The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00240

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, October 3, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index A Dog Island resident escaped serious injury after his small plane crashed en route to Jackson, Ga. Claude C. Nardy, 59, who owns a home on Gulf Shores Drive on Dog Island, was piloting a 1941 Aeronca Chief when he crashed Monday afternoon outside Thomaston, Ga., authorities said. The Aeronca Chief, which is registered to Nardy, was a side-byside two-seater propeller plane popular as a touring aircraft and trainer. During World War II, the Army Air Corps used a version of it called the L-16. Upson County, Ga., Sheriff Dan Kilgore said Nardy and Vera Allen, 39, of McDonough, Ga., went down just before 1 p.m. in a rural area near Logtown Road, 10 miles outside Thomaston. The plane crashed into a stand of pine trees, and the couple was able to exit the plane. The sheriff described heavy damage to several areas of the singleengine plane, including a wing, the tail and propeller. He said the Upson 911 center was able to locate the crash site by using the cell phone signal from the victims’ call for help. Nardy was taken to Upson Regional Medical Center for treatment of what appeared to be minor injuries, Kilgore said. He said Allen was the only passenger on board and appeared to be unharmed in the crash. Kilgore said the pair was headed to Seven Lakes Airport in Jackson, Ga., when the pilot reported running out of fuel. Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Kathleen Bergen said the agency is investigating the crash. — By LOIS SWOBODA By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Beset by a dwindling harvest, oystermen this week appealed for steps to be taken to boost the supply of oysters in Apalachicola Bay. At a standing-room-only meeting of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association in the courthouse annex Monday afternoon, a majority of the membership backed two proposals that were then presented the next morning at the county commission meeting: The FCSWA wants to create a locally owned hatchery at the county-owned Lombardi Seafood Park that would help with seeding the bay, and to make changes in the management plan for bay closures that would protect against overharvesting. “We’re the only shing community in the world that doesn’t have a hatchery,” seafood industry activist Ricky Banks said. Luther Hat eld, the FCSWA secretary, presented the hatchery plan to the county commission Tuesday morning, noting that it would produce more seed faster than any other method, including that of Mother Nature. He estimated it would cost about $70,000 to $80,000 to pipe water to the Lombardi’s at Two Mile site from across the channel and to create other infrastructure. The commissioners unanimously supported a motion to gather further information on how much such a hatchery would cost to construct and whether funding could be obtained. One possible source could be the nonpro t Gulf Coast Marine Life Center, a collaborative partnership of experts from industry and academia who are now at work developing a Center of Excellence at Okaloosa Island, site, with other facilities planned along the Gulf Coast. The Okaloosa Island site will house a stateof-the-art marine n sh and shell sh hatchery, a coastal plant production facility, classrooms and teaching laboratories, and WINDING WATER Oystermen plead for help COURTESY OF THE THOMASTON TIMES The right wing of a 1941 Aeronca Chief sits up like a warning beacon where the small two-seater plane went down in Georgia. Dog Island resident spared in plane crash BP settlement pays out $18 million in claims By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The man who oversees the Deepwater Horizon claims process paid a visit last week to Apalachicola, rallying local staff as part of his tour of 19 claimant assistance centers from South Florida to Texas. Patrick Juneau stopped by the claims of ce at the municipal complex at 194 14th St. on Sept. 24 to update the county on claims ful lled and settlements still to come. Nick Gagliano, who handles media relations for Juneau, said as of Sept. 23, 2,156 claims had been led in Franklin County, with 631 of these determined to be eligible, for a total of $18.34 million paid to Franklin County residents and businesses. “For the difference there may be some (claims) that have not been reviewed, some may be incomplete where we are waiting on documents, and some may have been denied,” he said. CAPT. CHRIS ROBINSON | Special to the Times This enormous waterspout was spotted from the launch ramp at Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park about 10:30 a.m. Monday. Park Manager Josh Hodson said the waterspout was far offshore and didn’t pose a threat to the park, but that extensive rain caused scattered ooding in the campground. Carrabelle city workers to get raises By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Carrabelle’s new budget keeps millage rates the same and grants pay raises to all city workers. On Sept. 24, amid a room full of protesting citizens, city commissioners voted to give themselves a $200 a year raise and to grant pay raises ranging from 3 to 20 percent to city workers. Olivia Massey, Carrabelle’s newest city commissioner, championed the raises, insisting across-the-board raises would cost the city about $21,000, but some people disagree. Only four citizens attended the rst hearing Sept. 12 on Carrabelle’s tentative budget. See OYSTERMEN A5 See CARRABELLE A5 See BP A7 Estuary enthusiasm, A2 VOL. 128 ISSUE 23 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 Register now for St. Vincent clean-up Supporters of St. Vincent Island are organizing a beach cleanup on the island Friday, Oct. 11. Volunteers will be transported on the barge from Indian Pass at 8 a.m. and can return at either noon or 4 p.m. Bring water, food, sunscreen and bug spray. This cleanup is not for the faint of heart, but participants will get to see the island’s natural beauty while helping preserve one of Florida’s last jewels. To register, email supportstvin@ hotmail.com by Oct. 4. Chamber plans Oct. 9 golf tourney Tee up with business members from around Franklin, Gulf, Leon and Wakulla counties at the 10th annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament on Wednesday, Oct. 9. Teetime is 1 p.m. on the St James Bay Golf Course east of Carrabelle. Prizes will be awarded the top three teams at a reception after the tournament. Cost per team is $400, $100 per player. Fees include range balls, golf carts equipped with the latest color GPS system. Tournament proceeds go toward the chamber’s building fund. For more information, call 6539419 or email anita@ apalachicolabay.org Blues in the Lot Oct. 12 On Oct. 12, the Apalachicola Sponge Company presents an all-day blues festival, with six sizzling bands at the Hays House, 48 Ave. D in Apalachicola across from Coombs Armory. Music will include the Smackwater Retrievers, guitarist Matt Law, Johnny Barbato and the Lucky Doggs, the Easy Street Blues Band, Slim Fatz and the John Bull Blues Band. Food will be provided by Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department BBQ. For more information, call 653-5564 or visit www. Apalachspongecompany. com.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 1 1 13270 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 1 5 / *1, 4 4 1*, % ( +, ( ) ( (*1 41 1, ,( 4 ( 4 0 0 1* ( 4 ( 1 ( $ 3! ( +1/ ( 5 &" 4 1 1 / , 1 0 ( 1 0 4, 4 ,1 / / 1 ( 1/ 1 1 ( 05 ( ( + 1 1 ( 4 4, / 1 ( ) 1* ( ( / ,5 0 1 1 1 (+ (* 0 1/ ( 1 ) ,1 3 (* 3 2 1, 0 1* 1 ( ( ( / ,5 ,5 ( 4 $ ( 4," 3 1 ( /" ( 1 4 ,5 ( 4 11* ,( 1 / ( , ( 5 3 1 ( *, ( ( + 5 1* 5 ( 4/ ( 5 ,+ 4 41* 41 1 5 1* *, + , ( 5 ( 0 ( 1 ,5 ( 4 ( 1+, # ,1 ,5 ( 4 %" 1 4 4, 4 ( (+1, 1 1 11 (*, 1' $ 1 3 4, ( 5 ( / , ( 5 , +1* ( 4 3 1 ( ( + 0 5 4 5 1 4 365 Coupon Expir es: 10-15-13 CODE: AP00 F r i d a y O c t o b e r 1 8 t h T rip l e T ai l s S e a f o o d & R a w B a r 3 p m & 5 p m P ro vis i ons 6 p. m T h e T h i r s t y G o a t 6 :3 0 p m 8: 3 0 p m & 1 0 : 3 0 p m Ma n g o Ma r le y s ( c e n t r a l t i m e z o n e ) 7 p m & 9 p m Sa t urda y O c t o b e r 1 9 t h D o c k s i d e S e a f o o d a n d R a w B a r 1 1 :3 0 a m 1 2 : 4 5 p m 2 p m F r e e S o n g w r i t e r s W or k sh o p Loo k o u t Lo u n g e 5 p m & 7 p m To u c a n s ( c e n t r a l t i m e z o n e ) 6 p m 8 p m & 1 0 p m Ha u gh t y Her o n 7 p m & 9 p m S u n d a y O c t o b e r 2 0 t h I n d i a n P a s s R a w B a r 2 p m 3 :3 0 p m 5 p m 6 :3 0 p m 8 p m 1 0 p m L a t e N ig ht J a m S es s io n F o r f u l l e v e n t s c h e d u l e v is i t: Bla s t o n t h e B a y c o m T h i s P r o j e c t r e c e i v e d n a n c i a l a s s i s t a n c e f r o m t h e G u l f C o u n t y T D C T h i s P r o j e c t r e c e i v e d n a n c i a l a s s is t a n c e f r om V is it F l or i d a. The weather was per fect Friday afternoon, as the schools closed early and more than 700 people attended Estuary Day 2013, held at Marion Mil lender Park and the ad jacent interpretive and research center for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. In all, 73 people, 28 staff and 45 volunteers manned the exhibits. Volunteers came from Franklin County High School and the ABC School, the Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commis sion. Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, the Florida State Univer sity Coastal and Marine Lab and numerous other organizations. New this year was an exhibit on honey staffed by local beekeepers George Watkins and Jim my Moses. Another first was a booth from the culinary students at the Frank lin County School, which served up “sea shell salad,” wraps and sweet treats for a very modest fee. Organizer Lisa Bailey said the crowd was up by about 100 from last year. Rumor has it that one young attendee failed to follow directions and wound up in one of the specimen tanks, but no name could be confirmed. Bailey said the young ster was unharmed. She said the fall was re sult of horseplay despite the fact that he was ac companied by a parent “Sounds like natural consequences to me!” she said. – By LOIS SWOBODA Hundreds ock to 2013 Estuary Day Volunteer Chloe Davis helps out on the obstacle course. FWC intern Danny Mannka loads up a “tree” with forage for little “bears” on the shore of Apalachicola Bay as part of an outreach on living with bears. A fascinated crowd watches Jimmy Moses extract honey from the comb. PHOTOS BY LO O I S S SS W OBO OBO DA | The Times New this year was a concession booth manned by students from the Franklin County School. Seen here are, from left, Brooke Frye, Sasha Carr, Keaton Hersey and Chandler White.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, October 3, 2013 A pa l ac h i c ol a – Ba t t e r y P a r k K a y d S e l d e n ( c o o r d i n at o r) D a vi d B a rc la y Ch r i s G io rda no M a r c ia G io rda no Jo hn G io rda no C a m e r o n G io rda no A pa l ac h i c ol a – A b e r c r o mb ie L a n d i ng J oh n In z e t t a ( c o o r d i n at o r) M e l o ni e Inz e t t a B ob I ngu a g ia t o D a v id F r a n c is c o G re g L a S c hu m A pa l ac h i c ol a L a f a y et t e P a r k L oi s S w o bod a ( c o o r d i n at o r) M e r s he l l S he r m a n S u s a n M a ke n A pa l ac h i c ol a – U S. 9 8 C o r r i do r R ob i n V ro e g op ( c o o r d i n at o r) Br u c e H al l Ra n d y Be l l M ar k P ar s l e y B a l d P o i n t S t a t e P a r k D u s t in A l l en ( c o o r d i n at o r) Me l is s a F o r e h a u s P e t e r Ni mk o f f Ma r e s h a h O wu su Y a n K a n y a J o n e s Ma r y Ma d s e n A n g e l i q u e T a y l e r J e f f r e y B e l l e J a m il a T u ll K i m R o s s B r ia n Le e Jo e A l b r igh t Jo e S ie r r a S t u a r t B r i l e y S ha r o n B r ad f o rd Cha r la L u c a s Jo ha nna P e t t y Ka r e n W e ns i n g A r ia ne U ngu r a i t A ng e l a M c C lo y Jim M c C l o y E l i z a b e t h S lack Ka yl a D a v i s Le s C a mp b e l l D a n ie l le F la t R i c ha rd C a r r ol l P a u l a C a r ro l l M a r t ha L a ng M i c hae l C o op e r Pa u l Pa r k e r M i tc h Pa r k e r Z ack B u r k e T e d D u n ca n H e a t he r D un c a n C a m ill e L illi e N i c hola s F o n t e la K a r e n Jo rda n D a n i e l He n d o n J ack C o r b e t t K a t h l e e n R C a r t e r J a m es C a r t er B l a i r e L a m y J e s s ic a Me e k e r O l i v i a W r ig h t T a yl o r Ra i ns L a r r y A r nol d By ro n S m i t h C a r ra be l l e B e a c h K i m Wr e n ( c o o r d i n at o r) A im e e D iP a lm a S a p p Z oie L a n c e D y l an L an ce T y l e r R owe l l S t u M ill e r L y n n M ill e r C a r ra be l l e L e s l e y C o x ( c o o r d i n at o r) T a m a r a A l le n ( c o o r d i n at o r) L i n d a B u r n s S W A T Ad v i s o r B o n n y B a l l T I G E R S Ad v i s o r Ca l A l l e n Br e n d a L aP a z G r e g K r i s to f f e r s o n D a v id Bu t l e r S t e v e n W A l l e n T i m ot h y K e i th L u c a s L is a K e it h L u c a s K e n M e r t z L o re nz o O ’ N e a l K a t h l e en O m ar S k ip F r i n k Le n u a rd H a l l J udy H a l l W illi e En g li s h M a r y C l a i r e L ove l l C a y ce D an i e l s Jo hnn i e D a n ie ls J e n ni f e r D a ni e l s B r a n dy St r o ps Ka yl a P i l g e r C a u l i n Sh e ri d an K e n A n d e r s o n Che r N o v a r ia D o g Is la n d B e ac he s C hr i st o p h e r T e af ( c o o r di n a t o r f o r t h e D o g I s l a n d C o nse r v a t i o n D i s t r i c t ) D a vi d P r i n t is s ( c o o r di n a t o r f o r t h e N a t u r e C o ns e r v a n c y ) Ra n d y C a n n o n P a t T ea f B i l l Sl ugg N a n cy K e ll e t t R i ck C le v e ng e r B r e n da C le v e ng e r A nn S ha n k s R os e G o o d so n D a v i d DeF i n a J ack i e W a t t s K e n Jo ne s D a n ie l le Jo ne s K a y l e e Jo ne s T e r r i C a nno n C l a u d i a B u j o l d R i ck C la r k M a r y K a m a t J ack M a r c he s e D ia nne M e l lo n Ed M e l l o n T a m m y O w e n B ill O w e n B arb ar a P e r l i s L a r r y Pe r l i s G e n e v i ev e P r i n t i s s P a m S t e ve n s B e n Wa t t s S h e r w ood W i s e E a s t p o i n t – D ow n t ow n H e idi M o n t g o m e r y ( c o o r d i n at o r) W a l k e r D e V a u gh n Ch a n c e B a r e l d J a re d K in g D a l l a s S h i ve r S ava n n a h M o n tg o m e r y E t h a n M o n t g o m e r y E as t p o i n t M ar i o n M i l l en d e r P ar k R i c k P l e s s in ger ( c o o r d i n at o r) R o s a l y n K il c o lli n s ( c o o r d i n at o r) L i n da P le s s i n g e r J a m e s L e e C ar o l O ’ De l Rob e r t O ’ D e l B r y c e T o b i n J e s s ie K a ne s M e g an L am b T a r a K l i n k M a n d y A n d re ws T a ba t ha S p u r l o ck A u st i n P a st or c i c h F S U C o a s t a l & M a r i n e L a b B arb ar a S h o p l o c k an d S a tu r d a y a t S e a G r o u p ( c o o rd i na t o r s ) L a i n g E dm i s t o n Le a h Ba k a n S a na n E ng e l C o r i nna C a r r ol l J ack s o n H e n r y L i a m S t r i v e lli H arp e r G e r a c i K yl a n S i m mo ns Is a ac Ba k a n K i m D unn Co l l e e n Cosg r o v e H e a t he r S ne e d T h o m a s J a x o n L e e Ma r is s a Z a l e y G re g F a l s t r o m Z o e S hop lo ck C a a s i N ak a b L a n ar k B ea c h K a t h y S w a g g e r t y ( c o o r d i n at o r) B G a il P h illi p s ( c o o r d i n at o r) J a m e s L S m i t h A n it a S m it h B r en d a K e en S u z a n n e Zi m m e r m a n S a i n t G e o r g e I s l a n d D o w n t o w n A d a L o n g ( c o o r d i n at o r) D a il M u lli n s ( c o o r d i n at o r) B o b Pr u i t t Ba r ba r a S a n de r s W K S a n d e r s Be t h A p p l e t o n D a v e H arb a u g h A de l e C ol s t o n P et e R it c h J a n e N ip p s S u s a n K ear n e y A n n a A nt h ui s T im A n t hu i s E la i ne Ro s e n t ha l Su s a n B a s s e t t J o E l l en P ear m a n Je a n G u nt e r R ay S a i n t G e o r g e I s l a n d S t a t e P a r k J o s h Hod s o n ( c o o r d i n at o r) Ma u r ic e T i n k l e r K r i s t i a n T i n k l e r A n n a K e l l y S c ot t T i m m K a t i e M a x we l l M at t h e w D a vi s S h a n n o n M a r t i n A s h l e y B e nne t t K i n s e y B ro ok C a r l e e R e d k o Ma r i ly n T i mm S a in t T e re s a S usan B u l l o ch ( c o o r d i n at o r) Ka r yl W C o ch r a n L i z a W it me r B e n S h aw S c ip i o C r e e k M a t t he w A n de r s o n ( c o o r d i n at o r) T w o M i le Is la n d L is a Ba i l e y ( c o o r d i n at o r) M a t t h e w A n de r s o n E r i k L ove s t r a n d 1 5 b o y s a n d 5 s t a f f f r o m t h e L ib e r t y J U S. T c a mp J o h n S P h i pp s N a t ur e C o nse r v a n c y P r e s e r v e A l l i g a to r Po i n t M a r y Ba l t h rop ( c o o r di n a t o r ) G e o r g e E L e w i s I I S a r a h L e w i s G e o r g e L e w i s I I I S t e l l a Le w i s C l i f t o n L e w i s T H E A C T O F C L E A N I N G A B E A C H C H A N G E S Y O U . ( P A M L O N G O B A R D I ) 2 0 1 3 F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o a s t a l C l e a n u p A p a l a c h i co l a R i v e rk e ep e r a n d i t s co s p o n s o r s — O c e a n C o n s e r v a n c y a n d t h e F r a n kl i n C o u n t y Dep a r t m e n t s o f P a rk s & R e c r e a t i o n a n d S o l i d W a s t e & R e c y c l i n g — t h a n k t h e 2 5 2 v o l u n t e e r s i n c l u d i n g 2 3 s i t e c o o r d i nat o r s w ho he l p e d c le a n u p ou r b e ac he s i s l a n d s b a y a n d ri v e r o n S ep t e m b e r 2 1 A cco r d i n g t o t h e o f c i a l w e i g h i n f r o m t h e Dep a r t m e n t o f S o l i d W a s t e & R e c y c l i n g v o l u n t e e r s co l l e c t e d 1 3 65 t o n s o f t r a s h : 2 6 7 b a g s o f ca n s b o t t l e s c i g a r e t t e b u t t s p l a s t i c s t yr o f o a m s h i n g g e a r r o p e s a n d o t h e r l i t t e r — a s w e l l a s l u m b e r h e a v y co n s t r u c t i o n m a t e ri a l s ca r p a r t s t i r e s c r a b t r a p s a l a z y b o y re c l in e r j a w b o n e s a n i n a t a b l e s h a rk a co y o t e s k e l e t o n a m o n s t e r t r u c k t i r e 2 r e e x t i n g u i s h e r s a t o y ri e a s a n d b a g f r o m 2 0 1 1 a r e f ri g e r a t o r a b e r g l a s s b o a t h u l l a 1 5 ’ X 1 5 ’ ca r g o n e t a T V s e t a n d a m e s s a g e i n a b o t t l e f o u n d b u ri e d i n t h e s a n d : “ S e n t t o s e a A p ri l 6 2 0 1 3 1 m i l e w e s t o f P e p p e r s h K e y ( ne a r S t e i nhat c he e ) ”

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 A Section Special to the Times On Tuesday, Gov. Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi announced Florida has led suit against Georgia to stop its unchecked and growing consumption of water that continues to harm the families of Northwest Florida. “Georgia has refused to fairly share the waters that ow between our two states, so to stop Georgia’s unmitigated consumption of water, we have brought the matter before the U.S. Supreme Court,” Scott said. “Georgia’s over-consumption of water threatens the existence of Apalachicola Bay and the future economic development of the region. “Generations of Florida families have relied upon these waters for their livelihood but now risk losing their way of life if Georgia’s actions are not stopped. Through this historic legal action, we are ghting for the future of Apalachicola Bay and its families. After 20 years of failed negotiations with Georgia, this is our only way forward in securing the economic future of northwest Florida.” Bondi said, “I am proud to join Gov. Scott in this ght to protect Florida’s fair share of water from Georgia’s over-consumption, which is devastating Apalachicola Bay’s ecosystem.” Florida and Alabama have sought relief from harm caused by reduced ows and increased Georgia consumption in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basins over the past 20 years through legal challenges, without success. Florida now proposes to address the problem squarely — an Original Action led with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking injunctive relief against Georgia’s unmitigated and unsustainable upstream consumption of water from the Chattahoochee and Flint river basins. Apalachicola River water levels are affected by withdrawals from the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers at all times. The Metro-Atlanta area primarily obtains its water from the Chattahoochee River, with withdrawals totaling 360 million gallons per day. Georgia’s consumption is expected to nearly double to about 705 million gallons per day by 2040, as Atlanta’s population and associated water withdrawals grow unchecked. That estimated daily consumption represents the approximate water volume of the entire Apalachicola Bay on an annual basis. Historically low water levels brought about by Georgia’s excessive consumption have caused oysters to die because of higher salinity, increased disease and predator intrusion in the Bay. Until recently, Apalachicola Bay accounted for about 10 percent of the nation’s Eastern oyster supply. However, the oyster industry in Apalachicola collapsed in 2012 after years of reduced ows of freshwater into the Bay, leading Scott to seek and obtain a Commercial Fisheries Disaster Declaration from the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this year. Special to the Times The Seahawks have been spotted preening colorful feathers; the Franklin County School’s K-12 Positive Behavior Support program for the 2013-2014 school year has taken ight. Under the school’s guidelines for success, students observed being responsible, respectful and safe randomly receive colorful “feathers.” Any faculty or staff member can award feathers to students following guideline behaviors throughout the school day. Students write their names on their awarded feathers before depositing them into classroom “nests” throughout the school week. On Friday mornings, feathers are drawn from classroom nests around the campus; two from each middle and high school rst period classes and two from each of the elementary classrooms. Winning feather recipients are awarded special treats and social time on Friday afternoons in a pre-designated location on the school’s campus. Each week, feathers are tallied, per grade level, in preparation for recognizing students receiving the most feathers in each nine week grading period. Special prizes will be awarded to students, at end-of-year grade level award recognition ceremonies, for receiving the most feathers throughout the school year. With the school’s positive behavior support program in place, it pays to be a successful Seahawk. Students can count their feathers, and blessings: “Ain’t it great to be a Hawk?” If anyone would like to make a donation toward the FCS incentive program, contact Kris Bray, assistant principal, at 670-2800, ext. 3115 or kbray@franklin.k12. .us. Your support would be greatly appreciated. Go Seahawks! Time to serve the needs of area seniors Over the last seven weeks, a group of between 16 and 25 Franklin County seniors has been meeting weekly to express concern that the board of directors charged with running the Carrabelle Senior Center has not followed the policy and procedures as directed by the current 2008 Franklin County Senior Citizens Council bylaws, the code of ethics and 1975 charter of incorporation. An annual council membership meeting in September at which you, the Franklin County 50 years old and over membership, can nominate board members and vote on the directors for the next year, as is stipulated by the Council by-laws, was not allowed to happen. Thus, your vote was denied. It was then decided by council members that the next scheduled board meeting of the council board of directors, at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9, would be the of cial annual meeting of the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council at which the members can nominate and vote on new board members and voice suggestions for the use of the Carrabelle Senior Center building. A plan on how to make the Carrabelle Senior Center return to serving the needs of the area seniors will be presented for your vote. Seniors, please attend this meeting and vote for your rights! Harriett Beach The problems that have devastated Apalachicola Bay are complicated, but the solution is simple: Congress must direct the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to release enough water to restore the health of the Apalachicola River, bay and estuary. The best way to implement this mandate is through the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2013. Anything short of a Congressional mandate that requires the Corps to act constitutes willful destruction of our highly productive, worldrenowned shery and the communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. Earlier this summer, Florida Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio tried unsuccessfully to get language into the Senate’s version of WRRDA. Their initial efforts were thwarted by Georgia’s powerful and well-connected senior senators. Rubio and Nelson took their work on behalf of the bay to the next level by bringing a U.S. Senate Committee Field Hearing to Apalachicola in August. That hearing and the of cial federal declaration that Apalachicola Bay has suffered a commercial sheries disaster brought national attention to the plight of our seafood workers. We are grateful for the senators’ work. Next, it was Rep. Steve Southerland’s turn to try to convince his colleagues to put this language into the House version of the WRRDA bill. And try he did, with an impassioned plea to the House Transportation Committee on behalf of his Panhandle constituents. “Countless oystermen, coastal businesses and hardworking families have seen their way of life destroyed by decreased water ows into the Apalachicola River and Bay,” Southerland said. Steve Southerland knows that if the Apalachicola River does not get the freshwater ow it needs to survive, the economic productivity of Apalachicola Bay and the $5.6 billion recreational and commercial seafood industry in the eastern Gulf of Mexico it supports will be history. This destruction is all the more unthinkable because it can be prevented through immediate congressional intervention. If Alabama, Florida and Georgia would work together to establish a foundation of collaboration and negotiation, a tri-state watersharing compact could be developed that would help Florida. But after decades of waiting for the states to act and the announcement that Florida is going to seek a solution from the Supreme Court, a compact is not likely to happen. Even if the state’s lawsuit is successful, it will be too late to save the Apalachicola River and Bay. Congress must step in and act. Georgia has the water, and for the moment, Georgia has the power. Absent a congressional mandate to the Corps, Georgia has no incentive to negotiate. It’s now up to Southerland to lead the charge. He clearly understands the challenge ahead: “Make no mistake: there are no overnight xes to this problem … With countless lives and livelihoods at stake, I am committed to standing shoulder-to-shoulder with local leaders and the citizens who live along Apalachicola River and Bay to keep the water owing.” Southerland did not leave empty-handed from his most recent efforts for the Apalachicola River and Bay. He has begun the process for an investigation of the Corps’ management by the U.S. Government Accountability Of ce and he has received a commitment for another congressional hearing to closely examine the Corps’ management of the river’s ow. But it is essential that Congress act now to protect our magni cent river and bay, a one-of-a-kind ecological-treasure. With the House of Representatives poised to vote on its version of WRRDA, we are counting on Southerland to overcome politics and ensure that the nal WRRDA bill clearly directs the Corps of Engineers to send Florida the water it deserves and the water it needs. It won’t be an easy lift, but it will be worth the effort. Congress must act now. We cannot let the communities die that depend on these vital natural resources. We can’t let the Apalachicola River and Bay die. Not on our watch. Dan Tonsmeire has served as riverkeeper and executive director of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper since May 2010. Page 4 Letter to the EDITOR Students padding the FCS ‘Nest’ with feathers Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft Congress must act now to protect river, bay DAN TONSMEIRE Special to the Times Legal action against Georgia ‘only way forward’ GOVERNOR: If Alabama, Florida and Georgia would work together to establish a foundation of collaboration and negotiation, a tri-state water-sharing compact could be developed that would help Florida. But after decades of waiting for the states to act and the announcement that Florida is going to seek a solution from the Supreme Court, a compact is not likely to happen. “Georgia’s over-consumption of water threatens the existence of Apalachicola Bay and the future economic development of the region. Generations of Florida families have relied upon these waters for their livelihood but now risk losing their way of life if Georgia’s actions are not stopped.” Gov. Rick Scott WATER WARS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 3, 2013 will serve as a resource to support Sea Grant out reach programs designed to transfer knowledge to the private sector. Dr. Karl Havens, a Uni versity of Florida professor who has worked closely with local seafood industry leaders in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, serves on the marine life center’s advi sory board, a collection of experts from around the world. In addition to the hatch ery idea, the FCSWA on Monday backed a proposal to ensure against over harvesting by appealing to state ofcials to expand their closures in the event that too much rain, or too high of river levels, forces a closure of the bay. The sea food workers want to make sure that in the event too much water forces closure of Cat Point — which is frequently the case during the winter season because it is closest to the river — that such a closure also extends to the oyster bars on the Miles farther west. “The Miles there ain’t nothing,” Hartseld said Monday. “Is anyone here works the west end of the bay?” When few hands were raised, he then asked, “Who’s doing a little bet ter on Cat Point? How long do you think Cat Point’s going to hold up?” Banks asked the au dience how many bags they were bringing in on average per day, and the consensus was that it was under three. The majority of boats working Cat Point are catching under three bags a day,” Banks said. “I hope to God it gets bet ter around November and December.” Not everyone agreed times were that bad, with Kenny Reeder and Philip Vinson saying they were catching more than a doz en bags per day, provided they kept their boats moving. “The sky’s is not fall ing; the bay’s coming back,” Vinson said. “You can make a living out here.” Seafood dealer David Barber said he’s paying oystermen the best pric es he ever has, at about $42 per bag, but he’s only buying about 60 to 80 bags “on a good day,” about onefth of what he could buy in a robust year. He said his trucks are shipping out far fewer loads than usual. “Now I’m lucky to get a load of oysters a week out of Louisiana,” he said, noting he expects produc tion from south Texas to be pretty good heading into the winter months, when demand typically rises for the holidays. Hartseld did not spare state agencies from criti cism, faulting the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services for spending more than $400,000 on research into aquaculture while not get ting to the bottom of what’s causing the drop-off in pro duction at the oyster bars. “That’s what DOACS is doing for us,” he said. “They want us to quit working our live bars and start farming oysters. They’re wanting us to put ourselves out of work. Both groups (DO ACS and FWC) are trying to destroy our bay.” Hartseld said he learned at a meeting last week that aquaculture methods can yield produc tion in 12-16 months’ time, and that a grower can make between $12,000 and $16,000 a year, but it would cost between $15,000 and $20,000 in start-up costs, much more than a typical oystermen has on hand to invest. He urged his fellow oys termen to avoid catching undersized oysters and to be sure to throw unsold oysters back in the bay. “We keep on doing what we’re doing, we’re not going to catch nothing,” Hartseld said. “By Christ mastime, there aren’t go ing to be any left out there. “We can’t get any help and assistance with this bay with the bay running wide open,” he said. “With out assistance, this bay is going to get worse. There’s oysters still dying at the west end.” Jerry Williams said, “Hagan’s at to the west, north spur, is just as clean as a sand dune. There’s lit tle on Cat Point, but to the west there’s nothing.” He downplayed the likelihood that his fellow oystermen would be able to prot from aquaculture. “That’s a sucker’s game, but there’s big money in managing programs like that,” Williams said. “The people who make the money are those who supervise.” One bright spot that emerged was several oys termen who said they’re beginning to see growth in the oysters they’re catch ing, especially since the amount of freshwater com ing down the river is in creasing for the rst time in years. “I can take you and show you bars with new oysters, new growth on it,” one man said. Hartseld urged the oystermen to take steps to organize a caravan to Tal lahassee, for a chance to make their plea for assis tance directly to legislators and the governor himself. “We have to have at least 500 people load up and go, when the gover nor’s there,” he said. “How Im p la nt s & C r o w ns Af f or da ble De ntu r es P ana ma Cit y P A W illia m C Kna pk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P ana ma City Squ ar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P ana ma City FL Cal l F or Inf or mat ion 188 841 516 38 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Addi tiona l f ees ma y be incur r ed depe nding on indiv idua l case s Same -da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailab le in cer t ain case s Af f or dable Dentu r es P anam a City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. G r e a t v s ot he r D en t a l p r o vi d er s Sin gle T oo th Im pla nt $ 1 7 95 D e n tu r e Im p la n ts $ 1 49 5 $ 1 8 95 Sa m e Da y Cr o wn s $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upp er Ar c h 20144-3-T4 W elcomes Selena Coult er t o our staf f Selena in vit es fr iends and f amily t o call f or an appointment. The Mane S alon and Da y Spa 1 31 A v enue E Apalac hicola er Selena Coult iends es fr vit in appointment. 653-8714 NO T I C E OF A D OP T I ON OF C I T Y ORD I N A NC E T h e C i t y C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a w i l l h o l d a p u b l i c h e a r i n g f o r t h e p u r p o s e o f r e c e i v i n g c i t i z e n ’ s c o m m e n t s o n t h e f o l l o w i n g p r o p o s e d o rd i na n c e : ORD IN A NC E NO 2 0 1 3 0 4 A N O R D I N A N C E B Y T H E C I T Y C O M M I S S I O N O F T H E C I T Y O F A P A L A C H I C O L A F L O R I D A A M E N D I N G S E C T I O N 2 0 4 9 O F O R D I N A N C E N U M B E R 2 0 0 8 0 2 ; P R O V I D I N G F O R A D O P T I O N O F A S E W E R U S E R C H A R G E ; P R O V I D I N G F O R R E P E A L E D O F A L L ORD IN A NC E S OR P A R T T H E RE OF IN C ON F L I C T H E R E W I T H ; A N D P R O V I D I N G F O R A N E F F E C T I V E D AT E T he p u b l i c he a r i ng w i l l b e he l d i n t he A pa lac h i c ola C o m m un i t y C e n t e r # 1 Ba y A v e n u e A pa lac h i c ola F l o r i d a a t 6 : 0 0 P M o n T u e s d a y O c t o b e r 8 2 0 1 3 A l l i n t e r e s t e d p a r t i e s a r e e n c o u r a g e d t o a p p e a r a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r e s p e c t t o t h i s p r o p o s e d o r d i n a n c e. The original budget draft did not contain the pay raises, but early in the meeting, Massey said rais es were necessary and should be added in. “There’s money in the budget, and they haven’t had raises in sev en years,” Massey said. “These men are working at poverty lev el, making $20,000 a year. Jared Mock is the only employee taking out inmates every day. He makes $25,000 a year.” She said Mock’s work was hazardous and deserved greater compensation and that the cost of the raises was slight and would not raise taxes. She distributed a worksheet showing the cur rent salaries of city employees, how much increase each worker would receive and the total cost, $21,500 for the city and the same amount for the water and sewer department. Under the proposal, workers earning $40,000 or more received a $1,000 raise, those earning $30,000 to $39,000 received a $2,000 raise and those earning $20,000 to $29,000 received a $3,000 raise. Commissioners got a $200 annual pay in crease. Mock, an employee since January 2011, got 20 percent, increasing his salary from $25,000 to $30,000. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the proposed increase in water and sewer expense would be funded by reducing the contribution to the contingency fund. “We had planned to contribute $70,000, and I reduced that to $50,000, which will give us $600,000 in that account,” she said. “We try to keep a rolling balance of $400,000.” The $21,500 for city raises will be funded by adjusting the balance forward, Messer said. One member of the audience asked if commissioners were concerned about public perception of the raises when so many people are struggling with a poor economy. “They choose to be seafood workers. I’ve seen the bay in a lot worse shape than it is today back in 1985,” Massey said. “How come them oystermen is making $1,000 a week and still drawing $900 in food stamps? They have the opportunity. They don’t want to do nothing.” She said few seafood workers have taken advantage of Workforce Florida pro grams to get additional training to pursue new careers in the face of problems with the oyster harvest. After discussion, the proposed raises passed unanimously. After the vote, Commissioner Brenda La Paz said, “You know folks out there aren’t going to understand about the rais es, so is everybody ready to get chewed up about it?” Massey replied, “Oh, I’m sure, but the same ones that’ll be complaining is the same ones that will be complain ing when their yard is full of water or a tree’s fell in their yard, when we do have a disaster. Who they’ll call rst is the city employees.” About 25 people, many of whom spoke out against the raises, attended the nal budget meeting Sept. 24. La Paz opened the meeting with a speech decrying the proposed raises. She said she had reviewed the proposal in the interim since the rst meeting and felt it was unreasonable. “At this point, the city and water and sewer are spending more than they take in,” she said. “At that rate, we won’t have revenue available to pay salaries. The gen eral fund reserve, water and sewer con tingency are savings accounts and should not be used for repeating expenses. If we use from our reserve and contingencies to support signicant salary increases this year, what will we do next year and the years after? The reserve and contin gency accounts are sacred and need to be reserved for emergencies. Reimburse ment from FEMA can take years.” Messer said La Paz did not understand the funding and that no money would be taken from contingency or reserve accounts. “I’m terribly offended that the commis sioners voted themselves raises unless those raises don’t take ef fect until everybody in here is reelected,” said former nance com missioner Gathana Parmenas. “I was nance commissioner for several years when the city had a lot of money,” she said. “Tax revenue was rolling in from a lot of developments that are now ghost developments. Property values are declining every year, and so our millage rates are going up every year. We have no more people in this town than we did in the year 2000. Some people say we have fewer. If the census says we have more, it is because they’re in the prison. It’s not because they’re tax-paying citizens on the outside. “What’s happening is if you compare what city government cost us to run in the year 2000 for the same number of people versus what it’s costing us to run right now, one can see that we’ve got a really big elephant to feed here,” Parmenas said. “I think everybody is reasonable about being concerned about whether we’re dipping into money that was left over from those lush years in order to keep things rolling with no more people to pay the taxes and with declining property values. So what we want, Keisha, is reas surance that the money coming in every year at least equals the money going out every year. When we hear words like con tingency and reserves, it sounds to us like you’re dipping into the rainy day funds. “You haven’t planned for any capital expenditures, and in the same meetings I hear about how terrible the roof is, how terrible the A/C and heating is and that it’s going to cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. That needs to be in your bud geting process from the beginning,” she said. Other audience members complained adjustments for workers compensation insurance and other hidden benets were improperly gured and that no city work er was below the poverty level. “Evidently, you’re not taking in the FICA or retirement income that’s added to the person’s income. If a base salary is $31,000 and you add FICA and retire ment, he gets over $54,000,” Randy Ush er said. “Is that below poverty level? The lowest income guy on here makes over $30,000.” La Paz presented commissioners with a handout she said demonstrated the pay increases would actually cost the city more than $700,000 and water and sewer more than $600,000. In an interview after the meeting, Messer said, she did not believe the g ures on the sheet were correct and that adjustments to FICA and workman’s compensation would not be made until the next scal year. Usher and La Paz warned that a 20 percent pay raise for a single employee could upset coworkers. Massey said Mock’s job was danger ous, and he deserved a raise. “I’ve been down there for a little over a year. I don’t have any retirement. If I don’t go to work, I don’t get a paycheck,” Shawn Oxendine said. “I want everybody to pros per and I want us to do good. I’m just ask ing y’all to run this thing like a business. If we don’t run it like a business, we’re go ing to run it into the ground.” Massey said money for the raises was available in the budget without increas ing millage. La Paz said the decision to give raises should be delayed and a for mal pay scale developed. The millage rate of 8.77 passed unani mously, with Finance Commissioner Charlotte Schneider not in attendance. The budget passed 3-1 with La Paz op posed. As the meeting closed, La Paz announced she would not accept an in crease in her salary. The city of Carrabelle was the only tax ing district to see an enlargement of its tax base, after having suffered a nearly 26 percent decline last year. Carrabelle’s combined valuation this year will expand from $101.8 million to $102.7 million, an in crease of $916,000, or almost 1 percent. BRENDA LA PAZ KEISHA MESSER O lL IVIA MASSEY CARRABELLE from page A1 OYSTERMEN from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com A professor of history at Troy University told members of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society on Saturday morning that he plans to write a social history of Apalachicola, focused on the theme of the community’s ability to rebound despite adverse and changing conditions. “There are thousands of Southern towns, suffering the vagaries of economic ups and downs. They’re gone away; they’re dead towns,” said Robert Saunders, chairman of the history department at the Alabama university. “Apalachicola easily could have succumbed to yellow fever, to oods, to the re of 1900. I want to nd out what has historically driven the town to keep on,” he said, “Apalachicolans have been knocked down many times, but they’ve always come back.” Saunders was guest speaker at the society’s general meeting, held at the Raney House carriage house and attended by about 30 members of the society. Saunders said he expected to work on the book for about two years and plans to begin after he completes the story of Wilber Wightman Gramling, a Leon County man who served in the Fifth Florida Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. He saw action at Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg; was sent to the prisoner-of-war camp at Elmira, N.Y.; and left behind one of the few surviving diaries written by a Florida soldier during the war, particularly rare in that it documents the experiences of a serviceman incarcerated in a Union prisoner-of-war camp. Saunders is also doing work on the letters exchanged between Mary Todd Lincoln’s half-sister, Elodie Todd, and her anc Nathaniel Henry Rhodes Dawson, a Selma, Ala., lawyer and politician, Confederate ofcer and United States commissioner of education. The professor, a Baltimore, Md., native who moved to Selma as a boy when his father, an FBI agent, was reassigned there, has taught college for 26 years and is an interim associate dean at Troy. He earned his bachelor and master’s degrees from Salisbury State University and a doctorate from Auburn University in 1994. In his recounting of Apalachicola’s economic history, Saunders described how the port city has been both geographically and socially isolated, but cosmopolitan in its sensibilities and diverse in its ethnic makeup. He said a visit to Chestnut Cemetery quickly reveals that “this is a town of immigrants, a town of Northerners. The rst thing that strikes you is they (the deceased) are from somewhere else.” Saunders said he plans to explore the history of Apalachicola’s ethnic enclaves, and its spirit of survival, by drawing on the history of families from all walks on life, as opposed to focusing exclusively on high-prole families, such as the Ormans and the Raneys, or famous individuals, such as Alvan Chapman or William Popham. “One person doesn’t make a town,” he said. “I want to provide as much details as I possibly can, to provide a whole picture, a complete picture. “We need records, the history of your families. I can tell a pretty good story, but I need the record.” Saunders said. “Look through your closets and your attics. Nothing is inconsequential; nothing is trivial. It adds color.” The professor said he envisions his work to be in the vein of two earlier works, one by Harry P. Owens, a professor emeritus from the University of Mississippi who wrote his 1966 doctoral dissertation at Florida State University on “Apalachicola before 1861” and the other by William Warren Rogers, a professor emeritus at FSU, whose 1986 work “Outposts on the Gulf” on the history of Franklin is considered the most denitive history of the area. He said he admired Rogers’ work but found it incomplete, in that it devoted lots of focus on individuals, such as real estate and condence man William Popham, to the exclusion of a broad look at social and religious trends. Saunders said he believes Rogers would welcome a successor to his work, especially from World War II to the present, but that he plans to conclude his narrative before the 1980s to ensure against bias. “When I get close to the present, I start getting nervous,” he said. “We know more about Charlemagne than we know of John Kennedy.” He also noted that while the rest of the county has a fascinating history, “I intend to focus on Apalachicola, because that’s the area’s anchor.” After Saunders presentation, the society had its annual general meeting and voted on a series of updates to their bylaws. In addition, they re-elected the current board, which includes President Tom Daly, Vice President David Adlerstein, Secretary Shirley Taylor and Treasurer Fran Edwards. In addition they re-elected Gene Smith to another term on the board of directors. HAVE A PIECE OF hH ISTORY? Professor Robert Saunders is hoping for assistance from area individuals in terms of providing him letters, family records, photos and other historical artifacts for his upcoming work. To reach him, email him at rsaunders@troy.edu. By T evis EVIS Pa A G e E Special to the Times As the weeks have progressed, the high school has been chatting about our upcoming homecoming game. Campaigns have been sold, and winners have been elected. Our 2013-14 Mr. Franklin County High School is our all-American Logan McLeod, and our Miss Franklin County High School is our beautiful Brook Pittman. The Homecoming Court consists of Chelsea Register and Thomas Copley-Subbarao for the freshman class; Jaylynn Lyston, Anna Riley, River Banks and Dallas Shiver for the sophomore class; Zoie Lance, Erin Riley, Kelsey Shuler, Austin Carter, Chandler White and Brandon Cash for the junior class; and Deborah Dempsey, Marlyn Lee, Haleigh Ming, Adriana Reeder, Jessica Shields, Alex Causey, Kyle Hathcox, Leonard Ward, Cameron White and Mercury Wynn for the senior class. These students, along with the rest of the student body, are eagerly waiting for homecoming week, which is Oct. 7-11. The theme this year will be, “Targeting the Tigers.” Our days will include Monday, Blast from the Past; Tuesday, Twin Day; Wednesday, Wacky/ Costume Day; Thursday, Color Wars/Silly Olympics; and Friday, Spirit day. The colors for high school consist of blue for seniors, yellow for juniors, purple for sophomores and green for freshman. This is going to be a week full of fun and memories. I cannot wait PUBLIC NO TICE The Franklin County T ourist De v elopment Council announces that its Mark eting Committee will hold a public meeting on W ednesday October 16, 2013 at 1:30 P .M. for the purpose of entertaining presentations from area media and publications desiring to pro vide services for future TDC mark eting ef forts. Presentations will be limited to ten minutes. T en copies of handouts for Committee members should be pro vided to the TDC of ce by W ednesday October 9, 2013. Interested or g anizations should call the TDC of ce at 850-653-8678 to be placed on the agenda and arrange for deli v ery of handouts. There will be no action by Committee members at this meeting. M e g i s a n 8 y e a r o l d C h i h u a h u a a n d s h e c o u l d n t b e s w e e t e r S h e i s c a l m a f f e c t i o n a t e a n d l o v e s h u m a n c o n t a c t S h e i s n o t a y a p p y d o g s o w o u l d d o w e l l e v e n i n a n a p a r t m e n t S h e i s h ear t w o r m n e gat i v e an d o t h e r t han n e e d i n g h e r t e e t h c l e a n e d i n g o o d s h a p e Whe n y o u a r e c on s ide r i n g a do pt i n g b e s u r e t o a s s e s s y o u r a c t i v i t y l e v e l a n d a d o p t a d o g t h a t f i t s y o u r l i f e s t y l e I f y o u s p e n d a l o t o f t i m e a t h o m e a n d a r e i n n e e d o f a c o m p a n i o n M e g w o u l d b e a g r e a t c h o i c e V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d e d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r a n i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e g r e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y or g bBB O WB ] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e Lily is 2! Our sweet baby is a big 2-year-old! Lillian Alice Henderson celebrated her Sept. 9 birthday with her family and a Minnie Mouse party at the White City Fire Department. The celebration continued at her school with cupcakes and treats for all her friends. Lily is the daughter of Heather Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the granddaughter of Donnie and Donna Harcus of White City and Michael Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the greatgranddaughter of Bill and Edna Henderson of Eastpoint. Happy Birthday Lily! We love you so much! CC ourtney Giddens, OO ttice A A mison to wed SS aturday Miss Courtney Giddens and Mr. Ottice Amison, both of Apalachicola, have announced nal plans for their wedding. The ceremony will be held at 5:30 p.m. this Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Peach Barn at Timber Mill Acres in Tifton, Ga. A reception at the same location will immediately follow the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Johnny and Gail Giddens of Fitzgerald, Ga. She is the granddaughter of James and Sara Phillips, Joyce Giddens, the late Alvin Giddens and the late John R. Giddens, all of Fitzgerald. The groom is the son of Tim and Ava Amison of Apalachicola. He is the grandson of Doris Bayles of Bascom; Kitty Amison and the late Eddie Amison of Apalachicola; and the late Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bodiford. The Rev. Steve O’Neal will perform the ceremony. Music will be provided by the Blues Factor Band of Valdosta, Ga. Brooke Barnes, sister of the bride, will serve as matron of honor. Bridesmaids will be Charlie Garbutt of Dublin, Ga., Erin Maloy and Katie Petrie, both of Fitzgerald, Ga., and Allison Norris of Douglas, Ga. Braidyn Barnes, niece of the bride, will serve as ower girl. The father of the groom will serve as best man. Groomsmen will be Christian Amison and Colin Amison, sons of the groom, both of Apalachicola, Brandon Martina of Eastpoint, and Doug Giddens of Fitzgerald, Ga., brother of the bride. Chase Giddens, nephew of the bride, will serve as ring bearer. Happy BIRThH DAY Wedding Excitement builds for Oct. 7-11 homecoming week H AA WK TATALK SS PECIAl L TO ThTH E TT IMES Dr. Robert Saunders, Troy University professor of history, addresses members of the Apalachicola Historical Society. Troy professor plans study of Apalachicola history SS PECIAl L TO ThTH E TT IMES Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School are Logan McLeod and Brook Pittman. Society

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She was a 1995 graduate of Apalachicola High School where she excelled academically and received numerous awards. She went on to further her education, receiving her bachelor’s degree in social work from Florida State University. She worked for many years with the Apalachee Center, counseling youth and adults. Jennifer was a lover of all life and was especially fond of her “critters.” She leaves behind her loving and devoted grandparents, Harry and Ida Falk; father, Mark Falk (Joann); sisters, Candace Webb and Jill Falk; brother, Zach Topham; step-brother, Daniel Hicks; nieces, Jaylan Prince, Jocelyn Webb, and Alexis Webb; nephew, Presley Hicks; and host of other family and countless friends. She was preceded in death by her mother, Marlene Hicks. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, Sept. 29, at Fellowship Baptist Church with viewing one hour prior to funeral. Kelley Funeral Home assisted family with arrangements. Jennifer Lynn Falk JENNI fF ER LYNN FAlL K Obituary This is a friendly reminder that the Tonya’s Hope Cancer Foundation is available to Franklin County residents being treated for cancer to help with gas, rent, utilities, groceries, etc. Just call 850625-0382 for an application. TONYA BRIDGES BEING tT REA t T ED fF OR CANCER? Well, how about these nice fall temperatures already? Very pleasant and easy on the power bill. Enjoy! Goody, goody gumdrops! Dot Bless opened the coffee hour on Tuesday, Oct. 1 for the season. Drop in when you come to the post ofce or are just out and about and enjoy a mug of coffee or two. Sometimes, there’s something on the counter to go with the coffee. How long has it been since you had a cup of coffee for 30 cents? I thought so. Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center. Chow line forms at noon. Minimum donation of $4 will be collected at the desk. Then, of course, you can enjoy a huge hamburger with chips every Friday night at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and pizza on Sundays. Phone in your orders between 5 and 7 p.m. at 697-9998 both nights. This Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4 and 5, there will be a huge yard sale on the golf course at Lanark Village. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be on hand to help you. Proceeds go toward the upkeep of the greens. Just follow the trafc. This Saturday evening, Oct. 5, Ron Vice will be on hand at the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center for the Over 50 Halloween Dance. So grab your favorite snack, beverage of choice and your main squeeze and have a great time. Dance starts at 7 p.m. and you might even get to do the Monster Mash. On Monday, Oct. 7, members of the Lanark Village Association board will meet at Chillas Hall at 6 p.m. The membership meeting will start at 7 p.m. Try to attend this meeting; we need your help. For those of you who don’t yet belong to the association, we have applications in the Hall. Mark you calendars for Saturday, Oct. 19 and plan to come to the October Birthday Bash/Halloween party. The party at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you walk in the door. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound, and as my longtime friend Rita Millender says, “Friends are like the stars in the sky. You don’t always see them, but you know they’re there.” Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Coffee hour returns; fall is here LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Special to the Times Historic Apalachicola Main Street recently com pleted another downtown improvement project in Apalachicola. Hand rails have been in stalled along the west block of U.S. 98 in the center of town, which encompasses several businesses includ ing a restaurant, retail shops, and a law ofce. The Main Street design committee chose this proj ect for safety and aesthet ics reason. Members of the board of directors held sev eral meetings with build ing and shop owners along that block to discuss what could be done to the steps to make them more attrac tive and safer. “From the discussions with the business owners, we initially thought of rede signing the steps,” said Jim Bachrach, chair of the de sign committee. “However, the group eventually de cided the steps are part of our history and rather than change what has been then for forever, we would install railings; keeping with our mission of preserving and enhancing the downtown area.” Main Street located a fabricator in Port St. Joe and they worked closely on the design and instal lation of the railings. “It seems to be accepted from the community as a good thing and it was a pleasure working with our shop own ers on this project” said Bachrach. The Apalachicola Area Historical Society has now asked Main Street to do the necessary leg work to have railings put in front of the Raney House. Main Street, afliated with the state and national Main Street organization, has the objective of taking on an aggressive, ongoing revitalization program for Apalachicola. Main Street continues to work towards improv ing the overall look of the downtown area. DD ance SS aturday night in C C arrabelle A dance will be held Saturday evening, Oct. 5, at the Carrabelle Senior Center. The dance starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Music will be provided by a local disc jockey serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to the Senior Center this Saturday night to dance... or just to listen to the music! The Senior Center is at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle.YY ard sale to benet C C arrabelle Food Pantry Carrabelle CARES is holding its annual yard sale to benet the Carrabelle Food Pantry on Saturday, Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot across from the Carrabelle branch of the Franklin County Public Library at 311 St James Ave on US 98. Bring your donations for us to sell and your money to buy; it goes to an important local cause. We will pick up your larger items. For more information call Tamara Allen at 850-524-1153 or email her at tballen@att.net. RR aku workshop in Bowery The Bowery Art Gallery, 149 Commerce St., is planning a special show and workshop featuring the art of Raku. On Oct. 11, works by Dr. Sid Wilroy and his wife Lynn will be on display from 6 to 9 p.m. Then, on Oct. 13 and 20, a Raku workshop will be taught by Kirby Gregory. Instruction will include working on a wheel and ring in a Raku kiln. Supplies will be provided. Cost is $150 for the twoday workshop. For information call 653-2425. SS eniors host NN ov. 9 Fall Festival The Franklin County Senior Center will host a Fall Festival on Saturday, Nov. 9. All persons interested in participating, please contact Carolyn Spivey or Pat Moore at the Center 697-3760 Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. GG ulf-Franklin offers correctional ofcer training A new correctional ofcer training program will be starting at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe on Jan. 22, 2014. This program is designed to prepare students for the state certication exam. Individuals who pass this exam are eligible for employment in any state, county or privately run correctional facility in Florida. The program, conducted using the new shorter curriculum, and lasting about three months, will run from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily, Monday through Thursday. For more information, please call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 or email her at bburkett@gulfcoast.edu The application deadline for Pell Grants and nancial aid is fast approaching, so please call today or come by the Gulf/Franklin Campus to pick up your application packet. Main Street completes hand rail project News b B RIE fF S Juneau, a Lafayette, La., attorney who has served as court-appointed special master in several high-pro le class action suits, in cluding Vioxx, Toyota and Avandia, serves under the auspices of the Deepwater Horizon economic and prop erty damage settlement, an $8 billion deal between BP and attorneys represent ing more than 100,000 indi viduals and businesses with claims against the company over the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion. Once the settlement was approved, the federal court in New Orleans relieved BP administrator Kenneth Feinberg of his duties as administrator of BP’s $20 billion compensation fund for victims of the spill. Fein berg had led the Gulf Coast Claims Facilities, which pro cessed about 221,300 claims, paying out $6 billion, before it was dissolved in June 2012. Juneau was appointed in March 2012 as claims admin istrator for the BP oil spill settlement process. The set tlement he oversees is sepa rate from the portion of the case federal Judge Carl Bar bier is now weighing, which is the amount of Clean Wa ter Act nes that BP will be subject to. This could range from $1,100 for every barrel spilled through simple neg ligence to as much as $4,300 a barrel if the company is determined to have been grossly negligent. The government is argu ing that it was a matter of gross negligence and that 4.2 million barrels were spilled, which could mean nes of as much as $18 billion. BP con tends simple negligence and that only 2.45 million barrels were spilled, making the to tal nes no more than $2.7 billion. The determined fee will be paid out through the RESTORE Act. In an interview after his visit, Juneau outlined how the current claims process is intended to serve individuals and businesses who did not agree to a nal settlement when the GCCF disbursed funds in the aftermath of the oil spill. He said there is no cap on the amount of claims for the dozen categories of individuals and businesses that may be eligible, with the exception of those in the seafood industry. The cutoff date for those seafood-re lated claims, which have a cap of $2.3 billion, was De cember 2012, after which no new claimants can come forward. Juneau said because the entire $2.3 billion cap was not exhausted in the rst round of seafood industry payouts, there will be an upcoming second round of payouts to these same claimants until all this settlement money is spent. He said there is no cap on the claims for other busi nesses, such as individual businesses and coastal rent al units, which are eligible to submit claims until April 22, 2014. “We have a lot of work left to do. It’s a job, and we’re going to fulll the job. We’ve got a ways to go. But the mission’s never changed,” he said. Statewide, 63,851 claims have been led and 16,167 eligibility notices issued, for a total of almost $1.08 billion. Overall, there have been 209,655 claims led and 57,188 eligibility notices issued, totaling more than $4.76 billion, Gagliano said. DADA V ID ID ADAD L ERS ERS T EIN EIN | The Times Patrick Juneau oversees the Deepwater Horizon claims process. BP from page A1 Faith

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By Amanda Nalley Special to the Times Before August 2013, I had talked a lot about lion sh, but other than seeing them in tanks, I had never put my hands on one and never had one for dinner. Lion sh is a hot topic right now. The population of this invasive, nonnative species has boomed exponentially in the past few years, and recent scienti c studies indicate that this species may be negatively impacting our marine resources. Today, we are seeing them in places we’ve never seen them before, and there are no signs of them going away anytime soon. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has taken notice and is moving forward with actions to help control the population, from changing regulations to hosting a Lion sh Summit on Oct. 22-24 in an effort to identify research and management gaps and brainstorm solutions to the lion sh issue. The summit will be in Cocoa Beach. Visit FWCLion sh.Eventbrite. com to learn more. As the public information specialist for the FWC’s Division of Marine Fisheries Management, it is my job to reach out to the media and sometimes the public with lion sh information. I often get asked questions like, “Can you eat them? What do they taste like? How do you let them without getting stuck by one of their venomous spines?” While I knew the answer to the questions, rsthand knowledge often trumps what you’ve read any day. In August, I got plenty of rsthand knowledge as I attended the rst ever Northeast Florida Lion sh Rodeo in Jacksonville. As the boats began to come in, I, with the help of coworker Alan Pierce, helped let lion sh and, later, got to eat some. I admit, I was nervous as I began lleting my rst one. Should I wear gloves? What if I get poked? What is the best way to get the meat off the sh? The best thing I learned that day? It’s not as scary as it looks. Lion sh have up to 18 spines that have venom. To be clear here, the spines are not hollow like a snake’s fangs. Instead, they are more like clear to opaque toothpicks with grooves. If you were to stick yourself, the skin covering the spine would push back, releasing the venom encapsulated in grooves along the spine. The venom is not in the meat of the sh. It is also susceptible to heat, so cooking the sh neutralizes it. The stings are painful, but can be treated with hot, but not scalding, water. When lleting a lion sh, you have quite a few options to keep your hands and ngers safe. My personal favorite was a needle-resistant glove. Using it on my left hand only to hold the sh down, I used my ungloved hand to llet. Others chose to go gloveless and hold the spines down. Another option that I tried but didn’t quite get comfortable with is clipping the spines with scissors. It was an effective method, but we had a lot of lion sh to llet and it felt time-consuming. For the most part, once you gure out the spine issue, lleting the sh is easy. It is just like lleting any other sh you catch. While there wasn’t much meat on the smaller ones, the effort was worth the return: a delicious, aky white delicacy. It is not “ shy” in taste and has a nice consistency. I tried lion sh three ways that night: in a ceviche, fried whole and llets cooked in a light panko and served with rice and a mango reduction. All three were delicious. More restaurants are starting to serve up lion sh, which can be harvested and sold commercially. But the most rewarding part of being there was getting to talk to the public as they oohed and aahed over the colorful sh. Some had never seen a lion sh. Many did not even know they were a problem in Florida’s waters. The rodeo was a success, with more than 400 lion sh removed from the waters near Jacksonville. The largest was 17 inches and the smallest, a mere 3.5 inches. With the current best method of control being removal via nets or spearing devices, these grassroots efforts are one of the best means of limiting the population. In 2012, in an effort to encourage the public to participate in lion shcontrol efforts, the FWC removed the requirement to have a recreational license when using speci c gear to target lion sh, including hand-held nets, pole spears, Hawaiian slings and any device geared speci cally for lion sh. The FWC also removed any and all bag limits on lion sh. Learn more about lion sh by visiting MyFWC.com/Nonnatives and click on “Marine Life.” Gone Coastal helps recreational anglers understand complex saltwater regulations and learn more about saltwater shing opportunities and issues in Florida. Have questions? Call the Division of Marine Fisheries Management at 850-487-0554 or email Marine@MyFWC.com. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C ST JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W ES T P ASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 227-7847 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu O c t 3 84 75 55 % F ri, O c t 4 83 76 65 % S a t O c t 5 81 73 100 % Sun, O c t 6 87 71 61 % M on, O c t 7 83 65 55 % T ues O c t 8 83 61 11 % W ed O c t 9 83 70 63 % Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, October 3, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Writing spiders are beautiful denizens of the roadside and garden. These spiders are members of the genus Argiope, which includes rather large, brightly colored spiders found throughout the world. Most countries in tropical or temperate climates are home to one or more species. The name is from a Greek word meaning “silver-faced” because many Argiope spiders are silvery white around the eyes. In North America, the most common member of the genus is Argiope aurantia commonly known as the black and yellow garden spider, zipper spider, corn spider or the writing spider, because it weaves a white pattern into its web. The highly re ective white patterns are called stabilimentum. They play a role in attracting prey to the web, and may prevent its accidental destruction by large animals by rendering the otherwise transparent trap visible. The center of their large webs is two to three feet above the ground. Writing spiders are active both day and night in our area. They often hunt during the day and construct or repair their webs after dark. Once a female nds a suitable site for her webs, she tends to stay there unless the web is frequently disturbed. Adult males roam in search of potential mates, but once they nd a female they build small webs nearby and court her by plucking and vibrating her web. After mating, the female lays her eggs, weaving her egg sac into the web. The sac contains between 400 and 1400 eggs. These eggs hatch in autumn, but the spiderlings overwinter in the sac and emerge during the spring. The egg sac is composed of multiple layers of silk and protects its contents from damage. Many species of insects and other spiders have been observed to parasitize the egg sacs. Like almost all spiders, writing spiders are harmless to humans and handy in a garden since they eat insects. They are capable of consuming prey up to twice their size. They might bite if grabbed, but otherwise do not attack large animals. Their venom is not regarded as a serious medical problem for humans. Legend has it that if you speak a name within their hearing, they will weave it into their web resulting in the death of the person named. In some areas, even looking at a writing spider is said to doom the observer. Another legend states that you will die if a writing spider looks at you long enough to “count your teeth.” “If you wish to thrive, let a spider stay alive,” is a saying that refers to all spiders. A popular Cherokee tale credits Grandmother Spider with bringing light to the world “in the early times when everything was dark and no one could see because the sun was on the other side of the world.” The animals agreed that someone must go and steal some light. Possum and buzzard both tried and failed. Finally, Grandmother Spider made a bowl of clay, rolled it to where the sun sat, weaving a web as she traveled across the sky. She placed the sun in the bowl, and rolled it home, following her web and traveling from east to west, bringing light with her as she came. The sun continued to follow that path daily from then on. DAVE EAKEN | FWRI, FWC This photo was taken in the Dry Tortugas in 2011. Lion sh derby offers real-life look at invader Have you ever wondered about Bigfoot? Scott Marlowe answers all your questions and raises a few more in his newest book to be released later this year. Marlowe, a frequent visitor to Franklin County, last month had a meet-and-greet at Downtown Books where he signed copies of his rst publication “Cryptid Creatures of Florida.” Bookstore owner Dale Julian said the book is a big seller with the beach crowd. In “Bigfoot Enigma,” Marlowe summarizes sightings of “wild men” around the world. It seems they occur on every continent but Antarctica and many Paci c Islands. He points out that large apes and in particular man’s ancestors, were and are relatively rare animals living in dispersed populations. He conjectures that scattered populations of an unknown ape or apes may still exist in wilderness areas. Marlowe cites the Bili Ape, a population of unknown primates recently discovered in central Africa, to support his reasoning. The volume includes quotes from the famed primate behavior specialist Dr. Jane Goodall acknowledging the possibility that Bigfoot may be real. “I’m a romantic. I always wanted them to exist,” said Goodall. Marlowe also outlines the latest research on DNA typing of hair believed to have come from unknown apes. In addition, the book contains a broad collection of accounts of Bigfoot encounters throughout history. It is liberally illustrated with both photographs and artistic renderings of the elusive creature. If you have an open mind and are in the mood for a little thought provoking speculation, then look for Bigfoot Enigma to be released around Christmas. By LOIS SWOBODA “Bigfoot Enigma” is an interesting read for a rainy afternoon All you ever wondered about ‘Bigfoot’ Writing spiders stuff of legends BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the Car Body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder. 4514339 8)XZt1PSU4U+PF] .PO5IVST".1.&45t'SJ4BU".1.&45 You're Invited To Join Us Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 5-7pm ET $BQU3JDL.VSQIZPGUIF'MPSJEB$IFWZ*OTJEFS'JTIJOH3FQPSU 5PHJWFBTFNJOBSPO “FISHING ARTIFICIAL LURES IN THE FALL” 3"''-&4/"$,"/%40'5%3*/,441&$*"-4"-&"-40

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G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 F r a n k l i n C oun t y H i gh S c ho ol s e n i o r M o r g a n M o ck ha s b e e n a k e y l e a de r t h is s e a s o n f o r t he L a d y S e a ha w k v a r s it y v ol l e y b a l l t e a m S he is ou r m a i n de f e n s i v e a n d o f f e n s i v e t h r e a t t o t he net ha v i ng t he h i ghe s t n um b e r o f b l o ck s a n d k i l ls s a i d c o a c h T a r a K l i n k S he is v e r y c o n s is t e n t e a c h g a m e a n d ha s b e e n a g r e a t l e a de r f o r he r t e a m M or g a n M o c k CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, October 3, 2013 A Page 9 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County was able to move the ball Friday night at Wewahitchka, but too many turnovers and the blazing speed of the Gators quarterback proved too much for the Seahawks. The Gators (1-4) rushed for more than 250 yards and dominated the winless Seahawks in a 4014 contest decided by halftime. But the Seahawks managed 247 yards on the ground, and threw for 71 more to keep pace. “We had critical turnovers at critical points in the game,” said coach Aaron York. “We had a very good rst quarter. I thought all the coaches did well with time management. We did a real good job of running the ball.” Wewa’s Jonathan Palmer rushed for 45 yards in the rst quarter to stake the Gators to an early 6-0 lead. Wewahitchka had the ball for only seven offensive plays in the opening half, but the lead bulged in the second period as Javar Hill scored on a runs of 15 and 25 yards and Willie Hill put the icing on the rsthalf cake by scooping up a fumble at the Seahawks 35 and running in for the touchdown. After posting a 26-0 halftime lead, Wewa quarterback Rashard Ranie, who rushed for 111 yards, continued the onslaught when he dashed 54 yards for a third-quarter touchdown and Shannon Jones, getting some varsity playing time, covered 16 yards on the ground for the Gators’ nal score. “Defensively we did not contain very well at all. Rashard Ranie hit the sideline on us three times and it was a foot race and we couldn’t catch him,” said York. The Seahawks managed to make it a game in the third quarter with two TDs, as sophomore fullback Trenton Lee scored on a 7-yard run, and senior quarterback Logan McLeod on a 4-yard run, to make it 33-14. Sophomore Walker DeVaughn kicked both extra points. Lee was the game’s leading rusher with 25 carries for 116 yards. Junior Cole Wheeler tallied 15 rushes for 85 yards, while McLeod was 4-for-11 from the air, with three interceptions. He also had one interception as a defensive back. “One thing I was very happy about we did a very good job with special teams. We ran for over 120 yards on kickoff returns,” said York. Senior Alex Causey had four returns for 72 yards, while Wheeler had three returns for 50 yards. “We look back between the last time we played Wewa in August and we’ve made tremendous strides. We judge each week if we got better or not and this ought to tell you we’re getting better,” he said. The team travels to Port St. Joe Friday to take on their rivals to the west. “My guys will be ready,” said York. “The kids are practicing hard every day. There’s no quit in these kids. It’s every day that they come out. They’re working hard in the weight room. We have 23 kids out there; I couldn’t ask for a better group.” Improving Seahawks fall to Wewahitchka By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity volleyball team continued its winning ways last week, triumphing twice over West Gadsden, once over Rickards and FAMU, and losing to South Walton The week got underway at West Gadsden Sept. 19, when the varsity swept both games of a double header, each in three straight games. The team won 25-5, 25-15 and 2516, and then in the nightcap, won 25-11, 25-9 and 25-12. “With this team being our easiest competition, we were able to try some different combinations and let the girls try different position,” said coach Tara Klink, who shares coaching duties with Hilary Stanton. “ It was fun to explore different possibilities! Morgan Mock led the team with eight aces in a single game, followed closely by Scout Segree with seven.” In a district game at South Walton on Sept. 24, both the junior varsity and varsity squads were unable to win a game. The JV fell 11-25 and 2025, while the varsity lost 1625, 12-25 and 19-25. “South Walton has proven to be our toughest competition in our district for both JV and varsity,” said Klink. At Rickards on Sept. 25, the JV lost a close one, falling 20-25 and then coming back to win 25-21 before losing the rubber game, 13-15. “This was a hard loss for us in overtime, especially when we were capable of getting the win,” said Klink. “We will de nitely work harder to be ready for the next time we meet.” The varsity emerged victorious in a hard-fought contest, losing 25-27 and then winning 25-21. The Lady Seahawks then fell 1725 but came back to win 2516. Franklin County walked away with a slim 18-16 win in the fth and deciding game. “We hung tight with this team when we should have had an easier win,” said Klink. “I’m glad we were still able to pull out a win on an off night.” The young ladies wrapped up a busy week with two wins at home on Sept. 26 against FAMU. The JV won after falling in the opener 15-25 and coming back to post 25-17 and 16-14 victories. “This was such an exciting game to watch as we won in overtime,” said Klink. “I was very proud of the girls for coming back after such a slow start.” The varsity girls lost their opening game, 19-25, but came back to win three straight, 25-22, 25-16 and 25-20. “I was so proud of the girls for not giving up during this match,” said Klink. “The rst game was a little rough for us, but they fought through to get the win. It was quite impressive when their whole team was a good foot taller than any of our girls. It was a really fun game to watch!” The teams travel to Liberty County today, Oct. 3 for a district match, and then are at home Friday against Altha. On Tuesday, they travel to Port St. Joe for a district match, and then return home Oct. 10 to face Rickards on “Think Pink” night to promote the battle against breast cancer. On Tuesday, softball coaches Kevin Newell and Matt Kelley presented the county commission with a trophy to add to the showcase in the courthouse annex. Franklin County’s Dixie Debs, for girls age 18 and under, brought home the rst-place trophy from the Dixie League 2013 state softball tournament. The Debs, who swept through the state tournament in Brooksville without a loss, were voted number one for sportsmanship. “This was one of my most fun years since I’ve been coaching,” Newell said, “Winning the sportsmanship award was just icing. We want to start a tradition sort of what Spring Hill was, a powerhouse.” The team included Brittany King, Morgan Newell, Morgan Kelley, Christina Collins, Shannon Pridgeon, Ally Millender, Gracyn Kirvin, Maddie Newell, Ashley Carroll, Marlyn Lee, and Hannah Winkler. Coaches included Newell, Kelley and Allen Millender. “These girls have brought softball a long way in Franklin County over the last several years,” Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender said. County honors Dixie Debs The 2013 Lady Seahawk Volleyball team, front row, from left, are #8 junior Shemeika Lake, #10 junior Robyn Segree, # 24 junior Madison Newell and #7 freshman Vanessa Simmons; and back row, from left, coach Hilary Stanton, # 22 freshman Scout Segree, #5 freshman Adriana Butler, #1 sophomore Bre Barrack, #00 senior captain Gracyn Kirvin, #6 senior captain Morgan Mock and coach Tara Klink. Volleyballers down West Gadsden, Rickards, FAMU DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Left: Eighth grader Morgan Anderson performs at halftime on the clarinet. Right: Eighth grader Josie Kriss performs at halftime on the ute. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times DIXIE DEBS BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Gulf red snapper season opens Oct. 1 The recreational harvest of red snapper opened Oct. 1 in state and federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. In state waters, which are from shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf, the season will remain open through Oct. 21, closing on Oct. 22. In federal waters, which are from 9 nautical miles out to 200 nautical miles, the season will remain open through Oct. 14, closing on Oct. 15. These supplemental recreational red snapper seasons are for 2013 only. The minimum size limit in state and federal waters is 16 inches, and the daily bag limit is two per harvester, per day. There is a zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew on for-hire vessels. Anglers are required to use circle hooks and dehooking devices when shing for any reef species, including red snapper, in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters. The requirement to use venting tools in federal waters was removed on Sept. 3. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will consider adopting similar changes at a future meeting. The intent of these rules is to help conserve shery resources by increasing the chances for a sh to survive after being caught and released. Learn more about red snapper by visiting MyFWC.com/Fishing and clicking on “Saltwater” and “Recreational Regulations.” ANERR announces Panhandle habitat classes The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is happy to announce the next classes in the Panhandle Habitat Series. The Estuaries class is Wednesday, Oct. 30 and the Rivers & Floodplains class is Wednesday, Nov. 13. Outdoors BRIEFS

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 N O TI C E O F T A X F O R S C H OO L CA PI T A L O U T L A Y B UDGET ALL FUNDS GENERAL SPECIAL DEBT CAPIT AL REVENUES OPERA TING REVENUE SER VICE PR OJECTS T OT AL F eder al Sour ces 110,464 2,507,830 2,618,294 Sta te Sour ces 2,317,441 17,901 306,000 145,000 2,786,342 Local Sour ces 7,947,520 125,415 1,646,489 9,719,424 T OT AL REVENUE 10,375,425 2,651,146 306,000 1,791,489 15,124,060 T r ansfers In 647,060 1,537,740 2,184,800 Fund Balance J ul y 1, 2013 134,871 377,694 14,346 3,975,881 4,502,792 T OT AL REVENUE AND B ALANCES 11,157,356 3,028,840 1,858,086 5,767,370 21,811,652 EXPENDITURES Instructional 6,602,990 964,800 7,567,790 Pupil P ersonnel Services 155,844 146,784 302,628 Instructional Media Services 70,824 15,200 86,024 Instructional and Curriculum Services 137,457 137,457 Instructional Staf f T r aining 5,000 79,816 84,816 Instruction R ela ted T echnolo gy 14,459 50,701 65,160 Boar d of Educa tion 381,060 381,060 Gener al Administr a tion 192,804 120,990 313,794 School Administr a tion 417,549 52,653 470,202 F acilities Acquisition and Construction 1,250,000 1,250,000 Fiscal Services 328,482 328,482 F ood Services 925,272 925,272 Centr al Services 447,410 27,735 475,145 Pupil T r ansporta tion Services 572,398 41,988 614,386 Oper a tion of Plant 898,539 1,705 900,244 Maintenance of Plant 204,934 204,934 Administr a ti v e T echnolo gy Services 36,959 36,959 Comm unity Services De bt Service 1,537,740 1,537,740 T OT AL EXPENDITURES 10,329,252 2,565,101 1,537,740 1,250,000 15,682,093 T r ansfers Out 306,000 1,878,800 2,184,800 Fund Balance J une 30, 2014 828,104 463,739 14,346 2,638,570 3,944,758 T OT AL EXPENDITURES TRANSFERS & FUND B ALANCES 11,157,356 3,028,840 1,858,086 5,767,370 21,811,652 THE TENT A TIVE, ADOPTED AND/OR FIN AL B UDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABO VE MENTIONED T AXING A UTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD PR OPOSED MILLA GE LEVY Oper a ting Local R equir ed 3.423 Discr etionary 0.748 Ca pital Outla y 1.000 Ad ditional Oper a ting 0.500 T OT AL 5.671 SCHOOL BO ARD OF FRANKLIN COUNTY B UDGET SUMMAR Y NOTICE FY 2013-2014 NO TICE OF PR OPOSED T AX INCREASE THE PREVIOUS NO TICE PLA CED BY THE FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT HAS BEEN DETERMINED BY THE DEP AR TMENT OF REVENUE T O BE IN VIOLA TION OF THE LA W NECESSIT A TING THIS SECOND NO TICE. The Franklin County School District will soon consider a measur e to incr ease its pr operty tax le vy A portion of the tax le vy is r equir ed under state law in order f or the school board to r ecei v e $2,317,441 in state education grants. The r equir ed portion has incr eased by 9.86 per cent, and r epr esents appr oximately six tenths of the total pr oposed taxes. The r emainder of the taxes is pr oposed solely at the discr etion of the school board. All concer ned citizens ar e in vited to a public hearing on the tax incr ease to be held on T uesday October 8, 2013 at 6:00 P .M. at the W illie Speed Board Room, Eastpoint, Florida. A DECISION on the pr oposed tax incr ease and the b udget will be made at this hearing

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The Times | A11 Thursday, October 3, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Not i c e o f V a c a n c y F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v e l o p m e n t C o u n c i l B o a r d M em be r M e m b e r s h i p o n t h e F C T D C i s m a d e t h r o u g h a p p o i n t me n t by t h e F C B O C C i n a c c o rd a n c e w i t h F l o r i d a S t a t u t e s T I T L E X I P A R T I C h a p t e r 1 2 5 s s 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 ( 4 ) ( e ) a n d p e r F r a n k l i n C o u n t y O rd i n a n c e 2 0 0 4 3 5 a s f o l l o w s : e C o u n c i l s h a l l c o n s i s t o f n i n e me m b e r s w h o s h a l l b e a p p o i n t e d f r o m t i me t o t i me by t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s e c h a i r m a n o f t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s ( o r s u c h o t h e r me m b e r o f t h e B o a rd a s s h a l l b e a p p o i n t e d by t h e C h a i r ) s h a l l s e r ve o n t h e C o u n c i l I n a d d i t i o n t w o me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e e l e c t e d m u n i c i p a l o c i a l s ( w h o e a c h s h a l l b e a n e l e c t e d o c i a l o f t h e C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a a n d t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e ) S i x me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e p e r s o n s w h o a r e i n vo l ve d i n t h e t o u r i s t i n d u s t r y a n d w h o h a ve d e mo n s t r a t e d a n i n t e r e s t i n t o u r i s t d e ve l o p me n t o f w h i c h me m b e r s n o t l e s s t h a n t h r e e n o r mo r e t h a n f o u r s h a l l b e o w n e r s o r o p e r a t o r s o f mo t e l s h o t e l s r e c r e a t i o n a l ve h i c l e p a r k s o r o t h e r t o u r i s t a t t r a c t i o n s i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y t h a t w o u l d b e s u b je c t t o a n y t o u r i s t d e ve l o p me n t t a x u n d e r s e c t i o n 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 A l l me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e r e g i s t e r e d e l e c t o r s a n d m u s t b e a f u l l t i me p e r m a n e n t r e s i d e n t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n p l e a s e c a l l F r a n E d w a rd s a t t h e F C T D C o c e a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 6 7 8 e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e ve l o p me n t C o u n c i l i s c o m p o s e d o f n i n e me m b e r s w h o a r e a p p o i n t e d b y t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o m m i s s i o n e r s A n y o n e i n t e r e s t e d i n b e i n g c o n s i d e r e d f o r t h i s vo l u n t e e r p o s i t i o n i s e n c o u r a g e d t o s e n d a l e t t e r o f i n t e r e s t a n d q u a l i f y i n g r e s u me t o t h e F C T D C A d m i n i s t r a t i ve O c e I n ter e ste d p er so n s s h o u l d r e p l y n o la ter t ha n 5 : 0 0 p m. O c to b er 1 4 2 0 1 3 A r e c o m me n d a t i o n w i l l b e f o r w a rd e d t o t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s f o r t h e i r c o n s i d e r a t i o n i s i s a vo l u n t e e r p o s i t i o n w i t h n o n a n c i a l c o m p e n s a t i o n B o a rd me m b e r s a r e r e q u i r e d t o a t t e n d r e g u l a r b o a rd me e t i n g s a n d a r e e x p e c t e d t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n t h e C o m m i t t e e a c t i v i t i e s o f t h e B o a rd P l e a s e r e v i e w q u a l i c a t i o n s i n P a r a g r a p h 2 a b o ve A p p l i c a t i o n s m a y be s u b m i t t e d t o F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v el o p m e n t C o u n c i l A d m i n i s t r a t i v e O c e v ia e m a i l t o : f r a n @ a n a t u r a l e s c a pe c o m ; b y h a n d t o 1 7 1 / 2 A v e n u e E ; b y U S M a i l t o P O B o x 8 1 9 ; A p a l ac h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 9 Law Enforcement Ofcer Gore was conducting surveillance on a boat landing and while watching vessels return to the landing, one vessel operator caught his attention. The operator was having difculty docking the boat and backing his trailer into the water to load his boat. The operator showed several signs of impairment. As the operator attempted to load his boat, he fell into the water. At this point, Gore intervened and identied himself as an FWC ofcer. Again, the operator showed signs of impairment during a boating safety inspection and did poorly on eld sobriety tasks. The subject was placed under arrest for boating under the inuence and transported to the Franklin County Jail. While at the jail, the vessel operator submitted to a breath test, which revealed his breath alcohol content was 0.15 and 0.14. Gore was conducting surveillance on individuals shing at a local shing spot, when two individuals pulled up beside him and parked in two separate vehicles next to him. One of the operators exited his vehicle and approached the window of the other vehicle. After a brief conversation, the subject produced a large sum of cash and handed it through the window to the subject in the car. He then walked around and got into the passenger seat of that car. Gore maintained surveillance on the subjects and made contact with Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce and reported the suspicious activity. The K-9 Unit arrived on scene and conducted a consensual search of the vehicle and the two suspects. A large amount of cash was recovered along with a large amount of prescription pills (Percocet). Neither of the subjects had prescriptions for the controlled substance and both were arrested by sheriffs deputies. Special to the Times Texting and driving is no longer legal in Florida. Florida becomes the 41st state to ban texting while driving. The new law took effect at midnight, Oct. 1. Distracted drivers are becoming one of the great est threats on our roads to day. More than 3,400 crash es occurred last year in Florida in which the driver was distracted by an elec tronic device, such as a cell phone, which resulted in 24 fatalities. The National Highway Transportation Safety Ad ministration estimates that a driver who texts and drives is 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash. The problem is of particular concern among teenage drivers. Eleven teens are killed each day in the U.S. as the result of a crash in which texting and driving was to blame. How much of a distrac tion can texting be to a driv er? Sending or receiving a text distracts a driver for an average of nearly ve seconds. Traveling at a speed of 55 miles per hour, thats the equivalent of driving the length of a football eld with your eyes closed. Teenagers are particu larly vulnerable to distract ed driving crashes due to their lack of experience be hind the wheel, said Julie L. Jones, executive direc tor of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV). Teens have the highest crash rate of any age group with more than 22,000 teen drivers in volved in crashes last year and 41 of them killed. Col. David Brierton, di rector of the Florida High way Patrol, said it is impor tant to enforce and educate all drivers about the dan gers of texting and driving. There are three things to remember to keep you safe while driving: keep your hands on the wheel, your eyes on the road and your mind on driving, he said. The Florida law makes texting while driving a sec ondary offense meaning the driver must rst have committed a primary of fense such as reckless or careless driving, speeding or failing to wear a seat belt in order to be cited. The DHSMV and the Florida Highway Patrol, working with safety and law enforcement partners across the state, are using this day to make motorists aware of the new law and to educate drivers on the dan gers of distracted driving. The Florida Police Chiefs Association (FPCA) is pleased to see the imple mentation of the anti-tex ting while driving legisla tion. This type of law can only make our roads safer and save lives, said FPCA President, Chief Philip Thorne, Springeld PD. Educating the public, specically our youth, on the dangers of distracted driving is crucial in our ef forts to protect those trav eling the roadways in our state. Steve Casey, execu tive director of the Florida Sheriffs Association, said that during the 2013 legisla tive session, the association fully supported anti-texting legislation. We are happy to have this new law put into effect today, he said. FSA has continually supported safe driving through our youth program, the Teen Driver Challenge, and will remain active in educating and promot ing safe driving among all drivers. The DHSMV has cre ated public service an nouncements for teen drivers. For more informa tion, visit http://www.hsmv. gov/fhp/DistractedDriving/ The Florida Depart ment of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles pro vides highway safety and security through excel lence in service, education and enforcement. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered, visit www.hsmv.gov, follow us on Instagram at FLHSMV, Twitter @FDHSMV or nd us on Facebook The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Sept. 24 Ben Turrell III, 36, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FHP) Sept. 25 Cawanna M. Messer, 31, Carrabelle, trafcking four grams or more in illegal drugs (FCSO) Robert A. Hill Jr., 23, Apalachicola, grand theft of a rearm and burglary of a conveyance/dwelling (FCSO) Sept. 26 Joshua L. Pilotti, 23, Apalachicola, eeing or eluding a law enforcement ofcer in boat, resisting ofcer without violence and possession of undersized oysters (FWC) Buddy R. Richards, 19, Eastpoint, criminal mischief (FCSO) Pamela K. Shaver, 47, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Delana L. Slaughter, 32, Eastpoint, two counts of providing alcohol to person under age 21 (FCSO) Sept. 27 Christopher D. Maxwell, 35, Port St. Joe, violation of probation, no saltwater products license and no harvesting permit (FCSO) David L. Adkins, 21, Eastpoint, held on Escambia County warrant (FCSO) Rose A. Millender, 34, Carrabelle, child abuse (CPD) Jennifer L. Smith, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Sept. 28 Richard J. Elhard, 31, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) Willie L. English, 53, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication, indecent exposure, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (CPD) Sam E. Lofton Jr., 64, Phenix City, Ala., domestic battery (APD) Sept. 29 Kristin R. Edgecomb, 32, Carrabelle, withholding child support (FCSO) Sept. 30 Elex D. Pugh, 36, Apalachicola, aggravated battery great bodily harm (APD) Jeffrey J. Kuhne, 51, Eastpoint, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Arrest REPORT Dont text and drive; its the law FWC REPORT

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A12 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 1010T STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION Publication: The Times 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Publication Number: 027-600 Filing Date: October 4, 2012 Issue Frequency Weekly (Thursday Morning) Published Annually: 52 Weeks Annual Subscription Price: $24.15 In County $34.65 Out of County Contact Person: Rodney Menzel (850) 747-5042 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication and General Business Office of Publisher: P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publisher: Roger Quinn P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Editor: Tim Croft 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Managing Editor: N/A Owner: Halifax Media Holdings LLC (a Delaware Corporation) P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publication Title: The Times Issue Date for Circulation Data: August 30, 2012. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months; Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date. Total Number of Copies: Average: 2390 Actual: 2385 Paid Circulation Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 469 Actual: 470 Mailed In-County Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 303 Actual: 297 Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: Average: 1379 Actual: 1250 Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: Average: 0 Actual: 0 Total Paid Distribution: Average: 1619 Actual: 1513 Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: Average: 25 Actual: 25 Total Distribution: Average: 2176 Actual: 2042 Copies not Distributed: Average: 215 Actual: 343 Total: Average: 2391 Actual: 2385 Percent Paid: Average: 98.5% Actual: 98.4% Publication of Statement of Ownership: October 3, 2013 Roger Quinn Regional Publisher September 27, 2010 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties.) October 3, 2013 92534T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND OFR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA000242 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS AND BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER AND PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION – CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER and PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 11 OF SOUTHLAND A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF THE APALACHICOLA NORTHERN RAIL ROAD. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 199.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 269.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF HATCOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE WITH THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 311.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1977 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME. VIN#S: FLA58338 AND FL 58339. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 /(30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 12th day of September. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, AND SCHNEID, PL ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 6409 CONGRESS AVE, SUITE 100 BOCA RATON, FL 33487 MAIL@RASF LAW.COM Sept 26, Oct 3, 2013 92604T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA -000286-CAXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. WHITNEY WHITEHURST A/K/A WHITNEY WHITE A/K/A WHITNEY WHITEHURST FLETCHER; BANK OF AMERICA NA; BRIAN FLETCHER A/K/A BRIAN DAVID FLETCHER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 10th day of September, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000286-CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and WHITNEY WHITEHURST A/K/A WHITNEY WHITE A/K/A WHITNEY WHITEHURST FLETCHER; BANK OF AMERICA NA; BRIAN FLETCHER A/K/A BRIAN DAVID FLETCHER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash INSIDE FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 24th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK “A”, SUN & SAND VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 34, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 10-06928 October 3, 10, 2013 92656T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012-CA000307 CADENCE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH SUPERIOR BANK, NA., AS SUCCESSOR TO SUPERIOR BANK, Plaintiff, vs. W. EDWARD TILEY A/K/A EDWARD TILEY A/K/A WILLIAM E. TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2013, and entered in 2012-CA-000307 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR TO SUPERIOR BANK, is the Plaintiff and W. EDWARD TILEY A/K/A EDWARD TILEY A/K/A WILLIAM E. TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY; UNITED STATES ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE ADMINSTRATOR OF THE SMALL BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on October 23, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NINE (9), OF BLOCK SIX (6), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY NOW IN COMMON USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of August, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-06590 October 3, 10, 2013 95525T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000343CAXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT1, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL AND JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000343CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, is the Plaintiff and KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL; JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Kendall Wade as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on October 16, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE LOT LINE SEPARATING LOTS 58 AND 59 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE RIGHTOF-WAY OF PEACHTREE ROAD, AND RUN ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HATHCOCK ROAD, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HATHCOCK ROAD 165 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 95561T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 09000677CA SUNTRUST BANK, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MELANIE JANE TURNER; STANLEY W. BENECKI; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 27, 2013, and entered in Case No. 09000677CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. SUNTRUST BANK, INC. is Plaintiff and MELANIE JANE TURNER; STANLEY W. BENECKI; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 24th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, UNRECORDED, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT LYING 395.98 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY THE FOLLOWING COURSES: SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1096.00 FEET, SOUTH 60 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 3600.00 FEET SOUTH 62 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 1100.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 182.38 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 29.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 70.37 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 182.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF WAY BOUNDARY 99.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of August, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-08804 STM October 3, 10, 2013 95579T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000122 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR BAFC 2006-2, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE GLENMORE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE GLENMORE, NC 28270 ALICE T NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 42 PEBBLE BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 34 AND 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 12th day of September, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11040476 October 3, 10, 2013 95629T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-CA-237 JUDGE: REYNOLDS IN RE: Forfeiture of: One (1) 2004 Toyota Tundra VIN: 5TBBT44134S450117 NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS ALL PERSONS who claim an interest in the following property, 2004 Toyota Tundra, VIN: 5TBBT44134 S450117, which was seized because said property is alleged to be contraband as defined by Sections 932.701 (2)(a)(1-6), Florida Statutes (2012), by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Division of Florida Highway Patrol, on or about April 22, 2013, in Franklin County, Florida: Any owner, entity, bona fide lienholder, or person in possession of the property when seized has the right within fifteen (15) days of initial receipt of notice, to contact Sandra R. Coulter, Assistant General Counsel, Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, 2900 Apalachee Parkway, Room A-432, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399, by certified mail return receipt requested to obtain a copy of the Complaint and Order Finding Probable Cause filed in the above styled court. October 3, 10, 2013 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard Sale Come one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard Sale Come one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 Carabelle: Carabelle Flea Market (Behind the IGA) Saturday Oct. 5th, 8am -Until Venders Welcome Rain or Shine! Text FL67503 to 56654

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 3, 2013 The Times | A13 4514220 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND, UTILITIES INCLUDED ............... $1200 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 3 BR / 2 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ............. ............... ....................... $700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT/ 2 LOTS ................................. $650 HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGECOMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 4514325 Part-time Reading InterventionistApalachicola Bay Charter School seeks a Candidates must hold currentteachingcerticate. ABC School is an EqualOpportunityEmployer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 1114756 Experienced Cable Installers & Supervisor Innovation. Technology. Communications NOW HIRING Ft. Walton Beach, FLRequirements: Must have truck, van, or SUV, ladders, meter, necessary tools, and safety equipment required for cable installation (triple play). Triage Partners is a national technology based services company servicing telecommunications and cable industries. We are expanding into the Ft. Walton Beach area. Interested candidates please contact: Kim Kerbs at 813-868-1282 or send resume to: kkerbs@triage-partners.com 1113125 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS € pipe WeLDerS X-ray WeLDerS OutSiDe MachiniStS inDuStriaL Marine eLectricianS Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizations’information and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systems’capabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 Sales Advertising Sales Support Our fast-paced, innovative local media company has an immediate opportunity within our sales support team. This successful candidate will be a well-organized “take-charge” person who welcomes new challenges and enjoys helping other people. The Star News offers a wide variety of multi-media advertising solutions, ranging from traditional newspapers and direct mail to leading-edge digital advertising and social media. You will provide sales support to outside sales executives, who cater to the marketing needs of the small and medium-sized businesses we serve. We will consider individuals with a variety of experience, ranging from recent college graduates to individuals with experience in other industries or disciplines. Responsibilities include order entry, interacting with customers, supporting salespeople while they’re on the road and reviewing advertising materials. Scheduled workweek will be five days, Monday through Friday. Job requirements include computer skills, including the Microsoft Office suite of products, and the ability to work effectively in a team environment. Advertising, sales and/or customer service experience is a plus. Administrative skills and experience are also helpful. You will learn a lot For immediate consideration, submit a cover letter and resume to: lgrimes@pcnh.com An Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34267059 Sales Sales Reps The Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of America’s top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps The Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266381 Text FL66381 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 Eastpoint: 6th Street and Avenue A, by the Ball Park. Saturday 8am until Big Yard Sale Kids clothes, shoes, jackets, swings, carseats, pack & play, bouncers, dolls, little girls vanity and other toys, table items, furniture, and lots more Lanark Village Golf CourseRoute 98 Fri & Sat Oct. 4th & 5th Benefit Sale! Everything for the house plus antiques and collectibles! txt FL67276 to 56654 PSJ (Overstreet) Comming from HWY 98, turn on Co Rd 386, go 4 miles beyond Overstreet Bridge, take left on Pleasant Rest Cemetary Rd.. Go almost 2 miles, turn on Carr Rd. Look for signs Saturday Oct. 5th 8:30am (est) -untilBig Community Wide Yard Sale at Wetappo Creek 7 -8 families in yard sale! Rain cancels! txt FL67417 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 104 Bucaneer Dr. Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est) -5pm (est)Gulf Aire Community Yard SaleEverything! txt FL67498 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 206 Coral Dr. Seashores Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est.) -5pm(est) Bookcases, coffe & end tables, china cab., tools, garage cab., fishing and tackle, china, bakeware, glassware, and other household items, sewing and craft items and much more! txt FL67445 to 56654 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard Sale Tools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL63024 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Breakfast Attendants, Housekeepers and Night Auditors Email resume to 10270@hotel.bestwestern.co m or apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34266988 Text FL66988 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Full Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance Part-time position flex schedule. 30+ hours/ week. Pay is $10-12/hr, with 4 pay raises in 1st year, plus annual bonus. Health Ins after 90 days. Position resposible for maintaining several comm. buildings and rental properties inside and out. Light painting, carpentry, and flooring exp req’d. Any exp in small engine repair & vehicle servicing a plus. Must have HSD/GED, valid FLDL, NO criminal background. Drug free, physically fit. Check us out at: www .dansp awn.com or Apply in person at 1314 Bayview Ave Mon-Fri, 10am to 4pm. Web ID#: 34267165 Sec./Protective Serv Franklin Correctional Institution is now hiring: Certified and Trainee Correctional Officers. To apply go to:peoplefirst.myflorida.com Click on the drop down menu under Browse Jobs By County Select the county you wish to search jobs in and click on the search button. Scroll down to Public Safety & Security and click on CORRECTIONAL OFFICER, requisition number 70009909. This will take you to the job description -click on Begin Application Process to Apply Follow directions to apply for the position. Applicants must be at least 19 years of age with a high school diploma or equivalent, willing to take a drug and physical exam and possess a valid Driver’s License. Applicants must pass a background investigation, which includes after July 1, 1981 no felony convictions or a misdemeanor involving perjury or false statement, nor have received dishonorable discharge from any of the Armed Forces of the United States. In addition, a misdemeanor conviction of domestic violence prohibits employment. All other criminal charges will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Contact the recruitment office at (850) 697-1331 for more information. The Department is a drug-free workplace. The Department is an Equal Opportunity employer. If you require an accommodation to participate in the application/ selection process, please contact the hiring authority or personnel office in advance. Certain veterans and spouses of veterans receive preference in employment by the state as provided by Chapter 295, Florida Statutes, and are encouraged to apply. Web Id 34265626 Text FL65626 to 56654 Secure/Protective Serv FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Library Director/ Full TimeSalary Range: $33,000 -$35,000 Applications and Job Description available at Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Road, Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-670-8151 ext. 204, Applications may be requested through email @ ondra@franklin.lib.fl.us Applications accepted through October 31, 2013 The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer. Responsibilities: Supervises personnel, develops short and long term plans, prepares and administers operation budgets, acquisitions and distributes library materials and promotes awareness of library services and functions. Paid travel to attend library conferences and training workshops to stay abreast of library trends and technology in the field. Travel may be overnight and extend up to a week. Qualifications: Masters Degree in Library and Information Science or to receive degree within three years. Bachelor’s Degree required. A minimum of two years of library administrative experience including supervisory ability and experience, and knowledge of library technology is required. Must relate well to the general public, have good public relations skills, and be adaptable and flexible. Web ID#: 34267105 Text FL67105 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. 850-653-3838 Text FL64578 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL66454 to 56654 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit. Call 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Historic District house for sale, 3 BR /1 BA (1 outside BA), 1920’s Arts & Crafts Cottage style, completely renovated. $239k 850-591-1174. Text FL64323 to 56654 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r ts h a v e i d e n t i ed w h a t t h e y f ee l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s ec t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h P o r t S t J o e Ap a la c h i c o la C ap e S an B la s S t G e o rg e I s lan d C ar r a b e l l e an d s u r r o u n din g ar e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248790 $116,000 St. Geor ge Island 451 4345 GU LF BE AC HE S LO T Hig h dun ey lot on the nor th side of Gu lf Bea ch Dr ive, Bik e path acro ss the stre et. 3rd lot from the corn er of 6th Stre et Eas t, No clear ing nece ssa ry lot meas ures 100 x 150 1/3 acre, Hig h (dry ) ele v atio n. Buy to build or keep for inve stm ent. ## & $ $1( $1 / & 2 T h is 3B D / 2B A hom e is cu te as a bu tton and has g rea t pos sibi l itie s. Ple nty of r oom to s tor e a boa t. Car r abe lle Ri ve r is wit h i n v iew of fr ont y ard ; 1/2 b loc k fr om r i ve r T i le thr oug hou t hou s e. P ant r y and lau ndr y i n kitc hen wit h s tor age Gre at s tar te r hom e or a wee k end sh i n g cot tag e. SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! $ % (850)22 7 -7847 | tgolden@pcnh com S O L D ## #### )) )) # ) "" & $ $1( $1 / & 2 ! $ ( 1 ( / 1 ( 2 % $ ( & ( & ( / ( / & ( $ ( ( ( / ( ( / % $ ( $ ( ( ( $ & ( ( & 1 ( 1 ( 1 / $ % 1 ( / & ( ( ( & ( ( 2 ( $ % ( $ 2 ( / & $ $ 1 / ( $ $ ( $ 1 ( 2 ( / $ * ( # # 8 5 0 5 4 5 5 8 5 2 w w w c o a s tal r e al t y i n f o c o m T h i s 2 B D /2 B A h o m e i s l o c a t e d i n a q u i e t n e i g h b o r h o o d w i t h b e a u t i f u l s u n s e t s & v i e w s o f D o g I s l a n d E n j o y s h i n g f r o m y o u r d o c k & t h e c o n v e n i e n c e o f h a v i n g y o u r b o a t a t y o u r b a c k d o o r f o r t h o s e e a r l y m o r n i n g s h i n g t r i p s T h e h o m e i s v e r y c o m f o r t a b l e & e a s i l y m a i n t a i n e d T h e l i v i n g r o o m h a s a b u i l t i n b o o k c a s e & a r e p l a c e f o r t h o s e c h i l l y n i g h t s ### T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 250296 $299,900 St Geor ge Island ISLAND GET A W A Y 3 B R 1 1 / 2 B A h o m e i n q u i e t a r e a o f I s l a n d N e w m e t a l r o o f & d e c k B e a u t i f u l y a r d w i t h m a n i c u r e d L iv e O a k s & L a rg e P i n e O a k c a b i n e t s & i s l a n d i n k i t c h e n f u r n i s h e d 2 c a r u n d e r h o u s e g a r a g e w i t h w o r k s h o p / s t o r a g e t h a t ’ s 8 2 5 s q f t a r e a! W e s t P i n e A v e n u e # # # SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! $ % (850)22 7-7847 | tgolden@pcnh. com S O L D ## ## & $ $1( $1 / & 2 / # 2 ( / 1 & $ ( / $ / ( ( / % ' ( % $ ( ( 2 ( $ 2 $ ( % ( 2 ( $ & / / %$ 2 $ $ 1 0 / & 1 ( / & ( / ( 1 / / 2 / $ $ ( 1 $ & ( ( & / 1 1 / ( / / & $ $ & ( $ 1 ( $ $ & ( ( “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Apalachicola Times 1) What would a cruciverbalist ordinarily be looking for in a newspaper? Sports, Weather, Headlines, Crosswords 2) Ataxia is a medical condition as a consequence of which organ? Liver, Heart, Brain, Kidneys 3) What was the rst name of Lear, founder of the Lear Jet? Joseph, Lawrence, William, Glenn 4) Since when have Girl Scouts been selling cookies? 1917, 1939, 1956, 1970 5) What is the most popular U.S. garden plant? Squash, Cucumber, Tomato, Carrot 6) Which decade saw Major League Baseball build a record 11 ballparks? 1930s, 1950s, 1970s, 1990s 7) Who hosts a yearly celebration to honor the bluefooted Bresse chicken? France, Spain, Brazil, India 8) What antacid gum did Wrigley release in 2001? Chaco, Surpass, Johnny, Steptoe 9) Whose name at birth was Issur Danielovitch? Kirk Douglas, Usher, Burt Reynolds, Sinbad 10) Which is a thief whose specialty is robbing women? Slibber, Scobberlotcher, Roddikin, Moll-buzzer 11) What’s the public name of Trevor Tahiem Smith? Busta Rhymes, E-40, Red Caf, Rockwilder 12) Where is the football stadium of Heinz Field? Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Denver, Miami 13) Who issued the rst presidential pardon? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 14) What means to pour a drink for someone? Yerd, Franch, Walm, Shench ANSWERS 1) Crosswords. 2) Brain. 3) William. 4) 1917. 5) Tomato. 6) 1990s. 7) France. 8) Surpass. 9) Kirk Douglas. 10) Mollbuzzer. 11) Busta Rhymes. 12) Pittsburgh. 13) Washington. 14) Shench. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, October 3, 2013 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index A Dog Island resident escaped serious injury after his small plane crashed en route to Jackson, Ga. Claude C. Nardy, 59, who owns a home on Gulf Shores Drive on Dog Island, was piloting a 1941 Aeronca Chief when he crashed Monday afternoon outside Thomaston, Ga., authorities said. The Aeronca Chief, which is registered to Nardy, was a side-byside two-seater propeller plane popular as a touring aircraft and trainer. During World War II, the Army Air Corps used a version of it called the L-16. Upson County, Ga., Sheriff Dan Kilgore said Nardy and Vera Allen, 39, of McDonough, Ga., went down just before 1 p.m. in a rural area near Logtown Road, 10 miles outside Thomaston. The plane crashed into a stand of pine trees, and the couple was able to exit the plane. The sheriff described heavy damage to several areas of the singleengine plane, including a wing, the tail and propeller. He said the Upson 911 center was able to locate the crash site by using the cell phone signal from the victims call for help. Nardy was taken to Upson Regional Medical Center for treatment of what appeared to be minor injuries, Kilgore said. He said Allen was the only passenger on board and appeared to be unharmed in the crash. Kilgore said the pair was headed to Seven Lakes Airport in Jackson, Ga., when the pilot reported running out of fuel. Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Kathleen Bergen said the agency is investigating the crash. By LOIS SWOBODA By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Beset by a dwindling harvest, oystermen this week appealed for steps to be taken to boost the supply of oysters in Apalachicola Bay. At a standing-room-only meeting of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association in the courthouse annex Monday afternoon, a majority of the membership backed two proposals that were then presented the next morning at the county commission meeting: The FCSWA wants to create a locally owned hatchery at the county-owned Lombardi Seafood Park that would help with seeding the bay, and to make changes in the management plan for bay closures that would protect against overharvesting. Were the only shing community in the world that doesnt have a hatchery, seafood industry activist Ricky Banks said. Luther Hat eld, the FCSWA secretary, presented the hatchery plan to the county commission Tuesday morning, noting that it would produce more seed faster than any other method, including that of Mother Nature. He estimated it would cost about $70,000 to $80,000 to pipe water to the Lombardis at Two Mile site from across the channel and to create other infrastructure. The commissioners unanimously supported a motion to gather further information on how much such a hatchery would cost to construct and whether funding could be obtained. One possible source could be the nonpro t Gulf Coast Marine Life Center, a collaborative partnership of experts from industry and academia who are now at work developing a Center of Excellence at Okaloosa Island, site, with other facilities planned along the Gulf Coast. The Okaloosa Island site will house a stateof-the-art marine n sh and shell sh hatchery, a coastal plant production facility, classrooms and teaching laboratories, and WINDING WATEROystermen plead for help COURTESY OF THE THOMASTON TIMESThe right wing of a 1941 Aeronca Chief sits up like a warning beacon where the small two-seater plane went down in Georgia.Dog Island resident spared in plane crash BP settlement pays out $18 million in claimsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The man who oversees the Deepwater Horizon claims process paid a visit last week to Apalachicola, rallying local staff as part of his tour of 19 claimant assistance centers from South Florida to Texas. Patrick Juneau stopped by the claims of ce at the municipal complex at 194 14th St. on Sept. 24 to update the county on claims ful lled and settlements still to come. Nick Gagliano, who handles media relations for Juneau, said as of Sept. 23, 2,156 claims had been led in Franklin County, with 631 of these determined to be eligible, for a total of $18.34 million paid to Franklin County residents and businesses. For the difference there may be some (claims) that have not been reviewed, some may be incomplete where we are waiting on documents, and some may have been denied, he said.CAPT. CHRIS ROBINSON | Special to the TimesThis enormous waterspout was spotted from the launch ramp at Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park about 10:30 a.m. Monday. Park Manager Josh Hodson said the waterspout was far offshore and didnt pose a threat to the park, but that extensive rain caused scattered ooding in the campground. Carrabelle city workers to get raisesBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Carrabelles new budget keeps millage rates the same and grants pay raises to all city workers. On Sept. 24, amid a room full of protesting citizens, city commissioners voted to give themselves a $200 a year raise and to grant pay raises ranging from 3 to 20 percent to city workers. Olivia Massey, Carrabelles newest city commissioner, championed the raises, insisting across-the-board raises would cost the city about $21,000, but some people disagree. Only four citizens attended the rst hearing Sept. 12 on Carrabelles tentative budget. See OYSTERMEN A5 See CARRABELLE A5 See BP A7Estuary enthusiasm, A2 VOL. 128 ISSUE 23Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A12-A13Register now for St. Vincent clean-up Supporters of St. Vincent Island are organizing a beach cleanup on the island Friday, Oct. 11. Volunteers will be transported on the barge from Indian Pass at 8 a.m. and can return at either noon or 4 p.m. Bring water, food, sunscreen and bug spray. This cleanup is not for the faint of heart, but participants will get to see the islands natural beauty while helping preserve one of Floridas last jewels. To register, email supportstvin@ hotmail.com by Oct. 4.Chamber plans Oct. 9 golf tourneyTee up with business members from around Franklin, Gulf, Leon and Wakulla counties at the 10th annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament on Wednesday, Oct. 9. Teetime is 1 p.m. on the St James Bay Golf Course east of Carrabelle. Prizes will be awarded the top three teams at a reception after the tournament. Cost per team is $400, $100 per player. Fees include range balls, golf carts equipped with the latest color GPS system. Tournament proceeds go toward the chambers building fund. For more information, call 6539419 or email anita@ apalachicolabay.orgBlues in the Lot Oct. 12On Oct. 12, the Apalachicola Sponge Company presents an all-day blues festival, with six sizzling bands at the Hays House, 48 Ave. D in Apalachicola across from Coombs Armory. Music will include the Smackwater Retrievers, guitarist Matt Law, Johnny Barbato and the Lucky Doggs, the Easy Street Blues Band, Slim Fatz and the John Bull Blues Band. Food will be provided by Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department BBQ. For more information, call 653-5564 or visit www. Apalachspongecompany. com.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 1113270 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER VincentIvers,M.D.BCIM CSSKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit. CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening. www.iversmd.com VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070Mon-Tue-Thurs&Fri 9am-6pm Wed&Sat 9am-2pmALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED SERVICES 4514365 CouponExpires:10-15-13CODE:AP00 Friday,October18thTripleTailsSeafood &RawBar 3p.m.&5p.m. Provisions 6p.m. TheThirstyGoat 6:30p.m.,8:30p.m. &10:30p.m. MangoMarley's (centraltimezone) 7p.m.&9p.m.Saturday,October19thDocksideSeafoodandRawBar 11:30a.m.,12:45p.m. 2p.m.FreeSongwriters Workshop LookoutLounge 5p.m.&7p.m. Toucans (centraltimezone) 6p.m.,8p.m.,&10p.m. HaughtyHeron 7p.m.&9p.m.Sunday,October20thIndianPassRawBar 2p.m.,3:30p.m.,5p.m., 6:30p.m.,8p.m. 10p.m.LateNight JamSessionForfulleventschedule, visit:BlastontheBay.com ThisProjectreceivednancial assistancefromtheGulfCountyTDC. ThisProjectreceivednancial assistancefromVisitFlorida. The weather was perfect Friday afternoon, as the schools closed early and more than 700 people attended Estuary Day 2013, held at Marion Millender Park and the adjacent interpretive and research center for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. In all, 73 people, 28 staff and 45 volunteers manned the exhibits. Volunteers came from Franklin County High School and the ABC School, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab and numerous other organizations. New this year was an exhibit on honey staffed by local beekeepers George Watkins and Jimmy Moses. Another first was a booth from the culinary students at the Franklin County School, which served up sea shell salad, wraps and sweet treats for a very modest fee. Organizer Lisa Bailey said the crowd was up by about 100 from last year. Rumor has it that one young attendee failed to follow directions and wound up in one of the specimen tanks, but no name could be confirmed. Bailey said the youngster was unharmed. She said the fall was result of horseplay despite the fact that he was accompanied by a parent Sounds like natural consequences to me! she said. By LOIS SWOBODAHundreds ock to 2013 Estuary DayVolunteer Chloe Davis helps out on the obstacle course. FWC intern Danny Mannka loads up a tree with forage for little bears on the shore of Apalachicola Bay as part of an outreach on living with bears. A fascinated crowd watches Jimmy Moses extract honey from the comb.PHOTOS BY LO O IS S SS WOBO OBO DA | The TimesNew this year was a concession booth manned by students from the Franklin County School. Seen here are, from left, Brooke Frye, Sasha Carr, Keaton Hersey and Chandler White.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, October 3, 2013 ApalachicolaBatteryPark KaydSelden (coordinator) DavidBarclay ChrisGiordano MarciaGiordano JohnGiordano CameronGiordano ApalachicolaAbercrombieLanding JohnInzetta (coordinator) MelonieInzetta BobInguagiato DavidFrancisco, GregLaSchum Apalachicola-LafayettePark LoisSwoboda (coordinator) MershellSherman SusanMaken ApalachicolaU.S.98Corridor RobinVroegop (coordinator) BruceHall RandyBell MarkParsley BaldPointStatePark DustinAllen (coordinator) MelissaForehaus PeterNimkoff MareshahOwusu-Yan KanyaJones MaryMadsen AngeliqueTayler JeffreyBelle JamilaTull KimRoss BrianLee JoeAlbright JoeSierra StuartBriley SharonBradford CharlaLucas JohannaPetty KarenWensing ArianeUngurait AngelaMcCloy JimMcCloy ElizabethSlack KaylaDavis LesCampbell DanielleFlat RichardCarroll PaulaCarroll MarthaLang MichaelCooper PaulParker MitchParker ZackBurke TedDuncan HeatherDuncan CamilleLillie NicholasFontela KarenJordan DanielHendon JackCorbett KathleenR.Carter JamesCarter BlaireLamy JessicaMeeker OliviaWright TaylorRains LarryArnold ByronSmith CarrabelleBeach KimWren (coordinator) AimeeDiPalmaSapp ZoieLance DylanLance TylerRowell StuMiller LynnMiller Carrabelle LesleyCox (coordinator) TamaraAllen (coordinator) LindaBurns,SWATAdvisor BonnyBall,TIGERSAdvisor CalAllen BrendaLaPaz GregKristofferson DavidButler StevenW.Allen TimothyKeith-Lucas LisaKeith-Lucas KenMertz LorenzoONeal KathleenOmar SkipFrink LenuardHall JudyHall WillieEnglish MaryClaireLovell CayceDaniels JohnnieDaniels JenniferDaniels BrandyStrops KaylaPilger CaulinSheridan KenAnderson CherNovaria DogIslandBeaches ChristopherTeaf (coordinatorfortheDog IslandConservationDistrict) DavidPrintiss (coordinatorfortheNature Conservancy) RandyCannon PatTeaf BillSlugg NancyKellett RickClevenger BrendaClevenger AnnShanks RoseGoodson DavidDeFina JackieWatts KenJones DanielleJones KayleeJones TerriCannon ClaudiaBujold RickClark MaryKamat JackMarchese DianneMellon EdMellon TammyOwen BillOwen BarbaraPerlis LarryPerlis GenevievePrintiss PamStevens BenWatts SherwoodWise EastpointDowntown HeidiMontgomery (coordinator) WalkerDeVaughn ChanceBareld JaredKing DallasShiver SavannahMontgomery EthanMontgomery Eastpoint-MarionMillenderPark RickPlessinger (coordinator) RosalynKilcollins (coordinator) LindaPlessinger JamesLee CarolODel RobertODel BryceTobin JessieKanes MeganLamb TaraKlink MandyAndrews TabathaSpurlock AustinPastorcich FSUCoastal&MarineLab BarbaraShoplockandSaturday atSeaGroup (coordinators) LaingEdmiston, LeahBakan, SananEngel, CorinnaCarroll, JacksonHenry, LiamStrivelli, HarperGeraci, KylanSimmons IsaacBakan, KimDunn ColleenCosgrove HeatherSneed ThomasJaxonLee MarissaZaley GregFalstrom ZoeShoplock CaasiNakab LanarkBeach KathySwaggerty (coordinator) B.GailPhillips (coordinator) JamesL.Smith AnitaSmith BrendaKeen SuzanneZimmerman SaintGeorgeIslandDowntown AdaLong (coordinator) DailMullins (coordinator) BobPruitt BarbaraSanders W.K.Sanders BethAppleton DaveHarbaugh AdeleColston PeteRitch JaneNipps SusanKearney AnnaAnthuis TimAnthuis ElaineRosenthal SusanBassett JoEllenPearman JeanGunter Ray SaintGeorgeIslandStatePark JoshHodson (coordinator) MauriceTinkler KristianTinkler AnnaKelly ScottTimm KatieMaxwell MatthewDavis ShannonMartin AshleyBennett KinseyBrook CarleeRedko MarilynTimm SaintTeresa SusanBulloch (coordinator) KarylW.Cochran LizaWitmer BenShaw ScipioCreek MatthewAnderson (coordinator) Two-MileIsland LisaBailey (coordinator) MatthewAnderson ErikLovestrand 15boysand5stafffromtheLiberty J.U.S.Tcamp JohnS.PhippsNatureConservancy Preserve,AlligatorPoint MaryBalthrop (coordinator) GeorgeE.LewisII SarahLewis GeorgeLewisIII StellaLewis CliftonLewis"THEACTOFCLEANINGABEACHCHANGESYOU..."(PAMLONGOBARDI)2013FranklinCountyCoastalCleanupApalachicolaRiverkeeperanditsco-sponsorsOceanConservancyand theFranklinCountyDepartmentsofParks&RecreationandSolid Waste&Recyclingthankthe252volunteers,including23 sitecoordinators,whohelpedcleanupourbeaches, islands,bay,andriveronSeptember21.Accordingto theofcialweigh-infromtheDepartmentofSolidWaste &Recycling,volunteerscollected13.65tonsoftrash:267 bagsofcans,bottles,cigarettebutts,plastic,styrofoam, shinggear,ropes,andotherlitteraswellaslumber,heavy constructionmaterials,carparts,tires,crabtraps,alazy-boyrecliner, jawbones,aninatableshark,acoyoteskeleton,amonster-trucktire,2reextinguishers,atoy rie,asandbagfrom2011,arefrigerator,aberglassboathull,a15X15cargonet,aTVset, andamessageinabottlefoundburiedinthesand:SenttoseaApril6,2013,1milewestof PeppershKey(nearSteinhatchee).

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, October 3, 2013 ASection Special to the TimesOn Tuesday, Gov. Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi announced Florida has led suit against Georgia to stop its unchecked and growing consumption of water that continues to harm the families of Northwest Florida. Georgia has refused to fairly share the waters that ow between our two states, so to stop Georgias unmitigated consumption of water, we have brought the matter before the U.S. Supreme Court, Scott said. Georgias over-consumption of water threatens the existence of Apalachicola Bay and the future economic development of the region. Generations of Florida families have relied upon these waters for their livelihood but now risk losing their way of life if Georgias actions are not stopped. Through this historic legal action, we are ghting for the future of Apalachicola Bay and its families. After 20 years of failed negotiations with Georgia, this is our only way forward in securing the economic future of northwest Florida. Bondi said, I am proud to join Gov. Scott in this ght to protect Floridas fair share of water from Georgias over-consumption, which is devastating Apalachicola Bays ecosystem. Florida and Alabama have sought relief from harm caused by reduced ows and increased Georgia consumption in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basins over the past 20 years through legal challenges, without success. Florida now proposes to address the problem squarely an Original Action led with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking injunctive relief against Georgias unmitigated and unsustainable upstream consumption of water from the Chattahoochee and Flint river basins. Apalachicola River water levels are affected by withdrawals from the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers at all times. The Metro-Atlanta area primarily obtains its water from the Chattahoochee River, with withdrawals totaling 360 million gallons per day. Georgias consumption is expected to nearly double to about 705 million gallons per day by 2040, as Atlantas population and associated water withdrawals grow unchecked. That estimated daily consumption represents the approximate water volume of the entire Apalachicola Bay on an annual basis. Historically low water levels brought about by Georgias excessive consumption have caused oysters to die because of higher salinity, increased disease and predator intrusion in the Bay. Until recently, Apalachicola Bay accounted for about 10 percent of the nations Eastern oyster supply. However, the oyster industry in Apalachicola collapsed in 2012 after years of reduced ows of freshwater into the Bay, leading Scott to seek and obtain a Commercial Fisheries Disaster Declaration from the U.S. Department of Commerce earlier this year.Special to the TimesThe Seahawks have been spotted preening colorful feathers; the Franklin County Schools K-12 Positive Behavior Support program for the 2013-2014 school year has taken ight. Under the schools guidelines for success, students observed being responsible, respectful and safe randomly receive colorful feathers. Any faculty or staff member can award feathers to students following guideline behaviors throughout the school day. Students write their names on their awarded feathers before depositing them into classroom nests throughout the school week. On Friday mornings, feathers are drawn from classroom nests around the campus; two from each middle and high school rst period classes and two from each of the elementary classrooms. Winning feather recipients are awarded special treats and social time on Friday afternoons in a pre-designated location on the schools campus. Each week, feathers are tallied, per grade level, in preparation for recognizing students receiving the most feathers in each nine week grading period. Special prizes will be awarded to students, at end-of-year grade level award recognition ceremonies, for receiving the most feathers throughout the school year. With the schools positive behavior support program in place, it pays to be a successful Seahawk. Students can count their feathers, and blessings: Aint it great to be a Hawk? If anyone would like to make a donation toward the FCS incentive program, contact Kris Bray, assistant principal, at 670-2800, ext. 3115 or kbray@franklin.k12. .us. Your support would be greatly appreciated. Go Seahawks! Time to serve the needs of area seniorsOver the last seven weeks, a group of between 16 and 25 Franklin County seniors has been meeting weekly to express concern that the board of directors charged with running the Carrabelle Senior Center has not followed the policy and procedures as directed by the current 2008 Franklin County Senior Citizens Council bylaws, the code of ethics and 1975 charter of incorporation. An annual council membership meeting in September at which you, the Franklin County 50 years old and over membership, can nominate board members and vote on the directors for the next year, as is stipulated by the Council by-laws, was not allowed to happen. Thus, your vote was denied. It was then decided by council members that the next scheduled board meeting of the council board of directors, at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9, would be the of cial annual meeting of the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council at which the members can nominate and vote on new board members and voice suggestions for the use of the Carrabelle Senior Center building. A plan on how to make the Carrabelle Senior Center return to serving the needs of the area seniors will be presented for your vote. Seniors, please attend this meeting and vote for your rights!Harriett BeachThe problems that have devastated Apalachicola Bay are complicated, but the solution is simple: Congress must direct the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to release enough water to restore the health of the Apalachicola River, bay and estuary. The best way to implement this mandate is through the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2013. Anything short of a Congressional mandate that requires the Corps to act constitutes willful destruction of our highly productive, worldrenowned shery and the communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. Earlier this summer, Florida Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio tried unsuccessfully to get language into the Senates version of WRRDA. Their initial efforts were thwarted by Georgias powerful and well-connected senior senators. Rubio and Nelson took their work on behalf of the bay to the next level by bringing a U.S. Senate Committee Field Hearing to Apalachicola in August. That hearing and the of cial federal declaration that Apalachicola Bay has suffered a commercial sheries disaster brought national attention to the plight of our seafood workers. We are grateful for the senators work. Next, it was Rep. Steve Southerlands turn to try to convince his colleagues to put this language into the House version of the WRRDA bill. And try he did, with an impassioned plea to the House Transportation Committee on behalf of his Panhandle constituents. Countless oystermen, coastal businesses and hardworking families have seen their way of life destroyed by decreased water ows into the Apalachicola River and Bay, Southerland said. Steve Southerland knows that if the Apalachicola River does not get the freshwater ow it needs to survive, the economic productivity of Apalachicola Bay and the $5.6 billion recreational and commercial seafood industry in the eastern Gulf of Mexico it supports will be history. This destruction is all the more unthinkable because it can be prevented through immediate congressional intervention. If Alabama, Florida and Georgia would work together to establish a foundation of collaboration and negotiation, a tri-state watersharing compact could be developed that would help Florida. But after decades of waiting for the states to act and the announcement that Florida is going to seek a solution from the Supreme Court, a compact is not likely to happen. Even if the states lawsuit is successful, it will be too late to save the Apalachicola River and Bay. Congress must step in and act. Georgia has the water, and for the moment, Georgia has the power. Absent a congressional mandate to the Corps, Georgia has no incentive to negotiate. Its now up to Southerland to lead the charge. He clearly understands the challenge ahead: Make no mistake: there are no overnight xes to this problem With countless lives and livelihoods at stake, I am committed to standing shoulder-to-shoulder with local leaders and the citizens who live along Apalachicola River and Bay to keep the water owing. Southerland did not leave empty-handed from his most recent efforts for the Apalachicola River and Bay. He has begun the process for an investigation of the Corps management by the U.S. Government Accountability Of ce and he has received a commitment for another congressional hearing to closely examine the Corps management of the rivers ow. But it is essential that Congress act now to protect our magni cent river and bay, a one-of-a-kind ecological-treasure. With the House of Representatives poised to vote on its version of WRRDA, we are counting on Southerland to overcome politics and ensure that the nal WRRDA bill clearly directs the Corps of Engineers to send Florida the water it deserves and the water it needs. It wont be an easy lift, but it will be worth the effort. Congress must act now. We cannot let the communities die that depend on these vital natural resources. We cant let the Apalachicola River and Bay die. Not on our watch. Dan Tonsmeire has served as riverkeeper and executive director of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper since May 2010.Page 4 Letter to the EDITORStudents padding the FCS Nest with feathers Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft Congress must act now to protect river, bay DAN TONSMEIRESpecial to the TimesLegal action against Georgia only way forward GOVERNOR:If Alabama, Florida and Georgia would work together to establish a foundation of collaboration and negotiation, a tri-state water-sharing compact could be developed that would help Florida. But after decades of waiting for the states to act and the announcement that Florida is going to seek a solution from the Supreme Court, a compact is not likely to happen. Georgias over-consumption of water threatens the existence of Apalachicola Bay and the future economic development of the region. Generations of Florida families have relied upon these waters for their livelihood but now risk losing their way of life if Georgias actions are not stopped.Gov. Rick Scott WATER WARS Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, October 3, 2013will serve as a resource to support Sea Grant outreach programs designed to transfer knowledge to the private sector. Dr. Karl Havens, a University of Florida professor who has worked closely with local seafood industry leaders in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, serves on the marine life centers advisory board, a collection of experts from around the world. In addition to the hatchery idea, the FCSWA on Monday backed a proposal to ensure against overharvesting by appealing to state ofcials to expand their closures in the event that too much rain, or too high of river levels, forces a closure of the bay. The seafood workers want to make sure that in the event too much water forces closure of Cat Point which is frequently the case during the winter season because it is closest to the river that such a closure also extends to the oyster bars on the Miles farther west. The Miles there aint nothing, Hartseld said Monday. Is anyone here works the west end of the bay? When few hands were raised, he then asked, Whos doing a little better on Cat Point? How long do you think Cat Points going to hold up? Banks asked the audience how many bags they were bringing in on average per day, and the consensus was that it was under three. The majority of boats working Cat Point are catching under three bags a day, Banks said. I hope to God it gets better around November and December. Not everyone agreed times were that bad, with Kenny Reeder and Philip Vinson saying they were catching more than a dozen bags per day, provided they kept their boats moving. The skys is not falling; the bays coming back, Vinson said. You can make a living out here. Seafood dealer David Barber said hes paying oystermen the best prices he ever has, at about $42 per bag, but hes only buying about 60 to 80 bags on a good day, about onefth of what he could buy in a robust year. He said his trucks are shipping out far fewer loads than usual. Now Im lucky to get a load of oysters a week out of Louisiana, he said, noting he expects production from south Texas to be pretty good heading into the winter months, when demand typically rises for the holidays. Hartseld did not spare state agencies from criticism, faulting the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services for spending more than $400,000 on research into aquaculture while not getting to the bottom of whats causing the drop-off in production at the oyster bars. Thats what DOACS is doing for us, he said. They want us to quit working our live bars and start farming oysters. Theyre wanting us to put ourselves out of work. Both groups (DOACS and FWC) are trying to destroy our bay. Hartseld said he learned at a meeting last week that aquaculture methods can yield production in 12-16 months time, and that a grower can make between $12,000 and $16,000 a year, but it would cost between $15,000 and $20,000 in start-up costs, much more than a typical oystermen has on hand to invest. He urged his fellow oystermen to avoid catching undersized oysters and to be sure to throw unsold oysters back in the bay. We keep on doing what were doing, were not going to catch nothing, Hartseld said. By Christmastime, there arent going to be any left out there. We cant get any help and assistance with this bay with the bay running wide open, he said. Without assistance, this bay is going to get worse. Theres oysters still dying at the west end. Jerry Williams said, Hagans at to the west, north spur, is just as clean as a sand dune. Theres little on Cat Point, but to the west theres nothing. He downplayed the likelihood that his fellow oystermen would be able to prot from aquaculture. Thats a suckers game, but theres big money in managing programs like that, Williams said. The people who make the money are those who supervise. One bright spot that emerged was several oystermen who said theyre beginning to see growth in the oysters theyre catching, especially since the amount of freshwater coming down the river is increasing for the rst time in years. I can take you and show you bars with new oysters, new growth on it, one man said. Hartseld urged the oystermen to take steps to organize a caravan to Tallahassee, for a chance to make their plea for assistance directly to legislators and the governor himself. We have to have at least 500 people load up and go, when the governors there, he said. How Implants&CrownsAffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.WilliamC.Knapke,DDS,GeneralDentistPanamaCitySquare617West23rdStreet,PanamaCityFL CallForInformation1-888-415-1638 Feeseffectivethrough11/22/13.Additionalfeesmaybeincurred dependingonindividualcases.Same-dayCrownservicemaynot beavailableincertaincases.AffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.Ofce#:(850)872-6155. Great vs.other Dental providersSingleToothImplant$1,795Denture Implants$1,495$1,895 Same-DayCrowns$695LowerArch UpperArch20144-3-T4 Welcomes SelenaCoulter toour staff. Selena invitesfriends andfamilyto callforan appointment.TheManeSalon andDaySpa131AvenueE Apalachicola er Selena Coult iends es frvitin appointment. 653-8714 NOTICEOFADOPTIONOF CITYORDINANCETheCityCommissionoftheCityofApalachicolawill holdapublichearingforthepurposeofreceiving citizenscommentsonthefollowingproposed ordinance: ORDINANCENO.2013-04 ANORDINANCEBYTHECITYCOMMISSIONOF THECITYOFAPALACHICOLA,FLORIDAAMENDING SECTION20-49OFORDINANCENUMBER2008-02; PROVIDINGFORADOPTIONOFASEWERUSER CHARGE;PROVIDINGFORREPEALEDOFALL ORDINANCESORPARTTHEREOFINCONFLICT HEREWITH;ANDPROVIDINGFORANEFFECTIVE DATE. ThepublichearingwillbeheldintheApalachicola CommunityCenter,#1BayAvenue,Apalachicola, Floridaat6:00PMonTuesday,October8,2013.All interestedpartiesareencouragedtoappearandbe heardwithrespecttothisproposedordinance. The original budget draft did not contain the pay raises, but early in the meeting, Massey said raises were necessary and should be added in. Theres money in the budget, and they havent had raises in seven years, Massey said. These men are working at poverty level, making $20,000 a year. Jared Mock is the only employee taking out inmates every day. He makes $25,000 a year. She said Mocks work was hazardous and deserved greater compensation and that the cost of the raises was slight and would not raise taxes. She distributed a worksheet showing the current salaries of city employees, how much increase each worker would receive and the total cost, $21,500 for the city and the same amount for the water and sewer department. Under the proposal, workers earning $40,000 or more received a $1,000 raise, those earning $30,000 to $39,000 received a $2,000 raise and those earning $20,000 to $29,000 received a $3,000 raise. Commissioners got a $200 annual pay increase. Mock, an employee since January 2011, got 20 percent, increasing his salary from $25,000 to $30,000. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the proposed increase in water and sewer expense would be funded by reducing the contribution to the contingency fund. We had planned to contribute $70,000, and I reduced that to $50,000, which will give us $600,000 in that account, she said. We try to keep a rolling balance of $400,000. The $21,500 for city raises will be funded by adjusting the balance forward, Messer said. One member of the audience asked if commissioners were concerned about public perception of the raises when so many people are struggling with a poor economy. They choose to be seafood workers. Ive seen the bay in a lot worse shape than it is today back in 1985, Massey said. How come them oystermen is making $1,000 a week and still drawing $900 in food stamps? They have the opportunity. They dont want to do nothing. She said few seafood workers have taken advantage of Workforce Florida programs to get additional training to pursue new careers in the face of problems with the oyster harvest. After discussion, the proposed raises passed unanimously. After the vote, Commissioner Brenda La Paz said, You know folks out there arent going to understand about the raises, so is everybody ready to get chewed up about it? Massey replied, Oh, Im sure, but the same ones thatll be complaining is the same ones that will be complaining when their yard is full of water or a trees fell in their yard, when we do have a disaster. Who theyll call rst is the city employees. About 25 people, many of whom spoke out against the raises, attended the nal budget meeting Sept. 24. La Paz opened the meeting with a speech decrying the proposed raises. She said she had reviewed the proposal in the interim since the rst meeting and felt it was unreasonable. At this point, the city and water and sewer are spending more than they take in, she said. At that rate, we wont have revenue available to pay salaries. The general fund reserve, water and sewer contingency are savings accounts and should not be used for repeating expenses. If we use from our reserve and contingencies to support signicant salary increases this year, what will we do next year and the years after? The reserve and contingency accounts are sacred and need to be reserved for emergencies. Reimbursement from FEMA can take years. Messer said La Paz did not understand the funding and that no money would be taken from contingency or reserve accounts. Im terribly offended that the commissioners voted themselves raises unless those raises dont take effect until everybody in here is reelected, said former nance commissioner Gathana Parmenas. I was nance commissioner for several years when the city had a lot of money, she said. Tax revenue was rolling in from a lot of developments that are now ghost developments. Property values are declining every year, and so our millage rates are going up every year. We have no more people in this town than we did in the year 2000. Some people say we have fewer. If the census says we have more, it is because theyre in the prison. Its not because theyre tax-paying citizens on the outside. Whats happening is if you compare what city government cost us to run in the year 2000 for the same number of people versus what its costing us to run right now, one can see that weve got a really big elephant to feed here, Parmenas said. I think everybody is reasonable about being concerned about whether were dipping into money that was left over from those lush years in order to keep things rolling with no more people to pay the taxes and with declining property values. So what we want, Keisha, is reassurance that the money coming in every year at least equals the money going out every year. When we hear words like contingency and reserves, it sounds to us like youre dipping into the rainy day funds. You havent planned for any capital expenditures, and in the same meetings I hear about how terrible the roof is, how terrible the A/C and heating is and that its going to cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. That needs to be in your budgeting process from the beginning, she said. Other audience members complained adjustments for workers compensation insurance and other hidden benets were improperly gured and that no city worker was below the poverty level. Evidently, youre not taking in the FICA or retirement income thats added to the persons income. If a base salary is $31,000 and you add FICA and retirement, he gets over $54,000, Randy Usher said. Is that below poverty level? The lowest income guy on here makes over $30,000. La Paz presented commissioners with a handout she said demonstrated the pay increases would actually cost the city more than $700,000 and water and sewer more than $600,000. In an interview after the meeting, Messer said, she did not believe the gures on the sheet were correct and that adjustments to FICA and workmans compensation would not be made until the next scal year. Usher and La Paz warned that a 20 percent pay raise for a single employee could upset coworkers. Massey said Mocks job was dangerous, and he deserved a raise. Ive been down there for a little over a year. I dont have any retirement. If I dont go to work, I dont get a paycheck, Shawn Oxendine said. I want everybody to prosper and I want us to do good. Im just asking yall to run this thing like a business. If we dont run it like a business, were going to run it into the ground. Massey said money for the raises was available in the budget without increasing millage. La Paz said the decision to give raises should be delayed and a formal pay scale developed. The millage rate of 8.77 passed unanimously, with Finance Commissioner Charlotte Schneider not in attendance. The budget passed 3-1 with La Paz opposed. As the meeting closed, La Paz announced she would not accept an increase in her salary. The city of Carrabelle was the only taxing district to see an enlargement of its tax base, after having suffered a nearly 26 percent decline last year. Carrabelles combined valuation this year will expand from $101.8 million to $102.7 million, an increase of $916,000, or almost 1 percent. BRENDA LA PAZ KEISHA MESSER OlLIVIA MASSEY CARRABELLE from page A1 OYSTERMEN from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com A professor of history at Troy University told members of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society on Saturday morning that he plans to write a social history of Apalachicola, focused on the theme of the communitys ability to rebound despite adverse and changing conditions. There are thousands of Southern towns, suffering the vagaries of economic ups and downs. Theyre gone away; theyre dead towns, said Robert Saunders, chairman of the history department at the Alabama university. Apalachicola easily could have succumbed to yellow fever, to oods, to the re of 1900. I want to nd out what has historically driven the town to keep on, he said, Apalachicolans have been knocked down many times, but theyve always come back. Saunders was guest speaker at the societys general meeting, held at the Raney House carriage house and attended by about 30 members of the society. Saunders said he expected to work on the book for about two years and plans to begin after he completes the story of Wilber Wightman Gramling, a Leon County man who served in the Fifth Florida Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. He saw action at Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg; was sent to the prisoner-of-war camp at Elmira, N.Y.; and left behind one of the few surviving diaries written by a Florida soldier during the war, particularly rare in that it documents the experiences of a serviceman incarcerated in a Union prisoner-of-war camp. Saunders is also doing work on the letters exchanged between Mary Todd Lincolns half-sister, Elodie Todd, and her anc Nathaniel Henry Rhodes Dawson, a Selma, Ala., lawyer and politician, Confederate ofcer and United States commissioner of education. The professor, a Baltimore, Md., native who moved to Selma as a boy when his father, an FBI agent, was reassigned there, has taught college for 26 years and is an interim associate dean at Troy. He earned his bachelor and masters degrees from Salisbury State University and a doctorate from Auburn University in 1994. In his recounting of Apalachicolas economic history, Saunders described how the port city has been both geographically and socially isolated, but cosmopolitan in its sensibilities and diverse in its ethnic makeup. He said a visit to Chestnut Cemetery quickly reveals that this is a town of immigrants, a town of Northerners. The rst thing that strikes you is they (the deceased) are from somewhere else. Saunders said he plans to explore the history of Apalachicolas ethnic enclaves, and its spirit of survival, by drawing on the history of families from all walks on life, as opposed to focusing exclusively on high-prole families, such as the Ormans and the Raneys, or famous individuals, such as Alvan Chapman or William Popham. One person doesnt make a town, he said. I want to provide as much details as I possibly can, to provide a whole picture, a complete picture. We need records, the history of your families. I can tell a pretty good story, but I need the record. Saunders said. Look through your closets and your attics. Nothing is inconsequential; nothing is trivial. It adds color. The professor said he envisions his work to be in the vein of two earlier works, one by Harry P. Owens, a professor emeritus from the University of Mississippi who wrote his 1966 doctoral dissertation at Florida State University on Apalachicola before 1861 and the other by William Warren Rogers, a professor emeritus at FSU, whose 1986 work Outposts on the Gulf on the history of Franklin is considered the most denitive history of the area. He said he admired Rogers work but found it incomplete, in that it devoted lots of focus on individuals, such as real estate and condence man William Popham, to the exclusion of a broad look at social and religious trends. Saunders said he believes Rogers would welcome a successor to his work, especially from World War II to the present, but that he plans to conclude his narrative before the 1980s to ensure against bias. When I get close to the present, I start getting nervous, he said. We know more about Charlemagne than we know of John Kennedy. He also noted that while the rest of the county has a fascinating history, I intend to focus on Apalachicola, because thats the areas anchor. After Saunders presentation, the society had its annual general meeting and voted on a series of updates to their bylaws. In addition, they re-elected the current board, which includes President Tom Daly, Vice President David Adlerstein, Secretary Shirley Taylor and Treasurer Fran Edwards. In addition they re-elected Gene Smith to another term on the board of directors. HAVE A PIECE OF hHISTORY?Professor Robert Saunders is hoping for assistance from area individuals in terms of providing him letters, family records, photos and other historical artifacts for his upcoming work. To reach him, email him at rsaunders@troy.edu.By Tevis EVIS Pa A Ge ESpecial to the Times As the weeks have progressed, the high school has been chatting about our upcoming homecoming game. Campaigns have been sold, and winners have been elected. Our 2013-14 Mr. Franklin County High School is our all-American Logan McLeod, and our Miss Franklin County High School is our beautiful Brook Pittman. The Homecoming Court consists of Chelsea Register and Thomas Copley-Subbarao for the freshman class; Jaylynn Lyston, Anna Riley, River Banks and Dallas Shiver for the sophomore class; Zoie Lance, Erin Riley, Kelsey Shuler, Austin Carter, Chandler White and Brandon Cash for the junior class; and Deborah Dempsey, Marlyn Lee, Haleigh Ming, Adriana Reeder, Jessica Shields, Alex Causey, Kyle Hathcox, Leonard Ward, Cameron White and Mercury Wynn for the senior class. These students, along with the rest of the student body, are eagerly waiting for homecoming week, which is Oct. 7-11. The theme this year will be, Targeting the Tigers. Our days will include Monday, Blast from the Past; Tuesday, Twin Day; Wednesday, Wacky/ Costume Day; Thursday, Color Wars/Silly Olympics; and Friday, Spirit day. The colors for high school consist of blue for seniors, yellow for juniors, purple for sophomores and green for freshman. This is going to be a week full of fun and memories. I cannot wait PUBLICNOTICETheFranklinCountyTouristDevelopmentCouncilannouncesthat itsMarketingCommitteewillholdapublicmeetingonWednesday October16,2013at1:30P.M.forthepurposeofentertainingpresentationsfromareamediaandpublicationsdesiringtoprovideservices forfutureTDCmarketingefforts.Presentationswillbelimitedtoten minutes.TencopiesofhandoutsforCommitteemembersshouldbe providedtotheTDCofcebyWednesdayOctober9,2013. InterestedorganizationsshouldcalltheTDCofceat850-653-8678 tobeplacedontheagendaandarrangefordeliveryofhandouts. TherewillbenoactionbyCommitteemembersatthismeeting. Megisan8yearoldChihuahuaandshe couldn'tbesweeter.Sheiscalm,affectionate andloveshumancontact.Sheisnotayappy dogsowoulddowelleveninanapartment. Sheisheartwormnegativeandotherthan needingherteethcleaned,ingoodshape. Whenyouareconsideringadopting,be suretoassessyouractivitylevelandadopt adogthatfitsyourlifestyle.Ifyouspend alotoftimeathomeandareinneedofa companion,Megwouldbeagreatchoice. Volunteersaredesperatelyneededto socializeallofourdogsandcats.Weare alwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobring oneofouranimalsintotheirhometobe fosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCounty HumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogontothe websiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets.Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere Lily is 2!Our sweet baby is a big 2-year-old! Lillian Alice Henderson celebrated her Sept. 9 birthday with her family and a Minnie Mouse party at the White City Fire Department. The celebration continued at her school with cupcakes and treats for all her friends. Lily is the daughter of Heather Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the granddaughter of Donnie and Donna Harcus of White City and Michael Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the greatgranddaughter of Bill and Edna Henderson of Eastpoint. Happy Birthday Lily! We love you so much! CCourtney Giddens, OOttice A Amison to wed SSaturdayMiss Courtney Giddens and Mr. Ottice Amison, both of Apalachicola, have announced nal plans for their wedding. The ceremony will be held at 5:30 p.m. this Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Peach Barn at Timber Mill Acres in Tifton, Ga. A reception at the same location will immediately follow the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Johnny and Gail Giddens of Fitzgerald, Ga. She is the granddaughter of James and Sara Phillips, Joyce Giddens, the late Alvin Giddens and the late John R. Giddens, all of Fitzgerald. The groom is the son of Tim and Ava Amison of Apalachicola. He is the grandson of Doris Bayles of Bascom; Kitty Amison and the late Eddie Amison of Apalachicola; and the late Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bodiford. The Rev. Steve ONeal will perform the ceremony. Music will be provided by the Blues Factor Band of Valdosta, Ga. Brooke Barnes, sister of the bride, will serve as matron of honor. Bridesmaids will be Charlie Garbutt of Dublin, Ga., Erin Maloy and Katie Petrie, both of Fitzgerald, Ga., and Allison Norris of Douglas, Ga. Braidyn Barnes, niece of the bride, will serve as ower girl. The father of the groom will serve as best man. Groomsmen will be Christian Amison and Colin Amison, sons of the groom, both of Apalachicola, Brandon Martina of Eastpoint, and Doug Giddens of Fitzgerald, Ga., brother of the bride. Chase Giddens, nephew of the bride, will serve as ring bearer. Happy BIRThHDAY WeddingExcitement builds for Oct. 7-11 homecoming week HAA WK TATALKSS PECIAl L TO ThTH E TT IMESDr. Robert Saunders, Troy University professor of history, addresses members of the Apalachicola Historical Society.Troy professor plans study of Apalachicola history SS PECIAl L TO ThTH E TT IMESMr. and Miss Franklin County High School are Logan McLeod and Brook Pittman. Society

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The Times | A7Thursday, October 3, 2013 R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 Jennifer Lynn Falk passed away Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013, at the age of 36 in Tallahassee. Jennifer was born in Panama City. She was a 1995 graduate of Apalachicola High School where she excelled academically and received numerous awards. She went on to further her education, receiving her bachelors degree in social work from Florida State University. She worked for many years with the Apalachee Center, counseling youth and adults. Jennifer was a lover of all life and was especially fond of her critters. She leaves behind her loving and devoted grandparents, Harry and Ida Falk; father, Mark Falk (Joann); sisters, Candace Webb and Jill Falk; brother, Zach Topham; step-brother, Daniel Hicks; nieces, Jaylan Prince, Jocelyn Webb, and Alexis Webb; nephew, Presley Hicks; and host of other family and countless friends. She was preceded in death by her mother, Marlene Hicks. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, Sept. 29, at Fellowship Baptist Church with viewing one hour prior to funeral. Kelley Funeral Home assisted family with arrangements.Jennifer Lynn Falk JENNIfFER LYNN FAlLK Obituary This is a friendly reminder that the Tonyas Hope Cancer Foundation is available to Franklin County residents being treated for cancer to help with gas, rent, utilities, groceries, etc. Just call 850625-0382 for an application. TONYA BRIDGES BEING tTREAt TED fFOR CANCER? Well, how about these nice fall temperatures already? Very pleasant and easy on the power bill. Enjoy! Goody, goody gumdrops! Dot Bless opened the coffee hour on Tuesday, Oct. 1 for the season. Drop in when you come to the post ofce or are just out and about and enjoy a mug of coffee or two. Sometimes, theres something on the counter to go with the coffee. How long has it been since you had a cup of coffee for 30 cents? I thought so. Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center. Chow line forms at noon. Minimum donation of $4 will be collected at the desk. Then, of course, you can enjoy a huge hamburger with chips every Friday night at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and pizza on Sundays. Phone in your orders between 5 and 7 p.m. at 697-9998 both nights. This Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4 and 5, there will be a huge yard sale on the golf course at Lanark Village. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be on hand to help you. Proceeds go toward the upkeep of the greens. Just follow the trafc. This Saturday evening, Oct. 5, Ron Vice will be on hand at the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center for the Over 50 Halloween Dance. So grab your favorite snack, beverage of choice and your main squeeze and have a great time. Dance starts at 7 p.m. and you might even get to do the Monster Mash. On Monday, Oct. 7, members of the Lanark Village Association board will meet at Chillas Hall at 6 p.m. The membership meeting will start at 7 p.m. Try to attend this meeting; we need your help. For those of you who dont yet belong to the association, we have applications in the Hall. Mark you calendars for Saturday, Oct. 19 and plan to come to the October Birthday Bash/Halloween party. The party at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you walk in the door. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound, and as my longtime friend Rita Millender says, Friends are like the stars in the sky. You dont always see them, but you know theyre there. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry.Coffee hour returns; fall is here LANARK NEWSJim WelshSpecial to the TimesHistoric Apalachicola Main Street recently completed another downtown improvement project in Apalachicola. Hand rails have been installed along the west block of U.S. 98 in the center of town, which encompasses several businesses including a restaurant, retail shops, and a law ofce. The Main Street design committee chose this project for safety and aesthetics reason. Members of the board of directors held several meetings with building and shop owners along that block to discuss what could be done to the steps to make them more attractive and safer. From the discussions with the business owners, we initially thought of redesigning the steps, said Jim Bachrach, chair of the design committee. However, the group eventually decided the steps are part of our history and rather than change what has been then for forever, we would install railings; keeping with our mission of preserving and enhancing the downtown area. Main Street located a fabricator in Port St. Joe and they worked closely on the design and installation of the railings. It seems to be accepted from the community as a good thing and it was a pleasure working with our shop owners on this project said Bachrach. The Apalachicola Area Historical Society has now asked Main Street to do the necessary leg work to have railings put in front of the Raney House. Main Street, afliated with the state and national Main Street organization, has the objective of taking on an aggressive, ongoing revitalization program for Apalachicola. Main Street continues to work towards improving the overall look of the downtown area.DDance SSaturday night in C CarrabelleA dance will be held Saturday evening, Oct. 5, at the Carrabelle Senior Center. The dance starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free. Music will be provided by a local disc jockey serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to the Senior Center this Saturday night to dance... or just to listen to the music! The Senior Center is at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle.YY ard sale to benet C Carrabelle Food PantryCarrabelle CARES is holding its annual yard sale to benet the Carrabelle Food Pantry on Saturday, Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot across from the Carrabelle branch of the Franklin County Public Library at 311 St James Ave on US 98. Bring your donations for us to sell and your money to buy; it goes to an important local cause. We will pick up your larger items. For more information call Tamara Allen at 850-524-1153 or email her at tballen@att.net.RRaku workshop in Bowery The Bowery Art Gallery, 149 Commerce St., is planning a special show and workshop featuring the art of Raku. On Oct. 11, works by Dr. Sid Wilroy and his wife Lynn will be on display from 6 to 9 p.m. Then, on Oct. 13 and 20, a Raku workshop will be taught by Kirby Gregory. Instruction will include working on a wheel and ring in a Raku kiln. Supplies will be provided. Cost is $150 for the twoday workshop. For information call 653-2425.SSeniors host NNov. 9 Fall FestivalThe Franklin County Senior Center will host a Fall Festival on Saturday, Nov. 9. All persons interested in participating, please contact Carolyn Spivey or Pat Moore at the Center 697-3760 Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.GGulf-Franklin offers correctional ofcer trainingA new correctional ofcer training program will be starting at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe on Jan. 22, 2014. This program is designed to prepare students for the state certication exam. Individuals who pass this exam are eligible for employment in any state, county or privately run correctional facility in Florida. The program, conducted using the new shorter curriculum, and lasting about three months, will run from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily, Monday through Thursday. For more information, please call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 or email her at bburkett@gulfcoast.edu The application deadline for Pell Grants and nancial aid is fast approaching, so please call today or come by the Gulf/Franklin Campus to pick up your application packet. Main Street completes hand rail project News bBRIEfFSJuneau, a Lafayette, La., attorney who has served as court-appointed special master in several high-prole class action suits, including Vioxx, Toyota and Avandia, serves under the auspices of the Deepwater Horizon economic and property damage settlement, an $8 billion deal between BP and attorneys representing more than 100,000 individuals and businesses with claims against the company over the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion. Once the settlement was approved, the federal court in New Orleans relieved BP administrator Kenneth Feinberg of his duties as administrator of BPs $20 billion compensation fund for victims of the spill. Feinberg had led the Gulf Coast Claims Facilities, which processed about 221,300 claims, paying out $6 billion, before it was dissolved in June 2012. Juneau was appointed in March 2012 as claims administrator for the BP oil spill settlement process. The settlement he oversees is separate from the portion of the case federal Judge Carl Barbier is now weighing, which is the amount of Clean Water Act nes that BP will be subject to. This could range from $1,100 for every barrel spilled through simple negligence to as much as $4,300 a barrel if the company is determined to have been grossly negligent. The government is arguing that it was a matter of gross negligence and that 4.2 million barrels were spilled, which could mean nes of as much as $18 billion. BP contends simple negligence and that only 2.45 million barrels were spilled, making the total nes no more than $2.7 billion. The determined fee will be paid out through the RESTORE Act. In an interview after his visit, Juneau outlined how the current claims process is intended to serve individuals and businesses who did not agree to a nal settlement when the GCCF disbursed funds in the aftermath of the oil spill. He said there is no cap on the amount of claims for the dozen categories of individuals and businesses that may be eligible, with the exception of those in the seafood industry. The cutoff date for those seafood-related claims, which have a cap of $2.3 billion, was December 2012, after which no new claimants can come forward. Juneau said because the entire $2.3 billion cap was not exhausted in the rst round of seafood industry payouts, there will be an upcoming second round of payouts to these same claimants until all this settlement money is spent. He said there is no cap on the claims for other businesses, such as individual businesses and coastal rental units, which are eligible to submit claims until April 22, 2014. We have a lot of work left to do. Its a job, and were going to fulll the job. Weve got a ways to go. But the missions never changed, he said. Statewide, 63,851 claims have been led and 16,167 eligibility notices issued, for a total of almost $1.08 billion. Overall, there have been 209,655 claims led and 57,188 eligibility notices issued, totaling more than $4.76 billion, Gagliano said. DADA VID ID ADAD LERS ERS TEIN EIN | The TimesPatrick Juneau oversees the Deepwater Horizon claims process. BP from page A1 Faith

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By Amanda NalleySpecial to the Times Before August 2013, I had talked a lot about lion sh, but other than seeing them in tanks, I had never put my hands on one and never had one for dinner. Lion sh is a hot topic right now. The population of this invasive, nonnative species has boomed exponentially in the past few years, and recent scienti c studies indicate that this species may be negatively impacting our marine resources. Today, we are seeing them in places weve never seen them before, and there are no signs of them going away anytime soon. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has taken notice and is moving forward with actions to help control the population, from changing regulations to hosting a Lion sh Summit on Oct. 22-24 in an effort to identify research and management gaps and brainstorm solutions to the lion sh issue. The summit will be in Cocoa Beach. Visit FWCLion sh.Eventbrite. com to learn more. As the public information specialist for the FWCs Division of Marine Fisheries Management, it is my job to reach out to the media and sometimes the public with lion sh information. I often get asked questions like, Can you eat them? What do they taste like? How do you let them without getting stuck by one of their venomous spines? While I knew the answer to the questions, rsthand knowledge often trumps what youve read any day. In August, I got plenty of rsthand knowledge as I attended the rst ever Northeast Florida Lion sh Rodeo in Jacksonville. As the boats began to come in, I, with the help of coworker Alan Pierce, helped let lion sh and, later, got to eat some. I admit, I was nervous as I began lleting my rst one. Should I wear gloves? What if I get poked? What is the best way to get the meat off the sh? The best thing I learned that day? Its not as scary as it looks. Lion sh have up to 18 spines that have venom. To be clear here, the spines are not hollow like a snakes fangs. Instead, they are more like clear to opaque toothpicks with grooves. If you were to stick yourself, the skin covering the spine would push back, releasing the venom encapsulated in grooves along the spine. The venom is not in the meat of the sh. It is also susceptible to heat, so cooking the sh neutralizes it. The stings are painful, but can be treated with hot, but not scalding, water. When lleting a lion sh, you have quite a few options to keep your hands and ngers safe. My personal favorite was a needle-resistant glove. Using it on my left hand only to hold the sh down, I used my ungloved hand to llet. Others chose to go gloveless and hold the spines down. Another option that I tried but didnt quite get comfortable with is clipping the spines with scissors. It was an effective method, but we had a lot of lion sh to llet and it felt time-consuming. For the most part, once you gure out the spine issue, lleting the sh is easy. It is just like lleting any other sh you catch. While there wasnt much meat on the smaller ones, the effort was worth the return: a delicious, aky white delicacy. It is not shy in taste and has a nice consistency. I tried lion sh three ways that night: in a ceviche, fried whole and llets cooked in a light panko and served with rice and a mango reduction. All three were delicious. More restaurants are starting to serve up lion sh, which can be harvested and sold commercially. But the most rewarding part of being there was getting to talk to the public as they oohed and aahed over the colorful sh. Some had never seen a lion sh. Many did not even know they were a problem in Floridas waters. The rodeo was a success, with more than 400 lion sh removed from the waters near Jacksonville. The largest was 17 inches and the smallest, a mere 3.5 inches. With the current best method of control being removal via nets or spearing devices, these grassroots efforts are one of the best means of limiting the population. In 2012, in an effort to encourage the public to participate in lion shcontrol efforts, the FWC removed the requirement to have a recreational license when using speci c gear to target lion sh, including hand-held nets, pole spears, Hawaiian slings and any device geared speci cally for lion sh. The FWC also removed any and all bag limits on lion sh. Learn more about lion sh by visiting MyFWC.com/Nonnatives and click on Marine Life. Gone Coastal helps recreational anglers understand complex saltwater regulations and learn more about saltwater shing opportunities and issues in Florida. Have questions? Call the Division of Marine Fisheries Management at 850-487-0554 or email Marine@MyFWC.com. WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Oct.384 7555% Fri,Oct.483 7665% Sat,Oct.581 73100% Sun,Oct.687 7161% Mon,Oct.783 6555% Tues,Oct.883 6111% Wed,Oct.983 7063% Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, October 3, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Writing spiders are beautiful denizens of the roadside and garden. These spiders are members of the genus Argiope, which includes rather large, brightly colored spiders found throughout the world. Most countries in tropical or temperate climates are home to one or more species. The name is from a Greek word meaning silver-faced because many Argiope spiders are silvery white around the eyes. In North America, the most common member of the genus is Argiope aurantia commonly known as the black and yellow garden spider, zipper spider, corn spider or the writing spider, because it weaves a white pattern into its web. The highly re ective white patterns are called stabilimentum. They play a role in attracting prey to the web, and may prevent its accidental destruction by large animals by rendering the otherwise transparent trap visible. The center of their large webs is two to three feet above the ground. Writing spiders are active both day and night in our area. They often hunt during the day and construct or repair their webs after dark. Once a female nds a suitable site for her webs, she tends to stay there unless the web is frequently disturbed. Adult males roam in search of potential mates, but once they nd a female they build small webs nearby and court her by plucking and vibrating her web. After mating, the female lays her eggs, weaving her egg sac into the web. The sac contains between 400 and 1400 eggs. These eggs hatch in autumn, but the spiderlings overwinter in the sac and emerge during the spring. The egg sac is composed of multiple layers of silk and protects its contents from damage. Many species of insects and other spiders have been observed to parasitize the egg sacs. Like almost all spiders, writing spiders are harmless to humans and handy in a garden since they eat insects. They are capable of consuming prey up to twice their size. They might bite if grabbed, but otherwise do not attack large animals. Their venom is not regarded as a serious medical problem for humans. Legend has it that if you speak a name within their hearing, they will weave it into their web resulting in the death of the person named. In some areas, even looking at a writing spider is said to doom the observer. Another legend states that you will die if a writing spider looks at you long enough to count your teeth. If you wish to thrive, let a spider stay alive, is a saying that refers to all spiders. A popular Cherokee tale credits Grandmother Spider with bringing light to the world in the early times when everything was dark and no one could see because the sun was on the other side of the world. The animals agreed that someone must go and steal some light. Possum and buzzard both tried and failed. Finally, Grandmother Spider made a bowl of clay, rolled it to where the sun sat, weaving a web as she traveled across the sky. She placed the sun in the bowl, and rolled it home, following her web and traveling from east to west, bringing light with her as she came. The sun continued to follow that path daily from then on. DAVE EAKEN | FWRI, FWCThis photo was taken in the Dry Tortugas in 2011.Lion sh derby offers real-life look at invader Have you ever wondered about Bigfoot? Scott Marlowe answers all your questions and raises a few more in his newest book to be released later this year. Marlowe, a frequent visitor to Franklin County, last month had a meet-and-greet at Downtown Books where he signed copies of his rst publication Cryptid Creatures of Florida. Bookstore owner Dale Julian said the book is a big seller with the beach crowd. In Bigfoot Enigma, Marlowe summarizes sightings of wild men around the world. It seems they occur on every continent but Antarctica and many Paci c Islands. He points out that large apes and in particular mans ancestors, were and are relatively rare animals living in dispersed populations. He conjectures that scattered populations of an unknown ape or apes may still exist in wilderness areas. Marlowe cites the Bili Ape, a population of unknown primates recently discovered in central Africa, to support his reasoning. The volume includes quotes from the famed primate behavior specialist Dr. Jane Goodall acknowledging the possibility that Bigfoot may be real. Im a romantic. I always wanted them to exist, said Goodall. Marlowe also outlines the latest research on DNA typing of hair believed to have come from unknown apes. In addition, the book contains a broad collection of accounts of Bigfoot encounters throughout history. It is liberally illustrated with both photographs and artistic renderings of the elusive creature. If you have an open mind and are in the mood for a little thought provoking speculation, then look for Bigfoot Enigma to be released around Christmas. By LOIS SWOBODABigfoot Enigma is an interesting read for a rainy afternoon All you ever wondered about BigfootWriting spiders stuff of legends BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the Car Body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder. 4514339 You're Invited To Join Us Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 5-7pm ET FISHING ARTIFICIAL LURES IN THE FALL

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GulfsideIGA STUDENTATHLETESOFTHEWEEKSPONSOR HometownProud (850)653-96954514197FranklinCountyHighSchoolseniorMorgan Mockhasbeenakeyleaderthisseasonfor theLadySeahawkvarsity volleyballteam.Sheisour maindefensiveandoffensivethreattothenet,havingthehighestnumber ofblocksandkills,said coachTaraKlink.She isveryconsistenteach gameandhasbeena greatleaderforherteam. MorganMock CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, October 3, 2013 APage 9SectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County was able to move the ball Friday night at Wewahitchka, but too many turnovers and the blazing speed of the Gators quarterback proved too much for the Seahawks. The Gators (1-4) rushed for more than 250 yards and dominated the winless Seahawks in a 4014 contest decided by halftime. But the Seahawks managed 247 yards on the ground, and threw for 71 more to keep pace. We had critical turnovers at critical points in the game, said coach Aaron York. We had a very good rst quarter. I thought all the coaches did well with time management. We did a real good job of running the ball. Wewas Jonathan Palmer rushed for 45 yards in the rst quarter to stake the Gators to an early 6-0 lead. Wewahitchka had the ball for only seven offensive plays in the opening half, but the lead bulged in the second period as Javar Hill scored on a runs of 15 and 25 yards and Willie Hill put the icing on the rsthalf cake by scooping up a fumble at the Seahawks 35 and running in for the touchdown. After posting a 26-0 halftime lead, Wewa quarterback Rashard Ranie, who rushed for 111 yards, continued the onslaught when he dashed 54 yards for a third-quarter touchdown and Shannon Jones, getting some varsity playing time, covered 16 yards on the ground for the Gators nal score. Defensively we did not contain very well at all. Rashard Ranie hit the sideline on us three times and it was a foot race and we couldnt catch him, said York. The Seahawks managed to make it a game in the third quarter with two TDs, as sophomore fullback Trenton Lee scored on a 7-yard run, and senior quarterback Logan McLeod on a 4-yard run, to make it 33-14. Sophomore Walker DeVaughn kicked both extra points. Lee was the games leading rusher with 25 carries for 116 yards. Junior Cole Wheeler tallied 15 rushes for 85 yards, while McLeod was 4-for-11 from the air, with three interceptions. He also had one interception as a defensive back. One thing I was very happy about we did a very good job with special teams. We ran for over 120 yards on kickoff returns, said York. Senior Alex Causey had four returns for 72 yards, while Wheeler had three returns for 50 yards. We look back between the last time we played Wewa in August and weve made tremendous strides. We judge each week if we got better or not and this ought to tell you were getting better, he said. The team travels to Port St. Joe Friday to take on their rivals to the west. My guys will be ready, said York. The kids are practicing hard every day. Theres no quit in these kids. Its every day that they come out. Theyre working hard in the weight room. We have 23 kids out there; I couldnt ask for a better group. Improving Seahawks fall to Wewahitchka By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks varsity volleyball team continued its winning ways last week, triumphing twice over West Gadsden, once over Rickards and FAMU, and losing to South Walton The week got underway at West Gadsden Sept. 19, when the varsity swept both games of a double header, each in three straight games. The team won 25-5, 25-15 and 2516, and then in the nightcap, won 25-11, 25-9 and 25-12. With this team being our easiest competition, we were able to try some different combinations and let the girls try different position, said coach Tara Klink, who shares coaching duties with Hilary Stanton. It was fun to explore different possibilities! Morgan Mock led the team with eight aces in a single game, followed closely by Scout Segree with seven. In a district game at South Walton on Sept. 24, both the junior varsity and varsity squads were unable to win a game. The JV fell 11-25 and 2025, while the varsity lost 1625, 12-25 and 19-25. South Walton has proven to be our toughest competition in our district for both JV and varsity, said Klink. At Rickards on Sept. 25, the JV lost a close one, falling 20-25 and then coming back to win 25-21 before losing the rubber game, 13-15. This was a hard loss for us in overtime, especially when we were capable of getting the win, said Klink. We will de nitely work harder to be ready for the next time we meet. The varsity emerged victorious in a hard-fought contest, losing 25-27 and then winning 25-21. The Lady Seahawks then fell 1725 but came back to win 2516. Franklin County walked away with a slim 18-16 win in the fth and deciding game. We hung tight with this team when we should have had an easier win, said Klink. Im glad we were still able to pull out a win on an off night. The young ladies wrapped up a busy week with two wins at home on Sept. 26 against FAMU. The JV won after falling in the opener 15-25 and coming back to post 25-17 and 16-14 victories. This was such an exciting game to watch as we won in overtime, said Klink. I was very proud of the girls for coming back after such a slow start. The varsity girls lost their opening game, 19-25, but came back to win three straight, 25-22, 25-16 and 25-20. I was so proud of the girls for not giving up during this match, said Klink. The rst game was a little rough for us, but they fought through to get the win. It was quite impressive when their whole team was a good foot taller than any of our girls. It was a really fun game to watch! The teams travel to Liberty County today, Oct. 3 for a district match, and then are at home Friday against Altha. On Tuesday, they travel to Port St. Joe for a district match, and then return home Oct. 10 to face Rickards on Think Pink night to promote the battle against breast cancer. On Tuesday, softball coaches Kevin Newell and Matt Kelley presented the county commission with a trophy to add to the showcase in the courthouse annex. Franklin Countys Dixie Debs, for girls age 18 and under, brought home the rst-place trophy from the Dixie League 2013 state softball tournament. The Debs, who swept through the state tournament in Brooksville without a loss, were voted number one for sportsmanship. This was one of my most fun years since Ive been coaching, Newell said, Winning the sportsmanship award was just icing. We want to start a tradition sort of what Spring Hill was, a powerhouse. The team included Brittany King, Morgan Newell, Morgan Kelley, Christina Collins, Shannon Pridgeon, Ally Millender, Gracyn Kirvin, Maddie Newell, Ashley Carroll, Marlyn Lee, and Hannah Winkler. Coaches included Newell, Kelley and Allen Millender. These girls have brought softball a long way in Franklin County over the last several years, Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender said.County honors Dixie Debs The 2013 Lady Seahawk Volleyball team, front row, from left, are #8 junior Shemeika Lake, #10 junior Robyn Segree, # 24 junior Madison Newell and #7 freshman Vanessa Simmons; and back row, from left, coach Hilary Stanton, # 22 freshman Scout Segree, #5 freshman Adriana Butler, #1 sophomore Bre Barrack, #00 senior captain Gracyn Kirvin, #6 senior captain Morgan Mock and coach Tara Klink.Volleyballers down West Gadsden, Rickards, FAMU DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLeft: Eighth grader Morgan Anderson performs at halftime on the clarinet. Right: Eighth grader Josie Kriss performs at halftime on the ute.LOIS SWOBODA | The Times DIXIE DEBS BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 U.S.98COMMLOTS BELOWCITY.APP.PRICE C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,500COMM.BLDG.ON98&GULF FORRENT$500/MTH.MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Gulf red snapper season opens Oct. 1The recreational harvest of red snapper opened Oct. 1 in state and federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. In state waters, which are from shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf, the season will remain open through Oct. 21, closing on Oct. 22. In federal waters, which are from 9 nautical miles out to 200 nautical miles, the season will remain open through Oct. 14, closing on Oct. 15. These supplemental recreational red snapper seasons are for 2013 only. The minimum size limit in state and federal waters is 16 inches, and the daily bag limit is two per harvester, per day. There is a zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew on for-hire vessels. Anglers are required to use circle hooks and dehooking devices when shing for any reef species, including red snapper, in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters. The requirement to use venting tools in federal waters was removed on Sept. 3. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will consider adopting similar changes at a future meeting. The intent of these rules is to help conserve shery resources by increasing the chances for a sh to survive after being caught and released. Learn more about red snapper by visiting MyFWC.com/Fishing and clicking on Saltwater and Recreational Regulations. ANERR announces Panhandle habitat classesThe Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is happy to announce the next classes in the Panhandle Habitat Series. The Estuaries class is Wednesday, Oct. 30 and the Rivers & Floodplains class is Wednesday, Nov. 13. Outdoors BRIEFS

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 NOTICEOFTAXFORSCHOOL CAPITALOUTLAY BUDGET-ALLFUNDS GENERAL SPECIAL DEBT CAPITAL REVENUES OPERATING REVENUESERVICE PROJECTS TOTAL FederalSources 110,464 2,507,830 2,618,294 StateSources 2,317,441 17,901306,000 145,000 2,786,342 LocalSources 7,947,520 125,415 1,646,489 9,719,424 TOTALREVENUE 10,375,425 2,651,146306,000 1,791,48915,124,060 TransfersIn 647,060 -1,537,740 2,184,800 FundBalance-July1,2013 134,871 377,694 14,346 3,975,881 4,502,792 TOTALREVENUEANDBALANCES 11,157,356 3,028,8401,858,086 5,767,37021,811,652 EXPENDITURES Instructional 6,602,990 964,800 7,567,790 PupilPersonnelServices 155,844 146,784 302,628 InstructionalMediaServices 70,824 15,200 86,024 InstructionalandCurriculumServices 137,457 137,457 InstructionalStaffTraining 5,000 79,816 84,816 InstructionRelatedTechnology 14,459 50,701 65,160 BoardofEducation 381,060 381,060 GeneralAdministration 192,804 120,990 313,794 SchoolAdministration 417,549 52,653 470,202 FacilitiesAcquisitionandConstruction 1,250,000 1,250,000 FiscalServices 328,482 328,482 FoodServices 925,272 925,272 CentralServices 447,410 27,735 475,145 PupilTransportationServices 572,398 41,988 614,386 OperationofPlant 898,539 1,705 900,244 MaintenanceofPlant 204,934 204,934 AdministrativeTechnologyServices 36,959 36,959 CommunityServices DebtService 1,537,740 1,537,740 TOTALEXPENDITURES 10,329,252 2,565,1011,537,740 1,250,00015,682,093 TransfersOut 306,000 1,878,800 2,184,800 FundBalance-June30,2014 828,104 463,739 14,346 2,638,570 3,944,758 TOTALEXPENDITURES,TRANSFERS&FUNDBALANCES 11,157,356 3,028,8401,858,086 5,767,37021,811,652THETENTATIVE,ADOPTED,AND/ORFINALBUDGETSAREONFILEINTHEOFFICEOFTHEABOVE MENTIONEDTAXINGAUTHORITYASAPUBLICRECORD PROPOSEDMILLAGELEVY Operating LocalRequired 3.423 Discretionary 0.748 CapitalOutlay 1.000 AdditionalOperating 0.500 TOTAL 5.671SCHOOLBOARDOFFRANKLINCOUNTY BUDGETSUMMARYNOTICE FY2013-2014 NOTICEOFPROPOSEDTAXINCREASETHEPREVIOUSNOTICEPLACEDBYTHE FRANKLINCOUNTYSCHOOLDISTRICTHAS BEENDETERMINEDBYTHEDEPARTMENTOF REVENUETOBEINVIOLATIONOFTHELAW, NECESSITATINGTHISSECONDNOTICE. TheFranklinCountySchoolDistrictwillsoonconsidera measuretoincreaseitspropertytaxlevy. Aportionofthetaxlevyisrequiredunderstatelawin orderfortheschoolboardtoreceive$2,317,441instate educationgrants. Therequiredportionhasincreasedby9.86percent,and representsapproximatelysixtenthsofthetotalproposed taxes. Theremainderofthetaxesisproposedsolelyatthe discretionoftheschoolboard. Allconcernedcitizensareinvitedtoapublichearingon thetaxincreasetobeheldonTuesday,October8,2013 at6:00P.M.attheWillieSpeedBoardRoom,Eastpoint, Florida. ADECISIONontheproposedtaxincreaseandthe budgetwillbemadeatthishearing.

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The Times | A11Thursday, October 3, 2013 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter NoticeofVacancyFranklinCountyTouristDevelopmentCouncilBoardMemberMembershipontheFCTDCismadethroughappointmentbytheFCBOCCinaccordancewithFloridaStatutesTITLEXI,PARTI,Chapter125,ss.125.0104(4)(e)andperFranklinCountyOrdinance 2004-35asfollows: eCouncilshallconsistofninememberswhoshallbeappointedfromtimetotimebytheBoardofCountyCommissioners.echairmanoftheBoardofCountyCommissioners(orsuchothermember oftheBoardasshallbeappointedbytheChair)shallserveontheCouncil.Inaddition,twomembersoftheCouncilshallbeelectedmunicipalocials(whoeachshallbeanelectedocialoftheCity ofApalachicolaandtheCityofCarrabelle).SixmembersoftheCouncilshallbepersonswhoareinvolvedinthetouristindustryandwhohavedemonstratedaninterestintouristdevelopment,ofwhich members,notlessthanthreenormorethanfourshallbeownersoroperatorsofmotels,hotels,recreationalvehicleparks,orothertouristattractionsinFranklinCountythatwouldbesubjecttoanytourist developmenttaxundersection125.0104.AllmembersoftheCouncilshallberegisteredelectorsandmustbeafull-timepermanentresidentofFranklinCounty.Forfurtherinformation,pleasecallFran EdwardsattheFCTDCoceat850-653-8678. eFranklinCountyTouristDevelopmentCounciliscomposedofninememberswhoare appointedbytheFranklinCountyBoardofCommissioners .Anyoneinterestedinbeingconsideredforthis volunteerpositionisencouragedtosendaletterofinterestandqualifyingresumetotheFCTDCAdministrativeOce.I nterestedpersonsshouldreplynolaterthan5:00p.m.October14,2013 .A recommendationwillbeforwardedtotheFranklinCountyCommissionersfortheirconsideration. isisavolunteerpositionwithnonancialcompensation.BoardmembersarerequiredtoattendregularboardmeetingsandareexpectedtoparticipateintheCommitteeactivitiesoftheBoard. PleasereviewqualicationsinParagraph2above.ApplicationsmaybesubmittedtoFranklinCountyTouristDevelopmentCouncilAdministrativeOceviaemailto:fran@anaturalescape.com;byhand to17-1/2AvenueE;byUSMailtoPOBox819;Apalachicola,Florida32329. Law EnforcementOfcer Gore was conducting surveillance on a boat landing and while watching vessels return to the landing, one vessel operator caught his attention. The operator was having difculty docking the boat and backing his trailer into the water to load his boat. The operator showed several signs of impairment. As the operator attempted to load his boat, he fell into the water. At this point, Gore intervened and identied himself as an FWC ofcer. Again, the operator showed signs of impairment during a boating safety inspection and did poorly on eld sobriety tasks. The subject was placed under arrest for boating under the inuence and transported to the Franklin County Jail. While at the jail, the vessel operator submitted to a breath test, which revealed his breath alcohol content was 0.15 and 0.14. Gore was conducting surveillance on individuals shing at a local shing spot, when two individuals pulled up beside him and parked in two separate vehicles next to him. One of the operators exited his vehicle and approached the window of the other vehicle. After a brief conversation, the subject produced a large sum of cash and handed it through the window to the subject in the car. He then walked around and got into the passenger seat of that car. Gore maintained surveillance on the subjects and made contact with Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce and reported the suspicious activity. The K-9 Unit arrived on scene and conducted a consensual search of the vehicle and the two suspects. A large amount of cash was recovered along with a large amount of prescription pills (Percocet). Neither of the subjects had prescriptions for the controlled substance and both were arrested by sheriffs deputies.Special to the TimesTexting and driving is no longer legal in Florida. Florida becomes the 41st state to ban texting while driving. The new law took effect at midnight, Oct. 1. Distracted drivers are becoming one of the greatest threats on our roads today. More than 3,400 crashes occurred last year in Florida in which the driver was distracted by an electronic device, such as a cell phone, which resulted in 24 fatalities. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration estimates that a driver who texts and drives is 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash. The problem is of particular concern among teenage drivers. Eleven teens are killed each day in the U.S. as the result of a crash in which texting and driving was to blame. How much of a distraction can texting be to a driver? Sending or receiving a text distracts a driver for an average of nearly ve seconds. Traveling at a speed of 55 miles per hour, thats the equivalent of driving the length of a football eld with your eyes closed. Teenagers are particularly vulnerable to distracted driving crashes due to their lack of experience behind the wheel, said Julie L. Jones, executive director of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV). Teens have the highest crash rate of any age group with more than 22,000 teen drivers involved in crashes last year and 41 of them killed. Col. David Brierton, director of the Florida Highway Patrol, said it is important to enforce and educate all drivers about the dangers of texting and driving. There are three things to remember to keep you safe while driving: keep your hands on the wheel, your eyes on the road and your mind on driving, he said. The Florida law makes texting while driving a secondary offense meaning the driver must rst have committed a primary offense such as reckless or careless driving, speeding or failing to wear a seat belt in order to be cited. The DHSMV and the Florida Highway Patrol, working with safety and law enforcement partners across the state, are using this day to make motorists aware of the new law and to educate drivers on the dangers of distracted driving. The Florida Police Chiefs Association (FPCA) is pleased to see the implementation of the anti-texting while driving legislation. This type of law can only make our roads safer and save lives, said FPCA President, Chief Philip Thorne, Springeld PD. Educating the public, specically our youth, on the dangers of distracted driving is crucial in our efforts to protect those traveling the roadways in our state. Steve Casey, executive director of the Florida Sheriffs Association, said that during the 2013 legislative session, the association fully supported anti-texting legislation. We are happy to have this new law put into effect today, he said. FSA has continually supported safe driving through our youth program, the Teen Driver Challenge, and will remain active in educating and promoting safe driving among all drivers. The DHSMV has created public service announcements for teen drivers. For more information, visit http://www.hsmv. gov/fhp/DistractedDriving/. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety and security through excellence in service, education and enforcement. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered, visit www.hsmv.gov, follow us on Instagram at FLHSMV, Twitter @FDHSMV or nd us on Facebook The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Sept. 24Ben Turrell III, 36, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FHP)Sept. 25Cawanna M. Messer, 31, Carrabelle, trafcking four grams or more in illegal drugs (FCSO) Robert A. Hill Jr., 23, Apalachicola, grand theft of a rearm and burglary of a conveyance/dwelling (FCSO)Sept. 26Joshua L. Pilotti, 23, Apalachicola, eeing or eluding a law enforcement ofcer in boat, resisting ofcer without violence and possession of undersized oysters (FWC) Buddy R. Richards, 19, Eastpoint, criminal mischief (FCSO) Pamela K. Shaver, 47, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Delana L. Slaughter, 32, Eastpoint, two counts of providing alcohol to person under age 21 (FCSO)Sept. 27Christopher D. Maxwell, 35, Port St. Joe, violation of probation, no saltwater products license and no harvesting permit (FCSO) David L. Adkins, 21, Eastpoint, held on Escambia County warrant (FCSO) Rose A. Millender, 34, Carrabelle, child abuse (CPD) Jennifer L. Smith, 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Sept. 28Richard J. Elhard, 31, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) Willie L. English, 53, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication, indecent exposure, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (CPD) Sam E. Lofton Jr., 64, Phenix City, Ala., domestic battery (APD)Sept. 29Kristin R. Edgecomb, 32, Carrabelle, withholding child support (FCSO)Sept. 30Elex D. Pugh, 36, Apalachicola, aggravated battery great bodily harm (APD) Jeffrey J. Kuhne, 51, Eastpoint, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Arrest REPORTDont text and drive; its the law FWC ReportEPORT

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A12| The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 1010T STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION Publication: The Times 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Publication Number: 027-600 Filing Date: October 4, 2012 Issue Frequency Weekly (Thursday Morning) Published Annually: 52 Weeks Annual Subscription Price: $24.15 In County $34.65 Out of County Contact Person: Rodney Menzel (850) 747-5042 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication and General Business Office of Publisher: P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publisher: Roger Quinn P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Editor: Tim Croft 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Managing Editor: N/A Owner: Halifax Media Holdings LLC (a Delaware Corporation) P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publication Title: The Times Issue Date for Circulation Data: August 30, 2012. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months; Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date. Total Number of Copies: Average: 2390 Actual: 2385 Paid Circulation Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 469 Actual: 470 Mailed In-County Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 303 Actual: 297 Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: Average: 1379 Actual: 1250 Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: Average: 0 Actual: 0 Total Paid Distribution: Average: 1619 Actual: 1513 Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: Average: 25 Actual: 25 Total Distribution: Average: 2176 Actual: 2042 Copies not Distributed: Average: 215 Actual: 343 Total: Average: 2391 Actual: 2385 Percent Paid: Average: 98.5% Actual: 98.4% Publication of Statement of Ownership: October 3, 2013 Roger Quinn Regional Publisher September 27, 2010 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties.) October 3, 2013 92534T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND OFR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA000242 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS AND BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER AND PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER and PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 11 OF SOUTHLAND A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF THE APALACHICOLA NORTHERN RAIL ROAD. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 199.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 269.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF HATCOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE WITH THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 311.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1977 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME. VIN#S: FLA58338 AND FL 58339. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 /(30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 12th day of September. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, AND SCHNEID, PL ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 6409 CONGRESS AVE, SUITE 100 BOCA RATON, FL 33487 MAIL@RASF LAW.COM Sept 26, Oct 3, 2013 92604T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA -000286-CAXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. WHITNEY WHITEHURST A/K/A WHITNEY WHITE A/K/A WHITNEY WHITEHURST FLETCHER; BANK OF AMERICA NA; BRIAN FLETCHER A/K/A BRIAN DAVID FLETCHER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 10th day of September, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000286-CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and WHITNEY WHITEHURST A/K/A WHITNEY WHITE A/K/A WHITNEY WHITEHURST FLETCHER; BANK OF AMERICA NA; BRIAN FLETCHER A/K/A BRIAN DAVID FLETCHER; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash INSIDE FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 24th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK A, SUN & SAND VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 34, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of September, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 10-06928 October 3, 10, 2013 92656T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012-CA000307 CADENCE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH SUPERIOR BANK, NA., AS SUCCESSOR TO SUPERIOR BANK, Plaintiff, vs. W. EDWARD TILEY A/K/A EDWARD TILEY A/K/A WILLIAM E. TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2013, and entered in 2012-CA-000307 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR TO SUPERIOR BANK, is the Plaintiff and W. EDWARD TILEY A/K/A EDWARD TILEY A/K/A WILLIAM E. TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY, II A/K/A WILLIAM TILEY; UNITED STATES ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE ADMINSTRATOR OF THE SMALL BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 2nd Floor Lobby, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on October 23, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NINE (9), OF BLOCK SIX (6), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY NOW IN COMMON USE. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of August, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-06590 October 3, 10, 2013 95525T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000343CAXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT1, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL AND JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000343CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, is the Plaintiff and KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL; JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Kendall Wade as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on October 16, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE LOT LINE SEPARATING LOTS 58 AND 59 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE RIGHTOF-WAY OF PEACHTREE ROAD, AND RUN ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HATHCOCK ROAD, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HATHCOCK ROAD 165 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 95561T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 09000677CA SUNTRUST BANK, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MELANIE JANE TURNER; STANLEY W. BENECKI; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 27, 2013, and entered in Case No. 09000677CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. SUNTRUST BANK, INC. is Plaintiff and MELANIE JANE TURNER; STANLEY W. BENECKI; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 24th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, UNRECORDED, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT LYING 395.98 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY THE FOLLOWING COURSES: SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1096.00 FEET, SOUTH 60 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 3600.00 FEET SOUTH 62 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 1100.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 182.38 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 29.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 70.37 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 182.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF WAY BOUNDARY 99.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of August, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-08804 STM October 3, 10, 2013 95579T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA-000122 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR BAFC 2006-2, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN N. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN H. NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE GLENMORE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE GLENMORE, NC 28270 ALICE T NICHOLS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 CURRENT ADDRESS: 5707 GLENMORE GARDEN DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 28270 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 42 PEBBLE BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 34 AND 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 12th day of September, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11040476 October 3, 10, 2013 95629T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-CA-237 JUDGE: REYNOLDS IN RE: Forfeiture of: One (1) 2004 Toyota Tundra VIN: 5TBBT44134S450117 NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS ALL PERSONS who claim an interest in the following property, 2004 Toyota Tundra, VIN: 5TBBT44134 S450117, which was seized because said property is alleged to be contraband as defined by Sections 932.701 (2)(a)(1-6), Florida Statutes (2012), by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Division of Florida Highway Patrol, on or about April 22, 2013, in Franklin County, Florida: Any owner, entity, bona fide lienholder, or person in possession of the property when seized has the right within fifteen (15) days of initial receipt of notice, to contact Sandra R. Coulter, Assistant General Counsel, Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, 2900 Apalachee Parkway, Room A-432, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399, by certified mail return receipt requested to obtain a copy of the Complaint and Order Finding Probable Cause filed in the above styled court. October 3, 10, 2013 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 Carabelle: Carabelle Flea Market (Behind the IGA) Saturday Oct. 5th, 8am -Until Venders Welcome Rain or Shine! Text FL67503 to 56654

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 3, 2013 The Times | A13 4514220 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND, UTILITIES INCLUDED ............... $1200 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 3 BR / 2 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ................................................... $700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT/ 2 LOTS ................................. $650 HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGECOMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 4514325Part-time Reading InterventionistApalachicola Bay Charter School seeks a Candidates must hold currentteachingcerticate. ABC School is an EqualOpportunityEmployer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 1114756 Experienced Cable Installers & SupervisorInnovation. Technology. CommunicationsNOW HIRINGFt. Walton Beach, FLRequirements: Must have truck, van, or SUV, ladders, meter, necessary tools, and safety equipment required for cable installation (triple play).Triage Partners is a national technology based services company servicing telecommunications and cable industries. We are expanding into the Ft. Walton Beach area. Interested candidates please contact: Kim Kerbs at 813-868-1282 or send resume to: kkerbs@triage-partners.com 1113125 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:ShipfitterS pipefitterS pipe WeLDerS X-ray WeLDerS OutSiDe MachiniStS inDuStriaL Marine eLectricianSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a:Graphic ArtistCandidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelors Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizationsinformation and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systemscapabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 SalesAdvertising Sales SupportOur fast-paced, innovative local media company has an immediate opportunity within our sales support team. This successful candidate will be a well-organized take-charge person who welcomes new challenges and enjoys helping other people. The Star News offers a wide variety of multi-media advertising solutions, ranging from traditional newspapers and direct mail to leading-edge digital advertising and social media. You will provide sales support to outside sales executives, who cater to the marketing needs of the small and medium-sized businesses we serve. We will consider individuals with a variety of experience, ranging from recent college graduates to individuals with experience in other industries or disciplines. Responsibilities include order entry, interacting with customers, supporting salespeople while theyre on the road and reviewing advertising materials. Scheduled workweek will be five days, Monday through Friday. Job requirements include computer skills, including the Microsoft Office suite of products, and the ability to work effectively in a team environment. Advertising, sales and/or customer service experience is a plus. Administrative skills and experience are also helpful. You will learn a lot For immediate consideration, submit a cover letter and resume to: lgrimes@pcnh.com An Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34267059 SalesSales RepsThe Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of Americas top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriateall administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 SalesSales RepsThe Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriateall administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266381 Text FL66381 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experiencedSales ManagerWho will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. Communicates and advocates the companys vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solutions ROI for the client. Requirements: Bachelors degree or comparable experience. Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. Successful record of team building and leadership. Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 Eastpoint: 6th Street and Avenue A, by the Ball Park. Saturday 8am untilBig Yard SaleKids clothes, shoes, jackets, swings, carseats, pack & play, bouncers, dolls, little girls vanity and other toys, table items, furniture, and lots more Lanark Village Golf CourseRoute 98 Fri & Sat Oct. 4th & 5thBenefit Sale!Everything for the house plus antiques and collectibles! txt FL67276 to 56654 PSJ (Overstreet) Comming from HWY 98, turn on Co Rd 386, go 4 miles beyond Overstreet Bridge, take left on Pleasant Rest Cemetary Rd.. Go almost 2 miles, turn on Carr Rd. Look for signs Saturday Oct. 5th 8:30am (est) -untilBig Community Wide Yard Sale at Wetappo Creek7 -8 families in yard sale! Rain cancels! txt FL67417 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 104 Bucaneer Dr. Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est) -5pm (est)Gulf Aire Community Yard SaleEverything! txt FL67498 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 206 Coral Dr. Seashores Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est.) -5pm(est) Bookcases, coffe & end tables, china cab., tools, garage cab., fishing and tackle, china, bakeware, glassware, and other household items, sewing and craft items and much more! txt FL67445 to 56654 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard SaleTools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLOctober 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407Text FL63024 to 56654 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Breakfast Attendants, Housekeepers and Night AuditorsEmail resume to 10270@hotel.bestwestern.co m or apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34266988 Text FL66988 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESFull Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenancePart-time position flex schedule. 30+ hours/ week. Pay is $10-12/hr, with 4 pay raises in 1st year, plus annual bonus. Health Ins after 90 days. Position resposible for maintaining several comm. buildings and rental properties inside and out. Light painting, carpentry, and flooring exp reqd. Any exp in small engine repair & vehicle servicing a plus. Must have HSD/GED, valid FLDL, NO criminal background. Drug free, physically fit. Check us out at: www .dansp awn.com or Apply in person at 1314 Bayview Ave Mon-Fri, 10am to 4pm. Web ID#: 34267165 Sec./Protective Serv Franklin Correctional Institution is now hiring:Certified and Trainee Correctional Officers.To apply go to:peoplefirst.myflorida.comClick on the drop down menu under Browse Jobs By County Select the county you wish to search jobs in and click on the search button. Scroll down to Public Safety & Security and click on CORRECTIONAL OFFICER, requisition number 70009909. This will take you to the job description -click on Begin Application Process to Apply Follow directions to apply for the position. Applicants must be at least 19 years of age with a high school diploma or equivalent, willing to take a drug and physical exam and possess a valid Drivers License. Applicants must pass a background investigation, which includes after July 1, 1981 no felony convictions or a misdemeanor involving perjury or false statement, nor have received dishonorable discharge from any of the Armed Forces of the United States. In addition, a misdemeanor conviction of domestic violence prohibits employment. All other criminal charges will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Contact the recruitment office at (850) 697-1331 for more information. The Department is a drug-free workplace. The Department is an Equal Opportunity employer. If you require an accommodation to participate in the application/ selection process, please contact the hiring authority or personnel office in advance. Certain veterans and spouses of veterans receive preference in employment by the state as provided by Chapter 295, Florida Statutes, and are encouraged to apply. Web Id 34265626 Text FL65626 to 56654 Secure/Protective ServFRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENTPosition Title:Library Director/ Full TimeSalary Range: $33,000 -$35,000 Applications and Job Description available at Franklin County Public Library -Eastpoint 160 Hickory Dip Road, Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-670-8151 ext. 204, Applications may be requested through email @ ondra@franklin.lib.fl.us Applications accepted through October 31, 2013 The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer. Responsibilities: Supervises personnel, develops short and long term plans, prepares and administers operation budgets, acquisitions and distributes library materials and promotes awareness of library services and functions. Paid travel to attend library conferences and training workshops to stay abreast of library trends and technology in the field. Travel may be overnight and extend up to a week. Qualifications: Masters Degree in Library and Information Science or to receive degree within three years. Bachelors Degree required. A minimum of two years of library administrative experience including supervisory ability and experience, and knowledge of library technology is required. Must relate well to the general public, have good public relations skills, and be adaptable and flexible. Web ID#: 34267105 Text FL67105 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. 850-653-3838 Text FL64578 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12x 65Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL66454 to 56654 1BR Cottage850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba, all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit. Call 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Historic District house for sale, 3 BR /1 BA (1 outside BA), 1920s Arts & Crafts Cottage style, completely renovated. $239k 850-591-1174. Text FL64323 to 56654 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Turn to classifieds Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, October 3, 2013 Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach, PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#248790$116,000St.GeorgeIsland4514345 GULFBEACHESLOTHighduneylotonthenorthsideofGulfBeachDrive, Bikepathacrossthestreet.3rdlotfromthecornerof 6thStreetEast,Noclearingnecessary,lotmeasures100 x150,1/3acre,High(dry)elevation.Buytobuildor keepforinvestment. This3BD/2BAhomeiscuteasabuttonandhasgreat possibilities.Plentyofroomtostoreaboat.Carrabelle Riveriswithinviewoffrontyard;1/2blockfromriver. Tilethroughouthouse.Pantryandlaundryinkitchenwith storage.Greatstarterhomeoraweekendshingcottage. SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD 850-545-5852www.coastalrealtyinfo.com This2BD/2BAhomeislocatedinaquietneighborhoodwith beautifulsunsets&viewsofDogIsland.Enjoyshingfrom yourdock&theconvenienceofhavingyourboatatyour backdoorforthoseearlymorningshingtrips.Thehomeis verycomfortable&easilymaintained.Thelivingroomhasa builtinbookcase&areplaceforthosechillynights. ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#250296$299,900StGeorgeIslandISLANDGETAWAY3BR1-1/2BAhomeinquietareaofIsland,New metalroof&deck,Beautifulyardwithmanicured LiveOaks&LargePine,Oakcabinets&islandin kitchen,furnished,2carunderhousegarage,with workshop/storagethats825sqftarea! WestPineAvenue SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Apalachicola Times 1) What would a cruciverbalist ordinarily be looking for in a newspaper? Sports, Weather, Headlines, Crosswords 2) Ataxia is a medical condition as a consequence of which organ? Liver, Heart, Brain, Kidneys 3) What was the rst name of Lear, founder of the Lear Jet? Joseph, Lawrence, William, Glenn 4) Since when have Girl Scouts been selling cookies? 1917, 1939, 1956, 1970 5) What is the most popular U.S. garden plant? Squash, Cucumber, Tomato, Carrot 6) Which decade saw Major League Baseball build a record 11 ballparks? 1930s, 1950s, 1970s, 1990s 7) Who hosts a yearly celebration to honor the bluefooted Bresse chicken? France, Spain, Brazil, India 8) What antacid gum did Wrigley release in 2001? Chaco, Surpass, Johnny, Steptoe 9) Whose name at birth was Issur Danielovitch? Kirk Douglas, Usher, Burt Reynolds, Sinbad 10) Which is a thief whose specialty is robbing women? Slibber, Scobberlotcher, Roddikin, Moll-buzzer 11) Whats the public name of Trevor Tahiem Smith? Busta Rhymes, E-40, Red Caf, Rockwilder 12) Where is the football stadium of Heinz Field? Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Denver, Miami 13) Who issued the rst presidential pardon? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 14) What means to pour a drink for someone? Yerd, Franch, Walm, Shench ANSWERS 1) Crosswords. 2) Brain. 3) William. 4) 1917. 5) Tomato. 6) 1990s. 7) France. 8) Surpass. 9) Kirk Douglas. 10) Mollbuzzer. 11) Busta Rhymes. 12) Pittsburgh. 13) Washington. 14) Shench. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com