The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00241

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, October 10, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Nothing corny about fresh fruits and veggies By TEVIS PAGE AND DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com F ranklin County elementary school students have been enjoying fruit and veggie snacks all year, and last week, they took some time to celebrate their success. On Oct. 3, a raucous audience of prekindergartners through fth-graders, led by staff dressed in overalls and straw hats, went “down in the corn eld” to celebrate one of the many vegetables and fruits they enjoy three times a week, as part of a special state grant the district has received for the past three years. With an elaborate corn eld set Carrabelle millage steady Town seeks revenue sources By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Carrabelle’s millage rate is holding steady at 8.77 mills. Carrabelle on Sept. 24 approved raises for city employees for the 2013-14 budget, but nothing else has changed substantially from last year. Carrabelle was the only taxing district in the county to see an enlargement of its tax base, after having suffered an almost 26 percent decline last year. Carrabelle’s combined valuation this year will expand from $101.8 million to $102.7 million, an increase of $916,000, or almost 1 percent. This enlarged tax base — this is the rst time it has expanded since the real estate bubble burst a few years ago — means that at the same millage, ad valorem taxes increased by about $2,300, to $904,328. The total estimated receipts for the upcoming scal year, which also include franchise fees, utility taxes, sales taxes and various rents are $1.34 million, down from $1.36 million last year. City employees say they hope to see revenue from several new sources in the near future. In a telephone interview, City Clerk Keisha Messer said the city expects the new Franklin Correctional Institution Work Camp to increase water and sewer revenue by more than $150,000 based on the amount or revenue generated for Apalachicola by the Bay City Work Camp. She said she has not included this amount in the budget because the amount is speculative. “That will help cover the rs t payment DAVIDADLERSTEIN | The Times Brice Gilbert, right, wins a contest to shuck an ear of corn. Below Junior Miss Seahawk Tressie Edwards shows off her ear. State balks at Apalach joining suit By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A little more than six weeks after Apalachicola voted to join Florida in its lawsuit against Georgia to secure more water for Apalachicola Bay, city commissioners are nding the state is less than enthusiastic about a partnership. In his report Tuesday evening, City Attorney Pat Floyd said he is continuing talks with Matt Leopold, general counsel of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, on how best the city can take part in the suit. Gov. Rick Scott announced Oct. 1 that the state had led a motion before the U.S. Supreme Court, seeking injunctive relief against what he called “Georgia’s unmitigated and unsustainable upstream consumption of water from the Chattahoochee and Flint River Basins.” Floyd has spoken to and written Leopold, while Mayor Van Johnson has written a letter to the governor, asking that the city’s “suggestions of participation can be implemented quickly” and that the city and state sign a “common interest agreement” along the lines of June 2010 order by the Supreme Court’s Special Master enabling the city of Charlotte to take part in a water rights dispute between the states of North and South Carolina. So far, the state has been less than eager for a partnership, Floyd said. “We have had not much response, and we’re disappointed in that,” the city attorney said. “Suf ce it to say at this point we are working towards being AW, SHUCKS ELEMENTARY STUDENTS LEARN HEALTHY CHOICES FCHS YEARBOOK STAFF | Special to the Times County nds tenant for Garlick hangar By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com An Apalachicola transportation broker won’t be getting new renovated of ces at the airport’s commercial hangar and instead will lease a solar-powered hangar built ve years ago by the county for another company. Early this year, Randall Terry requested the county use existing Florida Department of Transportation grant money to construct a 60-by-60-foot hangar to house his business, TP Transport LLC. At the time, he was renting a Tee-hangar at the airport but said he needed a bigger space. Commissioners agreed that once built, they would lease Terry the new hangar for 20 years at $500 monthly. Terry estimated the cost of constructing the hangar would be $180,000. Ted Mosteller, chairman of the Airport Advisory Board, said the project would be fully funded by DOT grants. Commissioners agreed to the project, but when all bids on Feb. 5 came in excess of available funds, commissioners voted unanimously to reject them. On Feb. 9, the county agreed to lease Terry an existing commercial hangar, largely unoccupied since it was built nine years ago. There is $100,000 in DOT grant money available to pay for the work on the hangar, which needs interior renovations to house Terry’s of ces. The county in August requested bids to renovate the space, but none was received. Commissioners ordered the request be published again in September, with Commissioner Pinki Jackel specifying that county employees call local contractors to inform them See SHUCKS A10 RANDALL TERRY Owner, TP Transport See HANGAR A2 See CARRABELLE A10 See SUIT A2 Paddle for the Planet Saturday Journey’s Sgi and Island Fit Stand Up Paddleboard Fitness are hosting their rst ever Paddle at the Park event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Regatta Park. Come for family fun including paddle races, kayak demonstrations and free stand-up paddleboard yoga lessons. Entry fee for races is $10 for youth (15 and under) and $20 for adults, including goody bag and post-race party. Stand up kayaks available on a rst-come, rst-served basis. To register, call 9273259. Blues in the Lot Saturday On Saturday, Oct. 12, the Apalachicola Sponge Company presents an all-day blues festival, with six sizzling bands at the Hays House, 48 Ave. D in Apalachicola across from Coombs Armory. Music will include the Smackwater Retrievers, guitarist Matt Law, Johnny Barbato and the Lucky Doggs, the Easy Street Blues Band, Slim Fatz and the John Bull Blues Band. Food provided by Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department BBQ. For more information, call 653-5564 or visit www. Apalachspongecompany. com. FSU boat regatta Saturday Florida State University’s Coastal and Marine Laboratory invites water lovers to the second annual “Whatever Floats Your Boat” Regatta from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12. The challenge is to create and race a homemade boat from a list of approved recyclable materials. Prize categories include most creative use of materials, rst boat to cross the nish line, most spectacular failure and People’s Choice award. Other festivities surrounding the regatta include live music and food for purchase from Posey’s Steam Room and Oyster Bar. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 VOL. 128 ISSUE 24 Sculpture exhibit opens A6

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 10, 2013 N O T I CE O F P U B L I C H E A R I N G F O R T H E A D OP T I ON / T R A N S M I T T A L OF T H E E V A L U A T I ON A N D A P P R A I SA L R E P O R T O N T H E C I T Y O F C AR R AB E L L E C O M P R E H E NS I VE P L AN T h e P l a n n i n g C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e w i l l c o n d u c t a p u b l i c h e a r i n g i n t h e C o m m i s s i o n C h a m be r s C a r rabel l e C i t y H al l 1 0 0 1 G ra y A v e C a r rabel l e F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 2 o n T h u r s d a y O c t o b e r 1 7 2 0 1 3 a t 5 :0 0 p .m o r a s s o o n t h e r e a f t e r a s t h e i s s u e m a y b e he a r d t o c o n s i de r a r e c o m m e n dat io n t o t he C i t y C o m m i s s io n o n t he adop t io n a n d t r a n s m i t t a l o f a n E v a l u a t i o n a n d A p p r a i s a l R e p o r t ( E A R ) o n t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e C o m p r e h e n s i v e P l a n a n d o f a n O r d i n a n c e r e l a t i n g t h e r e t o t h e t i t l e o f w h i c h i s s e t f o r t h b e l o w T h e C i t y C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e w i l l c o n d u c t a p u b l i c m e e t i n g h o l d a r s t r e a d i n g o f t h e O r d i n a n c e t h e t i t l e o f w h i c h i s s e t f o r t h b e l o w i n t h e C o m m i s s i o n C h a m b e r s C a r r a b e l l e C i t y H a l l 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e n u e C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 2 o n T h u r s d a y N o v e m b e r 7 2 0 1 3 a t 6 :0 0 p .m o r a s s o o n t h e r e a f t e r a s t h e i s s u e m a y b e h e a r d t o c o n s i d e r t h e t r a n s m i t t a l o f a n E v a l u a t i o n a n d A p p r a i s a l R e p o r t o n t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e C o m p r e h e n s i v e P l a n T h e t i t l e o f t h e O r d i n a n c e t o b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r a d o p t i o n i s a s f o l l o w s : OR D I N A NC E N O 45 9 A N O R D I N A N C E O F T H E C I T Y O F C A R R A B E L L E FL O R I D A T O A D O P T A N E V A L U A T I O N A N D A P P R A I S A L R E P O R T O N T H E C I T Y O F C A R R A B E L L E C O M P R E H E N S I V E P L A N; R E P E A L I N G A L L R E S O L U T I O N S A N D O R D I N A N C E S O R P O R T I O N S T H E R EO F T O T H E E X T E N T O F A N Y C O N FL I C T ; P R O V I D I N G A S E V E R A B I L I T Y C L A U S E ; A N D P R O V I D I N G F O R A N E FFE C T I V E D A T E T h e p u r p o s e o f t h e p u b l i c h e a r i n g s i s t o r e c e i v e c o m m e n t s a n d m a k e d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i ng t he a b o v e m at t e r T he P la nn i ng C o m m i s s io n a n d t he B oa r d o f C o m m i s s io ne r s m a y c o n t i n u e t h e p u b l i c h e a r i n g s t o o t h e r d a t e s a n d t i m e s a s i t d e e m s n e c e s s a r y A n y i n t e r e s t e d p a r t y s h a l l b e a d v i s e d t h a t t h e d a t e s t i m e s a n d p l a c e s o f a n y c o n t i n u a t i o n o f t h i s a n d c o n t i n u e d p u b l i c he a r i ng s s ha l l b e a nnou n c e d d u r i ng t he he a r i ng A l l i n t e r e s t e d p a r t i e s a r e i n v i t e d t o a t t e n d t h e p u b l i c h e a r i n g s a n d c o m m e n t u p o n t h e E v a l u a t i o n a n d A p p r a i s a l R e p o r t a n d t h e O r d i n a n c e o r s u b m i t t h e i r c o m m e n t s i n w r i t i n g t o t h e B o a r d o f C o m m i s s i o n e r s F u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n c o n c e r n i n g t h e r e p o r t c a n b e o b t a i n e d f r o m t h e C i t y C l e r k a t C i t y H a l l a t 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 2 o r b y c a l l i n g ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 2 7 2 7 b e t w e e n t h e h o u r s o f 8 : 3 0 a .m a n d 4 : 3 0 p .m M o n d a y t h r o u g h F r i da y e x c l u d i ng hol i da y s P l e a s e b e a d v i s e d t h a t i f a p e r s o n d e c i d e d t o a p p e a l a n y d e c i s i o n m a d e b y t h e C i t y C o m m i s s i o n w i t h r e s p e c t t o a n y m a t t e r c o n s i d e r e d a t t h i s h e a r i n g s u c h p e r s o n w i l l n e e d a r e c o r d o f t h e p r o c e e d i n g s a n d f o r t h i s p u r p o s e s u c h p e r s o n m a y n e e d t o e n s u r e t h a t a v e r b a t i m r e c o r d o f t h e p r o c e e d i n g s i s m a d e w h i c h r e c o r d i n c l u d e s t e s t i m o n y a n d e v i d e n c e u p o n w h i c h t h e a p p e a l i s b a s e d. T h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e d o e s n o t p r o v i d e o r p r e p a r e s u c h r e c o r d p u r s u a n t t o F S S e c t i o n 2 8 6 .0 1 0 5 I n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h t h e A m e r i c a n s w i t h D i s a b i l i t i e s A c t p e r s o n s w i t h d i s a b i l i t i e s n e e d i n g a s p e c ia l ac c o m m o dat io n t o pa r t i c i pat e i n t he s e p r o c e e d i ng s s hou l d c o n t ac t t he c i t y C l e r k a t 1 0 0 1 G r a y A v e C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 2 o r b y c a l l i n g ( 8 5 0 ) 3 8 6 2 7 2 7 n o l a t e r t h a n t h r e e d a y s p r i o r t o t h e p r o c e e d i n g s W e e m s M e d i c a l C e n t e r s E a s t a n d W e s t C l i n i c s w i l l c l o s e a t 3 p m o n M o n d a y O c t o b e r 1 4 t h 1 1 13270 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 1 5 / *1, 4 4 1*, % ( +, ( ) ( (*1 41 1, ,( 4 ( 4 0 0 1* ( 4 ( 1 ( $ 3! ( +1/ ( 5 &" 4 1 1 / , 1 0 ( 1 0 4, 4 ,1 / / 1 ( 1/ 1 1 ( 05 ( ( + 1 1 ( 4 4, / 1 ( ) 1* ( ( / ,5 0 1 1 1 (+ (* 0 1/ ( 1 ) ,1 3 (* 3 2 1, 0 1* 1 ( ( ( / ,5 ,5 ( 4 $ ( 4," 3 1 ( /" ( 1 4 ,5 ( 4 11* ,( 1 / ( , ( 5 3 1 ( *, ( ( + 5 1* 5 ( 4/ ( 5 ,+ 4 41* 41 1 5 1* *, + , ( 5 ( 0 ( 1 ,5 ( 4 ( 1+, # ,1 ,5 ( 4 %" 1 4 4, 4 ( (+1, 1 1 11 (*, 1' $ 1 3 4, ( 5 ( / , ( 5 , +1* ( 4 3 1 ( ( + 0 5 of the project. County Planner Alan Pierce opened ve bids for the project at the Oct. 1 coun ty commission meeting, and the base bids ranged from $348,000 to $470,000, well in excess of the $100,000 in available funds. Terry said the work could be done for $150,000 and offered to subcontract to do the work himself. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said construction had to comply with Federal Aviation Authority regulations. Pierce said the high estimates were affected by airport security and when the construction could be carried out. He said many contractors were not interest ed in undertaking the project because of security constraints. Commissioner Noah Lockley asked whether the county could seek a larger grant from DOT. Pierce said this was possible but was uncertain if the request would be granted or how long it would take to receive funds. He said it was pos sible some additional funds “already in the pipeline” could be redirected. Parrish suggested Terry move into the hangar constructed for and leased by Garlick Environmental in 2008. The en vironmental services company vacated in late September when the rm moved to commercial property owned by CEO Dan Garlick at the Hays House in down town Apalachicola. At the time of the move, Garlick was leasing the hangar, which is powered by solar panels, for more than $1,600 month ly. Terry asked if he could lease the Gar lick hangar for $1,000 monthly. Terry told commissioners he could not remain in the Tee-hangar he is currently leasing because of size con straints, which has two of his employees working out of the ofce. “I’ve got guys walking outside to use the phone,” he told commissioners. Jackel asked if the Garlick hangar could be used to house emergency man agement ofces. Pierce said it did not meet ood requirements. Jackel moved, and the commission ers unanimously approved, leasing the Garlick hangar to Terry for six months at $1,200 a month. The commission also voted unanimously to table all renova tion bids for the vacant hangar. involved and participating as the primary city that has the most to win and the most to lose in this particu lar matter. “The state has indicated that they do not want our involvement in it, and we’re dealing with that,” Floyd said. “We’re still exploring the different avenues of participation at this time. They have not been real positive in their response. We’re just dealing with that and moving forward.” In a Sept. 25 letter to Leopold, Floyd shared a draft of such a common interest agreement that would not have the city be a party to the suit, but would enable it to assist the state as a friend of the court. The city’s representatives would be able to attend and take part in hearings and con ferences with the Special Master, who has the task of reviewing Florida’s mo tion and deciding whether the Supreme Court should hear the case. Floyd’s draft takes pains to spell out that the city would be obligated to uphold the condentiality of all documents and other materials in the case. He stressed Tuesday that the city is pursuing a seat at the legal table to ensure “the face of Apala chicola is present in this controversy. That enhances the focus of the court that there is somebody actually involved.” As Floyd wrote in his letter to Leopold, the may or “has reiterated that while Georgia is ‘betting the state’ on this litigation and keeping the water and using more of it, the state of Florida is ‘betting the Apalachicola.’” Johnson downplayed any friction between the city and the state. “We’re not going to ght the state,” he said. Floyd said the city re mains of the belief that the interests of Apalachicola and Florida “are actually the same, and that there would not be a conict at all between the two entities.” Sewer fee approved The commissioners opened their meeting with the swearing in of Commis sioners Brenda Ash and Frank Cook, both of whom were returned to ofce this year without opposition. Ash was sworn in by her son, Roderick Robinson, while Floyd did the honors for Cook. Johnson made no chang es to any of the commis sioners’ job assignments. “Since the voters decided not to make any changes, certainly I’m not going to supersede their will,” he said. Cook serves as mayor pro tem, as a representa tive on the Tourist Develop ment Council and oversees re and safety, while Ash oversees nances. Com missioner Mitchell Bartley is over water and sewer, and Commissioner Jimmy Elliott is over streets, the cemetery and the docks. The commissioners unanimously approved a new, state-mandated sewer user fee on customers next year, on top of the annual 3 percent hike in water and sewer rates that are part of the existing law. The proposal divvies up sewer customers’ share of the roughly $101,000 the user fee will generate, with that money going toward repayment of a $2 million state revolving loan that was taken out a few years ago to nance improve ments to the city’s ad vanced wastewater treat ment system. Each of the city’s 810 residential sewer custom ers will pay a fee of $6.50 per month, with the sys tem’s 298 senior citizen customers each paying $3.50 monthly. The city’s 175 commercial customers will pay $12.50 per month. The new fee remains in place until such time as the commissioners end it, and Ash encouraged city administrators to nd a fu ture method for repaying the loan other than keep ing this fee permanently in place. “It sufces to say we need to be working dili gently to come up with a plan,” she said. City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb said “it would be fortunate to have it (the loan) forgiven. “Initially the plan was to have the loan be invested in (a bank),” she said. “It was supposed to earn enough in terest to pay back itself but that didn’t happen. When the economy collapsed, it did not earn interest.” HANGAR from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The county hoped to renovate this corporate hangar for Randall Terry. PHo O T os OS bB Y DAVID ADLERST T EIN | the Times Brenda Ash and Frank Cook were sworn in at Tuesday’s city commission meeting. SUIT from page A1

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The Times | A3 Thursday, October 10, 2013 B l u e s i n t h e L o t 2 0 1 3 W e w i s h t o t h a nk t h e s e g e n e r o u s s p o n so r s . .. .. # $ 8 0 / $ 5 0 0 6 0 # 5 , 3 $ 0 3 / 6 / & # 0 0 6 0 0 8 6 3& 8 , # 8 8 0 0 6 3 & 8 , # 8 6 7 6 9 0 8 & 8 5 6 8 # 8 5 0 & 8 5 6 8 # $ 5 0 0 8 8 0 & 8 5 6 8 # 8 20 & 8 $ 9 / 0 6 0 6 3 9 & 8 5 6 8 # 8 0 8 2 6 / 0 & 8 5 6 8 0 0 0 0 8 / 6 & 8 5 6 8 # 7 0 & 8 5 6 8 , 6 6 3 0 6 3 # 5 , 5 0 & 8 5 # 6 0 8 7 2) 8 5 6 8 # 0 / 6 0 & 8 5 6 8 # 0 8 8 5 6 8 # 6 8 5 6 8 # 0 0 0 & 8 5 # / & 6 # $ 5 0 $ 5 6 & 0 % $ 5 0 0 0 7 8 5 6 8 # 0 0 0 0 2 / & 8 5 6 8 # 0 6 & 0 # $ 9 9 , 2) / $ , & 8 5 # 8 0 & 8 5 6 8 0 0 0 / 8 5 6 8 3 0 9 S A T U R D A Y, O C T O B E R 1 2 2 0 1 3 B L U E S i n t h e L O T 20 1 3 6 B a n d s A l l D a y B l u e s T H E H A Y S H O U S E w w w A p a l a c h S p o ng eC om p a n y c om S p o n so r s N e e d e d C a l l : 8 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 4 S C H E D U LE 4 0 & ,8 5 6 8 & -0 5 6 / 6 & 2 9 5 0 9 + 1 2 1 p m 1 1 : 4 5 p m 1 : 4 5 2 : 4 5 p m 3 4 p m 4 4 : 4 5 p m 5 6 : 3 0 p m S m a c k w at e r Re tr ie v e r s A pa l a c hic o l a F L M a t t L a w P a n a ma Ci t y F L J o h n n y B a r b a t o & L u c k y D o g g s G u l f po r t M S E a s y S t r e e t B l u e s B a n d T a l l a h a s s e e F L S l i m F a t z P a n a ma Ci t y F L T h e J o h n B u l l B l u e s B a n d Mo n t g o m e r y A L NOTICE: The Florida Associa tion of Bentholo gists (F AB) will hold its ann ual meeting No v 5-7, 2013 a t the A palachicola En vir onmental Educa tion T r aining Center in Eastpoint. F or mor e inf or ma tion contact the F AB Pr esident, And y R asm ussen a t 850.345.9711 or go to WWW .FLBENTHOS .OR G Coupon Expir es: 10-31-13 CODE: AP00 1 5 T H AN N U AL A R T & W I N E F E S T I V A L S A T U R D A Y O C T O B E R 1 2 2 0 1 3 – 2 P M ( C D T ) D R I F T W O O D I N N – M E X I C O B EA C H F L A E N J O Y L I V E M U S I C F O O D B E E R W I N E L I V E AN D S I L E N T A U C T I O N S A N D O V E R 2 5 AR T I S T S D I SP L A YI NG T H E I R W OR K F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N V I SI T M E X ICO BE A C H CO M $ 5 0 0 / P E R S ON A D M I S S IO N e { p  ’ Œ | 8  – “ c € Š { Mexic Bac Anua Ar & W n F stiva Mexico Beach 5th Annual 2003 Wine & Art Festival AL U N H AN T 5 1 L A V I T S E E F N I T & W R A ) T D C ( M 2 P 3 – 1 0 2 2 R 1 E B O T C O Y A D R U T A S A L F H C EA O B C I X E N – M N D I O O W T F I R D T N E L I D S E AN V I L E N I W R E E B D O O F C I S U E M V I Y L O J N E K OR R W I E H NG T YI A L SP I S D T S I T 5 AR R 2 E V D O N A S N O I T C U A T SI I V N O I T A M R O F N E I R O R M O F M CO H C A BE ICO X E M IO N S S I M D A ON S R E P / 0 0 5 $ { Š € –“ c  |8 ’Œ  p { e Mexic Bac Anua Ar & n W stiva F Mexico Beach 5th Annual Mexico Beach 5th Annual 2003 Wine & Art Festival 2003 Wine & Art Festival The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Oct. 1 Stefan L. Sims, 50, Port St. Joe, violation of probation (FCSO) Rashon Bahammou, 23, Tallahassee, robbery (FCSO) Oct. 2 Christopher G. Proctor, 28, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Evan P. Wiley, 19, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Arlene D. Shiver, 48, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Lenanya Q. Morris, 21, Port St. Joe, child abuse and criminal mischief (FCSO) George D. Cain, 54, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Danny M. Pinho, 50, Apalachicola, attaching improper license plate and driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) Gary M. Engard, 56, Alligator Point, DUI (FCSO) Joseph C. Zingarelli, 40, Apalachicola, burglary (FCSO) Oct. 3 David D. Hartman, 35, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) George V. Vause, 62, Eastpoint, aggravated battery with a deadly, weapon, and public affray (FCSO) Juan R. Nava, 34, Hosford, lewd or lascivious battery (FCSO) Oct. 4 Brandi Stulsky, 36, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Oct. 5 Tomas Juan, 26, Apalachicola, DUI and failure to appear (FCSO) Daniel L. Page, 36, Apalachicola, theft and tampering with a utility meter (FCSO) Devin D. Gilbert, 35, Eastpoint, lewd or lascivious battery (FCSO) Oct. 6 Carlos Velazquez, 27, Quincy, no valid drivers license (FCSO) Special to The Times The Northwest Florida Water Management Dis trict governing board has adopted a $47.9 million budget for scal year 201314, which runs from Oct. 1, 2013, to Sept. 30, 2014. “This budget reects the district’s focus on the projects and programs that directly benet the natural resources and communi ties of northwest Florida,” said District Executive Di rector Jon Steverson. “By focusing on efciencies and controlling operational ex penditures, the district is able to maximize the use of taxpayer dollars on the pro tection and management of the Panhandle’s water resources without adding to northwest Florida resi dents’ tax burden.” The district’s budget is comprised of a combination of ad valorem revenues, state and federal funding and other revenues, includ ing timber sales. The dis trict also continues to direct state revenue appropriated during prior scal years to critical resource restora tion and protection projects throughout the region, such as Apalachicola Bay. In his letter to the district giving his ofcial approval of the proposed budget, Gov. Rick Scott noted district ef forts to control administra tive overhead costs at the agency and commended the signicant expansion in the portion of the budget related to restoration and public works projects, such as the new water supply de velopment grant program for communities across the Panhandle. Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Herschel Vin yard expressed approval of the district’s efforts, as well. “We have worked closely with the Northwest Florida Water Management District over the last 15 months to improve water resources in the region, and their budget is a reection of that suc cessful relationship,” said Vinyard. “I continue to be impressed by the progress the district is making in protecting water resources, especially when it comes to our treasured springs.” The projects funded in the FY 2013-2014 budget maintain a consistent fo cus on the district’s core mission responsibilities of water supply, water quality, natural systems and ood protection. A major objectives for the upcoming scal year includes $4.7 million for Apalachicola River and Bay watershed protection and restoration, including $3 million in legislative fund ing. The district will provide $2.5 million in cooperative funding assistance to the city of Apalachicola to pro vide stormwater treatment and improve the quality of water owing into the river and bay. The district will also move forward with the development of a freshwa ter needs assessment and strategic plan for the bay. To view the FY 20132014 budget and a copy of the governor’s approval let ter, visit the district’s web site at www.nwfwmd.state. .us/biznance.html. NWFWMD adopts 2013-14 budget Arrest REP oO RT Law Enforcement

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By Shirley Taylor and Marilyn Hogan Special to the Times The year was 1896 when several prominent Apalachicola Women formed “The Woman’s Reading Club.” The rst book purchased was “The Library of American Literature.” In 1899, the ladies learned the library of famed local botanist Dr. Alvan Chapman was for sale and purchased 19 volumes. Shortly thereafter the club reported ordering Dickens works (15 volumes) and various histories, novels and books of poetry which, with other donations, brought the volumes owned to 80 books. A bookcase was made to hold the club books and a member brought the books home; she remained at home on Monday and Wednesday afternoons to give club members the opportunity to use the books. In 1904, the club adopted the name of Philaco, comprised of “Phil” for love, “Ac” for bravery and the letter O for strength and dignity. The collection continued to grow, and in 1915 the Philaco Woman’s Club established a public library above the Methodist Church Sunday School room with 300 donated books plus a sum of money. By 1923, when the collection had grown to 2,000 volumes, the old City Hall plus $600 was donated to Philaco. The building was moved to the northeast corner of Battery Park at the cost of $3,000. Members volunteered as librarians, plus the rst librarian was employed to work Wednesday and Saturday afternoons. The club maintained this building until 1944 when, along with $700 for repairs, it was deeded to the city of Apalachicola to be used as a youth center. In 1949 the club won an Honorable Mention award for their participation in a Florida Federation of Women’s Club (FFWC) “Build a Better Community” project. The club reported on their project of moving a small pump house from the Air Force base to Apalachicola for use as a Philaco-owned library. During the 1950s, members held fundraisers and volunteered to cook for other organizations as part of their efforts to maintain the library. They obtained a bank loan to purchase 50 USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, October 10, 2013 A Page 4 Section Special to the Times Will Congress ever get its act together? That question is likely on the minds of many Americans, but the latest impasse should actually serve as a reminder that we need to redouble our efforts to make sure Congress focuses on the right priorities and moves the country forward. As a former educator, I do not believe in giving up on anyone, even a Congress that always seems to be at loggerheads. Here are a few key budget lessons that Congress should heed. The rst lesson is that our nation can’t grow if we don’t invest in its people. The mindless, across-the-board budget cuts known as “the sequester” have already hurt our children. And it’s only going to get worse no BandAid solutions will heal this wound. More than half the districts recently surveyed by the national school superintendents’ association reported they will be reducing the number of staff in our schools in order to pay for these needless cuts. Of course, it’s our children who really miss out: Nearly half of the districts will be increasing class size. Early childhood programs; drop-out prevention programs; programs that help children with special needs the very investments our schools require have instead been slashed. Any parent or teacher knows you can’t get that time back again; there’s no doover for children who miss out on a good head start. The second lesson is that spending cuts are the direct result of big corporations and wealthy individuals dodging their fair share of taxes. In this fall’s budget debate, we have a stark choice: Do we continue to squeeze ordinary Americans until they can no longer breathe, or do we invest in America again, demanding that corporations and their CEOs contribute to America’s prosperity and start living by the same rules as the rest of us? The trade-offs can be startlingly clear. The sequester cuts to elementary and secondary education, which hit low-income kids and those with special learning challenges particularly hard, cost $1.7 billion this year. That’s the same value of the tax break we gave to hedge fund managers that allowed them to cut their tax rate in half. How does that help America grow? Another example: Head Start, the successful preschool program that gets low-income kids healthy and ready to learn, has dropped 57,000 children this year because of the sequester. Restoring those slots would cost $400 million, nearly all of which ($370 million) could be raised by ending the special tax treatment enjoyed by the owners of private jets. It’s a simple matter of priorities. By pushing for deep cuts, and causing uncertainty and frustration in schools, the unmistakable legacy of some members of Congress will be that they chose cuts over jobs, politics over compromise and the status quo over investment and future innovation. Thankfully, some members of Congress are already paying attention. Sen. Carl Levin (DMI) has introduced the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act, which would close many of the gaping loopholes that allow corporations to dodge taxes by hiding pro ts and shipping jobs overseas. It would raise $220 billion over 10 years to replace sequester cuts, curb the offshoring of jobs, and level the playing eld for small business trying to compete with big corporations. Passing this legislation would help make unnecessary further disastrous cuts to education. Federal budget battles have raged for three years now. As a math teacher, I’d like to see Congress prove its basic math pro ciency. It’s time to acknowledge that ordinary Americans can’t be squeezed any further. America does better when we all do better we need to protect middle-class priorities and close loopholes and special tax breaks for the wealthy so our nation can make a strong recovery. Dennis Van Roekel is president of the National Education Association, which represents more than 3 million public school employees. Will Congress learn its budget lessons? DENNIS VAN ROEKEL Guest COLUMN Women readers founded Apalachicola’s library Talk about some other ‘hard truths’ After reading the halfpage article/ad by the Concerned Citizens in the Sept. 19 issue of the Apalachicola Times, “Who holds hope for Franklin County in their Hands?” I want to say rst and foremost that I uphold the First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and press and will therefore exercise my right to do so at this time. While I might not always agree with certain opinions I do respect others’ rights to those opinions; regardless of my personal feelings. However when those opinions are stated as “The hard truth about Franklin County,” as a citizen of Franklin County myself I do have to differ with what some consider as truth being only “one opinion.” The questions you pose about the seafood industry, water from Georgia, the hospital, the charter school moving, city and county employment, in my opinion are saturated in illusion of concern when in actuality it is more of the same ole, same ole; digs at local government. However; as you go on and on about our fair community and air what you so poignantly consider the problems with Franklin County the heritage, attitudes, social, economical and dysfunctional situations you consider the truth and do so in the guise of being a concerned citizen, I have to ask a question myself “Really? Really?” If you are so dissatis ed with Franklin County, then why don’t you just move it on down the road? I have to wonder if where you moved from they allowed you to participate in local government. Were you allowed to speak out there the way that you do here? Were you allowed to criticize the community, its citizens, and the government in the local paper there? You have that right; I will give you that, but don’t expect the locals not to voice their opinions as well. As well if you are doing so because you are “Concerned.” especially about our future, then why would you do that in the local paper that is our only newspaper so that each and every visitor, prospective future resident might read it? Since you seem to have all the answers, perhaps the President could use your talents in Washington, I believe his campaign was on “Change”, and how far has that got us? You accuse the local government and citizens of Franklin County of fearing change and yet there is constant change in the community and plans for future improvements to our area. You accuse the locals of not accepting outsiders and yet the only ones I ever hear referring to you or anyone else as an “outsider” is you and your group. Point of fact: We have one commissioner on the board that happens to spend as much time in Georgia as she does in Franklin County and yet she is on the board of the local government you criticize. One of our industries is tourism. Do you also consider these outsiders as well? You also criticize the locals for their pride in their seafood heritage, and yet it was what this town was built on. Many of the churches, businesses, and real estate were bought, built up, cleared and owned by seafood families and are still being supported by those same families. As a citizen of Franklin County I am truly concerned; I am concerned that people will read what you spew out as truth and take it to heart without seeing the beauty that we do have to offer here in Franklin County. Without ever knowing the downhome Southern charm of the area and the people who love this community, ght for it to protect its beauty, its ecological and environmental treasures that are worth preserving as well as the traditions, heritage and true value of our community. We have people who ock from all over the world year after year; seeking out that charm, that uniqueness by the thousands and the growing population in Franklin County speaks for itself. There is always room for others who want to make this their home. They move from the hustle and bustle of the rat race of city life, traf c jams, and they are welcomed with open arms. We don’t call them outsiders; we call them neighbors and friends. Yes, like any other city, community, anywhere else in the world we have problems; but it is a work in progress to correct those problems. Our local government can only do so much; and the job before them is not an easy one. Considering the cutbacks they receive; how can you expect them to decrease your taxes and still provide you with more services? Yes, we can all agree we need more industry but that too is being worked on and there is hope for the future. Be part of the solution in Franklin County, not part of the problem; build her up, tell people of the glorious sunrise and sunset you see each day, tell them of the mouthwatering seafood you eat and the uniqueness of the area where you can still see the bay and the beach. Tell of the little old lady that does all the cakes, pies and cookies in the area, or the orist who just opened her doors downtown, talk about the wonderful afternoon and evening walks without being worried about being robbed or threatened at gunpoint, talk about the parks and playgrounds, the boat launches, the unique shops and the local grocer, butcher, and deli person who knows how you like your food and greets you by your rst name. Talk about the old man who sits at the park bench and tells stories about how it used to be or the couple who just celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary. Tell them of your pride in our local ball team or how your neighbor’s daughter just got a scholarship for college because she did so well in writing, tell them of how wonderful the seafood festival is or how the new doctor just came to town. There is a lot to crow about in Franklin County and the best way to make a friend is to be a friend. As for this ole girl, I am proud to be a Franklin County resident and I still say the true treasure in Franklin County is its residents, the pearls of Franklin County. Linda Raf eld STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA Members of the Philaco Woman’s Club, pictured here in the 1930s, are in the back row, from left are Mrs. George We ng (Stella), Mrs. A.N. Lefevre, Mrs. J.D. Rush, Mrs. John Wake eld (Rosalie), Mrs. Joe Messina (Etta), Mrs. Harry Marks (Verner), Miss Mattie Patton and Mrs. Mattie Whiteside Brunson. Front row, from left, are Mrs. Willoughby Marks (Anne Ryan), Mrs. John Ruge (Fannie), Mrs. W.H. Whiteside, and Mrs. S.E. Rice (Emily). Letter to the EDITOR See LIBRARY A6

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 10, 2013 PUBLIC NO TICE The Franklin County T ourist De v elopment Council has scheduled a special meeting at 1:00 pm on October 16, 2013 at the City of Apalachicola Community Room, 1 Bay A v enue. The purpose of this meeting will be re vie w applicants for the FCTDC director position and other administrati v e b usiness. This is a public meeting and tw o or more commissioners may attend. T h e F l o r i d a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h i n F r a n k l i n Co u n t y ’ s C l os i n g t h e G a p P r og r a m i n a n e f f o r t t o e n c o u r a g e s h o p p e r s t o s e l e c t a n d p r e p a r e m o r e f r u i t s a n d v e g e t a b l e s w i l l h os t h e a l t h y f oo d d e m o n s t r a t i o n s s t a r i n g O c t o b e r 2 0 1 3 t h r u M a r c h 2 0 1 4 a t t h e l oc a l P i g g l y W i g g l y G r oc e r y S t o r e No te : A c c o r d i n g t o t h e U S D e p a r t m e n t o f A g r i c u l t u r e o n l y on e i n f o u r A me r ic a n s e a t t h e r e c omme nd e d a m o u n ts o f f r u i ts a nd v e ge t a bl e s d a i ly E a t i n g f r u i ts a nd v e ge t a bl e s a nd ge t t i n g p h y s i c al a c t i v i t y e v e r y d a y m a y r e d u ce t h e r i s k o f s e r i o us h e al t h pr o b l e m s l i k e o be s i t y t y pe 2 d i a be t e s h e a r t d i s e a s e s t r o k e a n d ce r tai n t y pe s o f c a n ce r F or m or e i n f or mat i on p l e ase c a l l : ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 1 1 1 e x t 1 0 2 T h e F l or i d a D e p a r t m e n t of H e a l t h in F r a nk l in C o u n t y p r o mo t e s 4 51 6 8 2 2 S ome things get b ett er with age C apital H ealth Plan is one of them. Plan t o a tt end a SEMINAR during the M edic ar e A nnual E lec tion P erio d Oc t ob er 15 thr ough Dec emb er 7, 2013, t o LEARN MORE ab out C apital H ealth Plan A dv an tage Plus (HMO ) and C apital H ealth Plan P r ef err ed A dv an tage (HMO ). C apital Health P lan is a health plan with a M edicar e c on tr ac t F or ac c ommoda tion of persons with special needs a t sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 ( T T Y : 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., sev en da y s a w eek A sales person will be pr esen t with inf or ma tion and applica tions P aid Endorsemen t C all 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 t o RSVP or f or mor e inf orma tion. ( T T Y : 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., sev en da y s a w eek or visit us a t: w w w .c apitalhealth.c om/M edic ar e S eminars will b e held a t 10:00 a.m. a t the C apital H ealth Plan H ealth C en t er a t 1491 G o v ernor ’ s S quar e Blv d H5938_DP 458 CMS A c c ept ed 06192013 A nna Johnson sa y s .... “ Join me a nd b e c ome a memb er of a C a pital Health P la n Me dic a r e A d v a ntage (HM O) pla n. ” SM A n Indep enden t Lic ensee of the B lue C r oss and B lue S hield A sso cia tion O c t ober 11 O c t ober 14 O c t ober 16 O c t ober 24 O c t ober 25 O c t ober 29 O c t ober 31 No v ember 5 No v ember 8 No v ember 11 No v ember 12 No v ember 18 No v ember 22 No v ember 25 No v ember 29 D ec ember 2 D ec ember 3 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Last week, when 10 resi dents met with a research team from the University of Florida to discuss Chap man Auditorium, the results of a recent survey showed that people and the natural beauty of the area were the top two reasons for living in Apalachicola. On Sept. 26, Morris “Mar ty” Hylton, assistant profes sor in the University of Flor ida’s College of Design, Con struction and Planning, and graduate student Kara Litvi nas presented the results of a survey conducted over the last six months dealing with Chapman Auditorium and the Apalachicola lifestyle. Hylton and Litvinas are working toward restoration of the historic Chapman Schools’ auditorium on US 98. Hylton said, in order to explore possibilities for use of the historic building, he and Litvinas will engage the community by documenting existing conditions at the building and collaborating with local partners to iden tify potential new uses. To that end, the pair is in the process of preparing a Historic Structure Report (HSR). Their initial ndings were presented May 10 to about 20 people at a local workshop. The survey, which got 35 responses, identied six as pects of life in Apalachicola in addition to people and the natural environment that a large number of participants said were important to them. These were the “small town feeling.” the “built environ ment” (or structures making up the town), “local activities and events,” “safety,” “sea food restaurants and shops” and the “economy.” In a team exercise, three groups of participants in the Sept. 26 meeting were asked to rate these factors by im portance. The ratings varied widely with only built envi ronment making it into the top two factors on more than one chart. Of the top two choices for the survey overall, the natu ral environment made it into the top two for one team and people was the number one choice for one team. One team eliminated both built environment and economy from their list and substituted history and unique heritage. Safety and restaurants and shops were both rated low by all three teams. The third part of the meet ing dealt with phase II of Lit vinas’ research, an explora tion of possible new uses for Chapman Auditorium. A list of community needs that the auditorium could help fulll was com plied. Participants said more recreational activities and events, additional amenities, economic diversity and jobs, community activism, beauti cation and improved infra structure are needed. Each of the three teams was given a suggested use of the building and asked to consider how those needs might be met. One team was asked to consider creating an educational facility or li brary, a second mulled cre ating a performing arts cen ter and a third, dealt a “wild card” decided the building might be used to house gov ernment ofces. Litvinas said participants decided, whatever pro gram is pursued, the facility should remain public and multifunctional and should be used by many people. “It should probably house more than one program,” she said. “Participants liked the idea of a museum, li brary or educational facility because the school is next door, but wanted the audi torium to remain in use as well.” Litvinas said, before any denite decisions are made, the HSR must be completed and questions about the ownership of the facility and adjacent property must be resolved. She said, she will work to help create a master plan to present to a group of partners who can take on the tasks of fundraising and organization. She said the group might bring in ex perts to help with aspects of the project as well. At the May meeting, Hyl ton said Chapman Audito rium would be “difcult to demolish.” He said there are no signs of major settling or stress, but that a few cracks along seams near the foun dation of the building need to be monitored. There is also a problem with algae, mil dew and moss growing on the exterior of the building, partly attributed to rising damp in the walls caused by a system of built-in internal and external downspouts that are depositing water too close to the foundation. Of more concern are small leaks in the roof caus ing interior water damage. Hylton said these need to be xed within the next three years and recommended re placing the roof. Litvinas said some pro posed changes to the interi or of the building have to do with accessibility of the sec ond oor and changes made when the front portion of Chapman when it was con verted to a doctor’s ofce. On Sept. 26, Hylton said preparation of the HSR is ongoing and said creation of the government mandat ed report would help down the line with funding for restoration. In August, the Florida Trust for Historic Preserva tion announced that Chap man is on its 2013 Eleven Most Endangered Historic Sites list. Hylton said this is valuable to preservation ef forts because it documents both the historic nature and the physical state of Chapman. Hylton said Livinas, who has adopted the au ditorium as the subject of her master’s thesis, is also documenting the histori cal context of Chapman. He said a group of drawings dating back to the 1950s and 1960s, recently discovered at the Chapman complex has proved an unexpected wind fall of information. “What we found is many more structures on this site than we expected, especially a group dating to the 1950s that came and went,” said Hylton. Work on the Chapman Auditorium Building was commenced in 1931. The cast stone structure was designed by E. R. James to contain eight classrooms and an auditorium. A. D. Lawson from Port St. Joe was the contractor for the new building. The building housed the high school classes at the Chapman School. The Chapman High School class of 1934 was the rst to grad uate from the Chapman Au ditorium. When the Apala chicola High School was constructed on 14th Street, in the 1970s, the classrooms were renovated into ofces for the Franklin County School Board. The School Board deed ed the property to Franklin County in 2009. The building is the nest example of Art Deco archi tecture in Franklin County. Workshop discusses uses for Chapman Auditorium

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By Tevis Page Special to the Times Saturday morning, when most teenagers are sleeping away the day, three young men are hitting the field coaching an all-girls soccer team. Franklin County High School seniors James Bailey and James Harris, both of Eastpoint, accompany a recently graduated Josh Reeder of Apalachicola, every Saturday morning to mentor and coach girls soccer. They together have more than 10 years of experience in the sport. This year, Bailey and Harris are taking college classes offered by Gulf Coast State College and have bright futures ahead of them, while Josh is in a sabbatical state at the moment. The student body as a whole is proud of the young men for donating their time to all those aspiring athletes. Personally, I believe we need more young men like them. Last week was the week before homecoming, which is just as hectic as the real thing. Everyone was gossiping about our schedule and theme for this year’s homecoming. Students and teachers were chatting about what colors and patterns they would be wearing for “Blast from the Past Monday.” It is always a joy to see everyone so excited about one thing. Our homecoming game is Friday, and our boys are pumped and ready to target the Tigers. Seniors are truly enjoying this last wacky week and going out with a blue bang! S N O WB A L L i s a g o r g e o u s 1 y r o l d S iam e s e t hat w a s o w n e r s ur r e nde r e d a l on g w i t h he r e q ua l l y b e a u t i f u l si s t e r T h e s e c at s a r e n o t o n l y b e a u t i f u l b u t v e r y s o c ia l an d a f f e c t i o nat e W e k n o w t h e r e a r e a l o t o f p e o p l e o u t t h e r e t hat l o v e S iam e s e c at s an d si n c e w e w o u l d l i k e t o k e e p t h e s e l o v e l y l a d i e s t o g e t h e r i f p o s si b l e w e a r e h o p i n g t hat i f o n e S iam e s e i s g o o d. . t w o i s b e t t e r V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e sp e r at e l y n e e d e d t o s o c ia l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s an d c at s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y or g bBB O WB ] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e Society A6 | The Times Thursday, October 10, 2013 Katrina Prickett, Marques Jackson to wed Weddings Congratulations to Katrina Prickett and Marques Jackson, who will be united in marriage this Saturday evening, Oct. 12, at a ceremony on the beach on St. George Island. Katrina Prickett is the daughter of Gregory and Diana Prickett, and Marques Jackson is the son of Willie A. Charlene Jackson. Caleb and Denise Kembro are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Sophia Ruth Kembro on Sunday, Sept. 7 at 4:42 pm CST at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. She weighed eight pounds, 10 ounces and was 21.5 inches long. Proud big brothers are Carter and Ethan Kembro. Maternal grandparents are Carl and Sherrel McCalpin. Maternal greatgrandparents are Edward and Esther Harris, Sarah French and Mitchell and Lenny McCalpin. Paternal grandparents are Greg and Carline Kembro. Paternal greatgrandparents are Oscar and June Medley, Red and Ann Sizemore and Fred and Karen Kembro. Sophia Ruth Kembro born Birth HAWK TALK S p P ECIal AL tT O thTH E TIm M E s S The young coaches direct the young girls soccer team. Men of tomorrow helping today Join the celebration of Kaley Causey and Cole Lee as they begin their lives together as husband and wife Saturday, Oct. 12. The wedding will be held at the Eastpoint Church of God at 5 p.m. Reception will follow at the Boat Club in Carrabelle. No local invitations have been sent. Kaley CC ausey, CC ole Lee to wed Saturday A new exhibit by seven women sculptors will open Saturday night with a wine and light appetizers reception at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts. The exhibit, which runs through Dec. 14, is entitled “When Women Are Birds – Voices in Sculpture.” It features works by Johan Hagaman, Roelna Louw Bashew, Lynn Felton, Charlotte Tate, Alicia Miller, Cheryl Young and Martha Dupont. The exhibit is sponsored by Main Street Apalachicola, with support from the Tourist Development Council and the city of Apalachicola. DAVI I D ADLE E RSTEI EI N | The Times Right: Elena Rodriguez stands by a sculpture by Charlotte Tate, a South African-born artist who now lives in Johns Creek, Ga. with her husband and three sons. The work is part of her “Balanacing” series. Left: Saturday’s soft opening was sponsored by Main Street Apalachicola at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts. Sculpture exhibit opens Saturday chairs and purchased a sprinkler system for the library grounds which was installed free of charge by the city of Apalachicola. Dr. Dorothy Dodd, state librarian, prepared and read an article on Apalachicola history at the March 1954 Philaco meeting. Costs of utilities, landscaping and maintenance continued to mount, and the city of Apalachicola was given the deed to the library with the agreement that should they fail to maintain the library, ownership would revert to the Philaco Woman’s Club and if a larger building was to be given for the library, that the present building be reverted to the club. Philaco retained the right to recommend one city commissioner and four Philaco members to serve on the city library board. Three members administered funds. The mid-to-late ‘50s saw a resurgence of interest in establishing a new library for the city of Apalachicola. City commissioners gave Philaco permission to spearhead the project of raising funds for a new library building. Club past-presidents donated $100 as a gift to start the fund. By 1959, the club reported having $415 in the library fund. In 1963, the Philaco president addressed the city commission and emphasized the club’s interest in the building of a new library building by the city. A motion was made and passed to sell the old building. In 1964 the president announced that the old library building had been sold for $130. When a new library was constructed by the city with the help of government grants, Philaco retained the right to recommend a panel from which to choose library board members. The Philaco chairman of the library board brought a list of immediate needs to the attention of Philaco members. Five hundred dollars was withdrawn from the Philaco special library fund and donated to the new library for the purchase of needed items including a copy of the set of Americana encyclopedias and a book truck to be used as a rack for new books. Philaco continued to donate to the Apalachicola Municipal Library with monetary donations, books and memorials to deceased members. Jump to 1996 when the Philaco president from 1943-44, Margaret Key, died leaving all tangible and real property to the Apalachicola Municipal Library. Eight years later, Shirley Taylor, library advocate, and Joyce Estes, then president, along with the city of Apalachicola petitioned the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit requesting an accounting of the estate. It was disclosed that a local bank was holding $418,000 in the estate account. The personal representative was ordered to make a nal accounting and turn the money over to the city of Apalachicola for the sole benet of the library. Taylor has excelled in her efforts in carrying forth the right of Philaco to recommend candidates for the library board to the city commission for approval. Philaco won a FFWC Community Service Award in 2004 for their report of this achievement. The club makes annual cash contributions to the library at their awards banquet. Memorial books continue to be donated to either the Apalachicola or county library for each deceased member. In 2011, the city of Apalachicola presented a resolution of appreciation to Philaco, honoring 115 years of service to the community. LIBRARY from page A4

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Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Church The Times | A7 Thursday, October 10, 2013 Obituary Dan Rodney Robison passed away on Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Rodney was born Nov. 17, 1928, in Carrabelle to the late William Manson Robison and Zonie Cleveland Giles Robison. He graduated from Carrabelle High School and was a graduate of Asbury College in Wilmore, Ky. In 1954 he graduated from Candler School of Theology at Emory University, in Atlanta, Ga. He was ordained in 1955 in full connection of the Florida Conference of the United Methodist Church. Rodney was a lifelong Methodist and attended the Carrabelle United Methodist Church where he gave his heart to the Lord. He served as a chaplain in the Air Force and as a minister in various Methodist churches. Rodney lived most of his life in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was preceded in death by his wife Dorothy Smelton Robison; his son Mark Robison, four brothers, Samuel Julius, William Jennings, Byron Alton and William Manson; and ve sisters, Gladys McKnight, Christine McLean, Eva Grice, Elizabeth Robison and Mary Mayton. Survivors include many cousins, nephews and nieces. A memorial service will be at a later date at the Carrabelle United Methodist Church. Dan Rodney Robison Had a nice drill to prepare for Hurricane Karen over the weekend. Both yard sales and lunch were cancelled, along with a lot of other events. The big yard sale for the Lanark Golf Club will be held this Friday and Saturday, Oct. 11 and 12. Just follow the trafc to Heffernan Drive and turn left coming from Carrabelle or right if you are headed west. Havent heard about the sale rescheduled at the Legion just yet. Dont forget the Halloween dance at the American Legion. The members are combining the Birthday Bash and the Halloween Dance, which will be held Saturday, Oct. 19. Hope you can make it. Party will start at 6 p.m. Your monthly sugar x will be ready from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19 at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Come on over and start your day with a full breakfast. Still only $5. Well be watching for you. Our monthly covered dish luncheon will be Sunday, Oct. 20. Bring a dish to share and an empty stomach and have a great afternoon with your friends and neighbors. See ya there! On Saturday, Oct. 26 there will be a Halloween Dance at Chillas Hall. Ron Vice will be on hand to provide the music. Just bring a dish to share, your dancing shoes and, of course, your main squeeze and have a howling good time. After we won our case and voting lines were drawn, two things occurred. Members of the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc. voted to turn over our bingo to the Franklin County Senior Center. That way, they would have two bingos a week. The North Florida Democratic Executive Committee contacted me and asked if I would head up the Democratic rally in our new district. I chose to have it at the Lanark Village Boat Club, as I was rst vice commodore at the time. I pulled it together and Julia Maes restaurant furnished the food. We had a huge crowd and a lot of rain! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and dont complain about getting old, many dont get the chance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Yard sale rescheduled for this weekend Veterans ofce to reopen Monday The Franklin County Veterans Service Ofce will be closed until Oct. 14 while Service Ofcers William Scott and Charles Elliott attend their regular scheduled semi-annual training. We work for the people of Franklin County, not the federal government, therefore our absence has nothing to do with the shutdown in DC, said Scott. Upon our return we will have the latest information from the Department of Veterans Affairs. You can reach the Scott and Elliott at Franklinvets@yahoo.com The courthouse ofce (653-8096) will reopen on Monday, Oct. 14. Late night aerial exercises criticized At the request of Commissioner Smokey Parrish, County Planner Alan Pierce investigated the source of late night aviation activities around the Apalachicola airport, during the week of Sept. 1619, when there were low level aircraft ying as late as 3 a.m. around the airport. Pierce said the ights were coming from Hurlburt Field, a military eld near Pensacola. The information ofcer at Hurlburt Field said ight instructions for the maneuvers require aircraft to be back on base by 2 a.m. CST. Pierce told the information ofcer that Parrish wanted military ights around the Apalachicola airport to end at midnight. Pierce said he was composing a letter to that effect. Parrish said he had received complaints of paintings knocked off of walls and broken dishes. If they do it during the day, its not an issue, he said. Theyre not buying fuel or contributing to the community. Commissioners voted unanimously to ask the Air Force to cease exercises after midnight. Military air exercises were the topic of discussion at the Carrabelle city commission meeting of Oct. 3, as well. Thompson Field Manager Mark Nobles sent a letter to commissioners protesting proposed Air Force activity in Tates Hell. Nobles said the presence of military aircraft limits air activity at the airport. Bo May appointed to EDC At the recommendation of Carrabelle Economic Development Council Director David Butler, downtown businessman Bo May was appointed to the EDC at the Oct. 3 city commission meeting. The EDC was established in Oct. 2011. May is the seventh appointee to the council.Carrabelles CRA board to meet Carrabelles Community Reinvestment Act board will meet at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 29. The Community Reinvestment Act is a federal law designed to encourage commercial banks and savings associations to help meet the needs of borrowers in all segments of their communities, including lowand moderate-income neighborhoods. Congress passed the CRA in 1977 to reduce discriminatory credit practices against low-income neighborhoods. The CRA instructs the appropriate federal nancial supervisory agencies to encourage regulated nancial institutions to help meet the credit needs of the local communities in which they are chartered, consistent with safe and sound operation.Schneider replaces Allen on TDC At the Oct. 3 Carrabelle meeting, Mayor Curley Messer assigned committee memberships and city departments for the 2013-14 scal year. Commissioner Brenda La Paz will remain water and sewer commissioner and become city liaison to the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, replacing former commissioner Cal Allen. While Allen is no longer seated on the commission, he will remain Carrabelles liaison to Franklin County Emergency Management. He and wife Tamara recently completed Citizen Emergency Response Training at the Emergency Operations Center. Charlotte Schneider will continue to serve as nance commissioner and will take Allens seat on the Tourist Development Council. Newly-elected Olivia Massey will supervise the cemeteries and police force. Frank Mathes will remain public works commissioner and Messer will oversee the re department. Get your u shot early Flu season is just around the corner and the Florida Department of Health (DOH) in Franklin County encourages residents and visitors to get vaccinated against inuenza (u). Compared with most other viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, inuenza infection often causes a more severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Flu vaccines are available at either DOHFranklin location by scheduling an appointment or by walk-in. We encourage you to take this simple step to protect yourself and others from this potentially serious illness, said Marsha Lindeman, administrator of the Florida Department of Health in Franklin County. Be sure to watch for symptoms of the u, such as headache, fever, a severe cough, runny nose or body aches. This is particularly important for people at high risk for serious complications from u. For those with the u, antiviral medication may shorten both the duration and severity of illness. The Florida Department of Health urges the following preventive steps for the u: Get vaccinated every year because as the u types change, the vaccine changes. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcoholbased hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth, because germs spread this way. Avoid close contact with sick people. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw tissue in the trash after you use it. If you are sick with ulike illness, contact your primary care physician to determine whether you need antiviral medication. Stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone (except to get medical care or for other necessities). DOH protects, promotes and improves the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. For more information, call 653-2111. News BRIEFSBenefit S aturday for babys funeral cost There will be a benet lunch on Saturday, Oct. 12 at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint, beginning at 11 a.m. The benet is to help defray funeral costs for baby Lillian Grace McIver, the daughter of Will and Kristin McIver (Shattuck). F ish fry at F irst Baptist Mullet fish fry dinners will be offered Friday, Oct. 11, in the Fellowship Hall of the First Baptist Christian School, 46 9th Street, in Apalachicola from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. These dinners are by donation. You may eat-in or take-out, includes cole slaw, hush puppies, baked beans, and a homemade desert. Call 653-9540 to place an order to be delivered in Apalachicola only. United Baptist hosts S unday Homecoming The United Baptist Church, 37 Brian Street, Eastpoint, will host its 30th annual homecoming on Sunday, Oct. 13. Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m. with morning worship at 11 a.m. Guest speaker will be Brother Mike Traylor from Power Springs, Ga. Lunch and singing immediately following service, featuring local singers. Church BRIEFS LILLIAN GRACE MCIVER By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin County Senior Services is in need of ad ditional funding for Meals on Wheels. For about two years, Franklin County Senior Services has been run by agencies outside the county. Seniors in St. George Island, Eastpoint and the Apalachicola are served by Gulf County. Se niors to the east of East point, including Alligator Point, Carrabelle and La nark Village are serviced by Wakulla County. At the Oct. 3 Carrabelle city meeting, Gail Mathes, senior services coordina tor for the eastern portion of the county, asked for help funding the program. Mathes told commis sioners Wakulla Senior Services has been cut by $17,000, leaving Franklin County services $5,000 short of the funds needed for Meals on Wheels and other programs, such as homemaking, and trans portation for shopping and doctors appointments. Carrabelle unanimous ly agreed to donate $500 to senior services, out of a $2,000 budget set aside for non-prot needs. I only wish we could give more, said Commissioner Char lotte Schneider. Pat Phillips, out of Crawfordville, who coor dinates the Older Ameri cans Act, said funds from both the United Way and the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, have been reduced and that Meals on Wheels will be most directly impacted. We always depend on fundraisers and dona tions, she said. What we get from the area agencies doesnt run the program. Mathes said about 10 seniors come for congre gate meals served at the Senior Services Center across from the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center on Avenue F in Carrabelle. They can get coffee and donuts for breakfast and a TV din ner for lunch. If you would like to make a donation to Franklin County Senior Services or help with a fundraiser, call 6972371 or visit Senior Ser vices at 302 Avenue F in Carrabelle. Carrabelle kicks in for Meals on Wheels

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Special to The Times Get ready for an evening of cutting-edge cinematography when the Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival makes its debut on Oct. 19. This independent lm festival, at Riverfront Park on Water Street in downtown Apalachicola, will focus on thought-provoking lms portraying today’s culture, art, environment, local and global issues. The festival will feature local lmmakers, national and international lms and student lms. Organizers have collaborated with Florida State University and Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) lm schools and will showcase student lms from both schools. The program will also feature a discussion with special guest Kevin McCarey, professor of lm at SCAD who is a lm director, oceanographer, author and aspiring playwright. His latest lm “Extinction” is featured in the program. Filmgoers will enter through a tent where they can purchase food from locally prepared cuisine created by Chef Brett Gormley of Up the Creek Restaurant. A selection of ne wines, beverages and popcorn will also be available. Passing through the admission tent, attendees will enter the park where a 40’ screen positioned at one end of the park will provide an optimal viewing experience. Bring a lawn chair or blanket for a more comfortable experience on this fall evening. Please, no coolers. The gate opens at 6 p.m. providing time to enjoy the food and pick a good seat. Showtime is 7:30 10:30 p.m. Co-Emcee and Chair Merrill Livingston is an Apalachicola native who received a bachelor of ne art in lm and television at SCAD in 2008. She then directed the documentary, “A Different Way of Doing Business”, about the inspiring story of a rural Florida community’s revitalization through a partnership. She relocated back to Apalachicola in 2010 where she is in pre-production of her next lm. Co-emcee is local lmmaker Elam Stoltzfus of Blountstown, the creative force behind the Live Oak Production Group. He brings skills and experience as a producer, cinematographer, editor, and director. Stoltzfus, a graduate of Florida State University with a degree in media communications, for the past 25 years has documented diverse aspects of Florida’s natural resources including estuaries, rivers, swamps, and aquatic preserves. A gifted cinematographer; as executive producer of several documentaries, he combined his love of nature with his love of art. In celebration of its premier year, Stoltzfus has produced an introduction for the festival which features distinct landmarks, iconic waterfronts, and colorful locals all highlighting Apalachicola. Stoltzfus’ most recent documentary, the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, will also be shown. The documentary features four explorers who hiked from the Everglades to the Okeefeenokee Swamp. In 2012, the group hiked 1000 miles in 100 days to call attention to opportunities for a connected wildlife corridor in Florida’s heartland. For more information and tickets visit www.apalachriver lm.com. $ ' $ Y ou'r e In vit ed T o J oin Us W ednesda y Oc t ob er 16, 2013, 5-7pm E T ) # .( %! ) .( %( ., ( "( ,, (! “ FISHING ARTIFICIAL L URES IN THE F ALL ” $& $ ) $+ + & -)$ $$ WEEKL Y ALM ANA C ST JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W ES T P ASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 227-7847 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu O c t 10 83 64 3 % F ri, O c t 11 82 63 7 % S a t O c t 12 83 64 8 % Sun, O c t 13 83 63 9 % M on, O c t 14 81 60 14 % T ues O c t 15 82 62 3 % W ed O c t 16 79 62 25 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, October 10, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Special to The Times The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is proposing an Antler Point Regulation (APR) in the portion of Zone D south of Interstate-10 (DMU D1) that would require a deer to have at least one antler with two or more points (each point one or more inches in length); and an APR in the area north of Interstate-10 (DMU D2) that would require a deer to have at least one antler with three or more points (each point one or more inches in length). An APR) is a harvest strategy based on the minimum number of antler points that a deer possesses. Generally speaking, APRs are intended to protect younger and smaller bucks from harvest. FWC’s goal of implementing a APR is to protect yearlings (i.e., 1.5 years-old) from harvest while allowing the harvest of bucks 2.5 years-old and older. Because antler and body size generally increase with each year of age, an APR is likely to increase the average antler size and body weight of antlered deer harvested in Zone D. Youth 15 years of age and younger would be exempt from APRs on private lands and on some Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs). They could harvest deer with 5 inch or larger antlers). The purpose of these proposed APRs are to protect the majority of 1.5 year old bucks (yearlings) from harvest while allowing the harvest of 2.5 year old and older bucks. The goal is to increase the number of bucks in the population, improve buck-to-doe ratios and increase the size of bucks harvested. If approved by the FWC, the proposed rules would begin with the 2014-2015 hunting season. During public opinion surveys, public meetings and technical assistance group (TAG) meetings, hunters told us that they wanted to see more bucks and have a better chance to harvest larger bucks. While there are many ways to achieve this result, support was greatest for APRs. For more details on the results of assistance group meetings, visit http://tinyurl. com/oz4uv67 For an APR to be effective across the landscape and to reduce potential con icts, FWC is proposing the DMU speci c APRs apply on all land within DMU (Deer Management Unit) boundaries, regardless of whether it was privately or publicly owned. If a property is split by a DMU boundary, the property would have two different APRs respective to the DMU boundaries. Antler characteristics are in uenced by habitat quality. Due to differences in soil productivity and the amount of land in row crop agriculture, the habitat quality tends to be greater north of I-10 (DMU D2) than south of I-10 (DMU D1). Harvest data from each DMU indicates that the APR that would most effectively protect male yearlings (1.5 year old bucks) from harvest while allowing the harvest of most 2.5 year old and older bucks is a 3-points-on-a-side APR north of I-10 (DMU D2) and a 2-points-on-a-side APR or “forked antler” south of I-10 (DMU D1). We expect the antlered deer harvest in Zone D to decrease initially and then rebound close to current levels after three to four years. It is dif cult to estimate what the percent decline will be the rst year because many individual hunters, hunt clubs, private landowners, and some WMAs already have some form of an antler regulation. Based on data collected from WMAs, the average antlered deer harvested post-implementation of these APRs could be about 15 pounds heavier and the average gross antler score according to the Boone and Crockett antler scoring system could be approximately 28 inches greater. Antlerless deer will still be any deer (except spotted fawns) that do not have antlers or have antlers less than 5 inches in length. It is illegal to take spotted fawns. HOW BUCKS WILL BE BETTER PROTECTED DMU Proposed APR Age Class 1.5 2.5 3.5 4.5+ D1 2 points on one side 83% 24% 9% 7% D2 3 points on one side 89% 32% 10% 8% The table above shows the estimated percent protection from harvest for each buck age class under the proposed APR for each DMU. These estimates are based on harvest data collected from check stations throughout each DMU. FWC plans new deer harvest strategy Indy lm fest promises thought-provoking fare Gulf red snapper season opened Oct. 1 The recreational harvest of red snapper opened Oct. 1 in state and federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. In state waters, which are from shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf, the season will remain open through Oct. 21, closing on Oct. 22. In federal waters, which are from 9 nautical miles out to 200 nautical miles, the season will remain open through Oct. 14, closing on Oct. 15. These supplemental recreational red snapper seasons are for 2013 only. The minimum size limit in state and federal waters is 16 inches, and the daily bag limit is two per harvester, per day. There is a zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew on for-hire vessels. Anglers are required to use circle hooks and dehooking devices when shing for any reef species, including red snapper, in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters. The requirement to use venting tools in federal waters was removed on Sept. 3. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will consider adopting similar changes at a future meeting. The intent of these rules is to help conserve shery resources by increasing the chances for a sh to survive after being caught and released. Learn more about red snapper by visiting MyFWC.com/Fishing and clicking on “Saltwater” and “Recreational Regulations.” Stone crab season opens Oct. 15 The recreational and commercial stone crab season will open Oct. 15 in state and federal waters. Only the claws may be harvested and must be at least 2 inches long. The bag limit is one gallon of claws per person or two gallons per vessel, whichever is less. Harvest of claws from females with eggs is prohibited The season closes May 16. Harvesters cannot use any device that can puncture, crush or injure the crab body. A maximum of ve traps per person is permitted. Floridians hunting out of state need to be aware of CWD laws Florida hunters planning to hunt deer, moose or elk out of state need to be aware of certain laws and regulations aimed at preventing chronic wasting disease from entering our state. For more information about CWD or this rule, visit MyFWC.com/CWD. Outdoors BRIEFS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES A still from Elam Stoltzfus’ documentary “The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition.” SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Our 2013 fall red snapper fishing got off to a slow start last week with rough seas and high winds. We only have until Oct.14 in federal waters and fishing will continue in state waters until the Oct. 21. Good-sized snapper are still close to shore, and the MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are producing good numbers and size right now. Fall feeding patterns are starting to produce nice trout and redfish. With the rain from last week, sight fishing will be more challenging this week. Use darker colored jigs and grubs in deeper water this week to find the fish fast.

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F r a n k l i n C oun t y H igh S c ho ol f r e s hm a n M e g a n C o l l i n s s h o t h e r b e s t s c o r e o f t h e s e a s o n 4 4 t o le ad t he L ad y S e a ha w k s t o v i c t o r y o n t h e i r h o m e c o u r s e o n O c t 2 o v e r B r a nf o r d a n d J o h n P a u l I I C o lli n s a l s o b e c a m e th e i n di v i d u a l m e d a l i s t f o r a t o u r n a m e n t f o r t h e r s t t i m e t h i s y e a r O u r t e a m i s tr y i n g r e a l l y h a r d t o m a k e t h e p l a y o f f s a n d w e h a v e a l o t o f f u n t o g e t h e r s h e s a i d . G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 M e g a n C o lli n s 11 0 4 1 7 2 F R A N K LI N C O U NT Y C E NTR A L L A N D F I L L HO U R S OF O P E R A T I ON M O N D A Y – F R ID A Y WI N T E R HO U RS : O C T O B E R 1 st – MAR C H 3 1 st S U M M E R HO U RS : AP R I L 1 st – S EP T E M B ER 3 0 th O n l y e x ce p t i o n w i l l be C o u n t y H o l i d a y s P U B L IC N O T IC E CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, October 10, 2013 A Page 9 Section By TIM CROFT Halifax Media Services The host Tiger Sharks ensured Friday the Franklin County Seahawks’ two-week swing through Gulf County was a bumpy one. One week after losing at Wewahitchka, the Seahawks ran into a buzz saw at Shark Field, dominated in every phase in a 49-6 loss. The win improved Port St. Joe to 4-2 overall and 1-0 in District 4-1A. The Seahawks dipped to 0-6, 0-1. The Tiger Sharks controlled every facet of the game and inserted the junior varsity en masse before the rst half ended 35-0. Port St. Joe chewed up 191 total yards in the rst half, 293 for the game, while limiting the Seahawks to 46. Franklin County’s only rst down against the Tiger Shark varsity came courtesy of a roughing-the-passer penalty. The Tiger Sharks also transformed a long punt return and a blocked punt into points and allowed Franklin County to score only on the nal play of the game, the second half played while the clock ran continuously. The Seahawks’ junior Cole Wheeler, the game’s leading rusher with 83 yards, scored from the 5 as the clock ran out. “We will keep working and we’ll get better,” Franklin County coach Aaron York said. “I saw improvement tonight. We are a young team and we just need to keep working to get better every week which we have since the season started.” The Tiger Sharks wasted little time getting on the scoreboard. Port St. Joe stopped the Seahawks on downs on the opening series, and took over at the Franklin County 34 after a punt. Former Seahawk Dwayne Griggs did the rest in two carries, the touchdown coming from the 7. Drew Lacour nailed the rst of his six extra-point kicks. The personal foul penalty extended slightly the next Seahawk drive, with Port St. Joe taking over at its 24 after a punt. Three plays later Aaron Paul, on his only carry of the game, sprinted around right end and threaded through the defense on a 62-yard touchdown jaunt to make it 14-0. Franklin County went three-and-out again and Griggs returned a rolling punt that got over his head 34 yards to the Seahawks’ 31. After an offside penalty against the Seahawks, Lacour found Chad Quinn Jr. on a perfectly placed 26yard pass to the right ag, for a 21-0 score. The Tiger Shark defense stopped Franklin County in its tracks and former Franklin County student Umstead Sanders blocked a punt, Port St. Joe taking over at the Seahawk 27. Two plays later John Simpson broke a trap play for a 19-yard touchdown. Jak Riley scored from the 1 on the Tiger Sharks’ nal drive before intermission. Trey Sanders, a seventh grader who despite not entering the game until the second half was Port St. Joe’s leading rusher with 65 yards, scored from the 7 midway through the third quarter. Antonio Moree swept left end from the 12 for the nal Tiger Shark touchdown. The extra point came from Isaac Rocha, one of six seventh graders the Tiger Sharks played. TOUGH TASK TO ‘TARGET THE TIGERS’ The Seahawks have their work cut out for them as they face the top team in the state in Class 1A, the Blountstown Tigers, at Friday night’s Homecoming at Mikel Clark Stadium. The students have been working hard all week to “target the Tigers” and Coach Aaron York is preaching that his boys continue the grit they’ve shown all year in taking on this formidable foe. Don’t miss the parade through Eastpoint beginning a little after 1 p.m. Friday afternoon. Pre-game festivities start at 6:30 p.m. One of ve senior girls Deborah Dempsey, Marlyn Lee, Haleigh Ming, Adrianna Reeder and Jessica Shields will be announced at halftime as the new Homecoming Queen. Senior boys on the court include Alex Causey, Kyle Hathcox, Leonard Ward, Cameron White, and Mercury Wynn. The court consists also of freshmen Chelsea Register and Thomas Copley-Subbarao; sophomores Jaylynn Lyston, Anna Riley, River Banks, and Dallas Shiver; and juniors Zoie Lance, Erin Riley, Kelsey Shuler, Austin Carter, Chandler White, and Brandon Cash. Franklin County falls to Port St. Joe The Lady Seahawk varsity golf team defeated Branford and John Paul II at their home course of St. James Bay Oct. 2 to improve their overall record to nine wins and two losses. With her season-best round of 44, freshman Megan Collins led all golfers, while seventh grader Melanie Collins shot 45, junior Calli Westbrook 60, junior Katie Seger 62, eighth grader Harper Westbrook 66 and eighth grader Hannah Westbrook 66. The team total, which consists of the four top scores, was a 211. Branford shot a 226 to take second place while John Paul II didn’t attend and forfeited. The team played Tuesday in the Big Bend Championships at Killearn Country Club in an 18-hole event. “The girls are trying to get better every day and it de nitely shows,” said Coach Scott Collins. “The match at Killearn will be a great test for us because all the teams from the area will play to get ready for next week’s district tournament.” The team will host their nal home match today, Thursday, Oct. 10 as Wakulla and Branford will visit St. James to take on the Lady Seahawks. – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Golf team keeps winning DEBORAH DEMPSEY ADRIANNA REEDER JESSICA SHIELDS HALEIGH MING MARLYN LEE Excitement is building for the fourth annual “Race for the Bay” Marathon, to be held Sunday, Oct. 20 along a course stretching from Apalachicola to St. George Island. Organizer Scott Henderson said 450 runners have already signed up, and that he expects another 150 will be joining the ranks of runners who will take part in one of five races the full and half-marathons, the 10K, the 5K and the Ultra 50K “The biggest percentage is the half and full, with about 50 in the ultra and the balance in the 5K and 10K,” he said. Henderson is hoping that his field of runners and their families will take in Saturday night’s Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival. To help in boosting local runner involvement in the race, he said locals can take advantage of a $10 discount off the Ultra and marathon races, and $5 off the half-marathon, 10K and 5K. Henderson said the average runner brings a total of 2.5 people into the county, many of whom stay overnight. “They all buy meals, and tourist stuff,” he said. “That all adds up to hundreds of thousands of dollars in one weekend.” For more info, visit www.runningforthebay. com – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Enthusiasm builds for Oct. 20 marathon Both Lady Seahawk volleyball teams defeated Bozeman in an away match Oct. 1 The junior varsity won in two games, 25-13 and 25-12. “Our JV team proved to be much better skilled than the Bozeman girls,” said Coach Tara Klink. “Our younger JV girls got some playing time and did a great job against them. Sophomore Casey Tucker lead the team in serving points with a combined six aces between their two games and seventh grader Sophia Kirvin topped off our hitting with two kills. I’m very proud of my Seahawks!” The varsity girls lost their opening game 25-27 and then reeled off three straight victories, 25-20, 2522 and 25-20. “The varsity had a bit of a sloppy game, which caused us to lose our rst game. We were still able to pull it together for our victory over Bozeman,” said Klink. “Freshman Scout Segree lead our varsity team in serving with seven aces, followed by senior captain Morgan Mock with ve aces, and senior captain Gracyn Kirvin with four aces. Mock was our top hitter with ve kills.” – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Volleyball girls win over Bozeman The Seahawk middle school football team is searching for its rst win, but has shown steady improvement. “They are a great bunch of kids who play hard every week. They have improved every week,” said Aaron York, who directs the football program, assisted by coaches Bud Strange, Chase Golden, Jesse Page, and Gene McLeod. The team has lost to Bozeman 44-12 and 36-16, to Blountstown 38-6 and to River Springs 45-14. Stand-out players this year for the middle school team include, but are not limited to, quarterback Ethan Riley, shown carrying the ball in photo above, running back Daylin Sherridan, offensive/.defensive lineman Jesse Page, running back Athen Shipman, offensive lineman Tyler Banks, linebacker Rufus Townsend and linebacker Fisher Edwards. The team wraps up play today against Sneads at the Hawks Nest. – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Seahawk middle schoolers keep getting better

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, October 10, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 45 1 43 0 8 G u i t a r A m p S o u n d S y s t e m & I n s t r u m en t R epa i r S t J o e M u s i c C o & R S R R e c o rd i ng S t u d i o 21 0 W i l l i a m s A v e P o r t S t J o e ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 2 4 s a l es @ s t j o e m u s i c com W elcomes Selena Coult er t o our staf f Selena in vit es fr iends and f amily t o call f or an appointment. The Mane S alon and Da y Spa 1 31 A v enue E Apalac hicola er Selena Coult iends es fr vit in appointment. 653-8714 Not i c e o f V a c a n c y F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v e l o p m e n t C o u n c i l B o a r d M em be r M e m b e r s h i p o n t h e F C T D C i s m a d e t h r o u g h a p p o i n t me n t by t h e F C B O C C i n a c c o rd a n c e w i t h F l o r i d a S t a t u t e s T I T L E X I P A R T I C h a p t e r 1 2 5 s s 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 ( 4 ) ( e ) a n d p e r F r a n k l i n C o u n t y O rd i n a n c e 2 0 0 4 3 5 a s f o l l o w s : e C o u n c i l s h a l l c o n s i s t o f n i n e me m b e r s w h o s h a l l b e a p p o i n t e d f r o m t i me t o t i me by t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s e c h a i r m a n o f t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s ( o r s u c h o t h e r me m b e r o f t h e B o a rd a s s h a l l b e a p p o i n t e d by t h e C h a i r ) s h a l l s e r ve o n t h e C o u n c i l I n a d d i t i o n t w o me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e e l e c t e d m u n i c i p a l o c i a l s ( w h o e a c h s h a l l b e a n e l e c t e d o c i a l o f t h e C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a a n d t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e ) S i x me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e p e r s o n s w h o a r e i n vo l ve d i n t h e t o u r i s t i n d u s t r y a n d w h o h a ve d e mo n s t r a t e d a n i n t e r e s t i n t o u r i s t d e ve l o p me n t o f w h i c h me m b e r s n o t l e s s t h a n t h r e e n o r mo r e t h a n f o u r s h a l l b e o w n e r s o r o p e r a t o r s o f mo t e l s h o t e l s r e c r e a t i o n a l ve h i c l e p a r k s o r o t h e r t o u r i s t a t t r a c t i o n s i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y t h a t w o u l d b e s u b je c t t o a n y t o u r i s t d e ve l o p me n t t a x u n d e r s e c t i o n 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 A l l me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e r e g i s t e r e d e l e c t o r s a n d m u s t b e a f u l l t i me p e r m a n e n t r e s i d e n t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n p l e a s e c a l l F r a n E d w a rd s a t t h e F C T D C o c e a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 6 7 8 e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e ve l o p me n t C o u n c i l i s c o m p o s e d o f n i n e me m b e r s w h o a r e a p p o i n t e d b y t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o m m i s s i o n e r s A n y o n e i n t e r e s t e d i n b e i n g c o n s i d e r e d f o r t h i s vo l u n t e e r p o s i t i o n i s e n c o u r a g e d t o s e n d a l e t t e r o f i n t e r e s t a n d q u a l i f y i n g r e s u me t o t h e F C T D C A d m i n i s t r a t i ve O c e I n ter e ste d p er so n s s h o u l d r e p l y n o la ter t ha n 5 : 0 0 p m. O c to b er 1 4 2 0 1 3 A r e c o m me n d a t i o n w i l l b e f o r w a rd e d t o t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s f o r t h e i r c o n s i d e r a t i o n i s i s a vo l u n t e e r p o s i t i o n w i t h n o n a n c i a l c o m p e n s a t i o n B o a rd me m b e r s a r e r e q u i r e d t o a t t e n d r e g u l a r b o a rd me e t i n g s a n d a r e e x p e c t e d t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n t h e C o m m i t t e e a c t i v i t i e s o f t h e B o a rd P l e a s e r e v i e w q u a l i c a t i o n s i n P a r a g r a p h 2 a b o ve A p p l i c a t i o n s m a y be s u b m i t t e d t o F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v el o p m e n t C o u n c i l A d m i n i s t r a t i v e O c e v ia e m a i l t o : f r a n @ a n a t u r a l e s c a pe c o m ; b y h a n d t o 1 7 1 / 2 A v e n u e E ; b y U S M a i l t o P O B o x 8 1 9 ; A p a l ac h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 9 adorning the cafetorium stage, complete with hay bales and scarecrows, created by food service supervisor Terry Hilton the program touted the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable program, which provides students on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays with a healthful snack to enjoy outside of their regular breakfast and lunch. Funded by a $29,500 grant, the program is intended to introduce students to fresh, nutritious items they might otherwise not be familiar with, and to accompany this experience with fun facts that might inuence their dietary habits positively. Hilton said the variety is vast and has included everything from broccoli orets to cauliower, from star fruit to squash and everything in-between — asparagus, onions, potatoes, carrots, green beans, kale, celery, tomatoes, even dandelions. “We’ve had them before,” she said. “They can dip them into ranch or Italian dressing.” Plenty of fruits are also among the selections, including the exotic such as breadfruit, and each is portioned according to the students’ ages. “There are no requirements for specic serving size; it’s what’s appropriate for age group,” Hilton said. “Sliced apples may be appropriate for lower grades and whole for the upper grades.” Everything is served raw, but because the teachers often have crock pots in their classrooms, they are free to modify the offering to make them more delectable to young taste buds. “We’ve had collard greens and turnip greens and cooked them in the crock pot,” she said. “We ask them to try them as raw, which is at the highest nutritional value that there is. The elementary kids love everything that we do, and they eat it. Middle school are the picky eaters and the high school have so many choices that if they can’t nd anything they like, I’m sorry. We give them a variety of choices, that’s for sure.” Though the Apalachicola Bay Charter School was the district’s pilot program, they took part only for the rst two years, and this year it is limited to the main campus. For the rst two years of the annual celebration, Hilton chose watermelon and bananas as the “fruit of honor,” so this year she decided to go with corn. The program was busy with a changeover from a Montgomery, Ala., distributor to one out of Port Orange, all through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Hilton went with a fall theme of “down in the corneld.” Robin Tennille, director of food service, and Bill Mahan, from the Franklin County Extension Ofce, kicked off the program, with Hilton and April Dalton, manager of food service for all three school lunch programs, dressed like they just walked off from a hard day’s work in an Iowa corneld. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services sent Robin Saey, director of food, nutrition and wellness, and Aimee Ashley, director of the statewide fresh fruit and vegetable program. Saey presented the school with an award for a breakfast week promotion a few weeks earlier, in which students were served a breakfast of wafes for lunch to increase participation in the breakfast program, available at no cost to all students. “It’s hard to get the upper grades to eat breakfast,” Hilton said. Franklin County School administrators joined Miss Seahawk Robyn Segree, Teen Miss Seahawk Myranda McLeod, Junior Miss Seahawk Tressie Edwards, Little Miss Seahawk September Ferrell, Tiny Miss SeahawkMahala Griggs and the high school cheerleaders in building enthusiasm for the “corny” morning. Each student left with a bag of popcorn to enjoy. The fourth graders provided poems, and the fth graders shared art, a skit and an Indian dance to mark the event, which was highlighted by a shucking contest for the students. Brice Gilbert won with his quick hands and determination. TIME tT O CELEBRA t T E HEAL t T HY LUNCH CHOICES By APRIL D aA LTON Special to the Times More than 32 million children eat school lunch every day across the USA, and to celebrate the healthy lunch choices in Franklin County, schools will celebrate National School Lunch Week next week. The theme, “School Lunch Across the USA” will include activities to promote the benets of healthy school lunches and celebrate the avors, ingredients and culture of various regions of the USA. The campaign will put a spotlight on the healthy foods and positive changes that county schools have incorporated into their menus. Nutrition education sessions will teach what foods are available to choose this year at lunchtime; with so many options available to middle and high school students they are getting confused about their options. So many changes have taken place in the lunch program in the past few years that are helping us combat childhood obesity. We can make a difference in the lives of children every day by teaching them to make healthy choices. If we can save one child from getting diabetes or developing congestive heart failure, we will have succeeded in our mission. Every day, we serve fresh fruits and vegetables on our serving lines. We also serve healthy choices like salads, yogurt, lite meals, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, parfaits, wraps and various other healthy choices. No food coming from our kitchens is fried; everything must be baked, broiled, steamed or served at room temperature. Our staff works very hard to make sure that these children are given healthy and nutritious meals. The federally funded National School Lunch Program provides nutritionally balanced, healthy meals to students every day. The program, serving the nation’s children for more than 60 years, requires school meals to meet federal nutrition standards by: • Ensuring students are offered both fruits and vegetables every day of the week; • Substantially increasing offerings of whole grain-rich foods; • Offering only fat-free or low-fat milk varieties; • Limiting calories based on the age of children being served; and • Reducing amounts of saturated fat, trans fats and sodium. April Dalton is president of the Franklin County School Nutrition Association. SHUCKS from page A1 on the water processing plant,” Messer said. Last year, the note for a Department of Environmental Protection loan used to pay for Carrabelle’s new sewage treatment plant came due, and the city was faced with pay ing off an $11 million debt. After negotiations by City Commissioner Brenda LaPaz and city staff, the loan was restructured, and Carra belle must now make payments only on $4.5 million, the approximate amount of the capi talized interest to be repaid over 30 years in ballooning payments. The next installment is $175,000, increasing to $225,000 in 2014. An ordinance was passed this month to off set the debt by raising the water and sewer rates. Messer said the increase would be about $2 per household monthly within the city lim its. She said the city has set aside $75,000 for next year’s payment, which leaves $150,000 to be paid. Messer said Carrabelle would renegotiate rates for reuse water with some customers when the ow meter is repaired in December. She said FCI is the largest customer buying re use water. St. James Bay Golf Resort also uses large amounts of the recycled water for irrigation and, under the original agreement with the city, received the water free of charge, Messer said. “That was when we expected they would build out, and the new houses would be a big market for city water and sewer, which has not happened,” she said. Messer said the resort uses hundreds of thousands of gallons of water, and she plans to approach them about paying for what they use. Reused water is billed at 32 cents per 1,000 gallons. Another possible source of revenue for city government is occupational licensing. Earlier this year, Messer revamped the ex isting law governing the licenses and the city commission raised fees from between 50 and 100 percent. The budget shows an increase of $1,000 in these fees for the new scal year, but during the nal budget meeting, Messer said she discovered at least 30 businesses that have not paid for licensing at all. She said this could considerably raise the revenue expected from licensing. Messer said she plans to contact delinquent businesses by mail, and failure to comply with the occupational licensing ordinance could re sult in a $500 ne. New police vehicles for the police depart ment were discussed, and $29,000 was allo cated under capital projects to purchase one. Messer said she plans to pursue grants to pur chase two additional vehicles. The single part-time position with parks and recreation became a full-time position, with a salary increase from $4,850 to $25,000, with an additional $20,000 spent on Social Security and Medicare contributions, insurance and other benets. The total estimated expenditure for the department is $63,250, compared to $28,800 last year. The expenditure for streets and roads declined from $214,082 to $206,500 this year. Messer said this is because an employee ap proved in the 2011-12 budget was never hired, and the salary was removed from the depart ment’s budget. This year the city holds $148,000 in reserve for contingency, compared to $85,000 last year. CARRABELLE from A1 AA P RILRIL D ALAL T ONON

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 10, 2013 The Times | A11 92604T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA -000286-CAXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. WHITNEY WHITEHURST A/K/A WHITNEY WHITE A/K/A WHITNEY WHITEHURST FLETCHER; BANK OF AMERICA NA; BRIAN FLETCHER A/K/A BRIAN DAVID FLETCHER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 10th day of September, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000286-CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and WHITNEY WHITEHURST A/K/A WHITNEY WHITE A/K/A WHITNEY WHITEHURST FLETCHER; BANK OF AMERICA NA; BRIAN FLETCHER A/K/A BRIAN DAVID FLETCHER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash INSIDE FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 24th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK “A”, SUN & SAND VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 34, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 10-06928 October 3, 10, 2013 92728T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 19 2012 CA 000410 CAXXXX Division JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. DARREN JOHNSON, CHIMENE JOHNSON MAGNOLIA HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. A/K/A MAGNOLIA BAY HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on September 17, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: LOT 3, BLOCK “B”, MAGNOLIA BAY, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 21, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA and commonly known as: 279 BAY HOLLY CT, EASTPOINT, FL 32328; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash inside the front door steps of the Courthouse, at 33 Market St., in Apalachicola, Florida, on November 7, 2013 at 11:00am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of September, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 92656T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012-CA000307 CADENCE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH SUPERIOR BANK, NA., AS SUCCESSOR TO SUPERIOR BANK, Plaintiff, vs. W. EDWARD TILEY A/K/A EDWARD TILEY A/K/A WILLIAM E. TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2013, and entered in 2012-CA-000307 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR TO SUPERIOR BANK, is the Plaintiff and W. EDWARD TILEY A/K/A EDWARD TILEY A/K/A WILLIAM E. TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY; UNITED STATES ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE ADMINSTRATOR OF THE SMALL BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on October 23, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NINE (9), OF BLOCK SIX (6), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY NOW IN COMMON USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of August, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-06590 October 3, 10, 2013 92732T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA000393 SEC.:______ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER MARK DETREVILLE A/K/A CHRISTOPHER M. DETREVILLE; PATRICIA ELLEN DETREVILLE A/K/A PATRICIA E. DETREVILLE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000393 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 7th day of November, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, BLUE HERON VILLAGE, AS TO THAT CERTAIN PLAT AS RECORDED IN PLAT AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7 AT PAGE 50-51 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: Lot 8 Magnolia Ridge, Eastpoint, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 26TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 92740T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION Case No.11-000120-CA TIB BANK, Plaintiff, vs. APALACH CLASSIC SYSTEMS, INC., a Florida corporation; SALLY A. LEACH; GREGORY E. LEACH a/k/a GREGORY E. LEACH, M.D.; ADVANCED MEDICAL CENTER, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; LOGICAL INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS, WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; and UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure, dated September 25, 2012, and the Stipulated Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Vacate Judicial Sale dated September 24, 2013, in the abovestyled case in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, I will, on October 31, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, the following described real property: Parcel 1: Lots 1, 2 and the Southeast 30 feet of Lot 3, Block 52, of the City of Apalachicola, according to the map or plat thereof now in common use at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 2: Northwest 30 feet of Lot 4, Northwest 46 feet of Lot 8, and all of Lots 5, 6 and 7, all in Block “52”, of the City of Apalachicola, as per map or plat in common use on file at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 3: The Southeast 30 feet of Lot 4 and the Northwest 30 feet of Lot 3, in Block 52, of the City of Apalachicola, as per map or plat in common use on file at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated on this 1st day of October, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E Creamer Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 92736T PUBLIC NOTICE Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Notice of Meeting The City of Carrabelle Redevelopment Agency (CRA) will conduct a meeting scheduled for 5:00 p.m. EST on October 29, 2013 at City Hall, Carrabelle Municipal Complex, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL 32322. The purpose of the meeting will be to review and obtain public input on the draft Community Redevelopment Plan update. This meeting will be the first meeting in a series for this purpose. Public participation, comment and recommendations are encouraged. A draft CRA Plan update is available for review on the City website at mycarrabelle.com and at City Hall. Any interested person may contact the City Clerk at 850-697-2727 with questions regarding this Notice or the CRA meeting during normal business hours 8:30 a.m. through 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL 32322. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Clerk’s Office, no less than five (5) days prior to the above stated hearing date. October 10, 17, 2013 92768T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CA000182 CHRISTIANA TRUST, A DIVISION OF WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, AS TRUSTEE FOR STANWICH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2012-13, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH CARROLL, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 22, 2013 in the above-captioned action, the following property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 7, OF CORRECTIVE PLAT OF TREASURE BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Shall be sold by the Clerk of Court on the 23rd day of October, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) in the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 to the highest bidder, for cash, after giving notice as required by section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 6538861 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95561T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 09000677CA SUNTRUST BANK, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MELANIE JANE TURNER; STANLEY W. BENECKI; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 27, 2013, and entered in Case No. 09000677CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. SUNTRUST BANK, INC. is Plaintiff and MELANIE JANE TURNER; STANLEY W. BENECKI; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 24th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, UNRECORDED, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT LYING 395.98 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY THE FOLLOWING COURSES: SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1096.00 FEET, SOUTH 60 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 3600.00 FEET SOUTH 62 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 1100.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 182.38 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 29.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 70.37 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 182.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF WAY BOUNDARY 99.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of August, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-08804 STM October 3, 10, 2013 95579T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000122 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR BAFC 2006-2, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE GLENMORE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE GLENMORE, NC 28270 ALICE T NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 42 PEBBLE BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 34 AND 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 12th day of September, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11040476 October 3, 10, 2013 95691T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MARK JOHNSON & DEBORAH KING CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUST, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1418 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: UNIT 102 MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 29-07S-04W-1005-0000-01 02 Name is which assessed: BOLTON W. NEAL All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95629T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-CA-237 JUDGE: REYNOLDS IN RE: Forfeiture of: One (1) 2004 Toyota Tundra VIN: 5TBBT44134S450117 NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS ALL PERSONS who claim an interest in the following property, 2004 Toyota Tundra, VIN: 5TBBT44134 S450117, which was seized because said property is alleged to be contraband as defined by Sections 932.701 (2)(a)(1-6), Florida Statutes (2012), by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Division of Florida Highway Patrol, on or about April 22, 2013, in Franklin County, Florida: Any owner, entity, bona fide lienholder, or person in possession of the property when seized has the right within fifteen (15) days of initial receipt of notice, to contact Sandra R. Coulter, Assistant General Counsel, Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, 2900 Apalachee Parkway, Room A-432, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399, by certified mail return receipt requested to obtain a copy of the Complaint and Order Finding Probable Cause filed in the above styled court. October 3, 10, 2013 95681T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: October 26, 2013 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Yolanda Harvey Candice Lewicki Robert Lashley Before the sale date of October 26, 2013, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. October 10, 17, 2013 95695T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 507 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: 95693T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 830 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOT 3 BLOCK B HIDDEN HARBOR FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’S OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 05-07S-01W-1100-000B-0 030 Name is which assessed: ELDORADO INVESTMENTS LTD All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013

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A12| The Times Thursday, October 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 LOT 15, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMPLETE LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’S OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 22-08S-06W-1000-0000-01 50 Name is which assessed: SANUALLAH SHEZAD and HELEN NITSIOS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95699T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MARTHA M GHERARDI REVOCABLE TRUST, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1238 Year of issuance: 2008 Description of property: LOTS 1 and 2 BLOCK ONE HUNDRED and EIGHTY-ONE (181) in the City of Apalachicola PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0181-00 10 Name is which assessed: JANE DAVIS and BURMA D. YOUNG All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95697T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 941 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: SECTION 31, T7S, R6W, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’S OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 31-08S-06W-0000-0020-00 00 Name is which assessed: CLAIB M. PUTNAL, JR. All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95701T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC TAMPA 1 LLC, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 861 Year of issuance: 2011 Description of property: LOTS 1, 2, 3, & 4 BLOCK 84 (247) KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION IN CITY OF CARRABELLE W/1983 MOBILE HOME FULL LEGAL CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY CLERK’ OF CIRCUIT COURT’S OFFICE PARCEL NO: 20-07S-04W-4212-0084-00 10 Name is which assessed: RANDALL W. SCOTT & DAVID SNYDER All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95733T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000206 CENTENNIALBANK, an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN C. SWAFFORD, an individual, and ALISON SWAFFORD A/K/A ALLISON SWAFFORD, an individual Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lots 9 and 10, Block 9 (193) of KEOUGH’S 2ND ADDITION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Clerk’s office in the Courthouse of Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 AM on the 7th day of November, 2013. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 27th day of September, 2013. Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95703T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MARTHA M. GHERARDI REVOCABLE TRUST, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 994 Year of issuance: 2007 Description of property: North 1/2 (one-half) LOT 8 BLOCK 139 APALACHICOLA PARCEL NO: 01-09S-08W-8330-0139-00 80 Name is which assessed: ROBERT E. ALLEN, JR. M.D. All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2013, which is the 4th day of November 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95749T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12000351CA REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. DONALD A. RETT; WELLS FARGO BANK SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH WACHOVIA BANK, NA; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC.; FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 6, BLOCK “G”, OF THREE HUNDRED OCEAN MILE, PHASE I, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 26. OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Franklin County Courthouse, in Franklin County on the Second Floor in the Second Floor Lobby, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on December 12, 2013. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FUNDS FROM THIS SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 45.031(1)(a), FLORIDA STATUTES. DATED this 25th day of September, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk NOTE: THIS COMMUNICATION, FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR, IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 S Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 10, 17, 2013 95735T NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board proposes to amend and adopt policies as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change:  Franklin County School Board Policy Manual Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes The entire text of the proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board meeting room in Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than November 07, 2013. Documents may be reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office, at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday -Friday. October 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95771T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO. 2009-000696-CA HANCOCK BANK, successor in interest to PEOPLES FIRST COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ANDRES S. KRAATZ, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 17, 2013, entered in Case Number 2009-000696-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein HANCOCK BANK, successor in interest to PEOPLES FIRST COMMUNITY BANK is the Plaintiff and ANDREW S. KRAATZ is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, Second Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on the 7th day of November, 2013, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 30, Block “O” of LANARK BEACH, UNIT NO. ONE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 25th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95803T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000556 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JAMES H. CAMPAGNA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 17, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000556 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC1, is the Plaintiff and JAMES H CAMPAGNA; MARY W CAMPAGNA; THOMAS K CAMPAGNA; ELIZABETH A CAMPAGNA; BANK OF AMERICA, NA; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 17, BLOCK I, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 16, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 1041 W GORRIE DRIVE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 26, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850 -487-7947. F09093262 October 10, 17, 2013 95805T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000321 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DONALD C. RECKNER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 16, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000321 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and DONALD C RECKNER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD C. RECKNER N/K/A JANE DOE; AVANELL T RECKNER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AVANELL T. RECKNER N/K/A JOHN DOE; ST. JAMES BAY PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Inside FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 6 OF BLOCK C, ST. JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 39-46, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 6 BLOCK C -STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 25, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk 95813T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000289 SEC.: ___________ CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. NOLAN M. LASSITER; MELINDA B. LASSITER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2011-CA-000389 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 7th day of November, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NUMBER 36, UNIT 7 OF PENINSULAR POINT SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN BY PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 3 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 1039 Gulf Shore Boulevard, Alligator Point, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interst in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator, FL Phone: (850) 577-4401 DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 26th DAY OF September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95807T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000372 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR AFC TRUST SERIES 1999-2, Plaintiff, vs. DORRIE H. MYERS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 23, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2012-CA000372 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR AFC TRUST SERIES 1999-2 is the Plaintiff and DORRIE H MYERS; SANDRA MYERS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Inside FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT NINE (9) IN BLOCK ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX (146) IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OF SAID CITY NOW IN COMMON USE. WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS. A/K/A 207 13TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 24, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850487-7947 F11036334 October 10, 17, 2013 95831AT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000250-CA VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC. P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, vs. DONALD RANDOLPH LAWSON, RHONDA MICHELLE LAWSON, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARLENE E. SPENCER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINA M. HILL, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. CAPSACK, JR., and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, through its State Housing Initiative Partnership Program a/k/a SHIP Program, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY MEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT “A”; A portion of Lot 1 of Willow Acres Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Begin at an iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the Southeast corner of Lot I of Willow Acres Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida_ From said POINT OF BEGINNING nut North 01 degrees 17 minutes 22 seconds West along the Westerly right-ofway boundary of Baywood Drive a distance of 77_50 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 88 degrees 55 minutes 22 seconds West 665_06 feet, thence run South 21 degrees 04 minutes 42 seconds East S2.45 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 55 minutes 29 seconds East 637,15 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.16 acres, more or less. The undersigned surveyor has not been provided a current title opinion or abstract of matters affecting title or boundary to the subject property. It is possible there are deeds of records, unrecorded deeds, easements or other instruments which could affect the TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 CMH 52 X 28 CYPRESS PO MOBILE HOME SERIAL NUMBER WCH017588GAAB. Commonly known as: 271 BAYWOOD DRIVE, 95837T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-00327-CA IN RE FORFEITURE OF: $3,690.99 U.S. CURRENCY NOTICE OF FORFEITURE ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE FLORIDA CONTRABAND FORFEITURE ACT TO: DARIN W. CRUSON, II, c/o FRANKLIN COUNTY JAIL, 270 STATE ROAD 65, EASTPOINT, FL 32328 AND ANY UNKNOWN INTERESTED PARTIES. RE: In Re: Forfeiture of the Following Described Property: $3,690.99 U.S. CURRENCY The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office has filed a Certificate of Compliance with Forfeiture Act and Complaint for Forfeiture with the Clerk of Court in Franklin County, Florida. An Order Finding Probable Cause has been entered requiring the Claimant and all persons or entities who claim an interest in the property described above to respond. Copies of the Complaint and Order of Probable Cause can be provided by the Franklin County Clerk of Court. You are required to file any responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses, within twenty (20) days of receiving notice, with the Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and to serve copies upon Donna Duncan, Counsel for the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., 80 Market Street, P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Failure to file your defenses will result in a default judgment being entered against you. WITNESS my hand and the Seal of the Clerk of the Court this 3rd day of October, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 10,17, 2013 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse ,301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11012868 October 10, 17, 2013 CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash on the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, at 11:00 AM (ET), on the 16th day of October 2013. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 3, 10, 2013 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 10, 2013 The Times | A13 Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center RepresentativePanama City, FLHalifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: € 2 years previous sales experience, preferably in a Call Center environment € Ability and desire to sell € Strong communication skills € Prociency with all Microso applications € Detail oriented team player with a passion for helping customers Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/AD&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. In addition, we oer: € Performance/ Incentive Based Pay Scale € Friendly Team Environment € Supportive & Motivating Sta to help you succeed € Positive, Professional and Upbeat work environment € We Promote from within! Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1113131 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266376 Text FL66376 to 56654 Logistics/TransportCIRCULATION District ManagerThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for a District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until October 14, 2013. Web ID#: 34268014 Medical/Health RN’s Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! You’ll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at Franklin Correctional Facility in Carrabelle, FL. We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time and PRN RN’s. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more! For more info, contact: Tracy Mazuranic 1-800-222-8215 x9553 tracy .mazuranic@corizon health.com or Quick Apply online (under the job opportunities link). www .corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL66454 to 56654 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit. Call 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Breakfast Attendants, Housekeepers and Night Auditors Email resume to 10270@hotel.bestwestern.co m or apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34266988 Text FL66988 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance Part-time position flex schedule. 30+ hours/ week. Pay is $10-12/hr, with 4 pay raises in 1st year, plus annual bonus. Health Ins after 90 days. Position resposible for maintaining several comm. buildings and rental properties inside and out. Light painting, carpentry, and flooring exp req’d. Any exp in small engine repair & vehicle servicing a plus. Must have HSD/GED, valid FLDL, NO criminal background. Drug free, physically fit. Check us out at: www .dansp awn.com or Apply in person at 1314 Bayview Ave Mon-Fri, 10am to 4pm. Web ID#: 34267165 Secure/Protective Serv FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Library Director/ Full TimeSalary Range: $33,000 -$35,000 Applications and Job Description available at Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Road, Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-670-8151 ext. 204, Applications may be requested through email @ ondra@franklin.lib.fl.us Applications accepted through October 31, 2013 The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer. Responsibilities: Supervises personnel, develops short and long term plans, prepares and administers operation budgets, acquisitions and distributes library materials and promotes awareness of library services and functions. Paid travel to attend library conferences and training workshops to stay abreast of library trends and technology in the field. Travel may be overnight and extend up to a week. Qualifications: Masters Degree in Library and Information Science or to receive degree within three years. Bachelor’s Degree required. A minimum of two years of library administrative experience including supervisory ability and experience, and knowledge of library technology is required. Must relate well to the general public, have good public relations skills, and be adaptable and flexible. Web ID#: 34267105 Text FL67105 to 56654 Admin/Clerical Receptionist Needed for very busy medical practice is adding an additional position to our front office in Panama City. Ideal candidate will be fast paced, able to multitask and have a great personality to interact with our patients. Previous medical experience preferred but not required. If you are energetic, a quick learner and ready to join a great team with a company that offers competitive pay and benefits please send us your resume to: Jason Ragsdale at jragsdale@eyecent ersouth.net Web ID:34267903 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Full Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34268057 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard Sale Come one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1119151 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS € SAFETY REP Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace St. Joe Beach 354 Ponce de Leon St. Saturday Oct. 19th 8am (est.) -???? No Early Birds!! Large Yard Sale 2 elec. wheelchairs, lawn tractor, lrg. generator, power washer, lots of jewelry, clothing, furniture and much more! txt FL67561 to 56654 Physical Therapy ServicesApalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting sealed proposals to provide in accordance with the specications, terms and conditions stated herein. The scope of work will include providing physical therapy services to special education students as specied by their Individualized Educational Plans (IEP). Please send resumes to: Elizabeth Kirvin, Assistant Principal Email: ekirvin@abceagles.org 4516815 Deadline: 10-31-13, prior to 10:00 AM E.S.T. Hard Copy Only Delivery Point: Apalachicola Bay Charter School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard Sale Tools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-602-6572) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL63024 to 56654 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizations’information and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systems’capabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 10, 2013 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com $ MLS# 250349 $64,900 St. Geor ge Island ISLAND L OT FOR SALE H i g h d r y w a l k a b l e l o t m e a s u r i n g 9 0 x 1 3 5 a d j a c e n t l o t i s s e p a r a t e l y f o r s a l e q u i e t a r e a o f t h e I s l a n d o n E a s t S a w y e r A v e n u e n e a r e n d o f P o r t e r S t r e e t s h o r t d i s t a n c e f r o m t h e G u l f o f M e x i c o a n d A p a l a c h i c o l a B a y l i s t e d b y J o h n S h e l b y John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250325 $95,000 Apalachicola CL AS SIC HIS T OR IC CO TT AG E % % $ $ % $% %$ % $% % % # $ % $ SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! !! % !! # !! & # (850)22 7-7847 | tgol den@p cnh. com S O L D $ $ 850 -899 -510 4 | 850 -697 -901 0 ww w .co ast alre alt yin f o .co m T h i s c u t e c o t t a g e h a s b e e n c o m p l e t e l y r e n o v a t e d o v e r t h e p a s t 2 y e a r s w i t h a n e w r o o f d e c k a n d c e n tr a l h e a t a n d a i r u n i t I t i s j u s t a s h o r t w a l k t o t h e C a r r a b e l l e H a r b o r w i t h i t' s m a r i n a s p u b l i c b oa t la un c he s r e s t a u r a n t s a n d s hop s $ MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifu lly furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! !! % !! # !! & # (850)22 7 -7847 | tgolden@pcnh com S O L D $ O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Apalachicola Times. 1) Who were the wisecracking robots on “Mystery Science Theater 3000”? Buck/Bucko, Crow/Servo, Salt/Sally, Jake/Snake 2) What was the rst hotel built on the now famous Las Vegas strip? Aladdin, Ritz, Sands, Flamingo 3) Which dog was originally bred in England to catch rabbits? Pit Bull, English Setter, Beagle, Dalmatian 4) What’s a rugged waterproof fuse used to light reworks? Brocade, Salute, Visco, Willow 5) From surveys what’s the most popular response to name a sport that’s graceful? Ice skating, Golf, Gymnastics, Swimming 6) The average fashion model weighs what percentage less than the typical American woman? 7%, 11%, 23%, 32% 7) Which Shakespearean play introduced, “It’s all Greek to me”? Othello, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, King Lear 8) What’s the poke in the saying “a pig in a poke”? Bag, Corneld, Mud bed, Frying pan 9) Of these which has a town named Difcult? Indiana, Oregon, Tennessee, Wisconsin 10) Generally speaking if you divide your weight by 3, you’ll nd out how much what weighs? Head, Arms, Legs, Organs 11) Of these which did Alexander the Great introduce to Europe? Dog ghting, Eggplant, Silverware, Pears 12) From surveys what’s the most popular response to name a word containing “play”? Playboy, Playdoh, Playground, Playtime 13) What year marked the births of Bob Hope, John Dillinger, and Red Grange? 1900, 1903, 1906, 1909 14) In Italy who’s known as “Mr. KissKiss-Bang-Bang”? Simon Cowell, James Bond, Harry Potter, Owen Wilson ANSWERS 1) Crow/Servo. 2) Flamingo. 3) Beagle. 4) Visco. 5) Gymnastics. 6) 23%. 7) Julius Caesar. 8) Bag. 9) Tennessee. 10) Legs. 11) Eggplant. 12) Playground. 13) 1903. 14) James Bond. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A “leave no trace” law to further protect sea turtles by banning stuff from being left on beaches overnight is under consideration before county commissioners On Oct. 1, commissioners held a public hearing to dis cuss an ordinance to ban un attended “holes in the sand” and recreational equipment from county beaches at night. The ordinance proposed at the meeting prohibits obstructions on all county beaches. It requires a sign be prominently posted in each short-term rental unit warning that items left un attended on the beach be tween 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. will be considered abandoned and become the property of the county. They would be conscated by police or other county employees and taken to the landll. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the ordinance was meant to protect sea turtles and enhance and de velop tourism. He said both public and private beaches would be regulated by the ordinance. Bruce Drye, marine turtle permit holder for the island, said obstructions on the beach are a problem that is increasing every year. “Visitors that walk our beach at dawn don’t see the beauty, they see the clutter,” he said. Eastpoint resident Liz Sisung asked what the pro gram would cost. Parks and Recreation Di rector Nikki Millender said her employees patrol the beach seven days a week looking for trash. They make daily trips to the landll and could add enforcement of the law to their existing du ties, she said. Shuler said enforcement of the ordinance would be by existing county employees and require no additional funding. Millender said she had plans to have an em ployee working evenings on the public beach next summer. County Planner Alan Pierce said Bay County hires a contractor to enforce a similar ordinance. Shuler said the commis sion could impose both civil and criminal penalties for vi olations of the ordinance, but recommended the penalty be restricted to conscation of abandoned property. He said the time and expense of tracking down owners of the property would make other penalties impractical. He said the ordinance could be amended in the future if it became necessary. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said the cost of re placing conscated prop erty would be a deterrent to violations of the ordinance. Jackel agreed. “Some of those chairs and things are pretty pricey,” she said. Millender said the ordi nance would help parks and recreation employees, who must now determine wheth er property is broken before they remove it. “I can’t stand to see the stuff on the beach. If they come on Monday, their stuff stays there until Friday,” she said. “We have the di lemma that if we’re cleaning around their stuff they come and say that things have been stolen. This will help with keeping our beaches cleaner.” Drye said rented beach equipment has the name of the vendor. He said rented chairs and umbrellas often create a long barrier for turtles. Jackel said there would have to be education about where property could be appropriately placed. “We don’t want to infringe on personal property rights or business,” she said. Commissioner Noah Lockley said he didn’t want the ordinance to interfere with anyone’s business. Jackel said the ordi nance could be a win-win situation for the turtles and beachgoers. She said she received emails both in sup port of, and objecting to, the ordinance. She said she thought rules requiring beach equip ment and holes dug on the beach to be attended at all times were too restrictive. She said removal of objects from the beach should be tied to sunset rather than a specic time because sun set is later than 7 p.m. dur ing the summer. Jackel asked that aban doned property be held for retrieval at the landll before being discarded. Commissioner William Massey suggested cons cated property be distrib uted to needy families. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked if the law would apply to traditional seafood harvesting activi ties like seinyards. Parrish asked how it would be possible to police 15 miles of beach. Shuler said an ATV with a trailer could be authorized to pa trol the area, just as turtle permit workers already have authorization to patrol in ATVs. Jackel said she was op posed to using ATVs on the beach for safety reasons. “We allow people to sleep on the beach at night, and we’re not taking that away. We don’t want people out there in sleeping bags and ATVs when it’s dark,” Jack el said. She suggested the board move forward with the ordi nance with some revisions. Shuler said he would revise the ordinance and bring it before commissioners at a later date. Commissioners voted unanimously to table the ordinance. WWW.EARTHTIMES.ORG Loggerhead turtle leaves the surf to nest. County mulls ‘leave no trace’ turtle