. About six years ago, he handed over ownership of Millender and Son Seafood Company to his sons, David, 34, and Stephen, 32, who lives with wife Crystal and the Millenders’ rst grandchild, Jaxon, in Carrabelle. Farris Millender died in 1999, and his wife, Betty, lives nearby in Carrabelle. In 2009, the company built a plant at 607 SE Ave. B and introduced retail into the mix. “We do not do nearly as much process ing as we did in the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, not on a large scale,” Vance Millender said. “We really sell a lot of different types of seafood, but the main thing is shrimp.” Fresh shrimp and oysters will be among the many types of seafood available at the festival. “It’s seafood paradise; it’s all you look for in a festival,” Martin said. “It recognizes not only the seafood industry but the people in it who help to operate the seafood industry. It’s to recognize our fresh local seafood. Not everybody can say their seafood is fresh and local. “All ages are involved; no one’s left out,” she said. “Everyone can participate, from the youngest to the oldest.” Martin has many fond memories of the festivals of her childhood, going with older sisters, Ke’Asha and Cheyenne. She is the granddaughter of Betty Stephens, of Apala chicola, and Freddie Jefferson, of Miami. “I remember being involved in the fes tival every year,” she said. “The parade was my favorite thing, just to watch all the entries. It’s full of excitement, not only to receive candy and beads. Something you don’t want to miss out on.” An honors student, Martin has her sights set on college, majoring in the medical eld and minoring in theater. As a member of the Take Stock in Children program, she’s poised to have her tuition paid for two years at a community college, probably Gulf Coast State College, and two years at a four-year college, possible Flor ida State or the University of West Florida. Right now, though, her mind is set on this weekend. “I’m not a nervous wreck, but I’m not not nervous at all,” she said. “I’m kind of in between. It’s going to be a good time. You’re going to remember this one. I think it’s going to be great.” MUSIC from page A1 KELLIE from page A1 DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The Times King Retsyo Vance Millender and Queen Morgan Martin will reign over the 50th Florida Seafood Festival.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, October 31, 2013 A Section Special to the Times The governing board of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Stakeholders Inc., an organization of local governments, power producers, farmers and oystermen, manufacturers and conservationists throughout the ACF river basin, have called on Gov. Rick Scott to “delay any further legal action or the pursuit of any current lawsuit.” Last month, Scott led a lawsuit against the state of Georgia, asking the U.S. Supreme Court to force Georgia to reduce its water consumption in the ACF river basin, which runs from the mountains of north Georgia to the Apalachicola Bay. Rather than another courtroom battle, the ACFS believes its recommendations for a sustainable water management plan can form the foundation of a tri-state consensus. This work is expected to be completed before June 2014. “More than two decades of legal ghting has not led to any reasonable solution of this situation,” ACFS Governing Board Chairman Billy Turner said. “We rmly believe that any solution to this dispute will happen in a conference room, not a courtroom, and will rely on scienti c data rather than legal debates.” Since 2010, ACFS has been working on a sustainable water management plan based on science, good data and consensus. Over the last four years, the group has raised more than $1.3 million to accumulate and model the data necessary to develop a consensus-driven plan. The governing board crafted and passed this resolution opposing litigation during its regular quarterly meeting at Unicoi State Park in Georgia. Past meetings have been held in Alabama and Florida. The governing board comprises 56 individuals representing all aspects of the river basin’s economic, agricultural, aquacultural, recreational and environmental concerns. Membership on the board is divided equally among the four ACF sub-basins and includes membership from Alabama, Florida and Georgia. Once again in today’s world, marriage vows have been broken. The tall, handsome man, who pledged to be true and honest and faithful to his beautiful bride, chose to abandon her trust in favor of out-of-town in delity. His family is torn apart now, and no matter what happens tomorrow, none of them can ever be the same. Their children saw parents turn away from hopeful promises and futures. They learned rsthand the ugly life lessons of duplicity and lies. They saw pain and dishonesty and hurt that no one of any age should ever witness. They discovered that “trust” can be just an empty promise too easily ignored when inconvenient to honor. These same children also see life-quality standards breaking apart all around them, in school and in their community. Too many young men and women, truly still children themselves, carelessly create a new life to support and educate and love but then don’t bother to accept any of those responsibilities that new life brings. Where is such behavior learned? Great-grandparents are doing their best to raise the innocent offspring born to the irresponsible teenagers in their families. Teens who become mothers and fathers — in name only — pretend the children they created really don’t exist, and neither do any traditional social obligations. Jail cells become the home for too many of those young people who abandon responsibilities and integrity for seemingly easy money or so-called excitement. What was the behavior modeled by this unfaithful husband? Was the excitement created by the lure of a conveniently close-by affair worth throwing aside wedding promises and obligations to a back-home spouse? What happened to the hopeful commitment “to love and honor” that was so quickly and casually dashed against the rocks of his illicit affair? What did that husband think it really meant when he promised “to have and to hold?” When the celebrants were asked if they agreed “to be true to each other,” did that husband perhaps think to himself, “Until someone else comes along?” Now, each one in this damaged family must try to move forward with their lives, all suffering the results of the husband’s choice of in delity. Both mother and even the unfaithful father will nd daily life more dif cult without the hand of the spouse they promised to love “‘till death do them part.” Their family’s lives had really just begun to meld and grow in their new days together. Even if reconciliation could be achieved if and when the hurt ever diminishes, how long does it take to regain trust and real love between spouses? Can forgive and forget ever really come true? And how do those who loved the bride — before the new husband ever came along — now face the betrayal of their entire family? How do the bride’s children, who believed that this new groom seemed to honestly love their mother, how will they deal with the lesson now learned about people who can’t be believed or trusted? The family all opened their hearts and their homes to this new husband. What will his breach of faith, by someone who is supposed to be reliable and trustworthy, mean to their own future love relationships? Will they ever forget their mother’s hurt and be able to form real, trusting partnerships of their own? How will they ever nd a believable lifetime love? And if they someday do make their own promises in marriage, how long will they last? Will they remember the examples they lived with and decide no one can really be believed or trusted, and that it’s OK to hurt the other before they hurt me? Will this close-tohome example of in delity that just destroyed their family carry ripples of dysfunction through many more lives than just those of the two parents who were supposed to be good examples for their children? But for now, the immediate pain is bitter and intense for all who are left behind in the shattered home. Suddenly, there are legal entanglements to be separated for their individual futures. Papers must be led, joint nances must be clari ed, and worried questions from concerned friends must be answered. The empty bed, empty closet and empty promises will need to be faced on a daily basis. The personal betrayals will live within all the family, and the bitter lessons taught will live there, too. But even more destructive, his choice of in delity and its aftermath will leave an effect on the forever futures of young and old alike. Within all the members of the core family and far beyond, trust, love and honesty can never be the same. Left behind in the aftermath of in delity, this whole family has been given a terribly high price to pay, perhaps forever. Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. A step toward ‘unbeatable’ TDC collaboration In response to The Apalachicola Times’ article “Squabbles erupt over TDC seat,” in the Oct. 24 edition, I would like to clarify the meaning behind the portions quoted and further share my thoughts. I feel the ner points of an important dialogue that took place deserve to be addressed. I was in attendance and feel a healthy, productive discussion occurred between area hotel and small lodging owners, stakeholders and Tourist Development Council members. Lynn Spohrer correctly characterized the issue. There is a disconnect between audience members (hotel and small lodging owners, stakeholders) and the TDC council members. Some audience members feel that they do not have a way to constructively participate in the TDC marketing decisions. TDC members feel like their meetings are all public and decisions are open. Because of no one’s fault, the current meeting process seems to put audience members at a disadvantage and creates a defensiveness in part because the agenda is not provided in advance. In the process of an ongoing meeting, comments or questions may be viewed as an interruption rather than an attempt to provide constructive input. Maybe one solution is to have an overall marketing planning meeting that includes bed tax collectors, the chambers and visitors centers, the people on the front lines. Overall, I do believe that this discussion is a great step toward nding a way to put the best ideas forward for the best interest of our county as a whole. A collaboration of the intellect and decades of experience marketing this area offered by the hotel and small lodging owners, beach homes rental companies, chambers of commerce and business owners would be positive and unbeatable. Anita Grove Executive director Apalachicola Bay Area Chamber of Commerce Hospice helps families focus on living No one likes to think about death and dying, but it’s something everyone has to face eventually. There’s an incredible resource in our community that provides comfort, dignity and respect to all those coping with a serious or life-limiting illness. It’s Big Bend Hospice. November is National Hospice Palliative Care Month, a time to reach out to our community to raise awareness about the compassionate care that hospice and palliative care provide to patients and their families. One of the most important messages to help people understand is that hospice care and palliative care helps patients and families focus on living. The Big Bend Hospice team of Franklin County provides expert medical care to keep patients comfortable and able to enjoy time with loved ones. The hospice team answers questions, offers advice on what to expect and helps families with the duties of being a caregiver. The team also provides emotional and spiritual support for the entire family. Hospice Medicare and Medicaid cover 100 percent of the cost of the approved treatments and services related to the terminal illness. Hospice is covered by most insurance plans and HMOs. Thanks to community support, no one is ever refused Big Bend Hospice services because of inability to pay. Hospice care is provided in the home, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and long-term care centers. Hospice care is available to people of all ages, with any illness. Hospice professionals and trained volunteers will ask you what’s important and listen to what you say. They make your wishes a priority. If you or a loved one is facing a serious or life-limiting illness, the time to nd out more about hospice and palliative care is right now. Regina Compton, RN Senior team manager Wakulla/Franklin Big Bend Hospice By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Any time is a good time to eat your vegetables. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin counties has begun a new initiative to promote healthy eating and will host food demonstrations twice a month at the Dollar General Market in Port St. Joe and the Piggly Wiggly in Apalachicola. The demonstrations will run October through March of next year with the goal of helping local families adopt a more healthful diet and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption for proper nutrition. To kick start the efforts, the health departments in the two counties received a collaborative Closing the Gap grant to work with coordinated community partners to promote health education, healthy lifestyle choices and disease prevention activities. The Closing the Gap grants focuses on reducing and ultimately eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities. “We wanted to develop a way to foster successful partnerships within our communities in order to improve the health of Gulf and Franklin county residents,” said Marsha Lindeman, administrator for the Florida Department of Health in both counties. “As a result, county Community Health Improvement Plans were created by community partners with goals to reduce diabetes and increase the number of adults who are at a healthy weight.” Participants will be asked to ll out a short health survey in return for a free food sample, healthy recipe of the day and educational materials that incorporate healthy food as a prevention/control bene t. “We are very excited about this opportunity and collaborative effort with the Dollar Market in Port St. Joe and Piggly Wiggly in Apalachicola,” said Talitha Robinson, health educator consultant for Gulf and Franklin counties. “All food prepared during the cooking demonstration can be purchased in the store. “Our goal is to help highlight the affordable, healthy food options available and to encourage individuals and families to incorporate more fruits and vegetables in meals.” Robinson has been working with Closing the Gap since July and spoke with managers at both stores to explain the goals of the program when it came to healthy eating. In March, Robinson made a lifestyle change that eliminated junk food and fried food from her diet, added more fruits and vegetables, and began walking three times a week. She said since the change, she dropped 64 pounds and has felt healthier than ever. “Healthy eating is something that I’m passionate about,” Robinson said. “It works.” According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, only one in four Americans eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables every day. Adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet plus getting more exercise can reduce your risk of serious health problems like obesity, type-2 diabetes, heart disease and even certain types of cancer. The next food demonstrations will be 3-7 p.m. Wednesdays, Nov. 6 and 13, at the Apalachicola Piggly Wiggly. At the Dollar General Market in Port St. Joe, demos will be 3-7 p.m. Nov. 19 and 21. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Health Educator Consultant Talitha Robinson spent the day at the Dollar General Market and prepared food for guests that encouraged healthy eating. Department touts healthy eating with food demos Letters to the EDITOR Duplicity, lies tear apart a family THOUGHTS FOR THE TIMES Mel Kelly ACF stakeholders want Scott to shelve litigation Page 4

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 31, 2013 disagreed with the size of the mesh,” Beshears said. “It’s killing everything out there.” But Beshears also said he was “excited” about the rul ing, calling it a “great thing for the shermen.” “These commercial sh ermen have had their day in court over and over again, each time with slaps in the face,” he said in a written release. “Judge Fulford’s ruling has offered the best encouragement yet to con tinue this ght, and continue we will.” The court case stems from the state constitutional “net ban” amendment Flori da voters approved in 1994. It opened the door for restric tions on several net types. Commercial mullet sher men have fought the FWC rules that resulted from it for years. Three licensed commer cial shermen led the case, including a bait-and-tackle shop owner in Wakulla County. Their lawyer, Ron Mowrey, said the FWC rules discriminate against mullet shermen because larger mesh sizes can be used when going after other sh. He said this factored into the judge’s ruling. Mowrey also said the state led an appeal with in an hour of the ruling. “They’re chomping at the bit to spend taxpayers’ money,” he said. “We are appealing be cause we don’t think it is valid,” Amanda Nalley, FWC spokeswoman, told the Tal lahassee Democrat. Ronald Fred Crum, who owns the bait-and-tackle shop, long has fought the amendment. He said there are mullet shermen from Panama City to Tampa, offer ing a strong market for the sh, which is eaten in the re gion. He said he doesn’t want to repeal the amendment, only “correct the rules” en forced by FWC. He said the amendment does not include specic mesh sizes. “We want the mesh to not be restricted to anything,” Crum said. He said commercial shermen are professional enough to use a proper mesh size and catch the sh they’re targeting and release the rest “alive and unharmed.” “If I can correct this prob lem and stop the unneces sary killing and waste, I think I can enhance sport shing by 30 percent in 12 months,” Crum said. Meanwhile, the judge’s ruling offers unusual candor on an obviously controver sial and difcult case and says a “legal absurdity” has been created through con stitutional amendments and FWC rules related to this issue. “… the application of these laws by FWC appears to be fundamentally unfair and this Court, as a court of equity, feels compelled to at least attempt to abate the un fairness,” the ruling states. The ruling says the case was reviewed for a year — “weighed and re-weighed” — in an attempt to nd a clear answer. “Unfortunately, the more the matter is considered, the more unclear it becomes. An absolute mess has been cre ated,” the ruling states. “As legislators, we are challenged with listening to opposing factors and basing decisions on fairness and what is good for everyone,” Beshears wrote. “We have to listen to our constituency, or else we fail to render deci sions that provide opportuni ties to all citizens. “(The shermen) are not attempting to supersede the amendment, nor are their at tempts to undo the net ban. They are just asking for a larger mesh size so they can sh for mullet and undersized sh will not be entangled and die,” he wrote. “They want to sh, to work, to make a living just like all of us, just like ev eryone at FWC.” have planned an event t for a king (King Retsyo that is). The directors have worked all year to give the state’s oldest maritime event a 50th birthday like none other, by bringing back some of the old traditional activities. The King Retsyo Ball makes its return to the schedule of events on Friday, Nov. 1, at Fort Coombs Armory, starting at 9 p.m. and going until 1 a.m. The ball will have the band Crooked Shooz performing live and a buffet of local seafood dishes for all to enjoy. The board also welcomes the return of the reworks display to be held directly after the headline concert on Saturday, Nov. 2. The traditional events are still a big part of the festival and have been for many years. The park opens at 10 a.m. Friday, with free admission all day. Musical entertainment begins at noon. The festivities begin at 4 p.m. with the Blessing of the Fleet on the east side of the park, where local shing vessels and pleasure boats will be blessed by local clergymen. The Blessing of the Fleet is an old tradition to hope for a safe return to all shermen and for a bountiful harvest in the upcoming season. After the Blessing of the Fleet will be a procession of the Miss Florida Seafood Morgan Martin and King Retsyo Vance Millender from the Water Street gate to the information booth in the center of the festival grounds. There, opening ceremonies will be held with a welcoming speech from the queen, king and some special guests to help celebrate this golden anniversary. Musical entertainment continues until the park closes at 11 p.m., headlined by country artist Tim Dugger. Saturday begins with the annual Redsh Run through the streets of historic Apalachicola at 8 a.m., followed by the parade down Highway 98 at 10 a.m. The park opens at 10 a.m. with a $5 admission fee and children 12 and under free. Musical entertainment starts at noon. The festival’s oyster eating and shucking events start at 1 p.m. If you are interested in competing in either event, we urge you to be early to sign up, as spots ll up fast. Blue crab races for the kids start at 1 p.m. and are held at the top of the each hour until 5 p.m. It is free for kids age 12 and under, and every kid wins a prize. It is an exciting race to watch, with the blue crabs not always the most cooperative competitors. Of course, there is the carnival for kids of all ages in the southern area of the festival with many great rides promised this year; it should be fun for all. The golden anniversary celebration ends with a concert by country music star and “Dancing with the Stars” champion Kellie Pickler Directly after the show will be an about 25-minute reworks display over the Apalachicola Bay. Many of the festival’s food booths are local nonprot groups selling local fresh seafood, including oysters on the half shell, fried oysters, fried scallops, gumbo, fried mullet, low country boil, crab ngers and other delicacies. These food booths are run by local churches, school organizations and other community nonprot groups that do not pay anything to be in the park. Nor does the festival receive any proceeds from them. There will also be many other nonprot groups in the park doing other things. There will also be other fair food in the park on food row, promising a variety for all those who visit the festival. The arts and crafts area is full again this year, with new and additional local vendors; surely there is something for everyone to enjoy. There will also be a history of the festival exhibit where the photo contest is normally held so patrons can see how this festival was created and photos of the past. It is really a fun thing to see how it started and what it has become. So this year as the festival celebrates its 50th anniversary, and is the oldest maritime event in Florida, remember this festival was born by volunteers from the community wanting to celebrate local heritage and bring in much needed economy to the area during the offseason. Still to this day, it does what it was originally meant to do. The current board of directors of the Florida Seafood Festival would like to thank all the community members who have served as volunteers as former directors. For your perseverance and drive to keep this festival alive for 50 years, we thank you. We would also like to thank the community of Franklin County for many of you participate in the parade, food booths, nonprot booths and arts and crafts. One of the reasons this festival has survived for 50 years is the community it is held in. Finally, I would like to thank the current volunteer board of directors. Thank you for all the time you give up making this festival grow and be a success. I am very blessed to be in my 10th year on the board and have had the privilege to work alongside some of the most dedicated volunteers in the area. I encourage all to thank the directors when they see them. They do not get to enjoy the festival like everyone else; they are busy making sure everyone who attends has a great time, never asking for anything more than a smile from a happy patron. The volunteer board of directors of the Florida Seafood Festival invite any and all to the 50th anniversary of the state’s oldest maritime event the Florida Seafood Festival Nov. 1-2 in Battery Park Apalachicola, a celebration t for a king (King Retsyo that is). John Solomon is the president of the Florida Seafood Festival board of directors 2013. NETS from page A1 FESTIVAL from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, October 31, 2013 V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e sp e r at e l y n e e d e d t o s o c ia l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s an d c at s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y or g bBB O WB ] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y ookkMk e‚‚ u ¡¦ F¨ ‚¨¨ \}‚ } € R …¡ Q‚¦ ‚ R O D N E Y i s a 3 4 y e a r o l d J a ck R u s s e l l m i x H e w e i g h s i n a t l e s s th a n 2 0 lb s s o h e i s th a t r e a l l y ni c e m e d i u m s i z e d d o g H e i s a h a p p y li t tl e g u y w i t h o u t t h e s o m e t i m e s an n o y i n g ch a r a c t e r i s ti c s o f s o m e t e r r i e r s H e i s h e ar t w o r m n e g a t i v e n e u t e re d an d r e a d y f o r hi s f o r e v e r h o m e H e w i l l b e a t th e S e a f o o d F e s ti v a l thi s w e e k e n d T h e H u m a n e S o ci e t y t e n t w i l l b e l o c a t e d ju s t i n s i d e th e r e a r en t r a nc e S e e y ou t h er e NOW OPEN!! Flo wers & Gifts for All Occasions Cir cle E Candles Hand Cr afted Jewelr y b y Local Artists Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A Apalac hicola, FL ( 850 ) 899-1588 BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Georgia Southern University junior Taylor Tyson received the 2013 Brittany “Ally” Harbuck Scholarship during a reading and reception Sept. 12. Awardwinning writer Janisse Ray, who served as this year’s scholarship judge, presented the award on campus. Tyson is the son of Elizabeth Lanier Tyson and Nathan B. Tyson, of Loganville, Ga. and the grandson of Shirley N. Taylor, of Eastpoint, and J. Don Lanier, of Mexico Beach. Tyson’s winning submission consisted of three pieces: the short story “Sincerely,” the ash-ction “Reentry, or How to Ensure a Shooting Star,” and the poem “Skeletel/ Industrial.” The story and ashction were written in Prof. Laura Valeri’s ction writing class, and the poem was written in Prof. Emma Bolden’s creative writing class. “Taylor Tyson’s work does magnicently what good literature is supposed to do, which is land us someplace we’ve never been and turn us loose as changed people,” Ray said. “I was transformed reading him. Tyson’s prose – raw, gripping, edgy, even experimental – navigates a borderland, with its intricately developed, larger-than-life characters living double lives, shapeshifting between beauty and betrayal. Tyson, with his facile prose and gritty style, proves himself a trustworthy guide as he leads us into and out of dangerous territory. His voice is awless.” Tyson read from his entries during the ceremony, and members of the Harbuck family participated in the award presentation. The ceremony also included readings by Harbuck Scholarship nalists and award nominees and culminated with a reception. Tyson is the fth recipient of the scholarship endowed by David and Debi Harbuck of Savannah to honor their daughter, who died in a trafc accident in April 2005. The Harbuck Scholarship supports sophomore, junior and senior writing majors with at least a 3.0 grade point average in their writing courses. To be considered for the scholarship, students must be nominated by faculty in the Department of Writing and Linguistics and must submit 10-15 pages of ction, nonction or poetry to the Harbuck Scholarship Committee. The committee narrows the list of applicants to three nalists for judging by an outside author. Special to The Times The St. George Plantation’s fourth annual Photo Contest was a huge success. It was the biggest participation to date with 40 entries; all of which were good,-many that were outstanding! We would like to thank everyone who submitted their breathtaking photos of the beautiful Apalachicola/Eastpoint/St. George Island area and to encourage others to join in on the 2014 “shutterbug” fun. The fth annual photo contest is in fall 2014. We would like to extend our gratitude to our esteemed judges, Drew Ericson, curator of exhibits, design and fabrication for the Museum of Florida History, and Morgan Lewis, with the Division of Cultural Affairs. We thank you for your time and for your expertise in the judging of our artists’ exhibits. A daunting challenge. And the winners are as follows: Chip Sanders took home the rst place award with Drama at the Lighthouse; $150 prize. The second place award goes to Dragony Photography for Eastpoint Oyster Boat with Birds; $100 prize. The third place spot was captured by David Morris with his entry of Casting before the Storm; $50 prize. As in the past years; we let the locals choose their favorite photo for the People’s Choice Award. This year the $50 prize for the People’s Choice Award goes to Wild Dolphin by Ketaki Kini. Congratulations to all our winners! Special to The Times “A Taste of St. George Island, The Art of Gulf Coast Cooking,” the longawaited collections of Franklin County’s most treasured recipes, is here. This edition will also feature local artist Beth Appleton’s cut paper assemblages. Inspired by island life, the artist helped design the book by selecting her brightest and most colorful works to illustrate chapters and pattern pages. “I have loved working on this project,” Appleton said. “This cookbook is a fantastic way for all of us to help our island rst responders. They are not just our neighbors; they are modern day heroes.” The cookbook will be released to the public during this year’s 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival held in Apalachicola. Appleton will be on hand to sign books on Friday, Nov. 1 from 4 to 6 p.m. and again from 1-4 p.m. on Saturday at the St. George Island’s First Responder’s nonprot display at the festival. The cookbook will also be available for sale during other festival hours as well. The book will also be in select stores this Friday. Continuing the tradition of showcasing writers with local roots on Florida Seafood Festival weekend, Downtown Books welcomes Dan Cole from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Cole, who writes under the nom de plume J. W. Holden, was born and raised in Apalachicola and now lives in Panama City. He has worked domestically and overseas as a security contractor, survival instructor and corporate security consultant and weaves many of his own experiences into his historical adventures and modern thrillers. “The Desperate Search,” “You Cannot Serve Two Masters,” and “Flint and Steel,” set in frontier North Carolina, brim with details about Indian lore, woodcraft, folkways and period weaponry. “Crosswind 5,” which will make its debut at the event, is a modern tactical thriller set in Africa. Come early for some one-on-one conversation. The writer known as J. W. Holden joins the ranks of children’s’ authors Jolene Hueber and Dayma Wasmund-Nault, both of whom have greeted old friends and signed copies of their books at Seafood Festivals past. Downtown Books is at 67 Commerce St., across from the Apalachicola post ofce. Candace and Jeremy Burke, of Apalachicola, are proud to announce the birth of their son, Charles David Burke, on Friday, Oct. 11, at 12:11 p.m. at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. He weighed six pounds, three ounces and was 18.5 inches long. Proud big sisters are Iolana and Layla Burke. Maternal grandparents are Penny and Lamar Hardy, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Beverly and David Burke, of Apalachicola. Birth DAN COLE Apalach-born author to sign books Saturday TAYLOR TYSON TT aylor T T yson receives Harbuck scholarship Cookbook to benet island’s rst responders Charles David Burke born Society LEFT: “Casting before the Storm” won third place. RIGHT: The People’s Choice Award went to “Wild Dolphin.” Winning photos selected in Plantation contestPHOTOS SpSP E c C IAL TO ThTH E TT IMES LEFT: “Drama at the Lighthouse” won the top prize. RIGHT: “Eastpoint Oyster Boat with Birds” won second place. SS T. GEORgG E PLANTATION’S FOURThH ANNUAL P hH OTO CONTEST

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Micha el Whale y P astor Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, October 31, 2013 Special to the Times Happy Halloween. Get your calendars at hand and mark the following date. On Saturday morning, Nov. 16, just follow the crowds to Sacred Heart of Jesus Church for the yard sale. Sale starts at 8 a.m. and closes at 3 p.m. Stop on by and look around. There’s bound to be something you simply can’t live without. Coffee and baked goods will be on sale, too. See ya there! Most of the sale will be in the church hall. On Saturday, Nov. 2, you can enjoy a full breakfast at Chillas Hall, from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be happy to prepare and serve you. A donation of $5 is required. Later on Saturday will be the Over-50 Dance, with Jim the deejay at the juke box. Bring a snack to share, your favorite beverage, your dancing shoes and of course your main squeeze, and dance the night away. Heel and toe, heel and toe. When you get home from the dance, or after enjoying the seafood festival, remember to set your clocks back one hour, and enjoy the extra hour of sleep. And while you’re at it, check those batteries in your smoke alarms. There will be the gumbo cook-off and lunch on Saturday, Nov. 9 at the Lanark Village Boat Club from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Yum, yum. Your sugar x will be ready Saturday, Nov. 16 from 9 to 11 a.m. Start off the day with a good, full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Don’t worry about the calories; you can work them off in the evening. On Saturday evening, come on down to Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post #82, and enjoy the fun and music. The birthday bash for November will start at 6 p.m. You might get to join the songbird at the karaoke. Along with our monthly covered dish on Sunday, Nov. 17, we will have a block party with the lunch. The party will be inside and outside of Chillas Hall. Hot dogs and hamburgers furnished by the association. Bring a dish to share and enjoy the day. On Monday, Nov. 4 will be the monthly membership meeting at Chillas Hall. Board meeting at 6 p.m. The gavel falls at 7 p.m. for the membership meeting. Be watching for ya. See ya at lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Chow line forms at noon. A minimum donation of $4 will be collected at the desk. Sgt. Stacy and our faithful volunteers will have a good lunch xed for you. A Thanksgiving dinner is being planned for Thanksgiving Day at Chillas Hall starting at 1 p.m. In the meantime, there is a sign-up sheet in the hall for your name, number of guests and what dish you will bring. Hope you can join us. Everyone is welcome to all of the above-mentioned. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, contrary to popular opinion, God’s last name is not damn. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Dance on Saturday, then turn clocks back LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Need the perfect way to remember or honor a loved? With a $2 donation you can purchase and personalize a special luminary with their name and a message. Then join Big Bend Hospice for the Lighting of the Luminaries on Friday, Nov. 29 at River front Park at dusk. Luminaries may be purchased during the Florida Seafood Festival at the Big Bend Hospice tent and then later by contacting Pam Allbritton at 508-8759. This $2 donation will be used to care for Big Bend Hospice families in Franklin County. Be a part of this beautiful event when the whole town is lit up with luminaries! Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassion ate end of life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide informa tion and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla counties. If you would like additional information about services, please call (850) 878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org.Covenant W W ord hosts Joy N N ight tonight Covenant Word will host Joy Night from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 31 at the former Apalachicola High School gym. Everyone is invited to take part in this free Halloween activity, which will feature candy and food for young and old. A deejay will be on hand to help the party come alive, with plenty of prizes and games and even a bounce house. For more details contact Misty at (850) 247-8524 Lanark Boat Club hosts N N ov. 30 bazaar The Lanark Village Boat Club will host a Holiday Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 30 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event will feature work by local artisans, including jewelry, arts and crafts, holday items, gifts, baked goods and more. A lunch of soup, sandwich, drink and dessert will be available for $5. Tables available for $10. For more info call Janet at 697-2587. By Tevis Page Special to the Times The day every student has been eagerly waiting for is nally here. This Friday and Saturday is the 50th annual Florida Seafood Festival! The student body is proud to present our Miss Florida Seafood, Morgan Martin. She is a joy to be around and has a bright future ahead of her. The students will be running many booths this year. The seniors will be selling fried oysters, crab claws and apple butter. The fourth grade will be providing a low country boil and boiled shrimp; Take Stock In Children will be vending hamburgers and hotdogs; and the Franklin County High School girls softball team will be serving chili cheese fries and chicken strips. We have a half-day Friday, but it is expected that many students will not attend. There has been a myriad of chatter circling the school about the entertainment. Kellie Pickler, will be performing on Saturday night at 8 p.m. Directly after will be the reworks, then the park closes. This weekend has been anticipated since the beginning of the year, and it is nally here. H AWKAWK T A A L KK Students will be running many festival booths Faith b B RIEFS The following is the schedule for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in Apalachicola, Carra belle, Eastpoint, and the St. George Island areas. For more information, call the Hotline at 653-2000.MON N D A A Y 5:30-6:30 p.m. Al-Anon, at Eastpoint First United Methodist Church, 317 Pat ton Dr. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open AA, Apalachicola, Trinity Epis copal Church, 79 Sixth Street.TUES ES D A A Y Noon1 p.m. Open (New meeting) 5:30-6:30 p.m. 12 Step Study Group at Apala chicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street. 7:30-8:30 p.m., Carra belle, Church of the Ascen sion, 110 NE First Street.WEWE D NES NES D A A Y 6-7 p.m. Women’s AA, Open, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Men’s AA, Open, Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street.THURS RS D A A Y Noon-1 p.m. Apala chicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Open AA, St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr.FRIFRI D A A Y 5:30-6:30 p.m. AA Happy Hour, Open Apalachicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street. 7:30-8:30 p.m., Carra belle, Church of the Ascen sion, 110 NE First Street.SASA TUR R D A A Y 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Speak ers Meeting, Open, East point First United Method ist Church, 317 Patton Dr. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Discus sion Group, Alligator Point Mission By The Sea.SS U N N D A A Y 7:30-8:30 p.m. AA Big Book Study, Open, East point First United Method ist Church, 317 Patton Dr.SS P E E C IA IA L MEE EE T IN IN G S S Birthday Meeting The last Thursday of the month from 7:30-8:30 p.m. @ St. George Island United Methodist, 201 E Gulf Beach Dr.Meet, Greet and E E at Last Friday of each month from 5:30-8 p.m. @ Apalachicola, Trinity Epis copal Church, 79 Sixth Street. Business Meeting 7:30-8:30 p.m. Following AA Meeting. First Monday of each month @ Apala chicola, Trinity Episcopal Church, 79 Sixth Street.BOOKS KS /LI I T ERA ERA TURE RE Selected AA books and literature available for sale. God grant me the se renity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference. AA Meeting S chCH E dulDUL E H oO S pP I cC E lumLUM INARIA oO N SA lL E N oO W

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Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu Oc t 31 82 71 25 % F ri, N o v 1 81 68 64 % S a t N o v 2 81 53 22 % Sun, N o v 3 75 54 9 % M on, N o v 4 75 47 15 % T ues N o v 5 74 53 1 % W ed N o v 6 75 54 3 % SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Offshore fishing will soon come to a halt as the gag grouper season will end on December 3rd, leaving only a few species to target offshore. We have had a great fall so far with good grouper catches and amberjack and triggerfish. Most of the king fish and Spanish have moved further south. As the temperatures cool down, the fishing should heat up this fall. Good trout and flounder reports are starting to come in from the ICW (canal) in St. Joe. Try using grubs and jigs along the new seas wall for flounder and trout. Red fish, and some “bull” reds are also being caught here as well. The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus), sometimes known as the sea hawk, sh eagle, or sh hawk, is a sheating bird of prey. The osprey is unique among North American birds of prey for its diet of live sh and ability to dive into water to catch them. Because of its unique behaviors, it has been given its own taxonomic genus, Pandion and family, Pandionidae. The name Pandion comes from the mythical Greek king Pandion of Athens and grandfather of Theseus, who was transformed into an eagle. The osprey is unusual in that it is a distributed nearly worldwide. Four subspecies are usually recognized and two extinct species are known from the fossil record one in California and one in Florida. The osprey is the second most widely distributed raptor species, after the Peregrine Falcon. Ospreys commonly patrol waterways and shorelines. In our area, they are often seen on bridges and abandoned watercraft or standing on their huge stick nests in riverside cypress. Ospreys are compatible with humans and have rebounded in numbers following the ban on the pesticide DDT. In fact, human structures sometimes aid to the osprey. The birds happily nest on telephone poles, channel markers, and other such locations. Arti cial nesting platforms are common in areas where preservationists are working to reestablish the birds The osprey’s diet consists almost exclusively of sh. Ospreys and owls are the only raptors whose outer toe is reversible, allowing them to grasp prey like slippery sh with two toes in front and two behind. Ospreys search for sh by circling high in the sky over shallow water. They often hover brie y before diving to grab a sh. Ospreys are considered a type of eagle in many Native American tribes, and are accorded the same respect as bald and golden eagles are. In coastal tribes where ospreys are common, they are often considered guardians. Seeing one is sometimes considered a warning of danger to come. In other legends, FishHawk is noted for his pride or even arrogance. The Nez Perce considered Fish-Hawk a medicine bird, and seeing an osprey in a dream or vision was a sign that a man had been granted spiritual power as a healer. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Special to the Times Across the nearly six million acres in Florida’s wildlife management area (WMA) system, of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) can be found atop buggies, operating allterrain vehicles, in patrol trucks and on foot. One part of their job is to patrol public lands. This time of year, many hunters are also in the woods too, scouting or enjoying archery season, and other nature-lovers are taking advantage of the cooler weather. Through state, federal and private partnerships, Florida boasts many diverse and exciting public hunting opportunities. The FWC encourages adults and children to get out and enjoy all the state has to offer, and its of cers make sure that people do so safely and responsibly. “We want people to be safe outdoors and the resources to be around for generations to come,” said the FWC’s Lt. Albert Wass de Czege, a eld supervisor in northwest Florida. Safety while hunting is of paramount importance, which is why hunter safety courses are required for most hunters. FWC of cers make sure all bag and size limits are followed, appropriate methods and equipment are used, and that hunters are hunting during the right hours and possess the necessary license and permits. “We also check that all users, not just hunters, are being safe and responsible in our WMAs,” Wass de Czege said. “They should be operating on open roads or trails, staying off closed roads, following speed limits and showing courtesy to others.” As more people hit the woods this fall, FWC of cers may set up surveillance and plain-clothes details and use radar devices to accomplish this. Also, they are just a phone call away if people nd themselves in need of assistance. Violations involving licenses and permits could warrant a $50 ne plus the cost of the license. Penalties can escalate for people with recent previous violations. Some hunting and other violations can lead to more serious consequences, including higher nes and even jail time. “If you follow all posted information and treat others and the resources with respect, you will be setting yourself up for a great time in the outdoors,” Wass de Czege said. All safety precautions and resource laws are of vital importance, on both public and private lands. Those hunting on public lands just need to remember a few extra things: • Do not consume alcohol or use illegal drugs. • Pick up all belongings; don’t litter; preserve paradise. • Only build res of appropriate materials at recognized campsites and thoroughly extinguish ames and embers before leaving. Be sure of the speci c rules for the area in which you plan to visit. You can go to MyFWC. com/Hunting and click on “WMA Brochures” for more information. Remember to report any suspected sh, wildlife or boating violations by calling 888-404-3922, texting Tip@MyFWC.com or going online to MyFWC. com/WildlifeAlert. Katie Purcell is community relations coordinator for the FWC’s Division of Law Enforcement Community Relations Coordinator. “Protecting Paradise” provides a glimpse into the world of an FWC of cer. Finding lost hikers, checking boaters for safety gear and teaching children about shing and hunting are just some of the contributions they make. Stay safe, be responsible on public lands KATIE PURCELL Protecting Paradise Bird found round the world LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Ospreys on a nest in Tate’s Hell. Outdoors BRIEFS Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, October 31, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Beekeepers eld day Saturday: The University of Florida and its Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences is sponsoring the third annual Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show Saturday, Nov. 2 at the Washington County Extension Of ce, at 1424 Jackson Avenue in Chipley. The Field Day and Trade Show are part of the 2013 Florida State Beekeepers Association meeting in Chipley. The trade show provides educational opportunities through hands-on activities and interaction with expert beekeepers. The event begins at 8:30 a.m. CT with registration. Classes will include Splitting Beehives, What’s the Buzz about Honey and Products of the Hive. There will also be a smoker lighting competition, door prizes and lunch will be served beginning at 12:15 p.m. CT. Registration is $15 per person and $10 for each additional family member; the registration fee includes refreshments and lunch. Those interested in attending should call the Franklin County Extension Of ce at 653-9337 to register no later than Oct. 25. Early registration is encouraged so organizers know how much food to prepare. Florida Wild Mammal Association wish list: It has been another busy year and more than 550 wild animals have been brought to Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA) so far in need of care and medical treatment. Fortunately, FWMA has a brief period when the animal intake is slower than usual, so we are focusing on refurbishing all the cages and straightening out the property. This is a huge undertaking. The center has been absolutely slammed full this year so the cleanup is extensive. We have assembled a “wish list” of items that would help us along with volunteer services that are needed. For outside maintenance FWMA needs outdoor turf carpet to cover PVC perching and wooden decks so that the birds won’t damage their feet; metal hose nozzles and scrub brushes with 8-inch plastic handles. Timber is also needed for general maintenance.

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Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 S e a ha w k s e n io r r unn i ng back A le x C a u s e y had 1 1 c a r r i e s f o r 8 5 y a r d s ag a i n s t Ba k e r F r i da y ni g h t, in c lu d in g b u r s t s o f 1 3 a n d 1 9 y a r d s a n d a t o u c h d o w n r u n o f 4 8 y a r d s O n d e f e n s e a s ou t s i de l i ne back e r he had t h r e e t ack l e s A le x r a n t he ba l l ha rd a n d p l a y e d e v e r y s n a p d u r i n g t h e g a m e s a i d C o a c h A a r o n Y o r k G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R A l ex C a u s e y P U B L IC NO T IC E T H E F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y A D V I S O R Y B O A R D O F A D J U S T M E N T W I L L H O L D A P U B L I C H E A R I N G O N W E D N E S D A Y N O V E M B E R 6 2 0 1 3, A T 1 0 : 0 0 A .M I N T HE CO U N T Y CO M M I S SIO N ME E TI N G RO O M O F T H E C O U R T H O U S E A N N E X T O C O N S I D E R T H E F O L L O W I N G V AR I AN C E S AP P E AL S AN D S P E C I AL E X C E P TIO N S : 1 C O N S I D E R A T I O N O F A V A R I A N C E T O C O N S T R UC T S R OC K R E V E TM E NT W I TH I N TH E C R I TI C A L H A B I T A T Z O N E O N P R O P E R T Y D E S C R I B E D A S L O T 3 A L L I G A T O R P O I N T F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y F L O R I D A R E QU E ST S U B M I T T E D B Y L A R R Y J OE C OL S ON A G E N T O R J A MES G S T E L Z E NMUL L E R OW N E R 2 C O N S I D E R A T I O N O F A V A R I A N C E T O C O N S T R UC T S R OC K R E V E TM E NT W I TH I N TH E C R I TI C A L H A B I T A T Z O N E O N P R O P E R T Y D E S C R I B E D A S L O T 2 A L L I G A T O R P O I N T F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y F L O R I D A R E QU E ST S U B M I T T E D B Y L A R R Y J OE C OL S ON A G E N T F O R C H A P M A N I N V E S T M E N T O W N E R 3 C O N S I D E R A T I O N O F A V A R I A N C E T O T H E S 4 S P E C I A L D I S T R I C T R E Q U I R E M E N T S O F L A N A R K V IL L A G E W H I C H L IM I T C ON ST R U C T I ON O N A R E A R W A L L T O 8 F E E T T H E R E Q U E S T I S T O C O N S T R U C T A N A D D I T I O N 1 0 F E E T F R O M T H E R E A R W A L L O N P R O P E R T Y D E S C R I B E D A S U N I T 3 2 6 W A R R E N A V E N U E L O T 6 B L O C K 8 UNI T 1 L A N A R K V I L L A G E R E Q UES T SUBMI T T E D B Y R F G R A Y B U I L D E R S I N C A G E N T F O R H A Z E L M W O L F E O W N E R 4 C O N S I D E R A T I O N O F A V A R I A N C E T O C O N S TR U CT A R O C K R E V E TM E NT W I TH I N TH E C R I T I C A L H A B I T A T Z O N E O N P R O P E R T Y D E S C R I B E D A S 3 1 9 B R U C E S T R E E T L O T 1 0 B L O C K 57 U N I T 5 S T G E O R G E I S L A N D F R A N K L I N C O UN T Y F L O R I D A R E Q UES T SUBMI T T E D B Y G A R L I C K E N V I R O N M E N T A L A S S O C I A T E S I N C A G E N T F O R B E N J A M I N N C H A S E O W N E R T HE B O A R D O F C O UN T Y C O MMI S S I O NE R S A C T I N G A S T H E B O A R D O F A D J U S T M E N T W I L L A DDR E S S T H I S R E QU E ST A T T H E IR M E E T IN G O N N O V E M B E R 1 9 2 0 1 3 P e r s o n s w i s h i n g t o c o m m e n t m a y d o s o i n p e r s o n o r i n w r i ti n g t o t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y P l a n n i n g & Z o n i n g D e p a r t m e n t 3 4 F o r b e s S t r e e t S u i t e 1 A p a l a c h i c o l a F L 3 2 3 2 0 T r a n s a c ti o n s o f t h i s h e a r i n g w i l l n o t b e r e c o r d e d p e r s o n s w i s h i n g t o r e c o r d t h e p r o c e e d i n g s m u s t m a k e t h e n e c e s s a r y a r r a n g e m e n t s f o r r e c o r d i n g. N O TI CE O F AD O PTI O N O F CIT Y O RD IN AN CE e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n o f t h e Ci t y o f A p a l a c hico l a w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g f o r t h e p ur p os e o f r e cei v in g ci t izen ’ s co mm en ts o n t h e f o l lo w in g p r o p os e d o r din a n ce: O RD IN AN CE N O 2013-01 AN O RD IN AN CE BY THE AP AL A CHI C O L A CIT Y C O MMISS I O N O F THE CIT Y O F AP AL A CHI C O L A, FLO RID A AMEND IN G THE CIT Y O F AP ALCHI C O L A C O MP REHENS IVE P L AN T O AMEND THE P ERMIT TED L AND US E O F S EVER AL CIT Y -O WNED P R O P ER TIES FR O M RES ID ENTI AL AND C O M MER CI AL T O RECREA TI O N AL AND PUB LI C F A CILITIES; T O AMEND THE CIT Y ’ S C O A S T AL HI GH H AZ ARD MAP ; P R O VID E FO R THE REP EAL O F ANY O RD IN AN CE IN C O NFLI CT HERE WITH; AND T O P R O VID E FO R AN EF FECTIVE D A TE. e p u b lic h e a r in g w i l l b e h e ld in t h e A p a l a c hico l a C o mm uni t y C en t er #1 B a y A v en ue A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t 6:00 PM o n T ues d a y N o v em b er 5, 2013. A l l in t er es t e d p a r t ies a r e en co ura g e d t o a p p e a r a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r e s p e c t t o t hi s p r o p os e d o r din a n ce By RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin There were no surprises at Baker School’s Doug Grif th Memorial Stadium on Friday as the undefeated Gators hosted a winless Franklin County team for Homecoming 2013. Baker scored two touchdowns in the rst threeand-a-half minutes of play and didn’t look back on the way to a 54-13 win. The score was 47-7 at the half and the second half was played with a running clock to help ease the pain of the visiting Seahawks. The Gators (8-0) scored on all but their last offensive possession. And for good measure Troy Smith returned the interception of a Franklin County pass 55 yards giving Baker a defensive score. “It was just a good read,” Smith said of his score. “Once I caught the ball I just had to take it to the house.” Things started badly for the Seahawks (0-8) when they were forced into a three-and-out on the opening possession of the game. Things got worse when the Franklin County punt didn’t make it back to the line of scrimmage and went in the books as a negative six-yard kick. The poor punt set the Gators up at the Franklin County 27-yard line. Two D.J. Thomas runs later Baker was up 6-0. Malcolm Grif th’s extra point made it 7-0 with 8:47 left in the rst quarter. The Seahawks fumbled away the ensuing kickoff and David Oglesby recovered the live ball for Baker at the Franklin County 25. Jon Beck hit Kodi Moen with a 25-yard touchdown pass on the next play as the Gators scored their second touchdown in 16 seconds to go up 14-0. Before the end of the rst quarter Brandon Engler scored from two yards out and Austin Martin scored from on a 23-yard run. Thomas scored his second touchdown of the game and 21st of the season from 57 yards out with 10:06 left in the half to put the Gators up 35-0. Thomas’ long touchdown run was his last carry of the game as Gator Coach Matt Brunson quickly started to empty the bench and reward backups with some well-earned playing time. Even in limited playing time Thomas came up big rushing for 159 yards on nine carries. Thomas now has 1,480 yards rushing on the season. The Seahawks broke into the scoring column against the Baker reserves when senior Alex Causey scored from 48-yards out with 7:38 left in the half. Causey rushed for 11 carries for 85 yards. Another short eld set up a 10-yard touchdown pass from Beck to Jonathan Gatewood with 4:58 left in the half. Smith’s pick six with 1:26 left in the half pushed the lead to 47-7. Baker had 283 yards in total offense in the rst half and six different players scored. The nal Gator score on Baker’s rst offensive play when Beck hit Wilder Kersey with a 38-yard pass. Josh Mayhew added the extra point. Franklin County sophomore fullback Trenton Lee scored from a yard out in the nal seconds of the game. The Gators declined a holding penalty against the Seahawks on the previous play, which allowed Franklin County to punch the ball in for the score. Lee had 17 carries for 79 yards. Junior Cole Wheeler had ve carries for 75 yards. Sophomore kicker Walker DeVaughn nailed his rst extra point, but had his second one blocked. “I thought this was the hardest fought game we have played this year,” said Seahawk coach Aaron York. “Our coaching staff worked on the kids being physical all week and we played our best game up to this point in the year. “It was exciting to see our kids get after being physical. The downside was we had ve turnovers and you cannot do that against a good team like Baker,” said York. “We are off this week and we are going to get after it in practice and start prepping for Vernon, a very athletic team. We are going to work hard to play our best game of the year.” Randy Dickson is the Crestview News Bulletin’s sports editor. Email him at randyd@crestviewbulletin.com. Baker rolls past Franklin County CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, October 31, 2013 A Page 9 Section The Lady Seahawk golf team competed in the regional playoffs in Pensacola and finished in fourth place on Tuesday, Oct. 22. Pensacola’s U.S. Navy golf course proved to be a tough test for all competitors as it yielded few birdies and even fewer low scores. “Our girls played well, gave it their best shot, and made if further than they ever expected to,” said head coach Scott Collins. Only the top two teams and top two individuals advanced to the Florida High School Athletic Association state tournament in Leesburg on Oct. 29 and 30. Seventh-grader Melanie Collins advanced as one of the top two individuals and will represent Franklin County at the state finals in the two-day, 36-hole event. Collins ended the regional tournament tied for second place with Maclay sophomore McKenzie Glaze. Both girls went back to the first hole and played a sudden death playoff. Collins hit her drive down the middle of the fairway and her approach shot landed on the green 12 feet in front of the flag. Glaze hit her approach shot into the tree line and lost the first playoff hole by two strokes, which sent Collins to Lady Lake as the youngest individual qualifier in the state. “I’m glad I made it, but I wish my teammates were going to state with me,” said Melanie Collins after the win. “I knew Melanie was nervous, but I was hoping she would hit the ball solid and put some pressure on Mckenzie,” said coach Collins. “She did just that.” Melanie Collins began the state finals on Tuesday at Harbor Hills Country Club in Lady Lake with a 9:09 a.m. starting time, in a threesome that included Miami Ransom Everglades sixth-grader Phoebe Beber-Frankel, and Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian junior Kaitlyn Leta. Ninety-six girls from all over the state competed at Harbor Hills. – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Seventh-grade golfer quali es for state MELANIE COLLINS RANDY DICKSON | News Bulletin Cole Wheeler looks for some running room as he turns the corner against Baker.

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A10 | The Times Thursday, October 31, 2013 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. OCT. 22 Katie Matthews, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Pamela M. Moore, 52, Eastpoint, disorderly conduct (FCSO) Willie C. Lake, 35, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) OCT. 23 Tammy M. Stoutamire, 43, Havana, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Pamela M. Moore, 52, Eastpoint, disorderly conduct (FCSO) OCT. 24 Joe L. Morales, 34, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and leaving the scene of a crash with damage (FCSO) Alvin G. Martina, Jr., 30, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) OCT. 27 Robert T. Kilgore, III, 39, Carrabelle, DUI (FCSO) Marcus D. Kelley, 37, Bristol, petit theft (APD) OCT. 28 Thomas McDonnell, Jr., 24, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence, and retail theft (APD) Raymond L. Guthrie, 39, Carrabelle, withholding child support (FWC) Toby L. Dalton, 32, Eastpoint, Wakulla County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Jimmy Talley, Jr., 46, Lanark Village, domestic battery (FCSO) Rodney J. Richards, 47, Apalachicola, boating under the inuence (FWC) Joshua D. Bell, 29, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Marcus D. Kelley, 37, Bristol, violation of probation (FCSO) Thomas A. Arroyo, 38, Eastpoint, three counts of retail theft (FCSO) CE R T I F IC A T E T O RO LL I t h e u n d e r s i g n e d h e r e b y ce r t i f y t h a t I a m t h e d u l y q u al i e d a n d a c t i n g P r o pe r t y A p prai s e r i n a n d f o r F ra n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a A s s u c h I h a v e s a t i s e d m y s e l f t h a t al l pr o pe r t y i n c l u d e d o r i ncl u d a bl e on t h e X R e al X T a n g i b l e P e r s o n al P r o pe r t y A s s e s s m e n t R o l l f o r t h e a f o r e s ai d c o u n t y i s pr o pe r l y ta x e d s o f a r a s I h a v e be e n a b l e t o a sce r tai n t h a t t h e s ai d r o l l w a s ce r t i e d a n d d e l i v e r e d t o m e b y t h e v al u e a d j us t m e n t bo a r d o n O c t o be r 1 6 t h 2 0 1 3 a n d t h a t al l r e q u i r e d e x t e n s i o n s o n t h e a bo v e d e scr i be d r o l l t o s h o w t h e ta x a t t r i b u ta b l e t o al l ta x a b l e pr o pe r t y i n c l u d e d t h e r e i n h a v e be e n m a d e p u r s u a n t t o l a w I f u r t h e r ce r t i f y t h a t u po n c o m p l e t i o n o f t h i s ce r t i c a t e a n d t h e a t ta c h m e n t o f s a m e t o t h e h e r e i n d e scr i be d a s s e s s m e n t r o l l a s a p a r t t h e r e o f s ai d a s s e s s m e n t r o l l w i l l be d e l i v e r e d t o t h e T a x C ol l e c t o r o f t h is c oun t y I n w i t n e s s w h e r e o f I h a v e s u b scr i be d t h i s ce r t i c a t e c a us e d t h e s a m e t o be a t ta c h e d t o a n d m a d e p a r t o f t h e a bo v e d e scr i be d a s s e s s m e n t r o l e o n O c t o be r 1 6 t h 2 0 1 3 P r o pe r t y A p prai s e r o f F ra n k l i n C o u n t y F l o r i d a D R 4 0 8 R 6 / 91 D E P A RT M E NT O F R E V EN U E N O T I C E T O P R O P E R T Y O W N E R S / T A X P A Y E R S * 2 0 1 3 * T A X R O L L S O P E N F O R C O L L E C T I O N * 2 0 1 3 * N o t i c e is he r e b y g i v e n t ha t t he c e r t i e d T a x R ol l f o r t he y e a r 2 0 1 3 ha s b e e n de l i v e r e d t o F r a n kl i n Co u n t y T a x Co l l e c t o r J a me s A H a r r i s J r CF C b y t he F r a n k l i n C oun t y P r op e r t y A p p r a is e r H o no r a b l e R ho n da M i l l e n de r S k i p p e r f o r c ol l e c t i o n T he t a x r ol ls w i l l b e op e n f o r c ol l e c t i o n f o r p a y m e n t N o v e m b e r 1 s t f o r t he 2 0 1 3 A d V a l o r e m P e r s o na l P r op e r t y a n d C e n t r a l l y A s s e s s e d p r op e r t i e s f o r : F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F r a n k l i n C o u n t y S c h o o l B o a r d * C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e * E a s t p o i n t W a t e r & S e w e r D i s t r i c t * D o g I s la n d C onse r v at i on D is t r i c t A l l i g at or P o i n t W at e r * R e s o u r c e D i s t r i c t * N o r t h w e s t F l o r i d a W a t e r M a n a g e m e n t D i s t r i c t P a y m e n t s m a y b e m a de a t t he F r a n k l i n C oun t y C ou r t H ou s e 3 3 M a r k et S t r e et S u it e # 2 0 2 A p a l a c h i c ol a F l o r i da o r a t t he C a r r a b e l l e C ou r t H ou s e A nne x l o c a t e d a t 1 6 4 7 H i gh w a y 9 8 ( O l d D O T B u i l d i ng ) C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i da O f c e hou r s a r e M o n da y t h r u F r i da y 8 : 3 0 a m un t i l 4 : 3 0 p m P a y m e n t s m a y b e m a i l e d t o : J a m e s A H a r r is Jr C F C F r a n k l i n C oun t y T a x C ol l e c t o r P o s t O f c e D r a w e r 1 8 8 A p a l a c h i c ol a F l o r i da 3 2 3 2 9 SC H E DU L E O F P A Y M E N T S I S A S F O L L O W S 4 % D I S C O U NT N O V E M B E R 0 1 TH R U N O V E M B E R 3 0 2 0 1 3 3 % D I S C O U NT D E C E M B E R 0 1 TH R U D E C E M B E R 3 1 2 0 1 3 2 % D I S C O U NT J A N U A R Y 0 1 TH R U J A N U A R Y 3 1 2 0 1 4 1 % D I S C O U NT F E B R U A R Y 0 1 TH R U F E B R U A R Y 2 8 2 0 1 4 G R O S S A M O U NT D U E M A R C H 1 2 0 1 4 / P E N A L TI E S B E G I N A P R I L 1 2 0 1 4 S t a t e m e n t s w i l l b e m a i l e d t o a l l p r op e r t y o wne r s o r t he i r a g e n t s a t t he l a s t k no wn a d dr e s s o n o r b e f o r e N o v e m b e r 1 2 0 1 3 I f y ou do no t r e c e i v e y ou r t a x b i l l no t i c e p l e a s e c o n t a c t t h is o f c e a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 9 3 2 3 o r ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 8 3 8 4 o r C a r r a b e l l e B r a n c h O f c e a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 3 2 6 3 b et w e e n t he hou r s o f 8 : 3 0 a m a n d 4 : 3 0 p m M o n da y t h r u F r i da y o r y ou m a y : W r i t e t o / E M a i l Ja m e s A H a r r i s J r CF C F r a n k l i n Co u n t y T a x Co l l e c t o r P os t O f c e D r a w e r 1 8 8 | A p a l ac h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 9 T e l e f a x : ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 5 2 9 f c t c@ gt c o m .n e t Arrest REPOR T T Online trafc crash reporting debuts The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles has a new online trafc crash reporting form. Under Florida law, drivers involved in a crash that does not warrant a law enforcement report are required to submit their own written report to the department within 10 days of the crash. The online form is intended to make it easier to submit the required form directly to the department. The new Driver Report of Trafc Crash online form may be used only if the crash meets the following criteria: • The crash resulted in damage less than $500 • No injuries resulted from the crash • No vehicle involved required a tow truck • The crash did not involve an impaired driver • The crash did not involve a “hit and run” vehicle (all vehicles involved must have been occupied) A simple-to-use online questionnaire will guide users through the completion of the report. Once completed, the report will be automatically submitted to the Department and can also be saved and printed if needed. The Driver Report of Trafc Crash can be found at www.hsmv. gov/fhp/misc/ CC rashReport/ The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety and security through excellence in service, education and enforcement. The department is leading the way to a safer Florida through the efcient and professional execution of its core mission: the issuance of driver licenses, vehicle tags and titles and operation of the Florida Highway Patrol. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered, visit www.hsmv.gov follow us on Instagram at FLDHSMV, Twitter @ FDHSMV or nd us on Facebook. Sheriff to crack down on Halloween drunk driving This Halloween, sheriff deputies will crack down on drunk drivers throughout the county with an aggressive “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” enforcement effort, and they are giving a fair warning to all partygoers: Keep the party off the road! “If you celebrate with alcohol, you don’t belong behind the wheel. The scariest part of Halloween is not the spooky costumes and scary pranks, it’s the impaired drivers. All too often, partygoers don’t plan ahead and choose to drive impaired, but a costume can’t disguise drunk driving,” said Sheriff Mike Mock. A sober and safe ride after the party is the best treat you can give yourself and everyone else on the road this Halloween. To keep safe, the sheriff’s ofce recommends these tips: • Before the Halloween festivities begin, plan a way to safely get home at the end of the night. • Always designate a sober driver. • If you are impaired, call a sober friend or family member, or call a transportation service. Law Enforcement B rR I eE F sS Law Enforcement

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, October 31, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 31, 2013 The Times | A11 92876T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009CA-000707-CAXXXX CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHESTER N. KRAWCZUK; UNKNOWN TENANT (S); UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 24th day of September, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000707-CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC is the Plaintiff and CHESTER N. KRAWCZUK; UNKNOWN TENANT N/K/A JASON DORMAN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, LOBBY, 2ND FLOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: EXHIBIT “A” Situated in the City of Carrabelle, County of Franklin, and State of Florida: And known as being commence at the Southeast corner of Section 20, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida; and Thence run South 89 deg. 58’45” West along the South boundary of said Section 20, a distance of 1179.95 feet; Thence run North 00 deg. 06’ 54” East 592.67 feet; Thence run North 89 deg. 57’ 08” East 60.00 feet; Thence run North 00 deg. 06’ 54” East 235.55 feet to the point of beginning. From said point of beginning continue North 00 deg. 06’ 54” East 234.45 feet to the Southerly rightof-way boundary of Grays Avenue; Thence North 89 deg. 57’09” East along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 185.80 feet, Thence run South 00 deg 54’ West 234.45 feet; Thence run South 89 deg. 57’ 09” West 185.80 feet to the Point of beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.517. 4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 24th day of September, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free:1-800 4412438 File No. 09-71996 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com October 24, 31, 2013 92878T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2011-CA000396 Wells Fargo Bank, NA Plaintiff, vs. John Greg Fischer a/k/a John G. Fischer and Karen G. Dorminey Fischer a/k/a Karen G. Dorminey-Fischer a/k/a Karen Dorminey Fischer, Husband and Wife; Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Successor by Merger to Wachovia Bank, National Association NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000396 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Wells Fargo Bank, NA, Plaintiff and John Greg Fischer a/k/a John G. Fischer and Karen G. Dorminey-Fischer a/k/a Karen G. Dorminey Fischer a/k/a Karen Dorminey Fischer, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Marcia M. Johnson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on December 12, 2013, following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: PARCEL 3 OF PLAT MADE FOR HERBERT L. COOK BY MAX W. KOLBOURNE, MARCH 01, 1960, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE CONCRETE MONUMENT WHICH MARKS THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, AS ESTABLISHED NOVEMBER 17, 1958, BY FLORIDA ENGINEERING ASSOCIATED, INC., AND EXTEND A LINE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 18 FOR 223.45 FEET; THENCE TURN 49 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS RIGHT FOR 499.1 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERN RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD S-379-A FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM THIS POINT OF BEGINNING TURN 71 DEGREES 17 SECONDS RIGHT FROM THE LINE LAST DESCRIBED ABOVE FOR 645.3 FEET TO A POINT ON THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF KAPES BAYOU, THEN TURN 73 DEGREES 18 MINUTES LEFT ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF KAPES BAYOU FOR 104.4 FEET, THEN TURN 106 DEGREES 42 MINUTES LEFT FOR 661.8 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERN RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD S-379-A THEN TURN LEFT ALONG THE RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 3 DEGREE CURVE TO THE RIGHT FOR 101.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIPTION PARCEL OF LAND IS IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID PROPERTY BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY DATED JULY 28, 2001, BY EDWIN G. BROWN AND ASSOCIATES, INC., BEARING JOB NUMBER 86-202 AND BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD CONCRE’IE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM GCSC hosts Educator Preparation Institute forum If you ever wanted to become a teacher in your second (or third) career, your chance is now, and you can learn all about the Educator Preparation Institute (EPI) program at Gulf Coast State College on Nov. 5, starting at 5:30 p.m. The EPI program has an exceptional track record. Since Gulf Coast began the program in 2005, all of the completers who have sat for the certication exam have passed. In 2011-12, 25 percent of the teachers chosen to compete as Bay County’s Teacher of the Year were graduates of Gulf Coast’s EPI program. Five of the Gulf Coast EPI graduates were selected as a 2012 Teacher of the Year in the Bay district school system. Gulf Coast is hosting a free community forum to explain this unique program for those who already hold a bachelor’s degree and want to become teachers in the K-12 system. In six to eight months, the EPI program prepares completers to take the Florida Teacher Certication Exams. Students from varied backgrounds and all kinds of previous careers have found tremendous success in the classroom. Those interested in this alternative route to teacher certication are encouraged to attend the forum on the College’s Panama City Campus in Room 112 of the Social Sciences building, Tuesday, Nov. 5, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.gulfcoast.edu or contact Teresa Salter, (850) 769-1551, ext. 3393. St. James/Lanark Gumbo Cookoff Nov. 9 The fth annual St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department Charity Gumbo Cookoff will be held Saturday, Nov. 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club and Marina, 2364 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. There is a $50 entry fee. The space is limited, so get your applications in ASAP. Prizes include $500 for the rst prize, $250 for second and $100 for third. There will also be an auction and a rafe. The public can enjoy a sit-down gumbo meal inside the Boat Club. For more information call 567-4161 or email mrundel@yahoo.com. The Nest to start up Nov. 11 The Eastpoint and Carrabelle Nest after-school program will start on Monday, Nov. 11. Registration forms are available at the Franklin County School or at the Franklin County Schools district ofce. The Eastpoint Nest is located at the Franklin County Learning Center; the Carrabelle Nest is located at the Carrabelle City Complex. The program adheres to the Franklin County school calendar and is operational each day school is in session until 5:30 p.m. All students must be registered before the start date of Nov. 11. If you have any questions call Sandi Hengle at 850-323-0982 Tobacco Free coalition to meet Nov. 13 There will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Florida Department of Health in Franklin County, 139 12th Street, from 5 until 6 p.m. in the second oor conference room. News BR iefsIEFS

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A12 | The Times Thursday, October 31, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 1119158 1119142 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS (2 POSITIONS):The primary purpose is to instruct college-level and pre-college level mathematics and statistics courses as well as advising students. Additional duties of faculty position may apply. Minimum Qualications: A Masters Degree is required with 18 graduate semester hours in Mathematics or Statistics. Open till lled. Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Gulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of any federally protected class in its programs, activities or employment GCSC Equity Ofcer 850-872-3866 GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266362 Text FL66340 to 56654 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 18, A DISTANCE OF 223.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 49 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 499.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. S-379-A FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 632.54 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF KAPES BAYOU, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 07 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 13.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 37 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 29.54 FEET, THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 75.98 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 663.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD NO. S-379-A, SAID CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 613.69 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 09 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 02 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 96.40 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 37 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 96.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF COMPOUND CURVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID COMPOUND CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 1950.08 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 5.00 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 39 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 4.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida Michele Maxwell DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561)998-6700 (561) 998-6707 11-217940 FC01 WNI October 24, 31, 2013 92880T COUNTY, FLORIDA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA -000014 AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. BRIAN KOZAK; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 24th day of September, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000014, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC is the Plaintiff and BRIAN KOZAK, GLORIA FITZGERALD, WILLIAM RICHARDSON and UNKNOWN TENANT (S) N/K/A JIM LEMMOND IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Lobby 2nd Floor OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00AM on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK “125/E7”, OF PICKETT’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577. 4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 24th day of September, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@legalgroup.com File No. 10-41808 October 24, 31, 2013 92938T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 12-00007-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as Successor in Interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 on January 23, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: LOT 39 OF TARPON SHORES UNIT NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 1914.27 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 2620.31 FEET ALONG SAID ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 114.63 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST 114.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, A/K/A LOT 94 OF RIDGE ROAD. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 PLAN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ( VIN# HMST8922AGA and HMST8922BGA) PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: October 17, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 95691T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MARK JOHNSON & DEBORAH KING CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUST, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1418 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: UNIT 102 MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 29-07S-04W-1005-0000-01 02 Name is which assessed: BOLTON W. NEAL All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 92960T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility Act” 83.80283.809 F.S. Gulf Coast Storage LLC will sell, for cash, to the highest bidder(s) OR may opt to retain the contents of the following storage units: #139 Liberty Communications Office used for storage: Liberty Communications #111 William Wayne Webb #108 Jennifer Bairefoot #116 Bill Eaton/Jody Fitzgerald #59 Angela Crum #55 Brandy Hicks The facility will dispose of the contents at 241 Patton Dr, Eastpoint, Florida at 9:00 am November 16th, 2013. The parties may redeem their contents prior to sale time at full amount owed, cash only. Contents may be sold individually, as a whole unit or may retained by the facility for satisfaction of lien. Call 850-670-4636 to redeem contents. Oct 31, Nov 07, 2013 95693T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 830 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOT 3 BLOCK B HIDDEN HARBOR FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’S OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 05-07S-01W-1100-000B-0 030 Name is which assessed: ELDORADO INVESTMENTS LTD All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95697T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 941 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: SECTION 31, T7S, R6W, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’S OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 31-08S-06W-0000-0020-00 00 Name is which assessed: CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR. All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95695T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 507 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOT 15, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMPLETE LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’S OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 22-08S-06W-1000-0000-01 50 Name is which assessed: SANUALLAH SHEZAD and HELEN NITSIOS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95699T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MARTHA M GHERARDI REVOCABLE TRUST, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1238 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: LOTS 1 and 2 BLOCK ONE HUNDRED and EIGHTY-ONE (181) in the City of Apalachicola PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0181-00 10 Name is which assessed: JANE DAVIS and BURMA D. YOUNG All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday,October 31, 2013 The Times | A13 1118952 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RAY WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace 1119135The City of Carrabelle is accepting applications for a Water /Wastewater LaborerUnder the supervision of the Water /Wastewater Superintendent, the employee will be responsible to perform manual labor in maintaining water and sewer lines for the City of Carrabelle. Responsibilities include installing new water and sewer service, repairing water and sewer lines, manholes, meter readings, and all other assigned tasks. Employee is responsible for the operation of heavy equipment used in the performance of assigned tasks. High School Diploma/GED required. Experience is preferred. Salary will be discussed at time of interview. Applications can be picked up at City Hall, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL 32322, all previous applicants need to re-apply. The City is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free workforce 1119137 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGYThis position is required to teach courses in biological science, serve as course manager for several biology courses, to advise students seeking careers in health related areas, manage adjuncts teaching dierent biology courses and work on assigned committees. Minimum Qualications: Masters Degree with at least 18 graduate level semester credit hours in Biological Sciences. Open till lled. 1st review date February 1st 2014. Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@ gulfcoast.eduat GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Gulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of any federally protected class in its programs, activities or employment. GCSC Equity Ocer 850-872-3866 GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 1119146 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGYThe primary purpose is to teach credit courses in psychology described in the college catalog. Additional functions include; holding oce hours for students, attending orientation sessions, professional development sessions, submitting all required documentation by published deadlines, and submitting grades via Lighthouse by deadlines. Minimum Qualications: Masters Degree with at least 18 graduate level semester credit hours in Psychology. Experience in Developmental Psychology strongly desired. Open till lled. Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Gulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of any federally protected class in its programs, activities or employment. GCSC Equity Ofcer 850-872-3866 GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 1119132 NOTICE OF JOB OPENINGThe Franklin County Emergency Management Director will consider applications for the following position: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COORDINATORGENERAL DESCRIPTION: Responsible for assisting the director for planning, operations and administrative work in coordinating and promoting a countywide, comprehensive emergency management prog ram, and for organizing plans for emergency preparedness, response and recovery operations for all natural, technological and manmade hazards affecting the county. JOB FUNCTIONS: (Essential functions are fundamental job duties. They do include the implicit responsibility to assume the director’s responsibilities, during the director’s absence.) Will be responsible for coordinating all multi-hazard preplanning activities, as well as emergency response activities for all public, private and volunteer agencies within the jurisdiction. Develops updates and performs periodic testing of plans that will minimize the effects of disasters within the county. Coordinates emergency response and recovery operations for all hazards affecting the county. Develops and delivers public information programs. Performs related work as required. KNOWLEDGE, ABILITIES AND SKILLS: Knowledge of the techniques involved in the development of emergency management programs. Possess a high level of initiative, proven leadership skills and a willingness to accept responsibility for direction of a team effort. Demonstrat e continuous and current training in emergency operations. Must be available and prepared to respond to any emergency/ disaster or potential emergency, twenty-four (24) hours a day, seven (7) days a week. PHYSICAL SKILLS: Ability to communicate effectively using speaking, hearing, writing and vision skills. EDUCATION, TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Graduation from an accredited college or university, with an Associate’s Degree in emergency management, business, public relations or a related eld. Public sector experience preferred. A comparable amount of directly related experience may be substituted for the minimum educational requirements. LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS OR REGISTRATIONS: Must possess a valid driver’s license. Must have certications in the Incident Command System (IS100, IS200, IS700, and IS800) and Professional Developing Series, or must be able to obtain them within the probationary period. Starting Salary: $29,882. APPLICATIONS: May be obtained and returned from the Franklin County Planning and Building Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite #1, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. MORE INFORMATION: Please contact Pam Brownell, Franklin County Emergency Management Director at 850-653-8977.APPLICATION SUBMITTAL DATE & TIME: Applications must be submitted no later than 4:00 p.m. on November 8, 2013. Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer and Drug-Free Workplace. Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95701T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 861 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOTS 1, 2, 3, & 4 BLOCK 84 (247) KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION IN CITY OF CARRABELLE W/1983 MOBILE HOME FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’ OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 20-07S-04W-4212-0084-00 10 Name is which assessed: RANDALL W. SCOTT & DAVID SNYDER All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95735T NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board proposes to amend and adopt policies as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change:  Franklin County School Board Policy Manual Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes The entire text of the proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board meeting room in Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than November 07, 2013. Documents may be reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office, at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday -Friday. October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95703T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MARTHA M. GHERARDI REVOCABLE TRUST, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 994 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: North 1/2 (one-half) LOT 8 BLOCK 139 APALACHICOLA PARCEL NO: 01-09S-08W-8330-0139-00 80 Name is which assessed: ROBERT E. ALLEN, JR. M.D. All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 96023T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-293-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Aaron Wray, Franci G. Wray, Ida W. Garrett, Kathy Shelton and Magnolia Bay Homeowner’s Association, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 8, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on January 23, 2014, the following described property Lot 1 (unrecorded) Commence at a 6 x 6 inch concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Section 30, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida and run South 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West 659.56 feet to a re-rod (marked 5826) lying on the Southerly right of way boundary of Twin Lakes Road, thence run North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary 455.86 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160) marking the point of beginning; from said point of beginning continue North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary a distance of 200.08 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said right of way boundary run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 22 seconds West 214.87 feet; thence run South 89 degrees 42 minutes 40 seconds East 204.88 feet to a re rod (marked 7160); thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 43 seconds West 214.14 feet to the pain of beginning. Dated: October 11, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 24, 31, 2013 96065T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2013-00064-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF LINDA BLAIR MILLENDER, Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of LINDA BLAIR MILLENDER, deceased, File Number 2013-00064-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate and the will is dated July 26, 1983. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Any person entitled to exempt property is required to file a petition for determination of exempt property with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR WITHIN FORTY DAYS FROM THE DATE OF TERMINATION OF ANY PROCEEDING INVOLVING THE CONSTRUCTION, ADMISSION TO PROBATE, OR VALIDITY OF THE WILL OR INVOLVING ANY OTHER MATTER AFFECTING ANY PART OF THE ESTATE SUBJECT TO SECTION 732.402, FLORIDA STATUTES. A surviving spouse seeking an elective share must file an election to take elective share within the time provided by law. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is October 24, 2013. Personal Representative: Braxton Allen Millender 2125 Messer Road Carrabelle, FL 32322 Thomas M. Shuler of The Law Office of Thomas M. Shuler, P.A. 40-4th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1757 FL Bar No. 0947891 Attorney for Personal Representative October 24, 31, 2013 96067T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2013-00061-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIA W. VICKERS, Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of MARIA W. VICKERS, deceased, File Number 201300061-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate and the will is dated July 26, 1983. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Any person entitled to exempt property is required to file a petition for determination of exempt property with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR WITHIN FORTY DAYS FROM THE DATE OF TERMINATION OF ANY PROCEEDING INVOLVING THE CONSTRUCTION, ADMISSION TO PROBATE, OR VALIDITY OF THE WILL OR INVOLVING ANY OTHER MATTER AFFECTING ANY PART OF THE ESTATE SUBJECT TO SECTION 732.402, FLORIDA STATUTES. A surviving spouse seeking an elective share must file an election to take elective share within the time provided by law. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is October 24, 2013. Personal Representative: Charles Larry Bell 309 W. 7th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Thomas M. Shuler of The Law Office of Thomas M. Shuler, P.A. 40-4th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1757 FL Bar No. 0947891 Attorney for Personal Representative October 24, 31, 2013 j j ADOPTION: j j Affectionate Financially Secure College Sweethearts await your baby. j Carolyn & Chris j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Apalachicola: 105 6th St. Oct 26 & Nov 2nd 8:00am -4:00pmAntiques & More! Wardrobes, other furniture, and other household items. Nice stuff! Text FL69863 to 56654 Eastpoint : 994 C.C. Land Rd, Saturday, Nov. 2nd, 7:30aMOVING SALEPlease do not use the entrance at 989 Hwy 98 850-670-8375 Port St. Joe 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Sat., Nov. 2nd, 8am -UntilMulti Family Yard SaleToo much to list! Text FL70607 to 56654 Weekly Inside Yard Sale Thurs, Fri., & Sat. 9am -3pm 299 Tallahassee St. Eastpoint. txt FL70615 to 56554 Fine Quality Antiques Victorian Armoire, tables and chairs. English & American. Beautiful finish. We are out of room. By appointment only. 850-653-3270 txt FL68457 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Groundskeeper/ Beach Maintenance Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Nikki Millender 66 4th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8277 JOB SUMMARY Performs a variety of unskilled to semi-skilled work in a variety of fields in the maintenance and upkeep of the public parks, grounds, buildings, athletic fields and related facilities. PRINCIPAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Mows and maintains parks and open space areas such as baseball fields, soccer fields, football fields, and beach parks; mows weeds; cleans and maintains basketball courts and nets; maintains sprinkler systems and assists in the repair and installation of sprinkler lines and heads. Drags ball fields; lines fields for games. Inspects, washes and performs routine maintenance of park drinking fountains and restrooms. Sweeps, washes, paints and repairs or replaces park tables and slabs. Performs minor semi-skilled interior building maintenance such as painting, plumbing, carpentry and other unskilled and semi-skilled trades work. Performs routine maintenance on lawn, trees, shrubs, and flowers. Carries out the seeding, fertilizing, top dressing, soil conditioning, watering, and the pest and weed control of the parks and open spaces. Maintains and adjusts specialized turf care equipment and tools, including electric motors, pumps, sprinklers, tractors, and mowers. Operates tractors, mowers, weed eaters, blowers, pressure washers, and other listed equipment as needed. Maintains current skills and knowledge in the proper and safe techniques of building and grounds maintenance functions. Collects and disposes of solid waste from buildings and grounds; picks up litter from premises. Assists in setting up and taking down equipment for various park and recreation programs, prepares facilities for park and recreation program use. Willing to work holidays, weekends, and events hosted by parks and recreation. Supervise the work of State Inmates. Other duties as required, background investigation and drug screening will be completed on selected applicant. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS Requires High Diploma or Equivalent, or two consecutive years work related experience. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures: the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must have a valid Florida Driver’s License. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for certification as an NON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such certification within 90 days or hiring. October 31st, November 7th, 2013 Web ID#: 34270669 Text FL70669 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit. Call 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 31, 2013 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast MLS# 249620 Dog Island $575,000 # &3 ( 3 /3* & 2& ) # ) '*) 3" $% '&/ 3& 0* 0/ 0& '&2( 0* &) 0 0&*& & -* 200 &*& 0 2& ( 3 10( /* 0/ 0* + '& &) -2+ &) ) ( 32) 0&) *)" &((* 0'2* 2 '& Dan Ausley Broker www .tlgproperty .com &* 0 & (2& 0( **& &-* 22 0)* &22 /* & /* &* 2* (33 0 )(1 3* *2& &) &(/ /* )2/ 0 03 /02* /* 10) 2& /* '*&( / '*) 3" '&/ 2& -* (** (/ )*(1 (2 )* &))0 0&2 2 '*/0 ) /* )* 0 3 ** Dan Ausley Broker www .tlgproperty .com "$$ "$$ % ( % % % ( ( & % ( % % # # % & % # % % % $ % % , # # % # % # % % $ ( & % % % # % % + % % % # $ % % # % ) ) % ( % # # % & % % & % ( ( % BRING AN OFFER! John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249082 $225,000 St. George Island SEA GODDESS Light and airy 3 BR 2 B A island home pri v a te scenic fr esh w a ter pond, lar ge deck, 2nd le v el sundeck, cheer full y furnished, gr ound le v el laundry/stor a ge r oom, sh cleaning ar ea & outside sho w er under home par k ing on pad, W est Pine A v en ue Listed b y J anie Bur k e J o h n S h e l b y B r o k e r 8 0 0 3 4 4 7 5 7 0 8 5 0 9 2 7 4 7 77 w w w s g i r e a l t y c o m MLS# 2548790 $116,000 St. George Island GULF BEA CHES L OT H i g h d u n e y l o t o n t h e n o r t h s i d e o f G u l f B e a c h D r iv e B i k e p a t h a c r o s s t h e s t r e e t 3 r d l o t f r o m t h e c o r n e r o f 6 t h S t r e e t E a s t N o c l e a r i n g n e c e s s a r y l o t m e a s u r e s 1 0 0 x 1 5 0 1 / 3 a c r e H i g h ( d r y ) e l e v a t i o n Buy t o b u i l d o r k e e p f o r i n v e s t m e n t L i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y 4516919 &*) (330 0/ 0* 0* '*)3" '&/" &(0 0 0/ &2*) (*0200&* *2*& & 0* (*" /&)) &02* &20&(* 22 + 0/*) ** &* '& 20 0/ 20+" 2" (2'/* ** Dan Ausley Broker www .tlgproperty .com T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers. 1) What’s the term for an intense fear of Halloween? Nephophobia, Samhainophobia, Cibophobia, Wiccaphobia 2) Whose signs include a unibrow, hair palms, tattoos, and a long middle nger? Vampire, Werewolf, Zombie, Gargoyle 3) At the start of Mary Shelley’s novel, where is Dr. Victor Frankenstein? Transylvania, Arctic, France, England 4) How many pounds was the largest pumpkin ever grown happening in 1996 New York? 149, 473, 702, 1061 5) In the original story what’s the rst name of “The Phantom of the Opera”? Wilhelm, Ludwig, Bartholomew, Erik 6) Ideally for “trick or treaters” what’s the safest bag color? White, Black, Orange, Red 7) Who was not born on a Halloween? Robin Williams, Vanilla Ice, Dan Rather, John Candy 8) The word witch comes from the Saxon word “wicca,” which means? Older Lady, Wise One, Healer, Cook 9) Who celebrates “Day of the Dead” instead of Halloween? Mexico, Canada, Greece, England 10) Where does Halloween rank among America’s commercial holidays? 1, 2, 3, 4 11) When was the Count Dracula Society founded? 1921, 1943, 1954, 1962 12) Orange and which other are the “ofcial” Halloween colors? Red, White, Black, Purple 13) Which horror creature is also known as a lycanthrope? Mummy, Dracula, Frankenstein, Wolf Man ANSWERS 1) Samhainophobia. 2) Werewolf. 3) Arctic. 4) 1061. 5) Erik. 6) White. 7) Robin Williams. 8) Wise One. 9) Mexico. 10) 2. 11) 1962. 12) Black. 13) Wolf Man. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Help leaf out the library tree By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com The new headquarters of the Franklin County Li brary system is up and run ning, but there is still work to do. At the library’s grand opening, organizers made it clear the facility is a work in progress. Number one on the list of projects awaiting funding is a boardwalk nature trail showcasing the 13 acres of wetland preserved around the new building. The original grant from the Northwest Florida Wa ter Management District deeded the property to the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District, which in turn, do nated the property to the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library. The wetlands are the headwa ters of Indian Creek, which empties directly into the bay at Indian Creek Park. The trail was to be a joint project of the Friends and the Apalachicola River keeper, but Friends Presi dent Joyce Estes said she has no remaining funds to pay for landscaping around the new library. “The trail was a nobrainer,” she said. “It made sense to teach people about preserving the wetlands, but we are completely out of money.” Estes said landscape designer Bill Kollar of Gar dens Inc. in Apalachicola has volunteered to create plans for the grounds. She said she hopes to landscape the area with indigenous plants. “We need something to break up the lines of the building,” Estes said. “I would like to use palms. If we can’t nd funding for indigenous plants, I’ll use crepe myrtles.” The proposed landscape would be a rain garden, which uses depressions or holes to capture rainwater runoff from impervious ar eas, like roofs, driveways, walkways and parking lots. This reduces runoff by al lowing stormwater to soak into the ground instead of owing into storm drains and surface waters, which leads to erosion, pollution, ooding, and diminished groundwater. Florida A&M University has acted as a consultant for the project. Needed now are funds to bring the planned land scape into reality or dona tions of plants and labor. At the library’s dedica tion, The St. George Island Civic Association donated $1,000 to the Friends. Es tes said that money already has been spent on improve ments to the parking area. The Friends are seeking more funding to complete the trail, install a sprinkler system, landscape the front of the building and parking lot, pave the parking area and entry, and install out door benches and lighting. One way people can help support the new library is to buy a brick paver, which can be engraved with a dedica tion of up to 57 characters. A 5-by-9-inch cobble stone costs $50, while 8by-8-inch granite blocks can be purchased for $150. To purchase a paver, send your check to Friends of the FCPL, POB 722, Eastpoint, FL, 32328. The entry to the new li brary is already graced by a donor tree with gold, silver and copper leaves created by Allan McPhee. Each leaf is engraved with the name of a donor. There is always room for a few more. The 5,000-square-foot Vulcan steel building hous es more than 17,000 books including a section devoted to Florida and Franklin County historyThe new fa cility also boasts 15 public access computers, several meeting rooms and a selfserve document center. To reach the library, call 670-8151 or drop by 160 Hick ory Dip Road in Eastpoint. Estes said the annual meeting of the Friends to elect the board of directors will be at 7 p.m. Nov. 13 at the library. All the members and guests are invited to at tend this ice cream social. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Newt Colston, president of the St. George Island Civic Club, presents Joyce Estes with a $1,000 donation to support Franklin County’s new Eastpoint Library.