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The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

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Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00232

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date:
June 20, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID:
UF00100380:00232

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, August 1, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 14 Aquaculture leases back on the table State of cials take cautious approach By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In a lengthy and detailed face-toface meeting with local seafood industry leaders Monday afternoon, Florida aquaculture of cials signaled they planned to take a cautious approach to opening up Apalachicola Bay to small oyster harvesting leases. The meeting with members of the county’s oyster recovery team, an ad hoc group hosted by University of Florida of cials in the wake of the BP oil spill, drew a large audience at the Apalachicola Community Center at Battery Park. The topic under discussion was a request set to go before Gov. Rick Scott and his cabinet to reactivate four aquaculture use zones (AUZs) that were part of a previously planned, but abandoned, aquaculture leasing project in the aftermath of Hurricane Elena in the late 1980s. The proposal would allow the use of the full water column in all four lease areas, originally platted in February Charter school bucks statewide trend By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School swam against the statewide current last week as it posted its second consecutive A grade, its fourth in the last ve years. The grade for the kindergarten through eighth grade school was achieved even as the number of A schools throughout the state dropped sharply, from 1,242 in 2012 to 760 last year. The number of A schools went from being 48 percent of the total number of schools to 29 percent, a decline of almost 20 percentage points. “We were extremely proud that we maintained the A status and A ranking,” Principal Chimene Johnson said. “I feel like it comes from the support of our volunteer board of directors, our students, our staff, our parents, who all focus on the mission of our school, to reach the child’s social and academic potential. “It was an outstanding effort. A lot of team effort went into play. We’re very thrilled and excited for our students. Everyone is focused on the mission of our school.” The ABC School produced a total of 614 points, well above the minimum of 590 needed to earn an A. “It is comfortable, but there’s always room for growth,” Johnson said. Because Franklin County High School is a combination kindergarten through 12th grade school, its grade is pending until December. As it stands now, the school has produced 504 points and will be assigned additional points for student participation Twice the rain leads to runoff woes By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com July has been a wet month. The average monthly rainfall for July is 7.3 inches, making it the wettest month of the year. Though the record of 18 inches set in 1984 was not broken, the county almost doubled the expected rainfall with more than 12 inches of rain. Local residents with rain gauges anecdotally reported much higher amounts of rain in some areas of the county. Rod Gasche of Carrabelle, who watched both a digital and a traditional rain gauge, received almost 12 inches of rain between July 18 and 25. Recorded rainfall exceeded an inch at Apalachicola Regional Airport on July 3, 4, 19 and 22. Another A for ABC School By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com It was a perfect four-for-four for Franklin County High School junior Morgan Martin Saturday night, as she carried home the title of this year’s Miss Florida Seafood. The 16-year-old daughter of Henry and Teresa Ann Martin of Apalachicola won each of the four categories — Interview, Talent, Poise and Appearance, and Casual Wear — to win the prized tiara, especially signi cant because this year’s pageant is the 50th anniversary of the state’s oldest and largest maritime festival. MISS FLORIDA SEAFOOD 2013 See AQUACULTURE A2 Queen sweep PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Morgan Martin reacts to winning the title of Miss Florida Seafood 2013. Martin dances to Miss Florida Seafood crown RUNNER-UP SAMANTHA SHIVER SAVANNAH COOK ASHLEY CARROLL AALIYAH WEST See QUEEN A5 See RAIN A2 See ABC SCHOOL A5 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 Looking for Mr. Brown, A10 Dance in Carrabelle Saturday night A free dance will be at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice. King sh Shootout this weekend The 10th annual King sh Shootout will be Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 3-4 at C-Quarters Marina, 501 U.S. 98. The Captain’s Meeting is at 6 p.m. Registration is $250 per boat. Online registration is at www.c-quartersmarina. com/shootout.html. For information call 697-8400. St. George Island Sizzler coming up On Aug. 10, the 16th annual St. George Island Sizzler 5K Race and One Mile Fun Run will be at St. George Island. Registration at Lighthouse Park begins at 3 p.m. The one-mile fun run begins at 5:30 p.m., and the 5K begins at 6 p.m. Post-race party and awards at Lighthouse Park at 6:30 p.m. Pre-registration deadline is Aug. 8. For more info, call 509-2191. Register at StGeorgeIslandSizzler.com. Summer Bingo Tuesdays On Tuesdays, come to summer bingo upstairs at the re station, 324 E. Pine Avenue on St. George Island at 7 p.m. Cost is 25 cents a card. Oyster, wild ower talks Thursdays The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve will host two educational talks at their visitor center, 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. Today, Aug. 1, learn about oysters and the reefs they call home. On Aug. 8, ANERR will host a wild ower lecture, slideshow and nature walk. Both are at 3 p.m. For more information, call 6707703 or visit www.dep. state. .us/coastal/sites/ apalachicola/default.htm.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 2 6 0 +25 5 2+% ) ,) ) )+2 52 2-) 5 ) 5 1 1 2+ ) 5 ) 2 ) $ 4! ) ,20 ) 6 (" 5 2 2 0 2 1 ) 2 1 55 + -2 0 0 2 ) 20 2 2 ) 16 ) ) 2 2 ) 5 50 2 ) 2+ ) ) 0 -6 1 2 2 2 ), )+ 1 20 ) 2 -2 + 4 )+ 4 3 21 2+ 2 ) ) ) 0 -6 -6 ) 5 $ ) 5-" 4 2 ) 0" ) 2 5 -6 ) 5 + 22+ -) 2 0 ) ) 6 / 4 2 ) +) ) 6 2+ 6 ) 50 ) 6 / -, 5 52+ 52 2 6 2+ +, + ) 6 ) 1 ) 2 -6 ) 5 ) 2,# -2 -6 ) 5 %" 2 5 5" 5 ) ),22 + 2 22 )+2' $ 2 4 5) 6 ) 0 ) 6 ,2+ ) 5 4 2 ) ) + 1 6 Coupon Expir es: 8-31-13 CODE: AP00 time! oting s V ’ t I time! oting s V ’ t I time! oting s V ’ t I time! oting s V ’ t I time! oting s V ’ t I time! oting s V ’ t I TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA V ot e no w f or y our fa v or it e businesses people r estaur an ts and let them be r ec og niz ed in T he 2013 I naugur al Reader ’ s C hoic e T o V ot e: GO T O star .c om OR apalach times .c om AND CLICK ON THE O nline V oting A ug 1-12 T OP THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA om .c times apalach THE CLICK ON Andy Lahr, a volunteer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Tallahassee, said the wettest day was July 22 with more than 3 inches, which broke the previous July 22 record of 2 inches set in 1963. All this water caused problems across the county. During the rst week of the month, rain caused Independence Day celebrations to be rescheduled in both Carrabelle and on St. George Island. And there has been a large number of days in which the bay has been closed to oyster harvesting because of concerns over runoff into the estuary waters. On the bright side, housebound visitors ocked to local businesses, leading to a windfall for local merchants and restaurateurs. On July 23, county road crews performed emergency repairs on Buck Road in Eastpoint, after the road washed out near the entry to Ridge Road, stranding homeowners. This is the third time the county has repaired the privately owned thoroughfare even though at the July 15 county meeting, attorney Michael Shuler told commissioners county crews could not legally work on the road. On July 22, Carrabelle’s SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) alarm system warned city hall that parts of the sewer system were being overwhelmed by the huge in ux of water. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the SCADA system reacts when pumps are running constantly or water pressure starts to drop. It noti es Messer, Water and Sewer Head Keith Mock and other employees of the water department by telephone that there is a problem. “Water and sewer crews worked round the clock from Monday until Thursday to try and keep the system running,” Messer said. Parts of the city were brie y without service during that timeframe, but by Thursday afternoon all problems were resolved. Because of the problems with the sewer system and flooding on Gray Avenue, The Nest summer youth program in Carrabelle was canceled for July 23 but reopened the following day. On July 24, the county health department issued contamination advisories for both Carrabelle Beach and Alligator Point. Environmental health specialist Melissa Durkin said samples taken on July 22 showed unacceptable levels of fecal bacteria at both sites. Carrabelle Beach had 118 colonies of enterocci per 100 ml of water, and Alligator Point had 106. The cutoff for safe exposure is 104 colonies per 100 ml of water. Durkin said readings at all county sites were higher than normal on July 22. “We were surprised to see poor ratings because we haven’t seen poor ratings recently,” she said. She said the contamination likely was caused by the heavy runoff and that samples taken while it is raining were “not ideal.” Durkin said the health department was following a protocol that determines when beach water will be sampled. According to Durkin, the water will be resampled in two weeks. In the meantime, advisory signs are posted at the two beaches. The advisory did not deter swimmers at Carrabelle Beach on July 27. About two dozen adults and children were frolicking in the surf, and many more were enjoying the sunshine. 1990 and surveyed in areas suitable for oyster cultivation. These included the Nine Mile AUZ of about 40 acres, the Four Mile AUZ of 44 acres, the St. George Island AUZ of 46 acres and the Highway 65 AUZ, comprising 72 acres. The AUZs are set to be resurveyed to delineate two-acre parcels. Oyster farmers could be allowed to use the full water column by suspending oyster cages above the bottom away from predators and in the most nutrient-rich part of the water. But Kal Knickerbocker, the newly appointed head of the aquaculture division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, told the audience the proposal would not be going before the cabinet on Aug. 6 as originally planned. “It’s pretty obvious we need to look at this more,” he said. “It’s not the intention to offer this up to replace oyster tonging. “There’s nothing set in stone,” he stressed. “What we put out there is a starting point. There’s a series of criteria we have to go through, looking at water quality, and we’re concerned about sea grasses, all natural habitat. We have to deal with all the users, shrimpers, crabbers, recreational shermen. “There’s not a lot of places that are going to work, and the industry can identify areas,” Knickerbocker said. The meeting opened with remarks by State Sen. Bill Montford, who made a brief appearance. He offered condolences to the family of drowned oysterman Brandon Creamer and praised the work ethic of the industry as well as elected of cials. “Ask tough questions, and don’t leave anything unasked,” he advised the large assortment of seafood industry players who were on hand. “We’re at a critical point in this industry. The best way to address it is to get all the concerns out.” The meeting was chaired by Karl Havens, a University of Florida professor of sheries and aquatic sciences who has been a key adviser to the oyster recovery team. He began by introducing Leslie Sturmer, a veteran extension agent who has been active in revitalizing the Cedar Key clam farming industry and was involved in the unful lled effort of 20 years ago to bring oyster harvesting to Franklin County. Sturmer offered detailed answers to a series of questions on the science of oysters and how such farming might work here in Apalachicola Bay. “We have a lot of history when it pertains to oyster aquaculture,” she said. “There were a lot more wrongs, but that was 20-plus years ago. There’s been an amazing amount of technology developed since, for intensive oyster cultures. Are they applicable here? It’s all about can you make money. “The product is directed for the more lucrative half-shell trade. It’s got to be perfect to get that price. Those are the answers we don’t know today.” She, Havens and Knickerbocker handled every question lobbed their way from the oyster recovery team, chaired by Chris Millender, with help from Shannon Harts eld, both active with the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Sturmer said a hatchery here to grow spat for oyster farming might be done, but only if the business grew here and elsewhere from its current comparatively small numbers. “If there were a demand for oysters in Apalachicola Bay, I would expect the industry would consider it,” she said. “Right today, only a few folks have asked for oysters’ seed. We’re going through a very high learning curve.” Knickerbocker said aquaculture regulators require that all seed stock has to come from brood stock that originated in Gulf waters, and rules are in place to ensure East Coast oysters are kept separate from those from the West Coast, to keep the genetics from being commingled. He said the marketplace would set the standard for the farmed product, which would be regulated by FDOAC, and not the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Sizes smaller than the 3-inch minimum might be allowed, but the farmed product would have to be kept separate from the wild variety and would be subject to all the same rules concerning temperature, handling and the like. Sturmer said the leases might be used for extensive shell planting. “It gives you an alternative to harvesting the wild bars,” she said. “You can start managing your own stocks. You can become a lease holder. I understand these are scary times, but this might offer some opportunities down the line.” She noted that unlike the situation in the 1990s, when county commissioners eventually decided against granting leases in the bay, the state no longer grants county of cials the right to veto a program in the state waters. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders took issue with this. “I’m real concerned about this taking all the powers from local government,” she said. “The local government, one or the other, is going to have a say in it.” Sanders also said she supported giving a preference to local residents when it comes to handing out the leases. The aquaculture regulators said rules have yet to be drafted but indicated all applicants would likely have to have an equal chance in securing a lease. AQUACULTURE from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Swimmers in the surf at Carrabelle Beach despite a sign warning beachgoers not to swim. RAIN from page A1 KAL KNICKERBOCKER Aquaculture division, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

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The Times | A3 Thursday, August 1, 2013 Range Guys Fir ear ms T raining NRA Appr o v ed F ir ear m S af et y Classes f or Flor ida C oncealed W eapon P er mits (CWP) www .r ang egu y s.com | r ang egu y s@y ahoo.com Small P er sonal Classes t aught b y NRA C er tif ied Instr uct or s P erf ect f or Beginner Shoot er s and W omen Contact us f or mor e inf o: W e t each a C ombination NR A FIRS T St ep Pist ol Class with a FREE NR A Home F ir ear m S af et y Class – f or y our CWP Certif icat es Other c lasses a v ailab le: NRA Basic Pist ol Instr uction Classes also f or CWP Certif icat es Met allic C ar tr idge & Shotgun Shell R eloading Classes Plus P r iv at e Lessons A v ailab le Dic k R einholtz Certif ied Home F ir ear m Saf et y Pist ol and R eloading Instruct or P or t St. J oe FL 850-227 -3889 Rand y Eubanks Certif ied Home F ir ear m Saf et y Pist ol and R eloading Instruct or P anama Cit y FL 850-872-1 865 THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y AD VISO R Y B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G O N WED NES D A Y A UGUS T 7, 2013, A T 10:00 A.M. IN THE C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O N MEE TIN G R O O M O F THE C O UR TH O US E ANNEX T O C O NS ID ER THE FO LLO WIN G V ARI AN CES, AP P EALS, AND S P ECI AL EX CEPTI O NS: 1 C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O L O CA TE A H O US E FIVE FEE T INT O THE EA S T S ID E L O T LINE AND 10 FEE T INT O THE FR O NT S E TB A CK LINE O FF O F CALIFO RNI A S TREE T O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 20, B L O CK H, UNIT 1, L AN ARK B EA CH, 2187 US HI GHW A Y 98, L AN ARK VILL A GE, FL O RID A 32323. REQ UES T S UB IT TED BY FO R GO T TEN C O A S T P R O P ER TIES, LL C, A GENT FO R J O E AD AMS, O WNER 2 C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O C O NS TR UCT A SWIMMIN G PO O L FIVE FEE T FR O M WES T S ID E P R O P ER T Y LINE O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 8, SCH O O NER L AND IN G, 2356 SCH O O NER L AND S T GEO R GE IS L AND FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY WILLI AM SCHUL TZ, O WNER 3 C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O C O NS TR UCT A H O US E 15 FEE T INT O THE FR O NT S E TB A CK LINE O FF O F 3RD S TREE T EA S T S T GEO R GE IS L AND FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y FL O RID A, O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 1 B L O CK 9, UNIT 1 EA S T S T GEO R GE IS L AND FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GALL O W A Y C O NS TR UCTI O N, A GENT FO R GLHJ LL C, O WNER 4 C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O C O NS TR UCT A H O US E FIVE FEE T INT O B O TH S ID E L O T LINES O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 5, B L O CK 9, UNIT 1 EA S T S T GEO R GE IS L AND FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GALL O W A Y C O NS TR UCTI O N, A GENT FO R GLHJ LL C, O WNER 5 C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A S P ECI AL EX CEPTI O N T O C O NS TR UCT A 10 S LIP MARIN A IN THE C-1 D IS TRI CT IN EA S TPO INT O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S A P AR CEL L YIN G O N THE SO UTH S ID E O F US HI GHW A Y 98 IN S ECTI O N 29, T O WNS HIP 8 SO UTH, R AN GE 6 WES T REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GARLI CK ENVIR O NMENT AL A SSO CI A TES, IN C., A GENT FO R MA GN O LI A RID GE, LL C, O WNER THE B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS A CTIN G A S THE B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL AD D RESS THES E REQ UES T S A T THEIR MEE TIN G O N A UGUS T 20, 2013. *P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g & Z o nin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, Fl 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s h e a r in g w i l l n o t b e r e co r de d p er s o n s w i s hin g t o r e co r d t h e p r o ce e din gs m u s t m a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts f o r r e co r din g PUB LI C N O TI CE C O MMUNIT Y HEAL TH F AIR FRID A Y A UGUS T 9TH FR O M 11AM T O 2PM A T WEEMS MED I CAL CENTER EA S T 110 NE 5th S t r e e t C a rr a b e l l e (850)697-2345 B lo o d P r es s ur e C h e c ks D en t a l S cr e enin gs G l ucos e S cr e enin gs Ora l C a n cer S cr e enin gs V i sio n S cr e enin gs W eig h t C h e c ks A nd M u ch M o r e! A ir M et h o d s A lzh eim er's P r o j e c t, I n c. B ig B en d A r e a H e a l t h E d uc a t io n C en t er B ig B en d H os p ice C linic a r e H o m e M e dic a l C o v en a n t H os p ice D a v id Dix o n MD N FL W o m en's C en t er e E y e C en t er o f N o r t h Flo r id a F ra n k lin C o un t y H e a l t h D ep t. FCHD D en t a l D ep a r t m en t F ra n k lin s P r o mi s e J a m es S t o c k w e l l MD Ga s t r o en t er o log i s t L i n c a re NH C H o m e H e a l t h C a r e N u t r i t io u s L if es t y les T MH C a n cer C en t er W e em s A m b u l a n ce S er v ice For gotten Coast Used And Out of Print Books in Apalachicola is Moving fr om its curr ent location at the cor ner of A venue F and Commer ce Str eet, to expanded quarters at 236A W ater Str eet in the High Cotton Marketplace (next to Cafe Con Leche). W e will close 5 PM July 31, 2013 and r eopen late August in our new location. Thank you for your continuing support and please watch for the announcement of our r eopening date The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. Arrests in this week’s report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. July 24 Gerald H. Kent, Jr., 40, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD) Misty R. Murray, 19, Eastpoint, public affray (FCSO) July 25 William G. Luberto, Jr., 35, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and violation of probation (FCSO) Howard N. Martin, 34, Carrabelle, eeing or eluding a law enforcement of cer, and driving while license suspended or revoked (CPD) John M. Davis, 48, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Misty R. Murray, 19, Eastpoint, trespass after warning (FCSO) Don L. Davis, Jr., 44, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning, and violation of probation (FCSO) July 26 Jessica L. Davis, 26, Eastpoint, driving without license causing death or serious injury (FCSO) July 27 Tina Kilgore, 38, Eastpoint, possession of rearm by a convicted fellow, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) July 29 Robert R. Osburn, Jr., 21, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission handled net and oystering violations at the end of last month. Resource Protection Service (RPS) Of cers John Allen and Matt Gore received information that two individuals were shing a seine net on the beachside of Bald Point State Park. When they arrived on the scene, they set up surveillance on two individuals who were shing two nets, and were able to determine they were shing with two mono lament gill nets. They observed the individuals working the nets pulling crabs and sh from the net. The two of cers approached the individuals and identi ed themselves. Two mono lament nets were seized and the case was turned over to the State Attorney’s Of ce for prosecution. Of cers Allen and Gore were on patrol in St. George Island State Park when they observed two individuals cast netting on the bay side of the park. Further surveillance revealed that one of the individuals shing was a repeat resource offender, whose recreational and commercial shing license is revoked for net shing violations. They continued surveillance and when the individuals quit shing, the of cers identi ed themselves and conducted a resource stop. The individual with the revoked license was in possession of a quantity of sh which included an undersized black drum. The subject was arrested and booked into the Franklin County Jail for shing on a revoked saltwater products license and possession of an undersized black drum. While on night patrol, Of cers Allen and Gore observed a boat in the Eastpoint Channel operating without navigation lights. Surveillance was set up on the vessel. There were two occupants on board and the individuals were observed harvesting oysters off of exposed oyster bars in the channel, an area where harvesting is prohibited. The of cers watched as the individuals harvested several bags of unculled oysters, brought them back to the boat ramp and hid them. When the boat returned back to the boat ramp with more oysters, the of cers identi ed themselves to the boat operator and passenger. The operator of the boat took off running into the water, but Gore was able to apprehend him. Seven large bags of oysters were seized and returned back to the water alive. The subjects on the boat were booked into the Franklin County Jail and charged with harvesting oysters in a prohibited area, harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise and possession of unculled oysters. One subject was charged with resisting a law enforcement of cer without violence and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. Arrest REPORT FWC REPORT Of cers tackle oyster violations THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on Law Enforcement

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NO TICE OF ADOPTION OF CITY ORDINANCES The Cit y C ommission of the Cit y of Apalachicola will hold pub lic hear ings f or the pur pose of r eceiving citiz en ’ s comments on the f ollo wing pr oposed or dinances: ORDINANCE 20 1 3-02 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE AP ALA CHICOLA CODE OF ORDINANCES T O REPEAL ORDINANCE 20 06-03; T O ADOPT A NEW FL OOD PLAIN MANA GEMENT ORDINANCE; T O ADOPT FL OOD HAZARD MAPS, T O DESIGNA TE A FL OODPLAIN ADMINIS TR A T OR, T O ADOPT PR OCEDURES AND CRITERIA FOR DEVEL OPMENT IN FL OOD HAZARD AREA S, AND FOR O THER PURPOSES; T O ADOPT L OC AL ADMINIS TR A TIVE AMENDMENTS T O THE FL ORID A B UILDING CODE; PR O VIDING FOR APPLIC ABILITY ; REPEALER; SEVER ABILITY ; AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE. ORDINANCE 20 1 3-03 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE HIS T ORIC GUIDELINES INT O THE AP ALA CHICOLA CODE OF ORDINANCES; PR O VIDING FOR APPLIC ABILITY ; REPEALER; SEVER ABILITY ; AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE The pub lic hear ings will be held in the Apalachicola C omm unit y C ent er #1 Ba y A v en ue Apalachicola, Flor ida at 6:00 PM on T uesda y A ugust 6, 20 1 3. All int er est ed par ties ar e encour aged t o appear and be hear d with r espect t o these pr oposed or dinances Page 4 Thursday, August 1, 2013 The Apalachicola Municipal Library and Project Impact’s joint Summer Reading Program has just ended, and it was a great success. Each week for three weeks in June and three weeks in July joint staff read to the children at the two Project Impact sites, did crafts, and welcomed the children to the library to check out books. The national theme for the summer was “Dig Into Reading” and along with crafts and activities designed around the theme, a number of new books were purchased through a grant from the Libri Foundation (see May 30, 2013 Times). Weekly themes included Gardening, Trucks, Underwater and Underground Animals, Pirates and Buried Treasure, the Earth and Geology, and nally Explorers, Archaeology and History. Almost 700 crafts were created including felt strawberry puppets, articulated truck puppets, rainbow sh, treasure ships, dinosaur bone paintings, solar systems and lighthouses, by the Kindergarten through second grade groups. Grades third and up made vegetable block print scarves, painted wooden snakes, gold and silver treasure coins, and pressed fossils. For the nal week, the older kids lled their own individual time capsules. These capsules are a miniature version of the city of Apalachicola time capsule which will be sealed at the opening ceremonies of the 50th Florida Seafood Festival. This large time capsule is part of the statewide celebration of VIVA 500, commemorating the arrival of Ponce de Leon to the St. Augustine area 500 years ago. Apalachicola’s time capsule will be opened at the 100th Florida Seafood Festival, in the year 2063. Citizens who would like to offer materials for inclusion should see Janelle Paul at City Hall. At the library hundreds of books were checked out, and “patrons” learned the importance of returning their books so they could check out more. There are still a few out, so if your child was at Project Impact this summer, please be sure to check if they have library books still at home. The Apalachicola Municipal Library thanks the city’s street department for providing earth-moving equipment, and an enormous thanks to Project Impact’s Faye Johnson, Kati-Morgan Hathcock, Barbara Lewis and Danielle Layne, and PALS (Dosik Fund) for all their support and help. Since a picture is worth a thousand words, here are just a few of the fun we had. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Special to The Times Residents of Franklin County and nearby counties have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in a historic study that has the potential to change the face of cancer for future generations. Men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer are needed to participate in the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS3). CPS-3 will enroll a diverse population of up to half a million people across the United States and Puerto Rico. The opportunity for local residents to enroll in CPS-3 is being made possible in partnership with Bay Medical Center-Sacred Heart Health System and Gulf Coast Medical Center, on Oct. 17 and 18. CPS-3 will help researchers better understand the lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors that cause or prevent cancer. “My mom is a two-time cancer survivor, and I’m doing all I can to make sure my children don’t have to say that ... I really believe this (CPS-3) is part of the answer,” said one study participant. To enroll in the study, individuals will go to a local enrollment location and will be asked to read and sign an informed consent form; complete a brief survey; have their waist circumference measured; and give a small blood sample. The inperson enrollment process takes approximately 20 to 30 minutes to complete. At home, individuals will complete a comprehensive survey packet that asks for information on lifestyle, behavioral, and other factors related to their health. Upon completion of this process, the society will continue to send periodic follow-up surveys to update participant information and annual newsletters with study updates and results. The initial and follow-up surveys completed at home will take an hour or less to complete and are expected to be sent every few years. “Many individuals diagnosed with cancer struggle to answer the question, ‘What caused my cancer?’ In many cases, we don’t know the answer,” said Alpa V. Patel, Ph.D., principal investigator of CPS-3. “CPS-3 will help us better understand what factors cause cancer, and once we know that, we can be better equipped to prevent cancer. “Our previous cancer prevention studies have been instrumental in helping us identify some of the major factors that can affect cancer risk,” he said. “CPS-3 holds the best hope of identifying new and emerging cancer risks, and we can only do this if members of the community are willing to become involved.” Researchers will use the data from CPS-3 to build on evidence from a series of American Cancer Society studies that began in the 1950s that collectively have involved millions of volunteer participants. The Hammond-Horn Study and previous Cancer Prevention Studies (CPS-1 and CPS-2) have played a major role in understanding cancer prevention and risk, and have contributed signi cantly to the scienti c basis and development of public health guidelines and recommendations. Those studies con rmed the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer, demonstrated the link between larger waist size and increased death rates from cancer and other causes, and showed the considerable impact of air pollution on heart and lung conditions. The current study, CPS-II, began in 1982 and is still ongoing. But changes in lifestyle and in the understanding of cancer in the more than two decades since its launch make it important to begin a new study. The voluntary, long-term commitment by participants is what will produce bene ts for decades to come. “Taking an hour or so every few years to ll out a survey – and potentially save someone from being diagnosed with cancer in the future – is a commitment that thousands of volunteer participants have already made. We’re looking for more like-minded individuals in the Franklin County area to join this effort that we know will save lives and improve the outlook for future generations,” said Patel. For more information or to learn how to become involved with CPS-3, visit cancer.org/cps3, email cps3@cancer org, or call toll-free 1-888-604-5888. To make an appointment to enroll at one of the Panama City event’s locations visit cancer.org/cps3 orida. Special to The Times The Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times took home four awards in the 2012 Better Weekly Newspaper Contest when winners were announced at the 2013 Florida Press Association / Florida Society of News Editors’ annual convention July 18-19 in Orlando. All four awards were in Division C, which encompassed weekly newspapers throughout the state with a circulation of under 7,000. Judging of the Florida Press Association contest was completed by out-ofstate industry executives. Staff writer Lois Swoboda won second place in the Outdoor & Recreation category for “A whale of a sh tale,” a feature about three Georgia shermen who encountered a rare whale shark about 30 miles offshore of Franklin County. City editor David Adlerstein took home three awards. In the category of Health, Medical & Science, he won third place for “First step toward the moon,” a story about how former high school teacher and Clerk of Courts Pal Rivers helped teach astronaut Neil Armstrong how to y Navy jets. Adlerstein won second place for Feature Photo for “High-wire act,” an image of workmen stringing transmission lines on the new power poles across the Apalachicola River. He won a rst place award for Best Headline, for three entries. “Ladies in wading,” about the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition; “Residents call to throttle the bottle,” about Carrabelle debating restrictions to alcohol sales; and “High hopes hang on hangar,” about new construction at the Apalachicola Regional Airport. The Times wins 4 awards in state newspaper contest County residents invited to join historic cancer study Summer reading a great success PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Students complete their vegetable block print scarves. Here is an example of students’ rainbow sh. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, August 1, 2013 in accelerated curricular, performance in acceler ated curricular, graduation rates and college readiness in reading and math. “Growth in learning this year has exceeded levels from last year,” Superin tendent Nina Marks said. Last year, the school earned a C grade. Earlier this month, the state board of education adopted Com missioner Tony Bennett’s recommendation to pre vent any school grade from dropping more than one letter grade in one year in order to transition to the more rigorous Common Core State Standards. Marks said Bennett spoke to superintendents last week to reinforce the “safety net” provision he had requested on behalf of the superintendents. Ben nett said the provision, sup ported by the board, is in place for superintendents “to maintain the integrity of the system” as Florida moves toward transition ing to Common Core. Ben nett also said that 2014-15 will most likely produce another decline in grades, indicative of maintaining higher standards, higher levels of expectation and the rigor of assessments. “Everyone working in the Franklin County School District system should un derstand that our primary focus and decision-making process must be for ben et of all district children,” Marks said. “We have a responsibility to make a difference in their lives. I believe students should be provided resources, en hancing their educational experiences. The job is never done until the life of a child is improved, con dence is evident, and future success is more secure.” Five new staffers to join ABC Johnson said the ABC School’s success has been because of a joint effort to evaluate the data generat ed by student performance and then involve students and parents in the ongo ing process of tailoring the best approach. “We have veteran teach ers teaching the same subjects and grade levels. They are ne-tuning the curriculum to reach all our students,” she said. “Stu dents play an active part in their education. They take ownership of their data and their scores, and teachers have chats with students and parents about setting goals for them to reach. “I feel that is one of the key factors that help our students to become more successful,” said Johnson, now in her 29th year as an educator. “We evaluate the data that we have to look at and see where the areas are that we need to focus their attention.” Schools that receive an A grade are eligible to re ceive bonus funding that they decide how best to spend. Johnson said staff members, together with the School Advisory Coun cil, will work out a plan that might include bonuses to employees, or an invest ment in additional technol ogy, or a combination of the two. The ABC School has used its A school bonus money for both purposes in years past. Johnson said the school has hired ve new teach ers, to replace those who have left either to be stayat-home moms or have moved away because of their spouse’s employment or to be nearer to family. First-grade teachers Lena Allen and Aani Carl ton have left and will be replaced by Shelby Mc Donald, from Georgia, and Roxanne Ramsdell, from Wisconsin. Fifth-grade teacher Brooke Linane, who John son said had helped pro duce excellent science scores, has moved and will be replaced by Leanne Pol oronis, who is back fulltime in the classroom. Dana Hicks also has moved, and she will be re placed in the pre-kinder garten classroom by Katy Sparks, from Atlanta. To accommodate growth, the ABC School has added an additional third-grade classroom, and that will be taught by Jessi Ammons, an Apalachicola native, who has been teach ing in the Orlando area. In addition, Johnson said, two new members have been added to the vol unteer board of directors that oversees the school. Parent Tina Messer has been added to the board, and Hank Kozlowsky has rejoined the board, which is chaired by Bud Hayes. She also was selected Miss Congeniality by the four other contestants. This earned her a $50 gift, courtesy of Karen Pette way Cumbie, the 1983 Miss Florida Seafood, which she donated in honor of this year’s golden anniversary. Selected as runner-up was Franklin County High School senior Samantha Shiver, the 17-year-old daughter of Tony and Joann Shiver of St. George Island. Shiver was named as run ner-up in the interview por tion of the competition. Runner-up in the talent portion went to Franklin County High School senior Savannah Cook, 17, daugh ter of Duane and Amy Cook of Eastpoint. Runner-up in the poise and appearance portion was Franklin County High School junior Aaliyah West, the 15-year-old daughter of Melissa and Nancy West of Apalachicola. Runner-up in the casual wear portion was Franklin County High School senior Ashley Carroll, 17, daugh ter of Tracey and Link Car roll of Eastpoint. The pageant, which drew a modest audience at Franklin County High School, was emceed by Ginger Coulter, the nance director of the sheriff’s ofce, and the 2012 Miss Florida Seafood Christina Collins. “Weeks of preparation and hard work have led up to this night’s event, and we are so proud of each one of these girls,” Coulter said. “It takes a lot of cour age to get up on this stage and perform as well as each of these young ladies do tonight.” The ve entrants opened the pageant with an appear ance in casual wear, a por tion of the competition that has replaced the physical tness category. The young women were then each introduced, with details about their hob bies, interests, ambitions and the person they most admire. Cook wrote that her am bition in life is to pay ser vice to society and reach out to help others in the profession of nursing. Lat er, in the portion in which Festival President John Solomon asked them each a question, Cook said visitors should attend the festival “to experience our charac ter here and to experience some of the world’s nest seafood.” Cook said she most ad mires her mother, who is her best friend in life be cause “she has a heart of gold, giving love to others that cannot be bought or sold. Her mother is always there to listen and help her through anything, and with out her she doesn’t know where she would be.” Sponsored by Coastal New and Used Furniture, Cook sang “I Was Here,” the hit song made famous by Beyonce, in the talent portion of the completion. Shiver wrote in her in tro that her ambition is “to graduate college, set foot on all continents and start a career as a psychologist.” She told Solomon her fa vorite memory of the festi val came when she was 5 years old, and she strolled the festival in a cheerlead ing outt, eating candy and enjoying all the rides with her mother and father. Shiver said she most admires her grandmother Veronica Armistead. “She was hardworking and in her 90s, managed several businesses daily. Despite her busy schedule, she would still make time to have tea parties, play card games and watch movies together. Her grandmother had a strong impact on her and taught her to be strong, always smile and though she is small, to stand like she was the tallest person in the room.” For her talent, Shiver delivered a humorous monologue titled “No Tal ent.” She was sponsored by the Armistead Companies. Carroll wrote that her ambition to help others and make them smile by becoming a nurse. She told Solomon the festival was scheduled to be held regu larly on the rst weekend of November because it came about before the boom in year-round tourism in the county and was intended to bring a large amount of visitors here during a slow time of the year. Carroll said she most admires her mother in life. “Her strength is unbreak able during hard times, and she is extremely de termined to accomplish her goals. She admires her open mind, compassion and sense of understand ing. She is always there to support her in anything she undertakes.” Sponsored by Lynn’s Quality Oysters, Carroll in the talent portion sang “Heads Carolina, Tails Cal ifornia,” a song made fa mous by Jo Dee Messina. West wrote that her ambition is to be a travel ing doctor, helping ones in need along her way. In her response to Solomon’s question, she said becom ing queen would mean she “would be able to put my input on my family’s legacy and be able to help a great number of people in the in dustry where we live.” Sponsored by Apalachic ola Commissioner Brenda Ash, West did a dramatic reading of Maya Angelou’s poem “And Still I Rise” dur ing the talent portion. Martin said her ambi tion to become an actress and perform on Broadway and in movies, and to mi nor in business in college. She described to the audi ence, during the questions, that King Retsyo’s name is the word “oyster” spelled backward and that he is the son of Neptune, who pro tects natural resources as well as the wonderful sea food industry. Sponsored by the Gulf Coast Workforce of Apala chicola, Martin did an ex pressive dance called “The Prayer” for her talent. As a break in the pag eant, ve former queens — Carline Medley (1976), Melissa Bloodworth (1977) Suzanne Hill (1979), Link McWhinnie (1989) and Donna Dasher (1991) — ap peared on stage for a dance number. Also as an inter lude, a handful of tiny danc es from Pam Nobles Stu dios performed on stage. Nobles also choreographed the pageant contestants’ dance numbers, beginning with “Edge of Glory” that opened the evening. The three-judge panel who decided on the winners included Heather Schimek, from Tallahassee, a mother of four who is the reigning Mrs. National Southern Miss Queen: Paige Ingram, an Alabama resident who has been judging and di recting pageants for the past two years; and Caron Myers, the former Caron Spikes who grew up in Apalachicola. Myers earned her de gree from Florida State University and has worked as a television reporter. Af ter she and her husband, Danny, a nationally syndi cated radio host, lost their daughter to childhood leu kemia, Myers helped to start the National Bone Marrow Transplant Regis try with Congressman C.W. Young, of St. Petersburg. Myers’ father, Billy Spokes, the rst chairman of the festival, was on hand to enjoy the festivities and will serve as grand mar shal of the Nov. 3 festival parade. That night will fea ture country music sensa tion Kellie Pickler as the headliner. The evening featured the rollout of new 50th an niversary T-shirts, which are now on sale, along with DVDs of the pageant. In ad dition to Solomon, serving on the all-volunteer board are Vice President Tress Anderson, Secretary An drea Register, Treasurer and Pageant Director Jen nifer Brown, and board members Kevin Ward, Danny Gay, Ted Mosteller, Michael Shuler, Carl Whal ey, R.J. Shelley, Danielle Layne and Pam Brownell. x„ x‹c ‹x…„ ‹… f xj ‹ p i g i i " " " " ¡ …„l L Y h … ‰l j j……ˆ u…ˆ x›…„ ‹c fc l ˆ ‰r r l ‰‹l j c „oc h ‹ ˆl ˆ x „‹lˆ „c ‹x…„ c fc l ˆ h …† …ˆc ‹x …„ …jl & ‹x‹c „ 7 l h …ˆ l ‡xc l „‹ x„ h jx „r …† ‹x…„ c c f… l r ˆ… „j h …„l – …ˆ ‰rr l ‰‹l j c „oc h ‹ ˆl ˆ x „‹l ˆ „c ‹x…„ c fc l ˆ h …† …ˆc‹x …„ …jl & h– *•%• …ˆ l ‡ x c l „‹ ‰ p i g i i ‚ ‰ ‰ „ d " p „„' g ‡ " p i i i ‚ ‰ ‰ „ d " " p € „ „ & ¡ ' ‡ ‚ m ‰‹ ‚ d „' d"" " " " " " " ‹ " " " " " ¡ & d‚ m ‰ ‹ ‹ d 4 „ i i ‚ ˆ p " i i d d " " p p p k k ‰ ‰ ‘ k K • X 4$ ( •4$ d " " " " " 2 v " g " † " s i 2 ‹ " " " d ‹ ‹ m…‹ y†… g ykk mˆ‰¡ p i " r g † d ˆ k †p i† …‹ – i† ‚ ‚ y‰ ‰ y†… mˆ‰ p ˆ d …~€y… i† …‹ – p € †ˆ ykd ivm ˆ – € ~ ‰ d …kmˆ ‰ ivd yˆ †f x‰u ¢ { ƒ' ƒ+ c ƒ+ BOARD OF TRUSTEES NOTICE OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT TRUST FUND Section 253 69 Florida Statutes Rule 16-21.021, F .A.C. July 12, 2013 NOTICE OF PROPOSED AQUACUL TURE LEASE AREAS NOTICE is her eby given pursuant to Section 253.70. Florida Statutes, that the Department of Agricultur e and Consumer Services is pr oposing to submit an agenda item to the Boar d of T rustees of the Inter nal Impr ovement T rust Fund, r equesting appr oval of four (4) ar eas of sover eignty submer ged lands to be r eestablished as Aquacultur e Use Zones (her eafter “Zones”) for the performance of oyster cultivation activities. If appr oved, these Zones would be subdivided into individual 2.0 acr e (mor e of less) lease par cels, for pr eemption of the bottom and the entir e overlying water column, and leased accor dingly The following Zones ar e pr oposed to be r eestablished: 1) Highway 65 (72 Acr es), in St. Geor ge Sound; 2) St. Geor ge Island (46 Acr es), in St. Geor ge Sound; 3) Four Mile (44 Acr es) in St. Vincent Sound; and 4) Nine Mile (40 Acr es), in St. Vincent Sound. All four (4) Zones ar e located in Franklin County Florida, and in the Apalachicola National Estuarine Resear ch Reserve. Nine Mile and Four Mile Zones ar e located in the Apalachicola Bay Aquatic Pr eserve. A map identifying the locations and the limits of the pr oposed activities accompany this notice. Anyone having any questions or comments r egar ding the pr oposed pr ojects should le them in writing with the Division of Aquacultur e, Magnolia Center Suite 501, 1203 Gover nor’ s Squar e Boulevar d, T allahassee, Florida 32301, on or befor e 5:00 p.m. on the 24th day of August, 2013. QUEEN from page A1 ABC SCHOOL from page A1 Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Flanking Morgan Martin are Billy Spikes, left, and John Solomon.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 B O O ME R! B o o m e r i s a 7 m o n t h o l d B l o o d h o u n d m i x H e i s a h a p p y g o l u c k y g o o f y p u p w h o l o v e s o t h e r d o g s a n d a t t e n t i o n f r o m p e o p l e H e w o n ’ t g e t a s b i g a s a p u r e b r e d n o r d o e s h e d r o o l l i k e o n e w h i c h i s d e f i n it e l y a p l u s C o m e t o t h e A d o pt i o n C e n t e r a n d m e e t t h i s s w e e t h e a r t W h a t a d o g V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d e d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l li n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r a ni m a l s i n t o th e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y ti m e y o u c a n sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e a tl y a p p r e cia t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t th e F r a n k li n C o u n t y H u m a n e S o ci e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o th e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ N… ?vv …Š 8… Fx N… Svs …“vŠ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! M ember FDIC 3 3 W e s t G a r d e n S t r e e t P e n s a c o l a F L 3 2 5 0 2 850.202.9900 or 1.877.962.3224 1 7 S E E g l i n P a r k w a y F t W a l to n B e a c h F L 3 2 5 4 8 850.244.9900 or 1.866.362.3224 w w w .beachc ommunit ybank .c om The F r anklin C ount y T our ist De v elopment C ouncil is conducting t w o P ub lic Hear ings t o discuss the possibilit y of incr easing the t our ist t ax b y 2% f or tr ansient r ent als The f ir st meeting has been scheduled on T uesda y J ul y 30, 20 1 3 at 6:00 p .m. at the Cit y Of f ices in C arr abelle The second meeting has been scheduled on Thur sda y A ugust 1, 20 1 3 at 6:00 p .m. at the Cit y of Apalachicola C omm unit y R oom, on Ba y A v en ue This meeting is t o pr esent options f or incr easing this t ax and t o solicit input fr om the pub lic. The pub lic is in vit ed t o at t end and shar e their ideas Y ou ma y obt ain mor e inf or mation b y calling the FCTDC of f ices at 653-8678 or email fr an@salt yf lor ida.com. These ar e pub lic meetings and t w o or mor e C ount y C ommissioner s ma y at t end. Watson shower Saturday at Living Waters The Watson family is expecting a blessing arriving in October, a precious baby boy named Joseph Eli Watson. A baby shower will be at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road, Apalachicola. Amber (King) Watson, husband Dominic and daughter Arianna Watson invite all family and friends to share in this special occasion. Society Patrick C. Smith completes basic training Navy Seaman Recruit Patrick C. Smith, son of Darlene M. Martinez of Lanark Village and Glenn D. Smith of Pleasant View, Tenn., recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Smith completed a variety of training that included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, rst aid, re ghting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis also was placed on physical tness. The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations,” an exercise that gives recruits the skills and con dence they need to succeed in the eet. “Battle Stations” is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacri ce, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Its distinctly Navy avor was designed to take into account what it means to be a sailor. Smith is a 2010 graduate of Sycamore High School of Pleasant View, Tenn. The Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International met at The Fisherman’s Wife restaurant in Carrabelle on June 4 to install three new members. Karen Ward, chapter president, introduced the inductees, Susan Clementson, Hilary Stanton and Jaime Duhart. Susan is a substitute teacher for the Franklin County School District, Hilary is a middle school history teacher and Jaime is a high school history teacher. Missy Cumbie, treasurer, conducted the installation ceremony. Members in attendance, in addition to the inductees, were Chimene Johnson, Laura King, Arlene Oehler, and Tara Ward and her two delightful girls, baby Leah and toddler Kate. Delta Kappa Gamma is an international organization of more than 94,000 educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. Raylan Carroll turns 2 Raylan Edward Carroll will turn 2 on Friday, Aug. 2. He is the son of Brittany Wilson and Cory Carroll of Eastpoint. Alonna Brown turns 7 Alonna Brown turned 7 on Monday, July 22, 2013. She is the daughter of Santana Myers and Shawn Brown of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Loretta and Garry Myers of Apalachicola. Maternal greatgrandparents are the late Carrie and C.W. Davis of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Darlene Pugh and Jerome Collins of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are Irestine and the late Jigs Bouie of Apalachicola. Godparents are Sonny and Bobbie Gail Turrell. Alonna celebrated her birthday on Sunday with a visit to Shipwreck Island. Birthdays Birth Congratulations SPECIAL TO THE TIMES New Delta Kappa inductees are, from left, Susan Clementson, Hilary Stanton and Jaime Duhart. Delta Kappa installs new members 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas

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The Times | A7 Thursday, August 1, 2013 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Yard sale to benet First Baptist Christian School The First Baptist Church in Apalachicola will be holding its annual Indoor-Outdoor Yard Sale to benet the Christian School for two consecutive Saturdays, Aug. 3 and 10, rain or shine. The sale is from 8 a.m. until. The sale will feature bedding, appliances, clothing for the entire family and much more, so come and check it out. Evangelist Steege to minister at High Calling The power of Pentecost has been diluted long enough! Lets set aside the counterfeits, imitations and substitutes, and ask the Lord to restore an old fashion move of God. Evangelist Jason Steege will minister the Gospel at 7 p.m. Saturday and 4 at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at High Calling Church, 21 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Join us Saturday night for a gospel concert where Christ will be exalted and the Holy Spirit will ow. Sunday morning Brother Steege will minister in song and in the preaching of the Word. You dont want to miss this opportunity. Chains will be broken, lives will be healed, and Christ will receive all the glory! For more information call 850-320-0409 or visit www.highcallingchurch.org. Faith BRIEFS Goodbye July! What a month, soggy and tearful. Dont forget now, we will have our monthly covered dish dinner in the church hall after 5 p.m. Mass at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church. So on Saturday bring your favorite dish to share and feed your soul and your body. The over-50 dance will be at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center in Carrabelle. Bring your favorite snack, beverage, dancing shoes and your main squeeze and enjoy the evening. You bet Ron Vice will be on hand to provide the music. Cha, cha, cha! On Sunday, there will be coffee and munchies after the 7:30 a.m. Mass in the church hall. Enjoy! The board members of the Lanark Village Boat Club held an appreciation party for the volunteers that helped them at the pancake breakfast and with other things around the boat club. Good going guys! Keep your preparedness kit and evacuation plan handy in late August and in September; the hurricane season really gets cranked up. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops and the poor, homeless and hungry. Bless us Lord as we pray; You took our Brandon home June 5, 2012. Please let him know as we have to say How much we love him every day. We miss his laugh, his smile, his thoughtful ways, His I got this Mom, it will be OK. As we still mourn our loss of him, There is no more pain for him. That puts peace in our hearts. Lord, its easier to say hello than it is to say goodbye. May he watch over all of his loved ones and friends who had to stay, Until we see him again some sweet day in Heaven. Happy birthday, my love, We all still love and miss you. God bless, Granny Mary Lou, Paw Paw King, Mama, family and friends IN LOVING MEMOR YAustin Brandon Glass July 17, 1989 June 5, 2012 Brandon Wayne Bruno Creamer, born Oct. 24, 1991, in Panama City, died Tuesday, July 23, 2013, in Eastpoint. He is survived by his mother, Maggie Creamer (Lance Flowers); father Milan Hicks; brothers John Dean and Daniel Hicks; and grandparents Martha and Ricky Flowers. He is also survived by aunts and uncles Margaret Hicks; Wayne Hicks and wife, Shirley; Bonnie and John; Stacy Flowers and Ashley Turner; Mark Wilson and wife, Lita; Bobby Joe; Darlene Moore (Sydney); Charles Creamer and wife, Beatrice; Arthur Creamer and wife, Katherine; Jackie Bunet and husband, Kent; Cindy Creamer; Sandra McClain; and Brenda Burch; cousins Mark Henry and wife, Candace; Derrick Henry and wife, Heather; Trina Hicks; Tammy Hicks; Frances Estes and wife Chelsea; and Scotty McClain and wife, Missy; and a host of other family and friends. Funeral services were Monday afternoon, July 29 at Deliverance Tabernacle in Eastpoint. Burial followed in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handling arrangements. Brandon Wayne Creamer BRANDON W AYNE CREAMER Robert L. Nute, 81, of Crawfordville, passed away Monday, July 22, 2013, at St. James Bay Health and Rehab Center in Carrabelle. He was born Nov. 21, 1931 in Tacoma, Wa. He was an Air Force veteran of the Korean War and a member of the Anacapa Masonic Lodge 710 in Oxnard, Calif. He worked for the U.S. Navy Department of Defense for 36 years. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Oralee Nute, of Crawfordville; three daughters Vickie Dragojevic and husband, John, of Ocala; Deborah Nute, of Newbery; and Joanna Beldin and husband, Bobby, of Crawfordville; one son, Robert L. Nute, Jr., of Savannah, Ga.; seven grandchildren; and ve great-grandchildren, He is also survived by his brother Alfred J. Nute Jr., of Everett, Washington. Viewing, for family and friends, was Thursday, July 25, at Kelleys Funeral Home in Apalachicola. The funeral was Friday afternoon, July 26 at the Church of God, Avenue A, in Eastpoint. Burial was at Eastpoint Cemetery. Robert L. Nute LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Lanark Boat Club appreciates its volunteers Obituaries Donald Patton Rogers, 71, of Tallahassee, died on Wednesday, July 24, 2013, of pancreatic cancer. He was at home with his surviving spouse, Stephanie Schotting Rogers. Don Rogers was born to Otis and Opal Rogers of Kenvir, Ky., on Sept. 17, 1941. He is survived by brothers Bob L. and Jerry Rogers, of Kentucky, and sister Barbara Rogers Asher, of Michigan; his children, Paul Rogers (Sylvia Pierce), of Michigan, Patricia Rogers Reed (Steve Reed), of Ohio, and Don Rogers Jr. (Tina Stone Rogers), of Virginia; three grandchildren, Robert and Christopher Rogers, of Virginia, and Steven Rogers, of Michigan; and two step-children Cole Carritz and Shannon Carritz Summerlin, of Tallahassee. Don Rogers spent much time in Carrabelle, originally coming here for recreational shing and boating, eventually purchasing a boat and a piece of land on Timber Island Road, where he built a dock to keep the boat. He loved to sh, and his many friends in Carrabelle will remember him for his unfailing good humor, generosity and the rare ability to laugh at himself. While he loved good food, drink and company, at heart he was a hardworking man whose focus was primarily on his family. It was on a weekend trip to Carrabelle that he met and fell in love with his surviving wife, Stephanie. After their marriage, he built a second home on his Timber Island property, and it was to Carrabelle that the Rogers family continued to retreat for holidays and vacations, enjoying many sunny days, riding out a few storms and lling out years of love and happy memories. Don Rogers will be missed and remembered fondly by all his Carrabelle friends.Don Rogers DON ROGERS By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin Countys oldest veteran is still going strong. At 101, World War II vet Dan Sangaree is still full of life. On July 18, he received his third pacemaker at Bay Medical Center as an outpatient and the operation was a complete success. Sangaree said, after two days, he felt stronger and better. He said Ann Sizemore took him for a postoperative checkup on July 19, and he will not need to return to Panama City for an additional treatment. At the age of 83, Sangaree received was the rst person to have pacemaker implanted at Weems Memorial Hospital, on July 29, 1998, almost 18 years ago to the day. That one remained in place for less than two years and the second was installed Jan. 28, 2000 at Gulf Pines Hospital in Port Saint Joe. Sangaree said after his latest surgery, his cardiologist, Dr. Basivi Baddingham, sent him his second pacemaker as a souvenir with a note congratulating him on its long period of service. They said most pacemakers last only ve or 10 years, said Sangaree. Seated in his Apalachicola home, Sangaree talked about his current projects, pausing frequently to take telephone calls from friends. Once known as the orchid man, he still has many owering plants under cultivation and a beautiful bamboo orchid blooming on his covered patio. I have converted some tools to make it possible for me to work in the garden from my power chair, he said and demonstrated a rake, hoe and bulb auger tted with long PVC handles. He also recently designed and built a Rube Goldbergesque alarm to frighten crows away from his g tree. A timer periodically triggers a stream of water to strike a tin dishpan, creating enough commotion to frighten the boldest bird. Although he said much of his garden drowned in the recent deluge, he still had a few pet projects to show off. The ramp to his front door is camouaged by a riot of buttery weed, cosmos and other bright owers mingled with cherry tomato vines. A papaya tree has volunteered in his yard near the venerable bay tree he has cultivated for decades, but his newest fascination is a climbing spinach vine with beautiful fuchsia stems and pink and purple berries. Try it! Its delicious, Sangaree said. Dan still gets around too. He bragged that he still drives at 101 years old. LOI S SW O B OD A | The Times Dan Sangaree demonstrates a rake he has modied to use from his power chair. Sangaree receives third pacemaker at 101

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Utricularias (“you-trickyou-lay-ree-as”), commonly called bladderworts, are more than 200 species of carnivorous plants that grow on wetlands and in freshwater and are found virtually worldwide except for in Antarctica. Some are cultivated for their exotic owers, often compared to members of the pea family, snapdragons and orchids. Bladderwort owers are usually bright yellow or occasionally white, pink or lavender and have two “liplike” petals of about equal size. Flowers are on long stalks that emerge several inches above the water. Bladderworts are rootless and have main stems from which lacy or scale-like leaves grow. Bladders are attached at regular intervals along the linear leaf segments. All bladderworts are carnivorous and capture small organisms by means of bladder-like traps. Wetland species tend to have tiny traps that feed on microscopic organisms. Freeoating bladderworts usually have larger bladders and feed on larger prey like small worms, water eas and even sh fry, mosquito larvae and young tadpoles. Some bladderworts have passive traps but many have active traps similar to a Venus ytrap, only much smaller. The prey brush against trigger hairs connected to the trapdoor. When the trap is triggered by movement of its victim along with the water surrounding it, is sucked into the bladder. Once the bladder is full of water, the door closes. The whole process takes only a tiny fraction of a second. These bladder traps are recognized as one of the most sophisticated structures in the plant kingdom by botanists. Dozens of bladderworts make their home in the United States and species are found in both Alaska and Hawaii. With 14 native species of bladderwort each, Florida and Rhode Island have the greatest variety of any state. Seven Florida natives are commonly found oating in lakes and ditches. Four are native to our pine atwoods. One Florida native, humped bladderwort, is considered an invasive species of international concern in other parts of the world. In traditional medicine, bladderwort was a remedy for urinary tract disorders including kidney stones and urinary tract infections, digestive spasms, uid retention, and swelling. They were thought to stimulate the gallbladder and promote weight loss. Bladderwort was sometimes applied directly to the skin for burns and swelling For an online key to the bladderworts of Florida, visit www.dep.state. .us and search for bladderwort. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 25 88 77 50 % F ri, July 26 89 78 30 % S a t July 27 87 77 20 % Sun, July 28 86 77 30 % M on, July 29 85 76 40 % T ues July 30 86 76 30 % W ed July 31 85 76 30 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : Page 8 Thursday, August 1, 2013 David Perchik, left, Turner Trapnell, center, and Angus Carson, all 11, display their catch of spotted trout from a day of shing with Capt. Tommy Holland on July 11. KATHY ROBINSON | Special to the Times Sea Grant guide to estuary living available “A Practical Guide to EstuaryFriendly Living” by Karl Havens, Gary Lytton and William Seaman is a new publication of the Florida Sea Grant Program. The 24-page publication can be viewed at www. seagrant.org or purchased from Kindle or the iBookStore for 99 cents. This is the rst all-electronic publication of Florida Sea Grant. Goliath grouper survey results released Goliath grouper numbers have grown, but scientists still don’t know how well the species has recovered. Atlantic goliath grouper, part of the sea bass family, were over shed from the 1960s through the 1980s. In 1990, a harvest moratorium was put into place in U.S. waters. As the name suggests, the slowmoving sh can reach 800 pounds and more than 8 feet in length. They are found off Florida’s coasts, throughout the Caribbean and off West Africa. The species’ recovery is good news for scuba tour guides who showcase the impressive sh during outings. Some anglers who have had goliath grouper snatch their catch say the large sh might have bounced back too well. Kai Lorenzen, a University of Florida sheries professor, led a team of UF and Florida Sea Grant researchers that surveyed almost 6,000 stakeholders in the goliath grouper debate. They held a workshop to discuss the big sh and presented the ndings to the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Many commercial shermen believe goliath grouper harm the environment by consuming huge amounts of sh. In addition, goliath interfere with shing operations, and many commercial shermen (43 percent of hook and line, 87 percent of spear shermen) have had to change where and how they sh to avoid goliaths. More than 70 percent of commercial shermen surveyed would like to see the goliath-harvesting moratorium lifted. Most recreational anglers view goliath encounters as desirable, and only 19 percent feel that goliath are bad for the ecosystem. About half the recreational anglers surveyed would like to see the goliath shery reopened. Most shing charter captains say it will be good for business if anglers are allowed to catch some goliath. Goliath are most popular with recreational nonshing divers. Eighty-seven percent hope to see goliath when they dive, and 54 percent have undertaken dives speci cally to view goliath. Dive charter operators bene t from this interest in goliath viewing. Nonshing divers and dive charter operators strongly favor keeping goliath off-limits to shing. The survey team found broad support for limited harvest for scienti c research to expand knowledge of the sh. Lorenzen recommended that policy makers continue to seek indepth, information on stakeholder views and bring groups together to communicate and look for shared solutions to maintaining a healthy population of goliath grouper. A TROUT IN THE HAND Outdoors BRIEFS A BIG BLACK DRUM PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTY CAPRON J.T. and Bonnie Tillman of Big Pine Key hold up the 50-pound black drum Bonnie caught on 10-pound line last week at Sportsman’s Lodge in Eastpoint. A sh that size can eat as many as 50 oysters per day and is likely at least 10 to 20 years old. Bladderworts sophisticated carnivores LOIS SWOBODA | The Times BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Offshore shing will be great this week with the return of amber jack on Aug 1. This will increase chances and make for a better trip, keeping both grouper and amberjack. King sh are still holding close to shore on the buoys and near shore wrecks, and with better weather, the bait should be back on the surface! Fishing has improved this week on the Forgotten Coast as the waters settle and things return to normal after all the rain. Good reports on ounder from Mexico Beach and Eagle harbor are the talk of the town. Scalloping is getting better and better this month as the shells are growing in size. Presnell’s channel and treasure bay areas are producing the most shells right now, and the numbers are great!

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s 16and-under team is headed to the TNC (True National Champion) National Tournament in Hampton, Va., this week after a busy summer off-season. On July 6-7, and July 1213, both county basketball teams represented the local community well in the North Florida Hoopfest at Tallahassee Community College and the TNC Regional Shootout National Quali er. All players, for both the younger team and the older team who played in these tourneys, were Tyler Howard, Marshall Sweet, Kenneth Wilson, Carza Harvey, Cameron White, Josue Barahona, Mercury Wynn, Tyler Farmer, Wesley Norred, Sharod Senatus, Brycen Beverly, Daijon Penamon, Nathan Jones, Jonathan Jones, Sean Williams, Mikalin Huckeba, Landon Nash, Jan Lowe, Chance White, Cameron Nash, Tyrell Green, Aric Sowell, Jeremiah Stephens, and Micah McLeod. Kelsey Jones and Logan McLeod were not able to participate in either due to injury. Coaches were Michael Sweatt, Jeremy Williams, and Ricky Jones. North Florida Hoopfest The 13-and-under team placed fourth in the North Florida Hoopfest by defeating the TAB Spurs 32-29. Standout players for the tourney were Nash offensively, Williams defensively, and Nathan Jones allaround. Penamon was most improved, Sowell made a lot of clutch three-point shots for the team, and Huckeba made many crucial midrange shots to help pull the team through. The 16-and-under team place third in the tournament, going 2-0 in regular play before losing in the semi nal game to the Alleyhoopers with players from Tallahassee and Wakulla making up that team. In the rst game against the Tallahassee Tarheels, the Seahawks won 70-35. Norred, Harvey, Senatus, and Barahona were the standout players, as everybody on the team contributed, whether on defense, offense or all around. “It was one of our bestplayed games of the summer,” said Sweatt. In the second game the Hawks played the TAB Spurs and blew a 20-point lead in the rst half to be up 28-27 at the half. In the second half the teams traded baskets throughout and the Hawks found themselves down by two with a minute left. “We set up full court on defense and Tyler Howard along Marshall Sweet got a good hard trap on in the corner,” said Sweatt. “Carza Harvey then got a tipped steal to Howard who then passed the ball back to Carza for the lay-up and tie. “ Sweatt said the team was able to get a stop on defense. “I noticed the Spurs were walking back so I elected not to call a timeout with 10 seconds left,” said Sweatt. Senatus then dribbled the length of the court and won the game with a lay-up. The Spurs heaved up a full court contested shot with three seconds left which missed wide, giving Franklin County a 61-59 win and a berth in the semi nals to face the Alleyhoopers. “We started off this game at and disinterested and dug ourselves a 20-point hole at the half,” said Sweatt. “We played a lot better the second half, closing the gap to nine but fell short of time.” A few late foul shots by the Alleyhoopers earned them a 63-49 win as the Hawks nished the tourney in third place. The 13-and-under team nished second in the TNC Regional Shootout National Quali er, even with the absence of starting center Nathan Jones. Sweatt said standout players for the tournament on the team were Lowe offensively, Howard defensively, and Nash all-around. Penamon played well, and White made some great hustle plays and a couple of clutch layups in the semi nal game. McLeod played some great defense as well. Sweatt said Nash hit a game-winning two-point jump shot in the semi nal game to help lift the team to the championship game. In that game, the Hawks were down 15-11 at the half but ran out of gas in the second half losing 20-37. The last tournament for the 13-andunder team was played July 19-21 in Tallahassee. TNC Regional Shootout National Quali er The 16-and-under team won their rst tournament of the season which started back in April. It was at the right time, since this was the regional shootout, with the winner of this tourney earning an automatic bid and invitation to the TNC (True National Champion) National Tournament in Hampton, Virginia. “We have placed second, falling short in four different tournaments, this offseason and the kids have been getting more and more tired of being second,” said Sweatt. “At the beginning the kids seemed to be just complacent and excited just to make a tournament championship game but after falling short on the second attempt this offseason, they have been everything but complacent.” In the rst game the Hawks faced a familiar foe, the Heat, with players from North Florida making up that team. The Hawks had lost to them in a previous championship game a few weeks ago. “Not today, our defense was all over the place,” said Sweatt. “It looked at times like we had seven guys on defense!” The Hawks allowed only three points in the rst half with the halftime score 18-3. In the second half the Heat hit a few three-pointers, and the nal score was 35-14. “We did not play great on offense but our defense was so intense and fast that it made up for the lack of offense,” said Sweatt. In the second game the Seahawks faced the Tallahassee Tarheels who already had secured a bid going to nationals. “They managed to handle our full court press in the rst half very well as we did not come out playing as intense as the previous game,” said Sweatt. Down 21-13 at the half, the Hawks were told to win the possession battles “with our man-to-man defense in the 1/4 court and we will mix in some half court press in between,” said Sweatt. “That’s exactly what we did, winning the second half executing our defense and only allowing them to score seven points in the second half. Our offense picked up as our defense did and we won 38-27.” In the third game, the semi nals, the Hawks faced the Georgia Rams. “This game can be de ned as ‘run’ because that’s what our game plan was and that’s what we forced them to do,” said Sweatt. “We won this game with a nal of 40-20.” In the championship, the Hawks again faced the Tarheels, who had advanced in the losers’ bracket. “This game was a battle, but our team speed was too much for them as we won 41-33,” said Sweatt. “It seemed close but they hit a couple of late treys to make it seem close. The kids were very excited to win this tournament as it means we are now going to Nationals in Hampton, Virginia this week. I am very proud of the team and I hope we will have Kelsey Jones and Logan McLeod back for Nationals.” The Hawks competed in a July 26-28 tourney at Tallahassee Community College. “This is the live recruiting week for college coaches so there should be some good exposure for the kids at this tourney and competition,” Sweatt said. He thanked the teams’ sponsors for their support and donations Franklin County Recreation and Parks, Gander Auto Parts, Fisherman’s Choice, Sandy Beach Properties, C and S Service, Barber’s Seafood, Gulf Coast Auto Parts, Red’s Family Store LLC, Water Street Seafood, R Gray and Associates, Buddy Ward and Son Seafood, George Thompson, and Jimmy Gander. 16TH ANNU AL St. Georg e Island Sizzler ONE MILE FUN R UN AND 5K RA CE Bene tting the Fr anklin County Humane Society Saturda y August 10, 2013 – St. Georg e Island, FL 3:00 pm On-site Registr ation in Lighthouse P ar k (center of the island) 5:30 pm One Mile Fun Run 6:00 pm 5K Race 6:30 pm P ost Race P ar ty and A w ar ds Pre-Registr ation b y August 8th $25.00 On-site Registr ation $30.00 Registration inc ludes T -shir t, race pac k et, one P ost Race P ar ty Tic k et. P ost Race P ar ty and A w ards T o be held at the Lighthouse P a villion in the center of St. Geor g e Island. Enjo y Fr esh Local Seaf ood and Be v er ag es While A w ar ds ar e Pr esented Additional P ost Race P ar ty Tick ets $15.00 f or Adults, $7.00 Childr en under 12. www .stg eorg eislandsizzler .com www .stg eor g eislandsizzler .com BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 # & ( !"$ '"% Thursday, August 1, 2013 Page 9 Members of the 13-and-under team have been learning to win this year. Seahawk summer hoopsters head to Nationals SUBMITTED PHOTOS Members of the 16-and-under team celebrate their tournament win.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 A10 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91694T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE MATTER OF THE CITY OF BENTON, Plaintiff, and, MONET INVESTMENTS, LLC, THOMAS FRANK MOORE, VINOD C. GUPTA, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants, No. 2013-MR-11 PUBLICATION NOTICE TO: Monet Investments, LLC, Thomas Frank Moore, Vinod C. Gupta, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendants: This is Notice to you of the filing of Petitioner for Order Authorizing Demolition on the following property: LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK “A” IN PARKRIDGE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF BENTON, SUBJECT TO PRIOR RESERVATIONS, EXCEPTIONS AND CONVEYANCES OF THE COAL, OIL, GAS AND OTHER MINERALS UNDERLYING THE SAME, SITUATED IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN NUMBER: 08-20129-001 NOW THEREFORE, unless you file your response to the Petition filed herein, or otherwise make your appearance in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Illinois, within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this Notice, default may be entered against you at any time thereafter, and the relief request in such Petition for Order Authorizing Demolition may be granted. Nancy Hobbs Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Illinois July 18, 25, 2013 August 1, 2013 91808T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 13-00045 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES CARL MAYO, Deceased NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of JAMES CARL MAYO, deceased, Case Number 13-00045 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the joint personal representatives and the personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. All persons having claims against this estate who are served with a copy of this notice are required to file with this court such claim within the later of three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or 30 days after the date of service of a copy of this notice on that person. Persons having claims against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file all claims against the estate within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 25, 2013. Joint Personal Representatives: GRACIE LAYFIELD 9145 SW Pitts Circle Kinard, FL 32449 And Charles Mayo 721 Hwy. 98 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GET Y OUR AD IN! 227-7847 L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D • 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E NC E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 ! # ! !# !# !# !# !# !# " 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Special to The Times Planned and permitted, the Postum Bayou dredg ing project is underway at Carrabelle Boat Club. The anticipated project began on July 25 with Gator Dredging of Pinellas Park, the operators of the dredg ing vessel, positioning themselves at the mouth of the Carrabelle River. Dredging was in full operational mode as of Mon day. The journey of the vessel will end at the Carra belle Boat Club in approximately one week to 10 days, with Gator Dredging operating six days a week, Mon day through Saturday from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily. “The staff, as well as members of Carrabelle Boat Club, are delighted to see this project come to forma tion,” said Amy Kilgore of Carrabelle Boat Club. “In creasing the depth of the channel to ve feet mean low water (MLW) is the solution that our owners have been looking for, since in the past the low water depth has been a major concern.” Channel depth will be controlled by an advanced on board GPS monitoring and tracking system attached to the cutter head and by an “as built” survey. Once the project is complete, it will conrm conformity to permit specications of ve feet MLW and channel width of 25 feet. Special to The Times Beverly Edna Brown Goode is looking for her family. She knows she has roots in Carrabelle and Sumatra. She is related to Rowan and Dewey Brown. Here is her story. As a child, I was told by my father, Allison Claude Brown, that his father, Henry Jesse Brown, mar ried Kate Sarvis and moved from some part of Georgia to Carrabelle. They lived in what is now known as Tate’s Hell area. He was in the lumber busi ness, so he picked a great area to move since it is all trees and such. I can only imagine their hardships along the way and even more once they took up homestead. Can you imagine my father hav ing to ride a horse to school when they lived so far from town? I recently visited the area and it took me by car, about a good 25 minutes to arrive where my grandfather is now laid to rest. Oh, and did I mention the mosquitoes I encountered? I cannot even imagine how they managed to get supplies living so far from Carrabelle, with only a horse and wagon. That must have been an all day event! As I said my grandfa ther was a logger, and from the stories I heard he was a very hardworking man. Unfortunately he was killed in a hunting accident. The death of my grandfather put a heavy burden on my father, who at the time was only 10 years old; he had to quit school to help take care of his mom and the homestead. I’m not sure when they moved, but from there they ended up in Bell, and from there my father moved his family to Cedar Key, where I grew up. My father was born in 1892 and passed away in 1970 in Cedar Key. I have been unsuccessful locating my grandmother’s grave. My father passed when I was 14 years old, my moth er passed away when I was only 8, so I never asked too many questions as a young child. If you recognize the above pictures or have in formation about Goode’s ancestry, you can contact her at 16424 Caju Road, Clermont, FL 34711 or call (407) 433-9426. Postum Bayou dredging underway SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S The Postum Bayou dredging project began July 25. FROM THE BROWN fF AMILY COLLECTIONAA bove: AJ Brannen, a friend of Allison Brown, is seen here with the gravesite markers and the headstone at Brown’s grave in 1964. RR ight: Annie Fowler, right, is Allison Claude Brown’s rst wife; the man seated is Allison Claude Brown, Henry Brown’s son. Kate Sarvis, left, is Henry Brown’s wife and Allison Claude Brown’s mother. Searching for Henry Brown

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, August 1, 2013 The Times | A11 4515281 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ........................ $750 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 1 BR / 1 BR FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ................ ............... ....................... $500 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $375 3 BR / 1 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ................................................$700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1110796 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCING BORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation € Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 4515237 Full-time Bus Driver Apalachicola Bay Charter School seeks a for morning & afternoon routes in Franklin County. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 1113278 GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER This position will be responsible for supporting the educational mission of the college by encouraging corporations, foundations, & individuals to donate gifts, grants, or bequests of money or property to the college through personal and public presentations, written proposals, & special fund-raising events. Requires: Master’s degree in Marketing, Communication, or Business. Experience working with small & large groups, foundations, grants & community organizations. Experience as a project leader & with soliciting of funds & campaigns. Salary commensurate with education & experience. This position will remain open until lled. Applications may be submitted at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. 1110075 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW Eastpoint, FL 32328 RACHEL CHESNUT Attorney for Personal Representatives P.O. Box 501 Apalachicola, FL 32329 (850) 653-4611 FL Bar No. 0048331 July 25, Aug 1, 2013 91910T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN, COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION File No: 13-46-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF HAROLD AUGUST GRONHOLM JR. Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the ancillary estate of Harold August Gronholm Jr., deceased, whose date of death was July 10, 2012; is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 13-46-CP; the address of which is The Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: August 1, 2013 Personal Representative Scott Alan Gronholm 859 W. Bay Drive Dog Island, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Charles A. Curran, Florida Bar No. 274380 P.O. Box 549 Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850) 697-5333 Email: cacurranlaw@ gmail.com August 1, 8, 2013 91900T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: August 17, 2013 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Tonita Turner #147 Paul Craft #155 Before the sale date of August 17, 2013, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. August 1, 8, 2013 94393T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-42CA Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF ELAINE MARIE FEEHAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELAINE MARIE FEEHAN, deceased, whose date of death was May 14, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for FRANKLIN County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 18, 2013. Personal Representative: Margaret Mary Ederle 15436 SE 22nd Place Bellevue, Washington 98007 Attorney for Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, PA Attorney for Margaret Mary Ederle FLBar No. 517143 PO Box 176 Apalachicola, FL32329 (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256 E-Mail: info@ kbblawfl.com Secondary E-Mail: susan@kbblawfl.com August 1, 8, 2013 94425T NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Apalachicola will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: SEAWALL REPAIR Project #219.005 Project is located in the City of Apalachicola, Florida and consists of approximately 400 linear feet of river stabilization (rip-rap & filter fabric) and wooden boardwalk removal and replacement. There will also be a bid alternate for steel sheet pile retaining wall with boardwalk removal and replacement. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. (850) 227-7200. The Bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Completion date for this project will be 75 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. The project is anticipated to start September 3, 2013. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $750.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for “ Seawall Repair ”. Bids will be received until 11:00 a.m (EDT), on August 6, 2013 at the Apalachicola City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, and will be opened and read aloud at that time. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. The City Commissioners reserves the right to waive information in any bid, to accept and/ or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of City of Apalachicola. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at the job site (Riverfront Park, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00a.m Eastern Time, August 1, 2013 All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Kennedy or Philip Jones at (850) 227-7200. July 25, August 1, 2013 94443T PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF APALACHICOLA REQUEST FOR DIVISION OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS GRANT SERVICES PROPOSALS The City of Apalachicola hereby requests proposals from qualified individuals or firms to provide Grant Administration services for its Culture Builds Florida (not to exceed $24,000, $20,000 grant funded, $4,000 locally funded) from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. Proposals must include a scope of work outlining how tasks are to be performed and a fee. A statement of understanding of the Goals and Objectives as well as a commitment to perform the work if selected must be provided by an individual authorized to bind the proposal, with an original signature. Submittals shall also include evidence of experience in Arts Administration, Cultural Tourism and/or Organizational Development. Corporations shall include a certificate of status/good standing. Scope of work, specifications for deliverables and proposal evaluation criteria are available at City Hall offices, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. Interested individuals or firms should submit an original and six copies of proposals, sealed and clearly labeled “Sealed Proposal for School of Art Services”. Proposals submitted by email or fax will not be considered. Proposals must be received by 2 p.m. on Friday, August 9, 2013 at the Apalachicola City Hall Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey at 850-6531522 or revenaramsey @cityofapalachicola. com. Contracts resulting from the selection process will be subject to state and federal requirements and release of funds by the funding agency. The City of Apalachicola reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive technical errors, waive any informalities or irregularities, and award the contract in the best interest of the City. THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, FAIR HOUSING & HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION. July 25, August 1, 2013 94537T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000065 SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAKE T. BRYANT, et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 24, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA000065 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash Inside Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of August, 2013, at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lots 20 and 21, Block “104”, each 50’ X 199.5’, according to an unrecorded 1956 map of the Northwest Quarter (1/4) of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, and which said Lots are further described as follows: Begin at a point, (LP, Stake), on the West boundary of the 100 foot “Jefferson Street”, 1618 feet due South and 996.5 Feet West of the Northwest Corner, (Concrete Monument), of said Northwest Quarter (Northwest 1/4); run thence West 199.5 Feet; thence South 100 Feet; thence East 199.5 Feet; thence North along said “Jefferson Street”, to the point of beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 2nd day of July, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff McCalla Raymer, LLC 110 SE 6th Street Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 July 25, August 1, 2013 94603T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000380CAXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SUZANNE M. CHOQUETTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUZANNE M. CHOQUETTE; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192012CA000380CA XXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SUZANNE M. CHOQUETTE; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 36 AND 37, BLOCK 3, OF SUN N’ SAND BEACHES UNIT NO.2, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH MOBILE HOME THAT IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID LAND A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 6538861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-9558771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 12-04785 August 1, 8, 2013 94589T PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: In 52 housing units, relocate existing 220 volt lines from exterior front porch area to the inside kitchen/pantry; Construct dryer vents from the kitchen/pantry area to the exterior of each unit. Bids will be received until August 20, 2013. Please send bids to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. For questions, email apalha@fairpoint.net or call 850-653-9304. August 1, 8, 2013 Apalachicola: 192 & 194 17th St August 2nd & 3rd 9am -untilMulti-Family Sale Misc. Items Rain Date of 8/09, 8/10 Text FL60486 to 56654 Apalachicola: 49 9th St., (First Baptist Church Christian School.), August 3rd & 10th, Both Saturdays 8am-TillIndoor & Outdoor Yard SaleT o benefit the school Kitchen gadgets, new ceiling fans, twin box spring & mattress, clothes for whole family, etc. Rain or shine! Flood Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Housekeepers and Maintenance Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34260536 Text FL60536 to 56654 Food ServiceCooks Apalachicola River Walk Cafe Needed for breakfast, lunch, dinner, flex hrs Mon -Sat. Apply in person at: 17 Ave. E., Apalachicola (Next to the Dixie Theater) Web ID#: 34258152 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *Bussers BLUE PARROT Now HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityExperienced WaitstaffBayside Burgers located at 260 Hwy 98 in Eastpoint is taking applications for experienced wait staff. Call 850-670-1025 or apply in person. Web ID# 60051 Text FL60051 to 56654 Other Driver / Sales Hiring Immediately. Driver’s must have valid driver’s license. Company provides vehicle. Also have two positions for Sales. Paid cash daily. Call Carmen at 850-370-0952. Web ID#: 34259712 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL59072 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL58599 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Harley Davidson Softail Nightrain (FXSTB), 2001, Looks great, runs great! Many upgrades. Asking $8700 850-319-8634 Text FL60393 to 56654

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 4515355 SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D # 850-545-5852 | 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyin f o .co m 4515291 En joy you r own priva t e be a ch in t h is spa r se ly popu la t e d a re a of Nort h we s t Florid a k n own a s Big Be n d. T h is be a u t ifu l h a lf a n a cre gu lf fron t lot h a s n a t u ra l ve ge t a t ion wit h a wh i t e sa n dy be a ch fa n t a st i c vie w s a n d su n rise s. John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249387 $75,000 St. Geor ge Island 451 5289 ISLAND CORNER LO T Lar ge sand dunes and ab undant nati v e v e getation, this “high and dry” corner lot is located in the quiet Gulf Beaches neighborhood, lot measures 100 x 160, Gulf vie w is lik ely from house on pilings. W est Pine A v enue & East Sa wyer Street, Listed by Michael Billings. John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249176 $139,000 A palachicola UNOBSTR UCTED B A Y VIEW W e l l m a i n t a i n e d t o w n h o m e b u i l t i n 2 0 0 6 2 B R 2 5 B A t a s t e f u l l y f u r n i s h e d & d e c o r a t e d r e a d y f o r i m m e d i a t e o c c u p a n c y l iv i n g r o o m & u p s t a i r s m a s t e r B R o v e r l o o k t h e A p a l a c h i c o l a B a y a n d s p e c t a c u l a r s u n r i s e s H w y 9 8 L i s t e d b y M i c h a e l B i l l i n g s # 4515296 L oc a t ed on a peninsula within the ga t ed Plan ta tion c ommunit y and surr ounded b y beautiful views of the B a y and marsh, this home is the per f ec t peac eful plac e t o enjo y na tur e and t o in vit e o v ernigh t guests t o their priv a t e quar t ers! Main house includes living and dining r ooms k it chen, mast er suit e with out door sho w er scr eened por ch with indoor/out door r eplac e G uest wing includes 3 bedr ooms living r oom, morning k it chen and laundr y! V er y priv a t e out door hot tub ac c essible fr om both ar eas of this unique home o v erlooks the marsh with outstanding views T his c ust om built home with beautiful c abinets pine oors/trim, lots of c ar eful details giving a f eeling of a secluded geta w a y w as lo vingly cr af t ed b y the o wners C o v er ed gar age w a t er ltr a tion syst em, cir c ular driv e beautiful landsc aping mak e this a must see home! S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .1431P elic anL ane .com O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r ts h a v e i d e n t i ed w h a t t h e y f ee l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s ec t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e a c h P o r t S t J o e Ap a la c h i c o la C ap e S an B la s S t G e o rg e I s lan d C ar r a b e l l e an d s u r r o u n din g ar e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com ## Special to The Times World Breastfeeding Week is celebrated around the world on August 1-7 each year. Franklin County will celebrate it twice! Franklin County WIC will celebrate World Breastfeed ing Week 2013 in Apalachico la Aug. 1 from 11 a.m. to noon at 139 12th St. Then they will have another celebration in Carrabelle, on Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 11 a.m. to noon, at 106 Northeast 5th St. WIC staff and volunteers will provide fun prizes and refreshments along with information about nutrition and breastfeeding for WIC participants. This year’s World Breastfeeding Week theme, “Breastfeeding Support: Close to Mothers,” highlights the importance of providing support to breastfeeding families. The WIC program plays a vital role in provid ing support to breastfeeding moms. The WIC program of fers a breastfeeding friendly environment with support from trained breastfeeding peer counselors. Deciding what and how to feed an infant is one of the most important decisions that new families make. Evi dence is clear that breast feeding is the ideal way to feed an infant. Research shows that infants who are not exclusively breastfed for their rst six months of life are more likely to develop a wide range of chronic and acute diseases, including ear infections, diarrheal diseases, asthma, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, obesity and respiratory ill nesses. Mothers also ben et from breastfeeding with a decreased risk for breast and ovarian cancers. World Breastfeeding Week is coordinated glob ally by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA). For more informa tion, visit the WABA website at www.waba.org.my. “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. 1) What was Detroit most renowned for manufacturing at the turn of the 20th century? Staplers, Chewing tobacco, Boots, Bicycles 2) Nathaniel Taylor portrayed what character on older TV’s “Sanford and Son”? Bubba, Rollo, Grady, Lamont 3) Phobos, one of the moons of Mars, makes how many complete orbits around the planet every day? One half, 3, 6, 27 4) What did most everyone in the Middle Ages believe was the “seat of intelligence”? Stomach, Brain, Heart, Eyes 5) From recent surveys what is considered the most honest profession? Ministry, Nursing, Teaching, Carpentry 6) Studies support that people perform better on tests when they have what? Good pencil, Breakfast, Not much sleep, A cold 7) Lili de Alvarez was the 1st woman player to do what at Wimbledon? Cuss ofcial, Wear “shorts,” Throw racket, Default match 8) Who is the only former president buried within the boundaries of Washington, D.C.? Wilson, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan 9) In 1903 how many days did it take the rst automobile to cross the U.S.? 11, 25, 52, 100 10) Brutus Thornapple is/was the star of what comic strip? Drabble, The Buckets, Flight Deck, The Born Loser 11) In an operation what is ordinarily removed in a hysterectomy? Appendix, Gall Bladder, Uterus, Abscessed tooth 12) Which continent has the greatest number of countries? Europe, Asia, Africa, S. America 13) The Asian Flu originated in what country? China, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam 14) How many points are on a Maltese cross? 8, 10, 12, 14 ANSWERS 1) Chewing tobacco. 2) Rollo. 3) 3. 4) Heart. 5) Nursing. 6) A cold. 7) Wear “shorts.” 8) Wilson. 9) 52. 10) The Born Loser. 11) Uterus. 12) Africa. 13) China. 14) 8. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com County celebrates World Breastfeeding Week School BRIE fF S SS tuff the B B us with school supplies A “Stuff the Bus with school supplies” effort is now under way to gather supplies for students and teachers as the school year approaches. The effort is seeking to gather items that students can use. Needed are such items as backpacks, No. 2 pencils and mechanical, cap erasers, pens (black and blue), red pens, expo markers, highlighters, glue sticks, colored pencils, 24-count crayons, three-ring one inch binders (not exible, single colored), tab dividers for 3-ring binders (5 per pack), plastic folders with two pockets, multi-colored card stock, white and colored index cards, wide ruled loose leaf paper, spiral notebooks, construction paper and scissors. The teachers wish list includes white copy paper, Clorox wipes, Kleenex, white and colored index cards, yellow plastic pocket folders, electric pencil sharpener, dry erase markers and colored and black ink for printers cartridge sizes (Hp950XL, Hp951XL, Hp564). For your convenience, there will be a school supply drop off bus in Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and Apalachicola Aug. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.Head S S tart now accepting applications Head Start Centers in Eastpoint and Carrabelle are now accepting applications for the 2013-14 school year. Head Start offers free pre-school for 3and 4 year old children of income qualied families. Students receive early childhood development services along with medical, dental and mental health care. To enroll your child in Head Start, please call (850) 222-2043 ext. 223. Or visit the Eastpoint Head Start Center on School Road, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., or the Carrabelle Center, on North 5th Street, Mondays and Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Head Start is a program of the Capital Area Community Action Agency and is funded, in part, by a grant from the United Way of the Big Bend.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, August 1, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 14Aquaculture leases back on the table State of cials take cautious approachBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In a lengthy and detailed face-toface meeting with local seafood industry leaders Monday afternoon, Florida aquaculture of cials signaled they planned to take a cautious approach to opening up Apalachicola Bay to small oyster harvesting leases. The meeting with members of the countys oyster recovery team, an ad hoc group hosted by University of Florida of cials in the wake of the BP oil spill, drew a large audience at the Apalachicola Community Center at Battery Park. The topic under discussion was a request set to go before Gov. Rick Scott and his cabinet to reactivate four aquaculture use zones (AUZs) that were part of a previously planned, but abandoned, aquaculture leasing project in the aftermath of Hurricane Elena in the late 1980s. The proposal would allow the use of the full water column in all four lease areas, originally platted in February Charter school bucks statewide trendBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School swam against the statewide current last week as it posted its second consecutive A grade, its fourth in the last ve years. The grade for the kindergarten through eighth grade school was achieved even as the number of A schools throughout the state dropped sharply, from 1,242 in 2012 to 760 last year. The number of A schools went from being 48 percent of the total number of schools to 29 percent, a decline of almost 20 percentage points. We were extremely proud that we maintained the A status and A ranking, Principal Chimene Johnson said. I feel like it comes from the support of our volunteer board of directors, our students, our staff, our parents, who all focus on the mission of our school, to reach the childs social and academic potential. It was an outstanding effort. A lot of team effort went into play. Were very thrilled and excited for our students. Everyone is focused on the mission of our school. The ABC School produced a total of 614 points, well above the minimum of 590 needed to earn an A. It is comfortable, but theres always room for growth, Johnson said. Because Franklin County High School is a combination kindergarten through 12th grade school, its grade is pending until December. As it stands now, the school has produced 504 points and will be assigned additional points for student participation Twice the rain leads to runoff woesBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com July has been a wet month. The average monthly rainfall for July is 7.3 inches, making it the wettest month of the year. Though the record of 18 inches set in 1984 was not broken, the county almost doubled the expected rainfall with more than 12 inches of rain. Local residents with rain gauges anecdotally reported much higher amounts of rain in some areas of the county. Rod Gasche of Carrabelle, who watched both a digital and a traditional rain gauge, received almost 12 inches of rain between July 18 and 25. Recorded rainfall exceeded an inch at Apalachicola Regional Airport on July 3, 4, 19 and 22. Another A for ABC School By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com It was a perfect four-for-four for Franklin County High School junior Morgan Martin Saturday night, as she carried home the title of this years Miss Florida Seafood. The 16-year-old daughter of Henry and Teresa Ann Martin of Apalachicola won each of the four categories Interview, Talent, Poise and Appearance, and Casual Wear to win the prized tiara, especially signi cant because this years pageant is the 50th anniversary of the states oldest and largest maritime festival. MISS FLORIDA SEAFOOD 2013 See AQUACULTURE A2 Queen sweepPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesMorgan Martin reacts to winning the title of Miss Florida Seafood 2013.Martin dances to Miss Florida Seafood crown RUNNER-UP SAMANTHA SHIVER SAVANNAH COOK ASHLEY CARROLL AALIYAH WESTSee QUEEN A5 See RAIN A2 See ABC SCHOOL A5Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A10-A11Looking for Mr. Brown, A10 Dance in Carrabelle Saturday nightA free dance will be at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice.King sh Shootout this weekendThe 10th annual King sh Shootout will be Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 3-4 at C-Quarters Marina, 501 U.S. 98. The Captains Meeting is at 6 p.m. Registration is $250 per boat. Online registration is at www.c-quartersmarina. com/shootout.html. For information call 697-8400.St. George Island Sizzler coming upOn Aug. 10, the 16th annual St. George Island Sizzler 5K Race and One Mile Fun Run will be at St. George Island. Registration at Lighthouse Park begins at 3 p.m. The one-mile fun run begins at 5:30 p.m., and the 5K begins at 6 p.m. Post-race party and awards at Lighthouse Park at 6:30 p.m. Pre-registration deadline is Aug. 8. For more info, call 509-2191. Register at StGeorgeIslandSizzler.com.Summer Bingo TuesdaysOn Tuesdays, come to summer bingo upstairs at the re station, 324 E. Pine Avenue on St. George Island at 7 p.m. Cost is 25 cents a card. Oyster, wild ower talks ThursdaysThe Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve will host two educational talks at their visitor center, 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. Today, Aug. 1, learn about oysters and the reefs they call home. On Aug. 8, ANERR will host a wild ower lecture, slideshow and nature walk. Both are at 3 p.m. For more information, call 6707703 or visit www.dep. state. .us/coastal/sites/ apalachicola/default.htm.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER VincentIvers,M.D.BCIM CSSKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit. CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening. www.iversmd.com VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070Mon-Tue-Thurs&Fri 9am-6pm Wed&Sat 9am-2pmALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED SERVICES CouponExpires:8-31-13CODE:AP00 time!oting s VtI time!oting s VtI time!oting s VtI time!oting s VtI time!oting s VtI time!oting s VtI TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA Votenowforyourfavorite businesses,people,restaurants, andletthemberecognizedin The2013 InauguralReadersChoiceToVote: GOTOstar.comORapalachtimes.comAND CLICKONTHEOnlineVotingAug.1-12TOPTHREEWINNERSWILLBECHOSEN TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA om.ctimes apalach THE CLICK ON Andy Lahr, a volunteer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Tallahassee, said the wettest day was July 22 with more than 3 inches, which broke the previous July 22 record of 2 inches set in 1963. All this water caused problems across the county. During the rst week of the month, rain caused Independence Day celebrations to be rescheduled in both Carrabelle and on St. George Island. And there has been a large number of days in which the bay has been closed to oyster harvesting because of concerns over runoff into the estuary waters. On the bright side, housebound visitors ocked to local businesses, leading to a windfall for local merchants and restaurateurs. On July 23, county road crews performed emergency repairs on Buck Road in Eastpoint, after the road washed out near the entry to Ridge Road, stranding homeowners. This is the third time the county has repaired the privately owned thoroughfare even though at the July 15 county meeting, attorney Michael Shuler told commissioners county crews could not legally work on the road. On July 22, Carrabelles SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) alarm system warned city hall that parts of the sewer system were being overwhelmed by the huge in ux of water. City Clerk Keisha Messer said the SCADA system reacts when pumps are running constantly or water pressure starts to drop. It noti es Messer, Water and Sewer Head Keith Mock and other employees of the water department by telephone that there is a problem. Water and sewer crews worked round the clock from Monday until Thursday to try and keep the system running, Messer said. Parts of the city were brie y without service during that timeframe, but by Thursday afternoon all problems were resolved. Because of the problems with the sewer system and flooding on Gray Avenue, The Nest summer youth program in Carrabelle was canceled for July 23 but reopened the following day. On July 24, the county health department issued contamination advisories for both Carrabelle Beach and Alligator Point. Environmental health specialist Melissa Durkin said samples taken on July 22 showed unacceptable levels of fecal bacteria at both sites. Carrabelle Beach had 118 colonies of enterocci per 100 ml of water, and Alligator Point had 106. The cutoff for safe exposure is 104 colonies per 100 ml of water. Durkin said readings at all county sites were higher than normal on July 22. We were surprised to see poor ratings because we havent seen poor ratings recently, she said. She said the contamination likely was caused by the heavy runoff and that samples taken while it is raining were not ideal. Durkin said the health department was following a protocol that determines when beach water will be sampled. According to Durkin, the water will be resampled in two weeks. In the meantime, advisory signs are posted at the two beaches. The advisory did not deter swimmers at Carrabelle Beach on July 27. About two dozen adults and children were frolicking in the surf, and many more were enjoying the sunshine. 1990 and surveyed in areas suitable for oyster cultivation. These included the Nine Mile AUZ of about 40 acres, the Four Mile AUZ of 44 acres, the St. George Island AUZ of 46 acres and the Highway 65 AUZ, comprising 72 acres. The AUZs are set to be resurveyed to delineate two-acre parcels. Oyster farmers could be allowed to use the full water column by suspending oyster cages above the bottom away from predators and in the most nutrient-rich part of the water. But Kal Knickerbocker, the newly appointed head of the aquaculture division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, told the audience the proposal would not be going before the cabinet on Aug. 6 as originally planned. Its pretty obvious we need to look at this more, he said. Its not the intention to offer this up to replace oyster tonging. Theres nothing set in stone, he stressed. What we put out there is a starting point. Theres a series of criteria we have to go through, looking at water quality, and were concerned about sea grasses, all natural habitat. We have to deal with all the users, shrimpers, crabbers, recreational shermen. Theres not a lot of places that are going to work, and the industry can identify areas, Knickerbocker said. The meeting opened with remarks by State Sen. Bill Montford, who made a brief appearance. He offered condolences to the family of drowned oysterman Brandon Creamer and praised the work ethic of the industry as well as elected of cials. Ask tough questions, and dont leave anything unasked, he advised the large assortment of seafood industry players who were on hand. Were at a critical point in this industry. The best way to address it is to get all the concerns out. The meeting was chaired by Karl Havens, a University of Florida professor of sheries and aquatic sciences who has been a key adviser to the oyster recovery team. He began by introducing Leslie Sturmer, a veteran extension agent who has been active in revitalizing the Cedar Key clam farming industry and was involved in the unful lled effort of 20 years ago to bring oyster harvesting to Franklin County. Sturmer offered detailed answers to a series of questions on the science of oysters and how such farming might work here in Apalachicola Bay. We have a lot of history when it pertains to oyster aquaculture, she said. There were a lot more wrongs, but that was 20-plus years ago. Theres been an amazing amount of technology developed since, for intensive oyster cultures. Are they applicable here? Its all about can you make money. The product is directed for the more lucrative half-shell trade. Its got to be perfect to get that price. Those are the answers we dont know today. She, Havens and Knickerbocker handled every question lobbed their way from the oyster recovery team, chaired by Chris Millender, with help from Shannon Harts eld, both active with the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Sturmer said a hatchery here to grow spat for oyster farming might be done, but only if the business grew here and elsewhere from its current comparatively small numbers. If there were a demand for oysters in Apalachicola Bay, I would expect the industry would consider it, she said. Right today, only a few folks have asked for oysters seed. Were going through a very high learning curve. Knickerbocker said aquaculture regulators require that all seed stock has to come from brood stock that originated in Gulf waters, and rules are in place to ensure East Coast oysters are kept separate from those from the West Coast, to keep the genetics from being commingled. He said the marketplace would set the standard for the farmed product, which would be regulated by FDOAC, and not the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Sizes smaller than the 3-inch minimum might be allowed, but the farmed product would have to be kept separate from the wild variety and would be subject to all the same rules concerning temperature, handling and the like. Sturmer said the leases might be used for extensive shell planting. It gives you an alternative to harvesting the wild bars, she said. You can start managing your own stocks. You can become a lease holder. I understand these are scary times, but this might offer some opportunities down the line. She noted that unlike the situation in the 1990s, when county commissioners eventually decided against granting leases in the bay, the state no longer grants county of cials the right to veto a program in the state waters. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders took issue with this. Im real concerned about this taking all the powers from local government, she said. The local government, one or the other, is going to have a say in it. Sanders also said she supported giving a preference to local residents when it comes to handing out the leases. The aquaculture regulators said rules have yet to be drafted but indicated all applicants would likely have to have an equal chance in securing a lease. AQUACULTURE from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesSwimmers in the surf at Carrabelle Beach despite a sign warning beachgoers not to swim. RAIN from page A1 KAL KNICKERBOCKERAquaculture division, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

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The Times | A3Thursday, August 1, 2013 RangeGuys FirearmsTrainingNRAApprovedFirearmSafetyClassesfor FloridaConcealedWeaponPermits(CWP)www.rangeguys.com|rangeguys@yahoo.comSmallPersonalClassestaughtby NRACertifiedInstructorsPerfectforBeginnerShooters andWomen Contactusformoreinfo:WeteachaCombination NRAFIRST Step PistolClasswitha FREENRA HomeFirearm SafetyClass foryourCWPCertificatesOtherclassesavailable:NRABasicPistolInstructionClasses alsoforCWPCertificates MetallicCartridge&ShotgunShellReloadingClasses PlusPrivateLessonsAvailableDickReinholtzCertifiedHomeFirearmSafety, PistolandReloadingInstructor PortSt.Joe,FL 850-227-3889RandyEubanksCertifiedHomeFirearmSafety, PistolandReloadingInstructor PanamaCity,FL 850-872-1865 THEFRANKLINCOUNTYADVISORYBOARDOFADJUSTMENTWILLHOLDAPUBLIC HEARINGONWEDNESDAY,AUGUST7,2013,AT10:00A.M.INTHECOUNTYCOMMISSION MEETINGROOMOFTHECOURTHOUSEANNEXTOCONSIDERTHEFOLLOWING VARIANCES,APPEALS,ANDSPECIALEXCEPTIONS: 1-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORAVARIANCETOLOCATEAHOUSEFIVEFEETINTO THEEASTSIDELOTLINEAND10FEETINTOTHEFRONTSETBACKLINEOFFOFCALIFORNIA STREET,ONPROPERTYDESCRIBEDASLOT20,BLOCKH,UNIT1,LANARKBEACH,2187US HIGHWAY98,LANARKVILLAGE,FLORIDA32323.REQUESTSUBITTEDBYFORGOTTEN COASTPROPERTIES,LLC,AGENTFORJOEADAMS,OWNER. 2-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORAVARIANCETOCONSTRUCTASWIMMING POOLFIVEFEETFROMWESTSIDEPROPERTYLINEONPROPERTYDESCRIBEDASLOT8, SCHOONERLANDING,2356SCHOONERLAND,ST.GEORGEISLAND,FLORIDA.REQUEST SUBMITTEDBYWILLIAMSCHULTZ,OWNER. 3-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORAVARIANCETOCONSTRUCTAHOUSE15 FEETINTOTHEFRONTSETBACKLINEOFFOF3RDSTREETEAST,ST.GEORGEISLAND, FRANKLINCOUNTY,FLORIDA,ONPROPERTYDESCRIBEDASLOT1BLOCK9,UNIT1EAST, ST.GEORGEISLAND,FRANKLINCOUNTY,FLORIDA.REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYGALLOWAY CONSTRUCTION,AGENTFORGLHJ,LLC,OWNER. 4-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORAVARIANCETOCONSTRUCTAHOUSEFIVEFEET INTOBOTHSIDELOTLINESONPROPERTYDESCRIBEDASLOT5,BLOCK9,UNIT1EAST, ST.GEORGEISLAND,FRANKLINCOUNTY,FLORIDA.REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYGALLOWAY CONSTRUCTION,AGENTFORGLHJ,LLC,OWNER. 5-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORASPECIALEXCEPTIONTOCONSTRUCTA10SLIP MARINAINTHEC-1DISTRICTINEASTPOINTONPROPERTYDESCRIBEDASAPARCELLYING ONTHESOUTHSIDEOFUSHIGHWAY98INSECTION29,TOWNSHIP8SOUTH,RANGE6 WEST.REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYGARLICKENVIRONMENTALASSOCIATES,INC.,AGENTFOR MAGNOLIARIDGE,LLC,OWNER. THEBOARDOFCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERSACTINGASTHEBOARDOFADJUSTMENTWILL ADDRESSTHESEREQUESTSATTHEIRMEETINGONAUGUST20,2013.*PersonswishingtocommentmaydosoinpersonorinwritingtotheFranklinCountyPlanning&Zoning Department,34ForbesStreet,Suite1,Apalachicola,Fl32320.Transactionsofthishearingwillnotbe recorded,personswishingtorecordtheproceedingsmustmakethenecessaryarrangementsforrecording.PUBLICNOTICE COMMUNITYHEALTHFAIRFRIDAY,AUGUST9THFROM11AMTO2PM ATWEEMSMEDICALCENTEREAST 110NE5thStreet,Carrabelle (850)697-2345 BloodPressureChecks DentalScreenings GlucoseScreenings OralCancerScreenings VisionScreenings WeightChecks AndMuchMore! AirMethods Alzheimer'sProject,Inc. BigBendAreaHealthEducationCenter BigBendHospice ClinicareHomeMedical CovenantHospice DavidDixonMD,NFLWomen'sCenter eEyeCenterofNorthFlorida FranklinCountyHealthDept. FCHDDentalDepartment FranklinsPromise JamesStockwellMD,Gastroenterologist Lincare NHCHomeHealthCare NutritiousLifestyles TMHCancerCenter WeemsAmbulanceService ForgottenCoast UsedAndOutofPrintBooksinApalachicolaisMoving fromitscurrentlocationatthecornerof AvenueFandCommerceStreet, toexpandedquartersat236AWaterStreetintheHighCottonMarketplace (nexttoCafeConLeche). Wewillclose5PMJuly31,2013and reopenlateAugustinournewlocation. Thankyouforyourcontinuing supportandpleasewatchforthe announcementofourreopeningdate The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.July 24Gerald H. Kent, Jr., 40, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD) Misty R. Murray, 19, Eastpoint, public affray (FCSO)July 25William G. Luberto, Jr., 35, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and violation of probation (FCSO) Howard N. Martin, 34, Carrabelle, eeing or eluding a law enforcement of cer, and driving while license suspended or revoked (CPD) John M. Davis, 48, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Misty R. Murray, 19, Eastpoint, trespass after warning (FCSO) Don L. Davis, Jr., 44, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning, and violation of probation (FCSO)July 26Jessica L. Davis, 26, Eastpoint, driving without license causing death or serious injury (FCSO)July 27Tina Kilgore, 38, Eastpoint, possession of rearm by a convicted fellow, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO)July 29Robert R. Osburn, Jr., 21, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Of cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission handled net and oystering violations at the end of last month. Resource Protection Service (RPS) Of cers John Allen and Matt Gore received information that two individuals were shing a seine net on the beachside of Bald Point State Park. When they arrived on the scene, they set up surveillance on two individuals who were shing two nets, and were able to determine they were shing with two mono lament gill nets. They observed the individuals working the nets pulling crabs and sh from the net. The two of cers approached the individuals and identi ed themselves. Two mono lament nets were seized and the case was turned over to the State Attorneys Of ce for prosecution. Of cers Allen and Gore were on patrol in St. George Island State Park when they observed two individuals cast netting on the bay side of the park. Further surveillance revealed that one of the individuals shing was a repeat resource offender, whose recreational and commercial shing license is revoked for net shing violations. They continued surveillance and when the individuals quit shing, the of cers identi ed themselves and conducted a resource stop. The individual with the revoked license was in possession of a quantity of sh which included an undersized black drum. The subject was arrested and booked into the Franklin County Jail for shing on a revoked saltwater products license and possession of an undersized black drum. While on night patrol, Of cers Allen and Gore observed a boat in the Eastpoint Channel operating without navigation lights. Surveillance was set up on the vessel. There were two occupants on board and the individuals were observed harvesting oysters off of exposed oyster bars in the channel, an area where harvesting is prohibited. The of cers watched as the individuals harvested several bags of unculled oysters, brought them back to the boat ramp and hid them. When the boat returned back to the boat ramp with more oysters, the of cers identi ed themselves to the boat operator and passenger. The operator of the boat took off running into the water, but Gore was able to apprehend him. Seven large bags of oysters were seized and returned back to the water alive. The subjects on the boat were booked into the Franklin County Jail and charged with harvesting oysters in a prohibited area, harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise and possession of unculled oysters. One subject was charged with resisting a law enforcement of cer without violence and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. Arrest REPORT FWC REPORTOf cers tackle oyster violations THE APALACHICOLA TIMES Like us on Law Enforcement

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NOTICEOFADOPTIONOFCITYORDINANCESTheCityCommissionoftheCityofApalachicolawillholdpublichearingsforthepurposeofreceiving citizenscommentsonthefollowingproposedordinances: ORDINANCE2013-02 ANORDINANCEAMENDINGTHEAPALACHICOLACODEOFORDINANCESTOREPEAL ORDINANCE2006-03;TOADOPTANEWFLOODPLAINMANAGEMENTORDINANCE;TO ADOPTFLOODHAZARDMAPS,TODESIGNATEAFLOODPLAINADMINISTRATOR,TOADOPT PROCEDURESANDCRITERIAFORDEVELOPMENTINFLOODHAZARDAREAS,ANDFOROTHER PURPOSES;TOADOPTLOCALADMINISTRATIVEAMENDMENTSTOTHEFLORIDABUILDING CODE;PROVIDINGFORAPPLICABILITY;REPEALER;SEVERABILITY;ANDANEFFECTIVEDATE. ORDINANCE2013-03 ANORDINANCEADOPTINGTHEHISTORICGUIDELINESINTOTHEAPALACHICOLACODE OFORDINANCES;PROVIDINGFORAPPLICABILITY;REPEALER;SEVERABILITY;ANDAN EFFECTIVEDATE ThepublichearingswillbeheldintheApalachicolaCommunityCenter,#1BayAvenue,Apalachicola, Floridaat6:00PMonTuesday,August6,2013.Allinterestedpartiesareencouragedtoappearandbe heardwithrespecttotheseproposedordinances. Page 4 Thursday, August 1, 2013The Apalachicola Municipal Library and Project Impacts joint Summer Reading Program has just ended, and it was a great success. Each week for three weeks in June and three weeks in July joint staff read to the children at the two Project Impact sites, did crafts, and welcomed the children to the library to check out books. The national theme for the summer was Dig Into Reading and along with crafts and activities designed around the theme, a number of new books were purchased through a grant from the Libri Foundation (see May 30, 2013 Times). Weekly themes included Gardening, Trucks, Underwater and Underground Animals, Pirates and Buried Treasure, the Earth and Geology, and nally Explorers, Archaeology and History. Almost 700 crafts were created including felt strawberry puppets, articulated truck puppets, rainbow sh, treasure ships, dinosaur bone paintings, solar systems and lighthouses, by the Kindergarten through second grade groups. Grades third and up made vegetable block print scarves, painted wooden snakes, gold and silver treasure coins, and pressed fossils. For the nal week, the older kids lled their own individual time capsules. These capsules are a miniature version of the city of Apalachicola time capsule which will be sealed at the opening ceremonies of the 50th Florida Seafood Festival. This large time capsule is part of the statewide celebration of VIVA 500, commemorating the arrival of Ponce de Leon to the St. Augustine area 500 years ago. Apalachicolas time capsule will be opened at the 100th Florida Seafood Festival, in the year 2063. Citizens who would like to offer materials for inclusion should see Janelle Paul at City Hall. At the library hundreds of books were checked out, and patrons learned the importance of returning their books so they could check out more. There are still a few out, so if your child was at Project Impact this summer, please be sure to check if they have library books still at home. The Apalachicola Municipal Library thanks the citys street department for providing earth-moving equipment, and an enormous thanks to Project Impacts Faye Johnson, Kati-Morgan Hathcock, Barbara Lewis and Danielle Layne, and PALS (Dosik Fund) for all their support and help. Since a picture is worth a thousand words, here are just a few of the fun we had. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.@THE LIBRARY Caty GreeneSpecial to The TimesResidents of Franklin County and nearby counties have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in a historic study that has the potential to change the face of cancer for future generations. Men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer are needed to participate in the American Cancer Societys Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS3). CPS-3 will enroll a diverse population of up to half a million people across the United States and Puerto Rico. The opportunity for local residents to enroll in CPS-3 is being made possible in partnership with Bay Medical Center-Sacred Heart Health System and Gulf Coast Medical Center, on Oct. 17 and 18. CPS-3 will help researchers better understand the lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors that cause or prevent cancer. My mom is a two-time cancer survivor, and Im doing all I can to make sure my children dont have to say that ... I really believe this (CPS-3) is part of the answer, said one study participant. To enroll in the study, individuals will go to a local enrollment location and will be asked to read and sign an informed consent form; complete a brief survey; have their waist circumference measured; and give a small blood sample. The inperson enrollment process takes approximately 20 to 30 minutes to complete. At home, individuals will complete a comprehensive survey packet that asks for information on lifestyle, behavioral, and other factors related to their health. Upon completion of this process, the society will continue to send periodic follow-up surveys to update participant information and annual newsletters with study updates and results. The initial and follow-up surveys completed at home will take an hour or less to complete and are expected to be sent every few years. Many individuals diagnosed with cancer struggle to answer the question, What caused my cancer? In many cases, we dont know the answer, said Alpa V. Patel, Ph.D., principal investigator of CPS-3. CPS-3 will help us better understand what factors cause cancer, and once we know that, we can be better equipped to prevent cancer. Our previous cancer prevention studies have been instrumental in helping us identify some of the major factors that can affect cancer risk, he said. CPS-3 holds the best hope of identifying new and emerging cancer risks, and we can only do this if members of the community are willing to become involved. Researchers will use the data from CPS-3 to build on evidence from a series of American Cancer Society studies that began in the 1950s that collectively have involved millions of volunteer participants. The Hammond-Horn Study and previous Cancer Prevention Studies (CPS-1 and CPS-2) have played a major role in understanding cancer prevention and risk, and have contributed signi cantly to the scienti c basis and development of public health guidelines and recommendations. Those studies con rmed the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer, demonstrated the link between larger waist size and increased death rates from cancer and other causes, and showed the considerable impact of air pollution on heart and lung conditions. The current study, CPS-II, began in 1982 and is still ongoing. But changes in lifestyle and in the understanding of cancer in the more than two decades since its launch make it important to begin a new study. The voluntary, long-term commitment by participants is what will produce bene ts for decades to come. Taking an hour or so every few years to ll out a survey and potentially save someone from being diagnosed with cancer in the future is a commitment that thousands of volunteer participants have already made. Were looking for more like-minded individuals in the Franklin County area to join this effort that we know will save lives and improve the outlook for future generations, said Patel. For more information or to learn how to become involved with CPS-3, visit cancer.org/cps3, email cps3@cancer org, or call toll-free 1-888-604-5888. To make an appointment to enroll at one of the Panama City events locations visit cancer.org/cps3 orida.Special to The TimesThe Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times took home four awards in the 2012 Better Weekly Newspaper Contest when winners were announced at the 2013 Florida Press Association / Florida Society of News Editors annual convention July 18-19 in Orlando. All four awards were in Division C, which encompassed weekly newspapers throughout the state with a circulation of under 7,000. Judging of the Florida Press Association contest was completed by out-ofstate industry executives. Staff writer Lois Swoboda won second place in the Outdoor & Recreation category for A whale of a sh tale, a feature about three Georgia shermen who encountered a rare whale shark about 30 miles offshore of Franklin County. City editor David Adlerstein took home three awards. In the category of Health, Medical & Science, he won third place for First step toward the moon, a story about how former high school teacher and Clerk of Courts Pal Rivers helped teach astronaut Neil Armstrong how to y Navy jets. Adlerstein won second place for Feature Photo for High-wire act, an image of workmen stringing transmission lines on the new power poles across the Apalachicola River. He won a rst place award for Best Headline, for three entries. Ladies in wading, about the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition; Residents call to throttle the bottle, about Carrabelle debating restrictions to alcohol sales; and High hopes hang on hangar, about new construction at the Apalachicola Regional Airport.The Times wins 4 awards in state newspaper contest County residents invited to join historic cancer study Summer reading a great successPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMESStudents complete their vegetable block print scarves. Here is an example of students rainbow sh. USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASection

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, August 1, 2013 in accelerated curricular, performance in accelerated curricular, graduation rates and college readiness in reading and math. Growth in learning this year has exceeded levels from last year, Superintendent Nina Marks said. Last year, the school earned a C grade. Earlier this month, the state board of education adopted Commissioner Tony Bennetts recommendation to prevent any school grade from dropping more than one letter grade in one year in order to transition to the more rigorous Common Core State Standards. Marks said Bennett spoke to superintendents last week to reinforce the safety net provision he had requested on behalf of the superintendents. Bennett said the provision, supported by the board, is in place for superintendents to maintain the integrity of the system as Florida moves toward transitioning to Common Core. Bennett also said that 2014-15 will most likely produce another decline in grades, indicative of maintaining higher standards, higher levels of expectation and the rigor of assessments. Everyone working in the Franklin County School District system should understand that our primary focus and decision-making process must be for benet of all district children, Marks said. We have a responsibility to make a difference in their lives. I believe students should be provided resources, enhancing their educational experiences. The job is never done until the life of a child is improved, condence is evident, and future success is more secure.Five new staffers to join ABCJohnson said the ABC Schools success has been because of a joint effort to evaluate the data generated by student performance and then involve students and parents in the ongoing process of tailoring the best approach. We have veteran teachers teaching the same subjects and grade levels. They are ne-tuning the curriculum to reach all our students, she said. Students play an active part in their education. They take ownership of their data and their scores, and teachers have chats with students and parents about setting goals for them to reach. I feel that is one of the key factors that help our students to become more successful, said Johnson, now in her 29th year as an educator. We evaluate the data that we have to look at and see where the areas are that we need to focus their attention. Schools that receive an A grade are eligible to receive bonus funding that they decide how best to spend. Johnson said staff members, together with the School Advisory Council, will work out a plan that might include bonuses to employees, or an investment in additional technology, or a combination of the two. The ABC School has used its A school bonus money for both purposes in years past. Johnson said the school has hired ve new teachers, to replace those who have left either to be stayat-home moms or have moved away because of their spouses employment or to be nearer to family. First-grade teachers Lena Allen and Aani Carlton have left and will be replaced by Shelby McDonald, from Georgia, and Roxanne Ramsdell, from Wisconsin. Fifth-grade teacher Brooke Linane, who Johnson said had helped produce excellent science scores, has moved and will be replaced by Leanne Poloronis, who is back fulltime in the classroom. Dana Hicks also has moved, and she will be replaced in the pre-kindergarten classroom by Katy Sparks, from Atlanta. To accommodate growth, the ABC School has added an additional third-grade classroom, and that will be taught by Jessi Ammons, an Apalachicola native, who has been teaching in the Orlando area. In addition, Johnson said, two new members have been added to the volunteer board of directors that oversees the school. Parent Tina Messer has been added to the board, and Hank Kozlowsky has rejoined the board, which is chaired by Bud Hayes. She also was selected Miss Congeniality by the four other contestants. This earned her a $50 gift, courtesy of Karen Petteway Cumbie, the 1983 Miss Florida Seafood, which she donated in honor of this years golden anniversary. Selected as runner-up was Franklin County High School senior Samantha Shiver, the 17-year-old daughter of Tony and Joann Shiver of St. George Island. Shiver was named as runner-up in the interview portion of the competition. Runner-up in the talent portion went to Franklin County High School senior Savannah Cook, 17, daughter of Duane and Amy Cook of Eastpoint. Runner-up in the poise and appearance portion was Franklin County High School junior Aaliyah West, the 15-year-old daughter of Melissa and Nancy West of Apalachicola. Runner-up in the casual wear portion was Franklin County High School senior Ashley Carroll, 17, daughter of Tracey and Link Carroll of Eastpoint. The pageant, which drew a modest audience at Franklin County High School, was emceed by Ginger Coulter, the nance director of the sheriffs ofce, and the 2012 Miss Florida Seafood Christina Collins. Weeks of preparation and hard work have led up to this nights event, and we are so proud of each one of these girls, Coulter said. It takes a lot of courage to get up on this stage and perform as well as each of these young ladies do tonight. The ve entrants opened the pageant with an appearance in casual wear, a portion of the competition that has replaced the physical tness category. The young women were then each introduced, with details about their hobbies, interests, ambitions and the person they most admire. Cook wrote that her ambition in life is to pay service to society and reach out to help others in the profession of nursing. Later, in the portion in which Festival President John Solomon asked them each a question, Cook said visitors should attend the festival to experience our character here and to experience some of the worlds nest seafood. Cook said she most admires her mother, who is her best friend in life because she has a heart of gold, giving love to others that cannot be bought or sold. Her mother is always there to listen and help her through anything, and without her she doesnt know where she would be. Sponsored by Coastal New and Used Furniture, Cook sang I Was Here, the hit song made famous by Beyonce, in the talent portion of the completion. Shiver wrote in her intro that her ambition is to graduate college, set foot on all continents and start a career as a psychologist. She told Solomon her favorite memory of the festival came when she was 5 years old, and she strolled the festival in a cheerleading outt, eating candy and enjoying all the rides with her mother and father. Shiver said she most admires her grandmother Veronica Armistead. She was hardworking and in her 90s, managed several businesses daily. Despite her busy schedule, she would still make time to have tea parties, play card games and watch movies together. Her grandmother had a strong impact on her and taught her to be strong, always smile and though she is small, to stand like she was the tallest person in the room. For her talent, Shiver delivered a humorous monologue titled No Talent. She was sponsored by the Armistead Companies. Carroll wrote that her ambition to help others and make them smile by becoming a nurse. She told Solomon the festival was scheduled to be held regularly on the rst weekend of November because it came about before the boom in year-round tourism in the county and was intended to bring a large amount of visitors here during a slow time of the year. Carroll said she most admires her mother in life. Her strength is unbreakable during hard times, and she is extremely determined to accomplish her goals. She admires her open mind, compassion and sense of understanding. She is always there to support her in anything she undertakes. Sponsored by Lynns Quality Oysters, Carroll in the talent portion sang Heads Carolina, Tails California, a song made famous by Jo Dee Messina. West wrote that her ambition is to be a traveling doctor, helping ones in need along her way. In her response to Solomons question, she said becoming queen would mean she would be able to put my input on my familys legacy and be able to help a great number of people in the industry where we live. Sponsored by Apalachicola Commissioner Brenda Ash, West did a dramatic reading of Maya Angelous poem And Still I Rise during the talent portion. Martin said her ambition to become an actress and perform on Broadway and in movies, and to minor in business in college. She described to the audience, during the questions, that King Retsyos name is the word oyster spelled backward and that he is the son of Neptune, who protects natural resources as well as the wonderful seafood industry. Sponsored by the Gulf Coast Workforce of Apalachicola, Martin did an expressive dance called The Prayer for her talent. As a break in the pageant, ve former queens Carline Medley (1976), Melissa Bloodworth (1977) Suzanne Hill (1979), Link McWhinnie (1989) and Donna Dasher (1991) appeared on stage for a dance number. Also as an interlude, a handful of tiny dances from Pam Nobles Studios performed on stage. Nobles also choreographed the pageant contestants dance numbers, beginning with Edge of Glory that opened the evening. The three-judge panel who decided on the winners included Heather Schimek, from Tallahassee, a mother of four who is the reigning Mrs. National Southern Miss Queen: Paige Ingram, an Alabama resident who has been judging and directing pageants for the past two years; and Caron Myers, the former Caron Spikes who grew up in Apalachicola. Myers earned her degree from Florida State University and has worked as a television reporter. After she and her husband, Danny, a nationally syndicated radio host, lost their daughter to childhood leukemia, Myers helped to start the National Bone Marrow Transplant Registry with Congressman C.W. Young, of St. Petersburg. Myers father, Billy Spokes, the rst chairman of the festival, was on hand to enjoy the festivities and will serve as grand marshal of the Nov. 3 festival parade. That night will feature country music sensation Kellie Pickler as the headliner. The evening featured the rollout of new 50th anniversary T-shirts, which are now on sale, along with DVDs of the pageant. In addition to Solomon, serving on the all-volunteer board are Vice President Tress Anderson, Secretary Andrea Register, Treasurer and Pageant Director Jennifer Brown, and board members Kevin Ward, Danny Gay, Ted Mosteller, Michael Shuler, Carl Whaley, R.J. Shelley, Danielle Layne and Pam Brownell. BOARDOFTRUSTEESNOTICEOFTHEINTERNAL IMPROVEMENTTRUSTFUNDSection25369FloridaStatutes-Rule16-21.021,F.A.C.July12,2013NOTICEOFPROPOSED AQUACULTURELEASEAREASNOTICEisherebygivenpursuanttoSection253.70. FloridaStatutes,thattheDepartmentofAgriculture andConsumerServicesisproposingtosubmitan agendaitemtotheBoardofTrusteesoftheInternal ImprovementTrustFund,requestingapprovalof four(4)areasofsovereigntysubmergedlandstobe reestablishedasAquacultureUseZones(hereafter Zones)fortheperformanceofoystercultivation activities.Ifapproved,theseZoneswouldbe subdividedintoindividual2.0acre(moreofless)lease parcels,forpreemptionofthebottomandtheentire overlyingwatercolumn,andleasedaccordingly. ThefollowingZonesareproposedtobereestablished: 1)Highway65(72Acres),inSt.GeorgeSound;2) St.GeorgeIsland(46Acres),inSt.GeorgeSound; 3)FourMile(44Acres)inSt.VincentSound;and4) NineMile(40Acres),inSt.VincentSound.Allfour(4) ZonesarelocatedinFranklinCounty,Florida,andin theApalachicolaNationalEstuarineResearchReserve. NineMileandFourMileZonesarelocatedinthe ApalachicolaBayAquaticPreserve.Amapidentifying thelocationsandthelimitsoftheproposedactivities accompanythisnotice. Anyonehavinganyquestionsorcommentsregarding theproposedprojectsshouldletheminwritingwith theDivisionofAquaculture,MagnoliaCenter,Suite 501,1203GovernorsSquareBoulevard,Tallahassee, Florida32301,onorbefore5:00p.m.onthe24thday ofAugust,2013. QUEEN from page A1 ABC SCHOOL from page A1 Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFlanking Morgan Martin are Billy Spikes, left, and John Solomon.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 BOOMER!!Boomerisa7monthold Bloodhoundmix.Heisa happy-go-lucky,goofypup wholovesotherdogsand attentionfrompeople.He wontgetasbigasapurebred nordoeshedroollikeone whichisdefinitelyaplus! CometotheAdoptionCenter andmeetthissweetheart. Whatadog!Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofour dogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofour animalsintotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds. Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklin CountyHumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.You maylogontothewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtosee moreofouradoptablepets. 4515017SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthCallTodayJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 GARLICKCLEANINGSERVICEEXTERIORHOUSE CLEANINGMildewRemoval Experts!Since1995850-653-5564 JerryGarlick|Owner 31AveE.Apalachicola,FL32320 ggarlick@fairpoint.net 850-653-3550(S)850-653-5564(C) www.apalachspongecompany.com Member FDIC 33WestGardenStreet Pensacola,FL32502850.202.9900or1.877.962.322417SEEglinParkway FtWaltonBeach,FL32548850.244.9900or1.866.362.3224 www.beachcommunitybank.com TheFranklinCountyTouristDevelopmentCouncilis conductingtwoPublicHearingstodiscussthepossibilityof increasingthetouristtaxby2%fortransientrentals. ThefirstmeetinghasbeenscheduledonTuesday,July30, 2013at6:00p.m.attheCityOfficesinCarrabelle. ThesecondmeetinghasbeenscheduledonThursday, August1,2013at6:00p.m.attheCityofApalachicola CommunityRoom,onBayAvenue. Thismeetingistopresentoptionsforincreasingthistax andtosolicitinputfromthepublic.Thepublicisinvitedto attendandsharetheirideas.YoumayobtainmoreinformationbycallingtheFCTDCofficesat653-8678oremail fran@saltyflorida.com.ThesearepublicmeetingsandtwoormoreCountyCommissionersmayattend. Watson shower Saturday at Living WatersThe Watson family is expecting a blessing arriving in October, a precious baby boy named Joseph Eli Watson. A baby shower will be at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road, Apalachicola. Amber (King) Watson, husband Dominic and daughter Arianna Watson invite all family and friends to share in this special occasion. SocietyPatrick C. Smith completes basic trainingNavy Seaman Recruit Patrick C. Smith, son of Darlene M. Martinez of Lanark Village and Glenn D. Smith of Pleasant View, Tenn., recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Smith completed a variety of training that included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, rst aid, re ghting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis also was placed on physical tness. The capstone event of boot camp is Battle Stations, an exercise that gives recruits the skills and con dence they need to succeed in the eet. Battle Stations is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacri ce, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Its distinctly Navy avor was designed to take into account what it means to be a sailor. Smith is a 2010 graduate of Sycamore High School of Pleasant View, Tenn. The Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International met at The Fishermans Wife restaurant in Carrabelle on June 4 to install three new members. Karen Ward, chapter president, introduced the inductees, Susan Clementson, Hilary Stanton and Jaime Duhart. Susan is a substitute teacher for the Franklin County School District, Hilary is a middle school history teacher and Jaime is a high school history teacher. Missy Cumbie, treasurer, conducted the installation ceremony. Members in attendance, in addition to the inductees, were Chimene Johnson, Laura King, Arlene Oehler, and Tara Ward and her two delightful girls, baby Leah and toddler Kate. Delta Kappa Gamma is an international organization of more than 94,000 educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education.Raylan Carroll turns 2Raylan Edward Carroll will turn 2 on Friday, Aug. 2. He is the son of Brittany Wilson and Cory Carroll of Eastpoint.Alonna Brown turns 7Alonna Brown turned 7 on Monday, July 22, 2013. She is the daughter of Santana Myers and Shawn Brown of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Loretta and Garry Myers of Apalachicola. Maternal greatgrandparents are the late Carrie and C.W. Davis of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Darlene Pugh and Jerome Collins of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are Irestine and the late Jigs Bouie of Apalachicola. Godparents are Sonny and Bobbie Gail Turrell. Alonna celebrated her birthday on Sunday with a visit to Shipwreck Island. Birthdays Birth CongratulationsSPECIAL TO THE TIMESNew Delta Kappa inductees are, from left, Susan Clementson, Hilary Stanton and Jaime Duhart.Delta Kappa installs new members 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas

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The Times | A7Thursday, August 1, 2013 NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 FaithYard sale to benet First Baptist Christian SchoolThe First Baptist Church in Apalachicola will be holding its annual Indoor-Outdoor Yard Sale to benet the Christian School for two consecutive Saturdays, Aug. 3 and 10, rain or shine. The sale is from 8 a.m. until. The sale will feature bedding, appliances, clothing for the entire family and much more, so come and check it out. Evangelist Steege to minister at High CallingThe power of Pentecost has been diluted long enough! Lets set aside the counterfeits, imitations and substitutes, and ask the Lord to restore an old fashion move of God. Evangelist Jason Steege will minister the Gospel at 7 p.m. Saturday and 4 at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at High Calling Church, 21 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Join us Saturday night for a gospel concert where Christ will be exalted and the Holy Spirit will ow. Sunday morning Brother Steege will minister in song and in the preaching of the Word. You dont want to miss this opportunity. Chains will be broken, lives will be healed, and Christ will receive all the glory! For more information call 850-320-0409 or visit www.highcallingchurch.org. Faith bBRIefsEFSGoodbye July! What a month, soggy and tearful. Dont forget now, we will have our monthly covered dish dinner in the church hall after 5 p.m. Mass at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church. So on Saturday bring your favorite dish to share and feed your soul and your body. The over-50 dance will be at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center in Carrabelle. Bring your favorite snack, beverage, dancing shoes and your main squeeze and enjoy the evening. You bet Ron Vice will be on hand to provide the music. Cha, cha, cha! On Sunday, there will be coffee and munchies after the 7:30 a.m. Mass in the church hall. Enjoy! The board members of the Lanark Village Boat Club held an appreciation party for the volunteers that helped them at the pancake breakfast and with other things around the boat club. Good going guys! Keep your preparedness kit and evacuation plan handy in late August and in September; the hurricane season really gets cranked up. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops and the poor, homeless and hungry. Bless us Lord as we pray; You took our Brandon home June 5, 2012. Please let him know as we have to say How much we love him every day. We miss his laugh, his smile, his thoughtful ways, His I got this Mom, it will be OK. As we still mourn our loss of him, There is no more pain for him. That puts peace in our hearts. Lord, its easier to say hello than it is to say goodbye. May he watch over all of his loved ones and friends who had to stay, Until we see him again some sweet day in Heaven. Happy birthday, my love, We all still love and miss you.God bless,Granny Mary Lou, Paw Paw King, Mama, family and friends IIN LOVING MeEMORy YAustin Brandon GGlassJuly 17, 1989 June 5, 2012Brandon Wayne Bruno Creamer, born Oct. 24, 1991, in Panama City, died Tuesday, July 23, 2013, in Eastpoint. He is survived by his mother, Maggie Creamer (Lance Flowers); father Milan Hicks; brothers John Dean and Daniel Hicks; and grandparents Martha and Ricky Flowers. He is also survived by aunts and uncles Margaret Hicks; Wayne Hicks and wife, Shirley; Bonnie and John; Stacy Flowers and Ashley Turner; Mark Wilson and wife, Lita; Bobby Joe; Darlene Moore (Sydney); Charles Creamer and wife, Beatrice; Arthur Creamer and wife, Katherine; Jackie Bunet and husband, Kent; Cindy Creamer; Sandra McClain; and Brenda Burch; cousins Mark Henry and wife, Candace; Derrick Henry and wife, Heather; Trina Hicks; Tammy Hicks; Frances Estes and wife Chelsea; and Scotty McClain and wife, Missy; and a host of other family and friends. Funeral services were Monday afternoon, July 29 at Deliverance Tabernacle in Eastpoint. Burial followed in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handling arrangements.Brandon Wayne Creamer BRaANDON Way AYNeE CReaEAMeER Robert L. Nute, 81, of Crawfordville, passed away Monday, July 22, 2013, at St. James Bay Health and Rehab Center in Carrabelle. He was born Nov. 21, 1931 in Tacoma, Wa. He was an Air Force veteran of the Korean War and a member of the Anacapa Masonic Lodge 710 in Oxnard, Calif. He worked for the U.S. Navy Department of Defense for 36 years. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Oralee Nute, of Crawfordville; three daughters Vickie Dragojevic and husband, John, of Ocala; Deborah Nute, of Newbery; and Joanna Beldin and husband, Bobby, of Crawfordville; one son, Robert L. Nute, Jr., of Savannah, Ga.; seven grandchildren; and ve great-grandchildren, He is also survived by his brother Alfred J. Nute Jr., of Everett, Washington. Viewing, for family and friends, was Thursday, July 25, at Kelleys Funeral Home in Apalachicola. The funeral was Friday afternoon, July 26 at the Church of God, Avenue A, in Eastpoint. Burial was at Eastpoint Cemetery. RRobert LL. NNute LaLANaARK NewsEWSJim WelshLanark Boat Club appreciates its volunteers Obituaries Donald Patton Rogers, 71, of Tallahassee, died on Wednesday, July 24, 2013, of pancreatic cancer. He was at home with his surviving spouse, Stephanie Schotting Rogers. Don Rogers was born to Otis and Opal Rogers of Kenvir, Ky., on Sept. 17, 1941. He is survived by brothers Bob L. and Jerry Rogers, of Kentucky, and sister Barbara Rogers Asher, of Michigan; his children, Paul Rogers (Sylvia Pierce), of Michigan, Patricia Rogers Reed (Steve Reed), of Ohio, and Don Rogers Jr. (Tina Stone Rogers), of Virginia; three grandchildren, Robert and Christopher Rogers, of Virginia, and Steven Rogers, of Michigan; and two step-children Cole Carritz and Shannon Carritz Summerlin, of Tallahassee. Don Rogers spent much time in Carrabelle, originally coming here for recreational shing and boating, eventually purchasing a boat and a piece of land on Timber Island Road, where he built a dock to keep the boat. He loved to sh, and his many friends in Carrabelle will remember him for his unfailing good humor, generosity and the rare ability to laugh at himself. While he loved good food, drink and company, at heart he was a hardworking man whose focus was primarily on his family. It was on a weekend trip to Carrabelle that he met and fell in love with his surviving wife, Stephanie. After their marriage, he built a second home on his Timber Island property, and it was to Carrabelle that the Rogers family continued to retreat for holidays and vacations, enjoying many sunny days, riding out a few storms and lling out years of love and happy memories. Don Rogers will be missed and remembered fondly by all his Carrabelle friends.DDon RRogers DDON R R OGeERsSBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin Countys oldest veteran is still going strong. At 101, World War II vet Dan Sangaree is still full of life. On July 18, he received his third pacemaker at Bay Medical Center as an outpatient and the operation was a complete success. Sangaree said, after two days, he felt stronger and better. He said Ann Sizemore took him for a postoperative checkup on July 19, and he will not need to return to Panama City for an additional treatment. At the age of 83, Sangaree received was the rst person to have pacemaker implanted at Weems Memorial Hospital, on July 29, 1998, almost 18 years ago to the day. That one remained in place for less than two years and the second was installed Jan. 28, 2000 at Gulf Pines Hospital in Port Saint Joe. Sangaree said after his latest surgery, his cardiologist, Dr. Basivi Baddingham, sent him his second pacemaker as a souvenir with a note congratulating him on its long period of service. They said most pacemakers last only ve or 10 years, said Sangaree. Seated in his Apalachicola home, Sangaree talked about his current projects, pausing frequently to take telephone calls from friends. Once known as the orchid man, he still has many owering plants under cultivation and a beautiful bamboo orchid blooming on his covered patio. I have converted some tools to make it possible for me to work in the garden from my power chair, he said and demonstrated a rake, hoe and bulb auger tted with long PVC handles. He also recently designed and built a Rube Goldbergesque alarm to frighten crows away from his g tree. A timer periodically triggers a stream of water to strike a tin dishpan, creating enough commotion to frighten the boldest bird. Although he said much of his garden drowned in the recent deluge, he still had a few pet projects to show off. The ramp to his front door is camouaged by a riot of buttery weed, cosmos and other bright owers mingled with cherry tomato vines. A papaya tree has volunteered in his yard near the venerable bay tree he has cultivated for decades, but his newest fascination is a climbing spinach vine with beautiful fuchsia stems and pink and purple berries. Try it! Its delicious, Sangaree said. Dan still gets around too. He bragged that he still drives at 101 years old. LOILOI S SWO O BOD OD A | The TimesDan Sangaree demonstrates a rake he has modied to use from his power chair.Sangaree receives third pacemaker at 101

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Utricularias (you-trickyou-lay-ree-as), commonly called bladderworts, are more than 200 species of carnivorous plants that grow on wetlands and in freshwater and are found virtually worldwide except for in Antarctica. Some are cultivated for their exotic owers, often compared to members of the pea family, snapdragons and orchids. Bladderwort owers are usually bright yellow or occasionally white, pink or lavender and have two liplike petals of about equal size. Flowers are on long stalks that emerge several inches above the water. Bladderworts are rootless and have main stems from which lacy or scale-like leaves grow. Bladders are attached at regular intervals along the linear leaf segments. All bladderworts are carnivorous and capture small organisms by means of bladder-like traps. Wetland species tend to have tiny traps that feed on microscopic organisms. Freeoating bladderworts usually have larger bladders and feed on larger prey like small worms, water eas and even sh fry, mosquito larvae and young tadpoles. Some bladderworts have passive traps but many have active traps similar to a Venus ytrap, only much smaller. The prey brush against trigger hairs connected to the trapdoor. When the trap is triggered by movement of its victim along with the water surrounding it, is sucked into the bladder. Once the bladder is full of water, the door closes. The whole process takes only a tiny fraction of a second. These bladder traps are recognized as one of the most sophisticated structures in the plant kingdom by botanists. Dozens of bladderworts make their home in the United States and species are found in both Alaska and Hawaii. With 14 native species of bladderwort each, Florida and Rhode Island have the greatest variety of any state. Seven Florida natives are commonly found oating in lakes and ditches. Four are native to our pine atwoods. One Florida native, humped bladderwort, is considered an invasive species of international concern in other parts of the world. In traditional medicine, bladderwort was a remedy for urinary tract disorders including kidney stones and urinary tract infections, digestive spasms, uid retention, and swelling. They were thought to stimulate the gallbladder and promote weight loss. Bladderwort was sometimes applied directly to the skin for burns and swelling For an online key to the bladderworts of Florida, visit www.dep.state. .us and search for bladderwort. WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,July2588 7750% Fri,July2689 7830% Sat,July2787 7720% Sun,July2886 7730% Mon,July2985 7640% Tues,July3086 7630% Wed,July3185 7630% JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFIT CALLJOE@850-323-0741 ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM4514911 SPONSORTHEWEEKLYALMANACCALLTODAY!8502277847 Monday-Saturday:7:00AM-7:00PMEST Sunday:7:00AM-5:00PMEST FishingHeadquarters: Page 8 Thursday, August 1, 2013David Perchik, left, Turner Trapnell, center, and Angus Carson, all 11, display their catch of spotted trout from a day of shing with Capt. Tommy Holland on July 11.KATHY ROBINSON | Special to the TimesSea Grant guide to estuary living availableA Practical Guide to EstuaryFriendly Living by Karl Havens, Gary Lytton and William Seaman is a new publication of the Florida Sea Grant Program. The 24-page publication can be viewed at www. seagrant.org or purchased from Kindle or the iBookStore for 99 cents. This is the rst all-electronic publication of Florida Sea Grant.Goliath grouper survey results releasedGoliath grouper numbers have grown, but scientists still dont know how well the species has recovered. Atlantic goliath grouper, part of the sea bass family, were over shed from the 1960s through the 1980s. In 1990, a harvest moratorium was put into place in U.S. waters. As the name suggests, the slowmoving sh can reach 800 pounds and more than 8 feet in length. They are found off Floridas coasts, throughout the Caribbean and off West Africa. The species recovery is good news for scuba tour guides who showcase the impressive sh during outings. Some anglers who have had goliath grouper snatch their catch say the large sh might have bounced back too well. Kai Lorenzen, a University of Florida sheries professor, led a team of UF and Florida Sea Grant researchers that surveyed almost 6,000 stakeholders in the goliath grouper debate. They held a workshop to discuss the big sh and presented the ndings to the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Many commercial shermen believe goliath grouper harm the environment by consuming huge amounts of sh. In addition, goliath interfere with shing operations, and many commercial shermen (43 percent of hook and line, 87 percent of spear shermen) have had to change where and how they sh to avoid goliaths. More than 70 percent of commercial shermen surveyed would like to see the goliath-harvesting moratorium lifted. Most recreational anglers view goliath encounters as desirable, and only 19 percent feel that goliath are bad for the ecosystem. About half the recreational anglers surveyed would like to see the goliath shery reopened. Most shing charter captains say it will be good for business if anglers are allowed to catch some goliath. Goliath are most popular with recreational nonshing divers. Eighty-seven percent hope to see goliath when they dive, and 54 percent have undertaken dives speci cally to view goliath. Dive charter operators bene t from this interest in goliath viewing. Nonshing divers and dive charter operators strongly favor keeping goliath off-limits to shing. The survey team found broad support for limited harvest for scienti c research to expand knowledge of the sh. Lorenzen recommended that policy makers continue to seek indepth, information on stakeholder views and bring groups together to communicate and look for shared solutions to maintaining a healthy population of goliath grouper. A TROUT IN THE HAND Outdoors BRIEFS A BIG BLACK DRUMPHOTO COURTESY OF MARTY CAPRONJ.T. and Bonnie Tillman of Big Pine Key hold up the 50-pound black drum Bonnie caught on 10-pound line last week at Sportsmans Lodge in Eastpoint. A sh that size can eat as many as 50 oysters per day and is likely at least 10 to 20 years old. Bladderworts sophisticated carnivoresLOIS SWOBODA | The Times BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Inshore OffshoreOffshore shing will be great this week with the return of amber jack on Aug 1. This will increase chances and make for a better trip, keeping both grouper and amberjack. King sh are still holding close to shore on the buoys and near shore wrecks, and with better weather, the bait should be back on the surface! Fishing has improved this week on the Forgotten Coast as the waters settle and things return to normal after all the rain. Good reports on ounder from Mexico Beach and Eagle harbor are the talk of the town. Scalloping is getting better and better this month as the shells are growing in size. Presnells channel and treasure bay areas are producing the most shells right now, and the numbers are great!

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys 16and-under team is headed to the TNC (True National Champion) National Tournament in Hampton, Va., this week after a busy summer off-season. On July 6-7, and July 1213, both county basketball teams represented the local community well in the North Florida Hoopfest at Tallahassee Community College and the TNC Regional Shootout National Quali er. All players, for both the younger team and the older team who played in these tourneys, were Tyler Howard, Marshall Sweet, Kenneth Wilson, Carza Harvey, Cameron White, Josue Barahona, Mercury Wynn, Tyler Farmer, Wesley Norred, Sharod Senatus, Brycen Beverly, Daijon Penamon, Nathan Jones, Jonathan Jones, Sean Williams, Mikalin Huckeba, Landon Nash, Jan Lowe, Chance White, Cameron Nash, Tyrell Green, Aric Sowell, Jeremiah Stephens, and Micah McLeod. Kelsey Jones and Logan McLeod were not able to participate in either due to injury. Coaches were Michael Sweatt, Jeremy Williams, and Ricky Jones. North Florida HoopfestThe 13-and-under team placed fourth in the North Florida Hoopfest by defeating the TAB Spurs 32-29. Standout players for the tourney were Nash offensively, Williams defensively, and Nathan Jones allaround. Penamon was most improved, Sowell made a lot of clutch three-point shots for the team, and Huckeba made many crucial midrange shots to help pull the team through. The 16-and-under team place third in the tournament, going 2-0 in regular play before losing in the semi nal game to the Alleyhoopers with players from Tallahassee and Wakulla making up that team. In the rst game against the Tallahassee Tarheels, the Seahawks won 70-35. Norred, Harvey, Senatus, and Barahona were the standout players, as everybody on the team contributed, whether on defense, offense or all around. It was one of our bestplayed games of the summer, said Sweatt. In the second game the Hawks played the TAB Spurs and blew a 20-point lead in the rst half to be up 28-27 at the half. In the second half the teams traded baskets throughout and the Hawks found themselves down by two with a minute left. We set up full court on defense and Tyler Howard along Marshall Sweet got a good hard trap on in the corner, said Sweatt. Carza Harvey then got a tipped steal to Howard who then passed the ball back to Carza for the lay-up and tie. Sweatt said the team was able to get a stop on defense. I noticed the Spurs were walking back so I elected not to call a timeout with 10 seconds left, said Sweatt. Senatus then dribbled the length of the court and won the game with a lay-up. The Spurs heaved up a full court contested shot with three seconds left which missed wide, giving Franklin County a 61-59 win and a berth in the semi nals to face the Alleyhoopers. We started off this game at and disinterested and dug ourselves a 20-point hole at the half, said Sweatt. We played a lot better the second half, closing the gap to nine but fell short of time. A few late foul shots by the Alleyhoopers earned them a 63-49 win as the Hawks nished the tourney in third place. The 13-and-under team nished second in the TNC Regional Shootout National Quali er, even with the absence of starting center Nathan Jones. Sweatt said standout players for the tournament on the team were Lowe offensively, Howard defensively, and Nash all-around. Penamon played well, and White made some great hustle plays and a couple of clutch layups in the semi nal game. McLeod played some great defense as well. Sweatt said Nash hit a game-winning two-point jump shot in the semi nal game to help lift the team to the championship game. In that game, the Hawks were down 15-11 at the half but ran out of gas in the second half losing 20-37. The last tournament for the 13-andunder team was played July 19-21 in Tallahassee. TNC Regional Shootout National Quali erThe 16-and-under team won their rst tournament of the season which started back in April. It was at the right time, since this was the regional shootout, with the winner of this tourney earning an automatic bid and invitation to the TNC (True National Champion) National Tournament in Hampton, Virginia. We have placed second, falling short in four different tournaments, this offseason and the kids have been getting more and more tired of being second, said Sweatt. At the beginning the kids seemed to be just complacent and excited just to make a tournament championship game but after falling short on the second attempt this offseason, they have been everything but complacent. In the rst game the Hawks faced a familiar foe, the Heat, with players from North Florida making up that team. The Hawks had lost to them in a previous championship game a few weeks ago. Not today, our defense was all over the place, said Sweatt. It looked at times like we had seven guys on defense! The Hawks allowed only three points in the rst half with the halftime score 18-3. In the second half the Heat hit a few three-pointers, and the nal score was 35-14. We did not play great on offense but our defense was so intense and fast that it made up for the lack of offense, said Sweatt. In the second game the Seahawks faced the Tallahassee Tarheels who already had secured a bid going to nationals. They managed to handle our full court press in the rst half very well as we did not come out playing as intense as the previous game, said Sweatt. Down 21-13 at the half, the Hawks were told to win the possession battles with our man-to-man defense in the 1/4 court and we will mix in some half court press in between, said Sweatt. Thats exactly what we did, winning the second half executing our defense and only allowing them to score seven points in the second half. Our offense picked up as our defense did and we won 38-27. In the third game, the semi nals, the Hawks faced the Georgia Rams. This game can be de ned as run because thats what our game plan was and thats what we forced them to do, said Sweatt. We won this game with a nal of 40-20. In the championship, the Hawks again faced the Tarheels, who had advanced in the losers bracket. This game was a battle, but our team speed was too much for them as we won 41-33, said Sweatt. It seemed close but they hit a couple of late treys to make it seem close. The kids were very excited to win this tournament as it means we are now going to Nationals in Hampton, Virginia this week. I am very proud of the team and I hope we will have Kelsey Jones and Logan McLeod back for Nationals. The Hawks competed in a July 26-28 tourney at Tallahassee Community College. This is the live recruiting week for college coaches so there should be some good exposure for the kids at this tourney and competition, Sweatt said. He thanked the teams sponsors for their support and donations Franklin County Recreation and Parks, Gander Auto Parts, Fishermans Choice, Sandy Beach Properties, C and S Service, Barbers Seafood, Gulf Coast Auto Parts, Reds Family Store LLC, Water Street Seafood, R Gray and Associates, Buddy Ward and Son Seafood, George Thompson, and Jimmy Gander. 16THANNUALSt.GeorgeIslandSizzlerONEMILEFUNRUNAND5KRACEBenettingtheFranklinCountyHumaneSocietySaturday,August10,2013St.GeorgeIsland,FL3:00pm -On-siteRegistrationinLighthousePark (centeroftheisland) 5:30pm -OneMileFunRun 6:00pm -5KRace 6:30pm -PostRacePartyandAwards Pre-RegistrationbyAugust8th-$25.00 On-siteRegistration-$30.00 RegistrationincludesT-shirt,racepacket,onePostRacePartyTicket. PostRacePartyandAwards -TobeheldattheLighthousePavillioninthecenterof St.GeorgeIsland.EnjoyFreshLocalSeafoodandBeverages WhileAwardsarePresentedAdditionalPostRacePartyTickets$15.00forAdults,$7.00Childrenunder12.www.stgeorgeislandsizzler.com www.stgeorgeislandsizzler.com BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 U.S.98COMMLOTS BELOWCITY.APP.PRICE C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,500COMM.BLDG.ON98&GULF FORRENT$500/MTH.MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Thursday, August 1, 2013 Page 9Members of the 13-and-under team have been learning to win this year.Seahawk summer hoopsters head to Nationals SUBMITTED PHOTOSMembers of the 16-and-under team celebrate their tournament win.

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 A10| The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91694T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE MATTER OF THE CITY OF BENTON, Plaintiff, and, MONET INVESTMENTS, LLC, THOMAS FRANK MOORE, VINOD C. GUPTA, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants, No. 2013-MR-11 PUBLICATION NOTICE TO: Monet Investments, LLC, Thomas Frank Moore, Vinod C. Gupta, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendants: This is Notice to you of the filing of Petitioner for Order Authorizing Demolition on the following property: LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK A IN PARKRIDGE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF BENTON, SUBJECT TO PRIOR RESERVATIONS, EXCEPTIONS AND CONVEYANCES OF THE COAL, OIL, GAS AND OTHER MINERALS UNDERLYING THE SAME, SITUATED IN F RANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN NUMBER: 08-20129-001 NOW THEREFORE, unless you file your response to the Petition filed herein, or otherwise make your appearance in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Illinois, within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this Notice, default may be entered against you at any time thereafter, and the relief request in such Petition for Order Authorizing Demolition may be granted. Nancy Hobbs Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Illinois July 18, 25, 2013 August 1, 2013 91808T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 13-00045 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES CARL MAYO, Deceased NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of JAMES CARL MAYO, deceased, Case Number 13-00045 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the joint personal representatives and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All persons having claims against this estate who are served with a copy of this notice are required to file with this court such claim within the later of three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or 30 days after the date of service of a copy of this notice on that person. Persons having claims against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file all claims against the estate within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 25, 2013. Joint Personal Representatives: GRACIE LAYFIELD 9145 SW Pitts Circle Kinard, FL 32449 And Charles Mayo 721 Hwy. 98 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 GETYOURADIN! 227-7847 LICENSEDANDINSURED 20YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O.Box439 Carrabelle,FL32322 697-2783orMobile566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 4515031 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 Special to The TimesPlanned and permitted, the Postum Bayou dredging project is underway at Carrabelle Boat Club. The anticipated project began on July 25 with Gator Dredging of Pinellas Park, the operators of the dredging vessel, positioning themselves at the mouth of the Carrabelle River. Dredging was in full operational mode as of Monday. The journey of the vessel will end at the Carrabelle Boat Club in approximately one week to 10 days, with Gator Dredging operating six days a week, Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily. The staff, as well as members of Carrabelle Boat Club, are delighted to see this project come to formation, said Amy Kilgore of Carrabelle Boat Club. Increasing the depth of the channel to ve feet mean low water (MLW) is the solution that our owners have been looking for, since in the past the low water depth has been a major concern. Channel depth will be controlled by an advanced on board GPS monitoring and tracking system attached to the cutter head and by an as built survey. Once the project is complete, it will conrm conformity to permit specications of ve feet MLW and channel width of 25 feet. Special to The TimesBeverly Edna Brown Goode is looking for her family. She knows she has roots in Carrabelle and Sumatra. She is related to Rowan and Dewey Brown. Here is her story. As a child, I was told by my father, Allison Claude Brown, that his father, Henry Jesse Brown, married Kate Sarvis and moved from some part of Georgia to Carrabelle. They lived in what is now known as Tates Hell area. He was in the lumber business, so he picked a great area to move since it is all trees and such. I can only imagine their hardships along the way and even more once they took up homestead. Can you imagine my father having to ride a horse to school when they lived so far from town? I recently visited the area and it took me by car, about a good 25 minutes to arrive where my grandfather is now laid to rest. Oh, and did I mention the mosquitoes I encountered? I cannot even imagine how they managed to get supplies living so far from Carrabelle, with only a horse and wagon. That must have been an all day event! As I said my grandfather was a logger, and from the stories I heard he was a very hardworking man. Unfortunately he was killed in a hunting accident. The death of my grandfather put a heavy burden on my father, who at the time was only 10 years old; he had to quit school to help take care of his mom and the homestead. Im not sure when they moved, but from there they ended up in Bell, and from there my father moved his family to Cedar Key, where I grew up. My father was born in 1892 and passed away in 1970 in Cedar Key. I have been unsuccessful locating my grandmothers grave. My father passed when I was 14 years old, my mother passed away when I was only 8, so I never asked too many questions as a young child. If you recognize the above pictures or have information about Goodes ancestry, you can contact her at 16424 Caju Road, Clermont, FL 34711 or call (407) 433-9426. Postum Bayou dredging underway SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs SThe Postum Bayou dredging project began July 25. FROM THE BROWN fF AMILY COLLECTIONAAbove: AJ Brannen, a friend of Allison Brown, is seen here with the gravesite markers and the headstone at Browns grave in 1964. RRight: Annie Fowler, right, is Allison Claude Browns rst wife; the man seated is Allison Claude Brown, Henry Browns son. Kate Sarvis, left, is Henry Browns wife and Allison Claude Browns mother. Searching for Henry Brown

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 1, 2013 The Times | A11 4515281 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO WITH POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ........................ $750 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 1 BR / 1 BR FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED IN LANARK ...................................................... $375 3 BR / 1 BR HOME IN CARRABELLE ................................................$700 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ................................. $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1110796 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCINGBORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 4515237Full-time Bus DriverApalachicola Bay Charter School seeks a for morning & afternoon routes in Franklin County. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 1113278 GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICERThis position will be responsible for supporting the educational mission of the college by encouraging corporations, foundations, & individuals to donate gifts, grants, or bequests of money or property to the college through personal and public presentations, written proposals, & special fund-raising events. Requires: Masters degree in Marketing, Communication, or Business. Experience working with small & large groups, foundations, grants & community organizations. Experience as a project leader & with soliciting of funds & campaigns. Salary commensurate with education & experience. This position will remain open until lled. Applications may be submitted at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. 1110075 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:ShipfitterS pipefitterS pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the:chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations:13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Eastpoint, FL 32328 RACHEL CHESNUT Attorney for Personal Representatives P.O. Box 501 Apalachicola, FL 32329 (850) 653-4611 FL Bar No. 0048331 July 25, Aug 1, 2013 91910T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN, COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION File No: 13-46-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF HAROLD AUGUST GRONHOLM JR. Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the ancillary estate of Harold August Gronholm Jr., deceased, whose date of death was July 10, 2012; is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 13-46-CP; the address of which is The Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: August 1, 2013 Personal Representative Scott Alan Gronholm 859 W. Bay Drive Dog Island, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Charles A. Curran, Florida Bar No. 274380 P.O. Box 549 Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850) 697-5333 Email: cacurranlaw@ gmail.com August 1, 8, 2013 91900T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida SelfStorage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: August 17, 2013 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Tonita Turner #147 Paul Craft #155 Before the sale date of August 17, 2013, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. August 1, 8, 2013 94393T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-42CA Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF ELAINE MARIE FEEHAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELAINE MARIE FEEHAN, deceased, whose date of death was May 14, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for FRANKLIN County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 18, 2013. Personal Representative: Margaret Mary Ederle 15436 SE 22nd Place Bellevue, Washington 98007 Attorney for Personal Representative: Kristy Branch Banks, PA Attorney for Margaret Mary Ederle FLBar No. 517143 PO Box 176 Apalachicola, FL32329 (850) 670-1255 Fax: (850) 670-1256 E-Mail: info@ kbblawfl.com Secondary E-Mail: susan@kbblawfl.com August 1, 8, 2013 94425T NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Apalachicola will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: SEAWALL REPAIR Project #219.005 Project is located in the City of Apalachicola, Florida and consists of approximately 400 linear feet of river stabilization (rip-rap & filter fabric) and wooden boardwalk removal and replacement. There will also be a bid alternate for steel sheet pile retaining wall with boardwalk removal and replacement. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. (850) 227-7200. The Bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Completion date for this project will be 75 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. The project is anticipated to start September 3, 2013. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $750.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for Seawall Repair . Bids will be received until 11:00 a.m (EDT), on August 6, 2013 at the Apalachicola City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, and will be opened and read aloud at that time. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. The City Commissioners reserves the right to waive information in any bid, to accept and/ or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of City of Apalachicola. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at the job site (Riverfront Park, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00a.m Eastern Time, August 1, 2013 All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Kennedy or Philip Jones at (850) 227-7200. July 25, August 1, 2013 94443T PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF APALACHICOLA REQUEST FOR DIVISION OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS GRANT SERVICES PROPOSALS The City of Apalachicola hereby requests proposals from qualified individuals or firms to provide Grant Administration services for its Culture Builds Florida (not to exceed $24,000, $20,000 grant funded, $4,000 locally funded) from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. Proposals must include a scope of work outlining how tasks are to be performed and a fee. A statement of understanding of the Goals and Objectives as well as a commitment to perform the work if selected must be provided by an individual authorized to bind the proposal, with an original signature. Submittals shall also include evidence of experience in Arts Administration, Cultural Tourism and/or Organizational Development. Corporations shall include a certificate of status/good standing. Scope of work, specifications for deliverables and proposal evaluation criteria are available at City Hall offices, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. Interested individuals or firms should submit an original and six copies of proposals, sealed and clearly labeled Sealed Proposal for School of Art Services. Proposals submitted by email or fax will not be considered. Proposals must be received by 2 p.m. on Friday, August 9, 2013 at the Apalachicola City Hall Office, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320. For further information, contact Revena Ramsey at 850-6531522 or revenaramsey @cityofapalachicola. com. Contracts resulting from the selection process will be subject to state and federal requirements and release of funds by the funding agency. The City of Apalachicola reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive technical errors, waive any informalities or irregularities, and award the contract in the best interest of the City. THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, FAIR HOUSING & HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION. July 25, August 1, 2013 94537T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000065 SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAKE T. BRYANT, et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 24, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA000065 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash Inside Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 15th day of August, 2013, at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lots 20 and 21, Block , each 50 X 199.5, according to an unrecorded 1956 map of the Northwest Quarter (1/4) of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, and which said Lots are further described as follows: Begin at a point, (LP, Stake), on the West boundary of the 100 foot Jefferson Street, 1618 feet due South and 996.5 Feet West of the Northwest Corner, (Concrete Monument), of said Northwest Quarter (Northwest 1/4); run thence West 199.5 Feet; thence South 100 Feet; thence East 199.5 Feet; thence North along said Jefferson Street, to the point of beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 2nd day of July, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff McCalla Raymer, LLC 110 SE 6th Street Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 July 25, August 1, 2013 94603T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192012CA 000380CAXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SUZANNE M. CHOQUETTE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUZANNE M. CHOQUETTE; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192012CA000380CA XXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SUZANNE M. CHOQUETTE; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA 32320, at 11:00 A.M., on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 36 AND 37, BLOCK 3, OF SUN N SAND BEACHES UNIT NO.2, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH MOBILE HOME THAT IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID LAND A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 6538861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-9558771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 12-04785 August 1, 8, 2013 94589T PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: In 52 housing units, relocate existing 220 volt lines from exterior front porch area to the inside kitchen/pantry; Construct dryer vents from the kitchen/pantry area to the exterior of each unit. Bids will be received until August 20, 2013. Please send bids to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. For questions, email apalha@fairpoint.net or call 850-653-9304. August 1, 8, 2013 Apalachicola: 192 & 194 17th St August 2nd & 3rd 9am -untilMulti-Family SaleMisc. Items Rain Date of 8/09, 8/10 Text FL60486 to 56654 Apalachicola: 49 9th St., (First Baptist Church Christian School.), August 3rd & 10th, Both Saturdays 8am-TillIndoor & Outdoor Yard SaleT o benefit the school Kitchen gadgets, new ceiling fans, twin box spring & mattress, clothes for whole family, etc. Rain or shine! Flood Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Housekeepers and MaintenanceExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34260536 Text FL60536 to 56654 Food ServiceCooksApalachicola River Walk Cafe Needed for breakfast, lunch, dinner, flex hrs Mon -Sat. Apply in person at: 17 Ave. E., Apalachicola (Next to the Dixie Theater) Web ID#: 34258152 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityExperienced WaitstaffBayside Burgerslocated at 260 Hwy 98 in Eastpoint is taking applications for experienced wait staff. Call 850-670-1025 or apply in person. Web ID# 60051 Text FL60051 to 56654 OtherDriver / SalesHiring Immediately. Drivers must have valid drivers license. Company provides vehicle. Also have two positions for Sales. Paid cash daily. Call Carmen at 850-370-0952. Web ID#: 34259712 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL59072 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL58599 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Harley Davidson, Softail Nightrain (FXSTB), 2001, Looks great, runs great! Many upgrades. Asking $8700 850-319-8634Text FL60393 to 56654

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, August 1, 2013 4515355 SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD 850-545-5852|850-697-1010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com 4515291 Enjoyyourownprivatebeachinthissparselypopulatedareaof NorthwestFloridaknownasBigBend.Thisbeautiful,halfanacre, gulffrontlothasnaturalvegetationwithawhitesandybeach, fantasticviewsandsunrises. JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#249387$75,000St.GeorgeIsland4515289 ISLANDCORNERLOTLargesanddunesandabundantnativevegetation,thishigh anddrycornerlotislocatedinthequietGulfBeaches neighborhood,lotmeasures100x160,Gulfviewislikely fromhouseonpilings.WestPineAvenue&EastSawyer Street,ListedbyMichaelBillings. JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#249176$139,000ApalachicolaUNOBSTRUCTEDBAYVIEWWellmaintainedtownhome,builtin2006,2BR, 2.5BA,tastefullyfurnished&decorated,readyfor immediateoccupancy,livingroom&upstairsmaster BRoverlooktheApalachicolaBayandspectacular sunrises.Hwy98,ListedbyMichaelBillings. 4515296 LocatedonapeninsulawithinthegatedPlantationcommunityandsurroundedbybeautifulviewsofthe Bayandmarsh,thishomeistheperfectpeacefulplacetoenjoynatureandtoinviteovernightgueststotheir privatequarters!Mainhouseincludeslivinganddiningrooms,kitchen,mastersuitewithoutdoorshower, screenedporchwithindoor/outdoorreplace.Guestwingincludes3bedrooms,livingroom,morningkitchen andlaundry!Veryprivateoutdoorhottubaccessiblefrombothareasofthisuniquehomeoverlooksthemarsh withoutstandingviews.Thiscustombuilthomewithbeautifulcabinets,pineoors/trim,lotsofcareful detailsgivingafeelingofasecludedgetawaywaslovinglycraftedbytheowners.Coveredgarage,water ltrationsystem,circulardrive,beautifullandscapingmakethisamustseehome! ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.1431PelicanLane.com Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthem toyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe, Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com Special to The TimesWorld Breastfeeding Week is celebrated around the world on August 1-7 each year. Franklin County will celebrate it twice! Franklin County WIC will celebrate World Breastfeeding Week 2013 in Apalachicola Aug. 1 from 11 a.m. to noon at 139 12th St. Then they will have another celebration in Carrabelle, on Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 11 a.m. to noon, at 106 Northeast 5th St. WIC staff and volunteers will provide fun prizes and refreshments along with information about nutrition and breastfeeding for WIC participants. This years World Breastfeeding Week theme, Breastfeeding Support: Close to Mothers, highlights the importance of providing support to breastfeeding families. The WIC program plays a vital role in providing support to breastfeeding moms. The WIC program offers a breastfeeding friendly environment with support from trained breastfeeding peer counselors. Deciding what and how to feed an infant is one of the most important decisions that new families make. Evidence is clear that breastfeeding is the ideal way to feed an infant. Research shows that infants who are not exclusively breastfed for their rst six months of life are more likely to develop a wide range of chronic and acute diseases, including ear infections, diarrheal diseases, asthma, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, obesity and respiratory illnesses. Mothers also benet from breastfeeding with a decreased risk for breast and ovarian cancers. World Breastfeeding Week is coordinated globally by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA). For more information, visit the WABA website at www.waba.org.my. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. 1) What was Detroit most renowned for manufacturing at the turn of the 20th century? Staplers, Chewing tobacco, Boots, Bicycles 2) Nathaniel Taylor portrayed what character on older TVs Sanford and Son? Bubba, Rollo, Grady, Lamont 3) Phobos, one of the moons of Mars, makes how many complete orbits around the planet every day? One half, 3, 6, 27 4) What did most everyone in the Middle Ages believe was the seat of intelligence? Stomach, Brain, Heart, Eyes 5) From recent surveys what is considered the most honest profession? Ministry, Nursing, Teaching, Carpentry 6) Studies support that people perform better on tests when they have what? Good pencil, Breakfast, Not much sleep, A cold 7) Lili de Alvarez was the 1st woman player to do what at Wimbledon? Cuss ofcial, Wear shorts, Throw racket, Default match 8) Who is the only former president buried within the boundaries of Washington, D.C.? Wilson, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan 9) In 1903 how many days did it take the rst automobile to cross the U.S.? 11, 25, 52, 100 10) Brutus Thornapple is/was the star of what comic strip? Drabble, The Buckets, Flight Deck, The Born Loser 11) In an operation what is ordinarily removed in a hysterectomy? Appendix, Gall Bladder, Uterus, Abscessed tooth 12) Which continent has the greatest number of countries? Europe, Asia, Africa, S. America 13) The Asian Flu originated in what country? China, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam 14) How many points are on a Maltese cross? 8, 10, 12, 14 ANSWERS 1) Chewing tobacco. 2) Rollo. 3) 3. 4) Heart. 5) Nursing. 6) A cold. 7) Wear shorts. 8) Wilson. 9) 52. 10) The Born Loser. 11) Uterus. 12) Africa. 13) China. 14) 8. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com County celebrates World Breastfeeding Week School BRIEfFS SS tuff the B B us with school supplies A Stuff the Bus with school supplies effort is now under way to gather supplies for students and teachers as the school year approaches. The effort is seeking to gather items that students can use. Needed are such items as backpacks, No. 2 pencils and mechanical, cap erasers, pens (black and blue), red pens, expo markers, highlighters, glue sticks, colored pencils, 24-count crayons, three-ring one inch binders (not exible, single colored), tab dividers for 3-ring binders (5 per pack), plastic folders with two pockets, multi-colored card stock, white and colored index cards, wide ruled loose leaf paper, spiral notebooks, construction paper and scissors. The teachers wish list includes white copy paper, Clorox wipes, Kleenex, white and colored index cards, yellow plastic pocket folders, electric pencil sharpener, dry erase markers and colored and black ink for printers cartridge sizes (Hp950XL, Hp951XL, Hp564). For your convenience, there will be a school supply drop off bus in Carrabelle, Eastpoint, and Apalachicola Aug. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.Head S S tart now accepting applicationsHead Start Centers in Eastpoint and Carrabelle are now accepting applications for the 2013-14 school year. Head Start offers free pre-school for 3and 4 year old children of income qualied families. Students receive early childhood development services along with medical, dental and mental health care. To enroll your child in Head Start, please call (850) 222-2043 ext. 223. Or visit the Eastpoint Head Start Center on School Road, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., or the Carrabelle Center, on North 5th Street, Mondays and Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Head Start is a program of the Capital Area Community Action Agency and is funded, in part, by a grant from the United Way of the Big Bend.