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The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00236

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00236

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Air Force exercises in Tate’s Hell opposed By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com An Air Force proposal to stage war games in Tate’s Hell State Forest, rst approved last year by state of cials, met with a resounding no from county residents last week. More than 200 people from all walks of life attended the Aug. 29 meeting in Apalachicola’s community center at Battery Park, far more than attended either of the earlier scoping meetings last week in Milton and Blountstown. The overwhelming majority agreed military exercises are not welcome in Franklin County. But it’s not yet clear how much effect that will have. In October 2012, the Air Force signed an agreement with the state to use Florida Forest Service land, giving the go-ahead for the military to use about 400,000 acres in Tate’s Hell State Forest and in the Blackwater River State Forest near Eglin Air Force Base. At Tuesday morning’s county commission meeting, Chairman Cheryl Sanders, who lives in Tate’s Hell, was chosen as spokesperson for future discussions on war games in the swamp. She asked the county to seek a public records disclosure on the project, which she said has been in the works since 2006. “Somebody had to have known about this,” she said. Sanders said she planned to bring the matter up at a Tate’s Hell liaison meeting with the Florida Division of Forestry on Wednesday, Sept. 4. The Air Force wants a lease of the forest as part of its Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI), a plan to create Thursday, September 5, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 19 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Incumbent Carrabelle City Commissioner Brenda La Paz topped the eld of ve Tuesday and was returned to ofce, with political newcomer Audrey Olivia Massey winning a tight battle for the second seat. La Paz, 58, gathered 214 votes, easily topping the eld in the nonpartisan election, while Massey, 41, edged out incumbent City Commissioner Cal Allen, 75, by two votes, 173 to 171, to take the second seat. Nikki Mock Millender, 36, nished in fourth place, with 108 votes, while Franklin Daniels, 52, picked up 58 votes. A total of 375 registered Carrabelle voters cast ballots in the election. Both La Paz and Massey are now set to each serve fouryear terms. They will be sworn By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The former executive director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority has pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $11,000 from her employer at the tail end of the almost four years she served as director. Selena Jo Noblit and her defense counsel, Randolph P. Murrell, signed a plea agreement Aug. 29 with Eric K. Mountin, assistant U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Florida, that could result in her receiving up to 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a $250,000 ne. Noblit, 42, also agreed to pay a $100 special monetary assessment before her sentencing in midNovember before Judge Robert L. Hinkle on the single count of theft concerning programs receiving federal funds. Because the housing authority receives in the neighborhood of a quarter million dollars annually in operating subsidies from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the case was investigated by HUD’s Of ce By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A bid to double the county’s 2 percent bed tax met with little support from county commissioners Tuesday morning, and though they backed taking it to a public vote, it might be too late for inclusion on the November ballot. Commissioner Pinki Jackel’s back-to-back motions — to double the county’s bed tax and then to increase it by just 1 percentage point — both died for lack of a second. Commissioners voted 4-1 to place the question of doubling the tax to a public referendum, with Commissioner Noah Lockley opposed. A fourth motion by Lockley, to bring the administration of the Tourist Development Council in-house, failed by a 3-2 vote, with Commissioners Cheryl Sanders, William Massey and Jackel opposed. County Attorney Michael Shuler is now scrambling to see if the matter can be added to a Nov. 5 ballot already scheduled to determine whether the county will levy an additional halfpenny sales tax to fund indigent medical care in the county. TDC Executive Director Curt Blair told commissioners the county needed to double the bed tax to maintain momentum from BRENDA LA PAZ OLIVIA MASSEY SELENA NOBLIT Noblit pleads guilty to embezzlement Commission iffy on bed tax hike “You’re talking about leasing the land, but for how long, and what happens to the money? It looks to me like the people that we depend on to protect us are the ones that are taking our tax money and using it against us, to destroy what is most precious here.” Betty Cummins Alligator Point resident “We’re not doing this because we have to. We want to. Environmental is very key to the success of our mission. Tell us your concerns, and make it a part of the public record.” Col. Shawn Moore commander of the 96th Civil Engineer Group “Buck Siding Road is our escape route in a storm. What will happen if it is blocked by your equipment? I appreciate the long notice you gave us; a lot of people didn’t even hear about this until three hours ago. I oppose anything you want to do coming on Tate’s Hell.” Charles Brannen Franklin County Dog Hunters Association NO TO WAR GAMES FRANKLIN COUNTY RESIDENTS SAY La Paz, Massey win seats in Carrabelle Rarity in the air, A8 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times See BED TAX A11 See TATE’S HELL A5 See CARRABELLE A10 See EMBEZZLEMENT A10 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 Book signing Saturday for monster hunter A cryptid creature is something odd that many people report seeing but whose existence has not been scienti cally con rmed. Think skunk ape, or the Carrabelle cat. Florida (naturally) has a super uity of the critters, and cryptozoologist, author and TV personality Scott Marlowe is on their trail. In “The Cryptid Creatures of Florida,” Marlowe investigates the Pensacola sea monster and the giant Juno worm. Join him at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St. in Apalachicola, from 1-3 p.m. this Saturday, Sept. 7, for an investigation of these and other aquatic, avian and terrestrial terrors. He will debut his new book, “Bigfoot Enigma,” at the signing. Ice carving rescheduled for Saturday An ice carving event, originally scheduled for Aug. 17 as part of the annual Apalachicola Festival of Ice, has been rescheduled for Saturday, Sept. 7, at the John Gorrie Museum, 46 Sixth St. in Apalachicola. The event, honoring Dr. John Gorrie, father of modern refrigeration, will take place from noon to 5 p.m. and feature music, games and an ice carving competition. Historic handkerchiefs The Carrabelle History Museum is delighted to announce that a whimsical display of historical handkerchiefs will be highlighted during September and October. Have you ever thought of handkerchiefs as art? Please stop by 106 Ave. B SE on any Thursday, Friday or Saturday between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. to see this unusual exhibit. For more information, call Tamara Allen at 697-8380 home, or 524-1153 cell.

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Help suppor t outreach messages such as this and the year round research and advocacy the CCFC does to protect citizen’ s rights. Please join today; we need your suppor t both nancially and in numbers. The CCFC is non-par tisan and does not suppor t individual candidates for of ce.” CONCERNED CITIZENS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY INC. P .O. Box 990 Eastpoint, Florida 32328 AllanF@DEC-Inter national.com ABetterFranklin.com (850) 653-5571 facebook.com/Concer nedCitizensofFranklinCounty LIKE US! DID YOU KNOW? FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS AND SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS ‘EARN’ MORE THAN $24,000 PER YEAR FOR THEIR P AR T -TIME POSITIONS. 4 5 14 2 2 8 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Apalachicola this week became the proud home of the Louvre of lavatories, the Taj Mahal of toilets, the Coliseum of commodes. Even as the rain pelted the asphalt outside, Willie and Monica Poloronis were busy on Labor Day putting the nishing touches on the new public bathrooms on Commerce Street, adjacent to the Sponge Exchange and the Apalachicola Cen ter for History, Culture and the Arts, formerly the Cot ton Warehouse. Willie was helping to power wash the outside premises, while Monica was on her knees, cleaning spots on the gleaming tile oor. These two principal owners of Poloronis Con struction have been handson like that over the past ve months, overseeing the work of creating a function al, safe, inviting and, histori cally appealing, structure. On Tuesday evening, at the city commission meet ing, commissioners ap proved the project’s only change order, an additional $4,884 charge, which will bring the cost of the struc ture in at about $325,000, including a $10,000 grant for architectural services from the Tourist Development Council. Funding for the project came from a Community Development Block Grant for community revitaliza tion, obtained through the efforts of Deborah Belcher, the city’s grant writer. Completion of the proj ect comes just days before the deadline, not surprising considering the record rain fall this summer. “Six weeks of ridiculous rain this summer probably slowed things down,” said Mark Tarmey, with 4M De sign Group. “I am very im pressed with the quality. I think they did a real good job.” Architect Tarmey served as a sub consultant for Jim Waddell, of Inovia, the proj ect’s prime consultant. Working on the project as subcontractors were Eastpoint’s King’s Plumb ing, and Carrabelle’s R. Gray & Associates for elec trical work. To handle the extensive brick work, done of wood mold, not wire cut, brick from South Georgia, Poloronis turned to Tin ker and Tinker Masonry of Panacea. “It looks reclaimed,” said Tarmey. “We took all the tones and the hues, of the Cotton Warehouse and Sponge Exchange.” Tarmey recounted how the project began several years ago, but the original plans were set aside as city ofcials and Planning and Zoning reimagined the project. “When we nished we weren’t proud of that de sign,” he said. “This is a much better building for the city architecturally. I think what it does is it responds to the things that we have been supporting in the city, as how downtown should be redeveloped. “I feel like the rest room building looks more like what would have been there and what ts into downtown,” he said, noting that the city went through a period where deteriorating wood or masonry buildings were often replaced by less rugged structures, or treat ed to vinyl siding. “They don’t talk to the permanence of the city when you do that; you do that for economy,” said Tarmey. “I’m a big believ er in the way things were done. It was an investment, that the city was proud of its heritage and had some sense of permanence.” The architect was care ful to note that “we’re not trying to create some false illusion of historicity, not trying to create some sort of falsely historic things. “It’s all made to have that sort of waterfront sig nature,” he said. “There’s no single one thing that’s the design element. It’s the sum of the parts, they’re understated but they look compatible.” Putting in a 34-foot long ramp for wheelchairs took extensive work, and meant building up to federal ood plain standards of eight feet. “Street level is about ve or six feet, and we had to be two to three feet over that level,” said Tarmey. “I think that was a pretty sen sitive way to manage it.” With about a half-dozen public restrooms under his rm’s belt, including a few on the interstate, Tarmey said the designers had a handle on what would work and what wouldn’t. “We’ve learned that peo ple do ridiculous things in public bathrooms,” he said. “We’ve learned the need to mute the colors and use durable materials designed to help the city maintain the public restroom over its life span. To defeat grafti and help keep it sanitary and clean.” The design features high density porcelain, true porcelain, which means its colors are all the way from back to front. “We do that because people get sick, ev ery once in a while a toilet will get plugged up, and we can get it back to sanitary conditions as quickly as possible. “We know when we use lighted surfaces people tend to write grafti on them,” he said. Key to the project was adding a low-cost, low main tenance air conditioning and dehumidication sys tem, to keep the air fresh, open and airy, not dank and moist. “It was a very smart de cision, easier to maintain overall,” Tarmey said. Sensors will detect when the air conditioning gets above certain humidity lev els, just as they will kick on the lights when someone enters the door, and shut off after they leave, or when the toilet needs ushing. “People forget to do that in a public restroom,” he said. There are plenty of as pects that are vandal re sistant, and city ofcials acknowledge that maintain ing cleanliness and public safety is primary among their concerns. “It’s a very key piece in supporting tourism, to have comfortable things down town,” Tarmey said. “They stay longer, or they decide to spend the night instead of going back today.” Apalach project built like a brick outhousePHOTOS BYDAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The Times Above: Willie Poloronis works on the bathroom project on Labor Day. Left: Rob Clark, with Poloronis Construction, paints the outside trim on a window.

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The Times | A3 Thursday, September 5, 2013 F l o ri d a D ep a r t men t o f He al t h in F r a n k l i n C o u nt y 1 3 9 1 2 t h S t re e t A pa lac h i c ola F L 3 2 3 2 0 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 H e l e n C oo k A R N P D r I v a n B a ck e r m a n W O M E N S H E A L T H C L I NI C & % ' $ ' + & ' $ ' ( $ $ % ' % ' + % & ( $ ( $ + + $ ' + ) + ' $ & ( $ C l ini c Sc h ed u le : M o n d ay F r i d ay # A p a l a c hi c o l a C l ini c T u e sd a y W ed n e sd a y # ( ' ( $ C a l l t o s c he d ule y o u r a p p o i nt m e nt a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 111 C I T Y O F A P A L A C H I C O L A N O T I C E OF P UB I C W OR K S H OP B A T T E R Y P A R K OU T F A L L S T O R M W A T ER I M P R O VE M E N T D E S I GN P R O JE C T T he A pa lac h i c ola C i t y C o m m i s s io n w i l l hol d a p u b l i c w o r k s hop o n S e p t e mb e r 1 0 2 0 1 3 a t t he A pa lac h i c ola C o m m un i t y C e n t e r 1 Ba y A v e n u e A pa lac h i c ola F lo r i da i m m e d ia t e l y f ol lo w i ng t he C i t y ’ s B u d g e t P u b l i c H e a r i ng a n d S p e c ia l M e e t i n g s c h e d u l e d f o r 6 p m E S T T h e p u r p o s e o f t h i s w o r k s h o p i s t o o f fe r a n o p p o r t u n i t y f o r r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m Pr e b l e R i s h E n g i n e e r i n g t o p r e s e n t t h e r e s u l t s o f t h e i r A l t e r n a t i v e s A n a l y s i s f o r p r o p o s e d s t o r m w a t e r i m p r o v e m e n t s t o t h e B a t t e r y P a r k O u t f a l l T h e p r e s e n t a t i o n w i l l i n c l u d e a p o w e r p o i n t p r e s e n t a t i o n, i s s u a n c e o f a r e l a t e d t e c h n i c a l r e p o r t a n d s c h e m a t i c p l a n s w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e f o r r e v i e w a n d d i s c u s s i o n A l l c i t i z e n s a r e e n c o u r a g e d t o a t t e n d a n d p a r t i c i p a t e i n t h i s p u b l i c p r o c e s s dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ N… ?vv …Š 8… Fx N… Svs …“vŠ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests in this week’s report were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department, FHP and the FCSO. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. AUG. 26 Jessica L. Davis, 26, Eastpoint, failure to deliver shellsh to licensed dealer, untagged oysters, possession of unculled oysters, oystering between sunset and sunrise, oystering from prohibited area, and sale of unlawful product. (FWC) Sharon A. Brownell, 43, Eastpoint, withholding child support (FCSO) Jonathan G. Pace, 36, Apalachicola, withholding child support, domestic battery (FCSO) AUG. 27 Jeffrey J. Kuhne, 51, Eastpoint, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Shanalee Couch, 29, Telogia, grand theft (FCSO) Lisa M. Sellers, 41, Bristol, driving while license revoked – habitual (FHP) Amanda C. Rotan, 30, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Christopher A. Thompson, 38, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Joseph G. Putnal, Jr., 22, Eastpoint, kill / possess alligator, and placing baited hook (FHP) James D. Carden, 24, Eastpoint, kill / possess alligator, and placing baited hook (FHP) Jessica M. Opie, 26, Apalachicola, child neglect (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Joseph G. Putnal, Jr., 22, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) AUG. 28 Roy F. Albert, 43, Tallahassee, Leon County warrant for violation of probation and driving while license suspended (FHP) Heather L. Hicks, 25, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Joshua L. Pilotti, 23, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Joshua R. Furr, 31, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) James E. Pilotti, 27, Apalachicola, uttering (FCSO) Harley N. Tucker, 19, Carrabelle, possession of cannabis and trafcking in more than 14 grams (FCSO) AUG. 29 James E. Pilotti, 27, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Robert A. Hill, Jr., 23, Apalachicola, uttering and forgery (FCSO) Donald D. Page, 39, Carrabelle, two counts of grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Charles D. Ferrell, 36, Carrabelle, two counts of grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) AUG. 30 George E. Silvis, 56, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Donald D. Page, 39, Carrabelle, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) SEPT. 1 Jose R. Perez, 30, Apalachicola, DUI and no valid drivers license (FWC) Mark F. Wiley, 56, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence (FWC) SEPT. 2 Steven P. Robertson, 41, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence and refusal to sign uniform boating citation (FWC) Angela L. Sheridan, 44, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Arrest REPORT FWC REPORT Special to The Times The illegal taking of alligator and of harvesting oysters highlighted actions in the county by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Division of Law Enforcement during the last week of last month. Ofcers Gore, Allen and Martin were working a complaint in Tate’s Hell Wildlife Management Area regarding three subjects illegally killing deer and alligators at night. Surveillance was conducted and information obtained that one of the subjects had an alligator in the back of his truck. Shortly after the information was obtained, Gore spotted the truck. He and Martin, along with deputies from the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce conducted a trafc stop, during which the ofcers noticed blood on the tailgate and bumper along with blood on the suspect’s shirt. A subsequent search of the truck bed revealed alligator meat, alligator head, and other parts of the alligator. A rie used to shoot and kill the gator was found in the front seat. The suspect is a convicted felon and cannot possess rearms. After the evidence was secured, another individual involved in the crime was taken into custody. During interviews, information was obtained there was more evidence at the residences of the three individuals. A search was conducted at two of the residences. Additional alligator parts were located along with an illegal controlled substance. The subjects were arrested and booked into the Franklin County Jail for illegal taking of an alligator, possession of a rearm by a convicted felon, felony possession of a controlled substance and violation of probation. Ofcers Gore and Cook received information regarding three individuals harvesting oysters in a prohibited area. Following up on the information, Gore located the oysters that were harvested, stockpiled under an abandoned oyster house. He set up surveillance and, three hours later, three individuals showed up at the location and went under the house. Ofcer Gore was able to get closer and observe one of the individuals culling the oysters from the pile. A short time later, the ofcers stopped the individuals. The suspects admitted to harvesting the oysters the night before in a prohibited area of Apalachicola Bay. They returned 12 hours later to cull the oysters and take them to a dealer to sell. The ofcers obtained evidence to charge them with harvesting oysters from a prohibited area, harvesting between sunset and sunrise, possession of unculled and untagged oysters and failure to deliver to the shellsh dealer same day of harvest. One of the subjects was arrested just weeks prior to this arrest for harvesting shellsh in prohibited waters. This individual was booked into the Franklin County Jail. A total of 25 bags of oysters were seized and returned to the bay. The Department Of Agriculture and Consumer Services was notied and is pursuing further penalties. August ends with illegal gator hunting, oyster harvesting Law Enforcement

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 4 Thursday, September 5, 2013 Accent the positive of Carrabelle’s beauty An Aug. 22 Times article concerning Carrabelle’s faltering economy (“Study aims to boost Carrabelle economy,” Page A1) included a recommendation to improve the appearance of Carrabelle’s eastern entryway with new signage, monuments, landscaping, etc. Enacting a law governing the appearance of commercial signs was also suggested. Unfortunately, I feel that implementation of these particular measures at this point in time would be putting the cart before the horse. These actions will not serve to attract visitors or permanent residents to the area. These measures would have no bene cial impact on the current economic problems here. Proceeding with these recommended measures would be akin to putting a new front door on a house while ignoring its badly leaking roof. As has been pointed out by prior editorial submitters, attention should be given to the area’s many derelict structures. We basically need to tear down, clean up and clear out the area’s eyesores. Falling down, vacant structures and overgrown, junk strewn lots only serve to overpower the attraction of Carrabelle’s (and the rest of Franklin County’s) natural beauty and its bountiful natural resources. Additional legislation will not make the area more attractive. There needs to be compliance with the laws already in effect. Franklin County would probably bene t from the addition of a code compliance of cer position. Rather than trying to reinvent the wheel and make Carrabelle into something which it is not, we need to accentuate the positive and make use of what we’ve got. There are very few places blessed with this area’s natural beauty and resources. Refer to SaltyFlorida.com, Franklin’s TDC’s website, for examples of this area’s offerings. For ideas for pro table growth, I suggest you peruse the bigbendnature. com website. This website concerns the Big Bend area of Texas, but it could easily serve as a guidepost for application in Carrabelle/Franklin County. Please check it out. Big Bend, Texas, attracts visitors from around the globe. Before putting up any new signs, I feel we need to address the area’s current shortcomings. Let’s clean up and clear out where necessary. We can then start to develop a clear picture of what we want Carrabelle’s future to be and to decide on what steps are needed to achieve that end. Let’s make Carrabelle a community we’re proud to live in and show off to others. Sincerely, Stephany Railey Carrabelle Senior citizens need collective focus, effort On May 23, 1975, a group of 17 Franklin County residents and/ or property owners, from Alligator Point to Eastpoint, came together to le articles of incorporation as the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council Inc., a not-for-pro t corporation with the state of Florida. The purpose of this corporation “shall be to encourage and provide community programs, activities and resources primarily for those people 50 years of age and over, engage in social services relating to the needs of the aged, to standardize and coordinate social services in Franklin County, to organize and govern branches of af liated agencies of this corporation throughout Franklin County, offering direct services to the aged, and to promote and support research and educational activities in social welfare.” The 17 people listed in the articles of incorporation became the rst board members of whom the incorporation articles state that there “shall not be less than 11 directors and not more than 25.” The rst activity of the Senior Citizens Council was to draw up the bylaws which govern the activities and organization of the council. Over the years, the by-laws have been amended in proper fashion to timely re ect the activities of the council that would serve the needs of the aging. The last revision of the council by-laws was on Sept. 28, 2008, when it stipulated “Members of the Board of Directors shall be elected by the membership of the Council during the Fall membership meeting of the Council.” According to the current council by-laws, “Membership in the Council is open to any adult age 50 and over who subscribes to the purpose and policies of the Council as stated and implied in the Council’s by-laws and is a resident and/or property owner of Franklin County. All voting members shall have the right to participate in the Council’s annual meeting, to cast one vote on all Council voting matters, and be eligible for nomination and election to the Council’s board of directors. “The Fall membership meeting of the Council will be held the second Wednesday in September at a time designated by the board for the purpose of electing new board members and adopting a council budget. The board of directors will provide a progress report to the Council membership, they will also address and record Council members concerns and suggestions. There shall be no voting by proxy by any Council business. The board of directors shall also elect the of cers of the board.” The current by-laws state that there, “shall be a maximum of 16 members of which onequarter shall be elected every year during the fall membership meeting of the Council.” The board of directors shall be elected by the membership of the council. That means that every resident or property owner in Franklin County over the age of 50 is eligible to vote for the members of the board of directors of the Council. All eligible voting members must be in attendance and present at the membership meeting to be held on the second Wednesday of September. The membership meeting is usually held at 2 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Council Building, 201 NW Ave. F and First Street, Carrabelle. The Senior Citizens Council Building as a center for the activities of the Franklin County seniors was begun in 1985 when the council membership worked together to erect the building. There are several seniors around today who remember digging the foundations for the building, carrying concrete blocks and helping to paint the structure. The land upon which the building stands was conveyed by the city of Carrabelle to the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council Inc. for the consideration of the sum of $10 with the stipulation that “Said land is hereby conveyed for Senior Citizen Center purposes only. Should the land cease to be used as a Senior Citizen Center, all title conveyed herein to the lands described above shall automatically revert to the city of Carrabelle, its successors or assigns.” The 2008 by-laws of the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council, along with the 1975 Charter of Incorporation and the 1985 stipulation in the land deed, are very clear as to the what activities on which the current members and future 16 members of the board of directors of The Franklin County Senior Citizens Council should maintain their collective focus and efforts. In a recent issue of the Times, there was an article about a study on the economic development of the city of Carrabelle (“Study aims to boost Carrabelle economy,” Page A1, Aug. 22) in which it was noted that one of the strengths of the city is the many senior citizens that are living in this area. To the goal of providing adequate services and activities for the seniors, it is important that the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council elect board of director members who will work to welcome and keep the Senior Center open and easily accessible to all seniors wishing to enjoy the services of the Senior Center without any judgment as to the seniors’ economic or social status, race, creed or disabilities. Harriett Beach Carrabelle In 1960, I watched John Lewis and other black college students march past our Nashville, Tenn., high school on their trips downtown to the sitins. In 1963, while I was preparing for my senior year, Medgar Evers was assassinated in Jackson, Miss. For me, news of the civil rights movement was an unsettling blend of dark tragedies and heady victories. In our barbershop, black men debated pros and cons of actions of civilrights leaders. I recall one debate on whether Martin Luther King Jr.’s returning to town was good or bad. And I remember the letdown I felt when arguments focused on: What would the good white people think? But at 16, it was not yet my turn to speak. I got wind of a “March on Washington.” When I found out the march would be the subject of the next meeting at our Methodist church, I attended, immediately getting caught up in the spirit of the meeting. I can’t recall who spoke, sang or prayed; but I remember they talked about the signi cance the march, that there would be thousands in attendance, and they wanted youth participation. Someone said they had one seat left on one of the buses. I rushed up, saying I wanted to go. But I was told I needed my parents’ permission, which I thought would be no problem. So I ran home and asked my mom for the OK. She quickly and unequivocally said, “No, you might get hurt.” The decision was nal. What I didn’t understand then was that violence befalling blacks seeking change was common. I didn’t understand that racist violence was capricious and arbitrary. And I didn’t realize I was being protected by generations of black mothers’ wisdom. The march became the largest peaceful protest in American history. But the glow from the march evaporated when, a few weeks later, four girls were killed in a church bombing. Then President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. The following year, I enrolled at the University of Tennessee to major in engineering physics. It was a veyear interdisciplinary program combining a technical education with a heavy offering of liberal arts, basic sciences and languages. There were only two African-American students in UT’s freshman dorm. Across the hall was another engineering physics major. Early on, he asked if we could study together. I welcomed the opportunity because I loved the idea of teamtackling science and math problems. But after a couple of sessions, it became obvious I was helping him far more than he was me. He asked me about my scholarships; I told him I had none — I was there on educational loans. He expressed shock, and I asked why. He said he was on a full scholarship. It was my turn to be shocked. Here I was, tutoring a white, out-of-state scholarship student while I was on a college loan. At that moment, I lost my “glad to be here” attitude. By my junior year, I had cofounded UT’s Black Student Union, helped elect UT’s rst African-American SGA president and discovered a haven for challenging my limited world view: Knoxville’s Highlander Center. The 1963 March on Washington called upon the best of the American promise, even as Dr. King noted that though the arc of history is long, it bends toward justice. There was ample contemporary evidence, as global struggles for national liberation resonated with African-American struggles in a mutually reinforcing cadence. Looking back over the span of 50 years, other, yet sinister arcs appear. The civil rights movement occurred during a growing economy for all. From World War II until around 1980, the wealth gap between poorest and richest Americans actually closed. With an expanding economy, closing wealth gap and demands for racial justice, although everpresent reactionary voices were heard, they were unheeded. Today, with the wealth gap expanding and the middle class on the same downward trajectory as the poor, near maniacal fear of the future is a potent weapon in the arsenal of political forces that divide Americans. The recent march on Washington, called in an era of Supreme Court decisions gutting the Voting Rights Act, a Congress hamstrung by deliberate attempts to fray interests of the people and the presidency, and open economic and political power-plays by billionaires has its own challenges, and it must confront them in a more threatening environment than the 1963 march. That 1963 march carved new ground. The 2013 march can recover now-lost ground while providing a foundation for a future with brighter prospects for lowand moderateincome Americans, overcoming fear and division, jingoism and xenophobia, racism and sexism. Scott Douglas is executive director of Alabama-based Greater Birmingham Ministries, a multifaith, multiracial organization dedicated to pursuing social justice, helping those in need and building stronger neighborhoods. This article previously appeared in Equal Voice News and is provided courtesy of American Forum. Special to the Times Florida families attempting to buy a new home but facing daunting competition from cashush investment buyers would have new protections under legislation proposed last week by Sen. Darren Soto, D-Orlando. The Florida Homestead Recovery Act would compel sellers to seal the deal with homesteading buyers, provided the offer either matched or exceeded the all-cash offer. “What we’re seeing is families increasingly being locked out of the American dream because institutional investors like hedge funds are snapping up homes in cash-only deals,” Soto said. “If something isn’t done, we’re going to see Florida become a renter state, and families at the mercy of Wall Street landlords.” According to recent news reports, all cash deals are edging out more traditional home mortgage nancing even when the mortgage-backed offers are higher. This is largely because traditional mortgages take a little longer to process, and banks are eager to unload foreclosed homes as quickly as possible. If passed by the legislature, Soto’s bill would mean homesteading buyers — whether all cash or traditional nancing — would by law receive rst dibs on the purchase, provided the offer matches or exceeds the all-cash proposal. If the all-cash offer is higher, the statute would not apply. The law would go into effect June 1, 2014, and sunset three years later. SCOTT DOUGLAS Special to The Times March on Washington: Then and now Letters to the EDITOR Bill led to protect homesteading buyers

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, September 5, 2013 options in the Panhandle to relieve Eglin Air Force Base’s crowded airspace. The GRASI Landscape Initiative seeks to ease congestion over Eglin by expanding military training operations to the Tate’s Hell and Blackwater River state forests. Mike Spaits, public af fairs ofcer for Eglin, told the Aug. 29 gathering the two state forests were identied out of two dozen possibilities as the best t for training operations, based on distance from Eg lin/Hurlburt Field, minimal need for improvements, available landing areas and other infrastructure for access. Gov. Rick Scott praised the partnership in a 2012 news release. “Not only will this decision strength en our nation’s security, but it will support our military communities that provide jobs for Florida families,” he said. The scoping meeting be gan with a scripted presen tation by Air Force spokes men and rounded off with comments from the audi ence. Answers to audience questions were not per mitted during the formal meeting, though Air Force personnel elded queries both before and after the session. Attendees were urged to submit questions and comments in writing, which must be postmarked by Sept. 12 to be included in the public record. ‘A national treasure’ Military spokesmen told the audience increased air trafc has become a problem over Eglin, and additional space is needed to conduct nonhazardous training for Special Forces stationed there. Nonhaz ardous training consists of groups of fewer than 20 in dividuals dropping from air craft or conducting covert land maneuvers, without the use of live ammunition. In addition to existing helipads belonging to the Florida Forestry Service, the Air Force wants to use forest roads as runways for xed wing aircraft. In ad dition, the Air Force wants to deploy trailer-mounted, temporary and mobile ra dar, telemetry and train ing emitters to simulate an integrated air defense system. Members of the public were distrustful, skeptical and even hostile to the pre senters at the meeting. Col. Shawn Moore, com mander of the 96th Civil Engineer Group, intro duced himself as a repre sentative for Brig. Gen. David Harris, Eglin’s com mander. He said that under the National Environmen tal Policy Act, government agencies are required to hold scoping meetings like the one in Apalachicola before implementing any policy that might affect the environment. “We’re not doing this because we have to. We want to,” Moore said. “En vironmental is very key to the success of our mission. Tell us your concerns, and make it a part of the public record.” He said the Air Force team looking to implement GRASI exchanged ideas with the Nature Conser vancy, the Florida Forestry Service and the governor’s ofce about compatibility of the training sessions in state forests and reiter ated that the state was en thusiastic about a possible partnership. The Nature Conservan cy could not conrm they had a representative at the meeting or provide details of their dialogue with the Air Force about the Tate’s Hell proposal. GRASI “is the kind of arrangement where they would work out lease agreements or manage ment agreements where the Department of Defense would pay the state or pro vide other compensations,” said Janet Bowman, direc tor of legislative policy and strategy for the Conservan cy. “In the past, the military has put money on the table for the purchase of Florida Forever lands.” Mike “Pappy” Penland, point man for Eglin’s Air Armament Center, spoke for the operational side of the Air Force proposal and praised Tate’s Hell as a na tional treasure. “There are things you can do in North west Florida that you can’t do anywhere else,” he said. Penland said with the help of Georgia Tech, Vir ginia Tech and Florida State University, the Air Force is addressing increased air trafc at Eglin after the Base Realignment and Clo sure Committee brought additional ghter jets to the base beginning in 2005. The Eglin Air Force Base Joint Land Use Study estimates that in 2014, take offs and landings on Eg lin alone will total 427,000. Spokespersons at the scop ing meeting said by 2020, 59 additional F-35 ghters would move to Eglin, fur ther increasing air trafc with more training sorties. Penland said most of the air maneuvers over Tate’s Hell would take place at 24,000 to 60,000 feet and would be undetectable to people on the ground. He called the forest a “relief valve” for Eglin. He said a large exible area, like the Panhandle, is needed to train pilots to elude an inte grated air defense system. Penland said jet training needed to be carried out over undeveloped areas. “The Nature Conservancy wants to limit construc tion,” he said. “Guess what; that’s what we want too.” He stressed the military would work hard to make their training compatible with existing uses of public land like hunting, wildlife observation and timber harvesting. ‘We don’t want it messed up’ Members of the pub lic who commented saw it differently, their negativ ity stemming from various causes. Sanders, who insisted she spoke as a private citi zen, made her opposition clear. “I live in the middle of Tate’s Hell. In the 1940s, my husband’s family was taken off their land by Camp Gor don Johnston. When they came back, they had noth ing. They never got their deeds back,” she said. “Once you let the mili tary in, you can’t stop them. We have kept our popula tion down so we have an area that is not like any where else, and we don’t want it messed up. We didn’t do it for the military; we did it for preservation.” Charles Brannen of the Franklin County Dog Hunt ers Association said he spoke for 350 members. “Buck Siding Road is our escape route in a storm. What will happen if it is blocked by your equip ment?” he asked. “I ap preciate the long notice you gave us; a lot of people didn’t even hear about this until three hours ago. I op pose anything you want to do coming on Tate’s Hell.” He also expressed con cern fuel and exhaust, de posited in ditches, would make its way to the bay and further damage the oyster bars. Carrabelle’s Bill and Tammy Owens did not speak out but said before the meeting they had grown up next to Grifss Air Force Base in Rome, New York. “We’re concerned about helicopters and airplanes falling into the forest that weren’t intended,” Bill Ow ens said. “Jets and helicop ters fall out of the sky, and they make a big mess and release oil and fuel.” David Butler, chairman of the Carrabelle Econom ic Development Council, made the only supportive comment of the night. “If you’re doing anything that will help create jobs here, obviously I’m for it,” he said, adding his concern over the lack of detail in the proposal. “What are we agreeing to and on what scale?” he asked. Robin Vroegop, a certi ed green guide, said she witnessed maneuvers at Eglin. “There was constant boat and helicopter traf c and noise,” she said. “While that is appropriate for a military base, when you expand how will it af fect hunting, shing and wildlife viewing? “We are already not al lowed in the forest during res. This will be another block of time when the pub lic is not allowed access,” Vroegop said. “We need to be very careful about blurring the lines between military and other public property.” Margo Posten, a staff member at the Apalachic ola National Estuarine Re search Reserve, urged the Air Force to look at the hy drological effect of road im provement in the swamp. The Air Force has written that the roadway airstrips would be 30 feet wide by 2,000 feet long, would re quire bush hogging and possible widening or com pacting, and would have no paving or impervious surfaces. “Tate’s Hell has been preserved; that’s one of the reasons you’re here,” said Anita Grove, director of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce. “Visitors come to see our dark skies at night and our natural beauty. There are bears, dragonies and all kinds of creatures in the swamp. You have to won der if all these maneuvers will impact wildlife behav ior. We’re trying to nd a sustainable way to survive. I’ve got to wonder if it will impact our airport.” Alligator Point resident Betty Cummins questioned how much activity could be expected and where money from a lease on the prop erty would go. “You said tonight fre quency (of training exercis es) will increase over time. There’s no indication at what level,” she said, invok ing the Navy’s experience in Vieques, Puerto Rico, as an example of harmful environmental effects from weapons training. “You’re talking about leasing the land, but for how long, and what hap pens to the money?” Cum mins said. “It looks to me like the people that we de pend on to protect us are the ones that are taking our tax money and using it against us, to destroy what is most precious here.” Charles Elliot, who works for the Franklin County Veterans Service Ofce, said after the meet ing that he backed the mili tary’s plan. “The men and women of the armed forces need all types of terrain and environment to train in, simulating all parts of the world. They train as they ght,” he said. “It is very important that we support our sons and daughters. “This will not affect tourism,” Elliott said. “I have hunted and may again. I’ve run dogs and enjoyed it; I believe that public land belongs to the public. That being said, an individual doesn’t own those resources. “We are in the middle of the largest continuous acreage in this part of the country. We should share. The military will bring money into the local econ omy in lodging, food, shop ping and entertainment,” he said. F o r g o t te n C o a s t U s e d a n d O u t o f P r i n t B oo k s H a s R e o p e n e d A u g u s t 2 2 2 0 1 3 i n i t s N e w A i r Co n d i t i o n e d Loc a t i o n C o m e B r o w s e ou r C ol l e c t i o n o f R e g i o na l L i t e ra t u r e G i f t Q u al i t y U s e d B oo k s F i r s t E d i t i o n s L oc al A u t h o r s N e w e r T i t l e s a t U s e d B oo k P r i ce s 2 3 6 A W a t e r S t r e e t i n t he H i gh C o t t o n M a r k et p l a c e A p a l a c h i c ol a ( ne x t t o C a f e C o n Le c he ) O p e n M o n S a t 1 0 A M t o 5 P M S u n 1 P M t o 5 P M H e l p M a ke a D i f f e r e n c e .... B e c o m e a V o l u nt e e r i n Y O U R H o m e t o w n H o s p i t a l C al l H e a t h e r H u r o n a t 6 5 3 8 8 5 3 e x t 1 0 1 o r v i s i t w w w w e e m s m e m o r i al c o m W e e m s Ho s p i t a l A u xi l i a r y W e e m s C h a pl a i ns A s so c i a ti o n W e e m s A r t s In M e d i c i n e P r o g r a m W e em s M em o r ia l H e a l t h ca re F o u n d a t i o n W e e m s Ho s p i t a l J u n i o r V o l u n t e e r P r o g r a m B O ARD O F TR US TEES N O TI CE O F THE INTERN AL IMP R O VEMENT TR US T FUND S e c t i o n 253.69, F l o ri d a S ta t u t es – R u l e 18-21.021, F .A.C. A ug us t 13, 2013 N O TI CE O F A Q U A CUL TURE LEA S E M O D IFI CA TI O N AP P LI CA TI O NS N O TI CE i s h er e b y g i v en p ur s u a n t t o S e c t io n 253.70, Flo r id a S t a t u t es, t h a t t h e B o a r d o f T r u s t e es o f t h e I n t er n a l I m p r o v em en t T r u s t F un d h a s r e cei v e d 22 a p p lic a t io n s f r o m c ur r en t le a s e h o lder s in t h e A l liga t o r H a rb o r A q u ac u l t ur e U s e Z o n e t o m o dif y t h eir b o t t o m le a s e t o a wa t er co l umn le a s e e A l liga t o r H a rb o r A q u ac u l t ur e U s e Z o n e i s in F ra n k lin C o un t y in t h e A l liga t o r H a rb o r A q u a t ic P r es er v e e a p p lic a n ts a r e r e q ues t in g a wa t er co l umn le a s e t o in s t a l l o a t in g c a g es a n d o -b o t t o m rac k sys t em s f o r t h e c u l t i va t io n o f s h e l l s h. A di a g ra m iden t if y in g t h e p a r ce l s p r o p os e d t o b e m o die d t o wa t er co l umn le a s es acco m p a n y t hi s n o t ice A n y o n e h a v in g a n y q ues t io n s o r co mm en ts r ega r din g t h e p r o p os e d p r o j e c t s h o u ld le t h em in w r i t in g w i t h t h e Di v i sio n o f A q u ac u l t ur e M a g n o li a C en t er S ui t e 501, 1203 G o v er n o r ’ s S q u a r e B o u le va r d T a l l a h a s s e e Flo r id a 32301, o n o r b ef o r e 5:00 p .m. o n t h e 21s t d a y o f S ep t em b er 2013. TATE’S HELL from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Atul Patel, a member of Apalachicola’s Planning and Zoning Commission, attends a scoping meeting about Eglin Air Force Base’s use of Tate’s Hell State Forest for training.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, September 5, 2013 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y D O R EEN!! D o r e e n i s a n 1 8 m o nt h o l d B l u e T i c k H o u n d m i x S h e i s v e r y g e nt l e a n d s o c i a l a n d h a s a b e au t i f u l f a c e a n d e x p r e s s i o n S he i s hea r t w o rm ne g a t iv e a n d w i l l b e s p a y e d s o o n i n p r e p a r a t i o n fo r he r fo r e v e r h o m e I f y o u w o u l d l i k e to a d d a g e nt l e m e d i u m s i z e d d o g to y o u r f a m i l y D o r e e n m a y j u s t b e w h a t y o u v e b e e n l o o k i n g f o r V o l u nt e e r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d e d to s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g to b r i n g o n e o f o u r a n i m a l s i nto t h e i r h o m e to b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e g r e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F r a n k l i n C o u nt y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i nt Y o u m a y l o g o n to t h e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g to s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s W a yne Kight 227 .1 290 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 C a l l To d a y & & % % % 9 2 ; < : < : 8 1 + : 8 = = : : : < < 9 < 1 $ 2 0 : < ) ; 9 4 1 : 0 9 2 5 2 : : 5 9 2 $ 2 8 2 < 1 = = 2 0 : < : : 0 % 2 1 $ 2 2 = / 2 5 < < : 8 9 2 # 2 8 < 8 2 1 2 = : 8 = < 0 2 1 9 2 $ 2 8 2 < 1 ( < 2 2 : 2 2 = 2 7 : 2 2 2 $ 2 8 2 < 1 < : 1 2 5 = : = 2 < < < : 8 1 = : : : 2 : 3 C I T Y O F A P A L A C H I C O L A F L O RI D A P U B L IC NO T IC E OF ST RE E T N A M E C H A NG E C RE A T I NG “C O A C H W A G ON E R B O U L E V A RD” I n t h e c o n t i n u e d i n t e r e s t o f o u r c i t i z e n s a n d v i s i t o r s t h e A p a l a c h i c o l a C i t y C o m m i s s i o n h a s v o t e d t o r e n a m e t h e s e c t i o n o f 1 4 t h S t r e e t t h a t r u n s f r o m A v e n u e E t o A v e n u e L l o c a t e d w i t h i n i t s m u n i c i p a l j u r i s d i c t i o n a n d a s i d e n t i e d o n t h e o f c i a l m a p o f t h e C i t y n o w i n c o m m o n, t o Coa c h W a go n e r Bo u l e v a r d T h i s o f c i a l s t r e e t n a m e c h a n g e w i l l b e e f fe c t i v e c o n c u r r e n t w i t h t h e i n s t a l l a t i o n o f a p p r o p r i a t e s i g n a g e s h o r t l y a f t e r t h e 1 4 t h d a y o f t h e n a l a d v e r t i s e m e n t o f t h i s n o t i c e i n c o m p l i a n c e w i t h t h e u n i f o r m t r a f c c o n t r o l s p e c i c a t i o n s o f t h e F l o r i d a D e p a r t m e n t o f T r a n s p o r t a t i o n F o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n, c o n t a c t B e t t y W e b b C i t y A d m i n i s t r a t o r a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 3 1 9 o r B o b b y V a r n e s C h i e f o f P o l i c e a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 5 5 C o a s t a l F u r n i t u r e & W o o d w o r k s N e w O w n e r s W e n o w h a v e b o t h N e w a n d U s e d F u r n i t u r e V i s i t o u r s h o w r o o m a n d s e e o u r W e o f f e r O n e o f t h e a r e a s b e s t s e l e c t i o n s ( 8 5 0 ) 7 9 9 11 2 1 E ma i l u s a t coa s t a lf w @ y a h oo co m K i t M a s h b u r n O w n e r We are humbled and honored to announce our marriage to all our dear friends in Franklin County. Vivian May Johnson Stephenson and Timothy “Forrest” Hermann were united in marriage on Friday, Aug. 30, 2013 in the Florida Keys. The bride’s haircut and styling, plus the oral arrangements on the 25’ Tiki Wench sports shing boat, were created by the groom. The bride’s wedding attire, along with the entire wedding party, expressed tropical fun scenes, and all shirts were chosen handpicked by the groom from his wardrobe. Best man and matron of honor were Les and Chris; boat captain was Zane Solan, Original guitar selections were played by Art Humphries, The wedding party enjoyed a snorkeling outing and snacks prepared by the bride. On the way back to their home, God provided one of His more spectacular sunsets which was thoroughly enjoyed by all. Parents of the bride are Mr. and Mrs. Robert Johnson (Evelyn), Cherokee, Ala. Vivian has two sons, Jeffrey Stephenson (Jamie) from Birmingham, Ala., and Scott Stephenson (Rebecca) from Russellville, Ala. Grandchildren are Sydney and Blake (Jeff and Jamie’s) and Evan and ?(either Iain or Cadence tbd around Sept. 9). Vivian has six siblings Geri Lofton (Arkansas), Susan Robinson (Jasper, Tenn.), Bobby (Decatur, Ala.), Janet Henley (Tuscumbia, Ala.), Thomas (Ft Walton), and Steven (Cherokee, Ala.). Vivian discovered and fell in love with Carrabelle 13 years ago, and moved there after retiring ve years ago from the Alabama Department of Labor. Parents of the groom are Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth Hermann (Laverne), Cokato, Minn. Tim has four siblings, Kathy Hermann, Terry Matson (Dave), Phillip (Sherry), Nancy (John). Tim has several nieces and nephews in Minnesota. Tim has devoted his adult life to helping others, working for the Volunteers of America. Tim was there just after the earthquake in California in the 1989 cleaning up, at 9/11 cleaning up for a year, and helped clean ducks with Dawn at the Valdez oil spills. Tim stayed in Louisiana for three years following Hurricane Katrina helping folks who needed a hand up and not a handout. He volunteered to go to Hurricane Charlie, in Punta Gorda, Port Charlotte. Tim has also enjoyed looking like Tom Hanks (won $5,000 in a celebrity lookalike contest) and taking on the character Forrest Gump. Tim and Vivian will be residing in the Florida Keys and have started Tiki Wench Custom Charters. They will continue to be an active part of their community, as always. For their honeymoon, Tim and Vivian Hermann will be visiting northwest Alabama to enjoy their new grandbaby, then will go to Minnesota to visit Tim’s family. On Saturday, Sept. 7 there will be an open reception at Looe Key. Tim and Vivian will be provided all the meats, kegs of beer and lots of water. Several local friends in the community will be bringing side dishes and Tim’s musician friends will be on stage throughout the reception from 2-6 p.m.. We envision this party to be a combination of a typical “Johnson throw-down and a Sunday dinner on the ground. Vivian and Tim want to express a special thanks to all the folks in Franklin County who helped her safely break away from the cycle of being a victim of domestic violence. Thanks go out to the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department, the Refuge House and Judge Reynolds for all their support in keeping me safe. Also, in the Florida Keys, special thanks go out to the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department, Key West Police Department. To all my newfound friends, both in Apalachicola and the Keys, I want to thank you for helping me take back control of my life -only by the grace of God did this happen. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A no muss, no fuss continuing education. That is what Gulf Coast State College at its Gulf/Franklin Center will be offering in the coming weeks as Education Encore returns for another year. Education Encore offers non-credit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics. “We have a saying, you are never too old to learn,” said Jim Barr, coordinator of Education Encore. “There are no tests, no grades, no stress, just fun.” Registration for Education Encore begins at 1 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Sept. 18 in Building A, Room 101, at the Gulf/Franklin Center. Registration is rst-come, rst-served. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 25 and continuing through Oct. 30. Classes are being offered in three morning time periods, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, making it possible for a student to take three classes during this year’s Encore. In fact, the fee is based on each student having access to all three classes each Wednesday. The goal of Education Encore, Barr said, is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults explore new ideas. If you have been to college, Barr said, this is an opportunity to re-live the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live the college experience. “Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t—exercising the mind keeps one mentally t,” he added. The courses offered at the Gulf/Franklin Center include basic computer skills, digital camera, drawing, creative writing, chair yoga, Tai Chi, home repair, acrylic painting, yoga and others. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit the website at www.gulfcoast. edu/EducationEncore or for more information call 872-3823 or email Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. As Barr said, “Don’t miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. You are never too old to learn.” Society Be good to see you at lunch today. The Franklin County Senior Center will be cooking. All of our faithful volunteers will be on hand to prepare and serve our noon meal. Serving begins at noon. Hope you had a super holiday weekend. We sure did have a lot of visitors. Had a good crowd at the Lanark Village Boat Club on Labor Day. Lots of good food and great company. On Saturday, Sept. 14, you can have a full breakfast at the boat club from 9 to 11 a.m. and only a $5 donation is required. Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 was packed out with members and their guests. We were treated to a big chicken dinner. We had a great time. As always, thanks to our faithful volunteers who made it happen and those of you who supported the cause. Don’t forget now every Friday night is hamburger and chips at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82.. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the door. Yum, yum! Every Sunday evening is Pizza Night. Serving for both nights is from 5 to 7 p.m. and open to the public. Have a stomping good time at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center this Saturday night, Sept. 7 from 7 to 9 p.m. Ron Vice will be there to play your favorite tunes. Bring your favorite snack to share, your favorite beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze and enjoy the evening. Hop! Hop! Hop! Pray for the repose of the souls of Judy Green and Steve Furtak and pray for comfort and strength for their families. Judy was a grand lady and a good friend of mine for many years. Steve was also a good friend and neighbor and a super guy. Members of the Lanark/St. James Fire Department, the Lanark Village Association, the Lanark Village Golf Club and American Legion Post 82 and I will miss him very much. Always there to help out. Steve, his wife Sherry and the family have been close friends of mine for years. Steve’s funeral was held Tuesday, Sept. 3 at the Carrabelle Methodist Church. Pastor Aaron gave a great service and the church was wallto-wall with friends and neighbors. Steve was loved by everyone. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, God is watching from a distance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops and the poor, homeless and hungry. Prayers for a grand lady and good friend LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Education Encore back at Gulf/Franklin Center LACYE TIFFIN | Special to The Times This past Labor Day, an unusual something washed up on the beach on St. George Island. Lilly, the 5-year-old granddaughter of islanders Tom and BJ Tif n, spotted it and had this reaction. What do you think the funniest, strangest, most creative caption ought to be? Post your best idea or ideas on The Apalachicola Times Facebook page, or email to Dadlerstein@star .com, and win a prize! Vivian Stephenson, Tim Hermann wed Wedding ‘CATCH THE DRIFT’ CAPTION CHALLENGE Like us on THE APALACHICOLA TIMES

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She was born April 26, 1960, in Barberton, Ohio. A former longtime resident of Charlotte, North Carolina, she attended Belmont Abbey College and Central Piedmont Commu nity College, NC. She was a valued legal assistant for a law rm in Charlotte. When Chris was younger she enjoyed ballet, camping in the Blue Ridge Mountains, photography and the beach, the place she gravitated to most of her adult life. She loved her dogs with all her heart and soul. Music was her refuge. On her journey of life, even when the challenges were great, she summoned all that was positive in her world to project a joyful demeanor to uplift those around her. She was a breast cancer survivor and a remarkably re silient woman. She was beautiful, kind, gentle and trusting. The greatest love of her life and her greatest life ac complishment will always be her son, Brandon. Survivors in clude one son, Brandon K. Getz of Seattle, Wash.; father/parents, Ralph and Ann Getz of Charlotte, NC; mother, Beverly Smith of Charlotte, NC; brother, Casey Getz of Charleston, South Carolina; sister, Cynthia Getz Simien and brother-in-law, Terrance Simien, of Lafayette, La.; and niece, Marcella Simien of Memphis, Tenn. She also leaves her life partner and love, James Lemmond. Kelley Funeral Home handled the memorial ser vice that was held on Aug. 26 at 11 a.m. Reverend Ron Barks delivered the eulogy. He made the moon to mark the seasons; the sun knows its time for setting. Psalm 104:19 Christina Marie Getz CHRISTINA MARIE GETZ Stanley Peter Furtak Jr., 80, of Carrabelle, passed away Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013, at his home. He is survived by his wife, Sharol Furtak. He was born in Phila delphia, Pa., and had lived in Carrabelle for 25 years. He was a Master Plumber. He was vice-president of Lanark Golf Club, a volun teer reman for Lanark Village and an avid sher man. He is also survived by two children, Judith Gil bert (Gene) and Stephen Furtak (Susan); eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren; and sister: Rose Beckman (Wil liam). He is predeceased by two sons, David Furtak and Richard Furtak.SS tanley Furtak Jr. Mr. Curtis H. Padgett Jr., 67, of Carrabelle, passed away Thursday evening, Aug. 29, 2013, at his home. He was born and raised in Miami, but considered Starke to be his home. He retired as maintenance supervisor for Winn Dixie Stores. He loved to sh. Mr. Padgett is survived by his wife, Jackie Padgett, of Carrabelle; sons, David Padgett of Carrabelle, and Bobby Padgett and wife Carol of Valdosta, Ga.; grandsons, Sebastian and Schyler; stepson, Josh Sharp and wife Stepha nie, of Thomasville, Ga.; grandchildren, Julia and Anna; and sisters, Brenda Ordway and husband Paul of Mountain View, Missouri, and Linda Hedding and husband Norman, of Starke. At his request no ser vices are scheduled. Comforter Funeral Home is entrusted with nal arrangements.Curtis HH Padgett Jr. Obituaries AA LI cC IA GOLDEN Benet for AA licia Golden S S aturday There will be a benet sh fry for Alicia Massey Golden on Saturday, Sept. 7. The Fish Fry will begin at 11 a.m. at Taylor Building Supply 268 U.S. 98 in Eastpoint. Alicia has suffered severe burns and has had to travel to Georgia for surgery and doctor’s visits. Any money raised will help her cover medical and travel expenses. Please come by and get a sh plate on Saturday, Sept. 7. Fellowship Baptist reprises ‘Clothes Giveaway’ Fellowship Baptist Church at 706 Ryan Drive in Carrabelle started something last year that will be repeated this year and hopefully every year to come. Fellowship had “Clothes GiveAway” on the church property facing Ryan Drive and it was such a success and blessing that there will be another one on Saturday, Sept. 14 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. There will be clothes for all sizes for women, men, and children. Come and enjoy a time of “treasure hunting.” The sources of the clothes are from areas all around us as well as here at home. No telling what you might nd. There may be some other “things” too. See you then. Meals on Wheels welcomes new clients The Meals on Wheels program is available for Apalachicola and Eastpoint for eligible clients age 60 and over. If you are homebound and live alone, or with others who need help with preparation of meals, you may be eligible for home-delivered meals through the Older Americans Act Program provided by Senior Services of Apalachicola. For additional information please contact Debbie Sumner at Gulf County Senior Citizens in Port St. Joe at 229-8466. Faith b B RIE fF S News b B RIE fF S F S S U offers accelerated nursing degree program Florida State University’s College of Nursing is offering an accelerated bachelor’s of science in nursing degree program for students who have earned undergraduate and advanced degrees in other disciplines to address a looming national nursing shortage. The College of Nursing’s accelerated program offers the most expedient path to licensure as a registered nurse for those who completed degrees in other disciplines, leading to an earned bachelor’s degree in nursing in as soon as 12 months. The accelerated baccalaureate program builds on previous learning experiences to accomplish program objectives within a short period. Students receive the same number of clinical hours as their counterparts in the traditional entry-level nursing programs. The accelerated program at Florida State, established in 2009, has received support from outside organizations, including Capital Health Plan. About 70 percent of graduates of the Florida State accelerated nursing program obtain employment locally and remain in the Tallahassee area. “The U.S. Department of Labor projects the nation will need more than a million new and replacement registered nurses by 2020,” said Dianne Speake, interim dean and professor in the College of Nursing. “The challenge is to produce competent nurses in an expedited manner while maintaining the integrity and quality of the nursing education provided, which our accelerated program most certainly accomplishes.” Among the admission requirements for Florida State College of Nursing accelerated nursing degree programs are a completed baccalaureate level degree or higher from a regionally accredited college or university. Maintenance of at least a 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale) cumulative GPA on all college work. Satisfying the Florida State University admission requirements for students seeking a second degree. Veterans host annual reunion S S ept. 14 The Franklin County Veterans will have their 22nd annual reunion on Sept 14 at the Armory in Apalachicola. They will start about 7 a.m. A grilled chicken dinner, with sides, will be served at noon. Ladies, bring a dessert if you can. “This reunion is for all the Franklin County veterans, of all wars or campaigns,” organizers Charles Wilson and John Sack said. “We invite all of our veterans to come join us for good food and fellowship, and veterans, bring your families. We have hats for all veterans who are present.” An invitation is extended to anyone interested in sponsoring the veterans dinner. All donations are welcome. For more information, call Wilson at 653-6482 or John Sack at 670-8375 or email to sack@fairpoint. net

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Summer gardening on the coast can be a challenge. Climbing spinach is a new vegetable that repays a few square feet of garden space with delicious greens and a treat for the eye. Climbing spinach (Basella alba), also known as Malabar spinach, Ceylon spinach, Indian spinach, Saan Choy, Shan Tsoi, Luo Kai, Shu Chieh, Lo Kwai and “the red vine,” is easy to grow and versatile in the kitchen. The beautiful vine is unrelated to true spinach but produces a bumper crop of large leaves that are remarkably similar in taste. Unlike spinach, this plant is heat-tolerant and thrives locally in full sun or light shade. Native to India and Indonesia, the plant is used in traditional cuisines from Japan to Africa. It has also been introduced to South America and the Caribbean. Common Malabar spinach has yellowish stems and green leaves and is a pleasing enough plant, but it’s the redstemmed cultivar “rubra” that really catches the eye. Thick red stems contrast wonderfully with twoto four-inch-long dark green leaves mottled with red veins. Malabar spinach grows 8 to 10 feet tall and wide and can easily grow a foot a day. Provide a fence or trellis for support. The vine produces tiny pink owers that develop into pretty little purple berries. The juice from the berries is a natural food coloring. Malabar spinach prefers a humus-rich, sandy loam. It may be a perennial here, but just in case, dry some of the berries and store them in a screw-top jar to plant in the early spring. Start seeds in pots and transplant established seedlings. This plant is insect and disease resistant. The succulent leaves and stem tips are rich in vitamins A and C and are a good source of iron and calcium. They may be eaten raw in salads, boiled, steamed, stir-fried or added to soups, stews, tofu dishes and curries. You can also add them to quiche, omelets, turnovers and potpies. Use as a substitute for any leafy greens. The sprouted seeds are a tasty addition to salads and sandwiches. It has a thickening effect much like okra when added to soups and stews. Traditionally, the plant is chewed to relieve mouth ulcers. The cooked roots are thought to curb diarrhea, while the cooked leaves and stems are a mild, effective laxative. The sap is used to treat acne and soften the skin. Ongoing research is examining the traditional role of Malabar spinach as a remedy for infertility in men. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu S ept 05 90 75 30 % F ri, S ept 06 87 75 30 % S a t S ept 07 86 73 40 % Sun, S ept 08 85 74 10 % M on, S ept 09 86 74 0 % T ues S ept 10 85 73 10 % W ed S ept 11 85 73 0 % Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y Thursday, September 5, 2013 Page 8 SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Gag grouper are starting to show up in shallow water this week. Good reports from Mexico Beach and south of the Cape are coming in daily. Live pinfish or now, live finger mullet are great baits and plentiful still. Kingfish are still hanging out around near shore structures and in the channels as well. A few flounder have been caught in 20 feet of water this week, so the fall feeding patterns are taking effect. Redfish have invaded our coast this week and the past weekend. Many good slot-sized fish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge using all types of bait. However, tides will be a factor here. Scallops are still plentiful as we enter into the last month of the season. Presnell’s channel, the pot holes and the dog end channel are all holding good sized shells right now. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The state butter y has been spotted here, well north of its normal range. Naturalist Rod Gasche of Carrabelle, who spotted the butter y, said it is the rst time he has observed the species here in 27 years of nature watching. The zebra longwing was declared Florida’s state butter y in 1996 but rarely ventures into the Panhandle. A denizen of tropical hammocks, moist forests and elds, the normal range of the black and yellow beauty is South America north through Central America, West Indies and Mexico, to South Texas and peninsular Florida. It has been observed in New Mexico, Nebraska and South Carolina on rare occasions. According to the webpage for the Sarasota chapter of the North American Butter y Association, this has been a bumper year for zebra longwings, which might explain why one has wandered so far from home. “My yard is currently over-run with zebra longwings – have never had so many at one time!” one commenter wrote. “Toward evening, they gather en masse with folded wings on the bare hanging branches of the weeping bottlebrush tree in my backyard. They hang there until I can’t see them in the dark and by morning, they are gone. This has been happening every evening for the last several weeks.” Zebras are unusual because they eat pollen, a characteristic of primitive butter y species. Because of their high protein diet, they are long-lived for a butter y or moth, reaching 6 months of age, half of that spent as a cocoon or caterpillar. Zebras roost in groups of up to 70 at night and return to the same roost every evening. The males can detect a female in her cocoon and wait patiently for her to emerge and mate. When the emergence is near, a large group of hopeful suitors will congregate around the chrysalis. Over time, weaker males are chased away until only two remain clinging to the sleeping beauty. When the emergence begins, they ght for her favors, and the stronger mates with her before she takes her rst ight and then deposits a repellant chemical on her abdomen to discourage other males and protect his genetic material. She lays ve to 15 eggs on leaf buds or leaves of a passion ower vine. After emerging, the caterpillars feed at night on the plant. Adults gather ower nectar and pollen along a set foraging route or “trap-line.” Favorite plants include lantana and shepherd’s needle. Though this butter y is not considered imperiled, threats to its habitat are increasing because of development, especially in the Southern United States and Mexico. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Franklin the peregrine falcon came to the Florida Wild Mammal Association from St. George Island after being hit by a car and suffering a chest and wing injury. The bird has made great progress but has only recovered 60 percent of its ying ability and cannot be released. Franklin is now a permanent resident of the association and requires a special cage. If you can help sponsor the construction of his new home, email Chris Beatty at choppaota@ aol.com and put Franklin Funds in the subject line. Donations may be dropped at the of ce of the Apalachicola Times at 129 Commerce St. in Apalachicola. Peregrine falcons are one of the most widely distributed birds in the world and are found on every continent except Antarctica. The name comes from the Latin verb “peregrinus,” which means to wander. They are the fastest ying bird, diving at up to 200 miles per hour. During the mid-20th century, peregrine falcons fell victim to DDT poisoning and nearly disappeared in North America. Better pesticide controls have led to a rebound in the population, which is now estimated to be more than 1,600 nesting pairs. Peregrines, which mate for life, are also known as duck hawks, because their main food is small birds, ducks and bats. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Capt. Nathan Donahoe took this picture of an unusual red sh caught in Apalachicola Bay on Aug. 26. The photo has not been altered. JESSICA BEATTY | Special to the Times Island bird needs a special home ROD GASCHE | Special to the Times Zebra longwing feeds on a garden ower. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Malabar spinach is thriving in Dan Sangaree’s garden. Climbing spinach easy to grow, edible BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Unusual butter y spotted in Carrabelle SPOT-ON

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section G u l fs i de I G A S T U D E NT A TH L E TE S O F T H E W E E K S P O N SO R Homet o wn P roud (850)653-9695 4514197 L a d y S e a h a w k P l a y e r o f t h e W e e k i s # 1 5 s o p h o m o r e C a s e y T u c k e r a l s o k n o w n a s S un s h i ne C oac h H i la r y S t a n t o n s a i d T u c k e r “r e a l l y s t e p p e d f o r h e r t e a m o n Au g 2 9 vs F A M U S h e i s a s tr o n g s e r v e r a n d e a r n e d f o u r a c e s f o r h e r t e a m S h e i s a c o m m i t t e d p l a y e r a n d w e a r e p r o u d t o h a v e h e r o n t h e S e a h a w k j u n i o r v a r s i t y v ol le y ba l l t e a m Ca s e y T u c k er BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Page 9 Thursday, September 5, 2013 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Seahawks coach Aaron York is stressing to his players that it’s one step at a time as the team builds for the future. “Our kids continued to ght during the game until the end. We are going to continue to work hard at practice and continue to get better,” he said as he looked back on the team’s opening game loss 66-7 at home Friday night against the South Walton Seahawks. “We are stressing to the kids, they are laying the foundation for the future success of the program. We have this week to get healthy and continue our march for success,” York said. The Seahawks have a bye this Friday night. South Walton Seahawks coach Phil Tisa had just one win last year in his rst season, a victory over Franklin County in the nal game of the year. On Friday night, with 14 returning players, Tisa’s squad picked up where they left off, cruising to a second straight win over the Seahawks. “I told them ‘Enjoy it tonight, but tomorrow you start preparing for somebody else,’” Tisa said. “‘Don’t get complacent, and try to get better.’” South Walton took the opening kickoff into Franklin County territory, and with 9:13 left in the rst quarter, senior running back Anthony Gundrum trotted in from nine yards out. Senior kicker Chandler Parrett nailed the extra point, to draw rst blood. An 11-yard touchdown pass two minutes later from junior quarterback Johnathan Ortner to junior wide receiver Alex Smith, and a twopoint conversion pass from Smith to junior running back Carter Edwards, gave South Walton a 15-0 lead. A minute later, senior quarterback Sage Roberts connected on a 15-yard touchdown pass to Smith. Three minutes later, Ortner hooked up with senior Vinnie Ciurleo for a 28-yard touchdown pass and a 28-0 lead after one quarter. York’s Seahawks opened the second quarter with their rst sustained drive of the game, aided by a 25-yard tear by sophomore Trenton Lee. Back-to-back rst downs by junior Cole Wheeler gave Franklin County a third-and-1, and senior quarterback Logan McLeod snuck it from there for the team’s rst score of the year. “Offensively, we hit a couple of big pass plays, one to tight end Trenton Lee for over 20 yards, but we did not get the running game going like we did against Wewa,” York said. “I think our depth hurt us against South Walton.” South Walton dampened the hopes of the home crowd with 7:50 left in the half, when senior running back Zack Reese ran in from 14 yards out, for a 34-7 lead. “We played disciplined defense,” Tisa said. “I saw some good things tonight. We played up-tempo like we wanted to, and I saw areas of improvement.” With four minutes left in the half, junior running back Harrison Schaffer scored from 11 yards out. After an interception thwarted Franklin County’s drive, Gundrum ran it in from 35 yards out to get the running clock going, and with a minute left in the half, Reese ran into the end zone from 40 yards away for a 54-7 halftime lead. Gundrum scored both of South Walton’s rushing touchdowns in the second half. His second TD of the night came from 20 yards away with eight minutes left in the third, and his third and nal one was from 10 yards out, with about 10 minutes left in the game. “If I had to recap this game, I would say I was disappointed by the outcome,” York said. “I thought we would have a better showing than what we did. Youth of our football team came out; we had a lot of missed assignments. Several times we lost coverage responsibilities, and missed tackles continued to haunt us.” York cited the play of senior linebacker Alex Causey, who had eight solo tackles and two assist tackles, and seventh-grader Tyler Farmer, who had ve solo tackles and two assists. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks volleyball teams both got wins last week in their opener at FAMU Aug. 29. Coach Hilary Stanton’s JV team, assisted by Tara Klink, won their rst two games, eking out a 25-23 win the rst, and then a 2521 victory in the second. “We were very proud of them. They played hard and fought for the win,” Stanton said. The varsity match-up was intense in the best three out of ve. Franklin County won 25-17 in the rst, which sent them into the second set with loads of con dence. But the Seahawks fell 24-26, and then 14-25, to nd themselves trailing 2-1. “After losing the next two games, coaches Tara and I both were so proud that they never got down on themselves and fought till the end,” Stanton said. “The Lady Hawks’ drive, skill and commitment to win paid off! The Lady Hawks won the fourth game 26-24, sending the match into a decisive game ve, which is played to only 15 points. “The game was very suspenseful. But the girls wouldn’t give up and earned their win,” Stanton said, as the Hawks won 15-10. “I expect to see lots of Seahawk fans at our rst district game against Bozeman tonight. Nothing gets the kids playing like hearing a crowd cheer for them to win,” she said. Franklin County is at home in a district matchup against Bozeman tonight, Sept. 5, with no JV game and a varsity game at 6 p.m. On Tuesday, Sept. 10, the team is again at home for a district game, against Liberty County. The JV game is at 6 p.m. and the varsity at 7 p.m. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A newly formed girls golf team at Franklin County High School opens play today, Sept. 5. The team travels to Hilaman Golf Course in Tallahassee in a four-way match against Lincoln, Wakulla and Florida High that gets underway at 3 p.m. Under the direction of Scott Collins and assistant Spencer Tolbert, the team features a roster of two juniors, Katie Seger and Calli Westbrook; freshman Megan Collins; eighthgraders Marjorie Morrow, Hannah Westbrook, Harper Westbrook and Allison Yowell; and seventh-grader Melanie Collins. Play continues at 3 p.m. Sept. 19 at Capital City Country Club in Tallahassee in a match against Leon, Wakulla and Chiles high schools. At 3 p.m. Sept. 23, the team is at Jake Gaither Golf Course against Godby, Richards and Chiles. The team plays its rst home competition at St. James Bay on Oct. 3, against John Paul II. They play St. James Bay again on Oct. 10, against Wakulla. The Big Bend tourney is Oct. 7, with districts Oct. 15. Rock By The Sea golf tourney Saturday The Rock By The Sea Charity Golf Tournament will be at St. James Bay Golf Resort, 151 Laughing Gull Lane, Carrabelle, on Saturday, Sept. 7, the weekend of the Rock by the Sea Battle of the Bands. The format for play will be a modi ed Florida Scramble, with a 9 a.m. shotgun start, played with four-player teams. A $10,000 hole-in-one contest is part of the tournament. Cost will be $125 per player and includes cart, green fees, amenities bag, lunch and admission to the threenight Battle of the Bands music event. Register at www. rockbythesea.org or contact David Allen at dmjja1700@gmail.com or 927-2883. Sports SHORT Volleyball girls down FAMU in opener Seahawks debut girls golf team PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Seahawk line is developing its skills. Below, freshman trumpeter Melody Hat eld performs for the Seahawk band. South Walton defeats a young Franklin squad

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, September 5, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 G ar d e n T re e an d L a w n C are F r e e E st i m a t e s ( 8 50 ) 7 20 1 0 9 3 B O T A N I C A L C R E A T I ON S Coupon Expir es: 9-30-13 CODE: AP00 of Inspector General and prosecuted in federal court in Panama City. A statement of facts, also signed by Noblit, Murrell and Mountin, ac companies the plea agree ment and outlines Nobilt’s misdeeds. The statement said Noblit was promoted in July 2008 from housing manager/occupancy spe cialist to director, which enabled her to receive an American Express card to cover operational ex penses for the housing authority. The statement said after American Express requested payment from the executive director who preceded Noblit, the only individuals with access to the account and whose name was still connected with the credit card, “HUD became aware of suspi cious purchases” on the monthly statement. Between June 2011 and May 2012, Noblit made about $8,871 in personal purchases, said the state ment of facts. In all, she racked up about $11,126 worth of personal charges, based on a review of Amer ican Express and various department store records. Personal expenses in cluded purchase of food, junior clothing, tools, res taurant dining, dental care, a theme park visit and ve hicle renishing. The statement of fact went on to say when she was interviewed at her residence by HUD inves tigators in August 2012, a month after she was red as housing director, Noblit said her husband had re paid the unauthorized charges a week earlier, when he went to collect her personal belongings from the housing author ity ofce. She said he de livered cashier checks for approximately $11,000 as payment for the charges. Noblit “admitted she began using the American Express card for personal expenses in 2011, but in tended to repay the expens es,” reads the statement of fact. “She explained that she was unable to ‘co-min gle’ her personal money with the (housing author ity) money, and wanted to repay the charges from her paycheck, but did not know how to do so.” First established in 1962, the housing authority oversees 54 public housing units on two sites within the city. Earlier this year, Steve Lanier, an Apalachicola native and former comp troller at Weems Memorial Hospital, was named as the housing director, replacing interim director Paul Mills. Lanier completed a Navy career a few years ago in Key West. EMBEZZLEMENT from page A1 into ofce after the Thurs day, Sept. 5, city commis sion meeting. “I would like to thank the citizens of Carrabelle for their participation in the election process,” La Paz said. “I am very hon ored to have the support of the people for carrying on my public service.” “I’m looking forward to working with the new com mission board and looking forward to working with the city staff on projects that we currently have in the works,” she said. La Paz said high on her agenda is working to make sure the city’s Community Redevelopment Area is brought into compliance with Florida statute and can assist in downtown revitalization. “I reach out for public input; I want public input,” she said. “I would encour age the public to partici pate in the city commis sion meetings. I’m only one voice on that city commis sion, but I’m ready to con front the issues and I will continue my effort to make informed decisions that af fect the city’s future.” Massey said she is ea ger to get to her top prior ity: helping to bolster what the city can offer the city’s youth. “I’m happy that the peo ple from Carrabelle come out and voted for me,” she said. “I’m going to do my best, and I’m going to lis ten to what the people got to say and try to get some thing in here for our youth. And try to keep utility bills down without raising rates,” she said. “First thing I really want to work on is getting a grant and get something for our youth, and get some jobs in here, which is not only what the city of Car rabelle needs but what the whole county needs,” Massey said. She thanked her op ponents for their efforts during the campaign. “I like every one of them and think me and Miss Brenda La Paz will work well to gether,” she said. “I think anyone of them would have done a good job. “Right now, I’m going to sit back and see what’s go ing on and go from there.” CARRABELLE from page A1 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A contest funded by Tourist De velopment Council monies has been vandalized. The Salty Geocache Challenge, launched in December 2011, is a recre ational opportunity for outdoor enthusi asts visiting Franklin County. Geocaching, which combines the terms “geographical” and “cache,” is an outdoor adventure that sends seekers on a treasure hunt for containers of trin kets and prizes. Participants use a Global Positioning System receiver to hide and seek containers called “geocaches” or “caches.” A typical cache is a waterproof container containing a logbook. In 2011, Franklin County became one of the rst localities in the nation to have a geocaching contest or challenge with a prize. The TDC provided funds to buy collectable geocoins inscribed with East point’s ZIP code as a prize for cachers who complete the challenge and to promote caching in the county. Cachers frequently locate caches in an area by plugging the ZIP code into a search engine. Since that time, many other tour ist areas have followed in the county’s footsteps. In the Salty Challenge, numerical clues to the location of vouchers needed to collect a coin were hidden in some of the approximately 200 geocaches within the county. Once the voucher is obtained, it can be traded for the coin at either the Apalachicola Bay or Carrabelle chambers of commerce or the island visitor center. Since its creation, more than 100 out door enthusiasts have visited to county to track down the clues that would win them one of 200 souvenir coins. Some have made multiple trips to complete the game, and many have stayed overnight. This Labor Day, a pair of cachers con tacted the contest organizer to report some of the clues had been removed or defaced so that they were unusable. Since the challenge was last complet ed on Aug. 2, the damage must have oc curred sometime last month. Labels with clues were either removed entirely from cache containers or partly scraped away. The visiting cachers, who had traveled from Jacksonville to complete the Salty Challenge, were able to nish their hunt and collect a coin but only after much hard work. Caches in Apalachicola and on St. George Island were vandalized. The vandalism is typical of problems that have begun to arise for geocachers nationwide. There have always been rare inci dents of theft within the game, but this summer, Groundspeak, the corporation that organizes geocaching, sued to have a website taken down that urged people to extort money from cache owners. Muggled.net was a controversial web site encouraging players to steal geo caches and hold them ransom. Muggled is the term geocachers use for a cache that has been removed or damaged by an unknown person. The jargon is borrowed from the popular Harry Potter stories, referring to persons who do not possess magical powers. Alabama resident Gerald Roman posted the Muggled.net webpage and a lm on YouTube explaining geocaching and urging people to steal geocaches and demand $10 from the owner for their safe return. He maintained that geocaches, once placed, were abandoned and belonged to nobody. Groundspeak disagreed and had set litigation in motion. But, in June, Ro man voluntarily took down the website and the YouTube posting after he said he received threats to himself and his family. He apologized for the extortion scheme but said he had only wanted to add a twist to the popular game, which is one of the fastest growing hobbies in the world. Franklin County’s Salty Challenge was temporarily taken ofine until the dam age could be repaired but is now up and running. This is not the rst instance of theft or vandalism of caches in Franklin County. There have been repeated thefts in East point over the last three years, but the in cidents appear to be unrelated. Vandals strike TDC geocaching contest SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S This is the design of the coin presented as a prize to people who successfully complete the Salty Geocache Challenge. Alabama resident Gerald Roman posted the Muggled.net webpage and a lm on YouTube explaining geocaching and urging people to steal geocaches and demand $10 from the owner for their safe return. He maintained that geocaches, once placed, were abandoned and belonged to nobody.

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, September 5, 2013 an ad campaign formerly funded by BP money. “The county could probably leverage as much as 3 percent, but we have limited our request to 2,” he said. He began with a short history of the TDC’s activities and their effect on tourism. He said rev enue from the original bed tax had inched up slowly from its inception in 2005 until the 200809 recession. “In 2010, it started inching up again when the oil spill lled our rooms with work ers,” Blair said. He said bed tax revenue in creased by 6 percent in 2011 and jumped 14 percent in 2012. “That was the end of the BP money that funded the county with $1.2 million a year for those two years. We don’t have the numbers yet for the 2012-13 fis cal year, but I can tell you they will be down,” said Blair, citing a rainy summer as part of the problem. He said hits on county websites are down, too. Blair distributed lists of places the TDC has advertised and a breakdown of the use of funds since 2005. Of the $6.5 million collected since 2005, $4.6 million was spent on fund ing for community projects. Blair provided a breakdown of such funding, including almost $1.3 million for grants to non profits, $750,000 in visitor cen ter funding, such as renovating the Coombs Armory, $500,000 to acquire the Lombardi seafood property, a half-million for park improvements, and $426,000 for beach cleanup. Blair said tourists would not notice a change in the taxes they pay. He said visitors are already a major part of the tax base and estimated they con tribute $850,000 to the general revenue fund in sales and gas taxes each year. Blair said tourists spend $40 million on lodging here annually and half that much on food. He said more than 50 percent of the proposed tax increase would fund “out of area promotions.” Blair said the TDC met with the SMAART Committee, an ad hoc group addressing restora tion of the bay, to get seafood in dustry input on how the money could be used to promote the maritime trades. Ideas shared included funding a “seafood ambassador” program and re cycling oyster shells from res taurants for use in the shelling program. Jackel said the purpose of doubling the tax was to promote year-round sustainability. “Nobody likes a tax but the beauty of this is that 99.5 per cent of the people in this room will never pay a penny of this one,” she said. Jackel said visitors to the county use parks and roads, and it is fair they should help pay to maintain that infrastructure. She said the increase would help the entire tax base. Strong feelings, pro and con The tax increase drew sup port from a number of quarters. Apalachicola Commissioner Frank Cook and Carrabelle Commissioner Cal Allen both encouraged the commission to boost the bed tax outright. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson spoke on behalf of HC OLA and said that without TDC support, the annual festival celebrating African American culture would probably not take place. Rex Pennycuff, owner of Eastpoint’s Fisherman’s Choice and the newest member of the TDC, called the tax hike fair. “On the aspect of bringing new people in, (the existing bed tax) has worked,” he said. “And it has expanded the season of my business.” Alligator Point realtor Paul Parker, a member of the TDC, said he “personally witnessed a 31 percent increase in lodging revenues. This is one of Frank lin County’s best opportunities for economic diversification. The purpose of the increase is to eliminate the offseason. The biggest growth we’ve already seen is in the shoulder seasons of fall and spring.” There were naysayers too. Ken Schroeder, owner of Apalachicola’s Bryant House bed and breakfast, disagreed with Blair that a bed tax in crease would go unnoticed. “People ask about the tourist tax,” he said. “There is no free lunch. If you think we can fund this county on the backs of tour ists, we are going to lose that battle.” Schroeder said the amount of time his guests spend here already has decreased from a weekend to a single night. He suggested adding a quarter percentage point to the current sales tax if more money is need ed, or reallocating more of the existing bed tax to fight the off season slump. “I voted for the original tax. It was a good idea. I don’t think we’ve spent the money the way we should have,” he said. Bruce Hall, of Apalachicola, said she owns a rental house on St. George Island. “I don’t think the tax already received has been properly used by the TDC. I would like to see the county promoted in a different way,” she said. “Target your audience and be respectful of your resources. Our environ ment is fragile; look at what has happened to the bay.” Lynn Wilson, owner of Apala chicola’s Coombs House Inn, said doubling the sales tax is “a serious concern. I feel con fusion in my heart and soul. We have to explain to the tourists. I have concerns about the man ner in which some of the money was used in the past.” Wilson sought a seat on the TDC board for a representa tive of Apalachicola’s 12 hotels, motels and bed-and-breakfasts. “Our expertise is never includ ed in the TDC, which makes me sad,” she said. Commissioner Smokey Par rish read a letter from the Apala chicola hotel owners reiterating Wilson’s plea for a TDC seat. “Apalachicola has never been allowed to be represented,” he said. “Until we address these inequalities, I can’t support the tax.” Ketan Vora, who recently purchased the majority of units in the WaterStreet Hotel, also opposed the tax increase. Vora said he is “a designated expert in the field of hospitality” and has testified in state and federal courts as an expert witness. “People do ask about taxes,” he said. “You may have noticed the people who are in favor of the tax don’t own a hotel. We are dealing with the guests firsthand, and it will become an issue. “Travel is already down. The timing of this is not appropriate with gas increases, rain and mil itary furloughs,” he said. “It’s very convenient to push (the tax increase) off on visitors, but when they walk away with their money, you will see a domino effect. I think there has been a disconnect in how (TDC funds) have been spent in the past.” Jackel conceded that “we have made some mistakes. The TDC is learning. We’re never going to have 100 percent agree ment, but that’s no reason to kill this because we have made errors.” Shuler said he would report at special commission meeting today, Sept. 5, on whether the referendum can be placed on the November ballot. After the referendum was or dered, Lockley moved to bring the TDC administration, now handled under a private sector contract with Blair’s firm, un der direct control of the county. Parrish seconded the motion. “This needs to be worked out better,” Lockley said. “We’re getting a lot of complaints about people in Apalachicola not being represented on the board.” Parrish asked if contracts for vendors, which comprise up ward of 40 percent of the total expenditures, had ever been put out for public bid. “I just want a process where everybody has the opportunity to bid,” he said. “One of the big gest complaints about the TDC is transparency. It shouldn’t be dominated by one section of the county.” Blair assured commission ers bids had been sought for contracted work. BED TAX from page A1 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, September 5, 2013 The Times | A11 91972T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA’ CASE NO. 12-196-CA CIVIL DIVISION CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STALVEY LAND COMPANY, LLC, Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23, 2013, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerk’s Office, of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, on September 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., the following described proptery: Lot 9, Block W of LANARK BEACH UNIT NO. 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number: 14-07S-04W3131-000W-0090) Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON July 23rd, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk LAWYER FOR PLAINTIFF: Mary Ellen Davis, Esq Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 (850)926-6003 September 5, 12, 2013 92264T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2010-CA -000486 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE RESIDENTIAL ASSET SECURITIZATION TRUST 2005-A8CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-H UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005 Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM S. KENDRICK A/K/A WILL S. KENDRICK, CONSTANCE M. KENDRICK; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 12, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000486, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE RESIDENTIAL ASSET SECURITIZATION TRUST 2005-A8CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-H UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005 is Plaintiff and WILLIAM S. KENDRICK A/K/A WILL S. KENDRICK; CONSTANCE M. KENDRICK; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash INSIDE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 17th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 17 A DISTANCE OF 2820.33 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 1501.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #426 1) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 54 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 590.60 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 381.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 117.14 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED # 4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 282.51 FEET TO A RE ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 46 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 233.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 286.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED # 4261) ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE. ROAD S-67 SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY AND THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 1860.08 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 30.88 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 26 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 30.88 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 279.18 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 46 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 234.96 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 295.97 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 53 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 115.38 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 135.58 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 590.60 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 546.16 FEET TO A RE-ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261) TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of August, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Terry E Creamer As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone No. (904)6538861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-9558771 (TDD): if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954)382-3486 Fax: (954)382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 10-13677 OWB September 5, 12, 2013 92296T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012-CA000305 CADENCE BANK, N.A., “I don’t think the tax already received has been properly used by the TDC. I would like to see the county promoted in a different way. Target your audience and be respectful of your resources. Our environment is fragile; look at what has happened to the bay.” Bruce Hall who owns a rental house on St. George Island “People ask about the tourist tax. There is no free lunch. If you think we can fund this county on the backs of tourists, we are going to lose that battle.” Ken Schroeder owner of Apalachicola’s Bryant House bed and breakfast

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, September 5, 2013 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r ts h a v e i d e n t i ed w h a t t h e y f ee l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s ec t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h P o r t S t J o e Ap a la c h i c o la C ap e S an B la s S t G e o rg e I s lan d C ar r a b e l l e an d s u r r o u n din g ar e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249158 $42,750 St. Geor ge Island 451 4227 ISLAND FORECLOSURE V ery af fordable b uildable lot on beautiful St. Geor ge Island, outstanding in v estment potential & the opportunity to o wn your piece of the island, b uilding location can pro vide a bay vie w surv e y a v ailable, W est Bayshore Dri v e, Listed by Michael Billings. John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249082 $225,000 St Geor ge Island SEA GODDESS L i g h t a n d a i r y 3 B R 2 B A i s l a n d h o m e p r iv a t e s c e n i c f r e s h w a t e r p o n d l a rg e d e c k 2 n d l e v e l s u n d e c k c h e e r f u l l y f u r n i s h e d g r o u n d l e v e l l a u n d r y / s t o r a g e r o o m s h c l e a n i n g a r e a & o u t s i d e s h o w e r u n d e r h o m e p a r k i n g o n p a d W e s t P i n e A v e n u e L i s t e d b y J a n i e Bu r k e ! !! T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! (850)22 7 -1290 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D !! 4514224 L oc a t ed on a peninsula within the ga t ed Plan ta tion c ommunit y and surr ounded b y beautiful views of the B a y and marsh, this home is the per f ec t peac eful plac e t o enjo y na tur e and t o in vit e o v ernigh t guests t o their priv a t e quar t ers! Main house includes living and dining r ooms k it chen, mast er suit e with out door sho w er scr eened por ch with indoor/out door r eplac e G uest wing includes 3 bedr ooms living r oom, morning k it chen and laundr y! V er y priv a t e out door hot tub ac c essible fr om both ar eas of this unique home o v erlooks the marsh with outstanding views T his c ust om built home with beautiful c abinets pine oors/trim, lots of c ar eful details giving a f eeling of a secluded geta w a y w as lo vingly cr af t ed b y the o wners C o v er ed gar age w a t er ltr a tion syst em, cir c ular driv e beautiful landsc aping mak e this a must see home! S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .1431P elic anL ane .com !! "$$ "$$ % ( % % % ( ( & % ( % % # # % & % # % % % $ % % , # # % # % # % % $ ( & % % % # % % + % % % # $ % % # % ) ) % ( % # # % & % % & % ( ( % “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose dad became the rst-ever American citizen ordained as a Buddhist monk? Beyonce, Uma Thurman, Cher, Mae West 2) What’s the yo-yo trick when it’s thrown down and stays down? Sleeper, Walk the dog, Pinwheel, Rock the baby 3) Who runs or ran Philtrum Press, a small publishing company? Hillary Clinton, Pat Robertson, Pat Sajak, Stephen King 4) When Life magazine debuted in 1936, what was its cover price? Nickel, Dime, Quarter, 50 cents 5) What car was Global Motors associated with in the 1980s? DeLorean, Yugo, Rambler, Renault 6) Whose nickname is “Pearl of the Antilles”? Cuba, Madeira, Hawaii, Nova Scotia 7) In 1947 what honoree said, “I want to thank everyone for making this night necessary”? Berra, Cooper, Lindbergh, Truman 8) What is the most common name for counties in the U.S.? Washington, Madison, Jefferson, Lincoln 9) Excluding Alaska which state has the most roadless area? Wyoming, Colorado, California, Utah 10) Which tire company developed the “Tiger Paws” mascot? Cooper, Uniroyal, Goodyear, Firestone 11) The world’s rst speed limit was in 1903 England at what m.p.h.? 3, 7, 11, 20 12) Which University of Texas campus became accredited as the nation’s rst to offer belly dancing? Austin, Tyler, Arlington, Brownsville 13) What kind of Ferrari did Thomas Magnum (Tom Selleck) drive in the popular TV series? 110 XT, 308 GTB, 397 RS, 630 S 14) Where is the National Hobo Convention that elects a king and queen of the road? Iowa, Texas, Pennsylvania, Georgia ANSWERS 1) Uma Thurman. 2) Sleeper. 3) Stephen King. 4) Dime. 5) Yugo. 6) Cuba. 7) Berra. 8) Washington. 9) California. 10) Uniroyal. 11) 20. 12) Arlington. 13) 308 GTB. 14) Iowa. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Special to The Times Are you ready to take your business to the next level? Want to expand, change focus or need to resolve old issues that are holding you back? Join us for the Small Business Resource Expo on Sept. 16-17. Presented by the Small Business Development Center at FAMU, and the Apalachicola Bay and Carrabelle Area chambers of commerce, Small Business Development Center Gulf Coast State College Veteran’s Outreach Center, the expo is to help small business owners discover resources to expand or refocus their business, bring business owners together to meet and share issues and ideas, and aid potential small business owners in getting started. Technical assistance is available in the areas of social media, business planning, disaster planning and one-toone business counseling. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 16 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Environmental Education and Training Center in Eastpoint. On Sept. 16, the discussion classes offered include, from 12:30-1:30 p.m., “Ideas for Being Self Employed,” led by Christine Urban; from 1:302:30 p.m., “Business Disaster Planning”; and from 3-5 p.m., “ Facebook for Business,” with attendees asked to bring their laptops. One-on-one appointments are from 12:30-5 p.m. There will also be a representative from the Small Business Development Center Veteran’s Outreach Center and tours available of the MAC, a self-contained RV decked out with the latest technology to help get a business running after a disaster. From 6-8 p.m., a meet and greet with other local business area owners and entrepreneurs will be at the Gibson Inn. On Sept. 17, Small Business Development experts Christine and Keith will be available to come to a business on location for one-on-one appointments. To schedule one-to-one sessions, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce 653-9419 or the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce 697-2585. By TEVI sS PAGE Special to the Times We are surely in the full swing of things. As the rst week wound down, we began to get the hang of our school again. Our bell schedule was no longer an issue, and the new teachers were settling in. New students began acting as though they were feeling more at ease with the rest of our student body, while some returning students acted rushed and confused. Week One was lled with friends reuniting, but Week Two was completely different. We are settling in to our classes and stomping on other people’s nerves. There is a light tension circling the school, which has been lingering since our loss to Wewa at the rst game of the year. The teachers are beginning to assign homework, and tests are being administered. Friday we had a pep rally; it was just what the school needed. We came together and cheered our teams on while having fun with the games the cheerleaders arranged for us. It was amazing seeing the entire high school covering all the bleachers from one wall to the other. Our school has grown as we have, and seeing all the students gives our senior class a bittersweet feeling. As we soar high with just over 60 students, we have underclassmen learning to y with over 100 students. This is going to be an amazing year; we have great teachers, a great principal, great ofce personnel and amazing students (especially the senior class). I cannot wait to see how we grow together in the coming months. Go Hawks!GG etting the hang of school again HAWK TALK Small business expo Sept. 16-17