The Apalachicola times

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00239

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, September 26, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8893 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index County seeks new library director By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The search is on for a new county library director. At the Sept. 17 county meeting, commissioners were told Glenda Ondracek has submitted her resignation, effective Oct. 31. The Franklin County Library Advisory Board is advertising the opening with a starting salary of $33,000 to $35,000 depending on quali cations. Denise Butler, representing the library board, has formed a three-person committee — Sondra Furbee of Apalachicola, Christine Hinton of St. James and Kate Aguilar of St. George Island — to assess candidates for the position and make a recommendation to the county board. “We want to maintain our level of professional services,” Butler said. State: Probation of cer might have taken $100K By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A former Franklin County probation of cer stands accused of stealing as much as $100,000 by taking cash from probationers and then concealing it by recording their payments as community service hours. Jennifer Martina Brown, who worked as county probation of cer from March 2009 until she was red six weeks ago, faces felony charges of grand theft, tampering with physical evidence and of cial misconduct. After a warrant for her arrest was issued last week out of the Apalachicola of ce of Assistant State Attorney Robin Myers, Brown turned herself in to the Gulf County Detention Facility in Port St. Joe on Sept. 18. She was released within a few hours after posting a $100,000 bond. Rumors of Brown’s impending arrest had circulated throughout the county ever since she was red Aug. 15 from Florida Probation Services LLC, a private company contracted by the county to handle probation matters for those people convicted of misdemeanors. Brown, 31, began her employment in March 2009 with Florida Probation Services’ predecessor, Judicial Correction Services. She was retained by Florida JENNIFER BROWN Theft investigation continues YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS THE T IMES & C arrabelle A palachicola 50¢ www.apalachtimes.com DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society Friday at 11 a.m. Real Estate Ads — Thursday at 11 a.m. Classied Display Ads Friday at 11 a.m. Classied Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m. Phone: (850) 653-8868 Web site: apalachtimes.com E-mail: timesnews@star.com Fax: (850) 653-8036 TABLE OF CONTENTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 15 2009 At the Jan. 6 meeting of the Franklin County Commission, Denise Butler, right, introduced Glenda Ondracek of Cape San Blas as the new director for Franklin County Public Library. Ondracek holds a master’s in library, media and information studies from the University of South Florida and has more than 30 years of experience as a librarian. She has worked as a librarian in the Florida public school system and at the University of Tampa. She was also law librarian at the Gulf Correctional Institution. Pendleton’s closes: A sign of the times St. James to be largest private-sector employer By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer About three dozen people were on hand Jan. 8 when the new St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center ofcially opened its doors to the public with a ribbon-cutting. The facility is at 239 Crooked River Road, east of Carrabelle, adjacent to the St. James Bay housing development. “We’re out here to cel ebrate the opening of this facility, which will provide a much needed service,” said Commissioner Smokey Parrish, on hand for the ribbon-cutting. “This will increase and enhance the quality of life for a lot of people in Franklin County.” The new facility brings nursing home services to Franklin County for the rst time since August 2002, when the Bay St. George facility in Eastpoint, no relation to the current St. James facility, shut down. The St. James nursing home was built by Third Street Management LLC of Hickory, N.C., and is one of about 40 nursing homes owned and managed by the rm. “We want to provide a facility not only to put the community to work, but to provide a service to the community,” said Joyce Denham, vice president for strategic development for Third Street. “Many of your health professionals are driving to Tallahassee and Panama City to work. We want to bring those people back home.” Denham said St. James will employ 125 workers when it is in full operation and will house 90 residents, making it the largest pri vate-sector employer in the county. Linda McCord, assistant director of nursing, said interviews for the house keeping and dietary depart ments and the ofce and the nursing staff will begin in mid-January. She said St. James will employ about 25 certied nursing assistants (CNA), and the facility will provide in-house training for CNA applicants. “I’ll be teaching CNA classes,” she said. “The program prepares them to take the certication course. Classes will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., ve days a week for two weeks, and there is no charge. We only ask that they stay and work with us for a year after they are certied.” McCord said applica tions to work at St. James are available at the Cham O N D RA CEK NA MED CO UN T Y LIB RAR I AN By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Three service stations in the county closed their doors during the last quarter of 2008. Two were victims of a struggling economy, while the third, one of the last full-service stations in the Panhandle. had a different reason for clos ing shop after more than half a century. Latest to go under was the Chevron sta tion at the intersection of Market Street and Av enue E in Apalachicola, which closed Jan. 1. A sign reading “closed for winter” has been cov ered by a “for rent” sign. Owner of the Chevron franchise, Gary Jones of Ritz Stores, out of Crest view, said he does not plan to return and hopes the property’s owner, John L. Miller, soon will nd a tenant to take over in the last year of Ritz’s ve-year lease. Jones said he has closed two of his 15 ser vice stations and can celed plans to open two new ones. He told Apala chicola Chamber of Com merce Director Anita Grove he chose to close properties he leased but did not own. He said his reason for the closures was simple. “Economics,” he said on Jan. 2, as he and fel low staffers cleared out inventory from the ser vice station, which locals often refer to as “the Taco Bell” because of its previous status. “We enjoy doing busi ness in Franklin County and are members of the chamber, but these are tough economic times,” he said. Much of the equip ment and goods was moved to the Ritz loca tion in Eastpoint, which remains open. Jones said he acquired that store from the former owner, “Mr. Cheap Butts.” The service station down the street from Jones’ Eastpoint loca tion, Rick’s BP, closed late last year as well, vic tim of a bankruptcy. L ast full-service gas station in the county Pendleton’s in Apala chicola, the last full ser vice station in the county, shut down in October. “Daddy decided he had had enough,” said Tommy Pendleton, who operated the station with his father, Jimmy Pend leton. “He was ready to retire. He had been in business since 1954. ‘It wasn’t due to any nancial problem. We had a healthy business. It was killing me and my son. I stood it as long as I could, 54 years. I don’t think anybody else could have stood it as long.’ Jimmy Pendleton Owner, Pendleton’s See P E N DLETO N A5 PHOTOS B Y L OIS S WOBOD A | The Times Lisa Mitchem, left, and Judy Denham, right, cut the ribbon opening the doors of St. James Health and Rehabilitation to the public. Behind them is Dr. Stephen Miniat, left, physical therapist Tom Brocato, center, and County Commissioner Smokey Parish, right. At far left is Director of Nursing Beverly Martin. Nursing home opens doors The dining room at St. James is bright and spacious. Tom Brocato of Apalachicola will oversee physical therapy at St. James Bay. See S T. JA MES A5 Letter to the Editor ................... A4 Sheriff’s Report ....................... B 5 Church News ......................... B 3 Society News ......................... B 2 Tide Chart ........................... A7 Classieds ........................ B 6B 7 Working with water — Page B1 GLENDA ONDRACEK Key House con ict resolved By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Port St. Joe man who paid a pittance for one of Apalachicola’s most famous historic homes at a foreclosure sale in May won’t be getting it after all. At a brief hearing Tuesday afternoon before Circuit Judge George S. Reynolds III, attorneys for Capital Bank and David T. Ethridge, who bid $1,000 in May to emerge as top bidder on the Key House worth more than $800,000, agreed on a settlement of $35,000 to vacate the sale. “This is a fascinating case,” Reynolds said in accepting the settlement. “I’m glad you all reached agreement. A settlement is always better.” Tidying up the tides See LIBRARY A10 See KEY HOUSE A10 See THEFT A5 COASTAL CLEANUP PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Genna and David Prentiss rounded up rubbish on Dog Island. Below, Mary Balthrop totes a crab trap at John S. Phipps Nature Conservancy Preserve on Alligator Point. Bald Point sets Coastal Cleanup record By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com More than 50 volunteers turned out to scour the sand at Bald Point State Park and set a new county record for attendance on the 2013 International Coastal Cleanup on Saturday, contributing to a huge success throughout the county. There were more than 800 cleanups registered in the state of Florida. In Franklin County, there were 20, including remote areas like Dog Island, Lanark Reef and Alligator Point. The biggest turnout of volunteers was at beautiful Bald Point State Park, where 58 intrepid outdoorsmen collected about 12,000 pounds of trash. Organizer Dustin Allen said his crew included members of the Alligator Point Taxpayers Association, students and faculty from Maclay School in Tallahassee and a large group from ReThink Energy Florida a not-for-pro t dedicated to educating and engaging the public on energy issues, including the use of fossil fuels, renewable energy and lower energy consumption. Cleanup organizer Ada Long said the turnout at Bald Point set a record for Coastal Cleanup in the county. She said countywide, 250 volunteers collected 267 bags of trash weighing almost 14 tons. The Bald Point crew collected the most litter. Second place went to Dog Island with almost a ton and third to Carrabelle with 1,100 pounds. See CLEANUP A10 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 VOL. 128 ISSUE 22 Seahawks skillful little birdies, A9 Bene t BBQ lunch Friday On Friday, Sept. 27, the Philaco Women’s club will host a cookout to support the Florida Wild Mammal Association wildlife rescue facility. The $8 meal includes chicken, baked beans and potato salad. Master chef John Solomon will man the grill. The bene t takes place next to the Tin Shed at the corner of Avenue D and Water Street. Meals are available from 11:30 a.m. until all gone. To preorder or arrange for a delivery, call 653-5857. Celebrate Estuary Day on Friday afternoon The Apalachicola National Estuary Research Reserve will host a free Estuaries Day celebration from 1:30-6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27, at the Nature Center, 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. The rst 600 visitors over age 3 will receive a free T-shirt. This event will feature fun games and learning activities. Friends of the Reserve is partnering with the Franklin County School culinary program to sell food at the event. Door prize drawings from 5:30-6 p.m. include more than 40 items from local businesses and individuals. Historical Society to meet Saturday The Apalachicola Area Historical Society will have its general meeting at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, at the Raney Carriage House. The meeting will open with a talk by author Robert Saunders, Ph.D. A history professor and department head at Troy University and a regular visitor to this area, Saunders is working on a new book that will chronicle the area’s rich heritage. After Saunders’ talk will be a general business meeting to address revisions that will update AAHS Articles of Incorporation. Please remember to pay your annual $10 membership dues now or at the meeting. Only paid members are eligible to vote in the election.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, September 26, 2013 The T obacco-F ree F ranklin Partnership Coalition is cur rentl y looki n g f or new membe r s to he lp counte r ac t the nor malcy of tobacco us e he re i n F r ankl i n County and ach ieve our g oal of a T obacco-F ree F ranklin if y ou are i nte res ted i n jo i n i n g us to mak e F r ankl i n County a health ie r place to l i ve wor k, and play i n or woul d l ik e i nf or mati on abou t our meeti n gs, pleas e call (850) 653-2111 e xt 123. It’ s Recruitment T ime... and WE W ANT YO U FRANKLIN COUNTY SW A T (Students W orking Ag ainst T obacco) If you are a student between the ages of 11-17 and w ould lik e to join us in the ght ag ainst Big T obacco who is constantly using their tactics to lure you, your f amily and your best friends to become lifetime users of their deadly tobacco products, then SW A T is for Y OU! (W e ha v e SW A T Clubs in Apalachicola, Eastpoint (Franklin County School) and Carrabelle) F or mor e inf ormation please call (850) 653-2111 ext 123. By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com U.S. Rep. Steve South erland last week shelved a proposal that could have helped safeguard Apala chicola Bay’s current freshwater supply, opting instead for a resolution re questing Florida, Georgia and Alabama work togeth er on divvying up available water coming from Lake Lanier. The bay’s oyster popu lation has been devas tated, primarily from the lack of freshwater coming down the Apalachicola River, which is fed by the lake near Atlanta. The Panama City Re publican’s amendment would have required the U.S. Army Corps of Engi neers to get congressional approval before diverting more than 5 percent of the ow, but he pulled back when the House Transpor tation and Infrastructure Committee chairman told him the amendment went too far. Southerland said the chairman offered a substi tute amendment — “basi cally edited my amend ment” — halting its prog ress. “It wasn’t all that I wanted … but it was a lot more than we had the day before yesterday,” he said. The resolution — “sense of Congress” lan guage — passed the com mittee unanimously and was tacked on to the Water Resources Reform Devel opment Act, which cleared the panel. An Apalachicola envi ronmental group, however, said the resolution won’t do much to benet the bay. “What resulted out of that was not helpful,” said Dan Tonsmeire, executive director of Apalachicola Riverkeeper. “I mean, what they’ve done essentially is say to the Corps that, you know, they need to encour age the three states to get in a compact and work this thing out.” Tonsmeire praised Southerland’s committee speech but said the legis lative action would yield little. He also noted the legislation has a long way to go before becoming law. Tonsmeire said even the initial amendment would not have helped much; it would only have kept the ow from de creasing more, rather than requiring the Corps to increase it. Southerland, mean while, was condent his actions would have an effect. “Even though I didn’t get everything I wanted, I do believe that the ‘sense of Congress’ language that the chairman allowed to be put in the bill did highlight the inaction of the Corps,” he said, “and so we’re try ing to put more pressure and up the ante on the Corps.” Southerland has an other plan to spur federal action. He will request a Government Accountabil ity Ofce report on Corps’ reduction of water ow to the bay. He said committee chairman Bill Shuster, RPenn., agreed to help him get the report and made By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m The county is seeking state grants to improve all three county sports elds. On Sept. 17, county commission ers moved forward on several infra structure projects, including some to be funded with grant money from FRDAP (Florida Recreationa Devel opment Assistance Program). Commissioners voted unanimous ly to sign a contract with North Flori da Construction to build Carrabelle’s multi-use path, which will allow peo ple to safely walk or bike between the Carrabelle Beach and the Crooked River Lighthouse. The path was de signed by the Preble Rish engineer ing rm of Port St. Joe. Commissioners also directed Pre ble-Rish to prepare bid and specica tions for Oak Street in Lanark Village and the Bayshore/ Twin Lakes loop in Eastpoint, as the Florida Depart ment of Transportation (FDOT) has sent the county the notice to proceed on both projects. County Planner Alan Pierce re ported that, while FDOT has classi ed Syrup Branch Bridge as “func tionally obsolete” in a recent report, it is not structurally decient and DOT is not recommending any changes to the weight limit on the bridge. Next, the discussion turned to the upcoming FRDAP funding cycle for grants. Pierce said the county has until Sept. 30 to submit completed FRDAP applications. Commissioners had discussed possible improvements to DW Wil son Park using FRDAP funding at an earlier meeting. The discussion was continued with reference to Vrooman and Kendrick sports parks. Pierce said the planning ofce would seek a grant to upgrade Ken drick Park. After discussions with Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender, Pierce recommended re questing funds to build another base ball eld furnished with a pitching machine for 7-to-8 year olds; a bath room to serve the T-ball eld, a small picnic shelter at T-ball eld, and a large picnic pavilion to hold team meetings. The commissioners unanimously accepted his recommendations. Commissioner Pinki Jackel sug gested seeking FRDAP money to convert an area across Patton Street from the Eastpoint Pavilion to a chil dren’s park, but several people raised objections to the plan. Shannon Hartseld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Work ers Association said the area is con gested with cars and boat trailers because it is close to the Eastpoint boat ramp. “Nobody will take their kids to the pavilion area because of the people hanging out,” he said. Jackel said the sheriff’s depart ment is working hard to end loiter ing at the pavilion and church groups have begun to use it for functions. “I’ve gotten calls from people con cerned about having children in that area with people hanging out and the store nearby. I can’t support a play ground in a commercial district like that, and between two busy streets. I would like to see a bigger pavilion at Vrooman,” Commissioner Smokey Parrish said. “I agree. I don’t want to see any body’s kid get hurt. I see two prob lems there, trafc and alcohol,” Com missioner Noah Lockley said. “We purchased that property for parking for the ramp and pavilion. I have a problem with little kids run ning across the street. I’m not against anything for children. I’m just con cerned about that area,” Commis sioner Cheryl Sanders said. Jackel said she did not believe the land was purchased for a particular purpose. Commissioner William Massey said parking space was a big issue in the area of the Eastpoint ramp with people waiting as long as 40 minutes for a spot. Hartseld said the ramp was heavily used for at least nine months of the year. Pierce said Millender wanted to request funds for a pavilion and T-ball eld for Vrooman Park. Parrish sug gested adding additional playground equipment to the request. “I would like to see this nalized,” Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson said. “The recommendation was that the property be purchased for parking. I’m being told by seafood workers that we need parking.” Jackel moved a request be made for funds to improve Vrooman Park and the motion passed unanimously. Water proposal weakened in House committee This property adjacent to the Eastpoint Pavilion was the subject of a debate over possible uses. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Funds sought for park improvements See WATER A6

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, September 26, 2013 F l o ri d a D ep a r t men t o f He al t h in F r a n k l i n C o u nt y 1 3 9 1 2 t h S t re e t A pa lac h i c ola F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H e l e n C oo k A R N P D r I v a n B a ck e r m a n W O M E N S H E A L T H C L I NI C & % ' $ ' + & ' $ ' ( $ $ % ' % ' + % & ( $ ( $ + + $ ' + ) + ' $ & ( $ C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d ay F r i d ay # A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y # ( ' ( $ C a l l t o s c he d ule y o u r a p p o i nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 A LLI G A TO R P O I N T W A T E R R E S O U RC E S D I S TR I C T M E E TI N G N O TI C E T H E B O A R D O F T H E A L L I G A T O R P O I N T W A T E R R E S O U R C E S D I S T R I C T A D O P T E D T H E T H I R D S A T U R D A Y O F E A C H M O N T H A T 9 : 0 0 A M F O R I T ’ S R E G U L A R L Y S C H E D U L E D M E E T I N G M E E T I N G S W I L L B E H E L D A T T H E A L L I G A T O R P O I N T W A T E R R E SO U R CE S D IS T R IC T O F F ICE : 1 3 7 8 A L L I G A T O R D R I V E A L L I G A T O R P O I N T F L O R I D A M O N T HL Y ME E TI N G S C HE D U LE F O R O C T O B E R 2 0 1 3 S E P T EM B E R 2 0 1 4 I S A S F O L L O W S : A L L I G A T O R P O I N T W A T E R R E S O U R C E S D I S T R I C T P O S T O F F I C E B O X 1 5 5 1 378 A LLI G A T O R D R I V E A L L I G A T OR P O I N T F L OR ID A 3 2 3 4 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 3 49 2 2 7 4 | F A X ( 8 5 0 ) 3 49 2 5 0 8 p o i nt w a t e r @ fa i r p o i nt. n e t | w w w .a l l i g a t o r p o i nt w a t e r c o m O c t o b e r 1 9 2 0 1 3 A p r i l 1 9 2 0 1 4 N o v e m b e r 1 6 2 0 1 3 Ma y 1 7 2 0 1 4 D e c e m b e r 2 1 2 0 1 3 J un e 2 1 2 0 1 4 J a n u a r y 1 8 2 0 1 4 J u ly 1 9 2 0 1 4 F e b r u a r y 1 5 2 0 1 4 A u g u s t 1 6 2 0 1 4 Ma r c h 1 5 2 0 1 4 S e p t e m b e r 2 0 2 0 1 4 1 1 13270 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 1 5 / *1, 4 4 1*, % ( +, ( ) ( (*1 41 1, ,( 4 ( 4 0 0 1* ( 4 ( 1 ( $ 3! ( +1/ ( 5 &" 4 1 1 / , 1 0 ( 1 0 4, 4 ,1 / / 1 ( 1/ 1 1 ( 05 ( ( + 1 1 ( 4 4, / 1 ( ) 1* ( ( / ,5 0 1 1 1 (+ (* 0 1/ ( 1 ) ,1 3 (* 3 2 1, 0 1* 1 ( ( ( / ,5 ,5 ( 4 $ ( 4," 3 1 ( /" ( 1 4 ,5 ( 4 11* ,( 1 / ( , ( 5 3 1 ( *, ( ( + 5 1* 5 ( 4/ ( 5 ,+ 4 41* 41 1 5 1* *, + , ( 5 ( 0 ( 1 ,5 ( 4 ( 1+, # ,1 ,5 ( 4 %" 1 4 4, 4 ( (+1, 1 1 11 (*, 1' $ 1 3 4, ( 5 ( / , ( 5 , +1* ( 4 3 1 ( ( + 0 5 4 515 9 0 2 BBQ lunch Friday to benet wildlife On Friday, Sept. 27, the Philaco Women’s club is hosting a benet luncheon to raise money in support of the Florida Wild Mammal Association wildlife rescue facility. The meal includes a half chicken, baked beans and potato salad. Master chef John Solomon will man the grill. The cookout takes place next to the Tin Shed at the corner of Avenue D and Water Street. Meals are available from 11:30 a.m. until it’s all gone. A donation of $8 is requested. To preorder or arrange for a delivery, please call 653-5857. Estuary Day Friday afternoon in Eastpoint The Apalachicola National Estuary Research Reserve will host the annual Estuaries Day celebration on Friday, Sept. 27 from 1:30 to 6 p.m. at the Nature Center, 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. As always, the event is free to the public. Children that attend must be accompanied by an adult. Visitors must enter from 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint; Millender Street will be closed. The Nature Center will remain closed the morning of Estuaries Day. Although the gate to the parking lot will open at 1 p.m., visitors will not be admitted to the event until 1:30 p.m. The rst 600 visitors, over age 3, will receive a free T-shirt. This event will feature more than a dozen fun games and learning activities including touch tanks, beekeeping demonstrations, science on the shoreline activities and more. For the rst time, Friends of the Reserve is partnering with the Franklin County School culinary program to sell food at the event. All activities wrap up in time for the door prize drawing from 5:30-6 p.m. This year’s drawing includes more than 40 items from local businesses and individuals. The grand prize is a two-night stay at The Villas on St. George Island. Historical Society to meet Saturday The Apalachicola Area Historical Society will hold its general meeting this Saturday, Sept. 28 at 9:30 a.m. at the Raney Carriage House. The meeting will open with a talk by author Robert Saunders, PhD. A history professor and department head at Troy University, and a regular visitor to this area, Saunders is working on a new book that will chronicle the area’s rich heritage. Please join us to hear and enjoy Bob’s in-depth insights on our unique history! Immediately after Saunders talk we will have a general business meeting to address much needed revisions that will update AAHS Articles of Incorporation. In addition, several ofcer/board members will stand for election. We encourage any individual interested in taking a more active role in our vital community organization to contact one of the nominating committee members to discuss your interest. Nominations will also be taken from the oor. Also, please remember to pay your annual $10 membership dues due now (or at the meeting) and update your contact information). By mail, please make check payable to AAHS, P.O. Box 75, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Apalachicola Area Historical Society, Inc. is 501c(3) non-prot Registered Corp. and your membership and contributions are tax deductible, welcomed and most appreciated. Only paid members are eligible to vote. Workshop on Chapman Auditorium today The University of Florida invites Franklin County residents to participate in a community workshop. Participants will engage in activities that address a new use for the historic Chapman School Building and Auditorium. The workshop, in the Chapman Auditorium at Avenue E and 12th Street, will start at 9 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 26. The workshop will last approximately two hours. Please come help create a better future for the beloved historic school. All county residents are welcome. Contact Kara Litvinas at Klitvinas@gmail.com or call (267) 671-7308 for further information. News b B RI efsEFS

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, September 26, 2013 A Page 4 Section By COL. SHAWN MOORE Special to the Times Allow me to clarify the Air Force’s intent regarding Eglin Air Force Base’s efforts to use the Blackwater River State Forest and Tate’s Hell State Forest for occasional, nonhazardous military activities. I’d like to make clear that the U.S. Air Force is not pursuing control, authority, or land exchange of state property. We simply are looking to share the forests with you. Our goal is to be completely compatible with current forest uses. The Florida Forest Service will maintain complete control and authority over the forests and must approve each and every Air Force activity. That means we will not conduct any operation that keeps you, as a member of the public, from enjoying your forest exactly as you do today. Hopefully you won’t even notice we were there. By going through the National Environmental Policy Act process, it ensures our activities result in little, to no impact to the environment. We started that process by issuing a Notice of Intent to publish an Environmental Impact Statement in the Federal Register Aug. 12, 2013. We ran advertisements in the Pensacola News Journal, the Northwest Florida Daily News, the Panama City News Herald and the Tallahassee Democrat both on Aug. 9 and Aug. 16. We also ran an ad in the Apalachicola Times on Aug. 22. In these ads, we invited the public to our scoping meetings in Milton, Blountstown, and Apalachicola on Aug. 27, 28 and 29 respectively. Over time, you’ll see more of these announcements and we’ll look for other ways to get the word out about future meetings and releases. These meetings have already been invaluable to us as we’ve learned a tremendous amount about what is important to you. We learned you love your forests and you want them to stay in pristine condition for many generations to come, and we agree with that 100 percent. Here at Eglin AFB, we recovered the red cockaded woodpecker population and championed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s upgrade of the Okaloosa darter from endangered to threatened, on the way to removing it from the endangered list altogether. We are very proud of our stewardship record, and we completely understand why that’s important to you. We grow these species along with more than 22 threatened and endangered species, and host more than 17,000 hunters, campers and hikers annually in the middle of one of the Department of Defense’s most heavily used ranges. The types of occasional activity that may take place at Blackwater and Tate’s Hell vary from CV-22s conducting landings and take-offs to dropping off small teams of four to six people who would use communication tools and maneuver through the forest, hopefully unnoticed. Some of the Air Force Special Operations Command’s smaller aircraft may also be able to conduct landings and take-offs on existing forest roads when those areas are not open to recreational activities. And again, we want to “leave no footprints behind.” Each time we enter your forests, all of these activities will be fully coordinated, scheduled, and approved by our partners in the Florida Forestry Service. In our draft document, which we hope to have ready for review this fall, you’ll see a careful analysis of all the potential impacts from traf c to water quality to noise and more. But that’s just our analysis we strongly urge you to continue adding your input. In fact, we’ll consider your comments until a decision is made as we want to make the best, most informed decision possible. I look forward to more discussion and encourage you to stay informed on our process by going online at http://grasieis.leidoseemg.com/. Col. Shawn Moore is commander of the 96th Civil Engineer Group at Eglin Air Force Base. Clearing the air on Eglin, state forests COL. SHAWN MOORE Special to the Times The “Cuckoo’s Calling” by Robert Galbraith, really J. K. Rawlings under a “nom de plume”, is a wonderfully intricate who-done-it. It draws together the very modern chic world of high fashion, and the rather retro world of a down on his luck private eye. The characters are compelling and offer great contrasts – the wealthy step-relatives of the deceased supermodel, with the scrappy world of her birth parents. Did Lulu jump, or as the distraught apartment neighbor contends, get murdered. Who has motive, who has opportunity? All explored through a convoluted plot, with a great surprise ending. Then there is the loveable but decrepit PI Cormoran Strike, war amputee, who has just left his girlfriend of 15 years, and is hiding his sleeping bag in his of ce from the charming and resourceful temp, Robin. The latter becomes an intricate part of his investigation team. I can’t say more – you have to read the book. I listened to the book as an Audible download, and noticed some of the reviewers did not seem to realize who the author actually was, but were all hoping that this would be the rst in a series. I had wondered why Rawlings was writing under another name until I read the reviews for her rst adult ction attempt, “The Casual Vacancy,” which did not go over very well. Another author I would like to mention, even though I have not started reading her books, is Kathryn Wall. Her Bay Tanner series, recommended by Susan Clementson of the library board, is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina, and is instilled with great Southern charm and intrigue, not to mention the belle aristocracy, contrasting with dirt poor ignorant cousins, both essential components of contemporary Southern ction. There appears to be a lot of similarities in theme with Rawlings’ PI protagonist, and let’s admit it, there is no better escapist ction than murder mysteries. The life of Lydia Baynard Simpson Tanner, despite her fancy name, evolves over the course of 11 novels, and rather than highbrow literature, it is distinctly low country avored. Characters include boyfriends, bleach-blonde babes and illegal aliens, while the settings encompass beautiful beaches, antebellum mansions and everything in between. If the circulation statistics are any measure of success in ful lling the AML patron needs, over 50 percent of the books are checked out. Good One note: The rst Apalachicola Heritage Dinner, with proceeds to support the library, has sold out all its tickets. This event will be at the Owl Caf Wine Room this Friday, Sept. 27, with a steamboating theme, and an historical speaker. Look out for the posters next fall for this annual event. We will try to have it in a bigger space so more people can enjoy. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. No better escapist ction than murder mysteries @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Special to The Times Some dogs have all the luck but it didn’t seem like Lexie was one of them until she made her way to the Franklin County Humane Society shelter. Lexie, a.k.a. Gracie, was housed at the shelter for over a year, four years ago. She and her sister were abandoned in Carrabelle and left tied up by a woman running a puppy mill. Alice Dawn Kerkvliet abandoned three dogs in Sept. 2009 and they were con scated by animal control after a neighbor complained they were starving. Because they were evidence in an animal cruelty case and Kerkvliet would not assign custody of the animals to authorities, they could not be adopted until the case was resolved. Lexie and her sister Serena came to the shelter very thin and almost hairless due to a severe case of mange. Lexie was also heartworm positive. At the shelter, Lexie was treated her both conditions. When the case was nally resolved, Kerkvliet was banned from owning animals in Florida and all three abandoned dogs were offered for adoption and eventually found forever homes. Lexie was placed with a lady from North Carolina and moved to a town north of Charlotte where she had plenty of room to play and doting owners. A year ago, the family moved to Houston, Texas and Lexie now dwells in a large loft apartment across the street from a golf course and the Houston Zoo. She has a play yard where she meets and spends time with her buddies everyday. She also attends doggie daycare three days a week. In spite of her history of abuse, Lexie is a very loving and affectionate dog. She is social and loves the company of both people and other dogs and is always up for a new adventure. Thank you to the adopters for giving this very special dog a second chance in life. The humane society, a 501(c)(3) non-pro t organization, is in need of donations from animal lovers who want to make a difference in the lives of the homeless and abandoned companion animals housed there. Your donation is tax deductible. Mail your donation to FCHS, P.O. Box 417, Eastpoint, FL. 32328 In addition to cash, supplies including dog treats, collars, leashes, hard rubber chew toys, tennis balls, braided chew rope, cat litter, bleach, hand soap, laundry detergent, utility water and food bowls (all sizes), kitchen bags and 39-gallon yard bags are always needed. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County saw a drop in its unemployment rate in August, as it continued to be the fourth best county in the state for joblessness. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the county’s jobless rate last month dropped three-tenths of 1 percent, from 5.5 to 5.2 percent. The unemployment rolls shed 18 people, dropping from 301 to 283 people in search of work. This decrease in unemployment occurred as the workforce shrank by 52 people, from 5,514 to 5,462. The current work force comprises 46 fewer workers than one year ago, when it comprised 5,508 workers and the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 6.6 percent. Franklin County’s August jobless picture, tied with St. John’s County, placed it just a few notches behind Monroe County, at 4.1 percent, Walton at 4.1 percent and Okaloosa, at 4.7 percent. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates have relatively high proportions of government employment. Seasonal tourism also was a contributing factor. Franklin had the lowest jobless rate in the tri-county Gulf Coast Workforce region, which averaged 6.2 percent in August, 1.6 percentage points lower than the region’s year ago rate of 7.8 percent, and 0.8 percentage points below the August 2013 state rate of 7.4 percent. Bay County’s jobless rate fell from 6.5 to 6.3 percent, while Gulf County’s dropped from 7.1 to 6.9 percent. Out of a labor force of 102,665, there were 6,661 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Out of a labor force of 100,826, there were 6,300 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. “We are excited that our unemployment rate keeps dropping, and we look forward to next month’s numbers where we will begin to see in these unemployment and job creation numbers the local economic impact of General Dynamics Information Technology opening their new call center in Lynn Haven,” Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. The Panama City metro area lost the most jobs over the year and had the highest rate of job losses of all metro areas in Florida. The metro area also lost the most jobs in trade, transportation, and utilities; and leisure and hospitality. “Keep in mind the data gathered for unemployment rates and job creates rates are collected using different agencies and different sample sizes, so it has been common for our area to see a seeming incongruence of these numbers and we have made our partner agencies aware that we don’t believe the job loss numbers year over year in tourism and hospitality and retail trade are accurate,” said Bodine. “But if you look closer at the monthly change, we will normally see our metro area’s August jobs rise in the education and government sectors from July to August because of the school year beginning again, and we will notice a decrease in leisure/ hospitality jobs because the tourism season begins to slow down.” As workforce shrinks, jobless rate drops SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Happy endings: Lexie

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, September 26, 2013 Probation Services in March 2012 when that rm was granted the contract with the county. “I think this is a tragedy, and I think it’s just a case of a theft by a person with no regard for others,” said Richard Stewart, a former Bay County commissioner who, together with Harold Bazzel, founded Florida Probation Services. “To think she would take money from economically deprived people is just un believable to me,” Stewart said. “This is a slap in my face and a slap in the whole community’s face. I’m co operating 110 percent to get this resolved.” Brown is accused of grand theft above $20,000, a second-degree felony that could get her as much as 15 years in prison, but an investigator with the state attorney’s ofce said Mon day the theft amount was likely much more money. “Conservatively, it was over $100,000 worth of com munity service hours,” said Johnny Turner, chief inves tigator among a crew as signed by William Meggs, state attorney for the Sec ond Judicial Circuit, to track down probationers to obtain sworn recorded statements and copies of receipts of their payments, to get to the bottom of what Brown is alleged to have done. Myers said the investi gation is ongoing and that the theft charge could be amended to grand theft over $100,000 if the evi dence warrants it. That crime is a rst-degree fel ony with a maximum pen alty of 30 years in prison. “I don’t think anybody is ever going to be able to give you an exact amount of money.” Myers said. The two other charges against Brown, ofcial misconduct and tampering with physical evidence, are each third-degree felonies, which carry a ve-year maximum sentence. The ofcial misconduct charge is connected to ling false reports as a county proba tion ofcer, and the tamper ing with physical evidence stems from the allegation she shredded receipts be fore her ring. ‘She just bypassed the whole system’Based on interviews with Stewart, Turner and Myers and a statement from Clerk of Courts Mar cia Johnson, a picture emerges of Brown’s al leged scheme, how it even tually was detected and the painstaking work of track ing down probationers who unknowingly were taken advantage of. In a written statement, Johnson said the Clerk of Court’s ofce discovered on Aug. 9 “an apparent dis crepancy” while preparing a legislative report on the assessment and collection of court nes and costs. Myers said the report was a new requirement, instituted by state ofcials who want to boost assess ment and collections to bet ter fund the court system with local dollars. The endof-year report, due some time before the scal year ends Sept. 30, grew out of a recent move by the Florida legislators to cut down on under-assessments by lo cal judges, Myers said. Myers said the deputy clerk assigned to prepare the report “noticed an awful lot of conversion to community service hours” in Brown’s paperwork. The deputy clerk “took it to Marcia (Johnson) and said ‘this looks strange to me,’” he said. In Johnson’s statement, she said Florida Probation Service was notied within days, and Stewart recalled he was called Aug. 13 by Johnson herself. “She did make me aware she thought there might be a problem. She told me what she thought the problem was,” he said. That call was no doubt difcult for Johnson, who is Brown’s aunt. Brown’s mother, Glenda Martina, supervises the Clerk of Courts’ criminal divi sion ofce. No one inter viewed, and none of the public records, have indi cated either woman had any knowledge or connec tion with Brown’s alleged wrongdoing. Johnson said her of ce “is currently conduct ing an audit of probation cases to determine what funds are due from Florida Probation Service. No em ployee of the Clerk’s Ofce is under suspicion of crim inal activity or having any involvement in the actions of Florida Probation Ser vice that have prompted the investigation. “The Clerk of Court will continue to protect the interests of the public by operating in a manner that is subject to a high degree of nancial, operating and compliance oversight to provide transparency and accountability,” Johnson wrote. Stewart said his staff called about 40-50 pro bationers on Aug. 13-14 and went to gather cash receipt books that were suspected of containing evidence of payments not recorded within the com pany’s system. He said Brown routinely took cash payments from probationers, and rather than recording them prop erly, had indicated the in dividual had completed community service hours, which can be credited against an account at a rate of $10 per hour. “She did a good job of keeping it balanced so we would never catch it,” Stewart said. “Jennifer took it upon herself to do it herself. She just bypassed the whole system.” Stewart immediately hired Billy Rogers, former head of Gulf County’s pro bation ofce, to replace Brown the day she was red, Aug. 15. He said the company has implemented a new system for handling all payment records. “Nothing is turned in without a time sheet,” Stewart said. “Billy’s doing a ne job of getting every thing squared away. He’s the right man for the job.” Johnson said after her ofce received the prelimi nary results of the internal audit, Chief Judge Charles Francis and County Judge Van Russell were notied, and a report was led with the State Attorney’s Of ce, which then began its investigation. “Florida Probation Ser vices acted immediately to correct its system of collecting and reporting probation nes and costs without an interruption of services to the probation ers,” Johnson said. No one in jail for non-paymentStewart said his com pany went back to Febru ary 2012 to review its list of probationers, and then sent out 240 letters to ev eryone who was on the conversion list since that time. All these names were turned over to Turner, who then set out to track down and conrm what each had paid and whether any actu ally performed community service hours. “The rst thing we did is we reviewed everybody that was in violation sta tus for monetary status, where it was alleged they had not paid,” Myers said. “We made sure nobody was in jail for a failure to pay monetary violations. There were none.” Turner said he took be tween 130 and 140 sworn recorded statements from probationers, who were not always easy to nd. “These aren’t necessarily the kind of people who keep their contact information up to date,” he said. Turner said they re viewed any documentation provided and compared individuals’ receipts to the probation cash le. “So far, out of 130-140 people, I found three that actu ally did community service hours in lieu of court costs and nes,” he said. Turner said Russell told him that in his capacity as judge, he had approved “a very low number” of ac tual community service hours. The courts require a series of forms, including a nancial afdavit, and approval by the judge, be fore nes and court costs can be worked off through community service. Turner said the alleged wrongdoing might date back four years and in volve more than 300 proba tioners, but that it mainly involved cases in 2012 and 2013. “From January to July 2013, there were over 80 cases that were con verted from court costs and nes,” he said. “In 2012, there was more than that. In 2009, 2010 and 2011, the numbers were low.” On Sept. 13, a meeting was held with about three dozen of the current and former probationers to ob tain further information, including any handwrit ten receipts Brown might have written. Not long after he as sumed the probation of cer position, Rogers dis covered copies of these receipts in the shredder at the ofce, giving rise to the tampering with evi dence charge. “It took us a week to empty the shred der when he (Rogers) no ticed it was full,” Stewart said. “He noticed it was all shredded receipts, which were bagged immediately and taken to the state at torney’s ofce.” Turner said the ma jority of the probationers affected were struggling nancially to pay off every thing from nes for oyster ing violations, to driving while license suspended and other misdemeanors. “She was taking advan tage of some of the most vulnerable people in the county,” he said. “Many ones I’ve talked to and I’ve asked about receipts, they’ll tell me ‘I didn’t get a receipt, I trusted my pro bation ofcer. If you can’t trust your probation of cer, who can you trust?’” Stewart said Brown “seemed to prey on ei ther the people who were scared or a little bit slow in learning (the system). “We are trained in as sisting, not intimidating them,” he said, adding that he hoped a paraplegic girl who was among those whose payments were wrongly recorded would be “the rst one to testify” if the case comes to trial. Turner has asked that any county probationers over the last four years who have questions about their case records to call the state attorney’s ofce at 653-8181 for assistance. Y o u ma y c o n t a c t u s b y e ma i l at c a m pg o r d o n j o h ns t o n @ f a i r po i n t n e t o r c a l l ( 8 5 0 ) 6 9 7 8 5 7 5 F o r fu r t h e r i nf o r mat i o n o n N at i o na l M u se u m D a y p l e ase vis i t S m i t hs o n ia n ma g a z i n e c o m / mu se u m d a y C o m e C e l e b r a t e w i t h u s €} @ qŠ  G “ {  L €  • ™  g g J J P › • } › Š ‚ • q  q “ ™  ~ ™ € } E ˆ  “ ‚ { q g  “ ˆ { g q “ J J I } “ ‚ ™ q } “ q ‚ ˆ F T h e C a m p G or don J oh ns t on A s s o c iat i o n is a 5 0 1 c ( 3 ) n o t f or p ro t c or por at i on d e d i c at e d t o p r e s er v in g t h e hi s t o r y o f t h e A m p hi bi o u s So ld ie r s o f W W I I w h o t r ai n ed in F r a n k l in C o u n t y F l o ri d a a n d i s f u n d e d i n p a r t b y t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v e l o p m e n t C o u n c i l a n a t u r a l e s c a p e c o m T our ist D ev elopmen t C ouncil T his m a r k s the s e v e nth c o n s e c u tiv e y e a r th at the C a m p G o r d o n J o h n s t o n W WI I M u s e u m h a s b e e n a s k e d t o pa r tici pat e i n the S m i th s o ni a n M a g a z i ne ’ s A nn u a l N a t i o n a l M u s e u m Da y T h e m u s e u m i s l o c a te d i n t h e C a r r a b e l l e M u n i c i p a l C o m p l e x a t 1 0 01 G r a y A v e C a r r a b e l l e F l o r i d a W e w i l l b e w e l c o m i n g v i s i t o r s f r o m 9 A M u n t i l 4 P M C o m e v ie w ou r e v e r g r o w i ng e x hi b i t s I f his he a l th a l l o w s a u th o r K e n ne th T u c k e r W W I I B 1 7 T a i l G u n n e r b o r n i n E a s t P o i n t FL w i l l b e s i g n i n g b o o k s O u r g i f t s h o p w i l l b e o p e n a l l d a y H e a r l i v e m u s i c a n d e n j o y f r e e r e f r e s h m e n t s A s a l w a y s a d m i s s i o n i s b y d o n a t i o n Y o u c a n l e a r n m o r e a b o u t t h e C a m p G o r d o n J o h n s t o n W W I I Mu s e um a n d d o wn l o a d d i r e c t i o n s a t w w w c a m p g o r d o n j o h n s t o n. c o m Coupon Expir es: 10-15-13 CODE: AP00 ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! THEFT from page A1 “I think this is a tragedy, and I think it’s just a case of a theft by a person with no regard for others. To think she would take money from economically deprived people is just unbelievable to me. This is a slap in my face and a slap in the whole community’s face. I’m cooperating 110 percent to get this resolved.” Richard Stewart, Florida Probation Services

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A6 | The Times Thursday, September 26, 2013 DA I S Y D A I S Y i s a 9 y e a r o l d L a b r a d o r Re t rie v e r t ha t wa s o w n e r s u rr e nd e r e d S he i s hea l t h y b r i g ht e y e d e n e r g e t i c a n d ha s m a n y h e alt h y ha p p y y e a r s to l i v e D a i s y i s h o u sebr o k en s p a y e d a nd hea r t w o rm n e g a t i v e S h e l o v e s to p l a y b a l l a n d w i l l o u t r u n m a n y a y o u n g e r d o g to g e t to t h e b a l l f i r s t W h e n i t s h e r t u r n to b e o u t i n t h e p l a y y a r d s h e w i l l c a r r y a t e n n i s b a l l i n h e r m o u t h w a i t i n g f o r s o m e o n e to t h r o w i t D o e s s h e l i k e w a t e r ? D o e s s h e e v e r D a i s y i s a w a t e r d o g t h r o u g h a n d t h r o u g h A g e m e a n s n o t h i n g to t h i s s w e e t g i r l S h e t h i n k s s h e s s t i l l a p u p w h e n s h e i s p l a y i n g b u t l o v e s to s e t t l e i n f o r a s n u g g l e a n d s o m e a f f e c t i o n a f t e r a b us y da y W h a t c ou ld b e m o r e ho n or a b le t h a n o p e n i ng y ou r ho m e t o a n o l d e r d o g w h e r e s h e c a n e x p e r i e n c e l o v e c o m p a s s i o n a n d s a f e t y a l l t h e d a y s o f h e r l i f e C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u nt y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i nt Y o u m a y l o g o n to t h e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g to s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s C a l l T od a y 227 .7847 S p o n so r t h e P et o f t h e W e e k CITY OF AP ALA CHICOLA, FLORID A PUBLIC NO TICE NEW FOUR-W A Y ST OP @ A VENUE M & 6TH STREET In the continued interest of public safety for our citizens and visitors, the City of Apalachicola will be creating a trafc control change at the intersection of A v enue M and 6th Street, located within its municipal jurisdiction. Please tak e note of this change and be prepared for this ad ditional required stop in your tra v el pattern in this area of the City Ne w stop signs, along with appropriate stop ahead signage and/or agging, will be installed shortly after the 14th day of the nal adv ertisement of this notice in compliance with the uniform trafc control specications of the Florida Department of T ransportation. F or further information, contact Betty W ebb, City Administrator at 850-653-9319 or Bobby V arnes, Chief of Police at 850-653-9755. Tyler Pemberton and his mom, Heather Shiver, of Eastpoint, are proud to announce the birth of his sister, Taylor Brooke Shiver on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013 at 7:32 CST. She weighed seven pounds one ounce and was 20.5 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Lisa and Cecil Babbs and the late Ricky Shiver, of Eastpoint. Maternal great grandparents are Joy and Marvin Moore, and Ethel and the late Nick Shiver, of Eastpoint. Births Robert Charles Lattimore and Ladonna Granger would like to announce the birth of their son, Roman Elias Lattimore. Roman was born at 2:58 p.m. on Thursday. Aug. 22, 2013 at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee. Maternal grandparents are Jimmy and Lynn Granger, of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Robert Lattimore, of Carrabelle, and Thomasene Lattimore, of Tallahassee. Bryson Andrew Brown turns 2 on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013. Bryson is the son of Jonathan and Jennifer Brown, of Apalachicola, and little brother to Brayden Brown. Maternal grandparents are Kenneth and Glenda Martina. Maternal greatgrandparents are Curtis and the late Bobbie Jean Watson, and Bill and Burnell Martina, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Jerome and Geanise Brown, of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparent is Mary Brown, of Port St. Joe. Happy Birthday to our special boy! We all love you so much. Bryson Brown turns 2 Birthday Taylor Brooke Shiver born Roman Elias Lattimore born By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Rare early camouage and mementos of an outstanding military career are among the new additions to the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum. Linda Minichiello is busy curating and preserving a number of interesting artifacts recently received at her Carrabelle domain. Among the new acquisitions are mementos of Lt. Col. Sam F. Warren, an Apalachicola native who landed on the beach at Normandy during World War II. Among his effects are Bronze and Silver Stars, as well as the announcement of his marriage to WAC Major Elizabeth Morgenstern in 1947. A rare uniform has been added to the museum’s collection as well. A camouage jacket and trousers used briey by the U.S. Army during World War II and rescued from the dustbin at a Tallahassee home is now prominently displayed in the museum’s main hall. The camo was used only briey because its appearance was too similar to the German uniforms resulting in friendly re deaths. Another treasure that Minichiello is preparing for display is a box of old newspapers from Apalachicola and Carrabelle, donated by Pam Shiver. Also on display now are examples of miniature magazines and letters received by soldiers in combat. NATIOnN AL MUSEU mM DAY THIS SS ATURdD AY The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum will once again participate in Smithsonian Magazine’s National Museum Day. This is the seventh year the museum has been invited to participate in this event. There will be music and light refreshments. The museum will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Saturday, Sept. 28. All are invited to attend this event. If you have been before, come see our changes. If you have never visited, you are in for a rare treat. For more information call 697-8575. Also go to the Smithsonian website and check out not only our museum, but other participants as well.PHOTOS BY LOISLOIS SS W OBO OBO D A A | The Times LEFT: Director Linda Minichiello displays a bronze and silver star belonging to Col. Sam F. Warren. TOP RIGHT: The US army experimented briey with camouage during World War II. BOTTOM RIGHT: This ad was found in a collection of old newspapers donated to the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. Camp Gordon Johnston collection grows a commitment to hold a hearing in which the Corps would come before the full committee to answer ques tions and respond to the report. “I know what that report is going to say; it’s going to say that the Corps of Engineers has been woeful in addressing the needs of the Apalachicola River Ba sin,” Southerland said. Tonsmeire said this plan was “really encouraging” and the focus must be on pressuring the Corps to care about the bay’s freshwater needs. He would most like to see a provision in the WRRDA bill requiring the Corps to increase ow to the bay, but Southerland has not committed to including such language. Meanwhile, the two share common ground in their distaste for the Corps. Southerland slammed it dur ing his impassioned committee speech, saying, “The Corps is the problem.” In the past ve decades, water ow down the Apala chicola River has decreased by more than 50 percent, Southerland told the committee. “This is a proud re gion, a place where heritage matters, and it’s a place on the verge of extinction,” he said in his speech. Tonsmeire said Florida and Georgia are unlikely to work together on dividing the water since Gov. Rick Scott recently announced a lawsuit against the north ern neighbor over the dispute. Even without the suit, Georgia would have no rea son to bargain because the Corps essentially is giving it everything it wants, Tonsmeire said. “When Geor gia has the upper hand like that, I don’t see any incen tive for them to come to the table,” he said, adding, the Corps doesn’t have a “perspective that’s going to help Florida at all.” As for Southerland, he has dug in for the long ght. He said he was “one new soldier in this battle that’s been going on for decades.” And he said the Florida delegation is unied on this issue — all 27 lawmakers, 19 Republicans and eight Democrats, signed on to a letter he sent recently laying out the case. “We are still very solidly sticking together,” he said. “Now Georgia, obviously, they’re ghting for their interests.” WATER from page A2 Society

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The Times | A7 Thursday, September 26, 2013 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Covenant Word to celebrate 10th year anniversary Pastors David and Harolyn Walker and Covenant Word Christian Center will be celebrating their 10th year church anniversary. Everyone is invited to come out and celebrate with us reaching this milestone in the ministry. Service dates and times are 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, led by Minister Tallie Gainer of Tallahassee; and 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, led by Pastor Dennis Walker of Ft. Lauderdale. Covenant Word is at 158 12th St., Apalachicola. For more information, call 370-1071 or email misty. cwcci@gmail.com. First Baptist to host fall revival First Baptist Church is hosting fall revival services at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, and 7 p.m. Sept. 30 to Oct. 2. Guest speaker for these services will be Rev. Troy Varnum of Panama City, director of missions for the Northwest Coast Baptist Associational in Panama City. He is a skillful preacher who will challenge everyone to have a greater walk with God. The community is invited to join us for these four days of spiritual renewal. The church is at 46 Ninth St. in Apalachicola. Sarge and our kitchen crew had a good lunch prepared last Thursday. Didnt see you. Maybe this afternoon youll be there. Lunch is ready every Thursday at the Franklin County Senior Citizen Center at noon. Hope you can make it. Your donation of $4 will be collected at the door. Been thinking about your Halloween costume. The rst Halloween dance will be held Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Over 50 Dance at the center. Come enjoy the evening! You can enjoy a huge hamburger with chips every Friday night at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the door. Every Sunday night is pizza night at the Legion. Pizza by the slice is $1 each, whole pizza is $8 and pizza on wheels is $10. While youre waiting for your order, you can play bar bingo, pull tabs, play a game of pool or shufeboard or just relax with your favorite beverage with your friends and neighbors. Both nights are open to the public. Phone in your orders between 5 and 7 p.m. at 697-9998. Come on down! Keep in mind that the rst meeting of the Lanark Village Association will be Monday, Oct. 7, at Chillas Hall. The membership meeting starts at 7 p.m. Pray for the repose of the souls of Patricia Lawler and Joyce Dyer and comfort and strength for their families. There is something on the hill on California Street that is attracting lightning. Every time we have a thunderstorm, the phone, the answering machine, the television or something gets hit at the home of Vivian Armistead. When I hear a loud strike, I think What did she miss now? You know those long white tables around the Legion, the center and the hall. The rst ones were at the St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department to go in the bingo rooms. Capt. Bill Peterson brought in a yer from Sams about the tables. Chief Bud Evans brought it up at our meeting about replacing the old tables with the new ones. Jim Bove and I went and picked them up. I was secretary/treasurer and headed up the bingo on Tuesday nights at that time. Saturday, Sept. 27, many of us will gather at the Crooked River Grill at 11:30 a.m. to help Gene Sewell celebrate her 39th birthday. Hope you can join us. We will have a good time. The Lanark Village Golf Club will hold a yard sale on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4-5, on the golf course grounds, between Heffernan and Parker streets. Hope to see ya there! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and dont forget belief is just a prayer away. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Speed Family The Speed family would like to thank everyone who came out to Mrs. Ella Speeds 93rd birthday celebration on Saturday, Sept. 21. It was a pleasure seeing you. Thanks for all the wonderful wishes and making her birthday special. The memories will last long after the party is over. Again, thanks for celebrating this memorable occasion with us. Sincerely, The Speed family Memorial services for Tammie Kay Reagan, 54, of Eastpoint, were Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 25, 2013, at the Chapel of Clark Funeral Home, Cairo, Ga. The Rev. Doug McGhee ofciated. Services concluded at the chapel. Ms. Reagan passed away on Friday, Sept. 20, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, Tallahassee. Ms. Reagan was born in Cairo, Ga., on Oct. 11, 1958, to the late Eldridge Dyess and Inez Helton Dyess. She was a housekeeper with T&B Cleaning. She was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include sons Buck Faircloth (Rhonda), of Inverness, Chad Faircloth of Cairo, Ga. and Brian Oaksford of Ochlocknee, Ga.; grandchildren, Cody Faircloth, of Inverness, Hunter and Taylor Faircloth, of Cairo, Ga.; sisters, Ann Combs of Cairo, Ga., Linda La Paz, of Carrabelle, Sarah Helton of Cairo, Ga., and Wanda Stewart of Cairo, Ga.; brother, Ed Dyess of Cairo, Ga.; and a host of nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents. Memorials may be made in Ms. Reagans memory to Franklin County Humane Society, Attn: Karen, 244 Highway 65, Eastpoint, FL 32328. The family received friends at Clark Funeral Home immediately following the service at the chapel. Guests may sign the online register at www. clarkfuneral.com. Tammie Kay Reagan TAMMIE KAY REAGAN Obituary Faith BRIEFS Card of THANKS Halloween dance just around the corner LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh From Staff Reports Seafood workers to meet M onday The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will have a special meeting at 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 30, at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola to discuss current issues regarding the bay. For more information, call FCSWA secretary Luther Hateld at 532-4464.FC I needs to ll 30 job openings At the Sept. 19 county commission meeting, Franklin Correctional Institution Warden Christopher Atkins said FCI is now seeking 30 correctional ofcers. The telephone number for the correctional facility is 697-1100.G ulf-Franklin offers correctional ofcer training A new correctional ofcer training program will start at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe on Jan. 22. This program is designed to prepare students for the state certication exam. Individuals who pass this exam are eligible for employment in any state, county or privately run correctional facility in Florida. The program, conducted using the new shorter curriculum and lasting about three months, will run from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily, Monday through Thursday. For more information, contact Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507 or bburkett@gulfcoast.edu. The application deadline for Pell Grants and nancial aid is fast approaching, so please call today or come by the Gulf/Franklin campus to pick up your application packet.G U I C awarded boat ramp repairs County commissioners voted Aug. 20 to award Gulf Coast Utility Contractors the contract to repair the revetment and road leading to the St. George Island boat ramp damaged last year during Tropical Storm Debby. Gulf Coast offered the low bid for the work, $434,511. FEMA reimbursed the county for the cost of the project. The deadline for completing this work is Jan. 2, 2014. Commissioner Pinki Jackel asked that the deadline for the project be moved up to Nov. 30, 2013. I dont want to get in a mess like the pier project, she said. County has vacancies on Planning and Zoning On Sept. 17, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners the county Planning and Zoning Commission could not meet this month for lack of a quorum. He said P&Z has been operating with less than a full commission for some time and suggested the vacancies be lled. The commission is made up of nine seats and two alternates. The seats that need to be lled are District 2/forestry; District 3/alternate and District 4/seafood worker. Pierce said Bill Laine, who represents District 3 as a Realtor, has not attended any meetings this year. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved Aaron Wray replace Laine, and the motion passed unanimously. Pierce said Steve Davis, who serves as a seafood dealer representing District 4, might not wish to continue serving for health reasons. Currently serving on P&Z are Paul Riegelmayer, District 1, atlarge; Larry Perryman, District 1, science; John Murphy, District 2, at large; and Dan Rosier and Skip Frink, District 5, at-large. County authorizes economic development study On Sept. 17, county commissioners voted unanimously to accept a $25,000 technical assistance grant from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity to assess the economic impact of tourism here. Stantech, an engineering consultation rm with ofces in Tallahassee, will carry out the research. The same rm recently analyzed Carrabelles economy. Revised personnel policy in effect next week At the Sept. 3 county meeting, Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson said consulting attorney Lucy Turner of Carson and Adkins has presented the nal version of the Personnel Policy and Procedures Manual. Any changes from the workshop have been incorporated. At Johnsons request, commissioners voted unanimously to approve the new manual and put it into effect Oct. 1. Lighthouse Society seeks homes for 2014 tour Plans are underway for the next St. George Island Tour of Homes, scheduled for Feb. 7-8. The weekend will begin with a reception and presentation on Friday evening, followed by the chance to visit some of the islands premier residences on Saturday. The Selection Committee is in the process of collecting home nominations for the 2014 Tour. To nominate a home, email info@ stgeorgelight.org. Organizers are looking for a mix of unique homes, from small to large, from beach to bay and in between, from the East End to Gulf Beaches to the Plantation. There are two caveats: 1) homes that will be for sale at the time of the Tour cannot be accepted; and 2) with many nominations expected, not all homes can be selected. But theres always the need to ll the pipeline for future years. If you are interested in volunteering on Tour day, contact the selection committee. Many folks are needed to serve as docents in the homes and to work as drivers for the Plantation shuttle. The Tour of Homes is a major fundraiser for the St. George Lighthouse Association. Proceeds help to maintain the Lighthouse, the Keepers House, and Lighthouse Park. News BRIEFS ReThink Energy Florida is a 501(c)(3) dedicated to edu cating and engaging the public on energy issues, including the use of fossil fuels and the need for renewable energy, dimin ished energy consumption and a sustainable environment. It empowers citizens to take ac tion toward achieving energy independence. Write a song to summarize the mission of ReThink En ergy Florida, and win a prize. Songs will be reviewed by the judges accordingly. Each entry costs $15 for nonstudents and $5 for students. Entries must be submitted electronically or postmarked by 11:59 p.m., Feb. 1. First prize is $500, or $300 and Nashville Songwriters As sociation International mem bership. Second prize is $100, and third prize is $50. For more information, visit http://re thinkenergyorida.org Win a prize for sustainable singing

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Thursday, September 26, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu S ept 26 87 70 10 % F ri, S ept 27 84 68 0 % S a t S ept 28 83 67 0 % Sun, S ept 29 82 71 0 % M on, S ept 30 83 72 0 % T ues Oc t 1 81 72 30 % W ed Oc t 2 82 72 30 % SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the car body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down, but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out, and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up, and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder. Page 8 Special to The Times Now that summer is over, we are going to start the fall season with a super island cleanup. This is your chance to see and help preserve the beauty of St. Vincent Island. This event, sponsored by Friends of St. Vincent, will take place Oct. 11. We are looking for a limited number of hardy volunteers (at least 20) to clean up the unspoiled beaches of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. These beaches, even though unmarred and untrampled by tourists, receive large amounts of manmade debris and all sorts of otsam and jetsam of modern life. This debris that people carelessly cast into the Gulf is washed onto the beaches, where it adversely affects the wildlife on St. Vincent Island, especially the nesting sea turtles, birds and marine life. The cleanup will focus mainly on small debris: bottles, cans, plastic and paper that can be recycled. This cleanup is made possible by the help from three individuals: Fonda Davis with Franklin County Solid Waste and Recycling for removing the collected debris from the island; Shelley Stiaes, refuge manager, for providing transportation to and from the island; and Mike Turrisi, a St. Vincent volunteer, for organizing the cleanup event. All debris collected will be transported to a collection point, where it will be picked up by Franklin County Solid Waste and Recycling. Everything that can be recycled will be recycled. Volunteers will be transported to St Vincent Island on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service barge, which will leave from their dock at Indian Pass at 8 a.m. There will be two returns from the island, one at noon and the other at 4 p.m. When you volunteer, be sure to let us know when you would like to return. This is not a hop-in or hop-out beach cleanup. You will need to choose what is best for you in terms of time and stamina. You will need to bring your own water, food, bug spray, sunscreen, appropriate clothing and large black garbage bags for collecting the debris. Please remember it is a refuge, and conditions can be extreme (heat, bugs, etc.). This cleanup is not for the faint of heart. If you can make it, you will have the reward of knowing you helped return one of Florida’s last great jewels to its natural state. To register for the cleanup, email supportstvin@hotmail.com by Oct. 4 — and thank you for your help! Turtle season is winding down, and it has been a record-breaking year on the island. There have been 104 recorded sea turtle nests. Of those nests, 23 have been “adopted” by individuals who are interested in supporting the turtle program on the island. The red wolf breeding program is not faring as well. The program, which has been ongoing on St. Vincent Island since 1989, has had another disappointing year. One breeding pair of red wolves is kept on the island to produce pups each spring. In the winter, the pups are trapped, their health checked and they are tted with radio tracking collars. The pups remain with their family until they are 18 months old. They are then trapped and relocated to Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in North Carolina, where they are reintroduced into the wild. The staff and volunteers who track the wolves have found no evidence of pups again this year. If there are no pups this spring, the two wolves on the island will be swapped out for another pair with the hope that they will be more productive. Fall and winter on the island always includes three scheduled hunts. The rst hunt, archery, takes place Nov. 20-24. The popular Sambar deer hunt is scheduled for Dec. 4-8, and the primitive weapons hunt is set for Jan. 22-26. Hunters can apply for any of these hunts at www.myfwc. com/license. The FWC website also has tips and advice on how to prepare for each hunt. The monthly island tours resume in the month of October. All tours are on second Wednesdays. The dates for the fall, winter and spring tours are as follows: Oct. 9 (tour already lled), Nov. 13, Dec. 11, Jan. 8, Feb. 12, March 12, April 9 and May 14. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on “Island Tour Sign Up.” The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web at www.stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive — bring everything you need, including drinking water, and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Special to The Times Celebrate state parks on National Public Lands Day The Department of Environmental Protection’s Florida Park Service and the Friends of Florida State Parks will celebrate the 20th anniversary of National Public Lands Day on Saturday, Sept. 28. As proclaimed by Gov. Rick Scott, residents are invited to volunteer and participate in a variety of activities planned at more than 70 of Florida’s award-winning state parks. In coordination with the National Environmental Education Foundation, National Public Lands Day invites volunteers to join ranks and improve the publicly owned lands where our state parks provide recreation, outdoor education and relaxation. For the past 20 years, this day has provided an opportunity for citizens of all ages to help preserve the lands of this nation. “It is such a joy to take part in National Public Lands Day. It is a wonderful chance for the residents and visitors of Florida to engage in restoring and preserving our public lands,” said Donald Forgione, director of the Florida Park Service, “It is also great to partner with the Friends of Florida State Parks and the 84 Friends groups around the state who are helping to coordinate this effort.” By contributing time in one of Florida’s many state parks, volunteers can restore Florida in many different ways. More than 70 events offered throughout the state provide the chance to remove trash and invasive plants, pick up litter surrounding the parks and plant trees and other foliage along the trails. In addition, demonstrations, exhibits, activities and complimentary snacks will be provided at various events. Bedbugs are not a pleasant subject but they need to be discussed, especially by people who travel. Cleanliness and a high price tag provide no guarantee a hotel room won’t come with unwanted occupants. Bedbugs are found in ve star resorts as well as cheap motels. At a recent convention of the national Pest Management Association in Hawaii, conventioneers were alarmed to discover wicker deck chairs in an ocean view bar crawling with bedbugs. Bedbugs are not microscopic or invisible, and you can save yourself a world of trouble by inspecting a room or short-term rental house when you arrive. Thoroughly check the bed linens, seams, piping or ruf es, including the dust ruf e, for the bugs or dark stains that indicate their presence. In hotels, the headboard is a popular hangout for these nasty critters. They are also frequently found between the corner of the box spring and its plastic guard and under the label of both the box spring and mattress. Inspect the rest of the furniture and other items close to the bed like pictures and mirrors. Place luggage on the luggage rack or on the top of the dresser or table. Never put a suitcase on the bed, the oor or any piece of upholstered furniture. That’s like asking bedbugs to hitch a ride home with you. If you nd bed bugs in your room, immediately report it to management and ask for another room. Make sure the new room is not adjacent to, above or below the infested room as bedbugs can travel through wall cavities and air ducts to infest other rooms. To ensure no bedbugs come home with you, bag all luggage in a large trash bag before placing it in your vehicle. This precaution will keep any infestation out of your car. Once you and your family arrive at home, visually inspect all items you plan to bring into the house. Place clothing and cloth material in the dryer on high for 20 minutes to kill any live bedbugs or eggs that might have traveled home with you. Items that cannot be placed in the dryer can go into the freezer for a period of ve days to ensure there are no live bed bugs or hatchable eggs. Steam cleaning luggage provides an added measure of precaution. If you own rental property, one precaution is to purchase moats for the legs of beds. These plastic cups trap bedbugs when they crawl in. The moat will give your cleaner early warning there is a problem; however, most are rather unattractive. One new brand, Blackout, is more discrete than earlier models. Bags are available for mattresses and box springs, but these are more for use after the bed is infested. There are also monitors of various kinds that can be deployed around a bed. These range from simple sticky traps to complicated devices that use pheromone and carbon dioxide as lures. The downside is that most of the better monitors are expensive. They cost from $20 to $40 each and monthly recharging will run $30 per trap or more. Outdoors BRIEFS WWW.KILLBEDBUGS.COM BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Check thoroughly for bedbugs COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM One never knows what he might nd on St. Vincent Island. BIRD’S-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND Island cleanup slated for St. Vincent

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G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 F r a n k l i n C oun t y H igh S c ho ol j u n i o r C a l l i e W e s t b r o o k n e w t o t h e g a m e o f g o l f h a s m a d e a n i m m e d ia t e i mpac t w h i le he l p i ng t he L ad y S e a ha w k g ol f e r s op e n t h e i r i n a u g u r a l s e a s o n w i t h a 7 2 r e c o r d C a l l i e i s f o c u s e d a n d d e t e r m i n e d t o g e t b e t t e r e v e r y da y S he l i s t e n s t o he r c oac he s le ad s he r y oung e r t e a m m a t e s a n d i s a n o u t s t a n di n g r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f o u r s c h o o l a n d t e a m s a i d c o a c h S c o t t C o l l i n s C a l l i e h a s i m p r o v e d h e r s c o r e s i n e a c h o f t h e t e a m s r s t t h r e e t o u r n a m e n t s I l i k e g o l f s h e s a i d I t' s p e a c e f u l a n d r e l a x i n g C a llie W e s t b r o o k BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Not i c e o f V a c a n c y F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v e l o p m e n t C o u n c i l B o a r d M em be r M e m b e r s h i p o n t h e F C T D C i s m a d e t h r o u g h a p p o i n t me n t by t h e F C B O C C i n a c c o rd a n c e w i t h F l o r i d a S t a t u t e s T I T L E X I P A R T I C h a p t e r 1 2 5 s s 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 ( 4 ) ( e ) a n d p e r F r a n k l i n C o u n t y O rd i n a n c e 2 0 0 4 3 5 a s f o l l o w s : e C o u n c i l s h a l l c o n s i s t o f n i n e me m b e r s w h o s h a l l b e a p p o i n t e d f r o m t i me t o t i me by t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s e c h a i r m a n o f t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s ( o r s u c h o t h e r me m b e r o f t h e B o a rd a s s h a l l b e a p p o i n t e d by t h e C h a i r ) s h a l l s e r ve o n t h e C o u n c i l I n a d d i t i o n t w o me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e e l e c t e d m u n i c i p a l o c i a l s ( w h o e a c h s h a l l b e a n e l e c t e d o c i a l o f t h e C i t y o f A p a l a c h i c o l a a n d t h e C i t y o f C a r r a b e l l e ) S i x me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e p e r s o n s w h o a r e i n vo l ve d i n t h e t o u r i s t i n d u s t r y a n d w h o h a ve d e mo n s t r a t e d a n i n t e r e s t i n t o u r i s t d e ve l o p me n t o f w h i c h me m b e r s n o t l e s s t h a n t h r e e n o r mo r e t h a n f o u r s h a l l b e o w n e r s o r o p e r a t o r s o f mo t e l s h o t e l s r e c r e a t i o n a l ve h i c l e p a r k s o r o t h e r t o u r i s t a t t r a c t i o n s i n F r a n k l i n C o u n t y t h a t w o u l d b e s u b je c t t o a n y t o u r i s t d e ve l o p me n t t a x u n d e r s e c t i o n 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 A l l me m b e r s o f t h e C o u n c i l s h a l l b e r e g i s t e r e d e l e c t o r s a n d m u s t b e a f u l l t i me p e r m a n e n t r e s i d e n t o f F r a n k l i n C o u n t y F o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n p l e a s e c a l l F r a n E d w a rd s a t t h e F C T D C o c e a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 6 7 8 e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e ve l o p me n t C o u n c i l i s c o m p o s e d o f n i n e me m b e r s w h o a r e a p p o i n t e d b y t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o m m i s s i o n e r s A n y o n e i n t e r e s t e d i n b e i n g c o n s i d e r e d f o r t h i s vo l u n t e e r p o s i t i o n i s e n c o u r a g e d t o s e n d a l e t t e r o f i n t e r e s t a n d q u a l i f y i n g r e s u me t o t h e F C T D C A d m i n i s t r a t i ve O c e I n ter e ste d p er so n s s h o u l d r e p l y n o la ter t ha n 5 : 0 0 p m. O c to b er 1 4 2 0 1 3 A r e c o m me n d a t i o n w i l l b e f o r w a rd e d t o t h e F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s f o r t h e i r c o n s i d e r a t i o n i s i s a vo l u n t e e r p o s i t i o n w i t h n o n a n c i a l c o m p e n s a t i o n B o a rd me m b e r s a r e r e q u i r e d t o a t t e n d r e g u l a r b o a rd me e t i n g s a n d a r e e x p e c t e d t o p a r t i c i p a t e i n t h e C o m m i t t e e a c t i v i t i e s o f t h e B o a rd P l e a s e r e v i e w q u a l i c a t i o n s i n P a r a g r a p h 2 a b o ve A p p l i c a t i o n s m a y be s u b m i t t e d t o F r a n k l i n C o u n t y T o u r i s t D e v el o p m e n t C o u n c i l A d m i n i s t r a t i v e O c e v ia e m a i l t o : f r a n @ a n a t u r a l e s c a pe c o m ; b y h a n d t o 1 7 1 / 2 A v e n u e E ; b y U S M a i l t o P O B o x 8 1 9 ; A p a l ac h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 9 CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, September 26, 2013 A Page 9 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Schools girls golf team is making a bold name for themselves in their rstever season. The Lady Seahawks won their second tournament on Monday, as they defeated Godby, Chiles and Rickards on Monday at Jake Gaither Golf Course in Tallahassee. The team shot a combined score of 205 and improved their overall record to 7-2. Seventh grader Melanie Collins scored the low round of the tournament with a 44. Freshman Megan Collins shot 48, junior Katie Seger 53 and junior Callie Westbrook 60 as the girls shattered their previous best score of 239. “All six of our players are improving and coming together as a team,” said head coach Scott Collins. On Thursday, Sept. 19, the girls defeated Wakulla at Capital City Country Club, but lost close matches to Leon and Chiles. Eighth grader Hannah Westbrook made the difference as she shot her personal best and the team beat Wakulla by only one stroke, 232 to 233. The team will host girls’ golf powerhouse John Paul II and Branford in their next match at St. James Bay on Thursday, Oct. 3. “The folks at St. James have been good to our team and made us feel very welcome there. We’re excited at the opportunity of hosting an event at one of the best courses in the area,” said Collins, who is assisted by Spencer Tolbert. The team plays St. James Bay again on Thursday, Oct. 10 against Wakulla. The Big Bend tourney is Oct. 7, with districts Oct. 15. Lady Seahawk linksters continue to win SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Members of the golf team are, from left, Assistant Coach Spencer Tolbert, Hannah Westbrook, Katie Seger, Harper Westbrook, Melanie Collins, Callie Westbrook, Megan Collins and Coach Scott Collins. Tee up with business members from around the Franklin, Gulf, Leon and Wakulla county areas at the 10th annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament on Wednesday, Oct. 9. Tee-time is 1 p.m. on the beautiful St. James Bay Golf Course east of Carrabelle. Well-known golf course designer Robert Walker created this perfectly manicured 18-hole championship course. He created a challenge for even the most skillful golfer, yet is still a course golfers of all abilities will love. Prizes will be awarded the top three teams. Scores will be totaled and prizes awarded at a reception following the tournament. Cost per team is $400, $100 per player. Fees include range balls, golf carts equipped with the latest color GPS system. Tournament proceeds will go toward the Chamber’s building fund. For more information contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at 653-9419 or email anita@apalachicolabay.org The Lady Seahawks junior varsity volleyball team won Sept. 17 against their biggest rivals, Port St. Joe. After losing the rst game 25-14, the girls came together as a team and won the second game 25-16. The Lady Hawks then narrowly triumphed in the tiebreaker, 15-12. “The games were very intense and the girls worked very hard for their win,” said coach Hilary Stanton. “Assistant Coach Tara Klink and I are very proud of how hard they worked for their win!” The Lady Seahawk varsity lost to their Tiger Shark rivals, ghting hard and working as a team, but succumbing 25-15, 25-13 and 25-18. “It was a hard loss to bear since it was district game,” said Stanton. ”Both teams do appreciate the local support we had on Tuesday night. The stands were full and the gym was loud with the sounds of Seahawk fans cheering on their girls.” On Sept. 13 at Altha, both squads lost, with the varsity making it a close match throughout. The girls lost the rst two, 25-15 and 25-20, won the third 25-23 and then lost the rubber game 25-15. – By David Adlerstein SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Members of the junior varsity Lady Seahawk volleyball team include front row, from left, #23 Melanie Collins, #2 Casey Riley, #5 Kimmie Boone, #20 Aracely Gallegos, #27 Scout McLemore, #19 Sophie Robertson, #4 Alexus Johnson, and #1 Laila Murray. Back row from left, are coach Hilary Stanton, captain #25 Sophia Kirvin, #28 Anna Riley, #6 Cheyenne Davis, #3 Myranda Mcleod, #15 Casey Tucker and coach Tara Klink. YOUNG SPIKERS REACHING JV volleyball team downs St. Joe Chamber plans Oct. 9 golf tourney The Franklin County High School varsity football team faced a powerful Liberty County team at home Friday night, and fell 64-0. The Bulldogs showed why they are ranked #5 in Florida, by scoring 32 points in the rst quarter, and 18 in the second to build a 500 halftime lead. Liberty County, under the direction of coach Grant Grantham, then scored a touchdown in each of the last two quarters as the running clock ran. “We turned the ball over seven times, three of them interceptions,” said Seahawk Coach Aaron York. “We did everything in the ballgame not to make it a game. We turned the ball over, did not play physical football like the week before and we did not play discipline. “These are all issues being addressed this week,” he said. The Seahawks’ dogged effort was led by #20 Trenton Lee, who rushed 12 times for 33 yards, #8 Alex Causey who rushed ve times for 26 yards, and had one tackle for a loss, and #5 Cole Wheeler, who had ve tackles. York is looking for better things as they travel Friday to Wewahitchka, who defeated the Seahawks in a preseason classic and has since gone winless, as has Franklin County. “We feel good going into this week. We have played Wewa two times in the last ve months, this makes the third. We will have to keep the ball and not turn it over in order to be successful,” said York. – BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN Liberty Bulldogs blank Seahawks The Franklin County Travel Ball team traveled to Marianna Saturday and competed in a Travel Ball USA Tournament. After four games of play the Angels pulled it off, winning the championship game against the Defuniak Springs Patriots 8-7. The team, for boys age 11 and under, and coached by Rhett Butler, Buck Smith, and Justin Odom, opened the tourney with a loss to the Tallahassee Tomahawks 12-8. But they snapped back into winning form by downing Defuniak Springs 15-4, and then the Jackson County Bulldogs 14-5 to earn their way into the championship game. Angels bring back gold in Travel Ball tourney CHALA PARISH | Special to the Times Celebrating their tourney win are Angels players Devin Daniels, George Foxworth, Ashton Topham, Joshua Odom, Cale Barber, Matthew Gay, Jon Austin Gee, Brennan Foxworth, Miles Butler, Lamarius Martin, Caden Turrell and Kelson Smith and coaches Rhett Butler, Buck Smith, and Justin Odom.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, September 26, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GET Y OUR AD IN! 227-7847 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D • 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E N C E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 G ar d e n T re e an d L a w n C are F r e e E st i m a t e s ( 8 50 ) 7 20 1 0 9 3 B O T A N I C A L C R E A T I ON S PUBLIC NO TICE The Franklin County T ourist De v elopment Council announces that its Mark eting Committee will hold a public meeting on W ednesday October 16, 2013 at 1:30 P .M. for the purpose of entertaining presentations from area media and publications desiring to pro vide services for future TDC mark eting ef forts. Presentations will be limited to ten minutes. T en copies of handouts for Committee members should be pro vided to the TDC of ce by W ednesday October 9, 2013. Interested or g anizations should call the TDC of ce at 850-653-8678 to be placed on the agenda and arrange for deli v ery of handouts. There will be no action by Committee members at this meeting. KEY HOUSE from page A1 She said the nomination committee has representatives from all of the areas served by the county library, from the Friends of the Library and from among library volunteers. Ondracek, of Cape San Blas, came to work as the director of the county library in January 2009. She holds a master’s degree in library, media and informa tion studies from the University of South Florida and has more than 30 years of experience as a librarian. She worked as a librarian in the Florida public school system and at the University of Tampa. She was also law librarian at the Gulf Correctional Institution. The qualications of the new direc tor could affect the library’s ability to qualify for grants and state funding. “Many grants do not consider you to be a library unless you are run by someone with a master’s in library science,” said Apalachicola Municipal Librarian Caty Greene. Greene, who does not have a mas ter’s, said Ondracek has signed off on grant proposals for the Apalachicola library. In an interview, Butler said the coun ty library qualies for state funding as a part of the Wilderness Coast Library system. She said if the Florida legisla ture should dissolve Wilderness Coast, or if Wilderness Coast lost their mas ter’s employee, the county library would no longer receive funding if the director did not have a master’s. “We don’t like to be dependent on someone else,” she said. Butler said the job description in the advertisement for the director’s posi tion allows applicants three years to nish their master’s in library science. “We would prefer to have someone who already has their degree, but we didn’t want to make the qualications too re strictive,” she said. She said in addition to nancial con siderations, there are other important reasons to have a formally trained direc tor. “It says something about the library system and where you want to go,” But ler said. Ondracek said she plans to retire for the second time after leaving her cur rent job. “I had been retired a couple of years, and when this position came available, I couldn’t resist,” she said. “This has been a wonderful opportunity and great chal lenge. I’m glad we were able to make the transition to the new building and that I was a part of that. I’m very satised with all of our accomplishments. We now of fer more services and programs to our patrons both adults and children.” Ondracek invites everyone to the grand opening of the new Eastpoint branch of the library from 4-6 p.m. Oct. 22. She said there would be a ribbon cut ting, speakers, light refreshments and an opportunity to tour the new facility. The open house is part of the celebra tion of Friends of the Library Week. After Ethridge had paid $1,000 for the three-story late Victorian gem adjacent to Lafayette Park at the May 16 sale, attor neys for Capital Bank, successor for TIB Bank, quickly moved to vacate the sale on the grounds Ethridge’s bid was “clearly an ‘unconscionably inadequate’ price caused solely by the mistake” of the bank’s agent, JMT Management. Naples attorney Kelly A. Johnson wrote in her objection that the bank had relied on JMT but that JMT’s representative “had forgotten about the assignment and did not appear for plaintiff at the sale.” Paperwork in the case indicates JMT was empowered to bid up to $832,000 on the property. None of the specics of what had gone wrong were discussed at Tuesday’s hear ing. Neither the bank’s attorneys, Johnson and John Scott, nor Ethridge, nor Collins Mallard, JMT’s director of operations, would comment on the settlement. The stipulation order species that JMT will pay the $35,000 as well as all at torneys’ fees and costs. Johnson asked that a December fore closure sale date be moved up, and after a brief recess, Reynolds returned to the bench with an order that the sale would be rescheduled for 11 a.m. Oct. 31 at the county courthouse. Reynolds’ selection of Halloween for the sale might have been more than a co incidental choice for the veteran judge, especially since the 1894 Queen Anne style home was home to Margaret and Alexan der Key, a well-known author and illustra tor whose novels include “Island Light,” “The Wrath and the Wind” and “Night on Witch Mountain,” later made into a Disney movie. The couple divorced in the 1940s, and Margaret, also an author, supported her self for more than half a century by work ing as a newspaper reporter and writing magazine articles. Both she and her sister Bess lived in the house until they were well into their 90s. Margaret died in 1996 and directed in her will that upon the sale of her estate, proceeds be given to the Apalachicola Mu nicipal Library board, of which she was a long time member. About $350,000 plus in terest resulted from the bequest, after the home was acquired in 1998 by Naples phy sician Dr. Gregory and Sally Leach. By November 2012, however, the home had fallen into foreclosure, complicated by the bankruptcy of one of the home’s sever al owner entities, which included Apalach Classic Systems Inc., Gregory Leach, Sally Leach, Advanced Medical Center LLC and Logical Investments. None of these defen dants in the case was represented at the hearing, but Johnson told the judge she had spoken with their lawyers, and none was contesting the stipulation order. Realtor Pandora Schlitt attended the hearing from the audience and said after ward that the unusual case might attract greater interest from potential buyers, but that the price for the home likely would be determined by other trends in real estate sales in the downtown historic district. Whoever eventually obtains the house will have to pay about $34,404 in back tax es, on three separate parcels, Tax Collec tor Jimmy Harris said. LIBRARY from page A1 By weight, this was 10,000 pounds more refuse than last year. In 2012, 191 volunteers collected 319 bags of litter weighing out at four tons. Hard work over the years and through out the summer seems to be paying off. Site director Kathy Swaggerty said Lanark Beach was unbelievably clean this year, thanks to ongoing efforts of villagers. Unfortunately, the cleanup of Lanark Reef had to be put on hold. While work ers dodged the bullet and nished before predicted rain began, it was too rough to reach the reef by small boat. Much of the wetland area below the boardwalk at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola was also unreachable because of high water. Unusual items collected included a 15-by-15-foot net, a chalk line box, an in atable shark, two re extinguishers and a message in a bottle launched from Pep persh Key on April 6. The bottle turned up at St. Teresa Beach. According to the Ocean Conservancy, which sponsors the International Coast al Cleanup, for more than a quarter of a century, volunteers worldwide have gathered annually along coastlines and waterways to participate in the cleanup. Many walk, while others set out on boats. Thousands more don scuba gear to seek trash below the water’s surface. In 2012, more than a half-million vol unteers participated, collecting more than 10 million pounds of trash and cov ering a distance of almost 18,000 miles. These volunteers have picked up ev erything imaginable along the world’s shorelines: cigarette butts, food wrap pers, abandoned shing gear and even automobiles and kitchen appliances. Last year more than 4,000 candles, 117 mattresses and thousands of sports balls were among the unusual rubbish collect ed worldwide. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times David T. Ethridge bid $1,000 in May to emerge as top bidder on the Key House, worth more than $800,000. CLEANUP from page A1 SPe E C ial IAL tT O THe E T i I M es ES Environmental warriors at Lanark Beach Saturday were from left, Brenda Keen, Jim Smith, Anita Smith, Kathy Swaggerty and Gail Phillips.

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The Times | A11 Thursday, September 26, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, September 26, 2013 The Times | A11 92434T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA000260 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTEE FOR CSMC TRUST 2011-11, acting by and through GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, as Servicing Agent 345 St. Peter Street 1100 Landmark Towers St. Paul, MN 55102, Plaintiff, vs. MARGARET A. ZUBERBUEHLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET A. ZUBERBUEHLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDWARD R. ZUBERBUEHLER, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARGARET A. ZUBERBUEHLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET A. ZUBERBUEHLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDWARD R. ZUBERBUEHLER YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 3, BLOCK B, GULF WYNN ESTATES, UNIT #1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Commonly known as: 2472 HIGHWAY 98 EAST, CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 30th day of August, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Sept 19, 26, 2013 92448T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000376 SEC.:________ U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF HARBORVIEW MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-10, MORTGAGE LOAN PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-10, Plaintiff, vs. KATHLEEN SIMS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 26, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000376 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 23rd day of October, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: THREE HUNDRED OCEAN MILE, PHASE I, BUILDING G, LOT 4, A SUBDIVSION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interst in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you ar ehearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 27TH DAY OF AUGUST, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Sept 19, 26, 2013 92482T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012-000378-CA Civil Division HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi Bank, Plaintiff, v. FORGOTTEN COAST PROPERTY, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company, ROBERT B. LINDSEY, an individual, and JOSEPH D. ADAMS, an individual, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated on or about August 27, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012 CA 000378 in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Hancock Bank is Plaintiff, and Forgotten Coast Property, LLC, Robert B. Lindsey and Joseph D. Adams, are the Defendants. The Franklin County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m. EST in accordance with §45.031, Florida Statutes, on the 20th day of November, 2013, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, in Franklin County, Florida, commonly known as Lot 2 & 17 off Highway 98, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, and described more particularly as: Lots 2 and 17 in Waterfront Block “I” in the Supplemental Subdivision, made by Robert W Day and Helen L Day, his wife, of Fractional Section 9, Township 8 South, Range 5 West in Franklin County, Florida, according to the map of which is on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of said county in Plat Book 1, Page 8. Parcel Identification Number 09-08S-05W0280-000I-0020. and also described as follows: Lots 2 and 17 in Waterfront Block “I” in the Supplemental Subdivision, Supplementary Map of Blocks I, J, and K, of the City of St George, made by Robert W Day and Helen L Day, his wife, of Fractional Section 9, Township 8 South, Range 5 West in Franklin County, Florida, according to the map of which is on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of said county in Plat Book 1, Page 8. Parcel Identification Number 09-08S-05W0280-000I-0020. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the date of sale. If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in this court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4430, as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or other court activity, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the schedLaw Enforcement The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests listed here were made, as noted, by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Sept. 15 Brenda D. Anderson, 28, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Bobby J. Bullock Jr., 45, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning, resisting ofcer without violence and child abuse (FCSO) Sept. 17 Tobias J. Rhodes, 25, Apalachicola, robbery (FCSO) Robert A. Hill Jr., 23, Apalachicola, six counts of uttering (FCSO) Sherry J. Perkins, 52, Eastpoint, no valid drivers license and giving false name or identication to ofcer (APD) Martin R. Raulerson, 53, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Robert L. Thompson, 20, Apalachicola, sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver (FCSO) Jonathan G. Pace, 36, Apalachicola, sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver (FCSO) Heather L. Hicks, 25, Apalachicola, four counts of possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell (FCSO) Sept. 18 Hunter R. Shiver, 19, Eastpoint, harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise, and enforcement of FWC rules (FCSO) Sept. 19 Andrew W. Ambra, 50, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Sept. 21 Melissa A. McKnight, 44, Lanark Village, battery (FCSO) Sept. 22 James H. Vandiver, 45, Canton, Ga., DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) Sept. 23 Ozell Knighton, 57, Panacea, burglary of an occupied dwelling and grand theft (FCSO) Derik A. Strevel, 31, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Audra L. Murray, 45, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Between Sept. 6 and 19, ofcers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission handled several instances in Franklin County in which too much alcohol had been consumed. Ofcer Gore was en route to vessel patrol when he came up behind a vehicle stopped at a stop sign in Apalachicola. The vehicle did not move, staying there for an extended period of time, and the ofcer determined the driver appeared to be passed out, slumped over the steering wheel. The driver attempted to drive off and attempted to make a U-turn in the road. Gore stopped the vehicle and detected a strong odor of alcoholic beverage. During the stop, the driver became combative and belligerent and Gore requested assistance. Lt. Calianno and Capt. Kelly responded and assisted with control of the scene. The driver performed poorly on eld sobriety tasks and was arrested for DUI and booked into the Franklin County Jail. The driver also did not have a driver license due to a prior DUI arrest. Gore was working in Eastpoint and set up surveillance on four subjects who were catching large amounts of sh. He observed two of the subjects catching black drum and spotted sea trout. Gore approached the subjects and engaged in general conversation, and determined that the subjects were in possession of illegal trout and black drum. The subjects were also selling the black drum at the location where they caught the sh. Gore identied himself as an FWC ofcer and conducted a resource inspection, during which he found oversized black drum and undersized spotted sea trout. The subjects were cited for possession of undersize spotted sea trout and issued warnings for possession of oversized black drum and the sale of saltwater products without a license. The trout were seized as evidence. Gore and Allen were on vessel patrol on the Apalachicola River when they stopped a vessel for a wake zone violation and boating safety inspection. During the course of the inspection and issuing the operator a warning, Gore detected an odor of alcoholic beverage on the operator, who showed signs of impairment. Gore conducted the eld sobriety tasks in which the operator performed poorly. The operator was arrested for BUI and booked into the Franklin County Jail, where it was determined the operator had several prior arrests for DUI. Information was forwarded to the State Attorney’s Ofce to direct le felony BUI charges. Ofcers Allen, Anderson, and Louque conducted resource patrols in Apalachicola and encountered several vessels harvesting shellsh in the west end of Apalachicola Bay. The vessels were stopped and the shellsh on board checked for size tolerance. Five misdemeanor citations were issued to individuals harvesting shellsh that day for harvesting undersized oysters. The catches ranged from 62 to 73 percent undersized. Special to the Times The Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce last week issued a state ment on the death of Cody Diorio, 22, of Carrabelle, whose body was recovered Aug. 12 in a wooded area northwest of Lanark Village, near Lake Morality. Diorio had been re ported missing April 2 near Duck Lake, and his green 1996 Dodge Ram was located, but a search at the time was unable to nd any trace of him. The following is the statement from the sheriff’s ofce: The Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce believes it is necessary to provide the fol lowing information in light of recent false and misleading rumors made surrounding the death of Cody Diorio. On April 1, Cody Diorio was under in vestigation by the Franklin County Sher iff’s Ofce for criminal activity. After an extensive interview with Mr. Diorio on April 1, his cell phone and computer were seized to preserve evidence as part of the case. The following day, April 2, Diorio’s mother led a missing person report with the Sheriff’s Ofce. During the time of this missing person case, the sheriff’s ofce worked diligently to address all legitimate concerns and information brought to us re garding Cody Diorio. The sheriff’s ofce conducted an extensive in vestigation, including interviews with family, friends and business associates. Several searches were made in the area where Cody’s ve hicle was found. These searches were grid searches by foot, heli copter and professional canine teams. During the course of this search and investigation, close friends and business associates of Cody went on record to state that Cody had told them he would kill him self before he ever went back to jail. In a search of Cody’s phone, it was discovered that research had been done on the phone on how to commit suicide. In the early morning hours of April 2, the same day he went missing, Cody Diorio did, in fact, pur chase a Jennings 9mm handgun. On Aug. 12, skeletal remains were found in a wooded area northwest of La nark Village. Sheriff’s ofce investigators and FDLE (Florida Department of Law Enforcement) crime scene technicians processed the area and found the follow ing: A Jennings 9mm handgun, one spent casing, clothing, ip op, skeletal remains, all at the location the evidence indicated the suicide took place. The remains were sent to the ofce of the medical examiner (ME) in Tallahas see. Positive identication by dental means conrmed this was Cody Diorio. The ME’s ndings resulted in a single, gunshot wound entering the mouth and exiting the back of the skull. The ME’s reports noted there were no other injuries identied. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce spent considerable time and effort in evaluating, investigating and reviewing all information surrounding the Cody Diorio case. Our actions have been fair, impartial, and complete. The case is now closed. Suicide takes a devastating toll on fami lies, friends and communities and is often very hard to accept. If anyone has ques tions or comments regarding this case, they are more than welcome to contact Sheriff Mock, who will be glad to sit down with them and show them the full report. As a side note, suicide is the third lead ing cause of death among teens and young adults and the second leading cause of death among college students, according to data from the World Health Organization. If you or someone you know is in crisis, please call the National Suicide Preven tion Lifeline at 800-273-TALK. Arrest REPORT Sheriff issues statement on Diorio death C oO DY D D I orOR I oO FWC REPORT

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A12 | The Times Thursday, September 26, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4514325 Part-time Reading InterventionistApalachicola Bay Charter School seeks a Candidates must hold currentteachingcerticate. ABC School is an EqualOpportunityEmployer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Sales Sales Reps The Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266378 Text FL66378 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 uled appearance is less than seven days. Dated September 11, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Published: Sept 19 and 26, 2013 92484T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2013-CA -000065 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST ALVIN W. HARRELL, SR. A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL A/K/A ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL, SR. A/K/A A. W. HARRELL, SR. A/K/A ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST ALVIN W. HARRELL, SR. A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL A/K/A ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL, SR. A/K/A A. W. HARRELL, SR. A/K/A ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL, JR. A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL, JR. A/K/A ALVIN WINDFRED HARRELL AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF ALVIN W. HARRELL, SR. A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL A/K/A ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL, SR. A/K/A A.W. HARRELL, SR. A/K/A ALVIN WINFRED HARRELL A/K/A ALVIN W. HARRELL, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1101 OAKDALE STREET SOUTHEAST GRAND RAPIDS, MI 49507 CURRENT ADDRESS: 1101 OAKDALE STREET SOUTHEAST GRAND RAPIDS, MI 49507 ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 656.64 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 2640.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF TWIN LAKES ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 989.37 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 264.18 FEET TO A RE-ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST 132.11 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 329.77 FEET TO A RE-ROD; THENCE RUN EAST 132.07 FEET TO A RE-ROD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 329.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY 20.00 FEET AND A PORTION OF THE WESTERLY 8.00 FEET THEREOF. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT AS DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 620 AT PAGE 571 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 2002 PALM HARBOR MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN# PH0913629AFL AND PH0913629BFL. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 8th day of April, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse 301 South Monroe St Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 Sept 19, 26, 2013 92534T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND OFR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2013-CA000242 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GLENDA KELLY STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA K. STEVENS A/K/A GLENDA STEVENS AND BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER AND PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION – CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: BRUCE S. SCHAFFER A/K/A BRUCE SCHAFFER and PAMELA SCHAFFER A/K/A PAMELA P. SCHAFFER whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: BEGIN AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 11 OF SOUTHLAND A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD AND THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF THE APALACHICOLA NORTHERN RAIL ROAD. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 79 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 199.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 269.47 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160) LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF HATCOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE WITH THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LINDEN ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY 311.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1977 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME. VIN#S: FLA58338 AND FL 58339. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 /(30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 12th day of September. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, AND SCHNEID, PL ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 6409 CONGRESS AVE, SUITE 100 BOCA RATON, FL 33487 MAIL@RASF LAW.COM Sept 26, Oct 3, 2013 95349T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-00421-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. COASTLINE PROPERTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-00421-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B PATTON DRIVE REAL ESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and COASTLINE PROPERTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front of the courthouse steps located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on October 24, 2013, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION (EXHIBIT “A”) PARCEL 1 BEGIN AT A POINT (IRON PIPE STAKE) ON THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE 66 FOOT HIGHWAY 110.75 FEET SOUTH AND 283.75 FEET WEST FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH. RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. FROM THIS POINT OF BEGINNING FOLLOW SAID ROAD IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION 100 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 38 MINUTES EAST TO THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE FOLLOW THE BEACH IN A SOUTHWESTERLY DIRECTION TO A POINT SOUTH 34 DEGREES 38 MINUTES EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTH 34 DEGREES 38 MINUTES WEST TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT 100 FEET WIDE AND COVERING THE ENTIRE DISTANCE BETWEEN THE SAID HIGHWAY AND THE SHORE OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND. PARCEL 2 LOT 4, MARINERS LANDING, PHASE I, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH Borrowers’ interest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses; benefits and proceeds of Borrowers’ interest therein. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 28th day of August, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL & ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNL Center II, 7th Floor Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 896-2224 Fax: (407)-835-3596 Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95347T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000419-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. SIDNEY E. GRAY, an individual; et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-000419-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B GULF VIEW WAY REAL ESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and SIDNEY E. GRAY, an individual, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front of the courthouse steps located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on October 24, 2013, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION (EXHIBIT “A”) Lot 7, RESORT VILLAGE, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 9, Pages 8 & 9, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH Borrowers’ interest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses, benefits and proceeds of Borrowers’ interest therein. TOGETHER WITH all personal property (tangible and intangible) located on or used in connection with the real property described above and as more particularly described in the Mortgage. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 28th day of August, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL & ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNL Center II, 7th Floor Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 896-2224 Fax: (407)-835-3596 Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95351T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-00027-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. COASTLINE PROPERTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2013-00027-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein, ACORN 6B RIVER ROAD REAL ESTATE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, is Plaintiff, and COASTLINE PROPERTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 2nd Floor Lobby at Franklin County Courthouse located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on October 24, 2013, the following described real and personal property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION (EXHIBIT “A”) PARCEL 1 COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 3403.53 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 1012.50 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 349.88 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RIVER ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 79 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 59.96 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 349.88 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 783.69 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 1133.40 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED 47160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 206.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 50 SECONDS, WEST 1957.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF AIRPORT ROAD AND A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1375.27 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 04 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.84 FEET, CHORD BEING SOUTH 33 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 88.82 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, OF SAID CURVE RUN NORTH 56 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 1957.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 525.02 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 987.91 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 31.72 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 61.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 3403.53 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 1012.50 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 349.88 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RIVER ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 79 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 59.96 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SOUTH 26 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 349.88 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 783.69 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 568.83 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 1180.83 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 990.42 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 2734.04 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1329.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 3: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 1262.18 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 323.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 57 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 546.33 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 936.23 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 149.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 4: LOTS 1, 3, 4, 14, 15, 16, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, LAKE MCKISSACK LANE, PARK & RECREATION AREA AND COMMON AREA, LAKE MCKISSACK PLACE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 9, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 AND 7, VILLAGES OF LAKE MCKISSACK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 32, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL 5: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 24 A DISTANCE OF 2666.96 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 376, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 135.67 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD NO. 376 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY 137.36 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 56 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 106.67 FEET TO A DISK ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD NO. 376, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1475.27 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 42 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 77.12 FEET, THENCE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 38 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 77.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH all personal property (tangible and intangible) located on or used in connection with the real property described above and as more particularly described in the Mortgage. TOGETHER WITH Borrowers’ interest in the homeowners association or equivalent entity owning or managing the common areas and facilities of the Planned Unit Development and the uses, benefits and proceeds of Borrowers’ interest therein. Dated at Franklin County, Florida this 28th day of August, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ROETZEL & ANDRESS, LPA Attorneys for Plaintiff 420 South Orange Ave. CNL Center II, 7th Floor Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 896-2224 Fax: (407)-835-3596 Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95437T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-000136-CA URBAN FINANCIAL GROUP Plaintiff, vs. E. B. JORDAN A/K/A ELVERT JORDAN A/K/A ELVERT BERL JORDAN A/K/A ELVERT B. JORDAN; WILLIE P. JORDAN; UNKNOWN TENANT I: UNKNOWN’ TENANT II, SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: E. B. JORDAN A/K/A ELVERT JORDAN A/K/A ELVERT BERL JORDAN A/K/A ELVERT 723 WELLBORN AVENUE CARRABELLE, FL 32322 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN And any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the abovenamed Defendant(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: LOTS 9, 10, 11 AND 12, IN BLOCK “H” OF AN UNRECORDED PLAT OF THREE RIVERS SUBDIVISION, IN SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 9, BLOCK “H”: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF SECTION 19, T7S, R.4W AND RUN N 8925’W, ALONG THE SECTION LINE, 737.2 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POB CONTINUE N 8925’W, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN S0013’E, 140 FEET; THENCE RUN S8925’E, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN N0013’W, 140 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING LOT 10, BLOCK “H”: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF SECTION 19, T7S, R4W AND RUN N8925’W, ALONG THE SECTION LINE, 797.2 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POB CONTINUE N8925’2, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN S0013’E, 140 FEET; THENCE RUN S8925’E, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN N0013’W, 140 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 11, BLOCK “H”: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF SECTION 19, T7S, R4W AND RUN N8925’W, ALONG THE SECTION LINE 857.2 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POB CONTINUE N8925’W, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN S0013’E, 140 FEET; THENCE RUN S8925’E, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN N0013’W, 140 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 12, BLOCK “H”: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF SECTION 19, T7S, R4W AND RUN N8925’W, ALONG THE SECTION LINE 917.2 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POB CONTINUE N8925’W, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN S0013’E, 140 FEET; THENCE RUN S8925’E, 60 FEET; THENCE RUN N0013’W, 140 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, September 26, 2013 The Times | A13 4514220 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND, UTILITIES INCLUDED ............... $1200 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 3 BR / 2 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ............. ............... ....................... $700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT/ 2 LOTS ................................. $650 HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGECOMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98, UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS 850 370 6223 1114756 Experienced Cable Installers & Supervisor Innovation. Technology. Communications NOW HIRING Ft. Walton Beach, FLRequirements: Must have truck, van, or SUV, ladders, meter, necessary tools, and safety equipment required for cable installation (triple play). Triage Partners is a national technology based services company servicing telecommunications and cable industries. We are expanding into the Ft. Walton Beach area. Interested candidates please contact: Kim Kerbs at 813-868-1282 or send resume to: kkerbs@triage-partners.com 1113125 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS € pipe WeLDerS X-ray WeLDerS OutSiDe MachiniStS inDuStriaL Marine eLectricianS Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center RepresentativePanama City, FLHalifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: € 2 years previous sales experience, preferably in a Call Center environment € Ability and desire to sell € Strong communication skills € Prociency with all Microso applications € Detail oriented team player with a passion for helping customers Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/AD&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. In addition, we oer: € Performance/ Incentive Based Pay Scale € Friendly Team Environment € Supportive & Motivating Sta to help you succeed € Positive, Professional and Upbeat work environment € We Promote from within! Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1113131 Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265881 Text FL65881 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps The Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of America’s top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 fenses, if any, to it on Oronda A. Ellis, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 6th day of September, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Sept. 19, 26, 2013 95525T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000343CAXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007-OPT1, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL AND JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000343CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2007OPT1, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OPT1, is the Plaintiff and KEVIN WAYNE NEWELL; JENNIFER NICOLE NEWELL; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Kendall Wade as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on October 16, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE LOT LINE SEPARATING LOTS 58 AND 59 OF SOUTHLAND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THE RIGHTOF-WAY OF PEACHTREE ROAD, AND RUN ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID LOT LINE 165 FEET EAST TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HATHCOCK ROAD, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN ALONG THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HATHCOCK ROAD 165 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE TURN LEFT AND RUN 264 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22nd day of July, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 Apalachicola: 244 Bobby Cato Rd. Sat, Sept 28th 8:00am -untilYard SaleText FL66251 to 56654 Downtown Apalach 31 Avenue E, corner of Hwy 98 and Market St. Saturday Only 8am -???Yard SaleEverything!!! Text FL66681 to 56654 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW GUN SHOW Sept. 28th and 29th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL66361 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL63024 to 56654 Motorized wheelchair lift for Auto. Great condition, $650. 850-524-3256 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Full Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City, Callaway, Parker, Springfield. Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com OR Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34266642 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed for TYNDALL AFB Base Access a plus but not necessary Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com OR Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34266644 Sales Furniture Sales Tiffin FurnitureApply in person at 117 Hwy 98, Eastpoint, FL Web Id 34265784 Text FL65784 to 56654 Secure/Protective Serv FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title:Inmate Supervisor NON-DC /Equipment OperatorIClosing Date: Thursday, October 3, 2013 Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Howard Nabors Road Department 376 State Road 65 Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone: (850) 670-8640 The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/ Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: AN EMPLOYEE IN THIS POSITION WILL SUPERVISE THE WORK OF STATE INMATES. OPERATE VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAVY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROAD DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS, OPERATES FRONT END LOADER TO LOAD ROAD MATERIAL OR DEBRIS FOR DUMP TRUCKS, BACK HOE TO DIG OUT DITCHES AND A VARIETY OF TRACTORS. OPERATES VARIOUS EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS, PUSH MOWERS, AND ETC. OTHER DUTIES AS REQUIRED. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT. Minimum Qualifications : Requires a high school diploma or an equivalent. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures; the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must possess a valid Florida Commercial Class A Driver’s License with a favorable driving record. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for a certification as anNON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Web ID#: 34265160 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL64958 to 56654 Downtown Apalach. 1BR/1BA apartment $675 plus electric! includes Large. Balcony, Satellite TV, and WiFi. Laundry on site 850-653-8801 txt FL66613 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl. 1100 sf, high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smoking/ pets. $850/mo. + $850 dep. 850-653-3838 Text FL64578 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt., furnished or unfurnished, 12’x 65’Deck. $275/per week, utilities included 850-653-5319 Text FL66454 to 56654 1 Bedroom Lanark Village Available Immediately! $550/mo. + Security Deposit & Background Check. Call Kathy Robinson Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-1653 or 653-7196. Text FL64123 to 56654 2 Br 1.5 Ba. Screened in porch and yard. W/D included. Jacuzzi Bath. $650 per month. 1 year lease. $500 deposit & refrncs. 404-710-4078 Text FL65926 to 56654 1BR Cottage and 3BR/2BA Home 850-643-7740 Text FL62204 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit. Call 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Historic District house for sale, 3 BR /1 BA (1 outside BA), 1920’s Arts & Crafts Cottage style, completely renovated. $239k 850-591-1174. Text FL64323 to 56654

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, September 26, 2013 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r ts h a v e i d e n t i ed w h a t t h e y f ee l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s ec t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h P o r t S t J o e Ap a la c h i c o la C ap e S an B la s S t G e o rg e I s lan d C ar r a b e l l e an d s u r r o u n din g ar e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249406 $229,000 Apalachicola 451 4383 IM MA CU LA TE MA IN T AI NE D # # %" " "" " % % " % " " "" $ $" $ " " " !! MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Imma c ula t ely main tained c ust om home desig ned b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e lands c aped lot in pr estigi ous S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beaut ifully furnis hed and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e south ern w all of the house T he spacio us mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laund r y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! # (850)22 7 -7847 | tgolden@pcnh com S O L D !! !! T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HA RR IS C ell: 8508901971 st e v e@s t e v esisl and .com w w w .288 mag noli aba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisl and .com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249387 $75,000 St Geor ge Island ISLAND CORNER L OT L a rg e s a n d d u n e s a n d a b u n d a n t n a t iv e v e g e t a t i o n t h i s h i g h a n d d r y c o r n e r l o t i s l o c a t e d i n t h e q u i e t G u l f B e a c h e s n e i g h b o r h o o d l o t m e a s u r e s 1 0 0 x 1 6 0 G u l f v i e w i s l i k e l y f r o m h o u s e o n p i l i n g s W e s t P i n e A v e & E a s t S a w y e r S t r L i s t e d b y M i c h a e l B i l l i n g s ! !! & $ ( # # ( ! ! % ( ( ! ( ( ( ! ( ( ( ! % ( % ! $ ( ( % ( $ ( ( % ( ! By TEVIS PAGE Special to the Times As the student body approached the middle of the rst marking period it became apparent that some teachers are not as easy as we thought. Thankfully we have four weeks left before our rst report card comes out on Oct. 25. With the Homecoming game less than a month away, the Student Government Association (SGA) is working overtime to organize the parade route and school festivities. This includes the dress-out days, pep rallies, and organizing the oats for the parade. This year’s requirements for Homecoming Court and Mr. /Miss FCHS, have changed. Every senior is eligible for Homecoming, while Mr. /Miss must meet a 2.5 grade point average requirement and be voted in by the entirety of the high school. This month has own by and the weeks are starting to add up. We will be voting on our Homecoming court and Mr. / Miss soon, and we have a senior meeting on Oct. 3. School pictures are in and will be distributed this week. Last Friday the cheerleaders held a pep rally. It was great! It got students enthusiastic with an adorable skit that portrayed our Hawk taking the Liberty County Bull Dawgs down and putting him in the pound. After the skit, we got involved in the screaming match for the spirit stick and participated in a game the cheerleaders had arranged for us. One student from each grade was to knock three bottles of water over with a stoking and tennis balls, remove tissues one at a time from a tissue box, blow a balloon up and release the air to blow cups off a table, and then draw a cheerleader on a piece of paper. It was interesting and fun to watch. After the games the cheerleaders continued the screaming match with the nalist, which were the junior and senior classes. Needless to say, the seniors won! Once the winners received their prize, the nal bell was ringing and we were dismissed from the gym. This past week has been full of fun; I hope the next 30 can be just the same. HAWK TALK “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Apalachicola Times. 1) What two years did “The Twist” by Chubby Checker hit the top of the charts? 1959/63, 1960/62, 1961/64, 1965/67 2) Hieronymous Bosch was an internationally famous Dutch? Boxer, King, Singer, Artist 3) In internet lingo what’s the abbreviation for “face to face”? ETE, F2F, FYI, MYM 4) With what is touch most associated? Fencing, Farming, Framing, Financing 5) Reportedly what color beard grows the fastest? Black, Gray, Blonde, Red 6) How many wings does a ea have? Zero, 1, 2, 3 7) What is/was Diana, also known as Artemis, the goddess of? Underworld, Ocean, Wind, Hunt 8) Of these which isn’t a member of the Hebrew alphabet? Kaf, Vav, Hei, She 9) Which sea surrounds the U.K.’s eastern coast? North, Mediterranean, Red, Black 10) From which animal do we ordinarily get coney fur? Chinchilla, Mink, Fox, Rabbit 11) How many astronauts manned each Apollo ight? 2, 3, 4, 5 12) What is haboob a type of? Hair style, Snowake, Sandstorm, Tree 13) Legendary jazz performer John Coltrane was best known for what instrument? Clarinet, Trumpet, Saxophone, Trombone 14) In what same state were Johnny Carson, Elijah Wood, and John Wayne born? Iowa, Nebraska, Indiana, Wisconsin ANSWERS 1) 1960/62. 2) Artist. 3) F2F. 4) Fencing. 5) Blonde. 6) Zero. 7) Hunt. 8) She. 9) North. 10) Rabbit. 11) 3. 12) Sandstorm. 13) Saxophone. 14) Iowa. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Students working overtime to plan homecoming apalachtimes.com