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The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 07-11-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00230

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 07-11-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00230

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Thunder and rain put a damper on county celebrations last week. Tourists who arrived last Saturday for a week of patriotic fun got more than they bargained for when rain bands from a tropical depression in the southern Gulf of Mexico inundated the area and stirred up blustery winds and occasional thunder and lightning. During the rst week of July, the By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Bad news landed in the county’s lap last week with the announcement the Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola would close this month. Christopher Atkins, warden of Carrabelle’s Franklin Correctional Institution, which oversees Bay City, told county commissioners July 2 he learned a day earlier of the closure, set to be completed by month’s end. Atkins said the Florida Department of Corrections is running a $73 million de cit and that other camps would be closing as well to help stanch the red ink. The Bay City inmates —there were 282 as of June 2011 — are “moving to brand new camps with lower operating costs,” he said. “As soon as we found out, we wanted to let you know. “Nobody will be losing their job,” Atkins said. “We are hiring more staff for an additional dorm at FCI, and there will be promotion opportunities.” Ann Howard, communications director for the DOC, said the department was in a de cit but would not con rm its size. “We have no of cial number yet; the scal year just started,” she said. She said the DOC would be closing facilities in Brevard and Glades counties, and opening work camps in Union, Liberty and FCI, the latter thought to absorb the bulk of the Bay City inmates. “They will be moved, not necessarily to FCI,” she said. “We don’t discuss movements of inmates until they are securely moved.” Howard said closure of Bay City and the opening of the new FCI work camp would gain between 10 and 14 additional jobs. Bay City employed about 67 correctional of cers as of March 2011. The FCI work camp “will be By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Vandals to St. George Island’s BJ’s Pizza, before one of the biggest weekends of the year, did an uncool thing. “We opened July 4 morning. We showed up at 10 a.m. and went in to start working and setting everything up,” owner Billy Blackburn said. His son Brad soon discovered the air conditioning did not work. George Pruett of Pruett’s Air Conditioning told Blackburn there was no Freon in the dining room unit. Pruett lead the investigation, which found something other than cold air coming out. “We started noticing all this oil leaking out on the coils,” Blackburn said. “That’s when we started noticing little holes.” Holes in the grills, likely made by an ice pick or awl, were visible on the outside air conditioning units. “They’re stabbing the grills trying to nd the coils,” Blackburn said, estimating the incident happened overnight July 3. “This was a very vengeful person who knew exactly what they were doing to pick July 4,” he said. Blackburn said all but two of his two dozen employees would have worked the long holiday weekend, and most would have made overtime. Bay City Work Camp closing BJ’s Pizza owner Billy Blackburn points out damage to an airconditioning unit. A vandal climbed behind this unit and damaged it. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times See CAMP A3 See BJ’S A3 gained for when rain bands from a tropical depression in the southern Gulf of Mexico inundated the area and stirred up blustery winds and occasional thunder and lightning. During the rst week of July, the xxxxx Index PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LEFT: A pair of Georgia peaches anks Uncle Sam on the third place oat on St. George Island. TOP RIGHT: Chason Martina wheels his way along Water Street in Apalachicola during the Independence Day parade. BOTTOM RIGHT: Amy and Lee Macky of Valdosta, Ga., decorated Boss for the occasion. BELOW: Uncle Sam and Captain America both came to Apalachicola’s celebration on July 3. See FOURTH A2 Red, wet and blue Nabors to lead road department Commission debates supervisor pay By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County commissioners last week quietly selected Howard Nabors to head the road department, and then loudly debated how much he and the other department heads ought to be paid. In a 3-2 vote, with Commissioners Pinki Jackel and Williams Massey opposed, the commissioners on July 2 selected Nabors to replace Hubert Chipman, who retired earlier this year. The vote came after commissioners held public interviews with Nabors and the other candidate for the job, DeWitt Polous, who heads mosquito control. The motion for Nabors was made by Commissioner Noah Lockley, seconded by Commissioner Smokey Parrish and quickly approved without discussion by the divided commission. What followed turned out to be the most contentious aspect of the morning, as commissioners wrangled over how much to pay Nabors and whether other department heads’ salaries, including those who have served in an interim capacity, ought to be bumped up. Chairman Cheryl Sanders opened the discussion by noting that when Fonda Davis was selected to replace Van Johnson as head of solid waste, his salary was moved up to $45,000. “Supervisors are on average $45,000,” she said. “Hubert (Chipman) was at $52,000.” See ROAD A2 Vandalism heats up, closes down BJ’s Revelers dodge raindrops July 4 Thursday, July 11, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 11 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | FOURTH OF JULY Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 Marine lab penguin lecture today The Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab Conservation Lecture Series, free and open to the public, will be at 7 p.m. today in the lab’s auditorium at St. Teresa. Speaking will be Dr. Heidi Geisz, an adjunct faculty member, on “Deep Thaw: The Adlie Penguin and Climate Change,” about the fate of these penguins in Antarctica. For more info, call 697-4120. Learn about coastal water birds See pictures and learn about the diversity of water birds that use coastal habitats throughout the region from 3-4 p.m. July 18 at the Apalachicola Environmental Education and Training Center, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For more info, call 670-7700. Discover county’s oldest visitors From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in July, enjoy a presentation about “Sea Turtles, Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors” by the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve at 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. For more info, call 670-7700. C-Quarters prepares for youth shing tourney C-Quarters Youth Fishing Tournament in Carrabelle will be July 19-20 for children 16 and younger. At completion of the Friday clinic, each child receives a rod and reel, a T-shirt, hat and bait. There are nine categories of sh with three places in each category; trophies awarded for each category. On Saturday morning, the kids can sh from docks or, if they can go out on a boat, they are allowed to sh the Carrabelle River up to Dog Island. Lunch will be provided. All participants must be registered before the tournament. Visit www. c-quartersmarina.com. Library renewal, A5

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 Jackel noted Davis re ceived a $5,000 increase, which in Nabors’ case would mean his pay would be bumped up from $37,200 to $42,200. “The man, he’s train ing all the people, he just doesn’t have the position,” Lockley said. “He say he do a lot of training, so he’s been training.” Sanders pressed her case. “Howard is coming from rank and le; he’s not coming from supervisory material. I’m looking at him being comparative to what Van was making at solid waste. “We put Fonda up at $45,000; it’s only right to put Howard up to $45,000 if that’s what we choose to do,” she said. “He deserves a little more consideration to me than $5,000. He’s been there a little over 26 years. I think that speaks for itself right there.” The motion for $45,000 passed unanimously, but the issue of salaries was not over. Jackel brought up whether additional pay might be due Polous for the time served as in terim head of the road department. Sanders took up the matter. “When Alan (Pierce) left that time — two times to be exact — we never raised his pay,” she said. “When Fonda (Davis) was in, we never paid him extra. I don’t think it would be going along the right lines to pay him extra.” Jackel noted commis sioners raised a worker’s pay by $2 an hour when they did additional interim work, but Sanders replied that this involved a me chanic, and not someone in a supervisory position. “I don’t have a problem with it as long as we re imburse Mark (Curenton) and Fonda for the time they’ve put in,” Sanders said. “What we did to Fon da is because his mechan ic was out; to me it’s differ ent. Let’s be consistent.” “We have to go back for everybody,” Lockley said. Jackel moved to re visit interim positions of Davis, Curenton and Polous, and “whoever it encompasses.” That motion carried unanimously, but the dis cussion continued. Nikki Millender, head of the county’s parks and recreation, told commis sioners, “When I received department head, I only received a $2,500 raise. No assistant, no secretary, I’m out every day sweating. I don’t even make $37,000.” Jackel moved to set a minimum salary for department heads that would have moved up Mil lender and perhaps others to $45,000. Sanders voiced her views. “I want to ask you all something. We’re giv ing a man a position of su perintendent of roads; he’s been there 26 years. That’s all we asked. “We’ve got everybody coming up here, but look. He’s been there 26 years — doesn’t anyone see what I’m saying?” she said. “If y’all ain’t been there 27 years like him, you’re not gonna get it.” Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson said the discus sion was “opening up the door” to future requests from other employees for additional compensation. “Today’s not the day to do it,” Sanders said. “We’re here (for Nabors’ salary), not to be up here jewing over somebody’s pay. I can’t believe that you all would put a man down who has worked here for 26 years because he don’t have a high school education.” Massey took exception. “Don’t be hollering,” he told Sanders. “I’m all for giving him a raise.” Sanders suggested the matter of department heads’ salaries be dis cussed as part of the bud geting process, set to be gin July 18. “Now is not the time to talk about a raise in pay. We need to do that in about three weeks,” she said. Issue raised over high school diploma The two candidates for the position, Nabors and Polous are both depart ment employees with more than 20 years of experi ence, well in excess of the eight-year requirement on the job description. Polous, supervisor of mosquito control, acted as interim assistant supervi sor in the absence of a per manent appointee. He had worked for the roads department since 1993, but was laid off for two years before return ing “to do just about ev erything you can imagine at that landll,” he said. After that, Polous was promoted to head of mos quito control, where he divided his time equally between that and the road department. He said he had done budgeting and supervised two employees for the past 13 years. “My computer skills improved over the years. I really applied my self to that and picked up a lot of skills.” Polous, who graduat ed from Carrabelle High School in 1987, is certied in public health pest con trol, holds a commercial driver’s license and is able to supervise inmates. His resume lists 13 continu ing education certicates including disaster man agement, damage assess ment, debris control, stor age tank management, advance mosquito control and supervisory training at Florida State University. Nabors said he “logged a couple years before I started with the county,” more than 26 years ago, and since has handled all the tools of the trade. “I trained a lot of the crew that’s out there now,” he said. “There’s a big dif ference between running a piece of equipment and operating it.” Nabors attended high school in Apalachicola in 1984, but there is no men tion of a diploma in his resume. County Planner Alan Pierce said he has not completed a General Education Development exam. In response to a ques tion from Jackel, County Attorney Michael Shuler said the board could con sider “any combination of training and experience which provides the re quired knowledge, skills and abilities to perform the job.” Nabors told commis sioners his “computer skills ain’t too good, but I can try to learn.” He said he planned to rely on (Vir ginia Messer) to “help a lot with the budget and stuff.” Parrish asked whether Nabors was familiar with reports. “What reports are you talking about now?” Nabors said. “All our crew turns a work paper in ev ery day, different areas where they work, and ev ery two weeks she makes the work order up. What dirt you get or what grass is cut or what ditches or culvert pipe is put in.” Nabors said he would work to improve the mo rale at the road depart ment and volunteered a test period for his hire. “We can try to have a better workplace; I think I can do that,” he said. “Six month probation, if I cain’t.” Parrish underlined the condition. “I’d like for us evaluate whoever the in dividual is for six months. Whoever we put there has not been there before.” C all f or inf or mation about our r ot ating specialists: W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: AP00 2091548 ROAD from page A1 county received more than 4 inches of rain. The deluge began with more than a halfinch of rain on Wednesday evening, July 3. The Apalachicola Maritime Museum canceled its planned celebration, but Main Street Apalachicola, organizers of the Apalachicola Indepen dence Day parade and fete, opted to carry on in spite of dire weather predictions. Bill Grimes, who loaned a barge for use in the reworks display, spent 24 hours on a solo voyage bringing it from St. Marks. With the exception of a drenching shower as the last of the decorated vehicles in the Red, White and Blue Parade arrived at Riverside Park, the event came off with out a hitch. Jim Bachrach, spokesman for Main Street, said 5,000 people attended the celebra tion with many spectators watching from the John Gor rie Bridge. The pyrotechnic display was truly spectacular and could be viewed from all over town. Bachrach thank all of the Main Street volunteers and sponsors who made this year’s event a success. “Everybody’s enthusiasm was unbelievable,” he said. “We already have donations toward next year’s Indepen dence Day celebration. The musical performers were tre mendous. Apalachicola Com munity Choir blew people away. We really appreciate Project Impact for their part in the children’s celebration as well. We are already in the planning stages for next year, and our goal is to double the size of the reworks display.” St. George Island and Car rabelle had both set July 4 as the date for their celebra tions, but it turned out to be the wettest day in a sodden week with more than 1.5 inch es of rain. This was nowhere near the record for that date, 2.59 inches set in 1958, but both venues postponed their festivities in the face of the stormy weather. The traditional island parade took place on Fri day morning, July 5, which was still blustery but free of thunder and lightning on the island. Abundant precipita tions led to a few changes in the usual island pageant. The route was shortened to avoid deep puddles of standing water. Only about 40 oats lined up, as opposed to 120 last year. The crowd lining the parade route was also much smaller than in previous years. Vickie Frost, of Eddy Teach’s Raw Bar, organized this year’s is land spectacle. In spite of the iffy weather, hundreds of gallons of water —encased in balloons, shot from water guns and hoses and even tossed from buckets and plastic cups — passed be tween onlookers and partici pants in the procession this year. A notable new entry was a golf cart rigged to squirt streams of water from clan destine jets in the canopy. Not on hand this year was Miss Liberty and the island ladder truck. Winner of the competition for the best oat was Capt. Clint Taylor and Team Big Fish. Fann Construction planted more than 1,000 American ags to mark the parade route. Elliot Fann said he hopes to make this an annual tradition. Parks and Recreation Di rector Nikki Millender, who had not experienced an is land parade in the past, said she plans to enter a oat next year. “That’s good, clean fun,” she said. Friday night, Carrabelle launched a successful re works display to the delight of the community. Renee Bran nan, a spokesperson for Car rabelle, said the display came off with no problems. “Marine Street and 98 were lined with people watch ing the show,” she said. “It was awesome.” St. George Island nished the week’s festivities with a 30-minute reworks display in front of the Blue Parrot on Saturday night, July 6. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times DeWitt Polous, left, and Howard Nabors await the hiring decision. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Caelyn Constantine is a regular in the St. George Island parade. FOURTH from page A1

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, July 11, 2013 “It would have been an excellent day — all week it’s been. The game guy for the game room had his best week ever because of all the rain,” he said. “If a merchant on St. George Island isn’t making money right now, they better close the doors. There’s some thing wrong with their business.” Blackburn, who opened the dining spot and hangout in 1990 with his wife, Judy, said he checked around to see whether other busi nesses had experienced similar vandalism. “All the other restau rants and bars are ne,” he said. “Whoever did this walked beside two air con ditioner units at Prudential to get my four. They were coming after me. “They knew exactly what they were doing. Somebody has something against BJ’s. We just don’t know why, or who.” The nancial loss was considerable, about $75,000 including lost business, which insurance does not cover. Cases of frozen food, including 20 cases of chick en, “all had to be thrown away. We make dough one day and let it sit 24 hours. All that has to be thrown away.” Pruett estimated the replacement cooling units and air conditioners would run more than $10,000, with parts shipped free by Trane. The restaurant reopened Wednesday morning. Blackburn made a brief attempt to stay open despite the vandalism, but “when the temperature got to 104 degrees in the kitchen and it was raining outside, I was afraid one of my employees would get hurt.” Blackburn said he isn’t sure whom to suspect, but possibilities, even remote ones come to mind. A dis gruntled employee, a rival business, even the angry residue from family strife are being considered. Law enforcement said they are pursuing leads in the case. “There are people out there that would have a mo tive to do things, and some body knows things,” said Blackburn, who is offering a $5,000 reward for the ar rest and conviction of the perpetrators. “And I will deliver it in $100 bills personally to ’em,” he said. opening this month, not sure when,” Howard said. Atkins stressed to county commissioners, “We don’t plan on stopping work squad ser vices. As far as transports, we’ll have to be creative, (and use) buses instead of individual trucks.” He said the DOC is doing its best to accommodate the situa tion. “We’re going to be as ex ible as we can,” he said. County Commission Chair man Cheryl Sanders noted the county had written several let ters asking that Bay City not be closed. The commissioners then quickly focused on the logistics of how work squads would be handled. In his interview seeking the post as head of the road depart ment, DeWitt Polous, interim head of the department since Hubert Chipman’s retirement earlier this year, said “there’s not a lot of difference between going to Apalachicola and Carrabelle. The distance is 2 to 3 miles. “We have two buses at the county yard right now. I’d like to assign some inmate squads to specic zones and leave trucks parked at satellite stations” he said. Polous noted the county is down from ve regularly dis patched inmate squads. “We haven’t been operating at full ca pacity since Lamar (Hardy) left,” he said. “One or two days a week it seems like the DOC calls the squads in and won’t let them out, for whatever reason. It’s hot.” Alan Pierce, county director of administrative services, noted the buses would not have to be caged. “Every inmate squad leader will have to be on the bus to sign them out,” Commissioner Wil liam Massey said. Commissioner Smokey Par rish said additional transporta tion time would mean a loss of time working by the inmates. “How many hours a day are we losing to have to do this stuff, in actual work time?” he asked. “Some hours can be revised or revamped so it works for everybody.” Sanders closed the discus sion by asking that she, Pierce and Sheriff Mike Mock meet with the warden “to see what we can organize to make it more cost ef cient for the county.” Apalachicola to lose water, sewer revenue The biggest concern over the closure was voiced at the Apala chicola city commission meeting July 2. City Administrator Betty Tay lor Webb said the city received $134,000 in water and sewer rev enue from Bay City during the 2012-13 scal year. “It’s going to be a really tough budget year,” she said. “It’s coming a lot faster than any of us would like. It’s here,” said County Attorney Michael Shuler, who was in the audience. Howard said a reverter clause in place when the county rst gave the land to the state in 1989 would mean the land and build ings would be deeded back to the county once the closure was complete. Apalachicola Mayor Van John son said he met three weeks ago with Dr. Frederick Humphries, president emeritus of Florida A&M University, who thought a good idea would be to use the site as a marine science acade my that could draw scholars and students from around the coun try to do research. Humphries, a former chem istry professor, had suggested money from the foundation set up by Sam Walton, founder of Wal-Mart, might be available to fund the institution, Johnson said. “We just don’t want this op portunity to escape us,” the may or said. The county’s representatives in Tallahassee both are opposed to the move. “This has been rumored for quite some time,” said State Sen. Bill Montford, who learned of DOC Secretary Michael Crews’ decision last week. “The issue about closure is not new. I’ve opposed the clos ing of it all along, and my argu ment has been the same. My argument has been that it makes good economic sense and trans fers everybody over to the new one in the short run. That might look like the right thing to do,” he said. “If you look at the full im pact of this decision, then it is not a wise decision nancially, not a wise decision in terms of jobs. There are far reaching implica tions of this that need to be taken into account.” He said both he and State Rep. Halsey Beshears plan to discuss their opposition to closure with DOC ofcials. “I have tremendous respect for his (Crews’) judgment,” Montford said. “I’m not sure the legislative side should get involved with those kind of deci sions. On this particular issue I disagree with him, as the senator who represents those constitu ents there.” Montford said the county’s legislators asked to be notied of any closures of work squads and are seeking more details on planning. “I’m looking forward to that interaction,” he said. “Let me see the plan. What I’ve asked for is their short-range plan and their long-range plan. I’d like to look at it. I look forward to vigor ous discussion before it’s closed. “This has an impact on sur rounding counties as well be cause a lot of people work there. We should pause, and we should stop. This facility is not located in central Florida where there are other job opportunities. They have had more than their share of troubling times. This is one more detrimental factor that’s entering into their equa tion down there. The community can’t afford this.” Beshears was more resigned. “I always support the state try ing to do what’s right in terms of their budget,” he said. “At the end of the day, they’re consolidating. It cuts some costs overall. I sup port the DOC in trying to balance their budget. “I don’t like surprises. This decision was done before any thing (was discussed). I’d like to see those exact numbers my self,” he said. “Maybe we can do something about it next year. My heart goes out for the people. It’s going to be harder for them to commute. I am thankful that they have somewhere else to go in the reasonable vicinity. We are fortunate that there is some where else to work.” Montford said he planned to press his argument to the DOC and “to look at the total compre hensive impact,” including the loss of sewer and water revenue. “That’s a big hit in their bud get. How do they make that up?” he said. “Franklin County is a de pressed area. It’s hurting.” Montford suggested bowing to this ght might be the outcome. “If they move forward with it, I will do my best to mitigate the damage, and we’ll move on,” he said. The future, in the state sena tor’s view, calls for nding a good use for the facility. “I would hope we would not mothball it and nd another alternative use for it,” Montford said. “Clearly, we got to be creative in what we do.” He said local ofcials need to be brought into the discus sion of “what can we do with this facility?” Montford added cost of a fu ture plan must be considered. “When you’re being creative, it’s going to cost,” he said. “We’ve got the expertise here to try to address the issue. It’s incumbent on us to nd an alternative use for that facility. A joint public-pri vate effort may be the answer. “The slate is clean.” 4514931 NOTICE OF ANNU AL MEETING The Boar d of Commissioners of the Northw est Florida R egional Housing A uthority will hold its Ann ual Meeting on J ul y 18, 2013, a t the Holida y Inn & Suites 2725 Gr a v es R oad, T allahassee Florida. Meeting will begin a t 1:00 p .m. E.D .S .T The meeting will be open to the pub lic. BJ’S from page A1 CAMP from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The Times The Bay City Work Camp is to close by the end of the month. A work camp is expected to opened at Franklin Correction Institution, right, where the majority of Bay City inmates likely will be moved.

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Interesting contrast regarding private vendors As Gomer Pyle would say Surprise, surprise, surprise. Having just started a tupelo honey distribution business, I decided so I thought it would be great to be a vendor at the July 3 Apalachicola festivities and, when seeing Joe Taylor scurrying around as usual, approached him with my vendor idea, and my paying a fee for each bottle sold, paid to whichever entity was appropriate. Joe quickly informed me my fee would have to be 100 percent of my sales proceeds. I thought I had misheard. I was confused. This was not just a surprise, it was downright amazing and absurd. Who would ever agree to such? Well, Joe said again thats the way it is. Upon then going to Carrabelle with the same idea, I was told come right on, no fee at all. I insisted on a fee and then approaching their chamber of commerce my proposal was courteously accepted and they welcomed me. An interesting contrast. I am still somewhat perplexed. Where is Gomer when I need him? Frank Venable Eastpoint Taxpayers should question Bay City closure When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people The beginning of a famous document and how appropriate that it must be used once again during this time of year. It has become necessary for the citizens of Franklin County to once again unite as one family. A plan has been developed to relocate jobs from the west side of the county and move them to the east. Specifically, closing Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola to open Franklin Work Camp in Carrabelle. However, the impact of such a move has not been fully examined. Why is this move necessary? We are told to offset the deficit and no jobs will be lost, so how can this improve the deficit when in fact just the opposite will happen? More correctional officers will be required to operate the larger, new facility at Franklin CI; an additional 10-15 staff will be required to operate with an added cost of $400,000. This comes at a time when the Department of Corrections is facing a shortfall of $40 million during the first month of the new fiscal year. One would conclude that this deficit will only increase over a years time. Why wasnt this not discussed during the legislative session? When our elected representatives could have questioned senior DOC staff. Instead, this is being fast-tracked and the community will barely have time to respond. Taxpayers should question: Is this a wise investment or an efficient manner with which to spend funds that arent available? We should question where is DOC coming up with this additional money? Certainly going forward with this plan will not reduce the deficit by one penny. We are told they would save from lower maintenance repairs over the years. However, little has been spent to upkeep Bay City Work Camp over the years. It appears, just from the surface, a new facility was constructed at a time when the Florida Dept. of Corrections didnt need the beds. Criminal justice estimating conference states in part: The projected prison population is 1,496 lower than the September forecast at the end of scal years 2009 through 2010, and even lower at the end of 2104 through 2015. Another reason DOC announced plans in 2012 to close approximately 11 facilities, however, some were spared. Management has long been aware that fewer beds would be required for in the short or long term. So why was the new camp constructed? A question that taxpayers of Franklin County should be asking of the governor and state politicians. Now to the larger question: What to do with a new facility, let it sit? Probably not; should the employees of Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola suffer for this poor decision? We are all taxpayers; many questioned the wisdom of constructing this facility. There will be a domino effect should this be fully implemented. For example, the City of Apalachicola will lose approximately $150,000 from the loss of revenue generated from the water/sewer system. Historic Apalachicola could be in jeopardy. Political leaders of the city will weigh out how best to proceed. Will it be worth the investment to continue supervising inmate work squads? How does the city offset this loss? Raising rates on existing customers or laying off employees. Neither one is acceptable to this struggling economy and community. Franklin County has long been designated one of Critical Economic Concern. At a time when the county commissioners should be looking for answers that would bene t the whole of Franklin County, we nd more evidence of political maneuvering that only increases the which side of the river mentality. We would hope that they could put aside their views for the betterment of the county, and put all their effort into making sure both work camps are in operation, This way new jobs are added thereby increasing the economy in Carrabelle while not diminishing the economy of Apalachicola and Eastpoint. Lets put all of Franklin County to work by keeping Bay City open and bringing Franklin Work Camp online. Theresa Amison USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 A Page 4 Section Special to the Times Imagine your 90year-old mother has Alzheimers disease and is near death. But before she became mentally incompetent, she gave you power of attorney to sign a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order so medical personnel would honor her wishes to die peacefully, without aggressive medical interventions in her nal days. Then your worst nightmare unfolds: your mother goes into cardiac arrest, and is subjected to the very treatment she had been determined to avoid: aggressive, traumatic cardio pulmonary resuscitation, and other extreme measures, including having a hole cut in her throat, being injected with paralyzing drugs, having tubes forced down her throat and into her stomach, and having air forced into her lungs. Two days after this aggressive, traumatic resuscitation, you are in the indescribably horrifying situation of having to direct that your mothers ventilator be removed so she can nally die and her suffering end. But she lingers on in a slow decline for another ve days while you maintain a heartbreaking, bedside vigil each day and night until she nally passes away. Then to add insult to injury, the hospital hands you a bill for this unwanted medical treatment totaling thousands of dollars. Sound preposterous? Unfortunately, its not. It is Sharon Halladas real life, front page news nightmare. It prompted the leading national organization dedicated to ensuring that medical professionals honor patients end-of-life choices, Compassion & Choices, to help Sharon le a lawsuit against a hospital and a nursing home in Lakeland, Florida, for failing to honor her mothers wishes, despite the fact that they had been clearly and legally speci ed in the DNR. Sharon sued on behalf of her deceased mother, Marjorie Mangiaruca, to ensure no elses parent has to endure this kind of traumatic experience. In fact, medical professionals override or ignore many patients decisions in the weeks and months before their deaths. It happens for a variety of reasons and can lead to invasive and fruitless testing, needless suffering, unrelenting pain and a prolonging of the period before death. Patients are tethered to monitors and machines despite their determination to reject treatment and desire to die at home in the embrace of loved ones. A recent study published in Journal of the American Medical Association found that between 2000 and 2009 treatment in intensive care units in the last month of life increased from 24 to 29 percent. The accompanying editorial concluded, The focus appears to be on providing curative care in the acute hospital regardless of likelihood of bene t or preferences of patients. If programs aimed at reducing unnecessary care are to be successful, patients goals of care must be elicited and treatment options such as palliative and hospice care offered earlier in the process than is the current norm. To stop this disturbing trend, policy makers can and should provide both the carrot and the stick to ensure that patients wishes are honored: nancial incentives for honoring advance directives and nancial disincentives for disregarding patients expressed wishes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) should deny payment to providers when there is clear evidence that patients were subjected to treatments they didnt want just as current policies deny payment when patients receive unnecessary treatment. The Justice Department is investigating hospitals and doctors groups for unnecessary treatment and taking legal action against the perpetrators when they nd evidence of such treatment. The same diligence should be trained on unwanted medical treatment. It is always unnecessary and should never be considered acceptable. Compassion & Choices recently recommended CMS initiate several steps to improve the quality of conversations among health care professionals, patients and families about end-of-life decisions, including: Reimbursing medical providers for participation in advanced care planning with patients and their families well in advance of illness or before facing end of life; Providing nancial incentives and training to encourage medical providers to offer all the information and counseling necessary for a patients decision making when they secure informed consent; Ensuring that the full range of medical care and treatment decisions, including curative care, palliative care and medical assistance in dying, are freely available to patients without institutional or reimbursement barriers. The explosion of the aging population coupled with the nations nancial and moral commitment to providing health care to an ever-increasing number of Americans reveals that the scourge of unwanted medical treatment must be an urgent priority for our nation. Mickey MacIntyre is chief program of cer for the nations leading end-oflife choice advocacy group, Compassion & Choices. He recently testi ed before the Institute of Medicines Committee on Transforming End-of-Life Care. Sean Crowley is media relations manager for Compassion & Choices and a former press secretary for U.S. Rep. Sander Levin, the ranking member of the House Appropriations Committee, which has jurisdiction over federal health care programs. This article previously appeared in The Hill online blog and is provided courtesy of the American Forum. Unwanted medical treatment a painful nightmare MICKEY MACINTYRE SEAN CROWLEY Special to the Times Governor Rick Scott last month announced that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Gulf Consortium to create a process to develop Floridas State Expenditure Plan for RESTORE funding. We need to do everything in our power to make Florida communities impacted by the BP oil spill whole again and Im pleased to work with the Gulf Consortium to develop projects for the State Expenditure Plan. Development of a comprehensive and thoughtful plan will ensure that Florida moves towards environmental and economic recovery of the Gulf, Scott said. This agreement with the Governor provides us with the opportunity to fully coordinate the collective efforts of all levels of government to restore and protect Floridas gulf waters, said Grover Robinson, Escambia County commissioner and Gulf Consortium chairman. The Gulf Consortium is ready to get to work on a transparent plan that will best enhance the economic and environmental recovery of our coastal communities and the state of Florida. The agreement lays the groundwork for the Gulf Consortium to work with Scott to ensure funding sources related to the resources and ecosystems sustainability, tourist opportunities, and revived economies of the Gulf Coast States Act of 2012 (RESTORE Act) are maximized when developing a long-term restoration plan for Florida. Key provisions of the agreement established a streamlined process for review, certification by the governor, and ultimate submission of projects and programs included in the State Expenditure Plan to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council. The RESTORE Act, passed by Congress on June 29, 2012, creates the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, and establishes various funding categories. The RESTORE Act will be funded by Clean Water Act civil and administrative penalties paid by responsible parties from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Council is comprised of the five Gulf State governors and six federal agencies. In Florida the 23 Gulf Coast counties (Gulf Consortium) are tasked with creating the State Expenditure Plan, which can include both economic and environmental restoration projects. Scott signs agreement with Gulf Consortium Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, July 11, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A decision last week by county commissioners opens more of the St. George Island commercial dis trict to residential development. On July 2, in keeping with rec ommendation from the planning and zoning board, com missioners voted unanimously to rezone Lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, Block 9, Unit 1 East on St. George Island, from C-2 com mercial use to C-4 mixed commercial and residential use. The block of land is adjacent to commercial buildings on the north and west and residences on the south and east. Last month, Gail Riegel mayer circulated an email and a map of the proposed change and urged island ers to attend Tuesday’s meeting and speak out about the change or con tact county commissioners directly. Several island residents did attend the meeting and voiced their views, but only realtor Mason Bean vocally opposed the change. “When our early plan ners laid out Gulf Beaches they did a great job. We only get in trouble when we change it. This is hor rible zoning and no plan ning,” he said. “We need a vision for St. George Island. You need a village and something to plan around. We’re losing that.” He also said that the change opens the door to denser devel opment on the island. Island resident and former P&Z board member Mary Lou Short said she favored the change. Refer ring to the small vertical houses that have come to be called “skinny Minnies” by locals, she said she felt the “honey moon cottages,” lining the beach at island center and on Gunn Road bayside were good for business. “People like to rent them, especially in the offseason. They like being able to walk to shops and restaurants,” she said. Short said mixed-use zoning to create a town center is a national trend. Travis Stanley, a real tor with Fickling and As sociates, said commercial spaces in Fickling’s mixeduse building at 112 Frank lin Avenue on the island have been difcult to ll, while the residential por tion of the building is in great demand. “We have tried but there are no takers,” he said. County Planner Alan Pierce said mixed-use de velopment tries to bridge “natural limitations to developing on St. George Island from an environ mental standpoint and eco nomic standpoint. “I would love for down town St. George Island to be a thriving business com munity but it’s not going to be. There are not enough people living there. Envi ronmental limitations will keep that from ever hap pening,” he said. “I don’t want to see (the commer cial district) go away but it has been driven by the market. People do like to walk around.” District 1 Commissioner Pinki Jackel, whose district includes the island, sup ported the zoning change. “I love these issues on St. George Island because I get a lot of emails and phone calls. In this case, the overwhelming number of comments was in favor of the change,” she said. “I share a desire for a compre hensive vision of St. George Island. If this request was in the center of commercial district, I would not be in favor of it but the request is consistent with surround ing structures. I am con cerned that we have three commercial structures on the island that are com pletely vacant.” Jackel said that of 156 vacant commercial lots re maining on the island, 100 are zoned C-2. “The com mercial district did not explode to the extent we thought it might, even dur ing periods of economic boom,” she said. “I want to see future visioning and I understand a public meeting with planning and zoning will be held on the island in August.” Pierce said Galloway Construction plans to build two cottages and one “skinny Minnie” on the ve lots. Jackel warned Heath Galloway that his company will be held to the highest standards in completing the project. She cautioned him to be sure he arranged for sufcient drainage to prevent water from pool ing on adjacent roadways. Island commercial district to add residences HEATH G aA LLOW a A Y M aA SON B eaEA N LOLO I S S SWOSWO B O O DA | The Times The property rezoned to C4 is bordered by rental houses to the south and east and by businesses to the north and west. Library workers have begun the arduous task of transferring the collections of the Eastpoint library to their new home. Librarian Glenda Ond racek is thrilled with her new 5,000 square foot facil ity but said there is much work to be done before the doors open to the public. Workers are busy con structing and wiping down metal shelves that will eventually house books. Much of the other furniture is in place but the library staff has faced challenges in accomplishing the much anticipated move. There were technical problems with running a line to provide internet service to the building. On dracek said installation of the line is now scheduled to begin earlier this week. There have also been some problems transferring phone service. None of this has re ally delayed opening the building. Unpacking and shelving the books, a monumental task, has begun. Ondracek said she has volunteers coming to help with the project this week. She said the library will probably re open around August 1. The new building, a gift from the Friends of the Eastpoint Library, will more than double the space of the old 1,800 square foot storefront. It features ofc es and multipurpose rooms and, best of all, windows. A view of the surround ing forest gives the library a restful feel. Ondracek said workers have already spotted a fox. A grand opening for the Eastpoint library is planned for this fall. — By LOIS SWOBODA Moving days for Eastpoint library LOLO I S S SWOSWO B O O DA | The Times Much of the library’s collection remains in boxes. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Gulf Group will pay pen alties for late completion of repairs on the St. George Island shing pier. On July 2, Greg Preble of Preble Rish, a county en gineering consul tant, told commis sioners Gulf Group of Panama City, the contractor tapped to repair the St. George Island sh ing pier, has fallen behind schedule. A runaway barge de stroyed 165 feet of the pier last year on June 28 during Tropical Storm Debby and left two thirds of the sh ing pier inaccessible from land. Preble Rish created a plan to reconnect the two sections of the pier with a wooden walkway. In Janu ary, Gulf Group was award ed the repair contract, which calls for the work to be completed by July 1. On July 2, Preble said he did not expect the job to be completed before late August. At that time, only a single piling had been placed but, as of July 8, more than a dozen pilings had been installed. Gulf Group is being pe nalized $300 daily for miss ing the June 30 deadline under the liquidat ed damages clause of their contract. Preble said, in ret rospect, he wishes the penalty for lateness had been greater. “My guess is the county will wind up with a $15,000 cred it,” said Preble. In addition to running behind schedule, Gulf Group asked for an addi tional $17,000 to add three pilings to the design. County Planner Alan Pierce said the engineer would normally have per formed a standard penetra tion test prior to construc tion but, in this case, the cost was $50,000 and the county opted to waive the test. Preble said his rm attempted to predict the condition of the seabed based on tests run during the construction of the two bridges. But when a test piling was driven, it be came apparent the heavy current had gouged out unexpected deep holes at the construction site. Pierce said the county saved money by not per forming the test. The commission voted unanimously to allow the work change order raising the cost of construction to more than $473,000. Preble said Gulf Group is “doing what they can to allow some shing” from the remnants of the pier still in place and not under construction. He said the new deck connecting the two sec tions of the old bridge will support foot trafc and light vehicles like golf carts but not cars and trucks. District 1 Commissioner Pinki Jackel, who repre sents St. George Island, said she was unhappy with the slow completion of the repairs. “Make sure you don’t waive any penalties. I want you to hold them to the letter of what they’re supposed to reproduce,” she told Preble. “The $300 is a drop in the bucket to what the island merchants would have gotten. The money won’t help the mer chants at all. We’ve missed the season.” She said she hoped most of the money spent on the construction would be re covered by the county’s lawsuit of Orion Marine Contractors, of Houston, Texas who owned the run away barge. Orion, who was in the area as a subcontractor for Progress Energy, is deny ing liability for the damage, calling the storm an “act of God.” The company main tains the barge was prop erly moored. The county retained Robert Dees, certied by the Florida Bar in maritime and admiralty law, in the event the county’s insur ance carrier denies cover age and payment is sought from Progress Energy or Orion for the damages. In the interim, com missioners voted to fund the repairs out of the $1.66 million in the bridge fund, which was set up by the state after it built the new bridge to St. George Island a decade ago. At the July 2 meeting, Commissioner Noah Lock ley pointed out that the money for the repairs came entirely out of accrued in terest and the principal of the fund has not been touched. Gulf Group penalized for slow progress on shing pier GR egEG PR ebEB L eE LOLO I S S SWOSWO B O O DA | The Times Over a dozen pilings are now in place.

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`= =G S=Y L UC Y & L I L L Y L u c y a nd Li l l y a r e 1 0 w e ek o l d L a b / H o u nd m i x p up s. Wi t h t he i r s h i n y b l a c k c o a t s a nd e x p r e s s i v e e y e s t he y a r e s i m p l y b e a u t i f u l p up pi e s. T he y b o t h h a v e h a p p y go l u c k y p e r s on a l i t i e s a nd w i l l m a k e t he p e r f e c t f a m i l y p e t P l e as e c om e a nd m e e t t he s e s w e e t he a r t s. T he y ’ r e s ur e t o s t e a l y o ur he a r t ! V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d e d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c at s W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e n p e t s. o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Society A6 | The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 Bridal shower for Shelby Nowling Monday There will be a bridal shower in Carrabelle for Shelby Nowling and Zachary Tarantino at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 15, in the Fellowship Hall of the First Assembly of God Church, 307 W 3rd Street. Everyone is invited. Bridal Shower Corey and Shana Crum, of Sopchoppy, and Michael and Jaime Baze, of Crawfordville, would like to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Payton Baze, to Seth Ward, son of Bryce and Karen Ward, of Apalachicola. Payton is a 2013 graduate of Wakulla High School and plans to attend Tallahassee Community College in the fall. Seth is a 2013 graduate of Franklin County School and has joined the family construction business. Seth and Payton will have a riverfront wedding on Saturday, July 27, 2013, at 6 p.m. at the Kirvin River Property located at 152 Pogy Road, Apalachicola. A dinner reception will follow. All friends and family are invited to celebrate with Seth and Payton as they exchange vows. No local invitations are being sent. Engagement On June 27, Governor Rick Scott, shown above with First Lady Ann Scott, left, showed his appreciation for Florida’s teachers and applauded their commitment to education by presenting the Governor’s Shine Award to 23 District Teachers of the Year for 2013-14. Franklin County’s Teacher of the Year, Laura King, center, has spent her 17 year teaching career in the district, where she currently teaches fourth grade. “She creates a nurturing and inviting classroom setting, establishing a positive learning environment for her students to relax, listen and absorb the lessons of the day,” wrote the governor’s ofce. “Our students should have access to a highquality education and Florida’s commitment to our teachers plays a critical role in preparing the workforce of tomorrow,” said the governor. “In acknowledging great teachers, I have created the Governor’s Shine Award to highlight teachers who go above and beyond the call of duty in pursuit of educational excellence. I am proud to present this distinguished award (and) I am also pleased that great teachers across the state will be receiving pay increases for their hard work and dedication to student success.” Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Martina, and Mr. Ronald Mears, request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their children, Kayle Martina and Jeremy Mears, at 5 p.m. on Saturday, July 13, 2013, at Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road. Immediately following the wedding, a reception will be at the Holy Family Senior Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries Street, in Apalachicola. All family and friends are invited to attend. There will be a baby shower in honor of Alexis Caro and Brennan Walden this Saturday, July 13, at 6 p.m. at the First Assembly of God Fellowship Hall in Carrabelle. The shower will be hosted by Donna Barber and Denise Massey. Please come and help us to prepare to welcome home baby boy A’Brailyn Brennan Walden. Baby Shower Wedding MEREDYTH HH OPE HH ALL | Photography for Governor Rick Scott sS HI nN E AWARD IsIS LA nN D CIVI cC CLU bB DO nN ATEsS TO FIREFIGHTER sS Kayle Martina, Jeremy Mears to wed Saturday P P ayton Baze, Seth WW ard to wed King receives governor’s ‘Shine AA ward’ CaroWW alden baby shower Saturday The St. George Island Civic Club on June 25 presented Jay Abbott, chief of the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department, left, with a check for $3,000. “The St. George Island Civic Club fully supports the efforts and sacrices of our volunteer reghters each year,” said Newt Colston, president, at right. “While we support many charities in Franklin County, our main charity is the re department, and we cannot thank them enough.” SPEc C IAL TO TT HE TT I m M E s S

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Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Fred Phillip Jet ton Jr. was born February 28, 1965, in Carrabelle. He passed away at his home in Carrabelle Tuesday, July 2, 2013, surrounded by his family and friends at the age of 48. Fred was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. He served in law enforce ment for Carrabelle Police Department and was chief of police for more than 15 years. He was an avid hunter. He leaves behind his de voted wife Mandy Jetton; children, Cheyanne Elise Jetton and Alexander Jacob Jake Jetton; par ents, Tina and Fred Jetton Sr.; siblings, Trina Dawn John son, Robin Holley, and Teresa Ann Segree; and grand children, Cayden Michael Cruse and Tylen Haze Cruse. Funeral services were Friday afternoon, July 5, at Carrabelle Christian Cen ter. Viewing was one hour prior to the funeral. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrange ments. Fred Jetton, Jr. FRED JETTON, JR. Joseph Man zanares, 77, of Mercer, Wis., died unexpectedly Tues day, July 2, 2013, at home. He was born Feb. 6, 1936, in Gary, Ind., son of the late Helen (Ge leott) Manzanares Gonzalez and Damian Manzanares, and attended school in Gary. He joined the U.S. Marine Corp. in August 1953, serving his country stateside during the Korean War, and was honorably discharged as a sergeant in August 1956. He then served ve years in the USMC Reserve. On Oct. 27, 1956, Joe married Joyce Olson in Gary, and they moved to Ironwood, Mich. in May 1960. Joe worked as meat manager at the Red Owl in Marenisco for two years, and in the spring of 1962 began a 25-year employ ment as meat manager at Carlsons Super Market in downtown Ironwood. Joe and Joyce then built a home on Echo Lake in Mercer in 1982, residing there for the past 31 years. Joe was an active mem ber of the Mercer United Methodist Church, Mercer Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9536, Mercer-Mani towish Waters American Legion Post 424, Mercer Lions Club and Mercer Senior Center Disabled Veterans. He was the re cipient of the Melvin Jones Award in the year 2000, one of the highest honors in the Lions Club, and was very active in volunteering in the Mercer community. In earlier years, he coached Little League baseball while his boys were growing up, as well as playing softball himself. He also served on the board of directors of Copper Peak. He enjoyed hunting and shing and was an avid Chicago White Sox and Bears fan. Joe dearly loved his family and spending time with his grandchildren, and will be deeply missed. Surviving are his wife, Joyce, of 56 years; four children, Joe (Linda) Man zanares, Pence, Mich.; Lynne Pedri (Al lan), Hurley, Mich.; Mark (Stephanie) Manzanares, Ironwood, Mich.; and Mi chael (Anne) Manzanares, Montreal, Mich.; eight grandchildren, Corey Pe dri, Andrea Pedri, Heather (Cory) Sbraggia, Hailey Manzanares (Matt), Mi randa Manzanares, Mat thew Manzanares, Kohl Manzanares and Ty Man zanares; two great-grand children, Braxton and Ad disyn Jo Sbraggia; a sister, Delores (Fred) Mezydlo; and special nephew, Fred (Vicky) Klahn. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother, Damian Man zanares. Per Joes wishes, cremation has taken place. Memorial services were held Tuesday morning, July 9, preceded by visita tion at the Mercer United Methodist Church, with the Rev. Richard Hartlerode, pastor, ofciating. Full military honors were accorded at the church by the combined Mercer VFW Post 9536 and Mercer-Manitowish Waters American Legion Post 424 Honor Guard. A reception followed at The Pines in downtown Mercer. In lieu of owers, me morial contributions may be made to the Mercer United Methodist Church or the Hurley Booster Club. Joes obituary can be viewed online and condo lences given the family at www.mckevittpatrickfu neralhome.com. Arrange ments have been entrusted to McKevitt-Patrick Fu neral Home and Cremation Services of Ironwood. Joseph Manzanares JOSEPH MANZANARES ObituariesT he R ochelles I would like to thank God for us for another year on our birthdays 2013. Also we thank our children for our birthday cookout on July 6 and my family and friends. From Mother Eula and Father Henry Rochelle. We love you all. Cards of THANKSFirst P entecostal Youth Dear community, friends, family and tourists, The youth group of Apalachicola First Pentecostal Holi ness Church wishes to thank everyone that has supported us in our endeavor to get to Dallas, Texas, for the Interna tional Pentecostal Holiness Church Youth Quest Student/ Leader Conference and National Fine Arts Competition. We are grateful to live in a community that is always will ing to help and support the youth. We would also like to send a special thank you to our two local grocery stores, Gulfside IGA, and Piggly Wiggly for supporting us. We pray that you all are blessed. 29 people in the group will depart for Dallas on July 18. Please keep us in your prayers for a safe journey. First Pentecostal Youth Leadership Team James Terry Tipton, Jr.Business A fter H ours tonight at T apas Bar The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host a Business After Hours on Thursday, July 11 at Tamaras Tapas Bar, 73 Market Street in Apalachicola from 5:30-7 p.m. The chambers next business luncheon will take place at noon on Wednesday, Aug. 7 at Beach Pit BBQ on US 98 in Eastpoint.D owntown street closure next week In Apalachicola, from Monday, July 15 through Wednesday, July 17, on Avenue E from Market Street to Commerce Street, traffic flow will be one-way, eastbound only, so that contractors can repair a portion of the roadway to improve the pedestrian crosswalk. Vehicles traveling down Avenue E from Market Street will merge to the left as to be directed around construction by a flagman. Vehicles traveling down Avenue E from Water Street will be redirected around construction by a flagman. We thank each of you in advance for your understanding and patience during this temporary phase of construction.S chools begin summer work hours Summer work hours at the Franklin County School District office began Monday and will run through Friday, Aug. 2. The summer work schedule will be Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., with a 45minute lunch. On Fridays the offices will be closed. Normal work hours will resume on Monday, Aug. 5.S mall business conference set for S ept. 16-20 Mark your calendar for the Small Business Week in Franklin County Sept 16-20, which will recognize and highlight the impact of small businesses. Mid-week there will be a small business resource conference hosted by the Small Business Development Center out of Florida A & M University, and the Apalachicola Bay and Carrabelle chambers of commerce to help small business owners discover resources to expand or refocus their business, bring business owners together to meet and share issues and ideas, and aid potential small business owners in getting started with their businesses.A palachicola R iverfront film festival planned Get ready for the first ever Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival, set for Saturday, Oct. 19 at Riverfront Park. Merrill Livingston is the creative brain behind the festival. Raised in Apalachicola, she graduated in 2008 with a bachelors of fine arts in film and television from the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). She has formed a volunteer nonprofit committee to help make the festival a reality. The committee includes Tom and Sharon Morgan, Ron Copeland, Anita Grove, Judi Stokowski, and Jim Bachrach. The festival will feature independent films from around the country, local documentaries and student films from the prestigious Florida State University Film School and SCAD. Special guest will include Kevin McCarey, National Geographic filmmaker and professor at SCAD. Tickets are available at http:// www.apalachriverfilm.com. or at Apalach Outfitters 29 Avenue E in Apalachicola. For info, call 653-3474.T he S t. George P lantation 2013 P hoto Contest continues through A ug. 28. The Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Prizes include first place $150, second place $100, third place $50 and Peoples Choice $50. For more information, go to www.sgpoa.com K idCare/Medicaid assistance available The Florida Department of Health in Franklin County in partnership with George E. Weems Memorial Hospital is offering KidCare/Medicaid assistance. For more information or to sign up, stop by the county health department offices. Visit the Apalachicola location at 139 12th St. on Thursdays or the Carrabelle location, 106 N.E. Fifth St, on third Tuesdays. For questions, call 653-2111. Quack, quack. Despite all the rain I hope you had a happy and safe Inde pendence Day. Mine was bittersweet. Thursday morning, I walked over to Chillas Hall and got a copy of the Times. On the door of the hall there was a note that Joe Manzanares had passed away. Joe was a good friend and a snowbird for many years. Joe was fun to be around and he enjoyed the coffee hour at Chillas Hall and was an ac tive member of the Lanark Village Golf Club and the Lanark Village Associa tion. He and his wife Joyce were always there to pitch in and help. Cards may be sent to Joyce Manzanares and family, P.O. Box 316, Mercer, Wisconsin 54547. Joe will be greatly missed. Pray for him and peace and strength for the family. Rode over to Lanark Village Boat Club with Dot Bless for the covered dish lunch. The place was wall to wall with friends, neighbors and visi tors. Lots of good food and desserts, and not much left over. Thanks to Carol Dadona and help ers, and to those who braved the weather to enjoy the after noon with us. In the evening, I was watching the news on Channel 6. They had the cameras over at the July 4 celebration in Sopchoppy. The celebration was in the memory of Bill Stephens and rightfully so. Bill was the founder of the celebra tion. Bill and his family and I have been friends for many years, and he and I shared the duty of calling bingo in the area. Dont forget the moving sale on Friday, July 12. All the items from our rectory and guest house will be for sale. The rectory is located at the corner of Spring and Newman streets, and the guest house is on the cor ner of Carl King and Elm streets here in the village. Sales are from 8 a.m. to noon. Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Chow line forms at noon. Be watch ing for you. Be sure to mark your calendars for Saturday, July 20 and Sunday, July 21. Good start Saturday morning with your sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Choose either pancakes or French toast served with bacon, eggs, juice and coffee. All that and stull only $5 donation is required. Yum, yum. Later on Saturday eve ning, July 20, you can come on down to the Camp Gor don Johnston American Legion Post 82 and enjoy all the fun things to do at the July birthday bash. The fun starts at 6 p.m. On Sunday, July 21, we will have our monthly covered dish luncheon at Chillas Hall. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Pack your favorite dish to share, a donation and enjoy the af ternoon with your friends and neighbors, see ya there! Oh yes, we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday nights at Camp Gordon Johnston Ameri can Legion Post 82, and pizza on Sunday nights, 5 to 7 p.m. both nights. Your donation of $6 will get you a huge hamburger with chips. Pizza is a donation of $8 that gets you a large pizza to eat in. A $10 dona tion will get you a whole pizza to take out. Pizza by the slice is $1 each. How about that? Be kind to one anoth er check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, contrary to popular opinion Gods last name is not damn. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Dont forget Sacred Heart moving sale this weekend News BRIEFS

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By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net Whether your taste runs to snappers — red or gray; groupers — red, black or gag; or amberjacks black sea bass and grunts, the heart of the summer is prime time to put some fresh llets on the grill throughout the Florida Panhandle. Red snapper season, though short, continues through July 14. Mangrove or gray snapper have no closed season, and neither do red or black grouper. The gag grouper season opened June 1 and continues to Dec. 4, and the AJ season is June 1July 31. There is no closed season on grunts or black sea bass, smaller sh but just as tasty. Panhandle waters are blessed with a vast assortment of reef sh habitat, both natural and manmade, and any good charting program — Navionics makes some of the best — can point you toward dozens of likely spots in any seaworthy boat. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission also has a complete list of all arti cial reefs, with depths and GPS numbers, at http://myfwc.com/ media/131585/reefs.pdf The bottom of much of the Gulf, out to the edge of the continental shelf, is a gentle slope of fairly smooth sand, and this type of bottom does not make good sh habitat. But here and there outcrops of rock or ledges and holes create refuges for the chain of life to gain a foothold. Bait schools gather on these spots, and the larger predators naturally follow. Placing ships or concrete rubble on bottom gives Nature a jump-start, and these arti cial structures often begin attracting sh within a few days of placement. Some of the manmade reefs are barely three miles off the beach, making them easy to get to in most saltwater-type boats. Others are 20 to 30 miles out. In general, those farther from shore tend to have more and larger sh simply because they are shed less. If you don’t have a larger boat — 25 feet or more with twin engines is about the safe minimum — you can take advantage of the huge party-boat eet at all Panhandle ports to get you to the reefs economically and safely. Sonar and GPS are a must for reef shing, and the new “scanning” sonars are particularly effective —Lowrance, Humminbird, Garmin and others have various models. Basically the GPS gets you on the spot, and the sonar shows you an image of what’s there, both in terms of bottom and the sh and bait that’s on the structure. Locating a good spot is only half the battle. Anchoring offshore is an art in itself. The trick is to motor up-current (or upwind if current is negligible) far enough so that when you drop anchor you can back down to put the stern of the boat either directly over the structure or just a few yards upcurrent of it. In water 100 feet deep, this requires a big anchor, a big chain lead, and 500 feet of line to provide adequate scope on a breezy day, so it’s no small investment. Once the boat is properly positioned, it’s a matter of dropping the right bait to entice whatever you’re after. Gags and black grouper tend to like hand-sized pin sh better than anything, though any sort of live bait sh will do the job. Red snapper readily grab live thread ns or sardines, jumbo shrimp, or fresh squid, and can also be caught on frozen bait sh when they’re in a biting mood. Gray snapper love tiny pin sh or scaled sardines, also big shrimp. Red grouper eat about anything, but take cut bait better than gags. And amberjack — which are not really bottom sh but are nearly always found circling around bottom structure — are more likely to attack large bait sh like blue runners. (AJ’s are also suckers for jumbo topwater plugs — the big poppers Northeast anglers use for stripers work well, and the louder you work them, the better.) Eat your Wheaties if you’re going after greater amberjack—they frequently weigh over 40 pounds and are tremendously powerful sh. Standard reef shing gear is typically a stout 8-foot rod, 3/0 star-drag reel and 60-pound-test mono, with about 3 feet of 80 pound hard mono or uorocarbon leader running to a circle hook, size 4/0 to 8/0 Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 11 86 78 30 % F ri, July 12 85 76 60 % S a t July 13 85 77 30 % Sun, July 14 87 78 40 % M on, July 15 87 78 30 % T ues July 16 86 78 30 % W ed July 17 86 78 60 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, July 11, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A CAPTAIN JOHN PAIVA | Special to Halifax Gag grouper like this one are a popular summer target on the reefs, particularly in the waters southeast of the Panhandle. Live pin sh are among the top baits. Summer offers a cornucopia of tasty reef species FRANK SARGEANT | Special to Halifax King mackerel frequently roam the waters above the reefs, and can readily be caught on at lines equipped with a live blue runner. SPONSORED BY Inshore Freshwater Offshore Offshore anglers will have the chance one more time to catch state-water snapper this week, ending on Sunday at midnight. Many good-sized fish can be caught near shore, and with all the weather from last week, these fish should bite very aggressively. Watch and know your state water boundaries. After a near record rainfall this past week, most area lakes and streams are near flood stage, and some still rising as waters from north of us reach the Forgotten Coast this week. Good reports from The Brothers and the Big River of sheepshead and channel cats are the only thing we hear right now. Most of the inshore attention is now focused on scallop season. We are seeing good numbers of shells coming to the docks, and the shells are strong and large for this time of summer. Keep your dive flags up, and watch for boaters! MIXED GRILL THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK

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T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Ž $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % ! # ! !# !# !# !# !# !# " 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 A Page 9 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s Dixie Debs swept through the state tournament last weekend without a loss, and are now poised to represent Florida next month in the World Series in Alexandria, La. In addition to ve straight wins and the state title, for the girls, age 18 and under, Coach Kevin Newell’s squad captured the sportsmanship trophy, voted on by the umpires and state directors. “Our team had an incredible attitude,” said Newell. The Debs had lost six players from last year’s state champion team, but drew suitable replacements, including Port St Joe’s Brittany King, whose two three-run homers in the opening game worried opposing pitchers. “She probably drew the most walks,” said Newell. Anchoring the squad were three returners in their last year Morgan Newell, Morgan Kelley and Christina Collins. “They were beyond happy,” said the coach. “Those three were pretty emotional they won state again.” Also playing were Shannon Pridgeon, Ally Millender, Gracyn Kirvin, Maddie Newell, Ashley Carroll and Marlyn Lee, and Hannah Winkler. Assistant coaches are Matt Kelley and Allen Millender. Following the July 4 banquet in Hernando County, the Debs opened Friday morning against host Brooksville, winning 15-3 in ve innings. Newell and Carroll shared pitching assignments, with King’s two homers highlight of the game. On Saturday morning, the Debs were victorious 18-14 in seven innings over West Pasco, after they broke the game open with 10 runs in the sixth inning. “That was just a slugfest,” said Kevin Newell. “We gave up 17 walks, that’s unreal. That’s unlike us. The girls were battling the heat and a tight strike zone and the pitching was just below average that game. “It was 95 degrees every day. It was brutal hot,” he said. “It rained all the way leading up to it and the elds were a mess, but it did not rain on us any.” On Saturday evening, the Debs faced undefeated Wahneta, and won an 87 squeaker when Kelley smacked a solo home run in the seventh to break a 66 tie. “That was a nail biter, we were pretty evenly matched,” said Newell. “That was a slugfest as well. We had almost ve players that went -2-for-3 that game. Everyone kind of contributed.” Millender pitched ve innings, and Morgan Newell two. The girls enjoyed a day off Sunday, half of them watching West Pasco defeat Wahneta 9-8, and the others lounging around the hotel to beat the heat. On Monday morning, the Debs sewed up the state title with a 6-2 win over West Pasco behind a seven-inning, three-hitter tossed by Morgan Newell. “She pitched a masterpiece, had them off balance the whole game,” said Kevin Newell. “We played good defense, got timely hits and timely bunts whenever we need it.” In the fourth inning, with the game tied 1-1, the Debs scored a pair of runs, after King walked, Pridgeon singled, Kelley walked and with bases loaded, Carroll, and then Collins, each batted in a run. Two more runs in the sixth sewed up the Aug. 2 trip to Louisiana, to compete against a dozen teams from as many states. “We’re full steam ahead on fundraising. We need all the help we can get,” said Kevin Newell, estimating it would take between $20,000 and $25,000 to cover the entire trip. “We’re going to start fundraising, bagging for bucks, car washes, and we’re still doing the ocking with the birds,” he said, noting they had sent out donation letters to local businesses. If anybody wishes to donate they can do it at any Centennial Bank location under “Franklin County Travel Softball.” State champ Debs head to World Series CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times A victorious team looks toward the World Series. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Belles battled under brutal heat last weekend at the state tourney in Brooksville, but nished second to powerhouse West Pasco for the second straight year. “Our girls played ve game total in the tournament. We played every single game but one right in the heat of the day, a 100 degree temperature,” said Coach Gary Martina. “Our girls played with heart with dignity. They did all they could do. Me and Ward Kirvin were extremely proud of our girls.” The Belles, for girls age 13-15, opened Friday with a 14-8 win over Lake Placid. “Our girls hit the ball very well, just about every player was getting base hits on that game,” said Martina. Vanessa Simmons pitched three innings, then Sophia Kirvin, 12, came in and pitched before Krista Martina came in as closer over the last three innings. Saturday afternoon the Belles topped Mulberry 125, with Simmons starting and Kirvin striking out ve after entering the second. In that game Vanessa Simmons started but she went only the rst inning, then Kirvin came in and pitched the rest of the way. That evening the team faced West Pasco, who had not had a game that day in the afternoon heat. “Our girls were already tired going up against a team that defeated us last year, the same team, a very stout team,” said Martina pitched all seven innings of this battle of the pitchers. Pasco scored a pair in the rst off errors, and Franklin scored one run that rst inning “We played defense, and the pitchers were hot,” said Martina. “That was a battle of the pitchers pitching their best and defense playing at their best. That was a nail biter of a ballgame.” In the fth inning, the Belles’ Allie Kirvin smacked a base hit to tie the game, and it remained 2-2 until the seventh. As home team, Pasco got last bats, and loaded the bases with no outs. Martina struck out the 10th batter, but the next grounded to third and the umpire ruled the runner had slid under the tag to win the game. On Sunday the Belles edged Mulberry 7-6 in 10 innings. Simmons and Kirvin split pitching duties until the seventh, when Mulberry had two runners on with one out, and the batter hit a sacri ce BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Belles runner-up in state title bid CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times Back row, left, Miranda McLeod, Summer Medley, Krista Martina, Allie Kirvin, Anna Riley, Adriana Butler, Lacey Hutchins. Front row, left, Coach Gary Martina, Kimmie Boone, Vanessa Simmons, Sophia Kirvin, Madison Smith, Sami Bearden, and Coach Ward Kirvin. See BELLES A12

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A10| The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91672T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Franklin County Emergency Management will receive sealed proposals at the Franklin County Emergency Management office, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola, Fl 32320 until Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm for the following: DISASTER DEBRIS MONITORING Emergency Management may accept all or part of any proposal. Any proposals received after Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm will be retained by Emergency Management unopened and will not be considered. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the proposal in the best interest of Franklin County. Franklin County does not discriminate because of race, creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact the Emergency Management Office at 850-653-8977. July 11, 18, 2013 94193T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000038 SEC.:________ BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. BILLIE J. ADAMS; STEPHEN H. ADAMS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated June 10, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA000038 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 15th day of August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK 3, SUN ‘N SAND, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 DESTINY MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL NUMBER DISH03537GAA/B. Any person claiming an interst in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 12TH DAY OF JUNE, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 94239T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000422 DIVISION: LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 26, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2008-CA-000422 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON N/K/A TRACEY LAFFOON; GARY FOGLEMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY FOGLEMAN; MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT NUMBER 208 OF MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS, AS PER THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO A/K/A 706 HOWARD STREET D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on this 19th day of June 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 F08068466 July 4, 11, 2013 94245T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000401-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. BRUCE L. TAYLOR, HUBERT BENTLEY, and NATALIE BUTLER, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 25, 2013, in the abovestyled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 15, 2013, the following described property: Lot 1 (unrecorded) Commence at a 6 x 6 inch concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Section 30, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida and run South 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West 659.56 feet to a re-rod (marked 5826) lying on the Southerly right of way boundary of Twin Lakes Road, thence run North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary 455.86 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160) marking the point of beginning; from said point of beginning continue North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary a distance of 200.08 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said right of way boundary run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 22 seconds West 214.87 feet; thence run South 89 degrees 42 minutes 40 seconds East 204.88 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160); thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 43 seconds West 214.14 feet to the point of beginning. Dated: June 27, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, July 11, 2013 The Times | A11 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1115179 $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCING BORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $ 386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation € Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 4515188 Other: Possess or be able to obtain within 30 days of employment a valid Florida Drivers License and have a satisfactory driving record. Special note: Bene ts include sick & holiday pay and Workers Compensation Insurance associated with the position. The selected candidate must be available to attend monthly Board meetings on Saturdays. Please submit cover letter and resume, with references, education, and Alligator Point Water Resources District ( “District” ) has an immediate opening for a full time Maintenance / Operations Supervisor position. The District is a special district authorized under Florida Law for the maintenance and operation of a potable water system within its service area located within Franklin County, FL. The desired candidate would t the description below: Position reports to: Of ce Manager Current salary starting at $30,000 annually. Duties Include: 1. Provide 24 hour/ 7 day per week availability to respond to and perform all maintenance needs of the water system, including routine maintenance, building maintenance, and emergency repair. Provide backup coverage in the event of absence. Responsible for providing additional staff and/or labor as needed to complete repairs and maintenance duties. Work with manager to insure maintenance operations are within allowed b udget. Develop and present water loss report for Board meetings. 2. Responsible for the installation of new service taps as requested by customers. 3. Replace old water meters as needed. 4. Work with Southern Water Services, Inc. to provide line ushing and water testing as necessary. 5. Responsible for the monthly meter reading in conjunction with of ce manager 6. Provide monthly monitoring and maintenance reports at scheduled Board of Directors meeting including written work order summary and daily work log summary. 7. Order and maintain inventory of all parts and supplies necessary for the satisfactory operation of the water system. 8. Oversees the maintenance of the districts well sites, chorine buildings, backhoe, Kawasaki mule, and other mechanical and electrical equipment. 9. Monitors District SCADA system on a daily basis. 10. Others duties as assigned. professional work experience history to Alligator Point Water Of ce Manager at P.O. Box 155, Panacea, FL 32346 by Monday July 22, 2013, by 11:00am. Applications will be reviewed by the Board of Directors and top candidates must be available to interview on July 23, 2013 beginning at 2:00 pm to determine the most quali ed applicants. Inquires should be made to the District of ce at (850) 349-2274 during normal business hours. Consistent with Florida Law, all applications may be made available for public inspection upon request. Criminal background checks and drug screenings are required. Alligator Point Water Resources District is an Af rmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer. Job Requirements: Education: Graduated from High School or have GED certi cate. Technical training in water distribution systems maintenance or equivalent preferred. Knowledge of FDEP requirements for operation of public water systems. Experience: One year of eld maintenance work or equivalent; able to operate and perform routine maintenance on backhoe and other district equipment. Candidate in this position holds a State of Florida Class C Water Distribution Operator license or a Class C Water Treatment Operators license or obtain one within one year. 1112661 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW 94261T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-130 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 370 Apalachicola, Florida 32320, Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN S. HARDY, TAMMI L. HARDY, PINE COAST PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, and FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 15, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-67 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. S-67 A DISTANCE OF 1040.43 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE FOLLOWING 6 COURSES: NORTH 54 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 66.84 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 450.00 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 39 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 06 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 308.41 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 679.81 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 687.50 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 14 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.63 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 2131.26 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND), THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 233.94 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD 1739.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTERLINE OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS CLARKS LANDING ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD 2628.83 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 3849.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ITS EXTENSION THEREOF 1409.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 1269.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1269.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94249T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-422 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 24th day of June 2013, in Case Number 11-422 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern, on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Mariners Landing Phase III, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 4, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 25th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000131-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL W. BYRD, JR., ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash inside the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32329, at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 28, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 5 and 6, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17,of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 598.0 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 210.85 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 523.75 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF A TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 90, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID TRACT 209.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 915.57 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. NO. 90 STATE ROAD NO. 10 THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 24 MINUTES WEST (BEARING BASE) ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 815.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 203.48 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 24 SECONDS WEST 312.81 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE FROM A TANGENT BEARING OF NORTH 64 DEGREES, 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 177.17 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 32 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 309.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAINING 1.74 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 25, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94279T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, July 19, 2013. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #33 Marshall Sweet Contents-Household STORATE UNIT #64 Tanieia Bell Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #73 Charlene Fincher Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #111 Karen Knowles Content-Household July 11, 18, 2013 94311T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-0230-CA IN RE FORFEITURE OF: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665 $1,882.00 U.S. CURRENCY NOTICE OF FORFEITURE ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE FLORIDA CONTRABAND FORFEITURE ACT TO: MICHAEL SHAWN LANGLEY, c/c FRANKLIN COUNTY JAIL, 270 STATE ROAD 65, EASTPOINT, FL 32328 AND ANY UNKNOWN INTERESTED PARTIES. RE: In Re: Forfeiture of the Following Described Property: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665, Florida Tag No. ACFR12. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office has filed a Certificate of Compliance with Forfeiture Act and Complaint for Forfeiture with the Clerk of Court in Franklin County, Florida. An Order Finding Probable Cause has been entered requiring the Claimant and all persons or entities who claim an interest in the property described above to respond. Copies of the Complaint and Order of Probable Cause can be provided by the Franklin County Clerk of Court. You are required to file any responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses, within twenty (20) days of receiving notice, with the Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and to serve copies upon Donna Duncan, Counsel for the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., 80 Market Street, P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Failure to file your defenses will result in a default judgment being entered against you. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Clerk of the Court this 1st day of July, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. j Kelly & Josh j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Lost Yellow Inflatable Raft with Fishing Equipment, Call 850-228-5778 East Point : 613 HWY 98, Sunday July 21st 9am-6pm Yard Sale Handyman’s Jackpot! Tools, parts, & much more! During week call Jim: 201-370-6596 Text FL57533 to 56654 Education Early Education and Care, Inc. Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 Food ServiceCooks Apalachicola River Walk Cafe Needed for breakfast, lunch, dinner, flex hrs Mon -Sat. Apply in person at: 17 Ave. E., Apalachicola (Next to the Dixie Theater) Web ID#: 34258152 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Pay based on prior experience. Call (850) 927-2163 Web ID: 34257518 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Logistics/TransportDrivers: Drivers: Guaranteed Home EVERYWeekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. Call: 1-888-880-5911 Text FL55307 to 56654 Other Experienced Resident Innkeeper Salary plus fully furnished spacious apt and car and benefits. Send resume and photo to lynnwilson2@aol.com Web ID#: 34257878 Other Housekeepers Experienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. $9/hour (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34257877 Other Live-In Caregiver Looking for live-in caregiver for elderly woman. All utilities paid. No rent. Possible pay. Call for details. Located in Carrabelle. 850-209-4124 Web ID#: 34257391 Lanark Village Carlton St. #6, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $500 month + $300 deposit. Call 864-356-5949 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Carrabelle, FLGulf Side 2 BD/ 1 BA, Furnished, $450mo. Plus Utilities & $450 Dep., Pets OK W/Deposit Call 850-567-3375 Text FL57381 to 56654 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $76,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Cadillac DTS -Luxury 1, 2006 ; Only 1 owner! 49,600 miles, White in color. Blue Book is $15,500, asking $13,500 850-340-0889 or 850-340-0890

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur lo c al r eal esta t e e xp er ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the b est v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real E sta t e P icks! D isc o v er the b est r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Jo e A palachic ola, C ap e S an Blas S t G eor ge I sland C arr ab elle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! !! % !! # !! # (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D $ ," "#(( *" .( $ *' #" + .( $ $ ( & ( ( $" $( & -( #(" + ( #++(( & # $ ( -( + ( "$ ( "$ ( -( & %)) %) ) $ "" ( "+ $ $ T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4515098 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248993 $75,000 A palachicola MUL TI-F AMIL Y B UILDING SITE A r ar e opportunity in A palachicola, R-2 zoning to de v elopment an income pr oducing m ulti-famil y r esidence ample r oom f or duple x, to wnhouse or a spacious single famil y home r ecentl y b ush-ho gged, Cotta ge Hill R oad, Listed b y Michael Billings $ 4515166 St G eor ge Island Plan ta tion C omf or table laidback qualit y -built W ill S olber g home in e x clusiv e C asa del Mar subdivision within w alk ing distanc e t o "F ishing a t T he C ut" f ea tur es lar ge living ar ea, o c e nook and mast er suit e on main lev el opening on t o spacious G ulf S ide por ch with boar dw alk t o the B each, F an tastic G ulf of Me xic o views fr om the living ar ea, MBR, and por ch! MBA has bidet jett ed tub separ a t e sho w er and lar ge 2-sink v anit y and w alk -in closet bet w een Mast er BR/BA. Upper oor has 2 e x tr a lar ge bedr ooms each with lar ge priv a t e ba ths E lev a t or fr om gr ound lev el t o t op oor! T his home w as c ust om designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e and f ea tur es c ust om c ypr ess in t erior trim. S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .2224S ail shD riv e .com UNDER CONTRACT! John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248585 $1,199,000 St. Geor ge Island 451 51 68 PLANT A TION BEA CHFR ONT Go r ge ou s 4 BR 3. 5 B A, Gr ea t ki tc he n, gr an it e co un te r to ps up sc al e ap pl ia nc es fu rn is he d, a t sc re en TV s, ti le o or s, Sp a T ub la r ge PO OL ou td oo r ki tc he n wi th po ol ta bl e & ba th IN CO ME PR OD UC ER Na ut il us Dr i v e. “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) American “what” was the title of a TV series set in the 1960s with Meg, Helen, Jack, and JJ? Idol, Gladiators, Dreams, Life 2) About what percent of America’s teens get an optimal amount (9+ hrs) of sleep? 9, 20, 31, 42 3) Who was the rst U.S. president to appear on a postage stamp? Lincoln, Jefferson, Washington, Madison 4) What country in the news media is often called the “Hermit Kingdom”? Libya, Nigeria, Laos, N. Korea 5) Of these which is not in Europe? Israel, Albania, Germany, Sweden 6) Where was the rst commercial espresso machine manufactured in 1906? San Francisco, Italy, NYC, France 7) Approximately three out of “how many” American teens drink a caffeinated beverage daily? 4, 6, 8, 10 8) Who was the only former U.S. president to die in the 1700s? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 9) What philosopher reportedly drank fty cups of coffee a day? Confucius, Descartes, Voltaire, Jung 10) Though cancelled due to WWI, where were the 1916 Olympics scheduled to be held? Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Warsaw 11) Of these industrialists who was a surgeon during the Civil War? Ford, Rockefeller, Goodrich, Firestone 12) Where was Elvis Presley scheduled to perform next when he died? Florida, Oregon, Michigan, Maine 13) What averages out to about 512 of them per pound? Paperclips, Potato chips, Popcorn kernels, Plain M & Ms 14) How many coffee beans does it ordinarily take to make an espresso? 20, 42, 100, 180 ANSWERS 1) Dreams. 2) 20. 3) Washington. 4) N. Korea. 5) Israel. 6) Italy. 7) 4. 8) Washington. 9) Voltaire. 10) Berlin. 11) Goodrich. 12) Maine. 13) Plain M & Ms. 14) 42. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com This report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests in this week’s report were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JULY 1 Shane Z. Creamer, 28, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (APD) JULY 2 Joshua W. Cooper, 25, Apalachicola, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Jimmy D. Kilgore, 35, Eastpoint, felony shing with license revoked (FCSO) Elizabeth Millender, 49, Carrabelle, criminal mischief and grand theft (FCSO) JULY 4 Robert K. Lee, 39, Carrabelle, criminal mischief (FCSO) JULY 5 Terrance I. Walker, 45, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) JULY 6 Dwain R. Weston, 43, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Roland M. Schoelles, 48, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) JULY 7 Joseph B. Stevens, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation, two counts possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Timothy W. Finley, 44, Apalachicola, misuse of 911 or e911 system, disorderly intoxication and resisting ofcer with violence (APD) JULY 9 Michael L. Lee, 44, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Kara Richards, 20, Apalachicola, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Bradley R. Cardin, 20, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Arrest REPO rtRT BELLES from page A9 deep to center to score both and tie the game at 6-6. The Belles loaded the bases in both the eighth and ninth innings but couldn’t capitalize. Martina’s heat kept Mulberry from scoring. “We got defensive play at short in the 10th, and Martina struck out two with bases loaded,” said the coach. “That saved us in the 10th.” In the bottom of the inning, Lacey Hutchins got on base on a shortstop error, then Kimmie Boone laid down a bunt to third base right on the chalk line that advanced Hutchins and lled rst. A grounder by Sum mer Medley to short led to Hutchins being picked off going to third. A passed ball advanced both Boone and Medley, and then with one out with runners on second and third, Kirvin grounded to second, enabling Boone to score the winning run. On Monday morning, the Belles would have had to twice defeat Pasco, which had fresher pitchers having only played three games. Martina hurled her two remaining innings and Kirvin her one, but with their en gines spent, the Belles fell 100 in ve innings. “We had opportunities, we had people on base but we just couldn’t make it happen,” Martina said. The coach was pleased at the strong turnout of Frank lin County fans. He said he and Ward Kirvin, along with the parents and players, were thankful for the $2,500 dona tion from the county com mission, and the $1,250 from Apalachicola and $200 from Carrabelle, as well as dona tions from the youth group at the Carrabelle Church of God and Ace Hardware. He thanked the Piggly Wiggly for allowing the girls to reap $2,000 in two days of “bagging for bucks” at the store. “We appreciate it, all those donations and the support we got for us to have a good trip to our state tournament,” said Martina. “It was a good comfortable trip; that really helped the players and par ents, that’s for sure.” The team also included local girls Miranda McLeod, Anna Riley, Adriana Butler and Madison Smith. Martina singled out the contribution of catcher Sami Bearden, who traveled over from Wakulla County to be a part of the team. “She caught all the dis trict games in the heat and all ve state game in the heat and did an outstanding job,” he said. “We were extremely proud of all the girls.”



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xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Thunder and rain put a damper on county celebrations last week. Tourists who arrived last Saturday for a week of patriotic fun got more than they bargained for when rain bands from a tropical depression in the southern Gulf of Mexico inundated the area and stirred up blustery winds and occasional thunder and lightning. During the rst week of July, the By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Bad news landed in the county’s lap last week with the announcement the Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola would close this month. Christopher Atkins, warden of Carrabelle’s Franklin Correctional Institution, which oversees Bay City, told county commissioners July 2 he learned a day earlier of the closure, set to be completed by month’s end. Atkins said the Florida Department of Corrections is running a $73 million de cit and that other camps would be closing as well to help stanch the red ink. The Bay City inmates —there were 282 as of June 2011 — are “moving to brand new camps with lower operating costs,” he said. “As soon as we found out, we wanted to let you know. “Nobody will be losing their job,” Atkins said. “We are hiring more staff for an additional dorm at FCI, and there will be promotion opportunities.” Ann Howard, communications director for the DOC, said the department was in a de cit but would not con rm its size. “We have no of cial number yet; the scal year just started,” she said. She said the DOC would be closing facilities in Brevard and Glades counties, and opening work camps in Union, Liberty and FCI, the latter thought to absorb the bulk of the Bay City inmates. “They will be moved, not necessarily to FCI,” she said. “We don’t discuss movements of inmates until they are securely moved.” Howard said closure of Bay City and the opening of the new FCI work camp would gain between 10 and 14 additional jobs. Bay City employed about 67 correctional of cers as of March 2011. The FCI work camp “will be By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Vandals to St. George Island’s BJ’s Pizza, before one of the biggest weekends of the year, did an uncool thing. “We opened July 4 morning. We showed up at 10 a.m. and went in to start working and setting everything up,” owner Billy Blackburn said. His son Brad soon discovered the air conditioning did not work. George Pruett of Pruett’s Air Conditioning told Blackburn there was no Freon in the dining room unit. Pruett lead the investigation, which found something other than cold air coming out. “We started noticing all this oil leaking out on the coils,” Blackburn said. “That’s when we started noticing little holes.” Holes in the grills, likely made by an ice pick or awl, were visible on the outside air conditioning units. “They’re stabbing the grills trying to nd the coils,” Blackburn said, estimating the incident happened overnight July 3. “This was a very vengeful person who knew exactly what they were doing to pick July 4,” he said. Blackburn said all but two of his two dozen employees would have worked the long holiday weekend, and most would have made overtime. Bay City Work Camp closing BJ’s Pizza owner Billy Blackburn points out damage to an airconditioning unit. A vandal climbed behind this unit and damaged it. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times See CAMP A3 See BJ’S A3 gained for when rain bands from a tropical depression in the southern Gulf of Mexico inundated the area and stirred up blustery winds and occasional thunder and lightning. During the rst week of July, the xxxxx Index PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LEFT: A pair of Georgia peaches anks Uncle Sam on the third place oat on St. George Island. TOP RIGHT: Chason Martina wheels his way along Water Street in Apalachicola during the Independence Day parade. BOTTOM RIGHT: Amy and Lee Macky of Valdosta, Ga., decorated Boss for the occasion. BELOW: Uncle Sam and Captain America both came to Apalachicola’s celebration on July 3. See FOURTH A2 Red, wet and blue Nabors to lead road department Commission debates supervisor pay By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County commissioners last week quietly selected Howard Nabors to head the road department, and then loudly debated how much he and the other department heads ought to be paid. In a 3-2 vote, with Commissioners Pinki Jackel and Williams Massey opposed, the commissioners on July 2 selected Nabors to replace Hubert Chipman, who retired earlier this year. The vote came after commissioners held public interviews with Nabors and the other candidate for the job, DeWitt Polous, who heads mosquito control. The motion for Nabors was made by Commissioner Noah Lockley, seconded by Commissioner Smokey Parrish and quickly approved without discussion by the divided commission. What followed turned out to be the most contentious aspect of the morning, as commissioners wrangled over how much to pay Nabors and whether other department heads’ salaries, including those who have served in an interim capacity, ought to be bumped up. Chairman Cheryl Sanders opened the discussion by noting that when Fonda Davis was selected to replace Van Johnson as head of solid waste, his salary was moved up to $45,000. “Supervisors are on average $45,000,” she said. “Hubert (Chipman) was at $52,000.” See ROAD A2 Vandalism heats up, closes down BJ’s Revelers dodge raindrops July 4 Thursday, July 11, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 11 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | FOURTH OF JULY Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 Marine lab penguin lecture today The Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab Conservation Lecture Series, free and open to the public, will be at 7 p.m. today in the lab’s auditorium at St. Teresa. Speaking will be Dr. Heidi Geisz, an adjunct faculty member, on “Deep Thaw: The Adlie Penguin and Climate Change,” about the fate of these penguins in Antarctica. For more info, call 697-4120. Learn about coastal water birds See pictures and learn about the diversity of water birds that use coastal habitats throughout the region from 3-4 p.m. July 18 at the Apalachicola Environmental Education and Training Center, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For more info, call 670-7700. Discover county’s oldest visitors From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in July, enjoy a presentation about “Sea Turtles, Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors” by the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve at 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. For more info, call 670-7700. C-Quarters prepares for youth shing tourney C-Quarters Youth Fishing Tournament in Carrabelle will be July 19-20 for children 16 and younger. At completion of the Friday clinic, each child receives a rod and reel, a T-shirt, hat and bait. There are nine categories of sh with three places in each category; trophies awarded for each category. On Saturday morning, the kids can sh from docks or, if they can go out on a boat, they are allowed to sh the Carrabelle River up to Dog Island. Lunch will be provided. All participants must be registered before the tournament. Visit www. c-quartersmarina.com. Library renewal, A5

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 Jackel noted Davis re ceived a $5,000 increase, which in Nabors’ case would mean his pay would be bumped up from $37,200 to $42,200. “The man, he’s train ing all the people, he just doesn’t have the position,” Lockley said. “He say he do a lot of training, so he’s been training.” Sanders pressed her case. “Howard is coming from rank and le; he’s not coming from supervisory material. I’m looking at him being comparative to what Van was making at solid waste. “We put Fonda up at $45,000; it’s only right to put Howard up to $45,000 if that’s what we choose to do,” she said. “He deserves a little more consideration to me than $5,000. He’s been there a little over 26 years. I think that speaks for itself right there.” The motion for $45,000 passed unanimously, but the issue of salaries was not over. Jackel brought up whether additional pay might be due Polous for the time served as in terim head of the road department. Sanders took up the matter. “When Alan (Pierce) left that time — two times to be exact — we never raised his pay,” she said. “When Fonda (Davis) was in, we never paid him extra. I don’t think it would be going along the right lines to pay him extra.” Jackel noted commis sioners raised a worker’s pay by $2 an hour when they did additional interim work, but Sanders replied that this involved a me chanic, and not someone in a supervisory position. “I don’t have a problem with it as long as we re imburse Mark (Curenton) and Fonda for the time they’ve put in,” Sanders said. “What we did to Fon da is because his mechan ic was out; to me it’s differ ent. Let’s be consistent.” “We have to go back for everybody,” Lockley said. Jackel moved to re visit interim positions of Davis, Curenton and Polous, and “whoever it encompasses.” That motion carried unanimously, but the dis cussion continued. Nikki Millender, head of the county’s parks and recreation, told commis sioners, “When I received department head, I only received a $2,500 raise. No assistant, no secretary, I’m out every day sweating. I don’t even make $37,000.” Jackel moved to set a minimum salary for department heads that would have moved up Mil lender and perhaps others to $45,000. Sanders voiced her views. “I want to ask you all something. We’re giv ing a man a position of su perintendent of roads; he’s been there 26 years. That’s all we asked. “We’ve got everybody coming up here, but look. He’s been there 26 years — doesn’t anyone see what I’m saying?” she said. “If y’all ain’t been there 27 years like him, you’re not gonna get it.” Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson said the discus sion was “opening up the door” to future requests from other employees for additional compensation. “Today’s not the day to do it,” Sanders said. “We’re here (for Nabors’ salary), not to be up here jewing over somebody’s pay. I can’t believe that you all would put a man down who has worked here for 26 years because he don’t have a high school education.” Massey took exception. “Don’t be hollering,” he told Sanders. “I’m all for giving him a raise.” Sanders suggested the matter of department heads’ salaries be dis cussed as part of the bud geting process, set to be gin July 18. “Now is not the time to talk about a raise in pay. We need to do that in about three weeks,” she said. Issue raised over high school diploma The two candidates for the position, Nabors and Polous are both depart ment employees with more than 20 years of experi ence, well in excess of the eight-year requirement on the job description. Polous, supervisor of mosquito control, acted as interim assistant supervi sor in the absence of a per manent appointee. He had worked for the roads department since 1993, but was laid off for two years before return ing “to do just about ev erything you can imagine at that landll,” he said. After that, Polous was promoted to head of mos quito control, where he divided his time equally between that and the road department. He said he had done budgeting and supervised two employees for the past 13 years. “My computer skills improved over the years. I really applied my self to that and picked up a lot of skills.” Polous, who graduat ed from Carrabelle High School in 1987, is certied in public health pest con trol, holds a commercial driver’s license and is able to supervise inmates. His resume lists 13 continu ing education certicates including disaster man agement, damage assess ment, debris control, stor age tank management, advance mosquito control and supervisory training at Florida State University. Nabors said he “logged a couple years before I started with the county,” more than 26 years ago, and since has handled all the tools of the trade. “I trained a lot of the crew that’s out there now,” he said. “There’s a big dif ference between running a piece of equipment and operating it.” Nabors attended high school in Apalachicola in 1984, but there is no men tion of a diploma in his resume. County Planner Alan Pierce said he has not completed a General Education Development exam. In response to a ques tion from Jackel, County Attorney Michael Shuler said the board could con sider “any combination of training and experience which provides the re quired knowledge, skills and abilities to perform the job.” Nabors told commis sioners his “computer skills ain’t too good, but I can try to learn.” He said he planned to rely on (Vir ginia Messer) to “help a lot with the budget and stuff.” Parrish asked whether Nabors was familiar with reports. “What reports are you talking about now?” Nabors said. “All our crew turns a work paper in ev ery day, different areas where they work, and ev ery two weeks she makes the work order up. What dirt you get or what grass is cut or what ditches or culvert pipe is put in.” Nabors said he would work to improve the mo rale at the road depart ment and volunteered a test period for his hire. “We can try to have a better workplace; I think I can do that,” he said. “Six month probation, if I cain’t.” Parrish underlined the condition. “I’d like for us evaluate whoever the in dividual is for six months. Whoever we put there has not been there before.” C all f or inf or mation about our r ot ating specialists: W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: AP00 2091548 ROAD from page A1 county received more than 4 inches of rain. The deluge began with more than a halfinch of rain on Wednesday evening, July 3. The Apalachicola Maritime Museum canceled its planned celebration, but Main Street Apalachicola, organizers of the Apalachicola Indepen dence Day parade and fete, opted to carry on in spite of dire weather predictions. Bill Grimes, who loaned a barge for use in the reworks display, spent 24 hours on a solo voyage bringing it from St. Marks. With the exception of a drenching shower as the last of the decorated vehicles in the Red, White and Blue Parade arrived at Riverside Park, the event came off with out a hitch. Jim Bachrach, spokesman for Main Street, said 5,000 people attended the celebra tion with many spectators watching from the John Gor rie Bridge. The pyrotechnic display was truly spectacular and could be viewed from all over town. Bachrach thank all of the Main Street volunteers and sponsors who made this year’s event a success. “Everybody’s enthusiasm was unbelievable,” he said. “We already have donations toward next year’s Indepen dence Day celebration. The musical performers were tre mendous. Apalachicola Com munity Choir blew people away. We really appreciate Project Impact for their part in the children’s celebration as well. We are already in the planning stages for next year, and our goal is to double the size of the reworks display.” St. George Island and Car rabelle had both set July 4 as the date for their celebra tions, but it turned out to be the wettest day in a sodden week with more than 1.5 inch es of rain. This was nowhere near the record for that date, 2.59 inches set in 1958, but both venues postponed their festivities in the face of the stormy weather. The traditional island parade took place on Fri day morning, July 5, which was still blustery but free of thunder and lightning on the island. Abundant precipita tions led to a few changes in the usual island pageant. The route was shortened to avoid deep puddles of standing water. Only about 40 oats lined up, as opposed to 120 last year. The crowd lining the parade route was also much smaller than in previous years. Vickie Frost, of Eddy Teach’s Raw Bar, organized this year’s is land spectacle. In spite of the iffy weather, hundreds of gallons of water —encased in balloons, shot from water guns and hoses and even tossed from buckets and plastic cups — passed be tween onlookers and partici pants in the procession this year. A notable new entry was a golf cart rigged to squirt streams of water from clan destine jets in the canopy. Not on hand this year was Miss Liberty and the island ladder truck. Winner of the competition for the best oat was Capt. Clint Taylor and Team Big Fish. Fann Construction planted more than 1,000 American ags to mark the parade route. Elliot Fann said he hopes to make this an annual tradition. Parks and Recreation Di rector Nikki Millender, who had not experienced an is land parade in the past, said she plans to enter a oat next year. “That’s good, clean fun,” she said. Friday night, Carrabelle launched a successful re works display to the delight of the community. Renee Bran nan, a spokesperson for Car rabelle, said the display came off with no problems. “Marine Street and 98 were lined with people watch ing the show,” she said. “It was awesome.” St. George Island nished the week’s festivities with a 30-minute reworks display in front of the Blue Parrot on Saturday night, July 6. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times DeWitt Polous, left, and Howard Nabors await the hiring decision. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Caelyn Constantine is a regular in the St. George Island parade. FOURTH from page A1

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, July 11, 2013 “It would have been an excellent day — all week it’s been. The game guy for the game room had his best week ever because of all the rain,” he said. “If a merchant on St. George Island isn’t making money right now, they better close the doors. There’s some thing wrong with their business.” Blackburn, who opened the dining spot and hangout in 1990 with his wife, Judy, said he checked around to see whether other busi nesses had experienced similar vandalism. “All the other restau rants and bars are ne,” he said. “Whoever did this walked beside two air con ditioner units at Prudential to get my four. They were coming after me. “They knew exactly what they were doing. Somebody has something against BJ’s. We just don’t know why, or who.” The nancial loss was considerable, about $75,000 including lost business, which insurance does not cover. Cases of frozen food, including 20 cases of chick en, “all had to be thrown away. We make dough one day and let it sit 24 hours. All that has to be thrown away.” Pruett estimated the replacement cooling units and air conditioners would run more than $10,000, with parts shipped free by Trane. The restaurant reopened Wednesday morning. Blackburn made a brief attempt to stay open despite the vandalism, but “when the temperature got to 104 degrees in the kitchen and it was raining outside, I was afraid one of my employees would get hurt.” Blackburn said he isn’t sure whom to suspect, but possibilities, even remote ones come to mind. A dis gruntled employee, a rival business, even the angry residue from family strife are being considered. Law enforcement said they are pursuing leads in the case. “There are people out there that would have a mo tive to do things, and some body knows things,” said Blackburn, who is offering a $5,000 reward for the ar rest and conviction of the perpetrators. “And I will deliver it in $100 bills personally to ’em,” he said. opening this month, not sure when,” Howard said. Atkins stressed to county commissioners, “We don’t plan on stopping work squad ser vices. As far as transports, we’ll have to be creative, (and use) buses instead of individual trucks.” He said the DOC is doing its best to accommodate the situa tion. “We’re going to be as ex ible as we can,” he said. County Commission Chair man Cheryl Sanders noted the county had written several let ters asking that Bay City not be closed. The commissioners then quickly focused on the logistics of how work squads would be handled. In his interview seeking the post as head of the road depart ment, DeWitt Polous, interim head of the department since Hubert Chipman’s retirement earlier this year, said “there’s not a lot of difference between going to Apalachicola and Carrabelle. The distance is 2 to 3 miles. “We have two buses at the county yard right now. I’d like to assign some inmate squads to specic zones and leave trucks parked at satellite stations” he said. Polous noted the county is down from ve regularly dis patched inmate squads. “We haven’t been operating at full ca pacity since Lamar (Hardy) left,” he said. “One or two days a week it seems like the DOC calls the squads in and won’t let them out, for whatever reason. It’s hot.” Alan Pierce, county director of administrative services, noted the buses would not have to be caged. “Every inmate squad leader will have to be on the bus to sign them out,” Commissioner Wil liam Massey said. Commissioner Smokey Par rish said additional transporta tion time would mean a loss of time working by the inmates. “How many hours a day are we losing to have to do this stuff, in actual work time?” he asked. “Some hours can be revised or revamped so it works for everybody.” Sanders closed the discus sion by asking that she, Pierce and Sheriff Mike Mock meet with the warden “to see what we can organize to make it more cost ef cient for the county.” Apalachicola to lose water, sewer revenue The biggest concern over the closure was voiced at the Apala chicola city commission meeting July 2. City Administrator Betty Tay lor Webb said the city received $134,000 in water and sewer rev enue from Bay City during the 2012-13 scal year. “It’s going to be a really tough budget year,” she said. “It’s coming a lot faster than any of us would like. It’s here,” said County Attorney Michael Shuler, who was in the audience. Howard said a reverter clause in place when the county rst gave the land to the state in 1989 would mean the land and build ings would be deeded back to the county once the closure was complete. Apalachicola Mayor Van John son said he met three weeks ago with Dr. Frederick Humphries, president emeritus of Florida A&M University, who thought a good idea would be to use the site as a marine science acade my that could draw scholars and students from around the coun try to do research. Humphries, a former chem istry professor, had suggested money from the foundation set up by Sam Walton, founder of Wal-Mart, might be available to fund the institution, Johnson said. “We just don’t want this op portunity to escape us,” the may or said. The county’s representatives in Tallahassee both are opposed to the move. “This has been rumored for quite some time,” said State Sen. Bill Montford, who learned of DOC Secretary Michael Crews’ decision last week. “The issue about closure is not new. I’ve opposed the clos ing of it all along, and my argu ment has been the same. My argument has been that it makes good economic sense and trans fers everybody over to the new one in the short run. That might look like the right thing to do,” he said. “If you look at the full im pact of this decision, then it is not a wise decision nancially, not a wise decision in terms of jobs. There are far reaching implica tions of this that need to be taken into account.” He said both he and State Rep. Halsey Beshears plan to discuss their opposition to closure with DOC ofcials. “I have tremendous respect for his (Crews’) judgment,” Montford said. “I’m not sure the legislative side should get involved with those kind of deci sions. On this particular issue I disagree with him, as the senator who represents those constitu ents there.” Montford said the county’s legislators asked to be notied of any closures of work squads and are seeking more details on planning. “I’m looking forward to that interaction,” he said. “Let me see the plan. What I’ve asked for is their short-range plan and their long-range plan. I’d like to look at it. I look forward to vigor ous discussion before it’s closed. “This has an impact on sur rounding counties as well be cause a lot of people work there. We should pause, and we should stop. This facility is not located in central Florida where there are other job opportunities. They have had more than their share of troubling times. This is one more detrimental factor that’s entering into their equa tion down there. The community can’t afford this.” Beshears was more resigned. “I always support the state try ing to do what’s right in terms of their budget,” he said. “At the end of the day, they’re consolidating. It cuts some costs overall. I sup port the DOC in trying to balance their budget. “I don’t like surprises. This decision was done before any thing (was discussed). I’d like to see those exact numbers my self,” he said. “Maybe we can do something about it next year. My heart goes out for the people. It’s going to be harder for them to commute. I am thankful that they have somewhere else to go in the reasonable vicinity. We are fortunate that there is some where else to work.” Montford said he planned to press his argument to the DOC and “to look at the total compre hensive impact,” including the loss of sewer and water revenue. “That’s a big hit in their bud get. How do they make that up?” he said. “Franklin County is a de pressed area. It’s hurting.” Montford suggested bowing to this ght might be the outcome. “If they move forward with it, I will do my best to mitigate the damage, and we’ll move on,” he said. The future, in the state sena tor’s view, calls for nding a good use for the facility. “I would hope we would not mothball it and nd another alternative use for it,” Montford said. “Clearly, we got to be creative in what we do.” He said local ofcials need to be brought into the discus sion of “what can we do with this facility?” Montford added cost of a fu ture plan must be considered. “When you’re being creative, it’s going to cost,” he said. “We’ve got the expertise here to try to address the issue. It’s incumbent on us to nd an alternative use for that facility. A joint public-pri vate effort may be the answer. “The slate is clean.” 4514931 NOTICE OF ANNU AL MEETING The Boar d of Commissioners of the Northw est Florida R egional Housing A uthority will hold its Ann ual Meeting on J ul y 18, 2013, a t the Holida y Inn & Suites 2725 Gr a v es R oad, T allahassee Florida. Meeting will begin a t 1:00 p .m. E.D .S .T The meeting will be open to the pub lic. BJ’S from page A1 CAMP from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The Times The Bay City Work Camp is to close by the end of the month. A work camp is expected to opened at Franklin Correction Institution, right, where the majority of Bay City inmates likely will be moved.

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Interesting contrast regarding private vendors As Gomer Pyle would say Surprise, surprise, surprise. Having just started a tupelo honey distribution business, I decided so I thought it would be great to be a vendor at the July 3 Apalachicola festivities and, when seeing Joe Taylor scurrying around as usual, approached him with my vendor idea, and my paying a fee for each bottle sold, paid to whichever entity was appropriate. Joe quickly informed me my fee would have to be 100 percent of my sales proceeds. I thought I had misheard. I was confused. This was not just a surprise, it was downright amazing and absurd. Who would ever agree to such? Well, Joe said again thats the way it is. Upon then going to Carrabelle with the same idea, I was told come right on, no fee at all. I insisted on a fee and then approaching their chamber of commerce my proposal was courteously accepted and they welcomed me. An interesting contrast. I am still somewhat perplexed. Where is Gomer when I need him? Frank Venable Eastpoint Taxpayers should question Bay City closure When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people The beginning of a famous document and how appropriate that it must be used once again during this time of year. It has become necessary for the citizens of Franklin County to once again unite as one family. A plan has been developed to relocate jobs from the west side of the county and move them to the east. Specifically, closing Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola to open Franklin Work Camp in Carrabelle. However, the impact of such a move has not been fully examined. Why is this move necessary? We are told to offset the deficit and no jobs will be lost, so how can this improve the deficit when in fact just the opposite will happen? More correctional officers will be required to operate the larger, new facility at Franklin CI; an additional 10-15 staff will be required to operate with an added cost of $400,000. This comes at a time when the Department of Corrections is facing a shortfall of $40 million during the first month of the new fiscal year. One would conclude that this deficit will only increase over a years time. Why wasnt this not discussed during the legislative session? When our elected representatives could have questioned senior DOC staff. Instead, this is being fast-tracked and the community will barely have time to respond. Taxpayers should question: Is this a wise investment or an efficient manner with which to spend funds that arent available? We should question where is DOC coming up with this additional money? Certainly going forward with this plan will not reduce the deficit by one penny. We are told they would save from lower maintenance repairs over the years. However, little has been spent to upkeep Bay City Work Camp over the years. It appears, just from the surface, a new facility was constructed at a time when the Florida Dept. of Corrections didnt need the beds. Criminal justice estimating conference states in part: The projected prison population is 1,496 lower than the September forecast at the end of scal years 2009 through 2010, and even lower at the end of 2104 through 2015. Another reason DOC announced plans in 2012 to close approximately 11 facilities, however, some were spared. Management has long been aware that fewer beds would be required for in the short or long term. So why was the new camp constructed? A question that taxpayers of Franklin County should be asking of the governor and state politicians. Now to the larger question: What to do with a new facility, let it sit? Probably not; should the employees of Bay City Work Camp in Apalachicola suffer for this poor decision? We are all taxpayers; many questioned the wisdom of constructing this facility. There will be a domino effect should this be fully implemented. For example, the City of Apalachicola will lose approximately $150,000 from the loss of revenue generated from the water/sewer system. Historic Apalachicola could be in jeopardy. Political leaders of the city will weigh out how best to proceed. Will it be worth the investment to continue supervising inmate work squads? How does the city offset this loss? Raising rates on existing customers or laying off employees. Neither one is acceptable to this struggling economy and community. Franklin County has long been designated one of Critical Economic Concern. At a time when the county commissioners should be looking for answers that would bene t the whole of Franklin County, we nd more evidence of political maneuvering that only increases the which side of the river mentality. We would hope that they could put aside their views for the betterment of the county, and put all their effort into making sure both work camps are in operation, This way new jobs are added thereby increasing the economy in Carrabelle while not diminishing the economy of Apalachicola and Eastpoint. Lets put all of Franklin County to work by keeping Bay City open and bringing Franklin Work Camp online. Theresa Amison USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 A Page 4 Section Special to the Times Imagine your 90year-old mother has Alzheimers disease and is near death. But before she became mentally incompetent, she gave you power of attorney to sign a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order so medical personnel would honor her wishes to die peacefully, without aggressive medical interventions in her nal days. Then your worst nightmare unfolds: your mother goes into cardiac arrest, and is subjected to the very treatment she had been determined to avoid: aggressive, traumatic cardio pulmonary resuscitation, and other extreme measures, including having a hole cut in her throat, being injected with paralyzing drugs, having tubes forced down her throat and into her stomach, and having air forced into her lungs. Two days after this aggressive, traumatic resuscitation, you are in the indescribably horrifying situation of having to direct that your mothers ventilator be removed so she can nally die and her suffering end. But she lingers on in a slow decline for another ve days while you maintain a heartbreaking, bedside vigil each day and night until she nally passes away. Then to add insult to injury, the hospital hands you a bill for this unwanted medical treatment totaling thousands of dollars. Sound preposterous? Unfortunately, its not. It is Sharon Halladas real life, front page news nightmare. It prompted the leading national organization dedicated to ensuring that medical professionals honor patients end-of-life choices, Compassion & Choices, to help Sharon le a lawsuit against a hospital and a nursing home in Lakeland, Florida, for failing to honor her mothers wishes, despite the fact that they had been clearly and legally speci ed in the DNR. Sharon sued on behalf of her deceased mother, Marjorie Mangiaruca, to ensure no elses parent has to endure this kind of traumatic experience. In fact, medical professionals override or ignore many patients decisions in the weeks and months before their deaths. It happens for a variety of reasons and can lead to invasive and fruitless testing, needless suffering, unrelenting pain and a prolonging of the period before death. Patients are tethered to monitors and machines despite their determination to reject treatment and desire to die at home in the embrace of loved ones. A recent study published in Journal of the American Medical Association found that between 2000 and 2009 treatment in intensive care units in the last month of life increased from 24 to 29 percent. The accompanying editorial concluded, The focus appears to be on providing curative care in the acute hospital regardless of likelihood of bene t or preferences of patients. If programs aimed at reducing unnecessary care are to be successful, patients goals of care must be elicited and treatment options such as palliative and hospice care offered earlier in the process than is the current norm. To stop this disturbing trend, policy makers can and should provide both the carrot and the stick to ensure that patients wishes are honored: nancial incentives for honoring advance directives and nancial disincentives for disregarding patients expressed wishes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) should deny payment to providers when there is clear evidence that patients were subjected to treatments they didnt want just as current policies deny payment when patients receive unnecessary treatment. The Justice Department is investigating hospitals and doctors groups for unnecessary treatment and taking legal action against the perpetrators when they nd evidence of such treatment. The same diligence should be trained on unwanted medical treatment. It is always unnecessary and should never be considered acceptable. Compassion & Choices recently recommended CMS initiate several steps to improve the quality of conversations among health care professionals, patients and families about end-of-life decisions, including: Reimbursing medical providers for participation in advanced care planning with patients and their families well in advance of illness or before facing end of life; Providing nancial incentives and training to encourage medical providers to offer all the information and counseling necessary for a patients decision making when they secure informed consent; Ensuring that the full range of medical care and treatment decisions, including curative care, palliative care and medical assistance in dying, are freely available to patients without institutional or reimbursement barriers. The explosion of the aging population coupled with the nations nancial and moral commitment to providing health care to an ever-increasing number of Americans reveals that the scourge of unwanted medical treatment must be an urgent priority for our nation. Mickey MacIntyre is chief program of cer for the nations leading end-oflife choice advocacy group, Compassion & Choices. He recently testi ed before the Institute of Medicines Committee on Transforming End-of-Life Care. Sean Crowley is media relations manager for Compassion & Choices and a former press secretary for U.S. Rep. Sander Levin, the ranking member of the House Appropriations Committee, which has jurisdiction over federal health care programs. This article previously appeared in The Hill online blog and is provided courtesy of the American Forum. Unwanted medical treatment a painful nightmare MICKEY MACINTYRE SEAN CROWLEY Special to the Times Governor Rick Scott last month announced that he has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Gulf Consortium to create a process to develop Floridas State Expenditure Plan for RESTORE funding. We need to do everything in our power to make Florida communities impacted by the BP oil spill whole again and Im pleased to work with the Gulf Consortium to develop projects for the State Expenditure Plan. Development of a comprehensive and thoughtful plan will ensure that Florida moves towards environmental and economic recovery of the Gulf, Scott said. This agreement with the Governor provides us with the opportunity to fully coordinate the collective efforts of all levels of government to restore and protect Floridas gulf waters, said Grover Robinson, Escambia County commissioner and Gulf Consortium chairman. The Gulf Consortium is ready to get to work on a transparent plan that will best enhance the economic and environmental recovery of our coastal communities and the state of Florida. The agreement lays the groundwork for the Gulf Consortium to work with Scott to ensure funding sources related to the resources and ecosystems sustainability, tourist opportunities, and revived economies of the Gulf Coast States Act of 2012 (RESTORE Act) are maximized when developing a long-term restoration plan for Florida. Key provisions of the agreement established a streamlined process for review, certification by the governor, and ultimate submission of projects and programs included in the State Expenditure Plan to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council. The RESTORE Act, passed by Congress on June 29, 2012, creates the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, and establishes various funding categories. The RESTORE Act will be funded by Clean Water Act civil and administrative penalties paid by responsible parties from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Council is comprised of the five Gulf State governors and six federal agencies. In Florida the 23 Gulf Coast counties (Gulf Consortium) are tasked with creating the State Expenditure Plan, which can include both economic and environmental restoration projects. Scott signs agreement with Gulf Consortium Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, July 11, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A decision last week by county commissioners opens more of the St. George Island commercial dis trict to residential development. On July 2, in keeping with rec ommendation from the planning and zoning board, com missioners voted unanimously to rezone Lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, Block 9, Unit 1 East on St. George Island, from C-2 com mercial use to C-4 mixed commercial and residential use. The block of land is adjacent to commercial buildings on the north and west and residences on the south and east. Last month, Gail Riegel mayer circulated an email and a map of the proposed change and urged island ers to attend Tuesday’s meeting and speak out about the change or con tact county commissioners directly. Several island residents did attend the meeting and voiced their views, but only realtor Mason Bean vocally opposed the change. “When our early plan ners laid out Gulf Beaches they did a great job. We only get in trouble when we change it. This is hor rible zoning and no plan ning,” he said. “We need a vision for St. George Island. You need a village and something to plan around. We’re losing that.” He also said that the change opens the door to denser devel opment on the island. Island resident and former P&Z board member Mary Lou Short said she favored the change. Refer ring to the small vertical houses that have come to be called “skinny Minnies” by locals, she said she felt the “honey moon cottages,” lining the beach at island center and on Gunn Road bayside were good for business. “People like to rent them, especially in the offseason. They like being able to walk to shops and restaurants,” she said. Short said mixed-use zoning to create a town center is a national trend. Travis Stanley, a real tor with Fickling and As sociates, said commercial spaces in Fickling’s mixeduse building at 112 Frank lin Avenue on the island have been difcult to ll, while the residential por tion of the building is in great demand. “We have tried but there are no takers,” he said. County Planner Alan Pierce said mixed-use de velopment tries to bridge “natural limitations to developing on St. George Island from an environ mental standpoint and eco nomic standpoint. “I would love for down town St. George Island to be a thriving business com munity but it’s not going to be. There are not enough people living there. Envi ronmental limitations will keep that from ever hap pening,” he said. “I don’t want to see (the commer cial district) go away but it has been driven by the market. People do like to walk around.” District 1 Commissioner Pinki Jackel, whose district includes the island, sup ported the zoning change. “I love these issues on St. George Island because I get a lot of emails and phone calls. In this case, the overwhelming number of comments was in favor of the change,” she said. “I share a desire for a compre hensive vision of St. George Island. If this request was in the center of commercial district, I would not be in favor of it but the request is consistent with surround ing structures. I am con cerned that we have three commercial structures on the island that are com pletely vacant.” Jackel said that of 156 vacant commercial lots re maining on the island, 100 are zoned C-2. “The com mercial district did not explode to the extent we thought it might, even dur ing periods of economic boom,” she said. “I want to see future visioning and I understand a public meeting with planning and zoning will be held on the island in August.” Pierce said Galloway Construction plans to build two cottages and one “skinny Minnie” on the ve lots. Jackel warned Heath Galloway that his company will be held to the highest standards in completing the project. She cautioned him to be sure he arranged for sufcient drainage to prevent water from pool ing on adjacent roadways. Island commercial district to add residences HEATH G aA LLOW a A Y M aA SON B eaEA N LOLO I S S SWOSWO B O O DA | The Times The property rezoned to C4 is bordered by rental houses to the south and east and by businesses to the north and west. Library workers have begun the arduous task of transferring the collections of the Eastpoint library to their new home. Librarian Glenda Ond racek is thrilled with her new 5,000 square foot facil ity but said there is much work to be done before the doors open to the public. Workers are busy con structing and wiping down metal shelves that will eventually house books. Much of the other furniture is in place but the library staff has faced challenges in accomplishing the much anticipated move. There were technical problems with running a line to provide internet service to the building. On dracek said installation of the line is now scheduled to begin earlier this week. There have also been some problems transferring phone service. None of this has re ally delayed opening the building. Unpacking and shelving the books, a monumental task, has begun. Ondracek said she has volunteers coming to help with the project this week. She said the library will probably re open around August 1. The new building, a gift from the Friends of the Eastpoint Library, will more than double the space of the old 1,800 square foot storefront. It features ofc es and multipurpose rooms and, best of all, windows. A view of the surround ing forest gives the library a restful feel. Ondracek said workers have already spotted a fox. A grand opening for the Eastpoint library is planned for this fall. — By LOIS SWOBODA Moving days for Eastpoint library LOLO I S S SWOSWO B O O DA | The Times Much of the library’s collection remains in boxes. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Gulf Group will pay pen alties for late completion of repairs on the St. George Island shing pier. On July 2, Greg Preble of Preble Rish, a county en gineering consul tant, told commis sioners Gulf Group of Panama City, the contractor tapped to repair the St. George Island sh ing pier, has fallen behind schedule. A runaway barge de stroyed 165 feet of the pier last year on June 28 during Tropical Storm Debby and left two thirds of the sh ing pier inaccessible from land. Preble Rish created a plan to reconnect the two sections of the pier with a wooden walkway. In Janu ary, Gulf Group was award ed the repair contract, which calls for the work to be completed by July 1. On July 2, Preble said he did not expect the job to be completed before late August. At that time, only a single piling had been placed but, as of July 8, more than a dozen pilings had been installed. Gulf Group is being pe nalized $300 daily for miss ing the June 30 deadline under the liquidat ed damages clause of their contract. Preble said, in ret rospect, he wishes the penalty for lateness had been greater. “My guess is the county will wind up with a $15,000 cred it,” said Preble. In addition to running behind schedule, Gulf Group asked for an addi tional $17,000 to add three pilings to the design. County Planner Alan Pierce said the engineer would normally have per formed a standard penetra tion test prior to construc tion but, in this case, the cost was $50,000 and the county opted to waive the test. Preble said his rm attempted to predict the condition of the seabed based on tests run during the construction of the two bridges. But when a test piling was driven, it be came apparent the heavy current had gouged out unexpected deep holes at the construction site. Pierce said the county saved money by not per forming the test. The commission voted unanimously to allow the work change order raising the cost of construction to more than $473,000. Preble said Gulf Group is “doing what they can to allow some shing” from the remnants of the pier still in place and not under construction. He said the new deck connecting the two sec tions of the old bridge will support foot trafc and light vehicles like golf carts but not cars and trucks. District 1 Commissioner Pinki Jackel, who repre sents St. George Island, said she was unhappy with the slow completion of the repairs. “Make sure you don’t waive any penalties. I want you to hold them to the letter of what they’re supposed to reproduce,” she told Preble. “The $300 is a drop in the bucket to what the island merchants would have gotten. The money won’t help the mer chants at all. We’ve missed the season.” She said she hoped most of the money spent on the construction would be re covered by the county’s lawsuit of Orion Marine Contractors, of Houston, Texas who owned the run away barge. Orion, who was in the area as a subcontractor for Progress Energy, is deny ing liability for the damage, calling the storm an “act of God.” The company main tains the barge was prop erly moored. The county retained Robert Dees, certied by the Florida Bar in maritime and admiralty law, in the event the county’s insur ance carrier denies cover age and payment is sought from Progress Energy or Orion for the damages. In the interim, com missioners voted to fund the repairs out of the $1.66 million in the bridge fund, which was set up by the state after it built the new bridge to St. George Island a decade ago. At the July 2 meeting, Commissioner Noah Lock ley pointed out that the money for the repairs came entirely out of accrued in terest and the principal of the fund has not been touched. Gulf Group penalized for slow progress on shing pier GR egEG PR ebEB L eE LOLO I S S SWOSWO B O O DA | The Times Over a dozen pilings are now in place.

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`= =G S=Y L UC Y & L I L L Y L u c y a nd Li l l y a r e 1 0 w e ek o l d L a b / H o u nd m i x p up s. Wi t h t he i r s h i n y b l a c k c o a t s a nd e x p r e s s i v e e y e s t he y a r e s i m p l y b e a u t i f u l p up pi e s. T he y b o t h h a v e h a p p y go l u c k y p e r s on a l i t i e s a nd w i l l m a k e t he p e r f e c t f a m i l y p e t P l e as e c om e a nd m e e t t he s e s w e e t he a r t s. T he y ’ r e s ur e t o s t e a l y o ur he a r t ! V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d e d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c at s W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e n p e t s. o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Society A6 | The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 Bridal shower for Shelby Nowling Monday There will be a bridal shower in Carrabelle for Shelby Nowling and Zachary Tarantino at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 15, in the Fellowship Hall of the First Assembly of God Church, 307 W 3rd Street. Everyone is invited. Bridal Shower Corey and Shana Crum, of Sopchoppy, and Michael and Jaime Baze, of Crawfordville, would like to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Payton Baze, to Seth Ward, son of Bryce and Karen Ward, of Apalachicola. Payton is a 2013 graduate of Wakulla High School and plans to attend Tallahassee Community College in the fall. Seth is a 2013 graduate of Franklin County School and has joined the family construction business. Seth and Payton will have a riverfront wedding on Saturday, July 27, 2013, at 6 p.m. at the Kirvin River Property located at 152 Pogy Road, Apalachicola. A dinner reception will follow. All friends and family are invited to celebrate with Seth and Payton as they exchange vows. No local invitations are being sent. Engagement On June 27, Governor Rick Scott, shown above with First Lady Ann Scott, left, showed his appreciation for Florida’s teachers and applauded their commitment to education by presenting the Governor’s Shine Award to 23 District Teachers of the Year for 2013-14. Franklin County’s Teacher of the Year, Laura King, center, has spent her 17 year teaching career in the district, where she currently teaches fourth grade. “She creates a nurturing and inviting classroom setting, establishing a positive learning environment for her students to relax, listen and absorb the lessons of the day,” wrote the governor’s ofce. “Our students should have access to a highquality education and Florida’s commitment to our teachers plays a critical role in preparing the workforce of tomorrow,” said the governor. “In acknowledging great teachers, I have created the Governor’s Shine Award to highlight teachers who go above and beyond the call of duty in pursuit of educational excellence. I am proud to present this distinguished award (and) I am also pleased that great teachers across the state will be receiving pay increases for their hard work and dedication to student success.” Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Martina, and Mr. Ronald Mears, request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their children, Kayle Martina and Jeremy Mears, at 5 p.m. on Saturday, July 13, 2013, at Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road. Immediately following the wedding, a reception will be at the Holy Family Senior Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries Street, in Apalachicola. All family and friends are invited to attend. There will be a baby shower in honor of Alexis Caro and Brennan Walden this Saturday, July 13, at 6 p.m. at the First Assembly of God Fellowship Hall in Carrabelle. The shower will be hosted by Donna Barber and Denise Massey. Please come and help us to prepare to welcome home baby boy A’Brailyn Brennan Walden. Baby Shower Wedding MEREDYTH HH OPE HH ALL | Photography for Governor Rick Scott sS HI nN E AWARD IsIS LA nN D CIVI cC CLU bB DO nN ATEsS TO FIREFIGHTER sS Kayle Martina, Jeremy Mears to wed Saturday P P ayton Baze, Seth WW ard to wed King receives governor’s ‘Shine AA ward’ CaroWW alden baby shower Saturday The St. George Island Civic Club on June 25 presented Jay Abbott, chief of the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department, left, with a check for $3,000. “The St. George Island Civic Club fully supports the efforts and sacrices of our volunteer reghters each year,” said Newt Colston, president, at right. “While we support many charities in Franklin County, our main charity is the re department, and we cannot thank them enough.” SPEc C IAL TO TT HE TT I m M E s S

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Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Fred Phillip Jet ton Jr. was born February 28, 1965, in Carrabelle. He passed away at his home in Carrabelle Tuesday, July 2, 2013, surrounded by his family and friends at the age of 48. Fred was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. He served in law enforce ment for Carrabelle Police Department and was chief of police for more than 15 years. He was an avid hunter. He leaves behind his de voted wife Mandy Jetton; children, Cheyanne Elise Jetton and Alexander Jacob Jake Jetton; par ents, Tina and Fred Jetton Sr.; siblings, Trina Dawn John son, Robin Holley, and Teresa Ann Segree; and grand children, Cayden Michael Cruse and Tylen Haze Cruse. Funeral services were Friday afternoon, July 5, at Carrabelle Christian Cen ter. Viewing was one hour prior to the funeral. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrange ments. Fred Jetton, Jr. FRED JETTON, JR. Joseph Man zanares, 77, of Mercer, Wis., died unexpectedly Tues day, July 2, 2013, at home. He was born Feb. 6, 1936, in Gary, Ind., son of the late Helen (Ge leott) Manzanares Gonzalez and Damian Manzanares, and attended school in Gary. He joined the U.S. Marine Corp. in August 1953, serving his country stateside during the Korean War, and was honorably discharged as a sergeant in August 1956. He then served ve years in the USMC Reserve. On Oct. 27, 1956, Joe married Joyce Olson in Gary, and they moved to Ironwood, Mich. in May 1960. Joe worked as meat manager at the Red Owl in Marenisco for two years, and in the spring of 1962 began a 25-year employ ment as meat manager at Carlsons Super Market in downtown Ironwood. Joe and Joyce then built a home on Echo Lake in Mercer in 1982, residing there for the past 31 years. Joe was an active mem ber of the Mercer United Methodist Church, Mercer Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9536, Mercer-Mani towish Waters American Legion Post 424, Mercer Lions Club and Mercer Senior Center Disabled Veterans. He was the re cipient of the Melvin Jones Award in the year 2000, one of the highest honors in the Lions Club, and was very active in volunteering in the Mercer community. In earlier years, he coached Little League baseball while his boys were growing up, as well as playing softball himself. He also served on the board of directors of Copper Peak. He enjoyed hunting and shing and was an avid Chicago White Sox and Bears fan. Joe dearly loved his family and spending time with his grandchildren, and will be deeply missed. Surviving are his wife, Joyce, of 56 years; four children, Joe (Linda) Man zanares, Pence, Mich.; Lynne Pedri (Al lan), Hurley, Mich.; Mark (Stephanie) Manzanares, Ironwood, Mich.; and Mi chael (Anne) Manzanares, Montreal, Mich.; eight grandchildren, Corey Pe dri, Andrea Pedri, Heather (Cory) Sbraggia, Hailey Manzanares (Matt), Mi randa Manzanares, Mat thew Manzanares, Kohl Manzanares and Ty Man zanares; two great-grand children, Braxton and Ad disyn Jo Sbraggia; a sister, Delores (Fred) Mezydlo; and special nephew, Fred (Vicky) Klahn. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother, Damian Man zanares. Per Joes wishes, cremation has taken place. Memorial services were held Tuesday morning, July 9, preceded by visita tion at the Mercer United Methodist Church, with the Rev. Richard Hartlerode, pastor, ofciating. Full military honors were accorded at the church by the combined Mercer VFW Post 9536 and Mercer-Manitowish Waters American Legion Post 424 Honor Guard. A reception followed at The Pines in downtown Mercer. In lieu of owers, me morial contributions may be made to the Mercer United Methodist Church or the Hurley Booster Club. Joes obituary can be viewed online and condo lences given the family at www.mckevittpatrickfu neralhome.com. Arrange ments have been entrusted to McKevitt-Patrick Fu neral Home and Cremation Services of Ironwood. Joseph Manzanares JOSEPH MANZANARES ObituariesT he R ochelles I would like to thank God for us for another year on our birthdays 2013. Also we thank our children for our birthday cookout on July 6 and my family and friends. From Mother Eula and Father Henry Rochelle. We love you all. Cards of THANKSFirst P entecostal Youth Dear community, friends, family and tourists, The youth group of Apalachicola First Pentecostal Holi ness Church wishes to thank everyone that has supported us in our endeavor to get to Dallas, Texas, for the Interna tional Pentecostal Holiness Church Youth Quest Student/ Leader Conference and National Fine Arts Competition. We are grateful to live in a community that is always will ing to help and support the youth. We would also like to send a special thank you to our two local grocery stores, Gulfside IGA, and Piggly Wiggly for supporting us. We pray that you all are blessed. 29 people in the group will depart for Dallas on July 18. Please keep us in your prayers for a safe journey. First Pentecostal Youth Leadership Team James Terry Tipton, Jr.Business A fter H ours tonight at T apas Bar The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host a Business After Hours on Thursday, July 11 at Tamaras Tapas Bar, 73 Market Street in Apalachicola from 5:30-7 p.m. The chambers next business luncheon will take place at noon on Wednesday, Aug. 7 at Beach Pit BBQ on US 98 in Eastpoint.D owntown street closure next week In Apalachicola, from Monday, July 15 through Wednesday, July 17, on Avenue E from Market Street to Commerce Street, traffic flow will be one-way, eastbound only, so that contractors can repair a portion of the roadway to improve the pedestrian crosswalk. Vehicles traveling down Avenue E from Market Street will merge to the left as to be directed around construction by a flagman. Vehicles traveling down Avenue E from Water Street will be redirected around construction by a flagman. We thank each of you in advance for your understanding and patience during this temporary phase of construction.S chools begin summer work hours Summer work hours at the Franklin County School District office began Monday and will run through Friday, Aug. 2. The summer work schedule will be Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., with a 45minute lunch. On Fridays the offices will be closed. Normal work hours will resume on Monday, Aug. 5.S mall business conference set for S ept. 16-20 Mark your calendar for the Small Business Week in Franklin County Sept 16-20, which will recognize and highlight the impact of small businesses. Mid-week there will be a small business resource conference hosted by the Small Business Development Center out of Florida A & M University, and the Apalachicola Bay and Carrabelle chambers of commerce to help small business owners discover resources to expand or refocus their business, bring business owners together to meet and share issues and ideas, and aid potential small business owners in getting started with their businesses.A palachicola R iverfront film festival planned Get ready for the first ever Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival, set for Saturday, Oct. 19 at Riverfront Park. Merrill Livingston is the creative brain behind the festival. Raised in Apalachicola, she graduated in 2008 with a bachelors of fine arts in film and television from the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). She has formed a volunteer nonprofit committee to help make the festival a reality. The committee includes Tom and Sharon Morgan, Ron Copeland, Anita Grove, Judi Stokowski, and Jim Bachrach. The festival will feature independent films from around the country, local documentaries and student films from the prestigious Florida State University Film School and SCAD. Special guest will include Kevin McCarey, National Geographic filmmaker and professor at SCAD. Tickets are available at http:// www.apalachriverfilm.com. or at Apalach Outfitters 29 Avenue E in Apalachicola. For info, call 653-3474.T he S t. George P lantation 2013 P hoto Contest continues through A ug. 28. The Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Prizes include first place $150, second place $100, third place $50 and Peoples Choice $50. For more information, go to www.sgpoa.com K idCare/Medicaid assistance available The Florida Department of Health in Franklin County in partnership with George E. Weems Memorial Hospital is offering KidCare/Medicaid assistance. For more information or to sign up, stop by the county health department offices. Visit the Apalachicola location at 139 12th St. on Thursdays or the Carrabelle location, 106 N.E. Fifth St, on third Tuesdays. For questions, call 653-2111. Quack, quack. Despite all the rain I hope you had a happy and safe Inde pendence Day. Mine was bittersweet. Thursday morning, I walked over to Chillas Hall and got a copy of the Times. On the door of the hall there was a note that Joe Manzanares had passed away. Joe was a good friend and a snowbird for many years. Joe was fun to be around and he enjoyed the coffee hour at Chillas Hall and was an ac tive member of the Lanark Village Golf Club and the Lanark Village Associa tion. He and his wife Joyce were always there to pitch in and help. Cards may be sent to Joyce Manzanares and family, P.O. Box 316, Mercer, Wisconsin 54547. Joe will be greatly missed. Pray for him and peace and strength for the family. Rode over to Lanark Village Boat Club with Dot Bless for the covered dish lunch. The place was wall to wall with friends, neighbors and visi tors. Lots of good food and desserts, and not much left over. Thanks to Carol Dadona and help ers, and to those who braved the weather to enjoy the after noon with us. In the evening, I was watching the news on Channel 6. They had the cameras over at the July 4 celebration in Sopchoppy. The celebration was in the memory of Bill Stephens and rightfully so. Bill was the founder of the celebra tion. Bill and his family and I have been friends for many years, and he and I shared the duty of calling bingo in the area. Dont forget the moving sale on Friday, July 12. All the items from our rectory and guest house will be for sale. The rectory is located at the corner of Spring and Newman streets, and the guest house is on the cor ner of Carl King and Elm streets here in the village. Sales are from 8 a.m. to noon. Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Chow line forms at noon. Be watch ing for you. Be sure to mark your calendars for Saturday, July 20 and Sunday, July 21. Good start Saturday morning with your sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Choose either pancakes or French toast served with bacon, eggs, juice and coffee. All that and stull only $5 donation is required. Yum, yum. Later on Saturday eve ning, July 20, you can come on down to the Camp Gor don Johnston American Legion Post 82 and enjoy all the fun things to do at the July birthday bash. The fun starts at 6 p.m. On Sunday, July 21, we will have our monthly covered dish luncheon at Chillas Hall. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Pack your favorite dish to share, a donation and enjoy the af ternoon with your friends and neighbors, see ya there! Oh yes, we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday nights at Camp Gordon Johnston Ameri can Legion Post 82, and pizza on Sunday nights, 5 to 7 p.m. both nights. Your donation of $6 will get you a huge hamburger with chips. Pizza is a donation of $8 that gets you a large pizza to eat in. A $10 dona tion will get you a whole pizza to take out. Pizza by the slice is $1 each. How about that? Be kind to one anoth er check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, contrary to popular opinion Gods last name is not damn. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Dont forget Sacred Heart moving sale this weekend News BRIEFS

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By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net Whether your taste runs to snappers — red or gray; groupers — red, black or gag; or amberjacks black sea bass and grunts, the heart of the summer is prime time to put some fresh llets on the grill throughout the Florida Panhandle. Red snapper season, though short, continues through July 14. Mangrove or gray snapper have no closed season, and neither do red or black grouper. The gag grouper season opened June 1 and continues to Dec. 4, and the AJ season is June 1July 31. There is no closed season on grunts or black sea bass, smaller sh but just as tasty. Panhandle waters are blessed with a vast assortment of reef sh habitat, both natural and manmade, and any good charting program — Navionics makes some of the best — can point you toward dozens of likely spots in any seaworthy boat. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission also has a complete list of all arti cial reefs, with depths and GPS numbers, at http://myfwc.com/ media/131585/reefs.pdf The bottom of much of the Gulf, out to the edge of the continental shelf, is a gentle slope of fairly smooth sand, and this type of bottom does not make good sh habitat. But here and there outcrops of rock or ledges and holes create refuges for the chain of life to gain a foothold. Bait schools gather on these spots, and the larger predators naturally follow. Placing ships or concrete rubble on bottom gives Nature a jump-start, and these arti cial structures often begin attracting sh within a few days of placement. Some of the manmade reefs are barely three miles off the beach, making them easy to get to in most saltwater-type boats. Others are 20 to 30 miles out. In general, those farther from shore tend to have more and larger sh simply because they are shed less. If you don’t have a larger boat — 25 feet or more with twin engines is about the safe minimum — you can take advantage of the huge party-boat eet at all Panhandle ports to get you to the reefs economically and safely. Sonar and GPS are a must for reef shing, and the new “scanning” sonars are particularly effective —Lowrance, Humminbird, Garmin and others have various models. Basically the GPS gets you on the spot, and the sonar shows you an image of what’s there, both in terms of bottom and the sh and bait that’s on the structure. Locating a good spot is only half the battle. Anchoring offshore is an art in itself. The trick is to motor up-current (or upwind if current is negligible) far enough so that when you drop anchor you can back down to put the stern of the boat either directly over the structure or just a few yards upcurrent of it. In water 100 feet deep, this requires a big anchor, a big chain lead, and 500 feet of line to provide adequate scope on a breezy day, so it’s no small investment. Once the boat is properly positioned, it’s a matter of dropping the right bait to entice whatever you’re after. Gags and black grouper tend to like hand-sized pin sh better than anything, though any sort of live bait sh will do the job. Red snapper readily grab live thread ns or sardines, jumbo shrimp, or fresh squid, and can also be caught on frozen bait sh when they’re in a biting mood. Gray snapper love tiny pin sh or scaled sardines, also big shrimp. Red grouper eat about anything, but take cut bait better than gags. And amberjack — which are not really bottom sh but are nearly always found circling around bottom structure — are more likely to attack large bait sh like blue runners. (AJ’s are also suckers for jumbo topwater plugs — the big poppers Northeast anglers use for stripers work well, and the louder you work them, the better.) Eat your Wheaties if you’re going after greater amberjack—they frequently weigh over 40 pounds and are tremendously powerful sh. Standard reef shing gear is typically a stout 8-foot rod, 3/0 star-drag reel and 60-pound-test mono, with about 3 feet of 80 pound hard mono or uorocarbon leader running to a circle hook, size 4/0 to 8/0 Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 11 86 78 30 % F ri, July 12 85 76 60 % S a t July 13 85 77 30 % Sun, July 14 87 78 40 % M on, July 15 87 78 30 % T ues July 16 86 78 30 % W ed July 17 86 78 60 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, July 11, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A CAPTAIN JOHN PAIVA | Special to Halifax Gag grouper like this one are a popular summer target on the reefs, particularly in the waters southeast of the Panhandle. Live pin sh are among the top baits. Summer offers a cornucopia of tasty reef species FRANK SARGEANT | Special to Halifax King mackerel frequently roam the waters above the reefs, and can readily be caught on at lines equipped with a live blue runner. SPONSORED BY Inshore Freshwater Offshore Offshore anglers will have the chance one more time to catch state-water snapper this week, ending on Sunday at midnight. Many good-sized fish can be caught near shore, and with all the weather from last week, these fish should bite very aggressively. Watch and know your state water boundaries. After a near record rainfall this past week, most area lakes and streams are near flood stage, and some still rising as waters from north of us reach the Forgotten Coast this week. Good reports from The Brothers and the Big River of sheepshead and channel cats are the only thing we hear right now. Most of the inshore attention is now focused on scallop season. We are seeing good numbers of shells coming to the docks, and the shells are strong and large for this time of summer. Keep your dive flags up, and watch for boaters! MIXED GRILL THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK

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T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Ž $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % ! # ! !# !# !# !# !# !# " 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 A Page 9 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s Dixie Debs swept through the state tournament last weekend without a loss, and are now poised to represent Florida next month in the World Series in Alexandria, La. In addition to ve straight wins and the state title, for the girls, age 18 and under, Coach Kevin Newell’s squad captured the sportsmanship trophy, voted on by the umpires and state directors. “Our team had an incredible attitude,” said Newell. The Debs had lost six players from last year’s state champion team, but drew suitable replacements, including Port St Joe’s Brittany King, whose two three-run homers in the opening game worried opposing pitchers. “She probably drew the most walks,” said Newell. Anchoring the squad were three returners in their last year Morgan Newell, Morgan Kelley and Christina Collins. “They were beyond happy,” said the coach. “Those three were pretty emotional they won state again.” Also playing were Shannon Pridgeon, Ally Millender, Gracyn Kirvin, Maddie Newell, Ashley Carroll and Marlyn Lee, and Hannah Winkler. Assistant coaches are Matt Kelley and Allen Millender. Following the July 4 banquet in Hernando County, the Debs opened Friday morning against host Brooksville, winning 15-3 in ve innings. Newell and Carroll shared pitching assignments, with King’s two homers highlight of the game. On Saturday morning, the Debs were victorious 18-14 in seven innings over West Pasco, after they broke the game open with 10 runs in the sixth inning. “That was just a slugfest,” said Kevin Newell. “We gave up 17 walks, that’s unreal. That’s unlike us. The girls were battling the heat and a tight strike zone and the pitching was just below average that game. “It was 95 degrees every day. It was brutal hot,” he said. “It rained all the way leading up to it and the elds were a mess, but it did not rain on us any.” On Saturday evening, the Debs faced undefeated Wahneta, and won an 87 squeaker when Kelley smacked a solo home run in the seventh to break a 66 tie. “That was a nail biter, we were pretty evenly matched,” said Newell. “That was a slugfest as well. We had almost ve players that went -2-for-3 that game. Everyone kind of contributed.” Millender pitched ve innings, and Morgan Newell two. The girls enjoyed a day off Sunday, half of them watching West Pasco defeat Wahneta 9-8, and the others lounging around the hotel to beat the heat. On Monday morning, the Debs sewed up the state title with a 6-2 win over West Pasco behind a seven-inning, three-hitter tossed by Morgan Newell. “She pitched a masterpiece, had them off balance the whole game,” said Kevin Newell. “We played good defense, got timely hits and timely bunts whenever we need it.” In the fourth inning, with the game tied 1-1, the Debs scored a pair of runs, after King walked, Pridgeon singled, Kelley walked and with bases loaded, Carroll, and then Collins, each batted in a run. Two more runs in the sixth sewed up the Aug. 2 trip to Louisiana, to compete against a dozen teams from as many states. “We’re full steam ahead on fundraising. We need all the help we can get,” said Kevin Newell, estimating it would take between $20,000 and $25,000 to cover the entire trip. “We’re going to start fundraising, bagging for bucks, car washes, and we’re still doing the ocking with the birds,” he said, noting they had sent out donation letters to local businesses. If anybody wishes to donate they can do it at any Centennial Bank location under “Franklin County Travel Softball.” State champ Debs head to World Series CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times A victorious team looks toward the World Series. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Belles battled under brutal heat last weekend at the state tourney in Brooksville, but nished second to powerhouse West Pasco for the second straight year. “Our girls played ve game total in the tournament. We played every single game but one right in the heat of the day, a 100 degree temperature,” said Coach Gary Martina. “Our girls played with heart with dignity. They did all they could do. Me and Ward Kirvin were extremely proud of our girls.” The Belles, for girls age 13-15, opened Friday with a 14-8 win over Lake Placid. “Our girls hit the ball very well, just about every player was getting base hits on that game,” said Martina. Vanessa Simmons pitched three innings, then Sophia Kirvin, 12, came in and pitched before Krista Martina came in as closer over the last three innings. Saturday afternoon the Belles topped Mulberry 125, with Simmons starting and Kirvin striking out ve after entering the second. In that game Vanessa Simmons started but she went only the rst inning, then Kirvin came in and pitched the rest of the way. That evening the team faced West Pasco, who had not had a game that day in the afternoon heat. “Our girls were already tired going up against a team that defeated us last year, the same team, a very stout team,” said Martina pitched all seven innings of this battle of the pitchers. Pasco scored a pair in the rst off errors, and Franklin scored one run that rst inning “We played defense, and the pitchers were hot,” said Martina. “That was a battle of the pitchers pitching their best and defense playing at their best. That was a nail biter of a ballgame.” In the fth inning, the Belles’ Allie Kirvin smacked a base hit to tie the game, and it remained 2-2 until the seventh. As home team, Pasco got last bats, and loaded the bases with no outs. Martina struck out the 10th batter, but the next grounded to third and the umpire ruled the runner had slid under the tag to win the game. On Sunday the Belles edged Mulberry 7-6 in 10 innings. Simmons and Kirvin split pitching duties until the seventh, when Mulberry had two runners on with one out, and the batter hit a sacri ce BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Belles runner-up in state title bid CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times Back row, left, Miranda McLeod, Summer Medley, Krista Martina, Allie Kirvin, Anna Riley, Adriana Butler, Lacey Hutchins. Front row, left, Coach Gary Martina, Kimmie Boone, Vanessa Simmons, Sophia Kirvin, Madison Smith, Sami Bearden, and Coach Ward Kirvin. See BELLES A12

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A10| The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91672T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Franklin County Emergency Management will receive sealed proposals at the Franklin County Emergency Management office, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola, Fl 32320 until Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm for the following: DISASTER DEBRIS MONITORING Emergency Management may accept all or part of any proposal. Any proposals received after Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm will be retained by Emergency Management unopened and will not be considered. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the proposal in the best interest of Franklin County. Franklin County does not discriminate because of race, creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact the Emergency Management Office at 850-653-8977. July 11, 18, 2013 94193T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000038 SEC.:________ BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. BILLIE J. ADAMS; STEPHEN H. ADAMS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated June 10, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA000038 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 15th day of August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK 3, SUN ‘N SAND, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 DESTINY MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL NUMBER DISH03537GAA/B. Any person claiming an interst in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 12TH DAY OF JUNE, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 94239T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000422 DIVISION: LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 26, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2008-CA-000422 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON N/K/A TRACEY LAFFOON; GARY FOGLEMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY FOGLEMAN; MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT NUMBER 208 OF MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS, AS PER THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO A/K/A 706 HOWARD STREET D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on this 19th day of June 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 F08068466 July 4, 11, 2013 94245T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000401-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. BRUCE L. TAYLOR, HUBERT BENTLEY, and NATALIE BUTLER, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 25, 2013, in the abovestyled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 15, 2013, the following described property: Lot 1 (unrecorded) Commence at a 6 x 6 inch concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Section 30, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida and run South 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West 659.56 feet to a re-rod (marked 5826) lying on the Southerly right of way boundary of Twin Lakes Road, thence run North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary 455.86 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160) marking the point of beginning; from said point of beginning continue North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary a distance of 200.08 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said right of way boundary run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 22 seconds West 214.87 feet; thence run South 89 degrees 42 minutes 40 seconds East 204.88 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160); thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 43 seconds West 214.14 feet to the point of beginning. Dated: June 27, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, July 11, 2013 The Times | A11 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1115179 $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCING BORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $ 386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation € Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 4515188 Other: Possess or be able to obtain within 30 days of employment a valid Florida Drivers License and have a satisfactory driving record. Special note: Bene ts include sick & holiday pay and Workers Compensation Insurance associated with the position. The selected candidate must be available to attend monthly Board meetings on Saturdays. Please submit cover letter and resume, with references, education, and Alligator Point Water Resources District ( “District” ) has an immediate opening for a full time Maintenance / Operations Supervisor position. The District is a special district authorized under Florida Law for the maintenance and operation of a potable water system within its service area located within Franklin County, FL. The desired candidate would t the description below: Position reports to: Of ce Manager Current salary starting at $30,000 annually. Duties Include: 1. Provide 24 hour/ 7 day per week availability to respond to and perform all maintenance needs of the water system, including routine maintenance, building maintenance, and emergency repair. Provide backup coverage in the event of absence. Responsible for providing additional staff and/or labor as needed to complete repairs and maintenance duties. Work with manager to insure maintenance operations are within allowed b udget. Develop and present water loss report for Board meetings. 2. Responsible for the installation of new service taps as requested by customers. 3. Replace old water meters as needed. 4. Work with Southern Water Services, Inc. to provide line ushing and water testing as necessary. 5. Responsible for the monthly meter reading in conjunction with of ce manager 6. Provide monthly monitoring and maintenance reports at scheduled Board of Directors meeting including written work order summary and daily work log summary. 7. Order and maintain inventory of all parts and supplies necessary for the satisfactory operation of the water system. 8. Oversees the maintenance of the districts well sites, chorine buildings, backhoe, Kawasaki mule, and other mechanical and electrical equipment. 9. Monitors District SCADA system on a daily basis. 10. Others duties as assigned. professional work experience history to Alligator Point Water Of ce Manager at P.O. Box 155, Panacea, FL 32346 by Monday July 22, 2013, by 11:00am. Applications will be reviewed by the Board of Directors and top candidates must be available to interview on July 23, 2013 beginning at 2:00 pm to determine the most quali ed applicants. Inquires should be made to the District of ce at (850) 349-2274 during normal business hours. Consistent with Florida Law, all applications may be made available for public inspection upon request. Criminal background checks and drug screenings are required. Alligator Point Water Resources District is an Af rmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer. Job Requirements: Education: Graduated from High School or have GED certi cate. Technical training in water distribution systems maintenance or equivalent preferred. Knowledge of FDEP requirements for operation of public water systems. Experience: One year of eld maintenance work or equivalent; able to operate and perform routine maintenance on backhoe and other district equipment. Candidate in this position holds a State of Florida Class C Water Distribution Operator license or a Class C Water Treatment Operators license or obtain one within one year. 1112661 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW 94261T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-130 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 370 Apalachicola, Florida 32320, Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN S. HARDY, TAMMI L. HARDY, PINE COAST PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, and FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 15, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-67 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. S-67 A DISTANCE OF 1040.43 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE FOLLOWING 6 COURSES: NORTH 54 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 66.84 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 450.00 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 39 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 06 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 308.41 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 679.81 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 687.50 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 14 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.63 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 2131.26 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND), THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 233.94 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD 1739.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTERLINE OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS CLARKS LANDING ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD 2628.83 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 3849.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ITS EXTENSION THEREOF 1409.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 1269.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1269.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94249T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-422 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 24th day of June 2013, in Case Number 11-422 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern, on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Mariners Landing Phase III, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 4, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 25th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000131-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL W. BYRD, JR., ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash inside the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32329, at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 28, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 5 and 6, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17,of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 598.0 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 210.85 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 523.75 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF A TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 90, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID TRACT 209.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 915.57 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. NO. 90 STATE ROAD NO. 10 THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 24 MINUTES WEST (BEARING BASE) ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 815.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 203.48 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 24 SECONDS WEST 312.81 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE FROM A TANGENT BEARING OF NORTH 64 DEGREES, 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 177.17 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 32 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 309.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAINING 1.74 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 25, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94279T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, July 19, 2013. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #33 Marshall Sweet Contents-Household STORATE UNIT #64 Tanieia Bell Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #73 Charlene Fincher Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #111 Karen Knowles Content-Household July 11, 18, 2013 94311T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-0230-CA IN RE FORFEITURE OF: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665 $1,882.00 U.S. CURRENCY NOTICE OF FORFEITURE ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE FLORIDA CONTRABAND FORFEITURE ACT TO: MICHAEL SHAWN LANGLEY, c/c FRANKLIN COUNTY JAIL, 270 STATE ROAD 65, EASTPOINT, FL 32328 AND ANY UNKNOWN INTERESTED PARTIES. RE: In Re: Forfeiture of the Following Described Property: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665, Florida Tag No. ACFR12. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office has filed a Certificate of Compliance with Forfeiture Act and Complaint for Forfeiture with the Clerk of Court in Franklin County, Florida. An Order Finding Probable Cause has been entered requiring the Claimant and all persons or entities who claim an interest in the property described above to respond. Copies of the Complaint and Order of Probable Cause can be provided by the Franklin County Clerk of Court. You are required to file any responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses, within twenty (20) days of receiving notice, with the Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and to serve copies upon Donna Duncan, Counsel for the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., 80 Market Street, P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Failure to file your defenses will result in a default judgment being entered against you. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Clerk of the Court this 1st day of July, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. j Kelly & Josh j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Lost Yellow Inflatable Raft with Fishing Equipment, Call 850-228-5778 East Point : 613 HWY 98, Sunday July 21st 9am-6pm Yard Sale Handyman’s Jackpot! Tools, parts, & much more! During week call Jim: 201-370-6596 Text FL57533 to 56654 Education Early Education and Care, Inc. Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 Food ServiceCooks Apalachicola River Walk Cafe Needed for breakfast, lunch, dinner, flex hrs Mon -Sat. Apply in person at: 17 Ave. E., Apalachicola (Next to the Dixie Theater) Web ID#: 34258152 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Pay based on prior experience. Call (850) 927-2163 Web ID: 34257518 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Logistics/TransportDrivers: Drivers: Guaranteed Home EVERYWeekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. Call: 1-888-880-5911 Text FL55307 to 56654 Other Experienced Resident Innkeeper Salary plus fully furnished spacious apt and car and benefits. Send resume and photo to lynnwilson2@aol.com Web ID#: 34257878 Other Housekeepers Experienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. $9/hour (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34257877 Other Live-In Caregiver Looking for live-in caregiver for elderly woman. All utilities paid. No rent. Possible pay. Call for details. Located in Carrabelle. 850-209-4124 Web ID#: 34257391 Lanark Village Carlton St. #6, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $500 month + $300 deposit. Call 864-356-5949 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Carrabelle, FLGulf Side 2 BD/ 1 BA, Furnished, $450mo. Plus Utilities & $450 Dep., Pets OK W/Deposit Call 850-567-3375 Text FL57381 to 56654 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $76,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Cadillac DTS -Luxury 1, 2006 ; Only 1 owner! 49,600 miles, White in color. Blue Book is $15,500, asking $13,500 850-340-0889 or 850-340-0890

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, July 11, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur lo c al r eal esta t e e xp er ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the b est v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real E sta t e P icks! D isc o v er the b est r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Jo e A palachic ola, C ap e S an Blas S t G eor ge I sland C arr ab elle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! !! % !! # !! # (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D $ ," "#(( *" .( $ *' #" + .( $ $ ( & ( ( $" $( & -( #(" + ( #++(( & # $ ( -( + ( "$ ( "$ ( -( & %)) %) ) $ "" ( "+ $ $ T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4515098 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248993 $75,000 A palachicola MUL TI-F AMIL Y B UILDING SITE A r ar e opportunity in A palachicola, R-2 zoning to de v elopment an income pr oducing m ulti-famil y r esidence ample r oom f or duple x, to wnhouse or a spacious single famil y home r ecentl y b ush-ho gged, Cotta ge Hill R oad, Listed b y Michael Billings $ 4515166 St G eor ge Island Plan ta tion C omf or table laidback qualit y -built W ill S olber g home in e x clusiv e C asa del Mar subdivision within w alk ing distanc e t o "F ishing a t T he C ut" f ea tur es lar ge living ar ea, o c e nook and mast er suit e on main lev el opening on t o spacious G ulf S ide por ch with boar dw alk t o the B each, F an tastic G ulf of Me xic o views fr om the living ar ea, MBR, and por ch! MBA has bidet jett ed tub separ a t e sho w er and lar ge 2-sink v anit y and w alk -in closet bet w een Mast er BR/BA. Upper oor has 2 e x tr a lar ge bedr ooms each with lar ge priv a t e ba ths E lev a t or fr om gr ound lev el t o t op oor! T his home w as c ust om designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e and f ea tur es c ust om c ypr ess in t erior trim. S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .2224S ail shD riv e .com UNDER CONTRACT! John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248585 $1,199,000 St. Geor ge Island 451 51 68 PLANT A TION BEA CHFR ONT Go r ge ou s 4 BR 3. 5 B A, Gr ea t ki tc he n, gr an it e co un te r to ps up sc al e ap pl ia nc es fu rn is he d, a t sc re en TV s, ti le o or s, Sp a T ub la r ge PO OL ou td oo r ki tc he n wi th po ol ta bl e & ba th IN CO ME PR OD UC ER Na ut il us Dr i v e. “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) American “what” was the title of a TV series set in the 1960s with Meg, Helen, Jack, and JJ? Idol, Gladiators, Dreams, Life 2) About what percent of America’s teens get an optimal amount (9+ hrs) of sleep? 9, 20, 31, 42 3) Who was the rst U.S. president to appear on a postage stamp? Lincoln, Jefferson, Washington, Madison 4) What country in the news media is often called the “Hermit Kingdom”? Libya, Nigeria, Laos, N. Korea 5) Of these which is not in Europe? Israel, Albania, Germany, Sweden 6) Where was the rst commercial espresso machine manufactured in 1906? San Francisco, Italy, NYC, France 7) Approximately three out of “how many” American teens drink a caffeinated beverage daily? 4, 6, 8, 10 8) Who was the only former U.S. president to die in the 1700s? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 9) What philosopher reportedly drank fty cups of coffee a day? Confucius, Descartes, Voltaire, Jung 10) Though cancelled due to WWI, where were the 1916 Olympics scheduled to be held? Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Warsaw 11) Of these industrialists who was a surgeon during the Civil War? Ford, Rockefeller, Goodrich, Firestone 12) Where was Elvis Presley scheduled to perform next when he died? Florida, Oregon, Michigan, Maine 13) What averages out to about 512 of them per pound? Paperclips, Potato chips, Popcorn kernels, Plain M & Ms 14) How many coffee beans does it ordinarily take to make an espresso? 20, 42, 100, 180 ANSWERS 1) Dreams. 2) 20. 3) Washington. 4) N. Korea. 5) Israel. 6) Italy. 7) 4. 8) Washington. 9) Voltaire. 10) Berlin. 11) Goodrich. 12) Maine. 13) Plain M & Ms. 14) 42. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com This report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests in this week’s report were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JULY 1 Shane Z. Creamer, 28, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (APD) JULY 2 Joshua W. Cooper, 25, Apalachicola, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Jimmy D. Kilgore, 35, Eastpoint, felony shing with license revoked (FCSO) Elizabeth Millender, 49, Carrabelle, criminal mischief and grand theft (FCSO) JULY 4 Robert K. Lee, 39, Carrabelle, criminal mischief (FCSO) JULY 5 Terrance I. Walker, 45, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) JULY 6 Dwain R. Weston, 43, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Roland M. Schoelles, 48, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) JULY 7 Joseph B. Stevens, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation, two counts possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Timothy W. Finley, 44, Apalachicola, misuse of 911 or e911 system, disorderly intoxication and resisting ofcer with violence (APD) JULY 9 Michael L. Lee, 44, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Kara Richards, 20, Apalachicola, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Bradley R. Cardin, 20, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Arrest REPO rtRT BELLES from page A9 deep to center to score both and tie the game at 6-6. The Belles loaded the bases in both the eighth and ninth innings but couldn’t capitalize. Martina’s heat kept Mulberry from scoring. “We got defensive play at short in the 10th, and Martina struck out two with bases loaded,” said the coach. “That saved us in the 10th.” In the bottom of the inning, Lacey Hutchins got on base on a shortstop error, then Kimmie Boone laid down a bunt to third base right on the chalk line that advanced Hutchins and lled rst. A grounder by Sum mer Medley to short led to Hutchins being picked off going to third. A passed ball advanced both Boone and Medley, and then with one out with runners on second and third, Kirvin grounded to second, enabling Boone to score the winning run. On Monday morning, the Belles would have had to twice defeat Pasco, which had fresher pitchers having only played three games. Martina hurled her two remaining innings and Kirvin her one, but with their en gines spent, the Belles fell 100 in ve innings. “We had opportunities, we had people on base but we just couldn’t make it happen,” Martina said. The coach was pleased at the strong turnout of Frank lin County fans. He said he and Ward Kirvin, along with the parents and players, were thankful for the $2,500 dona tion from the county com mission, and the $1,250 from Apalachicola and $200 from Carrabelle, as well as dona tions from the youth group at the Carrabelle Church of God and Ace Hardware. He thanked the Piggly Wiggly for allowing the girls to reap $2,000 in two days of “bagging for bucks” at the store. “We appreciate it, all those donations and the support we got for us to have a good trip to our state tournament,” said Martina. “It was a good comfortable trip; that really helped the players and par ents, that’s for sure.” The team also included local girls Miranda McLeod, Anna Riley, Adriana Butler and Madison Smith. Martina singled out the contribution of catcher Sami Bearden, who traveled over from Wakulla County to be a part of the team. “She caught all the dis trict games in the heat and all ve state game in the heat and did an outstanding job,” he said. “We were extremely proud of all the girls.”