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The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 07-04-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00229

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 07-04-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00229

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, July 4, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 10 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Nobody was hurt in an Eastpoint re last week that destroyed an RV and a storage shed. About 2 p.m. June 25, the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department responded to a 911 call from a home on Hickory Dip Road. Fire ghters found a storage shed and recreational vehicle engulfed in ames behind the primary residence. Although the RV and shed were a total loss, remen were able to save the house with damage only to the vinyl siding. A nearby travel trailer escaped with relatively minor damage. A thick plume of oily smoke was visible from Apalachicola and St. George Island for more than 30 minutes. The residents of the house declined to give their names, but Joseph Pumphrey said he owned the contents of the storage shed as well as the travel trailer that was damaged but not destroyed. Pumphrey, a former volunteer reman, said he believed the re was electrical. Neighbors conrmed the blaze started near a fuse box on the side of the shed. Pumphrey said the belongings destroyed several large appliances, an air conditioner and family pictures and mementos were in storage. He said he resides in a home on Ridge Road. I had just come in from oystering, and I was at the oyster house when I heard the re trucks, Pumphrey said. I jumped in my truck and put it to the oor to get over here. I was pulling my boat. Im heartbroke because everything I own and Ive worked for over the last 10 years was in that shed. What Ive worked for since I was 15 or 16 years old. Pumphrey said he lost 90 percent of his belongings and had no insurance. Im just glad everybody is all right, he said. Island residents could face stiff nes By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Stiff penalties might be in store for as many as 140 St. George island property owners who fail to remedy problems with lighting that disorient sea turtles during nesting season. At the June 18 county meeting, commissioners were told the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service may invoke the Endangered Species Act on St. George Island. County Planner Alan Pierce said he received a letter from USFW last month, asking the county to be more diligent in protecting nesting sea turtles. The letter requests a meeting with commissioners to discuss sea turtle protection. Last year there were a number of sea turtle disorientations, and the USFW wants the county to work to diminish those numbers, Pierce said. Franklin County, with one of the Schools look to shore up nances By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com As the Franklin County School District looks towards the 2013-14 scal year, the school board has agreed on a staf ng plan for next year based on a budget expected to raise about $150,000 more than came in this year, and to spend about $50,000 less. At their June 25 special meeting, the school board voted unanimously to approve 59 instructional positions, with three additional teaching positions an elementary school teacher and middle school math and physical education teachers as well as an information technology coordinator to be hired. The board earlier this month approved the re-hiring of ve teachers who are on assignment, serving as deans, guidance counselors or in other non-instructional posts, so it appears the district will have ve fewer teachers on staff than the 73 this year. The district plans to next year hire a foreign language instructor to teach Spanish, after having eliminated the position a year ago as a cost-cutting move. Students this past year who took Spanish did so through Florida Virtual School, which involved Fire ghters save Eastpoint home; shed destroyed Feds want lights out for turtles LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Fire ghters extinguish a blaze behind an Eastpoint home June 25. STATE APPROVES OYSTER FARMING FOR ALLIGATOR HARBOR By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In what is being heralded as an innovative step to help pep up the sagging oyster industry, the Florida cabinet last week gave the go-ahead for a Wakulla County family to farm oysters on their aquaculture leases in Alligator Harbor. On June 25, Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet approved an expansion of the use of two aquaculture leases in Alligator Harbor held by the Spring Creek Oyster Company, a Crawfordville-based company owned by the Lovel family. The approval will allow Spring Creek to modify two existing 1.5acre leases to use the full water column for oyster harvesting in cages suspended above the bottom. The company had been using submerged land bottom to grow oysters in cages at the bottom of the waterbody, but was limited by its variance from the state Division of Aquaculture to no more than 6 inches from the bottom, the same vertical limit placed on the surrounding clam leases. The Cabinet action enables the Lovels to take advantage of the top 2 feet of water, a space richer in nutrients, protected from predators and more easily accessible to the leaseholders. The oating cages may be the initial step in a new aquaculture practice and may become a potential alternative economic stimulus for the eastern bounds of Apalachicola Bay, Scott said in a press release that followed the Cabinet decision. The release said allowing use of the full water column is the only change to the two aquaculture leases, which both expire in 2022. It said Spring Creek is in compliance with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services aquaculture best management practices, and that the department, as well as the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, determined the NEW LEASE ON LIFE See SCHOOL A2 See OYSTERS A3 See TURTLES A3 JENNIFER STRICKLAND, USFWS | Special to the Times CLAY LOVEL | Special to the Times The Lovels farm oysters for their Spring Creek Restaurant. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 What if it rains on Independence Day? Main Street Apalachicola has announced that in the event of inclement weather, all Independence Day celebration events will be moved to the posted times on Friday, July 5. The St. George Island holiday parade on the morning of July 4 will happen, rain or shine. The rain date for Independence Day reworks in Carrabelle would be dark-thirty Friday. Maritime museum debuts Paddling Rowing Center From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 7, the Apalachicola Maritime Museum will host the grand opening of their Paddling and Rowing Center. Free trips will be available to museum members all day. The museum is at 103 Water St., Apalachicola. Call 653-2500 or visit www. amm .org. St. George Plantation photo contest Until Aug. 28, The St. George Island Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Forms and guidelines are available at www.sgpoa.com. Summer bingo on the island Every Tuesday, enjoy Summer Bingo upstairs at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. at 7 p.m. Cards are 25 cents. This event is sponsored by and bene ts the St. George Island Civic Club. For information, call 927-2654. Everyone welcome. Remembering a hero, A5

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 online learning. They did a survey with students before school was out, and our students re sponded very favorably to having an instructor, and we feel we have to address it, Superintendent Nina Marks said. Director of Financial Services Shannon Venable said about 60 students indi cated they wished to sign up for a foreign language class. She said hiring a beginning teacher would cost about $44,000 including benets, and all but about $7,000 of this expense would be reim bursed by the state Before approving the stafng plan, the school board heard a report from Venable, who told the board she forecast revenues next year to be roughly $10.97 million, about $150,000 more than this years $10.82 mil lion. This is in part because the districts combined property tax valuation will rise from $1.696 billion to $1.715 billion next year, by about $19 million, or rough ly 1.1 percent. Venable said the district will carry over a balance of about $400,000 from the current scal year and will have about $600,000 in rev enue in June 2014 at the end of the next scal year. Of this, about $371,000 will be in unrestricted funds, which is about 3.74 percent of the overall budget, considered an acceptable cushion by the Florida Department of Education. Were continuing to update that as we make changes, she said. One cost-cutting move that wont be made next year will be to privatize the districts custodial and lawn care services. The school board decided unanimously to postpone talk of a plan rst presented by Marks about a month ago, which would save the district any where from about $68,000 to $113,000 in custodial costs. They decided it should not go the bargaining table for this year but that chief ne gotiator Leonard Dietzen should open discussions on the matter for the 2014-15 scal year. The school district spends about $350,000 annu ally on its custodial needs, including supplies and lawn care. A proposed by GCA Services Group would have trimmed those costs back to $235,000, an annual sav ings of a little more than $113,000. At the time they rst reviewed the plan early last month, school board members asked for a sec ond quote that would have retained three existing custodial employees who were nearing retirement. Keeping those three on staff would have meant only the main campus custodial staff would be privatized and would have saved the district about $68,000 over this years costs. The school board decid ed June 25 that rather than make a decision now, they would keep the idea on the backburner for discussion with the union for the fol lowing scal year. The current custodial staff cant order supplies. Everythings kind of in lim bo, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin said. Im not saying we cant re visit it in the future. I think we should come to a deci sion tonight as a board as to what were going to do. I dont think its fair to keep them in limbo. Board Chairman Jimmy Gander pushed for a deci sion on privatization that would apply for the entire scal year. I know these employ ees back here; they want to know where they stand, he said. I just put myself in the place of employees. It we hire them tonight, we need to hire them for 12 months and be done. Ultimately, Marks agreed to postpone any move to ward privatization. I think with the nancial difcul ties that we have, its some thing we need to be looking at, she said. I also think they need to get on with the summer and get the school prepared. You need to hire them tonight and lets re visit it at a later date. Crooms contract renewed In another matter con cerning a private sector service provider, the board agreed to a $66,000 contract for next year with Crooms Transportation that will cover the cost of transport ing a half-dozen disabled students and a paraprofes sional to the Gretchen Ever hart School in Tallahassee. I believe were still go ing to try to work towards the future of transporting the children ourselves, Marks said. We dont have anything in place right now to take care of these chil dren, and we need it by July 1. The price tag for the transportation will run $15,000 more than did it this year. School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders said the cost increase was because Crooms would no longer be able to offset some costs by transporting additional adults to physician appoint ments in Tallahassee on the bus. My understanding is the contract before did not require the bus to only have our students. They were able to keep that price be cause they transported oth er kids, Sanders said, add ing that Martha Weimorts, the former director of spe cial programs, had insisted on the exclusivity because of requirements of the Jessica Lunsford Act. That state law requires background screening of all individu als who provide contracted non-instructional services to Florida public schools or districts. Last month, the school board approved the hiring of a successor to Weimorts, who retired from her post this year. Named as the new director of special programs was Sue Summers, a former su perintendent of the Liberty County Schools. Summers served onefour-year term, from 200812, as Liberty County superintendent. She lost her re-election bid in the August 2012 Democratic primary. She has a doctor ate in education and will be paid $67,000, about $3,000 less than her predecessor. A plea to visit classrooms In a spirited back-andforth at the start of the meeting, Cathy Wood, pres ident of the local teachers union, said the union had reviewed four proposals presented by Dietzen at the recent opening bargaining session. Three of the four took my breath away, said Wood, calling the proposals a little bit skewed. I just feel that once again the communication line has been severed and closed if these are the pro posals to balance the budget on the backs of the employees, she said. Both Wood and the school board members avoided going into detail on the proposals now on the table. She did encour age school board members to visit classrooms once school is back in session. Im saying to you, please come, please sched ule it, she said. You need to be there, maybe on your lunch hour from your other jobs. Show your presence on a regular basis in these classrooms. The proposal was met with some skepticism from school board members. It would be virtually impos sible and very disruptive to have ve school board members traipsing around from class to class, to teach er to teacher, Gander said. Everyone has an opportu nity to come to the board, as you do. I dont really un derstand how we can make ourselves more available unless we go on conference call to the classroom. Just to go out and knock on the door and say Do you want to see me or dont? Its never worked out well for me, he said. Ive tried it. I have rarely ever gone in there that didnt feel like I was interrupting some thing going on. Wood asked school board members formulate some sort of schedule. If a teach er knows that youre going, the teacher would have to agree with you coming, and pair you up. We would have camaraderie of people sitting in your position as elected ofcials, (being able to see) something wonder ful and positive that went on on that campus. Board Member Teresa Ann Martin sought to re assure Wood the school board supported teachers. I think great things are happening at the school, but theres always room for improvement. Dont take it so to heart that all theyre doing is putting us down. Were looking at numbers and results and saying we dont have to be a D school. Theres a lot of teachers working hard, some thats not and some that are. Wood continued to plea for personal visits. Please come and sit in a class room. For our staff to see you come and participate in some capacity is going to be that motivator, that something that will entice them to maybe make that difference. Board Member Pam Shiver said she did not favor the idea of staging school board visits. I wont come announced; I dont want to walk in on you on your best behavior, she said, and then likened the situation to hers as a postal service employee. Everything is data-driv en. Management looks at nothing but the data, Shiv er said. To the employee, its Hey Im a human be ing. But in the essence of it all theres still a business that needs to be done. Board Member David Hinton, a former teacher at Carrabelle High School, said he did not support the idea of school board mem ber visits. When I was a teacher, the only time I ever saw a board member was when there was a prob lem, he said. It wasnt the board members job to mi cromanage the school. He said when he was elected to ofce, he decided Im going to do it here in the board room. I dont go to school to see whats go ing on. I dont really have a de sire to go to the schools. Its intimidating for a school board member to go into the school. N O T I C E T O R E C E IV E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F ran k l i n B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e ce i v e s e a l e d b i d s q u a l i e d pe r s o n c o m p an y or c or p or a t i o n i n t e r e st e d i n c o n st r uc t i n g P L U M B I N G R E N O V A T I O N S A T T H E F R A N K L I N J A I L A N D S H E R I F F S O F F I CE T h e pr o j e c t i s l oc a t e d a t 2 7 0 S ta t e R o a d 6 5 E a s t po i n t F l o r i d a an d c o n s i s t s o f r e p l a c i n g p l u m b i n g c o m po n e n t s o n e x i s t i n g x t u r e s a t t h e C o u n t y J a i l an d Sh e r i f f s O f ce C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s pr o j e c t w i l l be 6 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i ce t o P r oce e d pr e s e n t e d t o t h e su c c e s sfu l bidd e r A m an d a t o r y pr e b i d w a l k t h r u i s sc h e d u l e d f o r M o n d a y J u l y 8 2 0 1 3 a t 1 0 : 0 0 a m T h e w a l k t h r u w i l l be h e l d a t t h e C o u n t y J a i l a t 2 7 0 S ta t e R o a d E a s t po i n t F l o r i d a L i q u i d a t e d d am a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e pr o j e c t o n t h e s pe c i e d d a t e w i l l be s e t a t $ 2 0 0 0 0 pe r d a y T h e s e a l e d b i d m us t be c l e a r l y m a r k e d o n t h e o u t s i d e o f t h e e n v e l o pe P L UM BI N G R E N O V A T I O N S A T C OU N T Y J A I L T h e e n v e l o pe s h o u l d a l s o be a r o n t h e o u t s i d e t h e B i d d e r s n am e a d d r e s s an d l i ce n s e n u m be r i f a p p l i c a b l e B i d s w i l l be r e ce i v e d u n t i l 4 : 30 p m ( E S T ) o n M o n d a y J u l y 1 5 2 0 1 3 a t t h e F ran k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f ce F ran k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o us e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 an d w i l l be o pe n e d an d r e a d a l o u d o n T u e s d a y J u l y 1 6 2 0 1 3 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g h e l d a t t h e C o u r t h o us e A n n e x 34 F o r be s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a T h e F ran k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e an y i n f o r m a l i t y i n an y b i d t o a c ce p t an d / o r r e j e c t an y o r a l l b i d s an d t o a c ce p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r be s t j u d g e m e n t w i l l be i n t h e be s t i n t e r e s t o f F ran k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n f o r m f o r a pe r i od o f s i x t y d a y s af t e r o p e nin g A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l c o m p l y w i t h a l l a p p l i c a b l e S ta t e an d l oc a l l a w s c o n ce r n i n g l i ce n s i n g r e g i s t ra t i o n an d r e g u l a t i o n o f c o n t ra c t o r s d o i n g b us i n e s s i n t h e S ta t e o f F l o r i d a Q u e s t i o n s s h o u l d be a d d r e s s e d t o A l an P i e r ce D i r e c t o r o f A d m i n i s t ra t i v e S e r v i ce s a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 E x t 1 6 1 o r a l an p @ f a i r po i n t n e t P UBL I S H D A T E S: T h u r s d a y J u n e 2 7 2 0 1 3 BI L L T O: F R A N KL I N C O U N T Y B OC C T h u r s d a y J u l y 4 2 0 1 3 A t t n : L i n d a P h i l l i p s 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: AP00 SUE SUMMERS SCHOOL from page A1

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, July 4, 2013 largest populations of nest ing sea turtles in the state, has wrestled for years with problems with disorienta tions of both adults and hatchlings because of im properly shielded residen tial and commercial light ing. Because all sea turtles are considered to be at risk of extinction, turtle deaths resulting from improper lighting may violate the Endangered Species Act. Bill Mahan, Franklin County extension agent called USFW the 600pound gorilla in the room waiting to pounce. Mahan said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission is co operating with the county to educate island property managers and owners. About a dozen property owners and managers on the island attended a June 19 sea turtle workshop at the St. George Island re house led by Kelly Roberts, an FWC wildlife biologist. Roberts said she was de lighted because she had held county wide work shops where only ve had attended. Last September, USFW threatened to ne island properties with lighting that disorients sea turtles to the tune of $5,000 or more for each violation. A letter from USFW said the county sea turtle protec tion ordinance, passed in 1998, is not being properly enforced, and the federal agency will invoke the En dangered Species Act if the county continues to ignore its own ordinance. A second letter received last month repeated that warning. Dan Garlick, owner of Garlick Environmental Services Inc., said USFW can and will levy stiff nes in order to enforce the En dangered Species Act. In my experience, what often happens is they im pose the nes, which cant be paid and are not paid by the violator but the whole process gives the commu nity a black eye, he said. Its very bad from a public image point of view. According to the act, civil penalties can be up to $25,000 per violation. Crim inal penalties are not to ex ceed $50,000 in nes and a year of imprisonment. Lisa Lehnhoff, a spokeswoman for USFW, said the amount of the ne is largely at the discretion of the USFW en forcement ofcer. There might be one dis orientation with more than one hatchling involved, and the ofcer could choose to treat it as a single violation and ne, say, $1,000, she said. If a second disorien tation occurs involving the same property, the ofcer might ne the owner for each turtle affected. Over the last ve years, the Endangered Species Act rarely has been invoked for violations involving sea turtles except where there was criminal activity, for example the sale of turtle meat or purposeful de struction of a nest. Charg es against property owners causing disorientations ap pear to be unprecedented. However, there is fund ing available from the Deepwater Horizon settle ment targeted at improv ing and protecting sea tur tle nesting areas, and that infusion of money could make enforcement of the law more feasible. USFW agents returned to the island in May and conducted a survey that identied 140 residences that might be out of com pliance. A copy of this list was attached to the USFW letter sent to Pierce. The list includes beachside and rst tier properties from Sunset Beach, on the ex treme eastern end, to Bob Sikes Cut on the west. Businesses are not in cluded in the list; about half the properties on the list appear to be vacation rentals, but many are pri vate homes. In a telephone interview, Lehnhoff said, The county has had an ordinance since 1998, and (USFW) has been active in trying to bring people into compliance. This is just a continuation of that initiative. Donald Imm, a USFW project leader, USFWs sea turtle effort isnt as much about sea turtles as the lifestyle on St. George Is land. People have enjoyed the beach there for many years. Being able to coex ist with sea turtles and their nests is an important part of that. At some point, it could get so developed local people wont be able to enjoy that lifestyle. In south Florida, there are plenty of islands where ev ery day Florida residents can no longer afford to go and enjoy those resources. This is about sustained growth, sustained econo my and sustaining condi tions on the island. We fully support a healthy economy and a healthy county. In no way are we trying to oppose any of those things, he said. We really hope to give the county residents some op tions. Right now, plans for enforcement of the Endan gered Species Act are on hold, but the time will come when law enforcement will get involved. Susan Ficklen, of Col lins Vacation Rentals, was among those who attended the June 19 workshop. In the past, Franklin County has stated that there was an ordinance but no money to enforce it, she said in an inter view last week. A volun teer organization led by Bruce Drye was formed. Each season, the turtlers turn a list of noncompliant houses to the county. The county sends a letter to the owner. Ficklen said Collins has one owner who recently re ceived such a county noti cation and told the rental company he wanted to be in compliance. He contacted the Turtle Conservancy. They provided him with advice and funding for xtures and installation, she said. (Property managers) rep resent the owners, and we are responsible to inform them about anything that will affect them or their renters or property. I think its important to recognize that we are still a part of the ecoheaven, Ficklen said. We already remind every guest when they arrive that this is turtle season. Its like the beach the way it was when we were kids and people respect that. She said the rental companies have received copies of the list of 140 properties and will work to inform affected property owners. Im certain that we have the support of all rental companies, Fick len said. Imm said USFW and FWC hope to obtain en vironmental restoration money from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill settlement to assist in bringing the is land into compliance and will work with homeowners and property management companies to that end. Lehnhoff began visit ing island businesses last week to provide informa tion and answer questions about compliance. She will speak at the August meet ing of the St. George Island Civic Club. At the June 18 county commission meeting, Pierce and Mahan said they had received word from USFW the county also might be eligible for grant money to protect turtles under Restoring the Night Sky, a project funded by the Deepwater Horizon settlement. Pierce said the countys grant proposal requests funds for education and to pay a code enforce ment ofcer to work nights and evenings inspecting lighting on the island. He said the grant also would provide money to retrot structures with compli ant lighting. The program would be run out of Mah ans Sea Grant ofce at the Armory. Pierce said some por tions of the island, in cluding the commercial district, would be difcult to bring into compliance. He said his plan is to cre ate a wide swath of dark beach on the east end of the island where housing is less dense than at island center. Commissioner Smokey Parrish expressed concern for public safety if lighting in the business district is reduced. Some folks, because they love turtles, get kind of extreme, Commission er Noah Lockley said. We dont want that. Commissioner Pinki Jackel suggested com mercial lighting and signs could be retrotted to protect the turtles. They were here before us, and we need to try and live with them, she said. Commissioners voted unanimously to allow Pierce and Mahan to apply for the grant. Imm said USFW will continue to document tur tle disorientations and col lect information that will be needed to prosecute vi olators of the Endangered Species Act. C all f or inf or mation about our r ot ating specialists: W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle change will not result in adverse impacts to seagrasses, existing shellsh beds, natural reefs or other sensitive habitats. At their April 2 meeting, Frank lin County commissioners had re viewed the Lovels proposal and raised some questions, although they lacked authority to approve or deny the proposed modications. This will keep other people from using that water. Boats will run into bags, Commissioner Smokey Parrish said. If theres damage done, whoever does it will probably be responsible. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said the leases were west of the ramp where boats turn in. People love to sh around those places for the drums, she said. (It could in terfere with) clammers being able to get to their leases. Commissioner William Massey concurred, noting the leases were straight off the boat landing, and Commissioner Pinki Jackel said it would be hard to run a boat where all those stakes are. Clay Lovel, younger brother to Ben Lovel, the two sons of Leo Lovel, said he was not sure how much effect using the entire water column will have on recreational boats. All the times Ive been there, Ive seen only one or two other boats driving in that area that werent other people working on their leases, he said. When you consider 1.5 acres on the wa ter, its a very, very small space. Im hoping it works outThe Lovel family, which has owned and operated Spring Creek Restaurant near Shell Point in Panacea since 1977, is sensitive to fears that farming oysters ulti mately could lead to the end of the traditional tonging methods that long have been the hallmark of Apalachicola Bay oystermen. Two decades ago, when the state tried to introduce oyster farming as part of job retraining, the idea met with a mixed reaction from locals and ultimately failed. But Clay Lovel said he thinks the familys plan could be one more tool in oystermens hands in keeping the industry alive and prospering. We hope the wild oyster popu lation comes back, over there and over here, he said. Its a regional problem. We are not competing at all. From what weve learned from other people who farm oysters, that there is a worldwide market that cannot be lled for oysters. If anything, we hope our oysters might help reseed the bay. There used to be oyster hous es all over Franklin and Wakulla County, Lovel said. Were hop ing any increase in oyster produc tion here could have a ripple ef fect. We have no grand giant plan other than to make a living on the water. We think if theres one more option for these people to make a living on the water, that can only be good. With hard times facing oyster men who work the bay, and with reliance on a $2.7 million federal grant for reseeding the bay about to dry up, longtime oystermen arent getting their dander up about the Alligator Harbor project. Im hoping it works out, Franklin County Seafood Works Association President Shannon Hartseld told the Tallahassee Democrat. Thats what we are going to have to do, trial and er ror. I dont see how it can hurt our bay. It may give an opportunity for a different way to harvest oysters. Thats a plus in my book. Clay Lovel said the familys oyster harvesting project actu ally landed in their laps thanks to a salesman for the Bay Shellsh Company out of Palmetto. The family started with two clam leases a year ago and was about halfway through the germi nation process when they decided to try oyster farming. It wasnt really our idea, to be honest with you, Lovel said. The seed salesman had oyster seed available, so we said yeah, and we bought some cages to put them in the water. It was more luck than anything that we ended up getting the oyster seed. A very clean and thin shellLast summer, aquaculture regulators granted the Lovels a variance on their clam leases, and they put in about 10,000 oys ter seeds. Nine months later, with about 150,000 pieces growing in 450 cages, they started harvesting their rst crop of oysters. We were astonished when we saw how fast they were growing. They lled those cages up pretty quick, Lovel said. It was the rst time we did it so they grew at dif ferent rates. They dont really all come off at once, some grow faster than others. Were learning trial by error even now. We probably overcrowded them at rst. What the Lovels have produced in Alligator Harbor has been a smaller, saltier oyster than those found in Apalachicola Bay, and they have only been sold at Spring Creek, at about $10 for a dozen on the half-shell. Thats all were doing at the moment; we only need to get as many as we need for the restau rant right now, Lovel said. We do harvest smaller ones, and were also trying to market a smaller oyster as well, he said. Since theyre so young they have a very clean and thin shell, very white on the inside. At the location where were going, theres hardly any freshwater. Its a very salty en vironment; therefore the oyster is very briny. Customers love em, Lovel said. Of course some people like a big oyster. I personally prefer a smaller oyster. Its just like mullet; some people like big mullet, and some people like small mullet. He said other than being al lowed to harvest oysters smaller than 3 inches long, Spring Creek is subject to all other rules regard ing oyster harvesting, including refrigeration and storage. We have to go through every single precaution and rule that any other oyster house would, Lovel said. He said hes not sure whether post-harvest processing will be an issue regarding vibrio vulnicus, naturally occurring bacteria that thrives in warm waters and can be deadly for people with compro mised immune systems who eat raw oysters. He said some diseases like der mo, which can threaten the health of oysters, take as long as 18 months to thrive. We are already harvesting some oysters that are less than a year old, Lovel said. Were hoping it wont be a major concern for us. The Lovels plan to experiment with different methods of oating the cages. Honestly, we are us ing a fraction of our one lease with oysters and clam. Its all we can do to run the restaurant and keep up with our oysters and clams, Lov el said. Being able to use the full water column will make our work easier and more efcient. He said using the entire water column will enable the Lovels to more easily defoul their equip ment of grasses and barnacles. We can get those out of the water more easily, and kill those organ isms, and keep our equipment and the oysters clean. It opens up the window of people that can do that, he said. Right now we can get in the water and work those cages in low tide, but thats a small window. You have to be t enough to get in the water and handle that equipment. We do realize were still in an ongoing experiment, but were very hopeful that it will be suc cessful, he said. We think it could provide some options for others who work on the water. We gure what were in to right now, its just like farming. There may be a good season, and there may be a bust season. Were not even taking baby steps yet. Were just getting crawling. We havent even got all the way through our rst crop. TURTLES from page A1 This drawing shows the oyster baskets the Lovels provided on their application to the state. LEO LOVEL | Special to the Times OYSTERS from page A1

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By Ron Pollack Special to the Times At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiums? A : When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security bene t each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also re ect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income bene ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can nd out if you qualify and apply online at www. socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www. familiesusa.org/resources/ program-locator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a xed incomeand thats most peoplethis is encouraging news. Ron Pollack is executive director of Families US, a national organization for health care consumers that has advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 4, 2013 A Page 4 Section IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America. When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Natures God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. W e hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures. He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly rmness his invasions on the rights of the people. He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers. He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their of ces, and the amount and payment of their salaries. He has erected a multitude of New Of ces, and sent hither swarms of Of cers to harass our people, and eat out their substance. He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures. He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: For depriving us in many cases, of the bene ts of Trial by Jury: For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences: For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighboring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and t instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies: For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments: For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & per dy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may de ne a Tyrant, is un t to be the ruler of a free people. Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. W e, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a rm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. The Declaration of Independence Understanding Medicare premiums

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, July 4, 2013 A nn u a l M e m b e rs hi p M e etin g a nd E l e c ti o n T ues d a y E v enin g J u ly 9, 2013 a t 6:00 Ra n c y H o u s e C a r r ia ge H o u s e A pa la c h ic o la, F lo r ida e P a n h a n d le Pla ye rs i n v i t es yo u t o j o i n u s f o r o u r a n n ua l m e eti n g s a n d f o r t h e e le c tio n o f B oa r d m e m be rs a n d o c e rs. H e a r a bo u t o u r p la n s f o r t h e c o m i n g s e a s o n a n d a bo u t h o w yo u c a n be c o m e i n vo l ve d. F o r mo r e inf o rma t i o n o r t o e xp r ess a n in t e r es t in r unnin g f o r the B o a r d o f Dir e c t o rs, p l e as e c a l l E l a ine K ozl o w s ky a t 850-670-1671 o r B o b I n g u ag i a t o a t 850-370-5281. 2091548 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin County has sired many a patriot and one of these was William El lis Van Vleet. Born in Apalachicola to William and Florida Van Vleet on Oct. 28, 1924, he en tered the world with a twin sister, Erris. His friends and family called him Buddy. He was by all accounts an all-Ameri can boy, who loved boat ing and shing, excelled at sports and made friends easily. His parents kept every one of his Sunday School graduation certicates from the First Baptist Church where their younger son, Louis, is still a devout mem ber. The diplomas are tucked away with Buddys other things in a wooden trunk. As soon as he was old enough, Buddy began shrimping with his father, when not in school. Some times they took along Louis, who was four years younger. Louis said he has often wondered what it would have been like to grow up with a brother. He has happy mem ories of Buddys kindness. He was a good brother, said Van Vleet. One time, when I was little, I had gone down to the Dixie Theatre. It cost a dime to get in. I got up to the window and found out I had lost my dime. My brother stepped up and put one down for me. I never for got that. And Buddy is not forgot ten. A shelf in the Van Vleet living room displays his pic tures, and a handful of spe cial treasures. His trunk, in a cozy bedroom, is lled with his things as if he might still return to claim them. Like so many of his mem bers of the Greatest Gen eration, Buddy volunteered in 1943 and at age 18 became a Marine. His Marine hand book remains in the trunk of his belongings. After training, he was as signed to the aircraft carrier, USS Franklin. Nicknamed Big Ben, the Franklin was one of 24 Essex-class air craft carriers built for the Navy during World War II. She was 872 feet long and 147 feet wide with a crew of more than 2,000. She carried 100 aircraft. Aboard the Franklin, Buddy traveled to the Pacif ic, crossing the international dateline on June 23, 1944 and the equator on Sept. 20. The Franklin participat ed in numerous battles from July through October 1944. On Oct. 27, she was hit by a suicide bomber killing 56 crew members and wound ing 60. The wrecked plane in two sections was shoved into the water off opposite sides of the ship. The Franklin was so badly damaged she re turned to Puget Sound Navy Yard for repairs. Buddy, who was on his gun mount during the fatal battle, was unhurt, but his cabin was burned. He had to borrow clothes for the re turn trip to the US. While the Franklin was being repaired, Buddy was able to return to Apalachicola for a visit with his family. He had a week off. It was the last time we was all here together, recalled Van Vleet. Buddy, who had never been a ladys man, joked with his mother that he might bring home a bride from the Philippines. He told his young broth er, Anybodys ever been in a war theyll never forget it. He gave Louis what must have been a tremendous treasure to a boy in his early teens, a piece of the fuse lage from the kamikaze that crashed into the Franklin. After Buddy returned to the aircraft carrier, his moth er told Louis that Buddy be lieved he would never return home again. She said she could read it on him, said Van Vleet. The telegram that every soldiers family dreads ar rived on April 10, 1945. On March 19, the Frank lin maneuvered closer to the Japanese mainland than any other US carrier during the war. She was struck by two armor-piercing bombs caus ing severe damage and trig gering explosions of stored ammunition and rockets. She lay dead in the water; many of the crew were killed or blown overboard. Initially, 724 were listed as dead or missing but later the toll of the dead was raised to more than 800. Buddy was among the missing. It like to killed Mama, said Van Vleet. When the telegram came, word spread fast. Dr. Weems, the family physi cian, was across town but he told the people he was with, I have to go now. Mrs. Van Vleet will need me. There was some ques tion about where Buddy had been at the time of the at tack. Many of the young men killed had been in the chow line. Ellsworth Taylor, who served on the Franklin with Buddy, wrote the Van Vleet family, that their son was one any mother would be proud to call her son. He was not killed in the chow line. He was on the second deck and there was a big explo sion. Its very hard to tell a mother that her son is dead but I really believe he is. If your boy died, he didnt suf fer as the boys never knew what hit them. Your boy lived a very clean life as we used to go on liberty together and I believe he was ready to meet God. Buddys remains were never returned home. In Au gust, 1945, his effects were returned by parcel post. Included in the package were four books, a box con taining six handkerchiefs, a collar stay, an envelope of photographs, a bundle of let ters, a pipe, a bathing suit, a sewing kit and four bath towels. Most of these items remain in the trunk at the Van Vleet home. In March 1946, the Van Vleets received an ofcial declaration of presump tive death from the Navy. Florida Van Vleet arranged for a memorial service and purchased a monument with the US Marine Corps insignia that can still be seen in Magnolia Cemetery. The family continued to inquire after their lost boy. My mother wrote to people about him and she looked for him to come home for anoth er 10 years, said Louis. Buddy received a post humous Purple Heart. The family received a section of plank from the Franklin from the Naval Historical Center in Washington D.C. On it Louis mounted the bit of fuselage his brother brought him in 1944. After Buddy enlisted, the Van Vleet family saved every letter from the son and ev ery memento of his wartime travels. His brother, Louis, still treasures these keep sakes of an American hero. Van Vleet said he hopes to eventually donate his brothers effects to the Camp Gordon Johnston Mu seum in Carrabelle so they can be preserved for future generations. GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com 4514931 NOTICE OF ANNU AL MEETING The Boar d of Commissioners of the Northw est Florida R egional Housing A uthority will hold its Ann ual Meeting on J ul y 18, 2013, a t the Holida y Inn & Suites 2725 Gr a v es R oad, T allahassee Florida. Meeting will begin a t 1:00 p .m. E.D .S .T The meeting will be open to the pub lic. Im p la nt s & C r o w ns Af f or da ble De ntu r es P ana ma Cit y P A W illia m C Kna pk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P ana ma City Squ ar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P ana ma City FL Cal l F or Inf or mat ion 188 826 877 18 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Addi tiona l f ees ma y be incur r ed depe nding on indiv idua l case s Same -da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailab le in cer t ain case s Af f or dable Dentu r es P anam a City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. G r e a t v s ot he r D en t a l p r o vi d er s Sin gle T oo th Im pla nt $ 1 7 95 D e n tu r e Im p la n ts $ 1 49 5 $ 1 8 95 Sa m e Da y Cr o wn s $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upp er Ar c h 20144-1-T4 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Louis Van Vleet displays the towel returned to the family with his brothers effects. A memorial to William Ellis Van Vleet sits in the family plot in Magnolia Cemetery.FR O M THE V A N V L EET FA M IL Y COLL ECT IO N Louis Van Vleet keeps a small memorial to his brother on a living room shelf. Ellis Van Vleet: A hometown hero

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K I T TE NS K I T TE NS K I T TE NS W e h a v e a s he l t e r F U L L of k i t t e n s. A l l k i nds of k i t t e n s. E v e r y c o l o r s i z e a nd b r e e d T he y a r e a l l f u l l y v e t t e d s p a y e d a nd ne u t e r e d A N D w e a r e on l y c h a r gi n g a $ 5 0 0 0 a do pt i on f e e P l e as e c on s ide r a do pt i n g one o ur b e a u t i f u l k i t t e n s a nd gi v i n g t he m t he h om e t he y s o de s e r v e T he y a r e a l l p ur r r f e c t l y w onde r f u l V O L U N T EE R S A R E D E S P E R A T E L Y N EE D E D T O S O C I A L I Z E A LL O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e npe t s o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 PSYCHIC READINGS 850-319-3711 Bay County's #1 Psychic Do you want to kno w wha t the future has in store? Ha ve questions about love, business or marria ge? Ann's ans wers tell the past, present & future. All readings are con dential Se Habla Espaol THIS WEEK ONL Y T AROT CARD READING $ 10 by Miss Ann Call today for a better tomorrow... Society A6 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 Celia Granger of Eastpoint would like to announce the birth of her twins, Kymbri Jayde and Kyron Jayceon Granger. Kymbri Jayde was born at 9:07 p.m. and Kyron Jayceon was born at 9:08 p.m. on Thursday, May 30, 2013 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Jimmy and Lynn Granger, of Eastpoint. GRAN G ER TWINS BORN Clarence and Judy Norris were married in their hometown of Bethel, Ohio on June 26, 1953. Clarence worked for General Motors for 30 years and retired in 1983. Judy works in retail sales and raised their son David, who passed away in 2007. They came to Eastpoint for a weeks vacation Christmas of 1983 and fell in love with the area and the friendly people and moved here the next year. Clarence works as a shing guide for Bay City Lodge and Judy worked for Bayside Florist for 10 years and then switched to Two Gulls Gift Shops where she has worked for almost 18 years. Their good friends, Lynn and Greg Martina, celebrated the occasion with them at Capt. Andersons Restaurant. 60 T H ANNIVERSARY By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A Franklin County High School student is about to get a glimpse of what her future would be like if she pursues her dream to be come a doctor. Cayce Daniels, who will be a sophomore this fall, is headed to Emory Univer sity in Atlanta Sunday for a 10-day participation in the National Youth Leadership Forum on Medicine. Shell be staying at a dorm at Emory as she em barks on a hands-on, inter active curriculum that in cludes shadowing practic ing physicians, clinical site visits at the nations top medical centers and meet ing and interacting with fac ulty from world-renowned medical institutions. Daniels, 15, the daugh ter of Jesse and Jennifer Daniels of Carrabelle, is an honor roll student, ac tive in the Tigers program at the Carrabelle branch li brary, and a member of the Franklin County band for four years. Jennifer Daniels said her daughter, who has dreams of becoming a ra diologist, was nominated for the program after an aptitude test at the school showed she has an inter est in and an aptitude for medicine. Tuition for the program runs close to $2,700, but with the help of family and friends, Daniels was able to make things work. She got a lot of help from the people in the commu nity, First Baptist Church Carrabelle, where she is a member, Gayla Parks State Farm Insurance, Dr. Eu gene Charbonneau, Mikes Quick Cash, just to name a few, said Jennifer Daniels. Her mother said Cayce plans to keep a journal and take photos of the forum. Its going to let her see what being a doctor entails as some of the activities will let her experience partici pating in a mock residency program selection, examin ing leadership by analyzing leaders in medicine, prob lem-based learning case, medical ethics scenarios and caucus, said Jennifer Daniels. Shell participate in workshops learning how to take a patients blood pressure and suturing, public health, participating in a mass triage scenario and site explorations to dif ferent medical schools and hospitals. According to the youth leadership forums website, participating institutions in the Atlanta area have included Emory School of Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, Mer cer School of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medi cine and Georgia CampusPhiladelphia School of Os teopathic Medicine. Hands-on activities may include histology, which in volves using microscopes to view cell anatomy, visits to an anatomy lab, engag ing in a vital signs work shop, and learning how to diagnose on SimMan, which is a portable, patient simulator. Other highlights with the forum have been a hyp notism extravaganza, led by Sean Wheeler, a certi ed hypnotist; a visit to the inspiring Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site; shopping at the Mall of Georgia, the largest mall in the state; and a semiformal dinner and dancing on the nal evening of the program. Speakers who have par ticipated in past Atlanta Forums include health of cials from the Centers for Disease Control and the Grady Health System. Daniels to get dose of doctoring Cayce Daniels Franklin County Elementary School student Camille Davis made a perfect score on her FCAT Math 2.0. She will be going into the fth grade in 2013-14. She is the daughter of Clint and Angela Davis, of Carrabelle, Beach. Grandparents are Arthur Red and Billie Faye Dais, and Mike and Sue Bodiford, of Apalachicola. Congrats Millie, we love you! CON G RA T ULA T IONS CAMILLE DAVIS The Philaco Womans Club education committee has announced the recipi ents of two $1,000 scholar ship awards for 2013. Winners are Morgan Walker, salutatorian for the Franklin County High School Class of 2013, and Sarah E. Strickland, vale dictorian at the First Bap tist Christian School. Walker, who has a grade point average of better than 4.0, served as team captain of the Brain Bowl team for 2012 and competed on the team in grades 10 through 12, as well as participating in sports, scouting, serving as a student mentor and working part-time. She has been accepted by the Uni versity of Florida where she plans to pursue a course of study in physics and as tronomy. Morgan also has been dual-enrolled at Gulf Coast State College and will have 36 credit hours when she graduates. Strickland, who has a 3.5 grade point average, served as a teachers aide her senior year, volun teered with her schools fundraising events, and as sisted with younger class es and her church nursery, while working part time since 2009. She enjoys sports and photography, and paints in oil, acrylic and pastels, and enjoys. She has been accepted by Pensacola Christian Col lege where she plans to en ter the nursing program, with art as an elective. Committee members Judy Cook, Ginny Griner, Heather Guidry, Dawn Radford, and Judy Sto kowski acted as judges during the scholarship competition. Morgan and Strickland are Philaco scholars Cant believe the year is half gone already. Be sure to have your survivor kits and your escape plan handy. There wont be a lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center today, July 4, but be watching for you next Thursday, July 11. You can, however, join your friends and neighbors for a covered dish lunch at the Lanark Village Boat Club this afternoon, July 4. Donation is $3. Bring your favorite dish to share and enjoy the Fourth of July afternoon. Serving begins at 1 p.m. See ya there! Later on, about dark thirty, come and watch the fireworks on the Carrabelle River. Have a safe and great Fourth of July. Grilled chicken will be served, along with two sides, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, on Saturday, July 6. Food line forms at 5 p.m. and will continue until gone. Your donation of $8 will be collected at the bar. Also on Saturday evening, July 6, you can dance the night away at the Franklin County Senior Center. Ron Vice will be on hand to spin the platters. Bring your favorite snack, beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. Cha, cha, cha! Fun starts at 7 p.m. There will be a big moving sale on Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13, from 8 a.m. until noon. The contents of our rectory, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 109 Newman Drive, corner of Spring and Newman, and our house for visiting clergy will be for sale. We need volunteers, however, to help with this sale. Come by theres bound to be something you simply cant live without. Be kind to one another check in on the sick and the housebound. Smile, Jesus loves you! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Legion post to host chicken dinner Saturday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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The Times | A7 Thursday, July 4, 2013 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com For youngsters at last weeks vacation Bible school at Eastpoints First Baptist Church, encountering the love of God may have been a rstever thing. For Alberta Read, it was the culmination of nearly a century of experience. At age 99, Read was among the two dozen volunteers from Belleview Baptist Church near Ocala who, for the third consecutive year, traveled north to conduct the weeklong Bible school at the Eastpoint church. With a smile on her face as stirring as a rainbow, Read clapped and shimmied and sang right along with the tots, encouraging them in their exploration of the weeks theme, to face their fears and to trust God. Im helping them singing, whatever they are doing, just acting crazy with the kids, said Read. Whatever they do, I do. Read continues to live alone, as she has for nearly the last 50 years, ever since her husband Edgar died from a heart attack at age 53. Read grew up in Pennsylvania, originally in a Methodist family, but later became a Baptist when I accepted the Lord as my Savior. Her beau Edgar would come to her town to visit, and they fell in love and were married in 1932. She worked as the manager of a school cafeteria in Langhorne, Pennsylvania, and he worked a factory job for the Rohm and Haas Company. The couple, who did not have children, had purchased ve acres in central Florida in anticipation of retiring to the Sunshine State but my husband died before we even got there, she said. Life as a widow was difcult in Langhorne, so Alberta moved down to Florida to be near her cousins, Flossie and Bob Castle in Belleview. The Castles were among the two dozen volunteers who came down from First Baptist of Belleview, bringing down all the materials for the Bible school curriculum Colossal Coaster World and their experience with teaching it The lessons are all built around the verse from 2 Timothy 1:7 For God has not given us a spirit of fearfulness, but one of power, love and sound judgment. The lessons all focus on Paul in the book of Acts, and teach kids they can trust God no matter what twists and turns the ride of life may take. Its about daring to change, to speak up, to believe, to stand strong and to trust, said Flossie Castle. She said Alberta was involved in all aspects of the school last week. She helps them sing and helps with the Bible story and trying to smile and show the kids some love, said Flossie Castle. Were all here to tell them Jesus loves them. Read, who will turn 100 on Sept. 17, said shes in good health, with the exception of her eyesight, which has waned due to macular degeneration. You do lose something at age 99. I guess your eyesight is the rst to go, she said. Im no different than anybody else. Other than that Im doing everything I used to, except teach. I cant see to study my lesson. I dont read anymore. Flossie Castle said she and her husband eat together with Read, but that she is mostly self-sufcient. She sang in the choir until she couldnt read music anymore she said. She visits hospitals and nursing homes, and she goes to all the services. She took care of me when I was a little girl, and now I take care of her, said Flossie Castle. She does very well. Shes pretty healthy. Shes getting forgetful. Read said she feels good these days as the years continue to roll by. I feel ne and I live alone and I dont have any problems, she said. The years go fast. As you get older, they go faster and faster. I am trying to volunteer and I have a couple jobs to do, she said. I just do as Im told. At 99, what more can I do? Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 C o m e j o i n t h e N a t i o n a l C r e m a t i o n S oc i e t y f o r a o n t h e b e n e t s o f p r e pl a n n i n g y o u r c r e m a t i o n F R E E L u n c h & I n f o r m a t i o n a l S e m in a r W h e n t h e t i m e c o m e s w o u l d n t y o u p r e f e r y o u r l o ve d o n e s c e l e b r a t e y o u r l e g a c y r a t h e r t h a n s t r e s s a b o u t m a k i n g a r r a n g e m e n t s ? G i v e t h e m t h e r e l i e f t h e y l l n e e d du r i n g a t o u g h t i m e W e l l d i s cu s s : RE S E R V A T I ON RE QU I RE D Li mi t e d s e a t in g a v ai l a b l e 9 a m 7 p m 1 8 5 0 40 5 6 644 F r e e c r e m a t i o n d o e s n o t i n c l u d e T r a v e l P r o t e c t i o n P l a n C a ro l i ne s R i v e r D in in g 1 2 3 W a t e r S t r e e t @N O O N @N O O N Faith Frank Harlen Doc Brown, 91, passed away peacefully Thursday, June 27, 2013, in Tallahassee. Frank was married to Virginia Mae (Thomas) Brown for 66 years before her passing in 2007. Brown, a retired public school superintendent, was born in Rushsylvania, Ohio. He graduated from Bellefontaine High School and went on to receive the bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees from The Ohio State University. He served as a rieman with the United States Armys 96th Infantry Division in the amphibious assault to liberate the Philippines in World War II, and was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart medals for his actions and for his wounds sustained in combat. Brown had a lengthy and distinguished career as an educator. He was coordinator of the Ohio State House Conference on Education in 1960. He served as superintendent of schools in Canal Winchester, Ohio, Bedford, Ohio, and West Aurora, Ill. A Kiwanian for more than 30 years, he also was active in the United Methodist Church, teaching Sunday school for several years. In his nal years, he became a Floridian. His personality to the end matched the sunshine in the state. He leaves a daughter, Beth Blair (husband Curt); two beloved grandchildren Joy Adele Stubbs (husband Chuck) and Ruel William Smith (wife Amy); and four treasured greatgrandchildren Charlie Stubbs, Mary Harlen Stubbs, Ruel Alden Smith and Reid Jameson Smith; as well as his sister, Charlotte Hall of Bellefontaine, Ohio; and numerous nieces and nephews. In addition to wife Virginia, Frank was predeceased by his son 1st Lt. Ruel Harlen Brown, while mobilized with the Ohio Air National Guard in 1968, and by his three brothers, Lowell, Perk, Carol, and his sister, Thelma. Plans are being made for a service celebrating his life to be held later in Bellefontaine and East Liberty, Ohio. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Frank Harlen Brown County food pantry open again July 9 The Franklin County Food Pantry would like to remind the community it is open the second and fourth Tuesday of every month from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Apalachicola Community Building, at 192 14th St., which is the site of the former Apalachicola High School. The food pantry will be open on July 9 and July 23 and then on Aug. 13 and Aug. 27. Faith BRIEF ObituaryPHOTOS B Y DAV I D ADL ERSTEI N | The Times Alberta Read joins in singing with the children in the sanctuary of the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint.AN AGELESS LOVE OF GOD 99-year-old helps conduct weeklong Bible school in Eastpoint Alberta Read helps show the children at the vacation Bible school how to go with the ow. T H E APALACH I C O LA TI M ES FIND US O N F A C EBOO K

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH The 28-day Gulf red snapper season ended in federal waters Friday, but for many local anglers and lawmakers, ghting increasingly strict snapper regulations is a year-round battle. The U.S. House Natural Resources Committee held an oversight hearing June 27 for testimony on the potential development of a management plan that would give Gulf states more authority in managing the recreational snapper shery. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, who serves on the committee, said he has been disappointed in the National Marine Fisheries Services continued disregard for people and the businesses people run. I am in great agreement that the states need to have more say and the federal government needs to have less, Southerland said. Im not happy with the National Marine Fisheries Service and how theyre responding to the needs of anglers. There is no sh that has greater economic value in Florida sheries than red snapper. The proposed amendment to the reef sh management plan would give states the authority to set bag limits and season lengths by dividing the recreational quota between the states and allowing for more exibility. Southerland said one of the biggest issues with the federal management plan is the absence of a reliable data collection procedure to measure the snapper stock. The federal season was reduced from 40 days to 28 days this year, despite growth in the snapper population. Southerland also commended the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission for supporting the proposal. These ever-shortening seasons have created uncertain challenging times for captains, shermen and coastal communities like Destin and Panama City, which depend on charter trips and vacationing families staying in hotels and eating in local restaurants, FWC marine sheries management director Jessica McCawley said. If lost, the shing heritage of these types of coastal communities is not something that can easily be rebuilt. NMFS assistant administrator Eric Schwaab testi ed that a new stock assessment has shown there are more snapper in the Gulf than there have been in decades. Recreational anglers are landing snapper at three times the rate they were in 2006 and commercial anglers caught 27 percent more in 2012 than in 2007. However, the improved recreational catch rates have had unforeseen impacts, said Schwaab, who noted red snapper quotas increased by 62 percent from 2008 to 2012, and landings increased 148 percent during the same time period. The rate of landings is outpacing the rate of population growth; as a result, the recreational seasons have been progressively shorter to prevent catch overages. Pam Anderson, operations manager at Capt. Andersons Marina, spoke on behalf of the Panama City Boatmens Association at the Washington, D.C., hearing. A 28-day red snapper season doesnt meet the needs of anyone, Anderson said. We need improved data, exibility in the regulations, and shery management that understands the importance of the impact of the shery on the Gulf Coast. Anderson said the dates for this years federal red snapper season changed four times in two months, impeding vacation plans for the many tourists who ock to the Gulf Coast for its world-renowned shing. Despite the good intentions of Congress to grow and maintain a healthy shery, there have been signi cant, unintended consequences with the 2007 Magnuson Act, Anderson said. It needs to be updated with common sense solutions to keep the shery rebuilding while getting people back to work. COME JOIN US FOR THE . 4 TH OF JUL Y SIDEW ALK SALE! JUL Y 3RD & 4TH WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 04 84 78 80 % F ri, July 05 87 78 70 % S a t July 06 88 80 40 % Sun, July 07 89 79 30 % M on, July 08 89 79 10 % T ues July 09 89 78 60 % W ed July 10 89 79 60 % JOES LA WN C ARE IF ITS IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 Of cials: Let states set snapper rules SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Red snapper is still in season in state waters, 9 miles from land, but the sh will be harder to land in shallow water. Try using lighter line and smaller hooks with cut bait shed halfway to the bottom. Gag grouper is open again in our region this week with no new changes in the bag limits or sizes. Good sized sh are in 150 feet of water due south of the Cape. Our regions lakes, rivers, and creeks are close to full with so much rain lately, and the sh have responded well to the cooler rainwater. Big bream and cat sh are being caught in the Brother and Howard Creek. Try using a 5to 6-foot light y rod and a chartruse or glow popper for great action under low-hanging trees and limbs. Page 8 Thursday, July 4, 2013 Special to the Times Gag grouper opened Monday for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state waters and all Gulf federal waters. The same day, the season closed in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. The gag grouper recreational harvest season in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, not including Franklin, Jefferson, Wakulla, Taylor and Monroe counties, will remain open through Dec. 3. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties were open from April 1 through June 30 and will not be open during the July 1through-Dec. 3 season. Monroe County is also excluded from the July 1-throughDec. 3 season because it is included in the Atlantic rules for gag grouper. Gag grouper caught in federal waters during the July 1-through-Dec. 3 season may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. The four-county region includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. The FWC manages marine sh from the shore to 9 nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico. The FWC is working with Floridas anglers to rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf of Mexico back to strong, sustainable levels. The gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size and bag limits are 22 inches total length and two gag grouper per person. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Grouper. Bay scallop season opens Recreational bay scallop season opened June 29 in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando County Line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The season will remain open through Sept. 24, with the rst day of the closure on Sept. 25. The bag limit is two gallons of whole bay scallops or one pint of meat per person, per day, with a vessel limit of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops or a half gallon of meat. Scallops may be collected by hand or with a landing or dip net. Recreational lion sh license requirement removed The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has waived the recreational license requirement for divers harvesting lion sh using certain gear and excluded lion sh from the commercial and recreational bag limits, allowing people to take as many of the invasive sh as they can. Before the change, recreational anglers could not catch more than 100 pounds of lion sh without being required to have a commercial license. Speci c gear that can be used to target lion sh without the requirement of a recreational license includes hand-held nets, pole spears, Hawaiian slings or any other spearing devices designed and marketed exclusively for lion sh. An identical executive order was put into place in August 2012 and is set to expire Aug. 3. The newly adopted rule will take effect before the executive order expires, so there will be no lapse in the expanded permissions. Lion sh are a nonnative, invasive species that negatively affect Floridas native saltwater sh and wildlife. Currently, the most effective method of removing lion sh from Florida waters is by spearing or using a hand-held net. Removing the license requirements and bag limits will increase lion sh harvest opportunities. Use caution when handling this sh. The spines of this species deliver a venomous sting that can last for days and cause extreme pain, sweating, respiratory distress, and even paralysis. If you are stung by a lion sh, seek medical attention immediately. Complications can be fatal. Immediate rst aid measures include immersing the wound for 30 to 90 minutes in water as hot as the poisoned person can tolerate (but not scalding) because the poisons are heat-sensitive. A chemical heat pack can also be applied. Repeat as necessary to control pain. Use tweezers to remove any spines in the wound using caution to not squeeze venom glands that might have broken off in the wound with the spine. Wear gloves to avoid self-inoculation during spine removal. Scrub the wound with soap and water. Then ush the affected area with fresh water. Do not apply tape to close the wound as this may increase the risk of infection. Florida Wild Mammal Association ight pen update Do you feel a sense of awe when you look up and see an eagle, an osprey or a hawk ying gracefully and free? Do you get a thrill when you nd an owl watching you from its perch in a tree? If your answer is yes, then the Florida Wild Mammal Association needs your help. Their ight cage was damaged a year ago during Tropical Storm Debby. This is the cage where they rehabilitate birds of prey (eagles, osprey, owls, hawks, etc.) so after they have recovered from their illnesses and injuries, they can get much-needed ight conditioning as the last step to prepare them for release back into the wild and a second chance at life. Volunteer Rob Olin has taken the initiative to make this project happen. He enlisted the help of friends for labor and worked out a deal with Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint, who generously agreed to donate half of the supplies needed to replace the roof of our ight cage. The total cost of supplies needed is $2,700; the balance due is about $1,350. As a nonpro t with no county, state or federal funding, FWMA has no funds to pay for the balance for this project. They desperately need sponsors. If you or your business would like to be a sponsor, email FWMA Director Chris Beatty at choppaotta@aol.com. Sponsors of $500 or more will be listed and thanked on our website, and a plaque in their honor will be placed on the newly refurbished ight cage. FWMA is totally funded by grants and donations from people like you. One in ve animals that come to the shelter is from Franklin County. You can send a tax-deductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. If you nd an injured animal, do not call. Please bring it to 198 Edgar Poole Road off of US 319 near Crawfordville. Grouper season closes in countys state waters Outdoors BRIEFS

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section FCHS to host July 15-17 volleyball camp The Franklin County High School volleyball program will host a Volleyball Camp at Franklin County Schools from July 15-17. The camp, for grades fifth through 12th, will be daily from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $151. Call coach Hilary Stanton at 653-5042 for information and registration. Sacred Heart to offer free physicals Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, in Port St. Joe will be conducting free physicals for all middle school and high school boys and girls in Franklin County at the Franklin County High School gymnasium from 5-8 p.m. on July 22 and Aug. 15. The physicals are open to students at all schools in Franklin County. Call Coach Michael Sweatt at 670-2800 ext. 1924 for details or any questions that are of concern. Physical forms can be uploaded and printed out at www.fhsaa. org/forms/general. Print the EL02, EL03 and EL3CH forms and fill out general information before you come. If not, there will be copies at the school the day of the physical dates listed above. Try to have a parent accompanying your child. If you are planning on playing a sport or think you might play any sports at all you will have to have a sports physical. Take advantage of this free opportunity to get your physical now. A sports physical will last you one year for every sport, so you will not have to worry about it the entire school year until next summer. Sweatt also extended his thanks to Dana Whaley and the county health department for providing free sport physicals to the Seahawk football team in the spring. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The 16th annual St. George Island Sizzler 5K Race has been designated one of 15 Grand Prix events for the 2013 season by the Gulf Winds Track Club of Tallahassee. Club members earn points by participating in these sanctioned events which are held to a high standard for record keeping and course measurement and must be properly insured and offer proper amenities. Founder Hobson Fulmer said the Sizzler has been part of the Grand Prix circuit before. They rotate you out every few years, he said. Youre more likely to get asked back if you do a good job with your race. It also helps that I am active in the Gulf Winds club. Fulmer said he put together the rst Sizzler in 1998. I had started the cross country track program at Apalachicola High School. The county commission gave me permission but wouldnt give me any money, so I had to nd a way to raise money to get my kids to meets, he said. Around 2003, I had stopped coaching, and the run became a fundraiser for the humane society. It has grown a little every year. For a long time, I had to do it by myself with just the help of my staff and spouse. Last year, it really took off. We developed a Sizzler committee and that allowed us to really expand the party and stuff. Its become a kind of community event for the island. Theyve done a wonderful thing. Now I can just concentrate on handling the race and let them promote it and plan the party and everything else. Fulmer thanked the committee for all their hard work and said local artist Ann Eason has made the race special by donating unique ceramic awards for the triumphant runners. Most people who participate in these things dont want another little plastic gold cup, he said. They have plenty. These are really nice. On May 7, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve a resolution recognizing the Sizzler for its bene t to the community as it raises money for the Franklin County Humane Society. Co-chairs Fulmer and Bob Landiss predict this years Sizzler will be bigger and better than ever. Start training now for the 5K race and one-mile Fun Run to be held Saturday, August 10 at 6 p.m. The Sizzler, sponsored by the Tates Hell Track Club, is notorious for the hot humid conditions experienced by participating runners. Deadline for preregistration is Aug. 8, and the cost is $25, or you can register the day of the event for $30. T-shirts may not be available for those registering on the day of the event. There is a $10 student rate for cross country teams. The Fun Run begins at 5:30 p.m. and is followed by the 5K race at 6 p.m. The post-race party and awards will begin around 6:30 p.m. at Lighthouse Park. There will be unique awards given out to overall male and female, Masters, Grand Masters, Senior Masters, and all standard age group winners. Awards will be three-deep for each age group for the 5K. This race is a bene t for the Franklin County Humane Society and is produced by The Tates Hell Track Club. The Sizzler is seeking cash donations to support the event as well as in-kind donations for the post-race party. Gift items like visors, coupons, gift cards, water bottles and koozies are needed for 450 goodie bags. Also needed are 40 cases of bottled water, 500 14-ounce cups, 500 9-ounce cups, 800 plastic forks and knives, 1,000 paper plates and paper napkins, 175 pounds of ice, 150 pounds new potatoes, 125 pounds Andouille sausage, 240 ears of corn, 185 pounds extra-large Gulf shrimp, 1,200 pieces of dessert, three gallons cocktail sauce, one case Old Bay seasoning, three kegs or 25 cases of beer, 10 cases of soda, 14 1.5-liter bottles of red and white wine and red beans and rice for 350. Branded items are OK. If you want to help, call Bud Hayes at 323-0138. For more information, go to www.stgeorgeislandsizzler.com. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400 + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Thursday, July 4, 2013 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Many people traditionally run the annual St. George Island Sizzler 5k Race, now designated one of 15 Grand Prix events. Sizzler 5K granted Grand Prix status Page 9 Sports BRIEFS Hobson Fulmer, founder of the Sizzler, makes an announcement at the event. News BRIEFS Schools begins summer work hours Summer work hours at the Franklin County School District of ce began Monday and will run through Friday, Aug. 2. The summer work schedule will be Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., with a 45-minute lunch. On Fridays the of ces will be closed. Normal work hours will resume on Monday, Aug. 5. Carrabelle seniors host dance Saturday The Carrabelle Senior Center will host a dance Saturday evening, July 6, starting at 7 p.m. Admission is free, with music provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to dance... or just to listen to the music! The Senior Center is at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. Juvenile Justice Council to meet Monday The Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council will meet at 11 a.m. on Monday, July 8 at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola, located behind the old Apalachicola High School on 14th Street, in the independent building facing the football eld. All meetings are open to the public, and all are welcomed. For more info, call Carol Bar eld, chair, at 653-2784 Seafood workers to meet Monday The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will hold a meeting at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 8 at the re house in Eastpoint, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road. The meeting will be discussing association business, and also will conduct elections to seat replacement of cers for the secretary, treasury and second vice president seats that have not been lled. Any questions please contact Shannon at 653-5190. Panhandle Players to meet Tuesday The annual membership meeting and elections for the Panhandle Players will be held Tuesday evening, July 9 at 6 p.m. in the Raney House Carriage House in downtown Apalachicola. The Panhandle Players invites everyone to join them for the annual meeting, and for the election of board members and of cers. Hear about the groups plans for the upcoming season, and about how you can become involved. For more information, or to express an interest in running for the board of directors, please call Elaine Kozlowsky at 6701671, Ann Cowles at 9274660 or Bob Inguagiato at 370-5281. Carrabelle commission to meet July 11 Carrabelles regular city commission has been rescheduled from July 4 to Thursday, July 11 at 6 p.m. Want to attend Camp Timpoochee? At the June 28 county commission meeting, Bill Mahan, county extension agent, said his of ce is receiving requests to attend Camp Timpoochee with the county 4H program. This years camp will take place July 22-26, and Mahan expects more than 20 county youngsters to attend. Camp Timpoochee accommodates 140 campers in climate controlled cabins. This year, Franklin County will be joined by campers from Okaloosa and Walton counties, and Covington County, Alabama. The camp is located in Niceville on the shore of the Choctawhatchee Bay. The camp has a dining hall with fully staffed kitchen; an outdoor pavilion with large barbecue grill; a re circle seating 120 and private beachfront facilities with canoes, shing, and marine collecting equipment. There is a 20-passenger pontoon boat for snorkeling and leisure trips and a marine wet lab with fresh and saltwater tanks. Interested campers and parents can contact Mahan at 247-9359. Business After Hours July 11 at Tapas Bar The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host a Business After Hours on Thursday, July 11 at Tamaras Tapas Bar, 73 Market Street in Apalachicola from 5:307 p.m. The chambers next business luncheon will take place at noon on Wednesday, Aug. 7 at Beach Pit BBQ on US 98 in Eastpoint.

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A10 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 A10 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO Js TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS Law Enforcement The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests in this weeks report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 25 Jenny L. Nowling, 27, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Jeremiah D. Branton, 33, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 26 Tammy Groome, 39, Port St. Joe, felony passing worthless bank check (FCSO) JUNE 27 Victoria L. Estes, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Stuart White, 34, Apalachicola, DUI, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FWC) JUNE 28 Miriam P. Barahona, 37, Apalachicola, no valid drivers license (APD) Holden E. Foley, 18, Apalachicola, lewd or lascivious battery (FCSO) Mary F. Beaty, 50, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) Andrew L. Butler, 41, Apalachicola, felony passing worthless bank checks (FCSO) Paul Z. Sanders, 23, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) George R. Needer, 55, Eastpoint, felony battery with great bodily harm, and disorderly intoxication (FCSO) JUNE 29 Joseph A. Beach, 53, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 30 Eugene Webb, 65, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Jamie R. Proctor, Jr., 31, Summerfield, Lake County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Ellis D. Maxwell, 29, Apalachicola, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Dillan D. Grimes, 20, Apalachicola, grand retail theft (FCSO) Arrest REPORT FWC REPORT T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Law enforcement ofcers for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were busy over Memorial Day weekend monitoring the White Trash Bash. FWC ofcers, along with deputies with the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, conducted an operational detail for the 2013 bash. The detail was designed to protect Floridas boating public through enhanced boating safety patrol, increase voluntary compliance from the boating public through education and enforcement of BUI laws, provide a highly visible law enforcement presence, and increase our multi-agency working relationships. During the detail, 86 vessels were boarded with 374 users checked, resulting in issuance of 24 boating safety warnings, ve citations for boating safety violations, four resource warnings and two warnings for alcoholic beverages in a state park. Two BUI arrests were made. While on patrol in the Tates Hell Wildlife Management Area (WMA), Ofcer Terry Martin cited an individual for allowing dogs to pursue wildlife during the closed season and driving with a revoked drivers license and warned for not having a valid hunting license.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 4, 2013 The Times | A11 1112687 NURSING FACULTY RN TO BSN PROGRAMThis individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. Salary commensurate with education and experience.Position open until lled. Apply at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98.Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 1112677 CHAIR, DIVISION PUBLIC SAFETYResponsible for directing the overall Public Safety program to include; coordinating faculty, maintain budget, resolve complaints from students, insure facilities are maintained properly, coordinate class schedules ensuring classes have qualied instructors, maintain & submit curriculum & catalog revisions, schedules, etc. Assist in writing grants; attend meetings as needed & other related duties. Requires: Bachelors Degree in Criminology, Criminal Justice or related eld, Masters preferred. Salary Range starts at $52,020. Deadline to apply: 7/18/2013 at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 4515123EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLEThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is seeking applications for a eld position in operations and maintenance. Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District Oce, 40 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 during normal business hours, Monday thru Friday 8:30 am 4:30 pm EST.The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and is a drug free workplace. Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW THINKING OF HAVING A GARAGE SALE?Give the News Herald classified department a call and you’re in Business! Aquick, convenient call connects you to a whole community of customers eager to examine the items you wish to see clothes, bikes, baby items, tools, you name it! Place your ad today, it’s easy, it’s economical and it’s fun! Who says you can’t mix business with pleasure? Call Classified today 747-5020. WEST 219.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 200.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 232.45 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE AFOREMENTIONED RIGHT-OF-WAY, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND A CURVE RUN WESTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 200.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 631.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE LEAVING SAID POINT GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (US HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET, THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHTOF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 19 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET (CHORD=44.86 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 208.74 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 3: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 676.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE ESTABLISHED BY REMNANTS OF A WIRE FENCE WITH CEDAR POSTS FOR A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID FENCE REMNANTS, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 222.99 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.44 FEET (CHORD= 100.44 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST) TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: June 20, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 2013 94239T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000422 DIVISION: LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 26, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2008-CA-000422 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON N/K/A TRACEY LAFFOON; GARY FOGLEMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY FOGLEMAN; MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT NUMBER 208 OF MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS, AS PER THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO A/K/A 706 HOWARD STREET D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on this 19th day of June 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 F08068466 July 4, 11, 2013 94193T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000038 SEC.:________ BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. BILLIE J. ADAMS; STEPHEN H. ADAMS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated June 10, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA000038 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 15th day of August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK 3, SUN ‘N SAND, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 DESTINY MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL NUMBER DISH03537GAA/B. Any person claiming an interst in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 12TH DAY OF JUNE, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 94245T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000401-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. BRUCE L. TAYLOR, HUBERT BENTLEY, and NATALIE BUTLER, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 25, 2013, in the abovestyled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 15, 2013, the following described property: Lot 1 (unrecorded) Commence at a 6 x 6 inch concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Section 30, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida and run South 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West 659.56 feet to a re-rod (marked 5826) lying on the Southerly right of way boundary of Twin Lakes Road, thence run North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary 455.86 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160) marking the point of beginning; from said point of beginning continue North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary a distance of 200.08 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said right of way boundary run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 22 seconds West 214.87 feet; thence run South 89 degrees 42 minutes 40 seconds East 204.88 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160); thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 43 seconds West 214.14 feet to the point of beginning. Dated: June 27, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 OtherFranklin County S.H.I.P. ProgramThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on July 19, 2013 for the Down Payment Assistance Program, to buy existing housing only, Owner Occupied Rehabilitation and Emergency Repair programs. The deadline for submitting applications will be August 30, 2013. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. Kelly & Josh 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 GUN SHOWJuly 6th & 7th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Pay based on prior experience. Call (850) 927-2163 Web ID: 34257518 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach OtherHousekeepersExperienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34256831 HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 OtherLive-In CaregiverLooking for live-in caregiver for elderly woman. All utilities paid. No rent. Possible pay. Call for details. Located in Carrabelle. 850-209-4124 Web ID#: 34257391 Sales/Retail/Bus DevSales ClerkPart time experienced help needed to work afternoons in Marine Store at Bay Bity Lodge. Must enjoy working with people and fishing. Call for interview. 653-9294 Web ID# 34257403 Lanark Village Carlton St. #6, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $500 month + $300 deposit. Call 864-356-5949 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Carrabelle, FL Gulf Side 2 BD/ 1 BA, Furnished, $450mo. Plus Utilities & $450 Dep., Pets OK W/Deposit Call 850-567-3375 Text FL57381 to 56654 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $79,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Chevy Monte Carlo 01 $575 Down. Total is $3900 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Chevy Silverado x/cab 02 $1175 Down. Total is $6500 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Chevy Blazer 04 $875 Down. Total is $5900 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 If you didn’t advertise your yard sale here,you’re missing out on potential customers.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur lo c al r eal esta t e e xp er ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the b est v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real E sta t e P icks! D isc o v er the b est r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Jo e A palachic ola, C ap e S an Blas S t G eor ge I sland C arr ab elle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D Sand alwood of Carrabe lle Ri ve rfron t commu n i t y wit h 1 3 lot s a va ila ble a t $ 4 2 5 0 0 e a ch a n d 1 Rive rfron t L ot for $ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 All lot s come wit h a boa t slip Ame n i t i e s in clu din g a pool, clu bh ou se bric k pa ve rs a n d a n e a rby boa t ra mp 850-899-5104 l 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyinf o .co m T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4515098 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249158 $47,500 St. Geor ge Island 451 51 57 ISLAND FORECLOSURE V er y af fo rd ab le b ui ld ab le lo t on be au ti fu l St Ge or ge Is la nd ou ts ta nd in g in v es tm en t po te nt ia l & th e op po rt ui nt y to o wn yo ur pi ec e of th e is la nd b ui ld in g lo ca ti on ca n pr o vi de a ba y vi e w su rv e y a v ai la bl e, W es t Ba ys ho re Dr i v e. Li st ed by Mi ch ae l Bi ll in gs L oc a t ed on a peninsula within the ga t ed Plan ta tion c ommunit y and surr ounded b y beautiful views of the B a y and marsh, this home is the per f ec t peac eful plac e t o enjo y na tur e and t o in vit e o v ernigh t guests t o their priv a t e quar t ers! Main house includes living and dining r ooms k it chen, mast er suit e with out door sho w er scr eened por ch with indoor/out door r eplac e G uest wing includes 3 bedr ooms living r oom, morning k it chen and laundr y! V er y priv a t e out door hot tub ac c essible fr om both ar eas of this unique home o v erlooks the marsh with outstanding views T his c ust om built home with beautiful c abinets pine oors/trim, lots of c ar eful details giving a f eeling of a secluded geta w a y w as lo vingly cr af t ed b y the o wners C o v er ed gar age w a t er ltr a tion syst em, cir c ular driv e beautiful landsc aping mak e this a must see home! S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .1431P elic anL ane .com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248583 $949,000 St. Geor ge Island PLANT A TION BEA CHFR ONT All the amenities 4 BR, 3 B A, P ool, Furnished, Fla t Scr een TV's & upscale a ppliances tile oors Spa T ub on deck, under house scr eened Kitchen near P ool wil billiar d ta b le Income pr oducer Owner Financing, Nautilus Dri v e Listed b y J ohn Shelb y Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Surveys say Roman candles are the most favorite type of reworks for the 4th with what the least favorite? Firecrackers, Smokeballs, Pinwheels, Snaps 2) Where is Rebildfest billed as the largest celebration of American independence held outside the U.S.? Germany, Denmark, Mexico, Australia 3) On July 4, 1848, President Polk laid the cornerstone of what famous structure? Lincoln Memorial, Library of Congress, Capitol building, Washington Monument 4) Thomas Jefferson and which other former president died July 4, 1826? George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson 5) On that same date of July 4, 1826, what noted American was born? Robert E. Lee, Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau 6) Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776; one was Hancock, who was the other? Henry, Franklin, Pinckney, Thomson 7) What famous American patriot was hung as a spy in 1776 by the British? Paul Revere, Nathan Hale, Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne 8) Whos been the only future President of the United States to be born on a July 4th? Jackson, Van Buren, Taft, Coolidge 9) Where did the Continental Congress sign the Declaration of Independence? Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Mount Vernon 10) Who was the rst President of the Continental Congress? Peyton Randolph, Roger Sherman, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin 11) At signing time the colonies were under which English King? George I, George III, Charles I, Charles III 12) Which colony had the most signers at 9? Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts 13) On July 4, 1960 Mickey Mantle hit which career-number homerun? 300, 400, 500, 600 14) Which president died July 4, 1831? Madison, Monroe, Tyler, Polk ANSWERS 1) Smokeballs. 2) Denmark. 3) Washington Monument. 4) John Adams. 5) Stephen Foster. 6) Thomson. 7) Nathan Hale. 8) Coolidge. 9) Philadelphia. 10) Peyton Randolph. 11) George III. 12) Pennsylvania. 13) 300. 14) Monroe. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com Large projects will be favored for RESTORE funding. On May 23, three years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Resto ration Council released the Draft Initial Comprehensive Plan: Re storing the Gulf Coasts Ecosys tem and Economy. The council is chaired by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, acting Secretary Rebecca Blank. Other members are the governors of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas and the secretaries of the U.S. Departments of Agricul ture, Army, Homeland Security and Interior, and the administra tor of the U.S. Environmental Pro tection Agency. The 20-page document gives a history and breakdown of avail able funding resources for Gulf restoration projects. Whats still missing is the amount of money available and how to apply for it. The amount will be established when the courts set an amount BP must pay to compensate for dam age caused by the spill. On June 18, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners he and Chairman Cheryl Sanders at tended a workshop in Gulf County hosted by the Nature Conservan cy (TNC) to talk about developing projects and criteria that would be competitive for BP money. The Nature Conservancy is of fering to provide guidance on proj ects that would be funded through the Gulf Coast Restore Council, Pierce said. The advice we were given is that the council looked very favorably upon projects that protected watersheds. Franklin County has three watersheds: Apalachicola River and Bay, New River, and Ochlocknee River and Bay. Watersheds go beyond coun ty boundaries, so if the concept of watersheds is used, then all proj ects are going to be multi-county in impact, which helps when com peting with other areas. Pierce said TNC advised work shop participants it will be critical to make clear what results can be expected from an investment. Pierce said the countys SMAART group is trying to come up with projects on a large enough scale to be competitive. Sanders said she wants to in vite representatives from Gulf and Wakulla counties to the next meet ing of the Countys RESTORE Council. According to the Restoration Council draft, when choosing proj ects to fund, the council will verify whether the proposal is legal and in keeping with restoration goals. Projects will be compared to avoid duplication of funding from mul tiple sources. Council members can choose to sponsor favorite projects. Sci entic experts will also be quizzed on whether a project is a good idea and feasible. The public can offer input on potential projects and funding cri teria at www.restorethegulf.gov. In addition to money for imple menting a plan, there will be fund ing for technical assistance to prepare proposals and to monitor the outcome of projects that have been funded. Guidelines emerging for RESTORE Act funding



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, July 4, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 10 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Nobody was hurt in an Eastpoint re last week that destroyed an RV and a storage shed. About 2 p.m. June 25, the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department responded to a 911 call from a home on Hickory Dip Road. Fire ghters found a storage shed and recreational vehicle engulfed in ames behind the primary residence. Although the RV and shed were a total loss, remen were able to save the house with damage only to the vinyl siding. A nearby travel trailer escaped with relatively minor damage. A thick plume of oily smoke was visible from Apalachicola and St. George Island for more than 30 minutes. The residents of the house declined to give their names, but Joseph Pumphrey said he owned the contents of the storage shed as well as the travel trailer that was damaged but not destroyed. Pumphrey, a former volunteer reman, said he believed the re was electrical. Neighbors conrmed the blaze started near a fuse box on the side of the shed. Pumphrey said the belongings destroyed several large appliances, an air conditioner and family pictures and mementos were in storage. He said he resides in a home on Ridge Road. I had just come in from oystering, and I was at the oyster house when I heard the re trucks, Pumphrey said. I jumped in my truck and put it to the oor to get over here. I was pulling my boat. Im heartbroke because everything I own and Ive worked for over the last 10 years was in that shed. What Ive worked for since I was 15 or 16 years old. Pumphrey said he lost 90 percent of his belongings and had no insurance. Im just glad everybody is all right, he said. Island residents could face stiff nes By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Stiff penalties might be in store for as many as 140 St. George island property owners who fail to remedy problems with lighting that disorient sea turtles during nesting season. At the June 18 county meeting, commissioners were told the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service may invoke the Endangered Species Act on St. George Island. County Planner Alan Pierce said he received a letter from USFW last month, asking the county to be more diligent in protecting nesting sea turtles. The letter requests a meeting with commissioners to discuss sea turtle protection. Last year there were a number of sea turtle disorientations, and the USFW wants the county to work to diminish those numbers, Pierce said. Franklin County, with one of the Schools look to shore up nances By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com As the Franklin County School District looks towards the 2013-14 scal year, the school board has agreed on a staf ng plan for next year based on a budget expected to raise about $150,000 more than came in this year, and to spend about $50,000 less. At their June 25 special meeting, the school board voted unanimously to approve 59 instructional positions, with three additional teaching positions an elementary school teacher and middle school math and physical education teachers as well as an information technology coordinator to be hired. The board earlier this month approved the re-hiring of ve teachers who are on assignment, serving as deans, guidance counselors or in other non-instructional posts, so it appears the district will have ve fewer teachers on staff than the 73 this year. The district plans to next year hire a foreign language instructor to teach Spanish, after having eliminated the position a year ago as a cost-cutting move. Students this past year who took Spanish did so through Florida Virtual School, which involved Fire ghters save Eastpoint home; shed destroyed Feds want lights out for turtles LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Fire ghters extinguish a blaze behind an Eastpoint home June 25. STATE APPROVES OYSTER FARMING FOR ALLIGATOR HARBOR By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In what is being heralded as an innovative step to help pep up the sagging oyster industry, the Florida cabinet last week gave the go-ahead for a Wakulla County family to farm oysters on their aquaculture leases in Alligator Harbor. On June 25, Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet approved an expansion of the use of two aquaculture leases in Alligator Harbor held by the Spring Creek Oyster Company, a Crawfordville-based company owned by the Lovel family. The approval will allow Spring Creek to modify two existing 1.5acre leases to use the full water column for oyster harvesting in cages suspended above the bottom. The company had been using submerged land bottom to grow oysters in cages at the bottom of the waterbody, but was limited by its variance from the state Division of Aquaculture to no more than 6 inches from the bottom, the same vertical limit placed on the surrounding clam leases. The Cabinet action enables the Lovels to take advantage of the top 2 feet of water, a space richer in nutrients, protected from predators and more easily accessible to the leaseholders. The oating cages may be the initial step in a new aquaculture practice and may become a potential alternative economic stimulus for the eastern bounds of Apalachicola Bay, Scott said in a press release that followed the Cabinet decision. The release said allowing use of the full water column is the only change to the two aquaculture leases, which both expire in 2022. It said Spring Creek is in compliance with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services aquaculture best management practices, and that the department, as well as the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, determined the NEW LEASE ON LIFE See SCHOOL A2 See OYSTERS A3 See TURTLES A3 JENNIFER STRICKLAND, USFWS | Special to the Times CLAY LOVEL | Special to the Times The Lovels farm oysters for their Spring Creek Restaurant. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 What if it rains on Independence Day? Main Street Apalachicola has announced that in the event of inclement weather, all Independence Day celebration events will be moved to the posted times on Friday, July 5. The St. George Island holiday parade on the morning of July 4 will happen, rain or shine. The rain date for Independence Day reworks in Carrabelle would be dark-thirty Friday. Maritime museum debuts Paddling Rowing Center From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 7, the Apalachicola Maritime Museum will host the grand opening of their Paddling and Rowing Center. Free trips will be available to museum members all day. The museum is at 103 Water St., Apalachicola. Call 653-2500 or visit www. amm .org. St. George Plantation photo contest Until Aug. 28, The St. George Island Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Forms and guidelines are available at www.sgpoa.com. Summer bingo on the island Every Tuesday, enjoy Summer Bingo upstairs at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. at 7 p.m. Cards are 25 cents. This event is sponsored by and bene ts the St. George Island Civic Club. For information, call 927-2654. Everyone welcome. Remembering a hero, A5

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 online learning. They did a survey with students before school was out, and our students re sponded very favorably to having an instructor, and we feel we have to address it, Superintendent Nina Marks said. Director of Financial Services Shannon Venable said about 60 students indi cated they wished to sign up for a foreign language class. She said hiring a beginning teacher would cost about $44,000 including benets, and all but about $7,000 of this expense would be reim bursed by the state Before approving the stafng plan, the school board heard a report from Venable, who told the board she forecast revenues next year to be roughly $10.97 million, about $150,000 more than this years $10.82 mil lion. This is in part because the districts combined property tax valuation will rise from $1.696 billion to $1.715 billion next year, by about $19 million, or rough ly 1.1 percent. Venable said the district will carry over a balance of about $400,000 from the current scal year and will have about $600,000 in rev enue in June 2014 at the end of the next scal year. Of this, about $371,000 will be in unrestricted funds, which is about 3.74 percent of the overall budget, considered an acceptable cushion by the Florida Department of Education. Were continuing to update that as we make changes, she said. One cost-cutting move that wont be made next year will be to privatize the districts custodial and lawn care services. The school board decided unanimously to postpone talk of a plan rst presented by Marks about a month ago, which would save the district any where from about $68,000 to $113,000 in custodial costs. They decided it should not go the bargaining table for this year but that chief ne gotiator Leonard Dietzen should open discussions on the matter for the 2014-15 scal year. The school district spends about $350,000 annu ally on its custodial needs, including supplies and lawn care. A proposed by GCA Services Group would have trimmed those costs back to $235,000, an annual sav ings of a little more than $113,000. At the time they rst reviewed the plan early last month, school board members asked for a sec ond quote that would have retained three existing custodial employees who were nearing retirement. Keeping those three on staff would have meant only the main campus custodial staff would be privatized and would have saved the district about $68,000 over this years costs. The school board decid ed June 25 that rather than make a decision now, they would keep the idea on the backburner for discussion with the union for the fol lowing scal year. The current custodial staff cant order supplies. Everythings kind of in lim bo, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin said. Im not saying we cant re visit it in the future. I think we should come to a deci sion tonight as a board as to what were going to do. I dont think its fair to keep them in limbo. Board Chairman Jimmy Gander pushed for a deci sion on privatization that would apply for the entire scal year. I know these employ ees back here; they want to know where they stand, he said. I just put myself in the place of employees. It we hire them tonight, we need to hire them for 12 months and be done. Ultimately, Marks agreed to postpone any move to ward privatization. I think with the nancial difcul ties that we have, its some thing we need to be looking at, she said. I also think they need to get on with the summer and get the school prepared. You need to hire them tonight and lets re visit it at a later date. Crooms contract renewed In another matter con cerning a private sector service provider, the board agreed to a $66,000 contract for next year with Crooms Transportation that will cover the cost of transport ing a half-dozen disabled students and a paraprofes sional to the Gretchen Ever hart School in Tallahassee. I believe were still go ing to try to work towards the future of transporting the children ourselves, Marks said. We dont have anything in place right now to take care of these chil dren, and we need it by July 1. The price tag for the transportation will run $15,000 more than did it this year. School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders said the cost increase was because Crooms would no longer be able to offset some costs by transporting additional adults to physician appoint ments in Tallahassee on the bus. My understanding is the contract before did not require the bus to only have our students. They were able to keep that price be cause they transported oth er kids, Sanders said, add ing that Martha Weimorts, the former director of spe cial programs, had insisted on the exclusivity because of requirements of the Jessica Lunsford Act. That state law requires background screening of all individu als who provide contracted non-instructional services to Florida public schools or districts. Last month, the school board approved the hiring of a successor to Weimorts, who retired from her post this year. Named as the new director of special programs was Sue Summers, a former su perintendent of the Liberty County Schools. Summers served onefour-year term, from 200812, as Liberty County superintendent. She lost her re-election bid in the August 2012 Democratic primary. She has a doctor ate in education and will be paid $67,000, about $3,000 less than her predecessor. A plea to visit classrooms In a spirited back-andforth at the start of the meeting, Cathy Wood, pres ident of the local teachers union, said the union had reviewed four proposals presented by Dietzen at the recent opening bargaining session. Three of the four took my breath away, said Wood, calling the proposals a little bit skewed. I just feel that once again the communication line has been severed and closed if these are the pro posals to balance the budget on the backs of the employees, she said. Both Wood and the school board members avoided going into detail on the proposals now on the table. She did encour age school board members to visit classrooms once school is back in session. Im saying to you, please come, please sched ule it, she said. You need to be there, maybe on your lunch hour from your other jobs. Show your presence on a regular basis in these classrooms. The proposal was met with some skepticism from school board members. It would be virtually impos sible and very disruptive to have ve school board members traipsing around from class to class, to teach er to teacher, Gander said. Everyone has an opportu nity to come to the board, as you do. I dont really un derstand how we can make ourselves more available unless we go on conference call to the classroom. Just to go out and knock on the door and say Do you want to see me or dont? Its never worked out well for me, he said. Ive tried it. I have rarely ever gone in there that didnt feel like I was interrupting some thing going on. Wood asked school board members formulate some sort of schedule. If a teach er knows that youre going, the teacher would have to agree with you coming, and pair you up. We would have camaraderie of people sitting in your position as elected ofcials, (being able to see) something wonder ful and positive that went on on that campus. Board Member Teresa Ann Martin sought to re assure Wood the school board supported teachers. I think great things are happening at the school, but theres always room for improvement. Dont take it so to heart that all theyre doing is putting us down. Were looking at numbers and results and saying we dont have to be a D school. Theres a lot of teachers working hard, some thats not and some that are. Wood continued to plea for personal visits. Please come and sit in a class room. For our staff to see you come and participate in some capacity is going to be that motivator, that something that will entice them to maybe make that difference. Board Member Pam Shiver said she did not favor the idea of staging school board visits. I wont come announced; I dont want to walk in on you on your best behavior, she said, and then likened the situation to hers as a postal service employee. Everything is data-driv en. Management looks at nothing but the data, Shiv er said. To the employee, its Hey Im a human be ing. But in the essence of it all theres still a business that needs to be done. Board Member David Hinton, a former teacher at Carrabelle High School, said he did not support the idea of school board mem ber visits. When I was a teacher, the only time I ever saw a board member was when there was a prob lem, he said. It wasnt the board members job to mi cromanage the school. He said when he was elected to ofce, he decided Im going to do it here in the board room. I dont go to school to see whats go ing on. I dont really have a de sire to go to the schools. Its intimidating for a school board member to go into the school. N O T I C E T O R E C E IV E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F ran k l i n B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e ce i v e s e a l e d b i d s q u a l i e d pe r s o n c o m p an y or c or p or a t i o n i n t e r e st e d i n c o n st r uc t i n g P L U M B I N G R E N O V A T I O N S A T T H E F R A N K L I N J A I L A N D S H E R I F F S O F F I CE T h e pr o j e c t i s l oc a t e d a t 2 7 0 S ta t e R o a d 6 5 E a s t po i n t F l o r i d a an d c o n s i s t s o f r e p l a c i n g p l u m b i n g c o m po n e n t s o n e x i s t i n g x t u r e s a t t h e C o u n t y J a i l an d Sh e r i f f s O f ce C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s pr o j e c t w i l l be 6 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i ce t o P r oce e d pr e s e n t e d t o t h e su c c e s sfu l bidd e r A m an d a t o r y pr e b i d w a l k t h r u i s sc h e d u l e d f o r M o n d a y J u l y 8 2 0 1 3 a t 1 0 : 0 0 a m T h e w a l k t h r u w i l l be h e l d a t t h e C o u n t y J a i l a t 2 7 0 S ta t e R o a d E a s t po i n t F l o r i d a L i q u i d a t e d d am a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e pr o j e c t o n t h e s pe c i e d d a t e w i l l be s e t a t $ 2 0 0 0 0 pe r d a y T h e s e a l e d b i d m us t be c l e a r l y m a r k e d o n t h e o u t s i d e o f t h e e n v e l o pe P L UM BI N G R E N O V A T I O N S A T C OU N T Y J A I L T h e e n v e l o pe s h o u l d a l s o be a r o n t h e o u t s i d e t h e B i d d e r s n am e a d d r e s s an d l i ce n s e n u m be r i f a p p l i c a b l e B i d s w i l l be r e ce i v e d u n t i l 4 : 30 p m ( E S T ) o n M o n d a y J u l y 1 5 2 0 1 3 a t t h e F ran k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f ce F ran k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o us e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 an d w i l l be o pe n e d an d r e a d a l o u d o n T u e s d a y J u l y 1 6 2 0 1 3 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g h e l d a t t h e C o u r t h o us e A n n e x 34 F o r be s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a T h e F ran k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e an y i n f o r m a l i t y i n an y b i d t o a c ce p t an d / o r r e j e c t an y o r a l l b i d s an d t o a c ce p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r be s t j u d g e m e n t w i l l be i n t h e be s t i n t e r e s t o f F ran k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n f o r m f o r a pe r i od o f s i x t y d a y s af t e r o p e nin g A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l c o m p l y w i t h a l l a p p l i c a b l e S ta t e an d l oc a l l a w s c o n ce r n i n g l i ce n s i n g r e g i s t ra t i o n an d r e g u l a t i o n o f c o n t ra c t o r s d o i n g b us i n e s s i n t h e S ta t e o f F l o r i d a Q u e s t i o n s s h o u l d be a d d r e s s e d t o A l an P i e r ce D i r e c t o r o f A d m i n i s t ra t i v e S e r v i ce s a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 E x t 1 6 1 o r a l an p @ f a i r po i n t n e t P UBL I S H D A T E S: T h u r s d a y J u n e 2 7 2 0 1 3 BI L L T O: F R A N KL I N C O U N T Y B OC C T h u r s d a y J u l y 4 2 0 1 3 A t t n : L i n d a P h i l l i p s 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: AP00 SUE SUMMERS SCHOOL from page A1

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, July 4, 2013 largest populations of nest ing sea turtles in the state, has wrestled for years with problems with disorienta tions of both adults and hatchlings because of im properly shielded residen tial and commercial light ing. Because all sea turtles are considered to be at risk of extinction, turtle deaths resulting from improper lighting may violate the Endangered Species Act. Bill Mahan, Franklin County extension agent called USFW the 600pound gorilla in the room waiting to pounce. Mahan said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission is co operating with the county to educate island property managers and owners. About a dozen property owners and managers on the island attended a June 19 sea turtle workshop at the St. George Island re house led by Kelly Roberts, an FWC wildlife biologist. Roberts said she was de lighted because she had held county wide work shops where only ve had attended. Last September, USFW threatened to ne island properties with lighting that disorients sea turtles to the tune of $5,000 or more for each violation. A letter from USFW said the county sea turtle protec tion ordinance, passed in 1998, is not being properly enforced, and the federal agency will invoke the En dangered Species Act if the county continues to ignore its own ordinance. A second letter received last month repeated that warning. Dan Garlick, owner of Garlick Environmental Services Inc., said USFW can and will levy stiff nes in order to enforce the En dangered Species Act. In my experience, what often happens is they im pose the nes, which cant be paid and are not paid by the violator but the whole process gives the commu nity a black eye, he said. Its very bad from a public image point of view. According to the act, civil penalties can be up to $25,000 per violation. Crim inal penalties are not to ex ceed $50,000 in nes and a year of imprisonment. Lisa Lehnhoff, a spokeswoman for USFW, said the amount of the ne is largely at the discretion of the USFW en forcement ofcer. There might be one dis orientation with more than one hatchling involved, and the ofcer could choose to treat it as a single violation and ne, say, $1,000, she said. If a second disorien tation occurs involving the same property, the ofcer might ne the owner for each turtle affected. Over the last ve years, the Endangered Species Act rarely has been invoked for violations involving sea turtles except where there was criminal activity, for example the sale of turtle meat or purposeful de struction of a nest. Charg es against property owners causing disorientations ap pear to be unprecedented. However, there is fund ing available from the Deepwater Horizon settle ment targeted at improv ing and protecting sea tur tle nesting areas, and that infusion of money could make enforcement of the law more feasible. USFW agents returned to the island in May and conducted a survey that identied 140 residences that might be out of com pliance. A copy of this list was attached to the USFW letter sent to Pierce. The list includes beachside and rst tier properties from Sunset Beach, on the ex treme eastern end, to Bob Sikes Cut on the west. Businesses are not in cluded in the list; about half the properties on the list appear to be vacation rentals, but many are pri vate homes. In a telephone interview, Lehnhoff said, The county has had an ordinance since 1998, and (USFW) has been active in trying to bring people into compliance. This is just a continuation of that initiative. Donald Imm, a USFW project leader, USFWs sea turtle effort isnt as much about sea turtles as the lifestyle on St. George Is land. People have enjoyed the beach there for many years. Being able to coex ist with sea turtles and their nests is an important part of that. At some point, it could get so developed local people wont be able to enjoy that lifestyle. In south Florida, there are plenty of islands where ev ery day Florida residents can no longer afford to go and enjoy those resources. This is about sustained growth, sustained econo my and sustaining condi tions on the island. We fully support a healthy economy and a healthy county. In no way are we trying to oppose any of those things, he said. We really hope to give the county residents some op tions. Right now, plans for enforcement of the Endan gered Species Act are on hold, but the time will come when law enforcement will get involved. Susan Ficklen, of Col lins Vacation Rentals, was among those who attended the June 19 workshop. In the past, Franklin County has stated that there was an ordinance but no money to enforce it, she said in an inter view last week. A volun teer organization led by Bruce Drye was formed. Each season, the turtlers turn a list of noncompliant houses to the county. The county sends a letter to the owner. Ficklen said Collins has one owner who recently re ceived such a county noti cation and told the rental company he wanted to be in compliance. He contacted the Turtle Conservancy. They provided him with advice and funding for xtures and installation, she said. (Property managers) rep resent the owners, and we are responsible to inform them about anything that will affect them or their renters or property. I think its important to recognize that we are still a part of the ecoheaven, Ficklen said. We already remind every guest when they arrive that this is turtle season. Its like the beach the way it was when we were kids and people respect that. She said the rental companies have received copies of the list of 140 properties and will work to inform affected property owners. Im certain that we have the support of all rental companies, Fick len said. Imm said USFW and FWC hope to obtain en vironmental restoration money from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill settlement to assist in bringing the is land into compliance and will work with homeowners and property management companies to that end. Lehnhoff began visit ing island businesses last week to provide informa tion and answer questions about compliance. She will speak at the August meet ing of the St. George Island Civic Club. At the June 18 county commission meeting, Pierce and Mahan said they had received word from USFW the county also might be eligible for grant money to protect turtles under Restoring the Night Sky, a project funded by the Deepwater Horizon settlement. Pierce said the countys grant proposal requests funds for education and to pay a code enforce ment ofcer to work nights and evenings inspecting lighting on the island. He said the grant also would provide money to retrot structures with compli ant lighting. The program would be run out of Mah ans Sea Grant ofce at the Armory. Pierce said some por tions of the island, in cluding the commercial district, would be difcult to bring into compliance. He said his plan is to cre ate a wide swath of dark beach on the east end of the island where housing is less dense than at island center. Commissioner Smokey Parrish expressed concern for public safety if lighting in the business district is reduced. Some folks, because they love turtles, get kind of extreme, Commission er Noah Lockley said. We dont want that. Commissioner Pinki Jackel suggested com mercial lighting and signs could be retrotted to protect the turtles. They were here before us, and we need to try and live with them, she said. Commissioners voted unanimously to allow Pierce and Mahan to apply for the grant. Imm said USFW will continue to document tur tle disorientations and col lect information that will be needed to prosecute vi olators of the Endangered Species Act. C all f or inf or mation about our r ot ating specialists: W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle change will not result in adverse impacts to seagrasses, existing shellsh beds, natural reefs or other sensitive habitats. At their April 2 meeting, Frank lin County commissioners had re viewed the Lovels proposal and raised some questions, although they lacked authority to approve or deny the proposed modications. This will keep other people from using that water. Boats will run into bags, Commissioner Smokey Parrish said. If theres damage done, whoever does it will probably be responsible. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said the leases were west of the ramp where boats turn in. People love to sh around those places for the drums, she said. (It could in terfere with) clammers being able to get to their leases. Commissioner William Massey concurred, noting the leases were straight off the boat landing, and Commissioner Pinki Jackel said it would be hard to run a boat where all those stakes are. Clay Lovel, younger brother to Ben Lovel, the two sons of Leo Lovel, said he was not sure how much effect using the entire water column will have on recreational boats. All the times Ive been there, Ive seen only one or two other boats driving in that area that werent other people working on their leases, he said. When you consider 1.5 acres on the wa ter, its a very, very small space. Im hoping it works outThe Lovel family, which has owned and operated Spring Creek Restaurant near Shell Point in Panacea since 1977, is sensitive to fears that farming oysters ulti mately could lead to the end of the traditional tonging methods that long have been the hallmark of Apalachicola Bay oystermen. Two decades ago, when the state tried to introduce oyster farming as part of job retraining, the idea met with a mixed reaction from locals and ultimately failed. But Clay Lovel said he thinks the familys plan could be one more tool in oystermens hands in keeping the industry alive and prospering. We hope the wild oyster popu lation comes back, over there and over here, he said. Its a regional problem. We are not competing at all. From what weve learned from other people who farm oysters, that there is a worldwide market that cannot be lled for oysters. If anything, we hope our oysters might help reseed the bay. There used to be oyster hous es all over Franklin and Wakulla County, Lovel said. Were hop ing any increase in oyster produc tion here could have a ripple ef fect. We have no grand giant plan other than to make a living on the water. We think if theres one more option for these people to make a living on the water, that can only be good. With hard times facing oyster men who work the bay, and with reliance on a $2.7 million federal grant for reseeding the bay about to dry up, longtime oystermen arent getting their dander up about the Alligator Harbor project. Im hoping it works out, Franklin County Seafood Works Association President Shannon Hartseld told the Tallahassee Democrat. Thats what we are going to have to do, trial and er ror. I dont see how it can hurt our bay. It may give an opportunity for a different way to harvest oysters. Thats a plus in my book. Clay Lovel said the familys oyster harvesting project actu ally landed in their laps thanks to a salesman for the Bay Shellsh Company out of Palmetto. The family started with two clam leases a year ago and was about halfway through the germi nation process when they decided to try oyster farming. It wasnt really our idea, to be honest with you, Lovel said. The seed salesman had oyster seed available, so we said yeah, and we bought some cages to put them in the water. It was more luck than anything that we ended up getting the oyster seed. A very clean and thin shellLast summer, aquaculture regulators granted the Lovels a variance on their clam leases, and they put in about 10,000 oys ter seeds. Nine months later, with about 150,000 pieces growing in 450 cages, they started harvesting their rst crop of oysters. We were astonished when we saw how fast they were growing. They lled those cages up pretty quick, Lovel said. It was the rst time we did it so they grew at dif ferent rates. They dont really all come off at once, some grow faster than others. Were learning trial by error even now. We probably overcrowded them at rst. What the Lovels have produced in Alligator Harbor has been a smaller, saltier oyster than those found in Apalachicola Bay, and they have only been sold at Spring Creek, at about $10 for a dozen on the half-shell. Thats all were doing at the moment; we only need to get as many as we need for the restau rant right now, Lovel said. We do harvest smaller ones, and were also trying to market a smaller oyster as well, he said. Since theyre so young they have a very clean and thin shell, very white on the inside. At the location where were going, theres hardly any freshwater. Its a very salty en vironment; therefore the oyster is very briny. Customers love em, Lovel said. Of course some people like a big oyster. I personally prefer a smaller oyster. Its just like mullet; some people like big mullet, and some people like small mullet. He said other than being al lowed to harvest oysters smaller than 3 inches long, Spring Creek is subject to all other rules regard ing oyster harvesting, including refrigeration and storage. We have to go through every single precaution and rule that any other oyster house would, Lovel said. He said hes not sure whether post-harvest processing will be an issue regarding vibrio vulnicus, naturally occurring bacteria that thrives in warm waters and can be deadly for people with compro mised immune systems who eat raw oysters. He said some diseases like der mo, which can threaten the health of oysters, take as long as 18 months to thrive. We are already harvesting some oysters that are less than a year old, Lovel said. Were hoping it wont be a major concern for us. The Lovels plan to experiment with different methods of oating the cages. Honestly, we are us ing a fraction of our one lease with oysters and clam. Its all we can do to run the restaurant and keep up with our oysters and clams, Lov el said. Being able to use the full water column will make our work easier and more efcient. He said using the entire water column will enable the Lovels to more easily defoul their equip ment of grasses and barnacles. We can get those out of the water more easily, and kill those organ isms, and keep our equipment and the oysters clean. It opens up the window of people that can do that, he said. Right now we can get in the water and work those cages in low tide, but thats a small window. You have to be t enough to get in the water and handle that equipment. We do realize were still in an ongoing experiment, but were very hopeful that it will be suc cessful, he said. We think it could provide some options for others who work on the water. We gure what were in to right now, its just like farming. There may be a good season, and there may be a bust season. Were not even taking baby steps yet. Were just getting crawling. We havent even got all the way through our rst crop. TURTLES from page A1 This drawing shows the oyster baskets the Lovels provided on their application to the state. LEO LOVEL | Special to the Times OYSTERS from page A1

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By Ron Pollack Special to the Times At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiums? A : When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security bene t each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also re ect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income bene ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can nd out if you qualify and apply online at www. socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www. familiesusa.org/resources/ program-locator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a xed incomeand thats most peoplethis is encouraging news. Ron Pollack is executive director of Families US, a national organization for health care consumers that has advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, July 4, 2013 A Page 4 Section IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America. When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Natures God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. W e hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures. He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly rmness his invasions on the rights of the people. He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers. He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their of ces, and the amount and payment of their salaries. He has erected a multitude of New Of ces, and sent hither swarms of Of cers to harass our people, and eat out their substance. He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures. He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: For depriving us in many cases, of the bene ts of Trial by Jury: For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences: For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighboring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and t instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies: For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments: For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & per dy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may de ne a Tyrant, is un t to be the ruler of a free people. Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. W e, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a rm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. The Declaration of Independence Understanding Medicare premiums

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, July 4, 2013 A nn u a l M e m b e rs hi p M e etin g a nd E l e c ti o n T ues d a y E v enin g J u ly 9, 2013 a t 6:00 Ra n c y H o u s e C a r r ia ge H o u s e A pa la c h ic o la, F lo r ida e P a n h a n d le Pla ye rs i n v i t es yo u t o j o i n u s f o r o u r a n n ua l m e eti n g s a n d f o r t h e e le c tio n o f B oa r d m e m be rs a n d o c e rs. H e a r a bo u t o u r p la n s f o r t h e c o m i n g s e a s o n a n d a bo u t h o w yo u c a n be c o m e i n vo l ve d. F o r mo r e inf o rma t i o n o r t o e xp r ess a n in t e r es t in r unnin g f o r the B o a r d o f Dir e c t o rs, p l e as e c a l l E l a ine K ozl o w s ky a t 850-670-1671 o r B o b I n g u ag i a t o a t 850-370-5281. 2091548 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Franklin County has sired many a patriot and one of these was William El lis Van Vleet. Born in Apalachicola to William and Florida Van Vleet on Oct. 28, 1924, he en tered the world with a twin sister, Erris. His friends and family called him Buddy. He was by all accounts an all-Ameri can boy, who loved boat ing and shing, excelled at sports and made friends easily. His parents kept every one of his Sunday School graduation certicates from the First Baptist Church where their younger son, Louis, is still a devout mem ber. The diplomas are tucked away with Buddys other things in a wooden trunk. As soon as he was old enough, Buddy began shrimping with his father, when not in school. Some times they took along Louis, who was four years younger. Louis said he has often wondered what it would have been like to grow up with a brother. He has happy mem ories of Buddys kindness. He was a good brother, said Van Vleet. One time, when I was little, I had gone down to the Dixie Theatre. It cost a dime to get in. I got up to the window and found out I had lost my dime. My brother stepped up and put one down for me. I never for got that. And Buddy is not forgot ten. A shelf in the Van Vleet living room displays his pic tures, and a handful of spe cial treasures. His trunk, in a cozy bedroom, is lled with his things as if he might still return to claim them. Like so many of his mem bers of the Greatest Gen eration, Buddy volunteered in 1943 and at age 18 became a Marine. His Marine hand book remains in the trunk of his belongings. After training, he was as signed to the aircraft carrier, USS Franklin. Nicknamed Big Ben, the Franklin was one of 24 Essex-class air craft carriers built for the Navy during World War II. She was 872 feet long and 147 feet wide with a crew of more than 2,000. She carried 100 aircraft. Aboard the Franklin, Buddy traveled to the Pacif ic, crossing the international dateline on June 23, 1944 and the equator on Sept. 20. The Franklin participat ed in numerous battles from July through October 1944. On Oct. 27, she was hit by a suicide bomber killing 56 crew members and wound ing 60. The wrecked plane in two sections was shoved into the water off opposite sides of the ship. The Franklin was so badly damaged she re turned to Puget Sound Navy Yard for repairs. Buddy, who was on his gun mount during the fatal battle, was unhurt, but his cabin was burned. He had to borrow clothes for the re turn trip to the US. While the Franklin was being repaired, Buddy was able to return to Apalachicola for a visit with his family. He had a week off. It was the last time we was all here together, recalled Van Vleet. Buddy, who had never been a ladys man, joked with his mother that he might bring home a bride from the Philippines. He told his young broth er, Anybodys ever been in a war theyll never forget it. He gave Louis what must have been a tremendous treasure to a boy in his early teens, a piece of the fuse lage from the kamikaze that crashed into the Franklin. After Buddy returned to the aircraft carrier, his moth er told Louis that Buddy be lieved he would never return home again. She said she could read it on him, said Van Vleet. The telegram that every soldiers family dreads ar rived on April 10, 1945. On March 19, the Frank lin maneuvered closer to the Japanese mainland than any other US carrier during the war. She was struck by two armor-piercing bombs caus ing severe damage and trig gering explosions of stored ammunition and rockets. She lay dead in the water; many of the crew were killed or blown overboard. Initially, 724 were listed as dead or missing but later the toll of the dead was raised to more than 800. Buddy was among the missing. It like to killed Mama, said Van Vleet. When the telegram came, word spread fast. Dr. Weems, the family physi cian, was across town but he told the people he was with, I have to go now. Mrs. Van Vleet will need me. There was some ques tion about where Buddy had been at the time of the at tack. Many of the young men killed had been in the chow line. Ellsworth Taylor, who served on the Franklin with Buddy, wrote the Van Vleet family, that their son was one any mother would be proud to call her son. He was not killed in the chow line. He was on the second deck and there was a big explo sion. Its very hard to tell a mother that her son is dead but I really believe he is. If your boy died, he didnt suf fer as the boys never knew what hit them. Your boy lived a very clean life as we used to go on liberty together and I believe he was ready to meet God. Buddys remains were never returned home. In Au gust, 1945, his effects were returned by parcel post. Included in the package were four books, a box con taining six handkerchiefs, a collar stay, an envelope of photographs, a bundle of let ters, a pipe, a bathing suit, a sewing kit and four bath towels. Most of these items remain in the trunk at the Van Vleet home. In March 1946, the Van Vleets received an ofcial declaration of presump tive death from the Navy. Florida Van Vleet arranged for a memorial service and purchased a monument with the US Marine Corps insignia that can still be seen in Magnolia Cemetery. The family continued to inquire after their lost boy. My mother wrote to people about him and she looked for him to come home for anoth er 10 years, said Louis. Buddy received a post humous Purple Heart. The family received a section of plank from the Franklin from the Naval Historical Center in Washington D.C. On it Louis mounted the bit of fuselage his brother brought him in 1944. After Buddy enlisted, the Van Vleet family saved every letter from the son and ev ery memento of his wartime travels. His brother, Louis, still treasures these keep sakes of an American hero. Van Vleet said he hopes to eventually donate his brothers effects to the Camp Gordon Johnston Mu seum in Carrabelle so they can be preserved for future generations. GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com 4514931 NOTICE OF ANNU AL MEETING The Boar d of Commissioners of the Northw est Florida R egional Housing A uthority will hold its Ann ual Meeting on J ul y 18, 2013, a t the Holida y Inn & Suites 2725 Gr a v es R oad, T allahassee Florida. Meeting will begin a t 1:00 p .m. E.D .S .T The meeting will be open to the pub lic. Im p la nt s & C r o w ns Af f or da ble De ntu r es P ana ma Cit y P A W illia m C Kna pk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P ana ma City Squ ar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P ana ma City FL Cal l F or Inf or mat ion 188 826 877 18 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Addi tiona l f ees ma y be incur r ed depe nding on indiv idua l case s Same -da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailab le in cer t ain case s Af f or dable Dentu r es P anam a City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. G r e a t v s ot he r D en t a l p r o vi d er s Sin gle T oo th Im pla nt $ 1 7 95 D e n tu r e Im p la n ts $ 1 49 5 $ 1 8 95 Sa m e Da y Cr o wn s $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upp er Ar c h 20144-1-T4 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Louis Van Vleet displays the towel returned to the family with his brothers effects. A memorial to William Ellis Van Vleet sits in the family plot in Magnolia Cemetery.FR O M THE V A N V L EET FA M IL Y COLL ECT IO N Louis Van Vleet keeps a small memorial to his brother on a living room shelf. Ellis Van Vleet: A hometown hero

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K I T TE NS K I T TE NS K I T TE NS W e h a v e a s he l t e r F U L L of k i t t e n s. A l l k i nds of k i t t e n s. E v e r y c o l o r s i z e a nd b r e e d T he y a r e a l l f u l l y v e t t e d s p a y e d a nd ne u t e r e d A N D w e a r e on l y c h a r gi n g a $ 5 0 0 0 a do pt i on f e e P l e as e c on s ide r a do pt i n g one o ur b e a u t i f u l k i t t e n s a nd gi v i n g t he m t he h om e t he y s o de s e r v e T he y a r e a l l p ur r r f e c t l y w onde r f u l V O L U N T EE R S A R E D E S P E R A T E L Y N EE D E D T O S O C I A L I Z E A LL O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e npe t s o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 PSYCHIC READINGS 850-319-3711 Bay County's #1 Psychic Do you want to kno w wha t the future has in store? Ha ve questions about love, business or marria ge? Ann's ans wers tell the past, present & future. All readings are con dential Se Habla Espaol THIS WEEK ONL Y T AROT CARD READING $ 10 by Miss Ann Call today for a better tomorrow... Society A6 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 Celia Granger of Eastpoint would like to announce the birth of her twins, Kymbri Jayde and Kyron Jayceon Granger. Kymbri Jayde was born at 9:07 p.m. and Kyron Jayceon was born at 9:08 p.m. on Thursday, May 30, 2013 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Jimmy and Lynn Granger, of Eastpoint. GRAN G ER TWINS BORN Clarence and Judy Norris were married in their hometown of Bethel, Ohio on June 26, 1953. Clarence worked for General Motors for 30 years and retired in 1983. Judy works in retail sales and raised their son David, who passed away in 2007. They came to Eastpoint for a weeks vacation Christmas of 1983 and fell in love with the area and the friendly people and moved here the next year. Clarence works as a shing guide for Bay City Lodge and Judy worked for Bayside Florist for 10 years and then switched to Two Gulls Gift Shops where she has worked for almost 18 years. Their good friends, Lynn and Greg Martina, celebrated the occasion with them at Capt. Andersons Restaurant. 60 T H ANNIVERSARY By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com A Franklin County High School student is about to get a glimpse of what her future would be like if she pursues her dream to be come a doctor. Cayce Daniels, who will be a sophomore this fall, is headed to Emory Univer sity in Atlanta Sunday for a 10-day participation in the National Youth Leadership Forum on Medicine. Shell be staying at a dorm at Emory as she em barks on a hands-on, inter active curriculum that in cludes shadowing practic ing physicians, clinical site visits at the nations top medical centers and meet ing and interacting with fac ulty from world-renowned medical institutions. Daniels, 15, the daugh ter of Jesse and Jennifer Daniels of Carrabelle, is an honor roll student, ac tive in the Tigers program at the Carrabelle branch li brary, and a member of the Franklin County band for four years. Jennifer Daniels said her daughter, who has dreams of becoming a ra diologist, was nominated for the program after an aptitude test at the school showed she has an inter est in and an aptitude for medicine. Tuition for the program runs close to $2,700, but with the help of family and friends, Daniels was able to make things work. She got a lot of help from the people in the commu nity, First Baptist Church Carrabelle, where she is a member, Gayla Parks State Farm Insurance, Dr. Eu gene Charbonneau, Mikes Quick Cash, just to name a few, said Jennifer Daniels. Her mother said Cayce plans to keep a journal and take photos of the forum. Its going to let her see what being a doctor entails as some of the activities will let her experience partici pating in a mock residency program selection, examin ing leadership by analyzing leaders in medicine, prob lem-based learning case, medical ethics scenarios and caucus, said Jennifer Daniels. Shell participate in workshops learning how to take a patients blood pressure and suturing, public health, participating in a mass triage scenario and site explorations to dif ferent medical schools and hospitals. According to the youth leadership forums website, participating institutions in the Atlanta area have included Emory School of Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, Mer cer School of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medi cine and Georgia CampusPhiladelphia School of Os teopathic Medicine. Hands-on activities may include histology, which in volves using microscopes to view cell anatomy, visits to an anatomy lab, engag ing in a vital signs work shop, and learning how to diagnose on SimMan, which is a portable, patient simulator. Other highlights with the forum have been a hyp notism extravaganza, led by Sean Wheeler, a certi ed hypnotist; a visit to the inspiring Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site; shopping at the Mall of Georgia, the largest mall in the state; and a semiformal dinner and dancing on the nal evening of the program. Speakers who have par ticipated in past Atlanta Forums include health of cials from the Centers for Disease Control and the Grady Health System. Daniels to get dose of doctoring Cayce Daniels Franklin County Elementary School student Camille Davis made a perfect score on her FCAT Math 2.0. She will be going into the fth grade in 2013-14. She is the daughter of Clint and Angela Davis, of Carrabelle, Beach. Grandparents are Arthur Red and Billie Faye Dais, and Mike and Sue Bodiford, of Apalachicola. Congrats Millie, we love you! CON G RA T ULA T IONS CAMILLE DAVIS The Philaco Womans Club education committee has announced the recipi ents of two $1,000 scholar ship awards for 2013. Winners are Morgan Walker, salutatorian for the Franklin County High School Class of 2013, and Sarah E. Strickland, vale dictorian at the First Bap tist Christian School. Walker, who has a grade point average of better than 4.0, served as team captain of the Brain Bowl team for 2012 and competed on the team in grades 10 through 12, as well as participating in sports, scouting, serving as a student mentor and working part-time. She has been accepted by the Uni versity of Florida where she plans to pursue a course of study in physics and as tronomy. Morgan also has been dual-enrolled at Gulf Coast State College and will have 36 credit hours when she graduates. Strickland, who has a 3.5 grade point average, served as a teachers aide her senior year, volun teered with her schools fundraising events, and as sisted with younger class es and her church nursery, while working part time since 2009. She enjoys sports and photography, and paints in oil, acrylic and pastels, and enjoys. She has been accepted by Pensacola Christian Col lege where she plans to en ter the nursing program, with art as an elective. Committee members Judy Cook, Ginny Griner, Heather Guidry, Dawn Radford, and Judy Sto kowski acted as judges during the scholarship competition. Morgan and Strickland are Philaco scholars Cant believe the year is half gone already. Be sure to have your survivor kits and your escape plan handy. There wont be a lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center today, July 4, but be watching for you next Thursday, July 11. You can, however, join your friends and neighbors for a covered dish lunch at the Lanark Village Boat Club this afternoon, July 4. Donation is $3. Bring your favorite dish to share and enjoy the Fourth of July afternoon. Serving begins at 1 p.m. See ya there! Later on, about dark thirty, come and watch the fireworks on the Carrabelle River. Have a safe and great Fourth of July. Grilled chicken will be served, along with two sides, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, on Saturday, July 6. Food line forms at 5 p.m. and will continue until gone. Your donation of $8 will be collected at the bar. Also on Saturday evening, July 6, you can dance the night away at the Franklin County Senior Center. Ron Vice will be on hand to spin the platters. Bring your favorite snack, beverage, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. Cha, cha, cha! Fun starts at 7 p.m. There will be a big moving sale on Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13, from 8 a.m. until noon. The contents of our rectory, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 109 Newman Drive, corner of Spring and Newman, and our house for visiting clergy will be for sale. We need volunteers, however, to help with this sale. Come by theres bound to be something you simply cant live without. Be kind to one another check in on the sick and the housebound. Smile, Jesus loves you! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Legion post to host chicken dinner Saturday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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The Times | A7 Thursday, July 4, 2013 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com For youngsters at last weeks vacation Bible school at Eastpoints First Baptist Church, encountering the love of God may have been a rstever thing. For Alberta Read, it was the culmination of nearly a century of experience. At age 99, Read was among the two dozen volunteers from Belleview Baptist Church near Ocala who, for the third consecutive year, traveled north to conduct the weeklong Bible school at the Eastpoint church. With a smile on her face as stirring as a rainbow, Read clapped and shimmied and sang right along with the tots, encouraging them in their exploration of the weeks theme, to face their fears and to trust God. Im helping them singing, whatever they are doing, just acting crazy with the kids, said Read. Whatever they do, I do. Read continues to live alone, as she has for nearly the last 50 years, ever since her husband Edgar died from a heart attack at age 53. Read grew up in Pennsylvania, originally in a Methodist family, but later became a Baptist when I accepted the Lord as my Savior. Her beau Edgar would come to her town to visit, and they fell in love and were married in 1932. She worked as the manager of a school cafeteria in Langhorne, Pennsylvania, and he worked a factory job for the Rohm and Haas Company. The couple, who did not have children, had purchased ve acres in central Florida in anticipation of retiring to the Sunshine State but my husband died before we even got there, she said. Life as a widow was difcult in Langhorne, so Alberta moved down to Florida to be near her cousins, Flossie and Bob Castle in Belleview. The Castles were among the two dozen volunteers who came down from First Baptist of Belleview, bringing down all the materials for the Bible school curriculum Colossal Coaster World and their experience with teaching it The lessons are all built around the verse from 2 Timothy 1:7 For God has not given us a spirit of fearfulness, but one of power, love and sound judgment. The lessons all focus on Paul in the book of Acts, and teach kids they can trust God no matter what twists and turns the ride of life may take. Its about daring to change, to speak up, to believe, to stand strong and to trust, said Flossie Castle. She said Alberta was involved in all aspects of the school last week. She helps them sing and helps with the Bible story and trying to smile and show the kids some love, said Flossie Castle. Were all here to tell them Jesus loves them. Read, who will turn 100 on Sept. 17, said shes in good health, with the exception of her eyesight, which has waned due to macular degeneration. You do lose something at age 99. I guess your eyesight is the rst to go, she said. Im no different than anybody else. Other than that Im doing everything I used to, except teach. I cant see to study my lesson. I dont read anymore. Flossie Castle said she and her husband eat together with Read, but that she is mostly self-sufcient. She sang in the choir until she couldnt read music anymore she said. She visits hospitals and nursing homes, and she goes to all the services. She took care of me when I was a little girl, and now I take care of her, said Flossie Castle. She does very well. Shes pretty healthy. Shes getting forgetful. Read said she feels good these days as the years continue to roll by. I feel ne and I live alone and I dont have any problems, she said. The years go fast. As you get older, they go faster and faster. I am trying to volunteer and I have a couple jobs to do, she said. I just do as Im told. At 99, what more can I do? Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 C o m e j o i n t h e N a t i o n a l C r e m a t i o n S oc i e t y f o r a o n t h e b e n e t s o f p r e pl a n n i n g y o u r c r e m a t i o n F R E E L u n c h & I n f o r m a t i o n a l S e m in a r W h e n t h e t i m e c o m e s w o u l d n t y o u p r e f e r y o u r l o ve d o n e s c e l e b r a t e y o u r l e g a c y r a t h e r t h a n s t r e s s a b o u t m a k i n g a r r a n g e m e n t s ? G i v e t h e m t h e r e l i e f t h e y l l n e e d du r i n g a t o u g h t i m e W e l l d i s cu s s : RE S E R V A T I ON RE QU I RE D Li mi t e d s e a t in g a v ai l a b l e 9 a m 7 p m 1 8 5 0 40 5 6 644 F r e e c r e m a t i o n d o e s n o t i n c l u d e T r a v e l P r o t e c t i o n P l a n C a ro l i ne s R i v e r D in in g 1 2 3 W a t e r S t r e e t @N O O N @N O O N Faith Frank Harlen Doc Brown, 91, passed away peacefully Thursday, June 27, 2013, in Tallahassee. Frank was married to Virginia Mae (Thomas) Brown for 66 years before her passing in 2007. Brown, a retired public school superintendent, was born in Rushsylvania, Ohio. He graduated from Bellefontaine High School and went on to receive the bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees from The Ohio State University. He served as a rieman with the United States Armys 96th Infantry Division in the amphibious assault to liberate the Philippines in World War II, and was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart medals for his actions and for his wounds sustained in combat. Brown had a lengthy and distinguished career as an educator. He was coordinator of the Ohio State House Conference on Education in 1960. He served as superintendent of schools in Canal Winchester, Ohio, Bedford, Ohio, and West Aurora, Ill. A Kiwanian for more than 30 years, he also was active in the United Methodist Church, teaching Sunday school for several years. In his nal years, he became a Floridian. His personality to the end matched the sunshine in the state. He leaves a daughter, Beth Blair (husband Curt); two beloved grandchildren Joy Adele Stubbs (husband Chuck) and Ruel William Smith (wife Amy); and four treasured greatgrandchildren Charlie Stubbs, Mary Harlen Stubbs, Ruel Alden Smith and Reid Jameson Smith; as well as his sister, Charlotte Hall of Bellefontaine, Ohio; and numerous nieces and nephews. In addition to wife Virginia, Frank was predeceased by his son 1st Lt. Ruel Harlen Brown, while mobilized with the Ohio Air National Guard in 1968, and by his three brothers, Lowell, Perk, Carol, and his sister, Thelma. Plans are being made for a service celebrating his life to be held later in Bellefontaine and East Liberty, Ohio. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Frank Harlen Brown County food pantry open again July 9 The Franklin County Food Pantry would like to remind the community it is open the second and fourth Tuesday of every month from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Apalachicola Community Building, at 192 14th St., which is the site of the former Apalachicola High School. The food pantry will be open on July 9 and July 23 and then on Aug. 13 and Aug. 27. Faith BRIEF ObituaryPHOTOS B Y DAV I D ADL ERSTEI N | The Times Alberta Read joins in singing with the children in the sanctuary of the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint.AN AGELESS LOVE OF GOD 99-year-old helps conduct weeklong Bible school in Eastpoint Alberta Read helps show the children at the vacation Bible school how to go with the ow. T H E APALACH I C O LA TI M ES FIND US O N F A C EBOO K

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH The 28-day Gulf red snapper season ended in federal waters Friday, but for many local anglers and lawmakers, ghting increasingly strict snapper regulations is a year-round battle. The U.S. House Natural Resources Committee held an oversight hearing June 27 for testimony on the potential development of a management plan that would give Gulf states more authority in managing the recreational snapper shery. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, who serves on the committee, said he has been disappointed in the National Marine Fisheries Services continued disregard for people and the businesses people run. I am in great agreement that the states need to have more say and the federal government needs to have less, Southerland said. Im not happy with the National Marine Fisheries Service and how theyre responding to the needs of anglers. There is no sh that has greater economic value in Florida sheries than red snapper. The proposed amendment to the reef sh management plan would give states the authority to set bag limits and season lengths by dividing the recreational quota between the states and allowing for more exibility. Southerland said one of the biggest issues with the federal management plan is the absence of a reliable data collection procedure to measure the snapper stock. The federal season was reduced from 40 days to 28 days this year, despite growth in the snapper population. Southerland also commended the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission for supporting the proposal. These ever-shortening seasons have created uncertain challenging times for captains, shermen and coastal communities like Destin and Panama City, which depend on charter trips and vacationing families staying in hotels and eating in local restaurants, FWC marine sheries management director Jessica McCawley said. If lost, the shing heritage of these types of coastal communities is not something that can easily be rebuilt. NMFS assistant administrator Eric Schwaab testi ed that a new stock assessment has shown there are more snapper in the Gulf than there have been in decades. Recreational anglers are landing snapper at three times the rate they were in 2006 and commercial anglers caught 27 percent more in 2012 than in 2007. However, the improved recreational catch rates have had unforeseen impacts, said Schwaab, who noted red snapper quotas increased by 62 percent from 2008 to 2012, and landings increased 148 percent during the same time period. The rate of landings is outpacing the rate of population growth; as a result, the recreational seasons have been progressively shorter to prevent catch overages. Pam Anderson, operations manager at Capt. Andersons Marina, spoke on behalf of the Panama City Boatmens Association at the Washington, D.C., hearing. A 28-day red snapper season doesnt meet the needs of anyone, Anderson said. We need improved data, exibility in the regulations, and shery management that understands the importance of the impact of the shery on the Gulf Coast. Anderson said the dates for this years federal red snapper season changed four times in two months, impeding vacation plans for the many tourists who ock to the Gulf Coast for its world-renowned shing. Despite the good intentions of Congress to grow and maintain a healthy shery, there have been signi cant, unintended consequences with the 2007 Magnuson Act, Anderson said. It needs to be updated with common sense solutions to keep the shery rebuilding while getting people back to work. COME JOIN US FOR THE . 4 TH OF JUL Y SIDEW ALK SALE! JUL Y 3RD & 4TH WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 04 84 78 80 % F ri, July 05 87 78 70 % S a t July 06 88 80 40 % Sun, July 07 89 79 30 % M on, July 08 89 79 10 % T ues July 09 89 78 60 % W ed July 10 89 79 60 % JOES LA WN C ARE IF ITS IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 Of cials: Let states set snapper rules SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Red snapper is still in season in state waters, 9 miles from land, but the sh will be harder to land in shallow water. Try using lighter line and smaller hooks with cut bait shed halfway to the bottom. Gag grouper is open again in our region this week with no new changes in the bag limits or sizes. Good sized sh are in 150 feet of water due south of the Cape. Our regions lakes, rivers, and creeks are close to full with so much rain lately, and the sh have responded well to the cooler rainwater. Big bream and cat sh are being caught in the Brother and Howard Creek. Try using a 5to 6-foot light y rod and a chartruse or glow popper for great action under low-hanging trees and limbs. Page 8 Thursday, July 4, 2013 Special to the Times Gag grouper opened Monday for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state waters and all Gulf federal waters. The same day, the season closed in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. The gag grouper recreational harvest season in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, not including Franklin, Jefferson, Wakulla, Taylor and Monroe counties, will remain open through Dec. 3. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties were open from April 1 through June 30 and will not be open during the July 1through-Dec. 3 season. Monroe County is also excluded from the July 1-throughDec. 3 season because it is included in the Atlantic rules for gag grouper. Gag grouper caught in federal waters during the July 1-through-Dec. 3 season may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. The four-county region includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. The FWC manages marine sh from the shore to 9 nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico. The FWC is working with Floridas anglers to rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf of Mexico back to strong, sustainable levels. The gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size and bag limits are 22 inches total length and two gag grouper per person. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Grouper. Bay scallop season opens Recreational bay scallop season opened June 29 in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando County Line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The season will remain open through Sept. 24, with the rst day of the closure on Sept. 25. The bag limit is two gallons of whole bay scallops or one pint of meat per person, per day, with a vessel limit of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops or a half gallon of meat. Scallops may be collected by hand or with a landing or dip net. Recreational lion sh license requirement removed The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has waived the recreational license requirement for divers harvesting lion sh using certain gear and excluded lion sh from the commercial and recreational bag limits, allowing people to take as many of the invasive sh as they can. Before the change, recreational anglers could not catch more than 100 pounds of lion sh without being required to have a commercial license. Speci c gear that can be used to target lion sh without the requirement of a recreational license includes hand-held nets, pole spears, Hawaiian slings or any other spearing devices designed and marketed exclusively for lion sh. An identical executive order was put into place in August 2012 and is set to expire Aug. 3. The newly adopted rule will take effect before the executive order expires, so there will be no lapse in the expanded permissions. Lion sh are a nonnative, invasive species that negatively affect Floridas native saltwater sh and wildlife. Currently, the most effective method of removing lion sh from Florida waters is by spearing or using a hand-held net. Removing the license requirements and bag limits will increase lion sh harvest opportunities. Use caution when handling this sh. The spines of this species deliver a venomous sting that can last for days and cause extreme pain, sweating, respiratory distress, and even paralysis. If you are stung by a lion sh, seek medical attention immediately. Complications can be fatal. Immediate rst aid measures include immersing the wound for 30 to 90 minutes in water as hot as the poisoned person can tolerate (but not scalding) because the poisons are heat-sensitive. A chemical heat pack can also be applied. Repeat as necessary to control pain. Use tweezers to remove any spines in the wound using caution to not squeeze venom glands that might have broken off in the wound with the spine. Wear gloves to avoid self-inoculation during spine removal. Scrub the wound with soap and water. Then ush the affected area with fresh water. Do not apply tape to close the wound as this may increase the risk of infection. Florida Wild Mammal Association ight pen update Do you feel a sense of awe when you look up and see an eagle, an osprey or a hawk ying gracefully and free? Do you get a thrill when you nd an owl watching you from its perch in a tree? If your answer is yes, then the Florida Wild Mammal Association needs your help. Their ight cage was damaged a year ago during Tropical Storm Debby. This is the cage where they rehabilitate birds of prey (eagles, osprey, owls, hawks, etc.) so after they have recovered from their illnesses and injuries, they can get much-needed ight conditioning as the last step to prepare them for release back into the wild and a second chance at life. Volunteer Rob Olin has taken the initiative to make this project happen. He enlisted the help of friends for labor and worked out a deal with Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint, who generously agreed to donate half of the supplies needed to replace the roof of our ight cage. The total cost of supplies needed is $2,700; the balance due is about $1,350. As a nonpro t with no county, state or federal funding, FWMA has no funds to pay for the balance for this project. They desperately need sponsors. If you or your business would like to be a sponsor, email FWMA Director Chris Beatty at choppaotta@aol.com. Sponsors of $500 or more will be listed and thanked on our website, and a plaque in their honor will be placed on the newly refurbished ight cage. FWMA is totally funded by grants and donations from people like you. One in ve animals that come to the shelter is from Franklin County. You can send a tax-deductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. If you nd an injured animal, do not call. Please bring it to 198 Edgar Poole Road off of US 319 near Crawfordville. Grouper season closes in countys state waters Outdoors BRIEFS

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section FCHS to host July 15-17 volleyball camp The Franklin County High School volleyball program will host a Volleyball Camp at Franklin County Schools from July 15-17. The camp, for grades fifth through 12th, will be daily from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $151. Call coach Hilary Stanton at 653-5042 for information and registration. Sacred Heart to offer free physicals Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, in Port St. Joe will be conducting free physicals for all middle school and high school boys and girls in Franklin County at the Franklin County High School gymnasium from 5-8 p.m. on July 22 and Aug. 15. The physicals are open to students at all schools in Franklin County. Call Coach Michael Sweatt at 670-2800 ext. 1924 for details or any questions that are of concern. Physical forms can be uploaded and printed out at www.fhsaa. org/forms/general. Print the EL02, EL03 and EL3CH forms and fill out general information before you come. If not, there will be copies at the school the day of the physical dates listed above. Try to have a parent accompanying your child. If you are planning on playing a sport or think you might play any sports at all you will have to have a sports physical. Take advantage of this free opportunity to get your physical now. A sports physical will last you one year for every sport, so you will not have to worry about it the entire school year until next summer. Sweatt also extended his thanks to Dana Whaley and the county health department for providing free sport physicals to the Seahawk football team in the spring. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The 16th annual St. George Island Sizzler 5K Race has been designated one of 15 Grand Prix events for the 2013 season by the Gulf Winds Track Club of Tallahassee. Club members earn points by participating in these sanctioned events which are held to a high standard for record keeping and course measurement and must be properly insured and offer proper amenities. Founder Hobson Fulmer said the Sizzler has been part of the Grand Prix circuit before. They rotate you out every few years, he said. Youre more likely to get asked back if you do a good job with your race. It also helps that I am active in the Gulf Winds club. Fulmer said he put together the rst Sizzler in 1998. I had started the cross country track program at Apalachicola High School. The county commission gave me permission but wouldnt give me any money, so I had to nd a way to raise money to get my kids to meets, he said. Around 2003, I had stopped coaching, and the run became a fundraiser for the humane society. It has grown a little every year. For a long time, I had to do it by myself with just the help of my staff and spouse. Last year, it really took off. We developed a Sizzler committee and that allowed us to really expand the party and stuff. Its become a kind of community event for the island. Theyve done a wonderful thing. Now I can just concentrate on handling the race and let them promote it and plan the party and everything else. Fulmer thanked the committee for all their hard work and said local artist Ann Eason has made the race special by donating unique ceramic awards for the triumphant runners. Most people who participate in these things dont want another little plastic gold cup, he said. They have plenty. These are really nice. On May 7, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve a resolution recognizing the Sizzler for its bene t to the community as it raises money for the Franklin County Humane Society. Co-chairs Fulmer and Bob Landiss predict this years Sizzler will be bigger and better than ever. Start training now for the 5K race and one-mile Fun Run to be held Saturday, August 10 at 6 p.m. The Sizzler, sponsored by the Tates Hell Track Club, is notorious for the hot humid conditions experienced by participating runners. Deadline for preregistration is Aug. 8, and the cost is $25, or you can register the day of the event for $30. T-shirts may not be available for those registering on the day of the event. There is a $10 student rate for cross country teams. The Fun Run begins at 5:30 p.m. and is followed by the 5K race at 6 p.m. The post-race party and awards will begin around 6:30 p.m. at Lighthouse Park. There will be unique awards given out to overall male and female, Masters, Grand Masters, Senior Masters, and all standard age group winners. Awards will be three-deep for each age group for the 5K. This race is a bene t for the Franklin County Humane Society and is produced by The Tates Hell Track Club. The Sizzler is seeking cash donations to support the event as well as in-kind donations for the post-race party. Gift items like visors, coupons, gift cards, water bottles and koozies are needed for 450 goodie bags. Also needed are 40 cases of bottled water, 500 14-ounce cups, 500 9-ounce cups, 800 plastic forks and knives, 1,000 paper plates and paper napkins, 175 pounds of ice, 150 pounds new potatoes, 125 pounds Andouille sausage, 240 ears of corn, 185 pounds extra-large Gulf shrimp, 1,200 pieces of dessert, three gallons cocktail sauce, one case Old Bay seasoning, three kegs or 25 cases of beer, 10 cases of soda, 14 1.5-liter bottles of red and white wine and red beans and rice for 350. Branded items are OK. If you want to help, call Bud Hayes at 323-0138. For more information, go to www.stgeorgeislandsizzler.com. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400 + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Thursday, July 4, 2013 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Many people traditionally run the annual St. George Island Sizzler 5k Race, now designated one of 15 Grand Prix events. Sizzler 5K granted Grand Prix status Page 9 Sports BRIEFS Hobson Fulmer, founder of the Sizzler, makes an announcement at the event. News BRIEFS Schools begins summer work hours Summer work hours at the Franklin County School District of ce began Monday and will run through Friday, Aug. 2. The summer work schedule will be Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m., with a 45-minute lunch. On Fridays the of ces will be closed. Normal work hours will resume on Monday, Aug. 5. Carrabelle seniors host dance Saturday The Carrabelle Senior Center will host a dance Saturday evening, July 6, starting at 7 p.m. Admission is free, with music provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to dance... or just to listen to the music! The Senior Center is at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. Juvenile Justice Council to meet Monday The Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council will meet at 11 a.m. on Monday, July 8 at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola, located behind the old Apalachicola High School on 14th Street, in the independent building facing the football eld. All meetings are open to the public, and all are welcomed. For more info, call Carol Bar eld, chair, at 653-2784 Seafood workers to meet Monday The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will hold a meeting at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 8 at the re house in Eastpoint, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road. The meeting will be discussing association business, and also will conduct elections to seat replacement of cers for the secretary, treasury and second vice president seats that have not been lled. Any questions please contact Shannon at 653-5190. Panhandle Players to meet Tuesday The annual membership meeting and elections for the Panhandle Players will be held Tuesday evening, July 9 at 6 p.m. in the Raney House Carriage House in downtown Apalachicola. The Panhandle Players invites everyone to join them for the annual meeting, and for the election of board members and of cers. Hear about the groups plans for the upcoming season, and about how you can become involved. For more information, or to express an interest in running for the board of directors, please call Elaine Kozlowsky at 6701671, Ann Cowles at 9274660 or Bob Inguagiato at 370-5281. Carrabelle commission to meet July 11 Carrabelles regular city commission has been rescheduled from July 4 to Thursday, July 11 at 6 p.m. Want to attend Camp Timpoochee? At the June 28 county commission meeting, Bill Mahan, county extension agent, said his of ce is receiving requests to attend Camp Timpoochee with the county 4H program. This years camp will take place July 22-26, and Mahan expects more than 20 county youngsters to attend. Camp Timpoochee accommodates 140 campers in climate controlled cabins. This year, Franklin County will be joined by campers from Okaloosa and Walton counties, and Covington County, Alabama. The camp is located in Niceville on the shore of the Choctawhatchee Bay. The camp has a dining hall with fully staffed kitchen; an outdoor pavilion with large barbecue grill; a re circle seating 120 and private beachfront facilities with canoes, shing, and marine collecting equipment. There is a 20-passenger pontoon boat for snorkeling and leisure trips and a marine wet lab with fresh and saltwater tanks. Interested campers and parents can contact Mahan at 247-9359. Business After Hours July 11 at Tapas Bar The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host a Business After Hours on Thursday, July 11 at Tamaras Tapas Bar, 73 Market Street in Apalachicola from 5:307 p.m. The chambers next business luncheon will take place at noon on Wednesday, Aug. 7 at Beach Pit BBQ on US 98 in Eastpoint.

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A10 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 A10 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO Js TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS Law Enforcement The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests in this weeks report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 25 Jenny L. Nowling, 27, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Jeremiah D. Branton, 33, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 26 Tammy Groome, 39, Port St. Joe, felony passing worthless bank check (FCSO) JUNE 27 Victoria L. Estes, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Stuart White, 34, Apalachicola, DUI, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FWC) JUNE 28 Miriam P. Barahona, 37, Apalachicola, no valid drivers license (APD) Holden E. Foley, 18, Apalachicola, lewd or lascivious battery (FCSO) Mary F. Beaty, 50, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) Andrew L. Butler, 41, Apalachicola, felony passing worthless bank checks (FCSO) Paul Z. Sanders, 23, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) George R. Needer, 55, Eastpoint, felony battery with great bodily harm, and disorderly intoxication (FCSO) JUNE 29 Joseph A. Beach, 53, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 30 Eugene Webb, 65, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Jamie R. Proctor, Jr., 31, Summerfield, Lake County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Ellis D. Maxwell, 29, Apalachicola, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Dillan D. Grimes, 20, Apalachicola, grand retail theft (FCSO) Arrest REPORT FWC REPORT T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Law enforcement ofcers for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were busy over Memorial Day weekend monitoring the White Trash Bash. FWC ofcers, along with deputies with the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, conducted an operational detail for the 2013 bash. The detail was designed to protect Floridas boating public through enhanced boating safety patrol, increase voluntary compliance from the boating public through education and enforcement of BUI laws, provide a highly visible law enforcement presence, and increase our multi-agency working relationships. During the detail, 86 vessels were boarded with 374 users checked, resulting in issuance of 24 boating safety warnings, ve citations for boating safety violations, four resource warnings and two warnings for alcoholic beverages in a state park. Two BUI arrests were made. While on patrol in the Tates Hell Wildlife Management Area (WMA), Ofcer Terry Martin cited an individual for allowing dogs to pursue wildlife during the closed season and driving with a revoked drivers license and warned for not having a valid hunting license.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 4, 2013 The Times | A11 1112687 NURSING FACULTY RN TO BSN PROGRAMThis individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. Salary commensurate with education and experience.Position open until lled. Apply at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98.Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 1112677 CHAIR, DIVISION PUBLIC SAFETYResponsible for directing the overall Public Safety program to include; coordinating faculty, maintain budget, resolve complaints from students, insure facilities are maintained properly, coordinate class schedules ensuring classes have qualied instructors, maintain & submit curriculum & catalog revisions, schedules, etc. Assist in writing grants; attend meetings as needed & other related duties. Requires: Bachelors Degree in Criminology, Criminal Justice or related eld, Masters preferred. Salary Range starts at $52,020. Deadline to apply: 7/18/2013 at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 4515123EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLEThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is seeking applications for a eld position in operations and maintenance. Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District Oce, 40 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 during normal business hours, Monday thru Friday 8:30 am 4:30 pm EST.The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and is a drug free workplace. Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW THINKING OF HAVING A GARAGE SALE?Give the News Herald classified department a call and you’re in Business! Aquick, convenient call connects you to a whole community of customers eager to examine the items you wish to see clothes, bikes, baby items, tools, you name it! Place your ad today, it’s easy, it’s economical and it’s fun! Who says you can’t mix business with pleasure? Call Classified today 747-5020. WEST 219.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 200.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 232.45 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE AFOREMENTIONED RIGHT-OF-WAY, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND A CURVE RUN WESTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 200.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 631.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE LEAVING SAID POINT GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (US HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET, THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHTOF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 19 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET (CHORD=44.86 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 208.74 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 3: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 676.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE ESTABLISHED BY REMNANTS OF A WIRE FENCE WITH CEDAR POSTS FOR A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID FENCE REMNANTS, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 222.99 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.44 FEET (CHORD= 100.44 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST) TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: June 20, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 2013 94239T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000422 DIVISION: LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 26, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2008-CA-000422 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein LASALLE BANK MIDWEST, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT L. LAFFOON A/K/A ROBERT LAFFOON N/K/A TRACEY LAFFOON; GARY FOGLEMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GARY FOGLEMAN; MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT NUMBER 208 OF MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS, AS PER THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO A/K/A 706 HOWARD STREET D, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on this 19th day of June 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 F08068466 July 4, 11, 2013 94193T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000038 SEC.:________ BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. BILLIE J. ADAMS; STEPHEN H. ADAMS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated June 10, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA000038 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 15th day of August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK 3, SUN ‘N SAND, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 DESTINY MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL NUMBER DISH03537GAA/B. Any person claiming an interst in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850)577-4401 Please contact at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 12TH DAY OF JUNE, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 94245T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000401-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. BRUCE L. TAYLOR, HUBERT BENTLEY, and NATALIE BUTLER, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 25, 2013, in the abovestyled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the second floor lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on August 15, 2013, the following described property: Lot 1 (unrecorded) Commence at a 6 x 6 inch concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Section 30, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida and run South 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West 659.56 feet to a re-rod (marked 5826) lying on the Southerly right of way boundary of Twin Lakes Road, thence run North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary 455.86 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160) marking the point of beginning; from said point of beginning continue North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary a distance of 200.08 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said right of way boundary run South 00 degrees 28 minutes 22 seconds West 214.87 feet; thence run South 89 degrees 42 minutes 40 seconds East 204.88 feet to a re-rod (marked 7160); thence run North 00 degrees 48 minutes 43 seconds West 214.14 feet to the point of beginning. Dated: June 27, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 OtherFranklin County S.H.I.P. ProgramThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on July 19, 2013 for the Down Payment Assistance Program, to buy existing housing only, Owner Occupied Rehabilitation and Emergency Repair programs. The deadline for submitting applications will be August 30, 2013. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. Kelly & Josh 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 GUN SHOWJuly 6th & 7th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Pay based on prior experience. Call (850) 927-2163 Web ID: 34257518 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach OtherHousekeepersExperienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34256831 HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 OtherLive-In CaregiverLooking for live-in caregiver for elderly woman. All utilities paid. No rent. Possible pay. Call for details. Located in Carrabelle. 850-209-4124 Web ID#: 34257391 Sales/Retail/Bus DevSales ClerkPart time experienced help needed to work afternoons in Marine Store at Bay Bity Lodge. Must enjoy working with people and fishing. Call for interview. 653-9294 Web ID# 34257403 Lanark Village Carlton St. #6, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $500 month + $300 deposit. Call 864-356-5949 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Carrabelle, FL Gulf Side 2 BD/ 1 BA, Furnished, $450mo. Plus Utilities & $450 Dep., Pets OK W/Deposit Call 850-567-3375 Text FL57381 to 56654 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $79,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Chevy Monte Carlo 01 $575 Down. Total is $3900 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Chevy Silverado x/cab 02 $1175 Down. Total is $6500 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Chevy Blazer 04 $875 Down. Total is $5900 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 If you didn’t advertise your yard sale here,you’re missing out on potential customers.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur lo c al r eal esta t e e xp er ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the b est v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real E sta t e P icks! D isc o v er the b est r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Jo e A palachic ola, C ap e S an Blas S t G eor ge I sland C arr ab elle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D Sand alwood of Carrabe lle Ri ve rfron t commu n i t y wit h 1 3 lot s a va ila ble a t $ 4 2 5 0 0 e a ch a n d 1 Rive rfron t L ot for $ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 All lot s come wit h a boa t slip Ame n i t i e s in clu din g a pool, clu bh ou se bric k pa ve rs a n d a n e a rby boa t ra mp 850-899-5104 l 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyinf o .co m T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4515098 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249158 $47,500 St. Geor ge Island 451 51 57 ISLAND FORECLOSURE V er y af fo rd ab le b ui ld ab le lo t on be au ti fu l St Ge or ge Is la nd ou ts ta nd in g in v es tm en t po te nt ia l & th e op po rt ui nt y to o wn yo ur pi ec e of th e is la nd b ui ld in g lo ca ti on ca n pr o vi de a ba y vi e w su rv e y a v ai la bl e, W es t Ba ys ho re Dr i v e. Li st ed by Mi ch ae l Bi ll in gs L oc a t ed on a peninsula within the ga t ed Plan ta tion c ommunit y and surr ounded b y beautiful views of the B a y and marsh, this home is the per f ec t peac eful plac e t o enjo y na tur e and t o in vit e o v ernigh t guests t o their priv a t e quar t ers! Main house includes living and dining r ooms k it chen, mast er suit e with out door sho w er scr eened por ch with indoor/out door r eplac e G uest wing includes 3 bedr ooms living r oom, morning k it chen and laundr y! V er y priv a t e out door hot tub ac c essible fr om both ar eas of this unique home o v erlooks the marsh with outstanding views T his c ust om built home with beautiful c abinets pine oors/trim, lots of c ar eful details giving a f eeling of a secluded geta w a y w as lo vingly cr af t ed b y the o wners C o v er ed gar age w a t er ltr a tion syst em, cir c ular driv e beautiful landsc aping mak e this a must see home! S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .1431P elic anL ane .com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248583 $949,000 St. Geor ge Island PLANT A TION BEA CHFR ONT All the amenities 4 BR, 3 B A, P ool, Furnished, Fla t Scr een TV's & upscale a ppliances tile oors Spa T ub on deck, under house scr eened Kitchen near P ool wil billiar d ta b le Income pr oducer Owner Financing, Nautilus Dri v e Listed b y J ohn Shelb y Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Surveys say Roman candles are the most favorite type of reworks for the 4th with what the least favorite? Firecrackers, Smokeballs, Pinwheels, Snaps 2) Where is Rebildfest billed as the largest celebration of American independence held outside the U.S.? Germany, Denmark, Mexico, Australia 3) On July 4, 1848, President Polk laid the cornerstone of what famous structure? Lincoln Memorial, Library of Congress, Capitol building, Washington Monument 4) Thomas Jefferson and which other former president died July 4, 1826? George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson 5) On that same date of July 4, 1826, what noted American was born? Robert E. Lee, Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau 6) Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776; one was Hancock, who was the other? Henry, Franklin, Pinckney, Thomson 7) What famous American patriot was hung as a spy in 1776 by the British? Paul Revere, Nathan Hale, Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne 8) Whos been the only future President of the United States to be born on a July 4th? Jackson, Van Buren, Taft, Coolidge 9) Where did the Continental Congress sign the Declaration of Independence? Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Mount Vernon 10) Who was the rst President of the Continental Congress? Peyton Randolph, Roger Sherman, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin 11) At signing time the colonies were under which English King? George I, George III, Charles I, Charles III 12) Which colony had the most signers at 9? Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts 13) On July 4, 1960 Mickey Mantle hit which career-number homerun? 300, 400, 500, 600 14) Which president died July 4, 1831? Madison, Monroe, Tyler, Polk ANSWERS 1) Smokeballs. 2) Denmark. 3) Washington Monument. 4) John Adams. 5) Stephen Foster. 6) Thomson. 7) Nathan Hale. 8) Coolidge. 9) Philadelphia. 10) Peyton Randolph. 11) George III. 12) Pennsylvania. 13) 300. 14) Monroe. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com Large projects will be favored for RESTORE funding. On May 23, three years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Resto ration Council released the Draft Initial Comprehensive Plan: Re storing the Gulf Coasts Ecosys tem and Economy. The council is chaired by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, acting Secretary Rebecca Blank. Other members are the governors of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas and the secretaries of the U.S. Departments of Agricul ture, Army, Homeland Security and Interior, and the administra tor of the U.S. Environmental Pro tection Agency. The 20-page document gives a history and breakdown of avail able funding resources for Gulf restoration projects. Whats still missing is the amount of money available and how to apply for it. The amount will be established when the courts set an amount BP must pay to compensate for dam age caused by the spill. On June 18, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners he and Chairman Cheryl Sanders at tended a workshop in Gulf County hosted by the Nature Conservan cy (TNC) to talk about developing projects and criteria that would be competitive for BP money. The Nature Conservancy is of fering to provide guidance on proj ects that would be funded through the Gulf Coast Restore Council, Pierce said. The advice we were given is that the council looked very favorably upon projects that protected watersheds. Franklin County has three watersheds: Apalachicola River and Bay, New River, and Ochlocknee River and Bay. Watersheds go beyond coun ty boundaries, so if the concept of watersheds is used, then all proj ects are going to be multi-county in impact, which helps when com peting with other areas. Pierce said TNC advised work shop participants it will be critical to make clear what results can be expected from an investment. Pierce said the countys SMAART group is trying to come up with projects on a large enough scale to be competitive. Sanders said she wants to in vite representatives from Gulf and Wakulla counties to the next meet ing of the Countys RESTORE Council. According to the Restoration Council draft, when choosing proj ects to fund, the council will verify whether the proposal is legal and in keeping with restoration goals. Projects will be compared to avoid duplication of funding from mul tiple sources. Council members can choose to sponsor favorite projects. Sci entic experts will also be quizzed on whether a project is a good idea and feasible. The public can offer input on potential projects and funding cri teria at www.restorethegulf.gov. In addition to money for imple menting a plan, there will be fund ing for technical assistance to prepare proposals and to monitor the outcome of projects that have been funded. Guidelines emerging for RESTORE Act funding