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The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 06-27-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00228

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 06-27-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00228

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, June 27, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 9 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Even as the real estate market continues to improve, Franklin County’s overall tax base dropped a wee bit this year, mostly because of the statewide cap on annual increases to the value of non-homestead properties. According to preliminary numbers Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper’s of ce provided the Florida Department of Revenue, the county’s combined taxable value will drop to $1.632 billion from $1.636 billion last year, a mere 0.2 percent. This is a sharp improvement over last year’s 12.7 percent slide and marks the seventh consecutive year the tax base has shrunk. It is now less than half the size it was in 2006 and almost exactly what it was a decade ago. Were it not for the law approved by Florida voters in 2008 as a change to the state constitution that caps increase to the value of nonhomesteaded properties at not more than 10 percent annually, the overall tax base would have grown. Such was the case of the school board’s tax base, which was not subject to the 10 percent cap. The school disBy LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com State seed money could jumpstart an arts program for the county’s schools. Two county not-for-pro ts have been awarded a total of $45,000 by the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs under the Speci c Cultural Project grant program. According to their guidelines, these grants are designed to fund a cultural project, program, exhibition or series involving arts in education and discipline based cultural or artistic projects. Culturally underserved communities are encouraged to apply. The Weems Memorial Arts in Medicine Program (AIM), which ranked fth on the awards list with a score of 91.8 out of a possible 100 points, was awarded $25,000. A second grant of $20,000 was awarded to Apalachicola to pay a portion of the salary for a parttime director for the Apalachicola School of Art, which will pitch in an additional $4,000 for the salary. That grant ranked sixth on the awards list with a score of 91.5. Maureen Murphy, who administers this grant program, said all but ve of the 44 applications for funding for the 2013-14 scal year were funded. One applicant withdrew. The total money awarded by the program statewide was $830,523 so Franklin County received about ve percent of the money. Joe Taylor, who chairs the city’s History, Culture and Arts board and is executive director of Franklin’s Promise Coalition, is listed as the contact for both grants. In the grant application, AIM is described as an arm of Franklin’s Promise Coalition, governed by its board of directors, but with “a devoted committee which plans and manages the program.” The funding will be used to expand the two main thrusts of the AIM program. According to the grant application, at the time the request was made, AIM provided an average of 12 “bedside arts experiences” per week and eight community outreach classes/ workshops per week. Both programs will expand by 25 percent with the new funding. Bedside arts experiences are conducted within the hospital, local nursing homes and in the residences of homebound patients, Taylor said. In an interview earlier this month, he said the bedside program has had limited success at Weems because people in the hospital were often too sick to participate. But, he said, several swing bed patients, those receiving transitional care and rehabilitation, “bene tted greatly” from AIM. AIM has taken the bedside program to St. James Bay Rehabilitation Center and to several homebound patients, including the late Vince Raf eld, Taylor said. AIM’s community outreach classes and workshops are held at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art (the former Cotton Exchange), the community service center (the former Apalachicola High School) and the Carrabelle Municipal Complex (the former Carrabelle High School). Plans are underway to add the Eastpoint Firehouse as a community outreach venue, Taylor said. Classes/workshops have included drawing, pottery, improvisational theater, Oriental exercise disciplines tai chi and qui gong, and zumba, a Latin-inspired dance tness program. Future programs will include photography, belly dancing and oral histories, according to the grant. Taylor said because of reduced Tax base stays mostly at RHONDA SKIPPER Property Appraiser See TAX BASE A5 Ladies’ night By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com This November’s Florida Seafood Festival will be the golden anniversary of the state’s oldest maritime event, so it only made sense to break tradition with the choice of the festival headliner. The festival board this week announced that for the rst time since Kathy Mattea took the stage in 1992, the Saturday night feature entertainment will be a female artist. Kellie Pickler, who at age 26 has risen to the top of the country charts and the incredibly popular television show “Dancing with the Stars,” will take the stage on Nov. 2 at Battery Park. “Her music ts the area; she likes old country,” said John Solomon, president of the all-volunteer board of directors. “She’s just a good person; she is one of those good-hearted people.” Solomon said the festival hasn’t made a deliberate effort to only feature male stars over the past two decades but that top-notch female acts often carry a heftier price tag. Kellie Pickler 1st female star to play seafood festival since 1992 County awarded $45,000 for arts expansion Delinquent tax volume continues to shrink By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The number and total value of the county’s delinquent tax certi cates dropped off sharply this year, continuing the steady decline in recent years. At the May 24 sale in the jury room on the third oor of the county courthouse, conducted by Tax KRISTIN BARLOWE | Special to the Times Kellie Pickler will headline the Florida Seafood Festival with a performance Nov. 2. See DELINQUENT A5 See PICKLER A5 See ARTS A5 Back to the brine, A10 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 Oyster licenses on sale through Friday Sale of the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License will continue through Friday, June 28, at the $100 rate. Staff will be selling the license from the old DEP-ANERR building at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. in Apalachicola. Apalach historical society to meet Saturday The annual meeting of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at the home of Lynn and Bill Spohrer, 127 Ave. B, in Apalachicola. Elections will be held for board members. Mel Livingston will discuss his restoration of the old Economy Cash Building in the Bowery. Amanda Pace will talk about a landscaping plan for the Raney House. President Tom Daly will speak brie y about his research into an endowment program for the society. St. George Plantation contest Until Aug. 28, The St. George Island Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners’ Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Forms and guidelines are available at www.sgpoa.com. Summer bingo on the island Every Tuesday, enjoy Summer Bingo at 7 p.m. upstairs at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. Cards are 25 cents. This event is sponsored by and bene ts the St. George Island Civic Club. For information, call 927-2654.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 2013-14 GR ANT C ALEND AR M a y 8, 2013 FCBOC C appr o v ed TDC r ec ommenda tion f or 2013-14 G r an ts P r o c ess June 5, 2013 – F inal TDC B oar d A ppr o v al f or 2013-14 g r an ts pr oc ess – June 13, 2013 – r elease Gr an t inf or ma tion and A pplica tion F or ms online; use FC TDC g r an t in t er est email da tabases t o inf or m new guidelines 2013-14 FC TDC E v en ts Gr an t P r oc ess June 13, 20, 27, 2013 P ublish TIMES public notic e tha t FC TDC 2013-14 online g r an t mar keting inf or ma tion is on the FC TDC w ebsit e P r e c er tica tion is r equir ed f or elig ibilit y and must be included with or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t inf or ma tion. T he deadline t o apply f or inclusion in the 2013-14 ev en t mar keting pr og r am is June 30, 2013 July 3, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting is c anc eled July 17, 2013 TDC C ommitt ee M eeting C it y of A palachic ola M eeting R oom, beg inning a t 1:30 pm. Gr an t A pplica tions f or mar keting the individual or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t will be r eview ed and r ec ommended f or appr o v al if qualied – July 19, 2013 – TDC S ta t o E-mail notic e t o or ganiza tion ’ s c on tr ac t manager of appr o v al f or inclusion in Gr an ts pr oc ess f or 2013-14 A ugust 7, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting F r ank lin C oun t y C our thouse A nne x, 3:00 p .m. A palachic ola F inal appr o v al of applican ts P r esen ta tion of TDC P r omotions Budget f or initial appr o v al On or bef or e A ugust 20, 2013, FC TDC S ta will issue ocial emailed notica tion as t o sta tus of inclusion f or or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t applica tion Oc t ob er 1, 2013 new scal y ear beg ins f or FC TDC 2013-14 ONLINE GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS M A Y BE A C CESSED ONLINE ON JUNE 13, 2013 A T W W W .SAL T Y FL ORID A.C OM/GR ANT S. THE DEADLINE T O SUBMIT THE 201314 GR ANT APPLIC A TION FOR Y OUR E VENT IS JUNE 30, 2013. IF Y OU WISH T O C OMPLE TE A GR ANT APPLIC A TION O THER THAN ONLINE PLEASE TELEPHONE THE FC TDC ADMINISTR A TIVE OFFICE A T 653-8678 T O REQUEST A C OP Y OR ST OP B Y THE FC TDC OFFICE A T 17-1/2 A VENUE E AP AL A CHIC OL A, FL ORID A. ALL 2013-14 GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS MUST BE SUBMIT TED ONLINE OR T O THE TDC OFFICE NO L A TER THAN JUNE 30, 2013. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com At a festive, grilled chick en luncheon Monday at the Holy Family Senior Center, participants in a series of jobs and training programs met to celebrate their suc cess and to signal the end of this infusion of this largely federally-assisted funding. “We are here today to acknowledge, show our ap preciation and celebrate the assistance that the various public and private entities rendered Franklin County during what could have escalated into the worst economic disaster in local history,” Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson said. “Given local economic conditions at the time, fol lowed by the collapse of the oyster industry, your swift response averted a s cal crisis beyond measure throughout the Franklin County community.” Joe Taylor, director of Franklin’s Promise Coali tion Inc. emceed the event, which featured remarks from a series of participants in an array of programs, an chored by a multi-million dollar federal grant that has funded the ongoing shelling program as well as a variety of other training programs. “Although this occasion certainly warrants such a celebration, it is also a bit tersweet moment, as it sig nals the end of the tempo rary jobs program put into place to help stabilize the local economy, which also lifted spirits and renewed hope throughout the Frank lin County community,” Johnson said. “However, left to linger in its path and perhaps most importantly and more lasting are the partnerships, collabora tions and friendships estab lished along the way by and between your agencies. “Through your efforts, support and nancial con tributions, workers have been retrained and placed into permanent job situa tions and adults long out of high school have fullled their dreams of obtaining a high school diploma,” the mayor said. Johnson thanked the ve main pillars of what has be come known as “Franklin Works,” the largest of which is the Gulf Coast Workforce Board (GCWB), which has administered the federal dollars. “This is so humbling for us to be thanked by so many people,” Kim Bodine, director of GCWB, said. “It has been an awesome proj ect for us. I do believe this is just the beginning.” Jennifer German, GC WB’s deputy director, de tailed GCWB’s success fol lowing the luncheon. She said 215 oystermen have been involved in the $2.7 million shelling program, which has been extended to run through July and August. Another 10 people worked for the county under this grant program, which was instituted in the wake of Tropical Storm Debby in June 2012. “There’s a lot that hap pened in the last year, a lot of opportunities we have never had before,” said Shannon Hartseld, presi dent of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Associa tion. “This is all about the community. I look forward to what’s going to happen in the future.” German said other mon ies to help dislocated work ers over multiple years and multiple counties, has af fected 414 participants, the largest number of whom have been involved in GED prep courses through the county literacy program. She said 126 people have been enrolled in the GED courses and about half so far received their high school diplomas. She said 42 individu als took part in classroom training at the Gulf Frank lin Center in Port St. Joe, including a dozen who have been trained as corrections ofcers and 25 in welding. Shawn Shattuck spoke to the luncheon about his four months of welding training, in which he n ished in the top three in his class and has gone on to start his own business. Also speaking as par ticipants in job training programs were Sandra Al len, as well as Cheryl Ray, who has been involved with the Bridges to Circles pro gram, sponsored by Catho lic Charities. Brunie Emmanuel spoke on behalf of the Bridges to Circles program he helped bring to the county. He said for the past two years the program has brought mil lions of dollars to help Gulf Coast residents affected by the oil spill, with two dozen successful projects up and down the coast. “It’s one of the high lights of my career,” he said. “I see people who have changed their lives because of this. Your neigh bors and kinfolk are going to have a different life. I’m honored to be a part of it.” German said 62 people have beneted from GCWB training in how to better their work experience by learning appropriate work behaviors, and 17 have been able to exit GCWB services for a job. The mayor also thanked Progress/Duke Energy for its direct assistance to people who had trouble paying their electric bills. Company representative Bobby Pickels said as a result of the program, the rates of disconnect in the county have either stayed the same or decreased. Johnson also expressed his thanks to Trinity Epis copal Church and the Capi tal Area Community Action Agency for their help. “And to countless others who show of support and com passion toward the wellbe ing of their fellow man have been duly noted throughout Franklin County, within the city of Apalachicola and be fore the gracious throne of Almighty God,” he said. Sister Jeanne, who is on the board of Franklin’s Promise, offered the invo cation, and Pastor Horace Solomon offered the bless ing over the meal. Franklin County High School stu dent Morgan Martin also provided an interpretive dance. A New Classic The Rear Engine Rider has been reinventing. Stop in today to see the new innovation combined with the tried and true features including Briggs & Stratton engines. ST JOE RENT -ALL 706 1s ## #" (850) 227.2112 “W e Service What W e Sell” # # ## # # % '## # & $ # !%% $ 00 Model 7800920 Same Gr eat Location Under New Ownership Coastal Fur nitur e and W oodworks, Inc. Outdoor F ur nitur e Sleeper Sof as Mat tr esses Living R oom, & Dining R oom F ur nishings Lar ge Selection of A ccessor ies C omf or t er s & Bedding 203 Highw a y 98 Eastpoint, FL 32328 St or e: (850)799-1 1 21 Cell: (850)728-6877 Owner: Kit Mashbur n coastalfw@yaho o.com DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Left: Shannon Hartseld speaks to the audience. Right: Kim Bodine, director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, left, and Jennifer German, deputy director, address the luncheon. Franklin Works celebrates its success

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The Times | A3 Thursday, June 27, 2013 1 ?5 1 = <5 '1@ A < 8 <= 5= 51 = <=;< 3<@ <5 <5 1 54 <1= ; 2 @5 251 <=; 85 1 =3 ? = <5 81A= @ 43 14 1 53 == 8 A54= 31 = 51 23< == <5 <= A=4 213? 3<@ 55 1 85 41 @1 5 <5 1 54 855@ 5 3< 5 144= = 2 @5 251 <=;* <= 3<5 < 14 <5 85@ @=;< <5145 4 14 15 = A< 5 5@1 =5* ? <=A 1 @31 @ 5A5 ;53 A 851= ; 1 555 1 = =A 5 8 '1@ 14 ;14 1= -, 5 15 > ;1 58@ 1 54=3 1@ 14 144= ;1A* 7 1=4 ?5 / AA 5@1 =5 @= 51@ @ 5 8A 851= ; 8 A / @=85 <51= ; <1 <5 <1 255 354 = > 1 85 41 =@@ 55 8 ;5 < 1 14 51@ @ <@5 81A= @ 1 <5@ 54 < ;< <= 5 31 =A 5 7 15 <= ; 3<1; 54 8 1 ?5 =35 54=3 1@ =< <=;< 3<@ 14 ,$, 25<= 4 <=A* <5 = <5145 4 &) = <5 1@@ 14 =@@ 25 4= ; 2=@ ; 14 3<5A = =< <5 @; 5A ;1@ 8 ;=; A54= 31@ 3<@ ! High S chool S enior with H ear t D isor der F inds Cur e a t Ba y Medic al 615 N. Bonita A v enue P anama City F L 324 01 (85 0) 7 6 9-1511 www.baymedical.or g W ha t is E lec tr oph y siolo gy? C ar diac elec tr oph y siolog y is the scienc e of diag nosing and tr ea ting an y abnor mal elec tr ical ac tiviti es of the hear t Elec tr oph y siolog y (EP) is a subspe cialt y of car diolog y tha t r equir es sev er al additi onal y ears of tr aining f ollo wing a car diolog y f ello w ship Elec tr oph y siolog ists ar e tr ained t o per f or m EP studie s of the hear t t o iden tify abnor mal hear t r h ythms and also t o sur g ically plac e implan t ed devic es such as pac emakers and ICDs (debr illa t ors) t o tr ea t both ar r h ythmia s and hear t failur e T o bec ome boar d c er tied in elec tr oph y siolog y not only r equir es man y additi onal y ears of tr aining and e xper tise but a dedica tion t o tr ea ting these disor ders W or ldwide ther e ar e appr o xima t ely 2,000 boar d c er tied elec tr oph y siolog ists and Ba y M edical is f or tuna t e t o ha v e t w o on our medical sta Har i Baddig am, M.D and Joe T r an tham, M.D Ba y M edical is also the only hospit al in the r eg ion with the adv anc ed t echnol ogy needed t o per f or m EP studie s and f or optimal tr ea tmen t of car diac r h ythm disor ders S T J OE N URSER Y AND S UPPL Y %% %$ ) $ !$ %%$ +% *%% % "% &,% $ % %$ #* ( $ ,% & Special to the Times In the morning hours of June 20, the Franklin County Drug Inves tigators received an anonymous tip that Anerence Ter rill Sweet was at a residence at 238 Eighth Street in Apalachicola. Sweet, 19, Pana ma City, was want ed out of Franklin County on several felony warrants, including felony eeing and eluding a police ofcer, driving while license suspended or revoked and leaving the scene of a traf c crash with prop erty damage. He was also wanted out of Bay County for felony violation of proba tion on two counts of grand theft, two counts of aggra vated assault and a failure to appear for principle to aggravated assault. The drug investigators, along with several road patrol deputies, went to the residence to attempt to locate Sweet. Sgt. Ronnie Jones, on the south side of the residence, saw Sweet jumped up from a bed and run toward the bathroom. Lt. Allen Ham, along with Sgt. Timmy Register and Deputy Casey Har rell, was able to take Sweet into custody. In the resi dence deputies saw a large amount of what appeared to be cannabis on the oor by the bed where Sweet was lying. The house was then secured and a search warrant obtained. Inside was 53 grams of cannabis and currency, along with scales and plastic bags, po lice said. Sweet was taken to the Franklin County Jail where he was booked on the outstanding warrants. He also faces charges for possession of cannabis with intent to sell or deliv er, and possession of drug paraphernalia. ANERENCE SWEET The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office. Arrests in this week’s report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. June 17 Melissa A. Estes, 44, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence and retail theft (CPD) June 19 Ellis D. Maxwell, 29, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Robert W. Barrineau, 49, Cairo, Ga., violation of probation (FCSO) Melissa A. Estes, 44, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) June 20 James E. Pilotti, 27, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Daniel Stepp, 45, Eastpoint, petit theft, grand theft and dealing in stolen property (FCSO) June 22 Derik A. Strevel, 31, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) Keijuan M. Sims, 25, Port St. Joe, violation of probation (FCSO) June 23 Charles M. Carpenter, Jr., 30, Telogia, battery and violation of a domestic violence injunction (CPD) Jamie L. Shiver, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) June 24 Johnny W. Callaway, 47, Theodore, Ala., driving while license suspended or revoked, and attaching improper license plate (APD) Arrest REPORT A 29-year-old Apalachicola was hit on her bicycle Wednes day evening, June 19 while rid ing along Bluff Road. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report pre pared by Trooper R. D. Snipes, Dianna Renee Cordes was ped aling north in the northbound lane of County Road 384, near the white line, with no rear red light, at about 10 p.m. Christopher Montgomery, 30, of Apalachicola, was driv ing a 2007 Dodge Dakota, also northbound, when he tried to avoid a collision with Cordes. The report said Montgomery steered left, and his front right collided with Cordes’ rear tire. She was ejected from the bi cycle and came to nal rest on the north shoulder, according to the report. Cordes was transported to Bay Medical, where she was reported in critical condition the night of the crash. The re port said charges are pending. – By DAVID ADLER ER S TE TE I N N Florida bicycle law According to Florida statutes, bicyclists are required to obey all trafc laws just as people driving vehicles. They must follow the ow of trafc whether they are riding on the street or the sidewalk. Riders may not have headphones, headsets or other listening devices that alter their ability to hear surrounding noises. Late-night riders must have lights – a lamp on the front and back that makes them noticeable from 500 feet away and a red reector that catches the light and gets the attention of other drivers, which are mandatory to legally ride a bike in the state of Florida. – By TETE VIS PP AG EE Apalachicola woman hit on bicycle Cops bust alleged pot dealer in Apalach Law Enforcement

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By George Oehlert Special to the Times It is that bittersweet time of the school year when we nd ourselves saying farewell to some colleagues, students and parents. For me, it will be my nal goodbye as my ve-year tenure as principal at Franklin County School has concluded. I will look back with appreciation to the school community for their support. I am grateful for the honor and privilege of having worked at FCS. The last ve years have been an incredibly rewarding journey with numerous successes and challenges. Change can bring much uncertainty, but we have been able to create a sense of certainty by remaining focused on our shared mission, values, and goals. Our focus on instruction, learning collaboration, and results has moved the school along the continuum of a professional learning community built on our motto: Inspire from the heart Lead with humility Soar with pride. It is my hope that the school district will continue to build the leadership capacity to make FCS, in partnership with the ABC School, the school that we all want, a school that models the educational practices that prepare students to be contributing citizens, productive workers, and competent leaders in the interconnected world of the 21st century. A school that is the cornerstone of community pride throughout Franklin County. To this pursuit, I wish incoming principal, Eric Bidwell, much success. Mr. Bidwell brings a vast array of experience and knowledge of FCS to the role as well as a philosophy of education that is committed to student success. I will always remember the Franklin County community and its schools in my prayers and I will be a Seahawk forever! George Oehlert retired this spring after serving ve years as principal of the Franklin County School. Principal Oehlerts nal farewell USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 27, 2013 A Page 4 Section By John Dunn Special to the Times Floridas consumer con dence keeps inching higher, rising one point from May to 82 this month -another postrecession high, according to a University of Florida survey. June is the fourth consecutive month to show a rise in the sentiment of Floridians. Four of the ve components measured in the survey went up, and one remained the same. Respondents overall opinion that they are better off nancially now than a year ago rose three points to 70, while their belief that their personal nances will improve a year from now remained at 82. Their outlook for U.S. economic conditions over the coming year rose two points to 83. The surveytakers long-term view for the nations economic health over the next ve years rose one point to 83. Finally, the survey shows that consensus of whether now is a good time to buy a big-ticket item such as a television went up two points to a post-recession high of 93. The last time perception of current buying conditions reached this level was April of 2007, said Chris McCarty, director of UFs Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. That was the beginning of the collapse in the housing market. Several things help explain Floridians current optimism. The stock market reached record highs by early June. In addition, the states May unemployment rate was 7.1 percent compared with the national 7.6 percent gure. This decline from Aprils 7.2 percent jobless gure occurred as Floridas labor force was increasing, which meant it was due to an increase in jobs, McCarty said. Home prices have also kept rising. The median price for an existing singlefamily home is $171,000 -the last time it was that high in Florida was Sept. 2008. Consumer con dence could soon sag, however. As we continue to collect interviews through the rest of the month the index will almost certainly be lower when it is revised as the stock market has declined in the second half of June, McCarty said. However for now, most consumers are still not registering any fears about the effects of sequestration. They are more concerned that interest rates may rise now that the Federal Reserve has indicated it may reduce the amount of Treasury bonds and mortgagebacked securities it has been purchasing each month to spur the economy, McCarty said. Concern over this move, however, is likely overstated for two reasons, he said. First, the Fed is unlikely to reduce the purchases completely. Instead, it will gradually reduce them, unless the economy shows signs of weakness. In that case, the Fed could be expected to resume its intervention. Its also worth noting that conditions are not the same as they were in 2008 when the Fed began making these purchases, McCarty added. Though the current housing market is being helped by lower interest rates, there has also been a low rate of new construction and an increase in population. These two factors lead to pent-up demand. Housing prices may decline from their recent highs, McCarty said, but the underlying quality of loans is now very different from 2008. Current home buyers typically have good credit scores and put 20 percent down on their homes, both of which reduce the likelihood of another massive number of foreclosures like the ones that led to the last recession. The Fed has seen the economy through dangerous economic times, McCarty said, but the economy is now operating normally. There was nothing normal about 2008. Conducted June 1-20, the UF study re ects the responses of 434 individuals, representing a demographic crosssection of Florida. The index used by UF researchers is benchmarked to 1966, which means a value of 100 represents the same level of con dence for that year. The lowest index possible is a 2; the highest is 150. Details of the June survey can be found at http://www.bebr.u edu/cci John Dunn is a writer for the University of Florida News Desk. He can be reached at dunnj@embarqmail.com UF: Floridians con dence in economy builds By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County saw a slight rise in its unemployment rate in May, but the county was poised as the fourth best in the state for joblessness. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate in May rose twotenths of 1 percent, from 5.0 to 5.2 percent. The unemployment rolls added 17 people, growing from 273 to 290 people in search of work. The increase in joblessness occurred even as the workforce grew by 67 workers, from 5,457 to 5,524, which is larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,365 workers, and when the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 6.5 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture placed it just a few notches behind Monroe County, at 4.0 percent, the states lowest unemployment rate. This was followed by Walton (4.1 percent) and Okaloosa (4.8 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. Strong population growth was also a contributing factor. Franklin had the lowest unemployment rate in the tri-county Gulf Coast Workforce region. Bay Countys jobless rate remained steady at 6.3 percent, while Gulf Countys increased from 6.4 to 6.6 percent. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 7.1 percent in May 2013, the lowest since Sept. 2008 when it was 7.0 percent. The May rate was down 0.1 percentage point from the April rate of 7.2 percent and was 1.7 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 8.8 percent. There were 671,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.4 million. The U.S. May unemployment rate was 7.6 percent. Floridas unemployment rate was 0.5 percentage point lower than the U.S. rate and was below the national rate for the third consecutive month. Jobless rate ticks up a tad Special to the Times NOAAs National Weather Service has discovered that 64 percent of lightning deaths since 2006 occurred while people were participating in leisure activities, with shing topping the list at 26 deaths. John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service, conducted the study by examining information on 238 deaths attributed to lightning over the last seven years. NOAA released these ndings on the rst day of National Lightning Safety Awareness Week to call attention to the danger of outdoor activities during a thunderstorm. Of the 152 deaths associated with leisure activities, shing is followed by camping, 15 deaths; boating, 14 deaths; soccer, 12 deaths and golf, eight deaths. The remaining 77 people were struck by lightning while participating in other leisure activities such as enjoying the beach, swimming, walking and running, riding recreational vehicles, and picnicking or relaxing in their yard. Between 2006 and 2012, 82 percent of people killed by lightning were male. When people think of lightning deaths, they usually think of golf, Jensenius said. While every outdoor activity is dangerous when a thunderstorm is in the area, outdoor activities other than golf lead to more lightning deaths. NOAA has made a concerted effort to raise lightning awareness in the golf community since we began the campaign in 2001, and we believe our outreach has made a huge difference since lightningrelated deaths on golf courses have decreased by 75 percent. Jensenius said the large number of shing, camping and boating lightning deaths may occur because these activities require extra time to get to a safe place. People often wait far too long to head to safety when a storm is approaching, and that puts them in a dangerous and potentially deadly situation, he said. Prior to the lightning safety campaign, lightning killed an average of 73 people each year in the United States. Since the National Weather Service launched the campaign, the average has dropped to 37. Seven people have died from lightning strikes so far this year. The best way for people to protect themselves against lightning injury or death is to monitor the weather and postpone or cancel outdoor activities when thunderstorms are in the forecast. Lightning can strike from 10 miles away, so if people can hear thunder, they are in danger of being struck by lightning. The only safe places to be during a thunderstorm are in a building with four walls and a roof or in a car. A hut, cabana, tent, or other rain shelter will not protect a person from being struck by lightning. Fishing, boating top lightning deaths The Fireworks Alliance is committed to educating people on the safe use of consumer reworks. The following guidelines are recommended to help you enjoy your reworks while minimizing the risk of an accident to yourself and others. Always read the instructions carefully before attempting to light a reworks item. Do not throw burned out sparklers on the ground. The hot debris left over from the sparkler can burn someone if they step on it. Always wear proper clothing whenever you use reworks. This includes cotton or denim clothing, long pants, eye protection, covered shoes, and (if necessary) ear protection. Never drink alcoholic beverages or take drugs when using reworks. Keep reworks away from open ames, including cigarettes. Do not smoke around reworks. Keep your reworks dry. Never attempt to light reworks that have become wet. Store reworks in a cool dry place, and away from children. Make sure small children cannot reach reworks, and never allow a child to eat reworks or put them in their mouth. Do not buy generic reworks that do not have labels identifying the manufacturer. All consumer reworks should be clearly labeled as Class C or 1.4G reworks. Do not buy illegal reworks. Many of these devices contain explosive compounds that are sensitive to shock and friction. Never allow children to use reworks without direct adult supervision. Children should be instructed on the safe use of reworks before allowing them to participate. Never throw or toss reworks at another person or animal. Do not light reworks in crowded areas. Use proper instruments for lighting reworks, such as instanton torches, safety ares, punk sticks, and other suitable tools that provide some distance between the reworks device and the person that is lighting it. Never pick up unlit or unexploded reworks. Malfunctioning reworks should be soaked in a bucket of water for one hour before disposing. Never attempt to re-light malfunctioning reworks. GEORGE OEHLERT Avoid accidents with reworks this Fourth

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 27, 2013 O N L Y TH E M O S T A D V A N C ED H EA R T C A RE C O U LD SA VE M Y LI FE I TR U ST ED O N E H EA R T TE A M I N TH E R E G IO N T O PE RF O R M I T R uss M ars h A vid T enn is P la y er THR EE YEA RS A GO I W AS SERV I N G T H E M A T CH PO I N T WHE N I SUFF ERED A M ASS I VE HEA R T A TT A CK L UCK IL Y, M Y P A R T NER I MM ED I A T E L Y S T AR T E D CPR WH I L E SOM EON E C A LL E D 911. THE HEA R T T E A M A T T MH USED AN AD V ANC ED HYP O T HER M I A T ECH N I QU E T O S L O W DO WN M Y HEA R T AND A LL O W IT T O HEA L T OD A Y I HA VE NO L AS T I NG EFFE C T S A N D A M B A C K O N T H E T ENN I S C OUR T TMH hea r t .or g T H E MO S T A DV AN CE D HE AR T C E NT ER IN TH E RE GI O N PE RIO D trict’s combined property tax valuation rose $19 mil lion, from $1.696 billion to $1.715 billion, roughly 1.1 percent. “That’s a good example right there of how much it (cap on non-homestead calculation increases) takes off of it (the tax base),” Skipper said. “You can see the real estate val ues are turning around a little bit.” To underscore the ef fect the 10 percent nonhomestead cap has had, Skipper noted that of the county’s 19,000 parcels of land, fewer than 2,000 were subject to sales last year. “Only 2,000 could go to an actual market val ue this year and not be capped,” she said, adding at the height of the mar ket a few years ago, about 3,000 to 3,500 parcels were sold in a typical year. “You’re not going to see a big jump in the future,” she said. “We are very lim ited with our increase as far as taxable value.” Skipper, in her rst year as property appraiser af ter being elected without opposition last fall, said she believes the real es tate is making a slow and steady comeback. “The biggest increase was prob ably on St. George Island,” she said. “We’ve had some areas over there that are really turning around big time, on the Gulf side.” Carrabelle was the only taxing district to see an enlargement of its tax base, after hav ing suffered an almost 26 percent decline last year. Carrabelle’s combined valuation this year will ex pand from $101.8 million to $102.7 million, an increase of $916,000, or almost 1 percent. The sharpest decline in the county was seen in the tax base of the Dog Island Conservation District, which went from $32.7 million to $29.4 million, a 10 percent drop of about $3.3 million. Skipper said erosion has taken away several lots that otherwise would have contributed to that tax base. “A couple of areas are almost washed in two,” she said. The next steepest drop in the county was seen in Apalachicola, where the tax base fell by about $8.6 million, from $126.4 mil lion to $117.7 million, or 6.8 percent. The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is ex pected to see a 3.6 percent drop in its tax base, a loss of $2.5 million, from $68.3 million to $65.8 million. The Alligator Point Wa ter and Sewer District will experience a drop in its tax base from $122.3 million to $119 million, a decline of $3.3 million, or about 2.6 percent. The Northwest Florida Water Management Dis trict, which is similar in size to the county base, will see a drop from $1.641 billion to $1.637 billion, a slide of $4 million, or about a 0.2 percent. Last year, the county levied 5.9637 mills in prop erty taxes, but with the up coming July 18-19 budget workshops, county com missioners will have to weigh whether to increase the millage, cut spending or a combination of both. Skipper said this year’s in-depth audit by the Flor ida Department of Rev enue, which is conducted every two years, is about complete and that her of ce has been told the re port will be a positive one. “We’re just waiting on an ofcial letter that we’ve passed,” she said. TAX BASE from page A1 Collector Jimmy Harris, the county sold 1,206 certif icates, worth almost $1.04 million. This total was a little more than a third of the $2.94 million sold off in 2009, when 1,791 certicates were snatched up by investors. Over the past three years, the totals have steadily declined, from 1,668 certicates worth $2.36 million in 2010, to 1,585 tax certicates total ing $1.96 million in 2011, to 1,413 tax certicates worth $1.52 million last year. “More people’s paying their taxes on time, or their mortgage companies,” Harris said. “The taxing districts are getting their money in a more timely fashion.” As required by Florida statute, the county had to assume possession of all tax deeds under $250 for homesteaded properties, and these totaled $11,519, he said. The county received a 5 percent commission from the sale of $48,319, Harris said. Also paid for out of the tax sale proceeds were the costs of advertising for three weeks before the sale, which totaled $27,642. Harris, who was as sisted at the sale by Sarah Braswell, one of the tax clerks, said about 65 peo ple attended the sale, down by about a dozen from last year. He said the rates paid on the certicates were bid down considerably from a starting point of 1.5 percent per month, or 18 percent per year, simple interest. “The rates were low this year, and they stayed low,” he said. “It’s whatever the bidders are willing to take for their investments, and banks aren’t paying very much so they’re willing to take less to secure their investment.” At least 60 of Florida’s 67 counties have opted for online auctions, but Har ris plans to keep the live sale the way it is, noting that the bidders, mostly local, prefer it that way. One Tampa group of investors spent about $270,000 on certicates at this year’s auction, Harris said. A recent inves tigation by the SunSentinel newspa per in Fort Lauder dale revealed going to an online format, in which anyone from any where can bid, could crowd out local investors. The reporters found many of the state’s online auctions have come to be dominat ed by large nancial insti tutions, which have dra matically increased their odds of winning by forming thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of proxy or shell companies to ood the auction, giving them a huge edge in tie bids where the winner is chosen by lottery. “The majority of the smaller bidders are getting squeezed out or dropping out because they cannot effectively compete,” said Miami real estate agent Murry Diamond, 60, a long time participant in South Florida tax auctions. “I’m one of the people they’re driving out.” In the online auctions, bids ood in from all over the world, from cy ber competitors who can place thousands of offers within milliseconds with a few keystrokes, wrote the reporters. They noted that in on line auctions, tie bids are broken by a random num ber generator, a computer ized equivalent of how win ning numbers are picked in the Florida Lottery. The result, they concluded, is that big investors now all agree to accept the theo retical minimum return, and swamp the system with simultaneous bids to increase their chances at being picked. DELINQUENT from page A1 AIM funding, some community out reach activities have been suspend ed. Leslie Coon continues to offer pottery classes, and Jeanette Taylor has resumed Zumba classes after a hiatus. Both work as volunteers in formerly paid positions. Both classes are held in Apalachicola. Zumba and the pottery class were two of the best received AIM programs. “They consider the work they are doing so important they chose to continue it,” Taylor said. Liz Sisung, who was in charge of theater programs for AIM, said she has not been working with AIM for some time but would consider partic ipating if AIM becomes more active. The grant application said AIM will add a new paid artist to the program during the 2013-14 funding cycle. Tay lor said there will be a call for artists to identify this person. He mentioned Lane Autrey and Ed Springer as pos sible instructors. Based on the grant’s timeline, once funding is in hand next month, painting classes will resume in Car rabelle, and community outreach drama classes also will start back up. In August, a plein air art exhibit is planned at Weems and a new drama tization of the health care contribu tions of Dr. John Gorrie will be per formed as part of the annual Festival of Ice. In September, there will be a pho tography workshop, and in December a program of caroling will be added to the ongoing bedside arts program. The grant application estimates 6,774 individuals will participate in 66 proposed events. Elders 65 and older account for 1,694 of the total; youth age 18 and under for 316 participants. AIM programs will take place in Calhoun, Gulf, Lib erty and Wakulla counties as well as Franklin, according to the application. The second grant will launch a program to provide art education opportunities to Franklin County students and the community at large. The funding will pay a part-time director for the Apalachicola School of Art, housed in the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art on Water Street, which is provided free of charge by the city, which also pays for utilities, maintenance and insurance. Based on the application, the pro gram will conduct at least one dozen threeto four-day instructional work shops taught by leading artists, and six to 10 weekend instructional work shops serving at least 10 participants each. The grant application estimates the workshops will bring a total of $74,800 in lodging, $22,440 in meals and $14,960 in other spending to the county. It predicts an additional 3,500 attendees at special events related to the arts program will spend $42,000. On average, students attending the workshops will pay $300 each, generating $60,000, notes the grant. Sixty-ve percent of this is paid to the teachers, and the remaining $21,000 will support programs to bring art to the community. These community programs in clude developing and implementing an arts academy for children ages 6 to 18, which will offer at least 12 classes tailored to specic children’s age groups. Most of these classes will be at the center, but an outreach pro gram will work within schools. Taylor said the academy prob ably will begin its work at the charter school and then expand to the Frank lin School, to cover every student within the district. The School of Art will partner with AIM to “address the creative and health needs of a diverse local population.” The new arts director will also help organize at least three annual events to encourage arts and promote the area as a cultural arts destination. In addition, each year during high sea son, the arts center will offer works by local artists for sale, with part of the proceeds paid back to support the School of Arts. The application estimates 3,672 individuals will participate in 179 events over the 2013-14 season. Pro grams will be held in a dozen coun ties in addition to Franklin. The budget for the grant indicates the art director’s salary will increase to $48,000 in the 2014-15 scal year, so presumably the director will become a full-time employee. “We haven’t written a job descrip tion,” Taylor said. “They should have at minimum a background in art his tory, arts coordination or implemen tation. We hope to nd someone local. Honestly, we have nobody in mind for the job.” ARTS from page A1 “They’re typically more expensive because there’s less of them. When they’re popular, they’re real expen sive,” he said. “We just set out to get the best we could get, that we could afford.” In Pickler, the festival found one of the nation’s fast est-rising stars, a North Car olina-born singer-songwriter who rst gained fame as a contestant on the fth season of “American Idol,” went on to release three popular albums and win a slew of awards and then topped it all off this past May by winning the 16th season of “Dancing with the Stars” with her partner Der ek Hough. Solomon said the festival is planning several enhance ments to mark the 50th anni versary of the festival, includ ing a giant reworks show after Pickler’s concert. The festival will welcome back Billy Spikes to serve as grand marshal of the Satur day morning parade, Solomon said. Spikes, who now lives in Mount Dora, served as the rst president of the Florida Seafood Festival in 1963. A large exhibit will cel ebrate the history of the festival’s ve decades. Also, the festival has decided to rejuvenate the King Retsyo Ball, which ended a few years ago because of a lack of atten dance. The traditional event will be held Friday evening at the Armory. “A lot of board members who are younger remember their parents going,” Solo mon said. “There’s been a good response so far.” JAMES HARRIS Tax collector PICKLER from page A1 FLORIDA MM EMORY PROj J ECT This photo, taken at the 1964 Florida Seafood Festival, shows from left Mrs. Gertrude George, Billy Spikes, (standing), Mrs. Billy Spikes and daughter, Jerry Allen and Louise Pendleton. Billy Spikes will serve as grand marshal of this year’s Florida Seafood Festival parade on Nov. 2. J OEOE TAYLORTAYLOR

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 P UB L I C N O T I CE F C T D C 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 3 F i sc a l Y e a r R E M A I N I NG M E E T I NG S CHE DU L E A T T H I S T I M E S U B S EQ U E N T M E E T I N G S F O R T H E B A L A N C E O F T H E F I S C A L Y E A R F O L L O W T H E R E G U L A R S C H E D U L E O F F I RS T A N D T H I R D WE D N E S D A Y B oa r d Me e t i n gs W E D N E S D A Y F O L L O W I N G F I R S T T U E S D A Y F C B O C C M E E T I N G J u n e 5 2 0 1 3 C ar r ab e l l e C it y O f c e s C ar r ab e l l e 3 : 0 0 p m C A N C E L E D : J u l y 3 2 0 1 3 F r a n k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e A n n e x 3 : 0 0 p .m A u g u s t 7 2 0 1 3 F r a n k l in C o u n t y C o u r t h o u s e A n n e x 3 : 0 0 p .m S e p t e m b e r 4 2 0 1 3 C ar r ab e l l e C it y O f c e s C ar r ab e l l e 3 : 0 0 p m A T T H E C I T Y O F A P A L AC H I C O L A C O M M U N I T Y R O O M 1 B A Y A V E N U E A P A L AC H I C O L A BEG I N N I N G A T 1 : 3 0 P M F O R G R A N T S ( I F S C H E D U L E D ) A N D A T 2 : 3 0 P M F O R M A R K E T I N G ( I F S C H E D U L E D ) C o mmi t t e e M e e t i ng s W E D N E S D A Y F O L L O W I N G T H I R D T U E S D A Y F C B O C C M E E T I N G J u n e 1 9 2 0 1 3 G r a n t s a n d M a r k e t in g C o m m i t t e e s b eg in ni n g a t 1 : 3 0 p m J u l y 17 2 0 13 G r a n t s a n d M a r k e t in g C o m m i t t e e s b eg in nin g a t 1 : 3 0 p m A u g u s t 2 1 2 0 1 3 G r a n t s a n d M a r k e t in g C o m m i t t e e s b eg in ni n g a t 1 : 3 0 p m S e p t e m b e r 1 8 2 0 1 3 G r a n t s a n d M a r k e t in g C o m m i t t e e s b eg in nin g a t 1 : 3 0 p m F o r f u r t h e r in f o r m a t i o n p l e a s e c o n t a c t F C T D C o f c e s @ 1 7 1 / 2 A v e n u e E A p a l a c hi c o l a 6 5 3 8 6 78 o r v i s it o u r w e bs it e : w w w an a t u r a l e sc ap e co m / a d m i n i s t r a ti o n T H I S I S A P U B L I C M E E TI N G A N D T W O OR M OR E F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y C O M M I S S I ON E R S M A Y A T T E N D R e v 6 / 1 2 / 1 3 Coupon Expir es: 7-15-13 CODE: AP00 N O TI CE O F INTENT T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTIN G C O UNT Y O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t o n J u l y 2, 2013 a t 10:10 a.m. (E T) a t 34 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a n o r din a n ce c a p t io n e d a s f o l lo ws: AN O RD IN AN CE AMEND IN G THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y ZO NIN G C O D E O RD IN AN CE 92-6, S ECTI O N 462, REGUL A TIN G S TR UCTURES AND ES T AB LIS HIN G THE P ERMIT TED HEI GHT LIMIT AND M O D IFI CA TI O NS T O N O M O RE TH AN 47 FEE T A T THE R O O F P EAK, N O R A C C O MM O D A TE M O RE TH AN THREE H AB IT AB LE FL O O RS, FR O M HI GHES T N A TUR AL GR AD E; P R O VID IN G S E VER AB ILIT Y AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE A co p y o f t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h t h e C ler k o f C o ur t, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a n d m a y b e v ie w e d t h er e I n t er es t e d P er s o n s m a y a p p e a r a t t h e m e et in g a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r es p e c t t o t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce A n y p a r t y w h o m a y w i s h t o a p p e a l t h e de ci sio n m ade a t t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r m a k in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e h e a r in g os e p er s o n s r e q uir in g a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e m e et in g m u s t c a l l dep u t y c ler k M ic h ae l M o r o n a t 850-653-8861 x100 a t le a s t t hr e e b u sin es s d a ys b ef o r e t h e m e et in g t o m a k e a r ra n g em en ts. St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle There were few surpris es when the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce chose a new governing board on June 5. The chamber elected a new board of directors for the 2013-14 scal year at their monthly business luncheon at Caroline’s in Apalachicola. Ofcers for this year are Donna Duncan, president for a second consecutive term, as is Bud Hayes vicepresident. Kristin Ander son, elected secretary/his torian, has served in that position since 2009. Jerry Hall will remain treasurer. Bonnie Gomes, for merly of Oyster Radio100.5 FM, Mark Friedman, with Friedman Financial Advi sors, and attorney Kristy Branch Banks, all retired from the board. New to the board and membership is Tom Morgan, owner of Apalach Outtters. Duncan, attorney with Sanders and Duncan; Hayes with the Franklin County Humane Society and the ABC School; An derson, owner of Long DreamGallery.com; Mike Koun, owner of the Gibson Inn; Brenda Ash, with Cen tennial Bank; Jean Ulrich, a real estate agent with Jeff Galloway Real Estate and owner of Ulrich Construc tion; Ouida Tartt, owner of the House of Tartts, a guest cottage in downtown Apalachicola; Bev Hewitt and Hall, with the Apala chicola Seafood Grill, the Soda Fountain, and the BackStreet Trading Com pany; attorney Michael Shuler; Ginny Griner with Weems Memorial Hospital; and Kevin Ward with Eagle Technology Services and 13 Mile Seafood,. The Apalachicola cham ber currently has 480 mem bers. It was started in the 1830s. Among its many presidents were ice ma chine inventor John Gor rie, and David Raney. In the 1980s, the chamber expand ed its membership area to encompass Apalachicola Bay including Eastpoint and St. George Island. – By LOIS SWOBODA Chamber of commerce elects 2013-2014 ofcers James Clain, of Kenrick A. Clain and Son Nautical Antiques, has identied an artifact recently donated to the St. George Island Lighthouse Museum. The lamp pictured above is a 200 mm Lovell BU-48 lantern, used on piers and on some buoys. It was electrically operated and required 12 volts DC to operate. Some buoys had batteries and later solar to power it. The bird spike on the top is to keep gulls from sitting on it. Clain placed a value of at least $1,500 on the brass lamp. LIGHT SHED ON O lL D lL AMP L OIS OIS SS W O O B ODA ODA | The Times This casually posed Vietnam era soldier is part of the expand ed displays at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. The museum has also added a World War II tail gunner in full gear. Three World War II era exhib its, depicting the camp post ofce, inrmary and a typical civilian liv ing room, are now complete and, as a nishing touch, recordings of vintage radio programs play in the background in the exhibition hall. If you haven’t visited the camp lately, now is a great time. Also on display at the museum are a set of three alternative plans for the proposed museum and monument to be built across US 98 from Carrabelle Beach Park. The plans were donated by Inovia, engineering consultants for the city of Carrabelle. The Camp Gordon Johnston Museum is open Monday through Thursday 1 to 4 p.m.; Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Camp Gordon Johnston expands displaysL OIS OIS SS W O O B ODA ODA | The Times

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The Times | A7 Thursday, June 27, 2013 Y o u lo v e y o ur c a r B u t i t mig h t b e t im e t o u pg rade Di s hin g o u t a lo t o f do ug h e ac h m o n t h j u s t t o k e ep O ld B etsy r unnin g m a y b e c a u sin g y o ur b udg et t o s cr e a m, "I t's t im e f o r a c h a n g e! C o m e t o t h e cr e di t unio n. W e c a n p u t y o u in t h e dr i v er's s e a t o f a n e w c a r M em b er s hi p e lig i b i li t y r e q uir e d R a t es a r e b a s e d o n cr e di t s co r e a n d a r e s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t ice 502 W o o d wa r d A v en ue P o r t Sa in t J o e P h: (850) 227-1156 101 E a s t R i v er R o ad W e wa hi t c h ka, P h: (850) 639-5024 248 US H ig h wa y 98, E a s t p o in t, P h: (850) 670-1199 T o l l-F r e e: 1-877-874-0007 Em a i l: em era ldco a s t@fa ir p o in t.n et w w w .em era ldco a s t f c u .co m

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`= =G S=Y L I L M A N T h i s l i t t l e s w e e t he a r t i s a 2 y e a r o l d Ch i h u a h u a / T e r r i e r c r o s s. He i s a s o c i a l h a p p y l i t t l e g u y w h o w o u l d do w e l l i n a h om e w i t h o u t s m a l l c h i l dr e n He i s a p e r f e c t s i z e f o r s om e one l i v i n g i n a n a p a r t m e n t o r w h o i s l o o k i n g f o r a l a p do g He i s he a r t w o r m ne g a t i v e v e t t e d a nd ne u t e r e d C om e t o t h e a do pt i on c e n t e r t o m e e t t h i s f i ne “ Li l M a n ” V O L U N T EER S A RE D E S P ER A T E L Y N EED ED T O S O C I A LI Z E A LL O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e npe t s o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 PUB LI C N O TI CE N O TI CE O F INTENT IS GIVEN TH A T FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTIN G AN AMEND ED FL O O D P L AIN MAN A GEMENT O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t o n J u l y 2, 2013 a t 10:00 a.m. (E T) a t 34 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a n o r din a n ce c a p t io n e d a s f o l lo ws: AN O RD IN AN CE BY THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS, AMEND IN G THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y C O D E O F O RD IN AN CE T O REP EAL O RD IN AN CE 2003-39; T O AD O PT A NEW FLO O D P L AIN MAN A GEMENT O RD IN AN CE; T O AD O PT FLO O D H AZ ARD MAPS, T O D ES I GN A TE A FLO O D P L AIN AD MINIS TR A T O R T O AD O PT P R O CE D URES AND CRITERI A FO R D EVELO PMENT IN FLO O D H AZ ARD AREA S, AND FO R O TH ER PURPOS ES; T O AD O PT LO CAL AD MINIS TR A TIVE AMEND MENT S T O THE FLO RID A B UILD IN G C O D E; P R O VID IN G FO R AP P LI CAB ILIT Y ; REP EALER; S EVER AB ILIT Y ; AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE. A co p y o f t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h t h e C ler k o f C o ur t, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a n d m a y b e v ie w e d t h er e I n t er es t e d P er s o n s m a y a p p e a r a t t h e m e et in g a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r es p e c t t o t h e p r o p os e d o r di n an c e A n y p a r t y w h o m a y w i s h t o a p p e a l t h e de ci sio n m ade a t t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r m a k in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e h e a r in g os e p er s o n s n e e din g s p e ci a l a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e m e et in g m u s t co n t ac t dep u t y c ler k, M ic h ae l M o r o n, a t 850-653-8861, ext en sio n 100, t hr e e b u sin es s d a ys p r io r t o t h e m e et in g t o m a k e a r ra n g em en ts f o r a t t en d a n ce Society A8 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 Wheeler twins’ shower on Saturday Courtney Giddens, Ottice Amison engaged Mr. and Mrs. Johnny C. Giddens, of Fitzgerald, Ga., announce the engagement of their daughter, Court ney Elizabeth, to Mr. Ottice Dewey Amison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tim Amison, of Apalachicola. Miss Giddens is the granddaughter of Sara and James Phillips, Joyce Gid dens and the late Alvin Gid dens and John R. Giddens. A graduate of Georgia Southern University, she holds a bachelor’s degree in exercise science. She received an associate’s de gree in nursing from Abra ham Baldwin Agricultural College. Miss Giddens is employed as an RN at Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola. Mr. Amison is the grandson of the late Eddie Amison, Kitty Amison, Do ris Bayles and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bodiford. He is a graduate of Apalachicola High School and served as a paratroop er in the 82nd Airborne, U.S. Army. He is co-owner and operator of Amison Seafood Inc. in Apalachicola. The couple will be mar ried at 5:30 p.m. on Satur day, Oct. 5, at the Peach Barn in Tifton, Ga. A recep tion at the same location will immediately follow the ceremony. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Engagement Happy birthday, Eula Rochelle Happy 73rd birthday on Friday, June 28, Mom. Love, From all your children and grandchildren Happy birthday, Henry Rochelle Happy 78th birthday, Dad, on Monday, July 1. Love, From all your children and grandchildren Happy BI rR T hH D aA Y Oh, by the way, there was a record crowd at the Lanark Village Boat Club, last Saturday, June 15. Thanks for your support and thanks to the members who prepared and served the breakfast. Well, here it is, almost time for the Fourth of July celebration. There will be reworks on Thursday July 4 at dark thirty. Come celebrate Fourth of July at the Lanark Village Boat Club on Thursday, July 4. Members will have a covered dish and they will prepare chicken and ribs. Donation is $3. Bring your favorite dish to share. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Be lookin’ for ya! Then on Saturday, July 6 come on down to the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and help us celebrate Independence Day. We will have a cook out with a half grilled chicken and two sides for a donation of $8. Serving begins at 5 p.m. and will continue until gone. See ya there! Been missing you at Thursday’s lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center. Serving begins at noon. Come join us, why don’t you? A minimum donation of $4 is required. Ann Wilson will be on hand to check your blood pressure, and probably someone will be there to have a display and information. Be lookin’ for ya! The center is at 201 Ave. F in Carrabelle. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, don’t drink a fth on the Fourth! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Check your blood pressure at Thursday lunch L aA N arAR K N eE WS Jim Welsh Two by Two, Twins are due, And we are tickled pink and blue! Please join us for a twin baby shower honoring Tanja Jewell Wheeler at the First Assembly of God Church, 307 Third Street NW, Carrabelle on Satur day, June 29 at 3 p.m. Registered at Burlington and Wal-Mart. All friends and family are invited. Twice the blessing, twice the love, Two little miracles sent from above. By BROOK PITTMAN Special to the Times Franklin County Middle School science students re cently completed a shore line restoration project, planting more than 2,500 sea grass seedlings at the school’s new marine sci ence pier along U.S. 98 across from the campus. Teachers Spencer Tol bert and Pamela Marshall said the shoreline planting project is a follow-up envi ronmental science activ ity that allows students to learn hands-on about habi tat protection, preserva tion and restoration in the Apalachicola Bay. “Two different seagrass species, the Spartina pat ens and Spartina alternio ra, were selected to provide the students with an op portunity to study their dif fering growth and survival characteristics” Tolbert said. “It does not sound like much, but it underscores how important a simple thing like seagrass is to the bay. It prevents erosion, promotes ltration and pro vides habitat for a myriad of different living organisms. “There are no better learning tools than getting out and doing the work yourself,” he said. Technical advice and support was provided by the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Re serve, Apalachicola River keeper and the University of Florida/IFAS Franklin County Cooperative Ex tension Service. The proj ect was fully funded by the Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District. “This was a great op portunity to support the Franklin Middle School’s environmental science and education program, to rec ognize the leadership of Tolbert and Marshall, and to involve the next genera tion in being responsible stewards of our fragile eco system, the lifeblood of our economy and way of life here in ‘paradise,’” said John Sink, a member of the district board. In addition to academic credit, the students earned community service hours that help them in honors programs and applications. Sowing the seedlings of stewardshipSS P ec EC I al AL T o O TheTHE TT IMe E S Franklin County Middle School students planted two kinds of seagrass near the marine science pier.

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Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur c h -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P .O Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Special to the Times With the blessing of Dio cese Bishop S.J. Williams, presiding elder Bishop Frank Hogans, Jr., and her pastor, Elder Clifford Wil liams, Minister Kathy Wil liams will be empowered Sunday as co-pastor of the Apalachicola First Born Church of the Living God. The installation and consecration service will be held at 4 p.m. at the church, at 194 Eleventh Street, in Apalachicola, Minister Kathy Wil liams was saved March 18, 1977, receiving the baptism of the Holy Ghost during a revival service in Apalachicola, conduct ed by Evangelist Nancy Spearman and Evangelist Geraldine Johnson. Born and raised in Port St. Joe, Williams graduat ed in 1971 from Port St. Joe High School. She received her early religious training from Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church, in Port St. Joe, under the pastorate of the Rev. Charles P. Price. On Aug. 13, 1972, she married Apalachicola min ister Clifford Williams, and God blessed them with four girls and one son. Early in her marriage, she ac companied her husband to Tacoma, Washington, and assisted him in the church Bishop R. B. Thompson had assigned him. In 1975, Minister Clif ford Williams returned with his family to Apala chicola, and they all joined the Apalachicola First Born Church of the Living God, under the pastorate of Elder Ernest Johnson. This began Kathy Wil liams work in this church, which is a member of the Greater Apalachicola Dis trict and the West Florida Diocese. Appointed in 1978 by Johnson as a deaconess and youth mother, Kathy Williams worked faithfully in those positions at her church. Also in 1978, Elder Williams was assigned a church in Pensacola, and she began commuting there with him during the two-year assignment, con tinuing her duties as a dea coness in both churches. Her service as a dea coness continued until Nov. 1993, when after giv ing her introductory mes sage in Crawfordville, she became licenses as a min ister by Presiding Elder W. L. McQueen, Jr. Minister Kathy Wil liams has served in sever al roles in the district and diocese, working faithfully as a Godly woman, loyal to her God. Promoted by Elder McQueen to union directress of the district in the early 2000s, she continues to work in that capacity. In Oct, 2010, Elder Williams, pastor of the Apalachicola First Born Church, recommended Minister Williams for or dination to the presiding elder, Bishop Hogans, who in turn recommended her to Diocese Bishop Wil liams. Later that month, she appeared before the Presbytery Board, passed the ordination examina tion and on the third Sun day of the month, Minster Williams was officially or dained, with all rights of an ordained elder. Kathy Williams to co-pastor First Born church KATHY WILLIAMS Michael Louis Red Hendels was born April 12, 1985, in Panama City. He passed away Saturday, June 15, 2013, in Apala chicola. He is survived by his mother, Marie Estes; daughter; Kelsey Hen dels; sister; Amy Fore man; brothers; Dwayne Hendels and Shawn Ward; grandfather; Robert Estes; numerous aunts, uncles, cousins; and other family and a host of friends. He was preceded in death by his father; Wayne Hendels; and grandpar ents, Gloria Estes, Mil dred and Coddie Hendels. Funeral services were Friday, June 21, at Kelley Funeral Home with burial in Magnolia Cemetery, with Pastor Susan Roach ofciating.MICHAEL HENDELS Mona Maxwell Moon was born Feb. 3, 1925, in Apala chicola. She passed away Friday, June 21, 2013, in Car rabelle at the age of 88. She was preceded in death by her husband of 55 years, retired Army Sgt. E-7 Cullen L. Moon; her parents, Homer and Laura Maxwell; and brothers, Edmund, Elmo, and Dolphus (Mac) Maxwell. She is survived by one sister-in-law, Anna Max well; numerous nieces and nephews; and care-givers, Charles and Betty Scott. Mrs. Moon was a mem ber of Fellowship Baptist Church. She was a life mem ber of Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary. She graduated from Chapman High School in 1943 and attended Belle Isle Business College in West Palm Beach. Before returning to Apalachicola in 1977, she worked as a steno for the Department of the Army at Ft. Bliss, Texas; Ft. Stewart, Ga.; and Okinawa, Japan. She also was a secretary for RCA at AUTEC Andros Island, Bahamas. Graveside services were Sunday, June 23, in Magno lia Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handling all arrange ments.MONA MAXWELL MOON ObituariesL ove and generosity A much-loved native son passed away on June 9, 2013. Gary M. Shiver, my brother, succumbed to his illness, leaving behind a grieving widow, two sons, a daughter, two grandsons and two granddaughters. Unfortunately, the family funds were very low and the funeral home demanded full payment before they would do anything. Thats when the good people of Apalachicola and Eastpoint came through with heartwarming donations of enough money to give Gary an elegant and decent funeral and burial. As a woman of 72 years, I have never seen such an outpouring of love and generosity as I have witnessed in this hour of need. Thank you again, Apalach and Eastpoint. Caroline (Shiver) Drouin Hudson, Florida The themes for this summer are Beneath the Surface for teens 13-18, Dig into Reading for ages 5-12, and Groundbreaking Reads for those over 18 years of age. Looking beyond the surface of the world around us offers some interesting and exciting weekly activities and reads. The SLP program for teens began June 20 and runs through Aug. 1. It will be held at the library in Carrabelle from 3-5 p.m. There is a limit of 12 students so be sure to call the library at 697-2366 and speak to Tonia Chisolm to enroll in the program. These programs are offered at no cost to the participant but a permission form must be completed by parents and caregivers to participate. A guest speaker, Sondra Taylor-Furbee who is a certied yoga instructor, kicked off the SLP for the teens on June 20. Children ages 5 to 12 will explore gardening, pirate adventures, sea creatures, pyramids and mummies over the six week SLP which began June 21, 10 a.m. to noon. Once again, seating is limited so call 697-2366 to enroll your child. The librarys Eastpoint Branch is moving! During the month of June we will be leaving the site on Island Drive and moving into the new building at 160 Hickory Dip. We will be setting up the new library during July so stay turn for an opening date. A grand opening celebration is planned for early fall. This is a very exciting time for our libraries! Summer library program begins Card of THANKS Michael Lee Creek, Sr., of Carrabelle, passed away Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at the age of 63. Michael worked as a newspaper deliverer and was a truck driver for con struction debris cleanup. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam conict. Michael was of the Protestant faith. He was preceded in death by his dad, William Wendell Creek. Survivors include his wife, Cheryl (Yelvington) Creek, of Carrabelle; son, Michael L. Creek, Jr. and ance Kim Norman, of Monticello; a daughter, Michelle Thomas and hus band Jody, of Hackberry, La.; ve grandchildren, Brandon L. Creek, Ker stin R. Creek, Brittany M. Thomas, Bashby D. Thomas, and Joseph N. Thomas; his mother, Mil dred Creek Stacy, of Wash ington Courthouse, Ohio; a brother, Bill Creek and wife Shirley, of Sabrina, Ohio; a sister, Drue Reveal and husband Jr., of Aber deen, Ohio; and several nieces and nephews. A Celebration of Life service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at First Baptist Church in Car rabelle, with the Rev. Rick Steward ofciating. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the ser vice, from 10 to 11 a.m. at the church. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the service. Online con dolences may be made at adamsfh.com.MICHAEL LEE CREEK, SR. Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, June 27, 2013 The Fellowship Bap tist Church, at 10 Ellis Van Vleet St., Apalachic ola, will have Judge Ken Hosford and Fortress in concert on Sunday, June 30, at 10:30 a.m. All are welcome to come and share the blessing. This Independence Day weekend, Audubon is reminding Floridians to take care with Floridas original beach babies, rare and declining spe cies of birds that nest on Floridas beaches and coastal islands. The beginning of July is a critical time for some of Floridas most iconic coastal birds and their uffy chicks. Roseate spoonbills, black skim mers, snowy plovers, American oystercatchers, least terns and more are using Floridas beaches and islands right now to raise their young. Unfortunately, when boaters or beachgoers ap proach nesting birds too closely, they may uninten tionally cause the death of chicks and eggs. When parents are ushed from their nests, chicks and eggs are left vulnerable to predators, overheating by the summer sun, crush ing under foot, or falling and drowning in water beneath the nest. A single ill-timed disturbance can destroy an entire colony. Please respect posted areas, even if you dont see birds inside them. Birds, eggs and nests are well-camouaged with the beach environment, and disturbance by people can cause the abandonment of an entire colony. Avoid disturbing groups of birds. If birds take ight or appear agi tated, you are too close. Give colony islands a wide berth, and when shing, be sure not to leave any equipment be hind. Always dispose of shing line and tackle appropriately. Audubon asks for help on beaches Fellowship Baptist hosts Sunday concert

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Saturday, the staff at Bald Point State Park was amazed by a huge turnout for a turtle release party. Event organizer Dustin Allen, a park spokesman, said the park normally has 300 visitors on a busy weekend. Park staff thought they might see 500 to 700 for the release of Allie, the turtle. More than 1,500 turned out. Allen said this was the rst event hosted by Bald Point its 13-year history and the rst collaboration with the Gulf Specimens Marine Lab. The park provided a venue for the party, and the Gulf Lab arranged for publicity. Two turtles released Saturday had both received medical treatment at the lab. Advertising, including two Tallahassee billboards, promised Allie, a loggerhead turtle, would be released at 2 p.m. About 30 minutes before Allie’s return to the Gulf, Jack Rudloe, director of the Gulf Lab, released a small Kemp’s Ridley turtle that was found with a shhook in its mouth about a week earlier. Volunteers from the park, the lab and the Alligator Point volunteer turtlers collaborated to make the day special. In preparation for the event, park staff created a temporary trail of MobiMat, a strong recycled polyester fabric, to the beach to protect the dunes and make the event ADA compliant. Allen said Bald Point brought in extra wheelchairs designed for beach use. He said attendees with limited mobility expressed their gratitude for the consideration. As the crowd amassed on the Bald Point beach, things began to get rowdy. With only three paid staff members, the park relied heavily on volunteers for parking and crowd control. Volunteers attempted to manage the multitude and shoo them back from the proposed release point and out of the water. One volunteer repeatedly shouted “Get out of the water. She won’t know the difference between you and her lunch.” He was largely ignored. Children and adults remained in the water throughout the release in spite of pleas and warnings that they were violating Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission rules. Rangers were able to clear the area directly in front of Allie, and her release went well. She was off without a glance back, resurfacing once to the delight of onlookers. Allen said if the park hosts another event, Bald Point will de nitely borrow additional staff from other parks. “We think it went well, all things considered,” Allen said. “The turtle was safe. We didn’t have any traf c mishaps and nobody got hurt. This was de nitely a learning experience.” The loggerhead turtle had been found by commercial sherman in Alligator Harbor who turned the distressed animal over to Rudloe’s lab in hopes it could be saved. Rudloe said at the lab, Allie gained her target weight for release, and the mass in her chest disappeared, during her yearlong rehabilitation. “This represents a major triumph,” he said. “It is a story of uncommon cooperation — commercial shermen working side-by-side with biologists.” Loggerheads are one of ve species of sea turtle that nest on Florida’s shores; all are endangered. The communities of Alligator Point and Bald Point hosted a record-breaking 47 nests during last year’s season, according to Bill Wargo, Alligator Point Sea Turtle Patrol. Wargo advocates keeping the beaches in their natural state, the best protection for the endangered animals being minimal disruption of their breeding habitats. He reports that area residents are largely supportive of protection efforts, and consider wildlife an essential part of the community. “Sea turtles are important sentinels,” Wargo said. “They let us know what is happening in the environment. Ultimately, what is best for them is best for us.” "$ # # COME JOIN US FOR THE . 4 TH OF JUL Y SIDEW ALK SALE! JUL Y 3RD & 4TH WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu June 27 89 78 30 % F ri, June 28 89 79 40 % S a t June 29 88 78 40 % Sun, June 30 88 78 40 % M on, July 01 88 78 60 % T ues July 02 88 78 60 % W ed July 03 88 79 60 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT • FULL LA WN SERVICES • TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL • ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore/Bottom Red snapper shing will come to a close Friday in federal waters. This year we have seen some good-sized sh, with some over 30 pounds. As the summer continues, the red snapper shing will be in state waters only after Friday. High air and water temps will drive most of the bigger sh deeper and out of the 9-mile zone well into July. With June fast coming to an end, the area’s lakes and creeks are heating up fast. Most creeks are near the 90-degree mark and will top that in July. This makes for some tough shing, forcing us to go deep and sh early as we can. Most action out on the bay is top water trout and live LY shing. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in the Fire Tower area and along the Pig Island channel this week Page 10 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Century plants are owering across the county. In case you haven’t noticed, scores of the big succulents are shooting up huge bloom spikes. That’s a good thing, because the ower spikes are interesting and impressive. It’s also a bad thing because once a century plant, also known as blue agave, owers, it dies leaving behind a mass of small “pups.” I’ve received numerous calls about the agave owers, including several from folks claiming to have the largest owering century plant. So far, the biggest I’ve seen is one in the backyard of Willie Irvine’s island home, but the agave on the corner of Avenue F by the Bryant House bed and breakfast in Apalachicola and one near Chillas Hall in Lanark Village are both close seconds. “Why are they all blooming?” asked Terry Kemp of St. George Island. Mark Weathington, assistant director of the Raulston Arboretum at North Carolina State University, said the age of the plant and unusual weather could play a role. He said in the wild, under desert conditions, century plants actually might take 80 to 100 years to mature and ower; hence the name. In richer soil and with irrigation, they usually take only 10 to 20 years to reach maturity. Weathington said it was possible weather conditions, including abundant rainfall last summer, could have helped trigger the widespread owering. Don Harrigan, a forecaster for the National Weather Service in Tallahassee, said last summer was a wet one here. Most residents will remember Tropical Storm Debbie brought record rains in June, and the wet weather continued through September. Tony Avent of Plant Delights Nursery, also in North Carolina, is an agave expert. He said the owering process began in 2012, likely last summer. He agreed agaves that are watered mature more rapidly than those growing wild. “At some point, the plant switches from vegetative growth to owering,” he said. “Once that happens, you can’t turn back. It’s kind of like being pregnant.” By the way, removing the ower spike will not stop the plant from dying. Avent suggested the mass owering might be related more to the origin of the plants than weather conditions. “It’s possible many of the plants are second-generation clones of a single parent,” he said. “Plants with the same origin planted in the same yard won’t all ower at once, but they will ower within a few years of each other.” He suggested because Franklin County receives about seven times as much rain as the agave’s native habitat, the plants might mature about seven times as fast, putting the year of origin of all the clones owering now at around 2000. On a related note, Weatherington said he spent his summers at Indian Pass as a child at a beach house belonging to his grandfather, Tom Weatherington, who was a physician for Franklin County’s health department. Mark’s father, Lee, grew up in Apalachicola. Thursday, June 27, 2013 EVIE MORTON | Special to the Times Jack Rudloe displays a Kemps-Ridley turtle before its release. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times A volunteer attempts to herd onlookers away from the turtle release site. Day-trippers ock to see Allie the turtle released Century plants owering in Franklin LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Agave owers tower at Willie Irvine’s two-story house on St. George Island. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda

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2012 Annual Drinking W ater Quality Report Lanark V illage W ater & Sew er District W e are pleased to present to you this year’ s Annual W ater Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality w ater and services we deli v er to you e v ery day Our constant goal is to inform you about the quality w ater and services we deli v er to you e v ery day Our constant goal is to pro vide you with a safe and dependable supply drinking w ater W e w ant you to understand the ef forts we mak e to continually impro v e the w ater treatment process and protect our w ater resources. W e are committed to ensuring the quality of your w ater Our w ater source is ground w ater from tw o wells. The wells dra w from the Floridan Aquifer Because of the e xcellent quality of our w ater the only treatments required are chlorine for disinfection purposes and Aquamag, which is a plyphosphate compound injected as a sequestering agent that neutralizes scale and corrosion. In 2012 the Department of En vironmental Protection performed a Source W ater Assessment on our system and a search of the data sources indicated no potential sources of contamination near our wells. The assessment results are a v ailable on the FDEP Source W ater Assessment and Protection Program website at www .dep.state..u s/ sw app. If you ha v e an y questions about this report or concerning your w ater utility please contact K eith Mock, W ater Superintendent at (850) 251-9106. W e encourage our v alued customers to be informed about their w ater utility If you w ant to learn more, please attend an y of our re gularly scheduled meetings. The y are held at The Carrabelle Municipal Comple x, 1001 Gray A v enue, on the rst T uesday of each month at 6:00 p.m. The Lanark V illage W ater & Se wer District (L VWSD) routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking w ater according to Federal and State la ws, rules and re gulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2012. Data obtained before January 1, 2012, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the la ws, rules, and re gulations. In the tables belo w you may nd unf amiliar terms and abbre viations. T o help you better understand these terms we ha v e pro vided the follo wing denitions: Maximum Contaminant Le v el or MCL: The highest le v el of a contaminant that is allo wed in drinking w ater MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best a v ailable treatment technology Maximum Contaminant Le v el Goal or MCLG: The le v el of a contaminant in drinking w ater belo w which there is no kno wn or e xpected risk to health. MCLGs allo w for a mar gin of safety Action Le v el (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if e xceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a w ater system must follo w Initial Distrib ution System Ev aluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a onetime study conducted by w ater systems to identify distrib ution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethane s (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). W ater systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR. Maximum residual disinfectant le v el or MRDL: The highesr le v el of a disinfectant allo wed in drinking w ater There is a con vincing e vidence that additions of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum residual disinfectant le v el goal or MRDLG: The le v el of a drinking w ater disinfectant belo w which there is no kno wn or e xpected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reect the benets of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. Non aaplicable (N A): Does not apply Non-Detect (ND): means not detected and indicates that the substance w as not found by laboratory analysis. P arts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the w ater sample. P arts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter ( g/il): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the w ater sample. Picocurle per liter (pci/L) measure of the radioacti vity in w ater If present, ele v ated le v els of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pre gnant w omen and young children. Lead in drinking w ater is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. L VWSD is responsible for pro viding high quality drinking w ater b ut cannot control the v ariety of materials used in plumbing components. When your w ater has been sitting for se v eral hours, you can minimize the potential for lead e xposure by ushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using w ater for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your w ater you may wish to ha v e your w ater tested. Information on lead in drinking w ater testing methods, and steps you can tak e to minimize e xposure is a v ailable from the Safe Drinking W ater Hotline or at http:// www .epa.go v/safe w ater/lead. The sources of drinking w ater (both tap w ater and bottled w ater) include ri v ers, lak es, streams, ponds, reserv oirs, springs, and wells. As w ater tra v els o v er the surf ace of the land or through the ground, it dissolv ed naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioacti v e material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human acti vity Contaminants that may be present in source w ater include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from se w age treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural li v estock operations, and wildre. (B) Inor g anic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occu rring or result from urban stormw ater runof f, industrial or domestic w aste w ater dischar ges, oil and g as production, mining, or f arming. (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a v ariety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormw ater runof f, and residential uses. (D) Or g anic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and v olatile or g anic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from g as stations, urban stormw ater runof f, and septic systems. (E) Radioacti v e contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and g as production and mining acti vities. In order to ensure that tap w ater is safe to drink, the EP A prescribes re gulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in w ater pro vided by public w ater systems. The F ood and Drug Administration (FD A) re gulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled w ater which must pro vide the same protection for public health. Drinking w ater including bottled w ater may reasonably be e xpected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the w ater poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health ef fects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’ s Safe Drinking W ater Hotline at 1-800-426-4791 Thank you for allo wing us to continue pro viding your f amily with clean, quality w ater this year In order to maintain a safe and dependable w ater supply we sometimes need to mak e impro v ements that will benet all of our customers. These impro v ements are sometimes reected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking w ater than the general population. Immuno-comprom ised persons such as persons with cancer under going chemotherap y persons who ha v e under gone or g an transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorder some elderly and inf ants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking w ater from their health care pro viders. EP A/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptoaporidiu m and other microbiologica l contaminants are a v ailable from the Safe Drinking W ater Hotline (800-426-4791) W e w ork to pro vide top quality w ater to e v ery tap. W e ask that all our customers help us protect our w ater sources, which are the heart of our community our w ay of life and our children’ s future If you ha v e an y questions or concerns about the information pro vided, please feel free to call an y of the numbers listed.  o b x u „ Z r l u Z u „ ‚ „ Z ^ o i & % # ( % # € ’ š ¤ ’ — ¤  b ’ ¤ ’ N _cn ‰v II ¢ II“ | ‚ b |v an ye c ‚ _cn ‰v } 9 nG H _‚ I qq J q› J7 q § ; ‚ |ƒ n |y | g y_† ‰‚ t ce }|ƒ n † ƒ l £ ’ ¤ — b ’ ¤ ’ 8 _‚ n ‰v }}v 7 }‚ IqI J q› q q! 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The team placed second in the Tallahassee Comets Explosion Tournament on May 10-12, defeating the Quincy Warriors 48-28 to make it to the championship. Kelsey Jones and Logan McLeod made the AllTournament team. Players who also participated in the tourney include Cameron White, Marshall Sweet, Tyler Howard, KK Wilson, Josue Barahona, Quantavious Fuller, Tanner Boone and Tyler Farmer. On May 31, the team opened up its rst tourney games against the Tallahassee Heat which had members from Godby, Lincoln, and FAMU high schools. Coach Michael Sweatt said the team played well but lost in double overtime. The last play of the game Jones hit a three-pointer to tie the game but one referee claimed his toe was on the line and called it a twopointer so the Seahawks lost 53-52. This meant they had to win the rest of their games Saturday and Sunday to make it to the championship game. “Boy, did our team respond to that,” said Sweatt. The team opened up Saturday morning at 10 a.m. with the Wildcats from Taylor County. It was a tight game at the half, with Franklin County down 19-17. “The second half we jumped on them with our full court pressure led by Sweet, White, and Jones in the backcourt and outscored them 42-19, nalizing the score of 59-38,” Sweatt said. An offensive spark from Barahona who hit six three-pointers in the game helped out. The next game wasn’t until 6 p.m. so the team went and watched a movie and hung out at the mall. They played the Georgia Rams, which had them beat in size but again speed and determination led to the victory. The Seahawks led the entire game and won with a defensive stop at the last play, with a nal of 49-47. McLeod fronted the post, as designed in the timeout, so they had to lob it over the top to their big man and there were Jones and White on the weak side to meet him. He threw up Hoopsters not content with second place CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 27, 2013 A Page 11 Section BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 See HOOPSTERS A12 Members of the Franklin County Basketball Academy 16 and Under team include Kelsey Jones, Logan McLeod, Cameron White, Marshall Sweet, Tyler Howard, KK Wilson, Josue Barahona, Quantavious Fuller, Tanner Boone, Matt Murray and Tyler Farmer. Franklin School hosts Friday golf tourney Go out and play golf to support the students, at the Franklin County Schools golf tournament. Tee time is Friday June 28 at 1 p.m. at St. James Bay Golf Resort Prizes awarded for rst, second and third places will be a cash payout. Amounts will be based on the participation of players and sponsors. Prizes for “Closest to the Pin”, The “Longest Drive” winner will receive a free round of golf donated by Rob Burlison, head golf professional at St. James Bay Country Club. A buffet will be provided. For sponsor questions call Shannon Venable, Franklin County Schools, 670-2810 ext. 4105 or svenable@franklin.k12. .us. For tournament questions contact Burlison at 697-9606 or rob@ stjamesbay.com Sacred Heart to offer free physicals Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, in Port St. Joe, will be conducting free physicals for all middle school and high school boys and girls in Franklin County at the Franklin County High School gymnasium from 5 to 8 p.m. on Monday, July 22 and Thursday, Aug. 15. The physicals are open to students at all schools in Franklin County. Call Coach Michael Sweatt at 670-2800 ext. 1924 for details or any questions that are of concern. Physical forms can be uploaded and printed out at: http://www.fhsaa. org/forms/general You can print out the EL02, EL03, and EL3CH forms and go ahead and get the general information lled out before you come. If not, then they will have copies here at the school the day of the physical dates listed above. Try to have a parent accompanying your child. If you are planning on playing a sport or even think you might be playing any sports at all then you will have to have a sports physical. So please take advantage of this free opportunity to get your physical now. A sports physical will last you one year for every sport, so you will not have to worry about it the entire school Sports BRIEFS See BRIEFS A12

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 The Dixie Debs, for girls age 18 and under, will be headed to the state tournament in Brooksville July 5 to 8. Back row, from left, are Coach Matt Kelley, Coach Kevin Newell, Morgan Newell, Christina Collins, Shannon Pridgeon, Brittany King, Ally Millender and Coach Allen Millender. Front row, from left, are Gracyn Kirvin, Maddie Newell, Morgan Kelley, Ashley Carroll and Marlyn Lee. Not pictured is Hannah Winkler. DIXIE DEBS BOUN dD FOR STATE HOOPSTERS from page A11 a wild contested shot and Jones secured the rebound for the victory. On that play McLeod tweaked the knee he hurt during the jambo ree football game. “We thought we weren’t going to have him on Sun day morning,” Sweatt said. Sunday the game start ed at 8 a.m. which meant the team left Apalachicola at 5:50 a.m. The team was sore and tired but every body showed up ready to win. And who was at the gym at FAMU waiting? Logan. “We played the Aucilla Attack team that morning and had a shaky rst half,” Sweatt said. “They ran a collapsing 2/3 zone and we were settling for contested shots and not running the play. We were down at the half 19-16.” The Seahawks played solid man defense led by Howard who shut their best player down the en tire second half. They only scored six points and the nal score was 39-25. “Farmer did really well, controlling the offense at the point in the second half too,” Sweatt said. With a three-game win streak, the Seahawks were in the championship game, facing the 4-0 Tallahassee Heat. “The only dilemma was it didn’t start until 3:30 p.m. Sunday afternoon, so another drag time of wait ing,” Sweatt said. “We went to the mall then came back and watched some ball. “The championship game started off rough. We had way too many turnovers throughout the whole game. Even though we turned the ball over, we played great defense,” said the coach. The Seahawks were down by four midway through the second half when McLeod went down again, and the team ended up losing by double digits. “Even though we lost in the championship game our guys represented our county very well,” Sweatt said. “Second place did not sit well with the team though, as this is now back-to-back tournaments in which we have been run ner-up. I like that our team is not settling for second and is not happy with it. I am proud of how hard we fought though.” Jones was named to the All-Tournament Team again. Kids in this tourna ment included Howard, Sweet, McLeod, Wilson, Jones, Barahona, White, Farmer, and Matt Murray. The team’s next tour nament was June 22 in Panama City. They are also playing on Tuesday evenings in Tallahassee at Dade Street Community Rec Center, in a 17-andunder league. On Tuesday, the team played against Port St Joe and Liberty County. They opened with a 41-29 win over Liberty and then lost to St. Joe in the nightcap 50-37. “We played well con sidering we were missing players,” said Sweatt. Kelsey Jones led scor ers in the Liberty game with a double-double 16 points and 12 rebounds. In the second game White stood out with his hustle on defense and his dribble drive penetration, nish ing with 11 points and ve steals. Barahona hit six three-pointers in the game and led scorers with 18 points. McLeod did not participate in the St Joe game, and Jones played sparingly due to a strained hip. Other play ers who participated and played well were Howard, Farmer, Murray, and Na than Jones. “Overall I liked the ef fort from the team and we are really improving and working hard,” said Swe att. “We started at the end of March with our offsea son basketball and the past three months have been great for our older team and our younger team. We have been working three days a week and some four days a week on fundamen tals and gaming. “We have another month left in gaming for the offseason before fall basketball workouts start. The 16 and under team has 3 tournaments left in the month of July.” he said. “I want to thank our sponsors again Gander Auto Parts, Inc., Fish erman’s Choice, Sandy Beach Properties, C and S Service, Barber’s Sea food, and Gulf Coast Auto Parts,” said Sweatt. N O T I C E T O R E C E IV E S E A L E D B I D S T h e F ran k l i n B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s w i l l r e ce i v e s e a l e d b i d s q u a l i e d pe r s o n c o m p an y or c or p or a t i o n i n t e r e st e d i n c o n st r uc t i n g P L U M B I N G R E N O V A T I O N S A T T H E F R A N K L I N J A I L A N D S H E R I F F S O F F I CE T h e pr o j e c t i s l oc a t e d a t 2 7 0 S ta t e R o a d 6 5 E a s t po i n t F l o r i d a an d c o n s i s t s o f r e p l a c i n g p l u m b i n g c o m po n e n t s o n e x i s t i n g x t u r e s a t t h e C o u n t y J a i l an d Sh e r i f f s O f ce C o m p l e t i o n d a t e f o r t h i s pr o j e c t w i l l be 6 0 d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e o f t h e N o t i ce t o P r oce e d pr e s e n t e d t o t h e su c c e s sfu l bidd e r A m an d a t o r y pr e b i d w a l k t h r u i s sc h e d u l e d f o r M o n d a y J u l y 8 2 0 1 3 a t 1 0 : 0 0 a m T h e w a l k t h r u w i l l be h e l d a t t h e C o u n t y J a i l a t 2 7 0 S ta t e R o a d E a s t po i n t F l o r i d a L i q u i d a t e d d am a g e s f o r f a i l u r e t o c o m p l e t e t h e pr o j e c t o n t h e s pe c i e d d a t e w i l l be s e t a t $ 2 0 0 0 0 pe r d a y T h e s e a l e d b i d m us t be c l e a r l y m a r k e d o n t h e o u t s i d e o f t h e e n v e l o pe P L UM BI N G R E N O V A T I O N S A T C OU N T Y J A I L T h e e n v e l o pe s h o u l d a l s o be a r o n t h e o u t s i d e t h e B i d d e r s n am e a d d r e s s an d l i ce n s e n u m be r i f a p p l i c a b l e B i d s w i l l be r e ce i v e d u n t i l 4 : 30 p m ( E S T ) o n M o n d a y J u l y 1 5 2 0 1 3 a t t h e F ran k l i n C o u n t y C l e r k s O f ce F ran k l i n C o u n t y C o u r t h o us e 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 7 an d w i l l be o pe n e d an d r e a d a l o u d o n T u e s d a y J u l y 1 6 2 0 1 3 a t t h e C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g h e l d a t t h e C o u r t h o us e A n n e x 34 F o r be s S t r e e t A p a l a c h i c o l a F l o r i d a T h e F ran k l i n C o u n t y B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o w a i v e an y i n f o r m a l i t y i n an y b i d t o a c ce p t an d / o r r e j e c t an y o r a l l b i d s an d t o a c ce p t t h e b i d t h a t i n t h e i r be s t j u d g e m e n t w i l l be i n t h e be s t i n t e r e s t o f F ran k l i n C o u n t y A l l b i d s s h a l l r e m a i n f o r m f o r a pe r i od o f s i x t y d a y s af t e r o p e nin g A l l b i d d e r s s h a l l c o m p l y w i t h a l l a p p l i c a b l e S ta t e an d l oc a l l a w s c o n ce r n i n g l i ce n s i n g r e g i s t ra t i o n an d r e g u l a t i o n o f c o n t ra c t o r s d o i n g b us i n e s s i n t h e S ta t e o f F l o r i d a Q u e s t i o n s s h o u l d be a d d r e s s e d t o A l an P i e r ce D i r e c t o r o f A d m i n i s t ra t i v e S e r v i ce s a t 8 5 0 6 5 3 9 7 8 3 E x t 1 6 1 o r a l an p @ f a i r po i n t n e t P UBL I S H D A T E S: T h u r s d a y J u n e 2 7 2 0 1 3 BI L L T O: F R A N KL I N C O U N T Y B OC C T h u r s d a y J u l y 4 2 0 1 3 A t t n : L i n d a P h i l l i p s 3 3 M a r k e t S t r e e t S u i t e 2 0 3 A pa lac h i c o la F L 3 2 3 2 0 On Sunday, June 23, the Dixie Youth League Belles won the District 2 championship in Wewahitchka, by defeating Port St. Joe and then Sneads in the championship. The team for girls age 15 and under will now compete in the state tournament on July 5 and 6 in Brooksville. Pictured above are back row, from left, are Sami Bearden, Anna Riley, Myranda McLeod, Summer Medley and Allie Kirvin. Middle row, from left, are Krista Martina, and Vanessa Simmons. Front row, from left, are Madison Smith, Kimberly Boone, Sophia Kirvin, Adriana Butler and Lacey Hutchins. Coaches are Gary Martina, left, and Ward Kirvin. BB ELLES HEA dD E dD TO STATE TOURNEY year until next summer. Sweatt also extended his thanks to Dana Whaley and the county health department for providing free sport physicals to the Seahawk football team in the spring. LL etter of support for trail concept On June 18, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve a resolution supporting the “concept of the Capital City to Sea Trail corridor so long as it does not interfere with existing hunting activities” and to seek planning funds from the Florida Department of Transportation to evaluate potential corridors for the bike trail. “This is for a study only,” said County Planner Alan Pierce. “The results will come back to the board and the board will have to take approve any further action.” BRIEFS from page A11

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, June 27, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Wewahitchka author Mi chael Lister is celebrating an award by giving back to the area that informs so much of his writing. In addition to a book signing Friday at the No Name Caf in Port St. Joe, Lister will be part of a River Day Celebration on Saturday at Gaskin Park, at the end of Lake Grove Road in Wewahitchka. He will also donate a portion of book prots from his award-winning novel to an organization advocating for the health of the Apalachicola River and Bay. Lister recently won his second Florida Book Award, a Silver Medal in Popular Fiction, for the fth volume in his John Jordan mystery series, “Blood Sacrice.” Lister won a Bronze Medal in Gen eral Fiction for “Double Exposure” in 2009. The Silver Medal was of particular import because the John Jordan series is the springboard for everything Lister has written in the past 15 years. “It was really a surprise,” Lister said. “It meant so much to me. That was so special. I didn’t see it coming. I was just thrilled.” To date, Lister has had 11 novels, three short-story collections, and three non-ction books published. “I have written a lot of other books, but I always return to John Jordan,” Lister said. “There is a soft spot in my heart for that series. My rst published novel was a John Jordan mystery and now 15 years later for the fth book in the series to be honored in this way means so much to me.” Lister serves on the board of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper, a non-prot organization ad vocating for the health of the Apalachicola River, its tributar ies and watersheds as well as Apalachicola Bay. And as “Double Exposure” and “Blood Sacrice” touched on issues surrounding the riv er and swamps that surround it, Lister saw a “great opportu nity to do something.” That something is two days of cel ebration of his writings and the river, with a portion of proceeds going to the Riverkeeper organization. Lister will donate half of all prots from every copy of “Blood Sacrice” sold this summer to the organization. “Winning a Florida Book Award re ally helps boost the prole of the book and the series and the other things you have written,” Lister said. “There is no question you get a bump from that for everything you write. “Part of the mystery/thriller plot of “Blood Sacrice” involves key environ mental issues facing Florida so it’s a natural t to use sales of the book for this cause.” Serving on the Riverkeeper board he understands the dire need for and the importance of the organization. “With all the water wars and issues we are facing, the collapse of the bay es pecially, there is a real challenge here,” Lister said. “It seems like there is no reasonableness, nothing makes sense. And there are solutions. We can do so much more with less water. “There is a great deal of concern among Riverkeeper for the bay and I am equally concerned about the rivers and the swamps. I just love this area so much and I am mindful of the issues we are facing. “If we just rely on our elected of cials, we are screwed. Alabama and Florida seem to be on the same page, but the way Georgia and the (U.S. Army) Corps have managed things, how do you get someone who has ev erything they want to the table.” Lister will hold a book signing at No Name Caf and the following day the River Day Celebration promises some thing for all ages. Wewa Search and Rescue will offer free boat rides on the river, including sonar so passengers can get a glimpse of life below the surface. There will be a boat poker run and a biker rally which will begin in Bay County, meander through Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka and end at Gaskin Park. Dave Lloyd out of Bay County will be on hand to provide live music through out the day, there will be a boat and car wash and a rides, pony and bounzee, for the kids. Lister will be reading from his writ ings and the photography of Clyde Butcher will be on display. “I just thought it would be a great idea to meet at the river and on it and entire thing is a fundraiser for Riverkeeper.” Entry to the event is free, though there will be charges for some activities. “I’ve always wanted my books to be highly entertaining, but not just that,” Lister said. “I want them to make a dif ference in the lives of their readers, to enrich them, to expand them in some small way. Partnering with Riverkeeper is doing the same thing—trying to make a difference.” “Blood Sacrice” and Lister’s other books are available in hardcover, paper back, ebook, and audiobook, and can be found online, at bookstores, and at his website www.MichaelLister.com For more information call Dawn at 628-4559 or email Pulpwood Press at PulpwoodPress@gmail.co m T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Ž $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % ! # ! !# !# !# !# !# !# " 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 PUB LI C N O TI CE THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y AD VISO R Y B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G O N WED NES D A Y JUL Y 3, 2013, A T 10:00 A.M. IN THE C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O N MEE TIN G R O O M O F THE C O UR TH O US E ANNEX T O C O NS ID ER THE FO LLO WIN G V ARI AN CES, AP P EALS, AND S P ECI AL EX CEPTI O NS: 1 C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O C O NS TR UCT A VER TI CAL S EA W ALL WITHIN THE CRITI CAL H AB IT A T ZO NE O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 5, B L O CK B MA GN O LI A B L UFFS, 123 N B A Y S H O RE D RIVE, EA S TPO INT FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY MI CH AEL L. AND ERSO N, A GENT FO R EMERSO N C. J O HNS, JR ., O WNER THE B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS A CTIN G A S THE B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL AD D RESS THIS REQ UES T A T THEIR MEE TIN G O N JUL Y 16, 2013. *P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g & Z o nin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, Fl 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s h e a r in g w i l l n o t b e r e co r de d p er s o n s w i s hin g t o r e co r d t h e p r o ce e din gs m u s t m a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts f o r r e co r din g LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Independence Day celebrations across the county By LOIS SWOBODA The Times Independence Day celebrations are planned across the county. Independence Day begins on July 3 this year with the second annual Old Apalachicola Independence Day Celebration sponsored by Historic Apalachicola Main Street. The Red, White and Blue Parade begins at 6:30 p.m. at Lafayette Park and will wind its way down Avenue C, under the bridge at Battery Park and along Water Street to end at Riverfront Park. The parade will be followed by a traditional ice cream social. The shrimp boat Lady Louise will act as a stage for live music. The Hillside Community Choir will pro vide stirring patriotic tunes on the docks. In addition, there will be an All American Kids’ Corner with unique games and activities for the youngsters. The highlight of the evening begins at dark thirty (approximately 9:15 p.m.) when revelers will be treated to a professional reworks display over the Apalachic ola River. Bill Grimes of Tallahassee has graciously donated his barge as a launch vehicle for the pyrotech nic extravaganza. This commitment along with the tremendous generosity of many residents, businesses and friends of Apalachicola has allowed Main Street to increase the reworks display twofold over last year. Please take time to observe our sponsors board located in Riverfront Park. These are the wonderful people, along with many Main Street volunteers who made our Independence Day celebration a reality. For more information or to volunteer, call Jim Ba chrach at 899-8689 or Harry Arnold at 524-0770. Carrabelle and St. George Island plan celebrations for July 4. In Carrabelle, there will be a professional reworks display at dark-thirty. Come downtown to en joy local businesses and a spectacular show. On St. George Island, July 4 begins with a holiday parade hosted by the St. George Island Business As sociation. Decorate your vehicle and join in. Anyone in costume, on a oat or in a decorated vehicle can par ticipate in the parade. Bring your squirt guns and plan to get wet! Line up at the intersection of First Street West and West Pine starting at 10 a.m. Parade begins at 11 a.m. Prize for the best decorated golf cart. At dark thirty, there will be reworks on the beach at the Blue Parrot. On July 5, the St. George Island Trash Patrol and anyone who wants to help will meet to clean up the central part of the island. Gather by the lighthouse at 9 a.m. Trash bags, gloves, water, and T-shirts will be provided. Lanark Village will observe Independence Day too. At the Lanark Village Boat Club, on July 4, members will prepare chicken and ribs. Donation is $3. Bring your favorite covered dish to share. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Then on Saturday, July 6 come to the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 for a cookout with a half grilled chicken and two sides for a donation of $8. Serving begins at 5 p.m. Lister book signing to benet Riverkeeper MICHAEL LISTER

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 AA14 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91430T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-000087-CA CIRCUITCIVILDIVISION SUPERIOR BANK, f/k/a THE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. SMITH; MICHAELL. HAMMOND; and CARRAWAYBAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that in accordance with the 3ODLQWLIIV)LQDO-XGJ PHQWRI)RUHFORVXUH entered on May 28th, 2013 in above-styled FDXVH,ZLOOVHOOWRWKH KLJKHVWDQGEHVWELGGHU IRUFDVKRQ-XO\WK 2013 at 11:00 A.M.(CST), at the )UDQNOLQ&RXQW\&RXUW KRXVHORFDWHGDW Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 for WKHIROORZLQJGHVFULEHG property: Lot 51, Carraway Bay 3ODQWDWLRQDFFRUGLQJWR the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat %RRN3DJHRI WKH3XEOLF5HFRUGVRI )UDQNOLQ&RXQW\)ORU ida. Property Address: Lot 51 Carraway Bay Plantation, Carrabelle, FL 32322 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: May 31, 2013 MARCIAM. JOHNSON, FRANKLIN COUNTY CIRCUITCOURT By: Michele Maxwell 'HSXW\&OHUN -XQH 91446T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.12000377CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CARLTON JACKSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RICKY R. REGIST A/K/A RICKY R. REGISTER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICKY R. REGIST RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5553 SPRING HILL ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32305 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 1 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 2, BLOCK ‘128’ (E-10), OF PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the The Apalachicola Times. DATED: March 6, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File No. 33981 June 20, 27, 2013 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLOR’S BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLOR’S BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 93951T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-129 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-129 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, whereStaff Reports Skip Foster, a veteran publisher and Florida na tive, a veteran publisher and Florida native, will be the next pub lisher of the North west Florida Daily News and oversee weekly newspapers in Milton, Crest view, Destin and Walton County. Friday morn ing’s announce ment followed a nearly twomonth search that drew candidates from across the country and ended with the hiring of Foster, publisher of the Shelby Star in Cleve land County, N.C., since 2007. “I’m excited,” said Rog er Quinn, central regional publisher for Halifax Me dia Group, which also owns the Shelby Star. “We looked across the country and found that the best candidate was one of our own. “He has a proven track record of not just leading awardwinning newspa pers, but of making a newspaper — and himself — an in tegral part of the community it serves.” Before assuming the publisher’s role at the Shel by Star, Foster served as its editor for 10 years. During that time it was part of the chain of newspapers that included the Northwest Florida Daily News, giving him familiarity with the “un believable” beauty of the re gion and its newspapers. “I am honored to lead such a tremendous team in this growing and vibrant market,” Foster said. “No one provides better content and better marketing solu tions than The Daily News. “I can’t wait to get to know this community,” he continued. “My favorite part of being publisher is connecting the newspaper with readers, businesses and organizations in the markets we serve.” Foster leaves a legacy of community involvement in Shelby. Just this month, he was awarded the H. Eugene LeGrand Lifetime Achieve ment award from the United Way of Cleveland County. He was also named most outstanding volunteer on the 2007 United Way campaign and the 2010 vol unteer of the year for the organization. In 2009, Foster found ed “Connect, Commit to Change,” a community event which brings togeth er two groups: agencies that help children and new volunteers. The effort was launched in the wake of a shooting death in Shelby, after which a Shelby Star reporter heard a young child matter-of-factly ask “Who got killed?” Foster wrote a column asking the community to commit to doing more for the commu nity’s children. A board was formed and last year, dur ing the now-annual event, more than 200 volunteers signed commitment cards to help one of the more than 50 agencies that help children. Foster has also served on the board of the Cleve land County Chamber and the legislative committee of the N.C. Press Association. He has served two stints on the vestry of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer and is a member of the Shelby Rotary Club. At The Shelby Star, he helped launch and sustain a content innovation project that earned the paper inter national attention. In 2007, Foster was invited to speak in Paris, France, about The Shelby Star’s forays into multimedia journalism. Foster was a 2002 Ethics Fellow with the Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Fla., and helped write Poyn ter’s “Journalism without Scandal” report in 2003. A native of Lakeland, Foster began his career as a sports writer in Hickory, N.C., in 1988, after gradu ating from the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn. He moved to The Gaston Gazette in Gastonia, N.C., in 1989 and eventually was promoted to managing editor. Foster is married to Dis trict Court Judge Anna F. (Dina) Foster, who will be resigning her seat to relo cate to the Panhandle. They have three children: Mary Frances, 18; Matthew, 15; and Will, 11. Halifax names new publisher in Fort Walton Beach, weekly newspapers SKIP FO sS TER The following is the honor roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School for the 2012-13 school year. All A’s First Grade A. Carlton: Hannah Grace Abel, Peyton Blackburn, Leonard Conway, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Taylor Pendleton, Isabella Price, Aubrie Thompson, Kiana Weeks L. Allen: Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Esteban Bernabe, Malic O’Neal Second Grade J. Mallon: Eric Lau, Jayden Nichols, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, John Michael Thompson S. Herrington: Kendall Hill, Lucy Neill, Arav Patel, Jabara Pearson, Timothy Poloronis, Kylah Ross, Brianna Stephens, Mark WillisTT hird Grade W. Martina: Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Andrew Monod, Genevieve Montgomery, Sophia Salman, Nico ValenzuelaT T Moses: Meredith Alford, Weston Bockelman, Gracie Smith Fourth Grade M. Lee: Kaylee Hicks, Livia Monod, Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Ava Neill L. Bockelman: Alex Joanos, Abby Johnson, Caden Turrell Fifth Grade B. Linane: Krista Kelley, Alyssa Martina, Camille Williams Sixth Grade Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Kevin Flores, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer, Adria Valenzuela, Becca Willis Seventh Grade Savannah Montgomery, Faith Sapp, Lucas SasnettEE ighth Grade Jayla Alley, Eve Bond, Corie Cates, Holly Chambers, Emily Crosby, Logan Crosby, Allie Kirvin, Mikayla Lloyd, Alexis O’Neal, Astrid Ramirez, Mallorie Shiver, Alina Valenzuela A/B First Grade A. Carlton: Alexicia McNair Martin, Jayla White L. Allen: Cody Abercrombie, Amontaye Austin, Caelyn Constantine, Trinity Creamer, Conner Lolley, Taylor Mallon, Charles McClain, Emma Rowland Second Grade J. Mallon: Johnathan Carter, Laithan Kent, Colin Weng, Leah Wren S. Herrington: Henry Abercrombie, Alisha Arroyo, Caleb Cassidy, Miranda Diaz, Emily Hooten, Mason Moses, Jackson Segree, Mahaley ShulerTT hird Grade W. Martina: Caleb Abel, Sevryn Everritt, Leslie Rowland, Jeremy ShulerT T Moses: Lanie Allen, Colin Amison, Lauren Conway, Carson Davis, Myia Maxwell, Jasmine Richards, John Sanders, Wil Varnes Fourth Grade M. Lee: Devin Daniels, Leslie Escobar, Kelsey Grifn, Lamarius Martin, Kiersten Prince, Avery Scott L. Bockelman: Dorian Fleming, Skye Huber, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clinton Rester, Lyndsey Stiefel, Gregory Wilson Fifth Grade B. Linane: Tanner Amison, Janacia Bunyon, Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Cade Juno, Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Jake Norred, Allison Register, Alyssa Robinson, Gabriel Smith Sixth Grade Alexus Johnson, Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Steven Hicks, Karolynn Myers, Daijon Penamon, Cameron Wynn Seventh Grade Christian Amison, Michaela Cassidy, Katelynn Denney, Simon Hodgson, Nick Joanos, Brooke Martina, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Andrew Nguyen, Madison SmithEE ighth Grade Cash Creamer, Tia Cummings, Max Davis, Jaylon Gainer, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bianca Huber, Bobbie Kilgore, Zachary May, Alexis Segree, Alyssa Shiver, Anna Smith, Katy Spann, Marshall Sweet, Xuripha Tiller, KK Wilson, Emily Zingarelli ABC S chCH OO lL HONOR RR O llLL

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, June 27, 2013 The Times | A15 Are you Looking for a Babysitter? I am trained in CPR and First Aid. I have 40hr of credit in child Devlopment, plus many additional hours of training in “on the Job” services. CDAcertification, Currently employed with Early Education and Care. Now need to be home. If intrested call Patricia at 850-323-0996 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 1109849 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace 4515128 The City of Carrabelle is accepting applications for Water /Wastewater LaborersUnder the supervision of the Water /Wastewater Superintendent, the employee will be responsible to perform manual labor in maintaining water and sewer lines for the City of Carrabelle. Responsibilities include installing new water and sewer service, repairing water and sewer lines, manholes, meter readings, and all other assigned tasks. Employee is responsible for the operation of heavy equipment used in the performance of assigned tasks. High School Diploma/GED required. Experience is preferred. Salary will be discussed at time of interview. Applications can be picked up at City Hall, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL 32322, all previous applicants need to re-apply. Deadline for all applications is July 8, 2013. The City is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free workforce. 1115104Refrigeration Technician WANTED€ Must have 1 year of commercial refrigeration experiences € EPA Certification € Clean MVR € Must be a self-starter € Company vehicle & uniforms All interested applicants must apply online: www.winndixie.com/careers Click on Apply Now –Logistics 4515123 EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLEThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is seeking applications for a eld position in operations and maintenance. Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District Oce, 40 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 during normal business hours, Monday thru Friday 8:30 am 4:30 pm EST.The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and is a drug free workplace. Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4515133 € 50 % Commission € PT/FT € Flexible Schedule € Paul Mitchell Focus Salon € Advanced Training Must be Florida Licensed Cosmetologist or Nail Tech Apply within at 147 W. Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL Stylist & Nail Tech Needed Very busy location with lots of walk-ins. or Call Cindy at (850) 653.5207 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ................... ............... ..................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD ................... ............... ................ $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND .............. ..... ............................ $750 1BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650 Other Youth & Family Advocate Several available positions as full-time counselor in an innovative agency serving adolescents and their families in outlying counties (Taylor, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson & Madison). These services may include initial screenings, crisis intervention, case planning, internal and external referrals, progress evaluation, individual, group and family counseling. Master’s Degree in a Counseling Related Field required. Travel Required. Mail your resume to 2407 Roberts Ave., Tall, FL 32310 or fax 576-2580. In order to process applications more efficiently, we ask that you please refrain from calling the office to confirm receipt of resumes. Web ID#: 34255232 Text FL55232 to 56654 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Southern Cross-28Ft, Good condition, Dsl Eng, 2-Spd Winchs, New stainless rig, Awlgrip Hull, West Bottom. Health, $7,500 OBO. Call 850 866-6989. Text FL55153 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/Repair Housekeepers Experienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34256831 Other Property Services Opportunity for energetic person to work with our uniformed property services team and learn valuable customer service skills while performing duties including landscape, pool cleaning, janitorial & general maintenance. Great wage, work 32-40 hours weekly. To apply start with a call to CMS at 850-927-4911. Web ID#: 34255273 Text FL55273 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair DISPATCHERS AND MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS National cleaning and outsourcing company needs experienced staff for above positions for a large, luxury property in the Santa Rosa Beach area. Dispatchers -$10 $12 per hour, shifts from 8am to 10pm, weekends required. Maintenance Techs must be experienced $12 -$16 per hour, nights and weekends required and some overnight on-call shifts. Voluntary benefits available after 90 days. Call Jennifer at (850) 231-1422 or (850) 461-2854. Web ID#: 34256011 txt FL56011 to 56654 Education Early Education and Care, Inc. Center Director position available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media Specialis t Collins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 ADOPT : Actor/Director & Executive long for 1st baby to LOVE; Home cooking awaits! 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Wanted: A place to board my horse in Franklin County. 850-274-1321 Text FL55658 to 56654 GUN SHOW July 6th & 7th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 in CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of AUGUST, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Commence at the Northeasterly corner of Lot 1, Block 16, Unit 4, Lanark Village, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 6, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and run South 67 degrees 13 minutes 35 seconds East 261.30 feet to a point lying on the Northerly right-ofway boundary of State Road No. 30, thence run South 62 degrees 13 minutes 55 seconds West along said right of way boundary 574.40 feet to a concrete monument (marked 4261) marking the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-ofway boundary run North 27 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds West 191.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence run North 88 degrees 41 minutes 17 seconds West 164.32 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261); thence run South 15 degrees 38 minutes 56 seconds East 277.04 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261) lying on the Northwesterly right of way of State Road No. 30; thence run North 62 degrees 13 minutes, 55 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 201.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 93953T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-128 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-128 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Block B, Saint James Island Park (Unit No. 1), according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO J’s TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 219.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 200.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 232.45 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE AFOREMENTIONED RIGHT-OF-WAY, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND A CURVE RUN WESTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 200.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 631.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE LEAVING SAID POINT GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (US HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET, THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHTOF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 19 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET (CHORD=44.86 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 208.74 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 3: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 676.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE ESTABLISHED BY REMNANTS OF A WIRE FENCE WITH CEDAR POSTS FOR A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID FENCE REMNANTS, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 222.99 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.44 FEET (CHORD= 100.44 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST) TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: June 20, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 2013 93983T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-21-CA APALACHICOLA INTERNATIONAL AVIATION TRAINING CENTER, INC., a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE P. HAMM, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 28th day of May, 2013, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by public sale, on the 10th day of July, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 33 Market Street in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: 1981 PIPER PA-44-180, SERIAL NO. 44-8195009, FAA REGISTRATION No. N8307E, LYCOMING 0-360A1D ENGINE TOGETHER WITH ACCESSORIES AND EQUIPMENT INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL LOGBOOKS (ENGINE, AIRCRAFT AND PROPELLER), PARTS, RADIOS, AVIONICS, AND PROPELLERS. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 3rd day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 Other Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on July 19, 2013 for the Down Payment Assistance Program, to buy existing housing only, Owner Occupied Rehabilitation and Emergency Repair programs. The deadline for submitting applications will be August 30, 2013. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur lo c al r eal esta t e e xp er ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the b est v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real E sta t e P icks! D isc o v er the b est r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Jo e A palachic ola, C ap e S an Blas S t G eor ge I sland C arr ab elle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! !! % !! # !! # (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D $ Th i s 1 B R/ 2 B A con d o a t P i ra tes Landi ng o n the beauti f u l Car r ab el l e R iv er o v er l o o ks the po o l and ho t tub and is tas tef ul l y f u r ni s hed to max imi z e s p ace and pr o v ide ev er ything yo u need to r el ax o n the weekend Launch yo ur bo at at the adj acent r am p. F ul l y f u r ni s hed 850-528-4141 l 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyinf o .co m $ T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4515098 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248579 $649,900 St. Geor ge Island SHELL HARBOR B A YFR ONT 4 BR, 4.5 B A, Guest Cotta ge boa t/R V gar a ge Gulf vie w fr om of ce/den, Ba y vie w lounge ar ea could be 5th BR, Scr eened por ches Guest cotta ge with kitchenette full ba th & scr eened por ch, Dock, Quality Construction, lots of stor a ge beautiful sunsets! $ MLS# 249568 $45,000 165 10th St ST AP ALACHICOLA, FL Lushly vegeta ted lot in A palachicola's north historic district. Conveniently loca ted c lose to do wnto wn and all of the grea t area restaurants and shops. Grea t loca tion to build a home in this charming southern to wn. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 $ $ MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248242 $279,900 St. Geor ge Island 451 51 02 1ST TIER PLANT A TION LO T Gr ea t Gu lf V ie ws P an or am ic vi e ws to th e ea st & no rt h, At te nt io n pi lo ts ne ar th e Pl an ta ti on ai rp or t; On e ac re lo t, Ad ja ce nt to bo ar dw al k to Gu lf On e of th e hi gh es t lo ts on th e Is la nd Am en it ie s in cl ud e Ne w Cl ub ho us e & Po ol Se as id e Dr i v e, Ni ck ’ s Ho le MLS# 248598 $95,000 PRICED REDUCED on this grea t F isherman's geta way! W ell maintained 3 bedroom / 2 ba th mobile home with large screened porch, 12'x24' stora ge shed, carport and green house on 3/4 acre. Less than 1/2 mile from the Carrabelle marina Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 $ “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) “Thousand Island” dressing was named for the islands of which river? Niagara, Ohio, St. Lawrence, Mackenzie 2) What’s the biggest city in the largest-sized geographical state? New York, Dallas, Anchorage, Los Angeles 3) Of these actresses, who was not born in California? Lisa Kudrow, Kirsten Dunst, Helen Hunt, Teri Hatcher 4) Per capita, from where are the most chicken-eaters? Mexico, Venezuela, Italy, Saudi Arabia 5) What are a rattlesnake’s belly scales called? Scutes, Scuds, Skits, Scowls 6) How many times does the earth go around the sun yearly? 1, 7, 24, 365 7) Who was the rst U.S. president to pardon a dog? Monroe, Tyler, Harding, LBJ 8) What means to talk through your nose? Snoach, Lute, Noose, Aedicule 9) Churchill Downs is a horseracing track in Kentucky, but where is Pimlico, another track? Missouri, Florida, Virginia, Maryland 10) Of these actors who was not born in California? Robert Duvall, Jack Nicholson, Kevin Costner, James Cromwell 11) What’s the average time lapse in hours between high and low tides on Earth? 2, 4, 6, 8 12) Near which country’s town of Jerez does Sherry (wine) originate? Chile, Italy, Spain, Peru 13) What are the rotating blades on a windmill called? Primers, Sails, Grubs, Leaves 14) Where did pajamas originate? India, Panama, Ireland, Egypt ANSWERS 1) St. Lawrence. 2) Anchorage. 3) Kirsten Dunst. 4) Saudi Arabia. 5) Scutes. 6) 1. 7) Harding. 8) Snoach. 9) Maryland. 10) Jack Nicholson. 11) 6. 12) Spain. 13) Sails. 14) India. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Oyster licenses on sale through Friday Sale of the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License will continue through Friday, June 28, at the $100 rate. Staff will sell the license from the old DEP-ANERR building at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. (formerly Seventh Street) in Apalachicola. Apalachicola historical society to meet Saturday The annual meeting of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at the home of Lynn and Bill Spohrer, 127 Ave. B, in Apalachicola. Elections will be held for members of the board. Mel Livingston will discuss his restoration of the old Economy Cash Building in the Bowery, also known as the “Bucket of Blood Street” to many local old-timers. Amanda Pace will talk about a landscaping plan for the Raney House. President Tom Daly will speak briey about his research into an endowment program for the society. Plantation photo contest seeks entries The St. George Plantation 2013 Photo Contest continues through Aug. 28. The Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners’ Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Prizes include rst place $150, second place $100, third place $50 and People’s Choice $50. For more information, go to www. sgpoa.com. Seafood workers to meet July 8 The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will meet at 6 p.m. July 8 at the re house in Eastpoint, on the corner of Sixth Street and CC Land Road. Workers will discuss association business and conduct elections to seat replacement ofcers for the secretary, treasury and second vice president seats. For more information, call Shannon at 653-5190. KidCare/Medicaid assistance available The Florida Department of Health in Franklin County is offering KidCare/Medicaid assistance. For more information or to sign up, stop by the county health department ofces. Visit the Apalachicola location at 139 12th St. on Thursdays or the Carrabelle location, 106 N.E. Fifth St, on third Tuesdays. For questions, call 653-2111. News BRIE fsFS

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* !!/ $0 ' S T J OE N URSER Y AND S UPPL Y "" "# ( ""'' # !# ""# +" '"" % &*"# "# $' ) # *" & Celebrate this 4th of July the "RITE" W ay! Visit our 3 Locations: 218 H w y 71 S W e wa hi t ch k a, FL (850) 639.2252 302 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B lv d P o r t S t J o e FL (850) 227.7099 117 H w y 98 A p a l achi c o l a, FL (850) 653.8825 Remember to PICK UP Y OUR PRESCRIPTIONS BEFORE THE FUN BEGINS! * $ +2' $ Home (850) 670-8893 B % $ % $ # 20 2120 2,-2 #123 (" "# !)& ,&! / + &!0& $0#!0&! (!& /!+ !&/&( -$. &/ -&( &! %!$, & !$. &$. /%& !% 0&" ,!$-$ $$& ,$-!/ ,&! *$ "' )##(## )##(## ) # # % & # NOW OPEN!! Flo wers & Gifts for All Occasions Cir cle E Candles Hand Cr afted Jewelr y b y Local Artists Balloon Bouquets 51 Mark et St., Suite A Apalac hicola, FL ( 850 ) 899-1588 C a r r a b e l l e B a y V i e w $ 4 4 9 0 0 0 3 B d r 3 B a | 3 0 0 0 S q F t q u a l i t y c o n s t r u c t io n s pac iou s r o o m s o w ne r b u i l t ba y v ie w h o m e N o o o d i n s u r a n c e r e q u i r e d 2 l a r g e g u e s t b e d r o o m s & f u l l b a t h l a r g e m a s t e r s u i t e m a s t e r b a t h w / g a r d e n t u b & s e p a r a t e s h o w e r i s r o o m y & a f f o r d s g r e a t n a t u r a l l i g h t L a r g e p o r c h e s s o m e o p e n s o m e s c r e e ne d s u r r ou n d t he ho m e S pac iou s k i t c he n op e n f a m i l y r o o m f o r m a l l i v i n g r o o m w / d i n i n g a r e a & s c r e e n e d i n b a c k p o r c h L a r g e l a u n d r y r o o m 2 c a r g a r a g e & w o r k s h o p D e t ac he d i n la w s u i t e S G I E a s t E n d B a y F r o n t $ 6 8 9 0 0 0 4 B d r 4 B a | 2 3 2 8 S q F t L o v e l y 2 s t o r y 4 b e d / 4 5 b a t h h o m e w / s c r e e n e d h e a t e d p o o l o n t h e b a y S t e p i n s i d e t o a t i l e d o p e n l i v i n g a r e a w / w a l l t o w a l l w i n d o w s f a c i n g t h e s c r e e n e d p o r c h & b a y T h e d i n i n g a r e a i s o p e n t o k i t c h e n w / g r a n i t e c o u n t e r s & a b u n d a n t c a b i n e t s M a s t e r b e d r o o m & b a t h w / a p o w d e r r o o m U p s t a i r s c o n s i s t s o f a n o t h e r 3 b e d r o o m s e a c h w / t h e i r o w n b a t h & a l a u n d r y r o o m P a t h t o p r i v a t e b e a c h c o m m u n i t y d o c k & p r i v a t e p o o l G r e a te r A p a l a c h ic ol a $ 1 6 9 0 0 0 1 B d r 1 B a | 1 5 6 4 S q F t L o v e l y c o u n t r y c o t t a g e l o c a t e d o n a p r i s t i n e 1 a c r e lo t i n A pa lac h i c ola A n i n v i t i ng p o r c h w e l c o m e s y o u o n e s i d e i s o p e n & t h e o t h e r i s s c r e e n e d L a r g e f a m i l y r o o m w / v a u l t e d c e i l i n g s & a d j a c e n t t o i t i s t h e d i n i n g a r e a & g r a c i o u s k i t c h e n w i t h a b u n d a n t c a b i n e t s & c o u n t e r s p a c e T h e l a u n d r y a r e a & c o m p u t e r n o o k i s c o n v e n i e n t l y s i t u a t e d n e x t t o t h e k i t c h e n T h e l a r g e b e d r o o m & m a s t e r b a t h i s b e a u t i f u l l y a p p o i n t e d T h e f u l l a c r e h a s n o t b e e n c l e a r e d f o r t h e i n t e n t i o n o f m a i n t a i n i n g p r i v a c y P l e n t y o f s p a c e t o p a r k b o a t s R V o r a n y o t h e r u t i l i t y o r r e c r e a t i o n v e h i c l e S G I G u l f B e a c h e s 1 s t T i e r G u l f $ 6 2 5 0 0 0 3 B d r 2 B a | 1 5 37 S q F t S u m m e r D r e a m s 1 s t t i e r b e a c h c o t t a g e l o c a t e d o n S G I T h e h o m e i s i m p e c c a b l e i n s i d e & o u t w i t h t o p o f t h e l i n e u p g r a d e s f u r n i s h i n g s & d c o r G r a n i t e c o u n t e r t o p s c u s t o m c a b i n e t s & b a c k s p l a s h i n t h e g o u r m e t k i t c h e n T h e f a m i l y r o o m h a s a g a s r e p l a c e & a m p l e s e a t i n g f o r a n u m b e r o f g u e s t s ; t h e m a s t e r b e d r o o m i s l a r g e w i t h v i e w s o f t h e g u l f E x t r a b e d r o o m s s h a r e a b a t h A n o p e n p o r c h s p a n s t h e f r o n t o f t h e h o m e o v e r l o o k i n g a b e a u t i f u l l y l a n d s c a p e d y a r d F i s h c l e a n i n g s i n k s h o w e r p i c n i c t a b l e & a d d i t i o n a l s t o r a g e f o r a b o a t j e t s k i' s e t c S G I G u l f B e a c h e s B a y F r o n t $ 4 2 9 0 0 0 4 B d r 2 B a 1 0 0 0 S q F t T h i s 4 b e d r o o m 2 b a t h g e m h a s b e e n met icu l o u s ly m a i n t a i n e d & is a f a v o r i t e o n t h e r e n t a l p r o g r a m f o r b o a t e r s & s h e r m a n a l i k e T h e e x t e r i o r a m e n i t i e s i n c l u d e a p r i v a t e b o a r d w a l k s h i n g p i e r d o c k w i t h b o a t l i f t & s h c l e a n i n g s t a t i o n o p e n d e c k s & a l a r g e 1 2 x 2 6 p o o l T h e s p a c i o u s y e t c o z y i n t e r i o r i s s p l a s h e d w i t h a i r y c o l o r s & f u r n i s h i n g s w i t h c o m f o r t & r e l a x a t i o n s p e c i c a l l y i n m i n d G o r g e o u s v i e w s & c e n t r a l l y l o c a t e d t o a l l t h e s h o p s & r e s t a u r a n t s S G I E a s t E n d G u l f V i e w $ 2 7 9 0 0 0 2 B d r 2 B a 1 3 9 6 s q f t Fa b u l o u s O c e a n M i l e t o w n h o m e w i t h g o r g e o u s v i e w s d i r e c t l y o v e r l o o k i n g t h e p o o l a n d o u t t o t h e b e a c h N e w t i l e o o r s n e w f u r n i t u r e n e w d e c k s & n e w w i n d o w s & d o o r s & t a s t e f u l l y d e c o r a t e d T h e r e n t a l h i s t o r y o n t h i s p r o p e r t y i s f a n t a s t i c w i t h m a n y l o y a l r e n t e r s T h e p r i m e l o c a t i o n o n t h e E a s t E n d w i t h t h e S t a t e P a r k a s h o r t w a l k d o w n t h e b e a c h i s a p l u s T h i s t o w n h o m e i s a m u s t s e e K a r a L a n d i s s R e a l t o r A B R C D P E G R I Y o u r F o r g o t t e n C o a s t R e a l E s t a t e P a r t n e r Pr ud e n t i a l S h i m m e r i n g S a n d s R ea lt y 1 2 3 E G u l f B e a c h D r S t G e o r g e I s l a n d F L 3 2 3 2 8 w w w .be a c h d r e a m sn o w c o m w w w f or g o t t e n c o a s t or ida c om ( 8 0 0 ) 9 7 4 2 6 6 6 e x t 1 4 3 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 53 7 7 53 ( 888 ) 6 5 1 0 88 3 C a l l K a r a L a n d is s t o V i e w T h e se E x ce p t i o n a l P r o pe r t i e s ' HAPPY 4TH OF JUL Y! from ev er y one at the Gulfside IGA & & # #+ % %! % % % &" &" (*$ #' % &% ) $ Chec k out our w eekl y mailer It’ s an e xplosion of sa vings! CALL L OIS A T 653-5857 WE OFFER MOSQUITO & NOSEEUM CO N TROL Happy 4th of July from Aloha Bu g Pest Manag eme nt

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See us f or your insurance needs at 61 A v e. E, A palachicola, FL 32320 W T G ; 68 * %82 ) 22 ) 9;12 68 4 ; ",,12 2 7;4 0, ,1 <22 *! ,< !1 ,1 ) "92 $22 /97 ) ,2 ,1 ) ,2 ,;; $,1 82 22 ,1 ,: 82 ",,12 82 912 /. "92 4 $% #% ( &$ ; 68' 8 8 + 8 $ ,1 < &9; ( &$ ) 2 8 ,1 38 -, 8 ;;9,02" &9; 2 !8' ; 1 9;; 97, ,1 Fourth of July Blast on the Beach LIVE MUSIC 9:00 PM 12:00 AM with “The Redneck Mothers” FIREWORKS SPECT ACULAR @ Dark P arty at the T iki Bar or Enjoy dinner and the reworks beach side in the dining area or on the deck. Come early and Stay Late! Restaurant Ser ving 11:00 AM 10:00 PM (850) 927-2987 68 W est Gorrie Dr Saint George Island, FL 32328 See Our LIVE WEBC AM www .BlueP arrotSGI.com

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Of f e r i ng A f f ord ab l e Fam i l y Fr i e n d l y Be ach Vaca ti o n s an d Roman ti c Co astal G e ta w ay s f o r o v e r 30 Y e ar s Cal l o r v i s i t u s o n l i ne to d ay Of f e i r ng f A f d or b a l e m Fa i l y ri F e n d l y 451 508 0 451 508 2 J u ly 3r d 20 13 2nd A nn u a l O l d A p a l ach i c o l a I nd e p e nd e nc e D a y 6: 30 PM – e R e d W hi t e a nd B l u e P a r ad e A er p a ra de T ra di t io n a l I ce Cr e a m S o ci a l L i v e M u si c, H i l l si de C o mm un i t y C h o ir Ga m es a n d A c t i v i t ie s f o r t h e K id s. 9: 15 PM “ D a rk i r t y ” F ir e w o rk s o v e r e A p a l ac hi c o l a R iv e r C a r ra b e l le J u ly 4t h, 20 13 – 9: 00 PM “ D a rk i r t y ” C o m e do w n t o w n t o en j o y lo c a l b u si n es s es a n d a S p e c t ac u l a r s h o w! S t. G e o r g e I s l a n d J u ly 4t h, 20 13 e I s l a nd B l as t! 11 :0 0 AM E d dy T e ac h ’ s W e t t es t a nd W i l d es t 4t h o f J u ly P a r ad e Dr es s u p y o ur G o lf C a r t o r C o m e W a t c h B r in g y o ur wa t er gun s a n d wa t er b a l lo o n s, m e et u p a t t h e co r n er o f 3r d S t r e et W a n d W P in e b eg innin g a t 10:30 a.m. a n d g et r e ad y f o r a w et a n d w i ld p a rade yo u wo n ’ t f o rge t A p a l ac hico l a 9:00 PM “ D a rk ir t y ”F ir e w o rks o n the B e ach @ e B l u e P a rr o t On e o f t h e b es t p a r t ies o f t h e y e a r L i v e M u sic, T i k i B a r a n d a B e ac h F r o n t Fir e w o r ks Di s p l a y t h a t N e v er Di s a p p o in ts. C om e J oi n U s!

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328 Br uce Str eet 90’ x 150’ Enjoy beautiful bay views from this lot. Located in a neighborhood of mostly permanent and second homes. The neighboring lot is also for sale, offering an opportunity to design and built a unique home with plenty of room for boat storage and privacy Only half a mile to the center of the island where you can enjoy restaurants, shopping or put your boat in the public landing under the bridge! Beach access just five short blocks down 6th St. !+(+( ( # %' $' Lovely bayfront lot with stunning marsh views in St. George Plantation. Located on A vocet Lane which is the first street in the Plantation so you won't have far to drive! An elevated house would offer western vistas overlooking the marsh towards the sunset. The lot has tall, mature pine trees which will provide shade and bird habitats for excellent bird watching opportunities. A beautiful homesite for a nature lover! !++( 355 Br uce Str eet If you like DEEP W A TER DOCKAGE on open water you'll love this lot. Deep channel is less than 100' from shoreline at the end of adjacent docks. Dock permit previously obtained by owner (now expired) ended at the channel and would have accomodated a 30+ foot boat. Views from the first level of a home would be incredible. Protected by rock seawall. V er y nice homes in neigborhood and good neighbors. Recent Development Feasibility Assessment in file showing 1,654 square feet available for 1st floor home plus plenty of room for on-site septic system and drainfield. # ( # + $ /) '$%. V er y nice Gulf front townhome. This unit has been recently remodeled throughout with a new kitchen, a new ceramic tiled master bath, ceramic tiled floors, and new living room furniture. Enjoy beautiful views of the Gulf. Subdivision offers 2 large swimming pools and is located near the State Park. !+# + + # + &.$ W aterbird W atch lives up to its name with incredible bay views overlooking natural wildlife habitats. The wraparound deck is extra wide to accommodate hammocks, lounge chairs and birders with binoculars! All the decks and exterior stairs are TREX deck no maintenance. Inside are two living areas so ever yone can have a bit of privacy The kitchen is on one end of the great room where the whole family can gather to discuss the days sights. One of the four bedrooms is a custom built bunk room that will delight the kids. Though chances are, they will probably spend most of their time in the heated, screened swimming pool. Currently on the rental market and ver y popular with nature lovers! !+( +( /$& 0 .0 Successful St. George Island business for sale! The Island Emporium has been an island fixture for 22 years. It is the go-to spot on the island to find anything to make a beach vacation more enjoyable; games, kites, swimsuits, beach towels, t-shirts, hats, seafood cookbooks, sand pails & shovels, and mementos. This sale includes the real estate and business. The real estate consists of a 3,431 total sq. ft. building on three tropically landscaped lots zoned C-4 mixed use allowing for residential living space. Building sits on two lots so the third could be used for expansion. Business includes all inventor y fixtures and equipment along with an outstanding reputation and exclusive lines of mer chandise only available at the Island Emporium. Excellent opportunity to pur chase turnkey business with repeat customers and room for growth! !+# + # $ $' Lovely first tier cypress home nestled under pines and oaks on a private lot. Built by William Solburg this three bedroom, 2 bath home features wonder ful decks and screen por ches on the east and west side of the house. Enjoy the sunrises and sunsets in shaded, screened comfort! The efficiently designed kitchen features a breakfast bar overlooking the dining area and living room. A wonder ful top floor living area with fireplace, grand windows with views of the Gulf and vaulted ceiling is sure to be a favorite spot for ever yone. Located just a few hundred feet from the beach access and quick bike ride to the community center with pool, tennis courts and Plantation amenities! !+( +(( # ' Beautiful, high beachfront lot in the prestigious subdivision of Sunset Beach that is next to the State Park. This subdivision offers a community pool, club house, and tennis court. Lot is located at the end of the cul-de-sac so it's a ver y private area next to the boardwalk. OWNER FINANCING A V AILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYER WITH 25% DOWN, 30 YR. AMOR TIZA TION SCHEDULE WITH A 5 YR. BALOON. INTEREST A T 5 3/4% FIXED FOR FIRST 3 YRS.; PRIME RA TE + 2 1/2%for 4th & 5th yrs. Seller's lender is offering an unprecedented 3.25% construction loan to qualified buyers. !( # ( # ./$% $' Stunning 100' wide beachfront lot in the heart of the St. George Plantation. Ideal building site for your custom beachfront dream home! Nestle your home amongst the dwar f beach oaks in the middle of the lot while enjoying the privacy offered by the low sea oat-covered dune protecting the beachfront. Located at the end of the street, connect to the community boardwalk to keep your panoramic Gulf view pristine. The newly built Plantation clubhouse, with fitness room, swimming pool and tennis courts are just steps away offering all the amenities of this wonder ful community right around the corner Per fect opportunity for a discriminating buyer who wants to design their own piece of coastal paradise! !+( # $/'$ Victorian elegance by the sea that is built for the Island lifestyle. Grand living with second floor master suite that includes living area, fireplace, breakfast nook, exer cise room, and office area. The garden tub overlooks the fabulous views of the Gulf. The spacious living area opens to a covered por ch and sundeck, and the elegant dining room is large enough to seat the whole family Lots of attention given to details with recessed lighting, crown molding, energy efficient appliances, 3 HV AC units one brand new T rane unit on upper level. T wo fireplaces, and security system. Gulf and Bay views from the widow's walk. Enjoy the soft island breezes in the gazebo or relax in the hot tub. Located next to beach access. !+ # (+ (( # /) '$%. This spacious home offers ever ything you could want in a beachfront setting. It has 5 private bedroom suites, 2 living areas, large covered por ches on both levels, an abundance of windows and glass doors that allow lots of light and fantastic views of the Gulf, a goodsize heated swimming pool, and a private boardwalk to the beach with a dune-top sundeck from which you can watch georgous sunrises. The top floor great room is a wonder ful open space large enough for ever yone in the family to relax and watch TV play board games or help in the kitchen. The dining area has a large picture window with good bay views so you can even watch the sunsets. It is nicely landscaped with a palm-lined gravel driveway to the house. Such a fun home! !++ ( # %. T wo acre bayfront estate in the St. George Plantation, just 1000’ to the Cut! 3BR/4BA custom home situated in the middle of two fenced acres under mature pines and palm trees with a private tennis court. High ceilings, crown molding, large light filled kitchen, expansive decks overlooking the Apalachicola Bay 200’ of bayfrontage with rip rap in place! !+(# # # ( # ' Fantastic 6BR/6.5BA beachfront home in the gated community of Sunset Beach. Freshly painted, updated with new furniture, this warm and inviting home says leave your worries at the door and enjoy island time! Gulf facing great room boasts open kitchen, corner gas fireplace and several seating areas opening to the beachfront decks. This kitchen is laid out to entertain for big groups with two ovens, two dishwashers, a large island and loads of counter space. Five master suites offer privacy for all members of the family or send the kids to the top floor theater room with big screen TV and wet bar all accessible by elevator! Whole house sound system plays beach tunes throughout home and to the numerous beach and bay facing! !+(# # ( # + '$ $ Picture yourself awakening each morning to the sun rising from a horizon dotted with fishing boats while dolphins swim by in the sur f. This gorgeous Mediterranean style home has been a second home for the current owners for years. This elegant home features a custom kitchen with 42" cabinets and granite counter tops. The adjacent dining area looks onto the deck and the pristine beach. The living room includes a gas fireplace and open comfortable seating space. There are three private master bedroom suites, with expansive closets, plus an additional bedroom with bath and a fifth full bath. The second floor living area offers additional room for family gatherings complete with wet bar !+(+ # # # $ $ $./ Elegant and spacious home located on a 1 acre lot with beautiful Gulf views and direct beach access that is for the most discriminating buyer This home features 7 bedrooms (stacked for noise control), 8 full baths, & 2 half baths; 4 equally appointed master suites; 2 children's suites with built-in bunks, cribs, playrooms, & baths; and a master bedroom on the 3rd floor that can be locked as an owner's area A living area on each floor Entertain in the home theater that has stadium seating for 11 and an additional mini kitchen & game room with a foos ball table. The gourmet kitchen has 2 refrigerators, dishwashers, ovens and sinks; stainless steel appliances, lots of cabinets, granite countertops, and butler's pantr y with additional sink. !+# # # ( $& '' $/$%-.%/$ V er y nice Florida Cottage style 3 bedrooms with 2 1/2 baths home. Cur rently a rental home along with house next door at 257 Prado. Both properties are for sale. See MLS 241347. (Shared driveways) Currently rents for $700/month. !+# + # ( # # '' $/$%-.%/$ Delightful cottage in Apalachicola's Historic north side! Beautiful hardwood floors throughout with trayed ceilings in the living room and kitchen adding to the spaciousness of the open floor plan. The large dine-in kitchen has extensive tiled countertops, a breakfast bar and plenty of cabinets. There is a half bath off the kitchen towards screened back por ch. The master bedroom has French doors opening to a shaded deck that also connects to the screened back por ch. Completely renovated in 2002, you can enjoy modern, low-maintenance conveniences in a charming setting sit on your front por ch and be neighborly or walk five short blocks to downtown. !+( # ( -' /& %$ /$ ./&., $/$%-.%/$ Remarks: Original New Urbanism! Live and work in the revitalized Bower y District of Historic Apalachicola. The old Coca Cola Bottling building offers two stories of histor y The first floor has been renovated into a charming retail space with distinct areas to showcase unique products. Approximately 2100 sq. feet on the first floor with a kitchen area, half bath, storage room and office all cooled with window/wall ACs. Upstairs is 2100 sq.ft. of classic warehouse loft; soaring ceilings and wood plank floors. Partially renovated with styrofoam insulation on the ceiling, a firewall/insulation/ sheetrock on the north wall, and sheetrock on the south wall. !+ + M a t c h m a k e rs f o r B u y e rs a n d S e ll e rs o n t h e C oa s t f o r o v e r 15 y ea rs #1 i n s a l e s b y v o l u m e s i n c e 2007 C O NT A CT : S us a n a t (850)323-0092, sb ass e t t@s t ge o rge w ir e d .c o m



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, June 27, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 9 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Even as the real estate market continues to improve, Franklin Countys overall tax base dropped a wee bit this year, mostly because of the statewide cap on annual increases to the value of non-homestead properties. According to preliminary numbers Property Appraiser Rhonda Skippers of ce provided the Florida Department of Revenue, the countys combined taxable value will drop to $1.632 billion from $1.636 billion last year, a mere 0.2 percent. This is a sharp improvement over last years 12.7 percent slide and marks the seventh consecutive year the tax base has shrunk. It is now less than half the size it was in 2006 and almost exactly what it was a decade ago. Were it not for the law approved by Florida voters in 2008 as a change to the state constitution that caps increase to the value of nonhomesteaded properties at not more than 10 percent annually, the overall tax base would have grown. Such was the case of the school boards tax base, which was not subject to the 10 percent cap. The school dis-By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com State seed money could jumpstart an arts program for the countys schools. Two county not-for-pro ts have been awarded a total of $45,000 by the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs under the Speci c Cultural Project grant program. According to their guidelines, these grants are designed to fund a cultural project, program, exhibition or series involving arts in education and discipline based cultural or artistic projects. Culturally underserved communities are encouraged to apply. The Weems Memorial Arts in Medicine Program (AIM), which ranked fth on the awards list with a score of 91.8 out of a possible 100 points, was awarded $25,000. A second grant of $20,000 was awarded to Apalachicola to pay a portion of the salary for a parttime director for the Apalachicola School of Art, which will pitch in an additional $4,000 for the salary. That grant ranked sixth on the awards list with a score of 91.5. Maureen Murphy, who administers this grant program, said all but ve of the 44 applications for funding for the 2013-14 scal year were funded. One applicant withdrew. The total money awarded by the program statewide was $830,523 so Franklin County received about ve percent of the money. Joe Taylor, who chairs the citys History, Culture and Arts board and is executive director of Franklins Promise Coalition, is listed as the contact for both grants. In the grant application, AIM is described as an arm of Franklins Promise Coalition, governed by its board of directors, but with a devoted committee which plans and manages the program. The funding will be used to expand the two main thrusts of the AIM program. According to the grant application, at the time the request was made, AIM provided an average of 12 bedside arts experiences per week and eight community outreach classes/ workshops per week. Both programs will expand by 25 percent with the new funding. Bedside arts experiences are conducted within the hospital, local nursing homes and in the residences of homebound patients, Taylor said. In an interview earlier this month, he said the bedside program has had limited success at Weems because people in the hospital were often too sick to participate. But, he said, several swing bed patients, those receiving transitional care and rehabilitation, bene tted greatly from AIM. AIM has taken the bedside program to St. James Bay Rehabilitation Center and to several homebound patients, including the late Vince Raf eld, Taylor said. AIMs community outreach classes and workshops are held at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art (the former Cotton Exchange), the community service center (the former Apalachicola High School) and the Carrabelle Municipal Complex (the former Carrabelle High School). Plans are underway to add the Eastpoint Firehouse as a community outreach venue, Taylor said. Classes/workshops have included drawing, pottery, improvisational theater, Oriental exercise disciplines tai chi and qui gong, and zumba, a Latin-inspired dance tness program. Future programs will include photography, belly dancing and oral histories, according to the grant. Taylor said because of reduced Tax base stays mostly at RHONDA SKIPPERProperty AppraiserSee TAX BASE A5 Ladies nightBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com This Novembers Florida Seafood Festival will be the golden anniversary of the states oldest maritime event, so it only made sense to break tradition with the choice of the festival headliner. The festival board this week announced that for the rst time since Kathy Mattea took the stage in 1992, the Saturday night feature entertainment will be a female artist. Kellie Pickler, who at age 26 has risen to the top of the country charts and the incredibly popular television show Dancing with the Stars, will take the stage on Nov. 2 at Battery Park. Her music ts the area; she likes old country, said John Solomon, president of the all-volunteer board of directors. Shes just a good person; she is one of those good-hearted people. Solomon said the festival hasnt made a deliberate effort to only feature male stars over the past two decades but that top-notch female acts often carry a heftier price tag.Kellie Pickler 1st female star to play seafood festival since 1992County awarded $45,000 for arts expansionDelinquent tax volume continues to shrinkBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The number and total value of the countys delinquent tax certi cates dropped off sharply this year, continuing the steady decline in recent years. At the May 24 sale in the jury room on the third oor of the county courthouse, conducted by Tax KRISTIN BARLOWE | Special to the TimesKellie Pickler will headline the Florida Seafood Festival with a performance Nov. 2.See DELINQUENT A5 See PICKLER A5 See ARTS A5 Back to the brine, A10Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15Oyster licenses on sale through FridaySale of the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License will continue through Friday, June 28, at the $100 rate. Staff will be selling the license from the old DEP-ANERR building at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. in Apalachicola.Apalach historical society to meet SaturdayThe annual meeting of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at the home of Lynn and Bill Spohrer, 127 Ave. B, in Apalachicola. Elections will be held for board members. Mel Livingston will discuss his restoration of the old Economy Cash Building in the Bowery. Amanda Pace will talk about a landscaping plan for the Raney House. President Tom Daly will speak brie y about his research into an endowment program for the society. St. George Plantation contest Until Aug. 28, The St. George Island Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Forms and guidelines are available at www.sgpoa.com.Summer bingo on the islandEvery Tuesday, enjoy Summer Bingo at 7 p.m. upstairs at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. Cards are 25 cents. This event is sponsored by and bene ts the St. George Island Civic Club. For information, call 927-2654.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 2013-14GRANTCALENDARMay8,2013-FCBOCCapprovedTDCrecommendationfor2013-14GrantsProcessJune5,2013 FinalTDCBoardApprovalfor2013-14grantsprocess June13,2013 releaseGrantinformationandApplicationFormsonline;useFCTDCgrant interestemaildatabasestoinformnewguidelines2013-14FCTDCEventsGrantProcessJune13,20,27,2013 -PublishTIMESpublicnoticethatFCTDC2013-14onlinegrant marketinginformationisontheFCTDCwebsite.Pre-certicationisrequiredforeligibility andmustbeincludedwithorganizationseventinformation.Thedeadlinetoapplyfor inclusioninthe2013-14eventmarketingprogramisJune30,2013July3,2013-TDCBoardMeeting,iscanceledJuly17,2013 -TDCCommitteeMeeting-CityofApalachicolaMeetingRoom,beginning at1:30pm. GrantApplicationsformarketingtheindividualorganizationseventwillbereviewedand recommendedforapproval,ifqualied July19,2013 TDCStatoE-mailnoticetoorganizationscontractmanagerofapproval forinclusioninGrantsprocessfor2013-14August7,2013 -TDCBoardMeeting,FranklinCountyCourthouseAnnex,3:00p.m. Apalachicola Finalapprovalofapplicants.PresentationofTDCPromotionsBudgetforinitialapprovalOnorbeforeAugust20,2013,FCTDCStawillissueocialemailednoticationasto statusofinclusionfororganizationseventapplicationOctober1,2013 -newscalyearbeginsforFCTDC2013-14ONLINEGRANTAPPLICATIONSMAYBEACCESSEDONLINEONJUNE13, 2013ATWWW.SALTYFLORIDA.COM/GRANTS.THEDEADLINETOSUBMITTHE201314GRANTAPPLICATIONFORYOUREVENTISJUNE30,2013. IFYOUWISHTOCOMPLETEAGRANTAPPLICATIONOTHERTHANONLINE,PLEASE TELEPHONETHEFCTDCADMINISTRATIVEOFFICEAT653-8678TOREQUESTACOPY, ORSTOPBYTHEFCTDCOFFICEAT17-1/2AVENUEE,APALACHICOLA,FLORIDA. ALL2013-14GRANTAPPLICATIONSMUSTBESUBMITTEDONLINEORTOTHETDC OFFICENOLATERTHANJUNE30,2013. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com At a festive, grilled chicken luncheon Monday at the Holy Family Senior Center, participants in a series of jobs and training programs met to celebrate their success and to signal the end of this infusion of this largely federally-assisted funding. We are here today to acknowledge, show our appreciation and celebrate the assistance that the various public and private entities rendered Franklin County during what could have escalated into the worst economic disaster in local history, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson said. Given local economic conditions at the time, followed by the collapse of the oyster industry, your swift response averted a scal crisis beyond measure throughout the Franklin County community. Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise Coalition Inc. emceed the event, which featured remarks from a series of participants in an array of programs, anchored by a multi-million dollar federal grant that has funded the ongoing shelling program as well as a variety of other training programs. Although this occasion certainly warrants such a celebration, it is also a bittersweet moment, as it signals the end of the temporary jobs program put into place to help stabilize the local economy, which also lifted spirits and renewed hope throughout the Franklin County community, Johnson said. However, left to linger in its path and perhaps most importantly and more lasting are the partnerships, collaborations and friendships established along the way by and between your agencies. Through your efforts, support and nancial contributions, workers have been retrained and placed into permanent job situations and adults long out of high school have fullled their dreams of obtaining a high school diploma, the mayor said. Johnson thanked the ve main pillars of what has become known as Franklin Works, the largest of which is the Gulf Coast Workforce Board (GCWB), which has administered the federal dollars. This is so humbling for us to be thanked by so many people, Kim Bodine, director of GCWB, said. It has been an awesome project for us. I do believe this is just the beginning. Jennifer German, GCWBs deputy director, detailed GCWBs success following the luncheon. She said 215 oystermen have been involved in the $2.7 million shelling program, which has been extended to run through July and August. Another 10 people worked for the county under this grant program, which was instituted in the wake of Tropical Storm Debby in June 2012. Theres a lot that happened in the last year, a lot of opportunities we have never had before, said Shannon Hartseld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. This is all about the community. I look forward to whats going to happen in the future. German said other monies to help dislocated workers over multiple years and multiple counties, has affected 414 participants, the largest number of whom have been involved in GED prep courses through the county literacy program. She said 126 people have been enrolled in the GED courses and about half so far received their high school diplomas. She said 42 individuals took part in classroom training at the Gulf Franklin Center in Port St. Joe, including a dozen who have b een trained as corrections ofcers and 25 in welding. Shawn Shattuck spoke to the luncheon about his four months of welding training, in which he nished in the top three in his class and has gone on to start his own business. Also speaking as participants in job training programs were Sandra Allen, as well as Cheryl Ray, who has been involved with the Bridges to Circles program, sponsored by Catholic Charities. Brunie Emmanuel spoke on behalf of the Bridges to Circles program he helped bring to the county. He said for the past two years the program has brought millions of dollars to help Gulf Coast residents affected by the oil spill, with two dozen successful projects up and down the coast. Its one of the highlights of my career, he said. I see people who have changed their lives because of this. Your neighbors and kinfolk are going to have a different life. Im honored to be a part of it. German said 62 people have beneted from GCWB training in how to better their work experience by learning appropriate work behaviors, and 17 have been able to exit GCWB services for a job. The mayor also thanked Progress/Duke Energy for its direct assistance to people who had trouble paying their electric bills. Company representative Bobby Pickels said as a result of the program, the rates of disconnect in the county have either stayed the same or decreased. Johnson also expressed his thanks to Trinity Episcopal Church and the Capital Area Community Action Agency for their help. And to countless others who show of support and compassion toward the wellbeing of their fellow man have been duly noted throughout Franklin County, within the city of Apalachicola and before the gracious throne of Almighty God, he said. Sister Jeanne, who is on the board of Franklins Promise, offered the invocation, and Pastor Horace Solomon offered the blessing over the meal. Franklin County High School student Morgan Martin also provided an interpretive dance. ANewClassicTheRearEngineRiderhasbeenreinventing. Stopintodaytoseethenewinnovation combinedwiththetriedandtruefeatures includingBriggs&Strattonengines. ST.JOERENT-ALL7061s(850)227.2112WeServiceWhatWeSell $00 Model7800920 SameGreatLocation-UnderNewOwnershipCoastalFurnitureandWoodworks,Inc.OutdoorFurniture,SleeperSofas, Mattresses,LivingRoom,&Dining RoomFurnishings LargeSelectionofAccessories, Comforters&Bedding203Highway98 Eastpoint,FL32328 Store:(850)799-1121 Cell:(850)728-6877Owner:KitMashburncoastalfw@yahoo.com DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLeft: Shannon Hartseld speaks to the audience. Right: Kim Bodine, director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, left, and Jennifer German, deputy director, address the luncheon.Franklin Works celebrates its success

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The Times | A3Thursday, June 27, 2013 HighSchoolSeniorwithHeartDisorderFindsCureatBayMedical 615N.BonitaAvenue PanamaCity,FL32401 (850)769-1511 www.baymedical.org WhatisElectrophysiology?Cardiacelectrophysiologyisthescienceofdiagnosing andtreatinganyabnormalelectricalactivitiesof theheart.Electrophysiology(EP)isasubspecialty ofcardiologythatrequiresseveraladditional yearsoftrainingfollowingacardiologyfellowship. ElectrophysiologistsaretrainedtoperformEPstudies ofthehearttoidentifyabnormalheartrhythmsand alsotosurgicallyplaceimplanteddevicessuchas pacemakersandICDs(debrillators)totreatboth arrhythmiasandheartfailure.Tobecomeboard certiedinelectrophysiologynotonlyrequires manyadditionalyearsoftrainingandexpertise,but adedicationtotreatingthesedisorders.Worldwide thereareapproximately2,000boardcertied electrophysiologistsandBayMedicalisfortunateto havetwoonourmedicalsta-HariBaddigam,M.D. andJoeTrantham,M.D.BayMedicalisalsotheonly hospitalintheregionwiththeadvancedtechnology neededtoperformEPstudiesandforoptimal treatmentofcardiacrhythmdisorders. ST.JOENURSERYANDSUPPLY Special to the TimesIn the morning hours of June 20, the Franklin County Drug Investigators received an anonymous tip that Anerence Terrill Sweet was at a residence at 238 Eighth Street in Apalachicola. Sweet, 19, Panama City, was wanted out of Franklin County on several felony warrants, including felony eeing and eluding a police ofcer, driving while license suspended or revoked and leaving the scene of a trafc crash with property damage. He was also wanted out of Bay County for felony violation of probation on two counts of grand theft, two counts of aggravated assault and a failure to appear for principle to aggravated assault. The drug investigators, along with several road patrol deputies, went to the residence to attempt to locate Sweet. Sgt. Ronnie Jones, on the south side of the residence, saw Sweet jumped up from a bed and run toward the bathroom. Lt. Allen Ham, along with Sgt. Timmy Register and Deputy Casey Harrell, was able to take Sweet into custody. In the residence deputies saw a large amount of what appeared to be cannabis on the oor by the bed where Sweet was lying. The house was then secured and a search warrant obtained. Inside was 53 grams of cannabis and currency, along with scales and plastic bags, police said. Sweet was taken to the Franklin County Jail where he was booked on the outstanding warrants. He also faces charges for possession of cannabis with intent to sell or deliver, and possession of drug paraphernalia. ANERENCE SWEETThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests in this weeks report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.June 17Melissa A. Estes, 44, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance, tampering with physical evidence and retail theft (CPD)June 19Ellis D. Maxwell, 29, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Robert W. Barrineau, 49, Cairo, Ga., violation of probation (FCSO) Melissa A. Estes, 44, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)June 20James E. Pilotti, 27, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Daniel Stepp, 45, Eastpoint, petit theft, grand theft and dealing in stolen property (FCSO)June 22Derik A. Strevel, 31, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) Keijuan M. Sims, 25, Port St. Joe, violation of probation (FCSO)June 23Charles M. Carpenter, Jr., 30, Telogia, battery and violation of a domestic violence injunction (CPD) Jamie L. Shiver, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)June 24Johnny W. Callaway, 47, Theodore, Ala., driving while license suspended or revoked, and attaching improper license plate (APD) Arrest REPORTA 29-year-old Apalachicola was hit on her bicycle Wednesday evening, June 19 while riding along Bluff Road. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report prepared by Trooper R. D. Snipes, Dianna Renee Cordes was pedaling north in the northbound lane of County Road 384, near the white line, with no rear red light, at about 10 p.m. Christopher Montgomery, 30, of Apalachicola, was driving a 2007 Dodge Dakota, also northbound, when he tried to avoid a collision with Cordes. The report said Montgomery steered left, and his front right collided with Cordes rear tire. She was ejected from the bicycle and came to nal rest on the north shoulder, according to the report. Cordes was transported to Bay Medical, where she was reported in critical condition the night of the crash. The report said charges are pending. By DAVID ADLER ER STE TE IN N Florida bicycle lawAccording to Florida statutes, bicyclists are required to obey all trafc laws just as people driving vehicles. They must follow the ow of trafc whether they are riding on the street or the sidewalk. Riders may not have headphones, headsets or other listening devices that alter their ability to hear surrounding noises. Late-night riders must have lights a lamp on the front and back that makes them noticeable from 500 feet away and a red reector that catches the light and gets the attention of other drivers, which are mandatory to legally ride a bike in the state of Florida. By TETEVIS PP AGEEApalachicola woman hit on bicycleCops bust alleged pot dealer in Apalach Law Enforcement

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By George OehlertSpecial to the Times It is that bittersweet time of the school year when we nd ourselves saying farewell to some colleagues, students and parents. For me, it will be my nal goodbye as my ve-year tenure as principal at Franklin County School has concluded. I will look back with appreciation to the school community for their support. I am grateful for the honor and privilege of having worked at FCS. The last ve years have been an incredibly rewarding journey with numerous successes and challenges. Change can bring much uncertainty, but we have been able to create a sense of certainty by remaining focused on our shared mission, values, and goals. Our focus on instruction, learning collaboration, and results has moved the school along the continuum of a professional learning community built on our motto: Inspire from the heart Lead with humility Soar with pride. It is my hope that the school district will continue to build the leadership capacity to make FCS, in partnership with the ABC School, the school that we all want, a school that models the educational practices that prepare students to be contributing citizens, productive workers, and competent leaders in the interconnected world of the 21st century. A school that is the cornerstone of community pride throughout Franklin County. To this pursuit, I wish incoming principal, Eric Bidwell, much success. Mr. Bidwell brings a vast array of experience and knowledge of FCS to the role as well as a philosophy of education that is committed to student success. I will always remember the Franklin County community and its schools in my prayers and I will be a Seahawk forever! George Oehlert retired this spring after serving ve years as principal of the Franklin County School.Principal Oehlerts nal farewell USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 27, 2013 APage 4SectionBy John Dunn Special to the TimesFloridas consumer con dence keeps inching higher, rising one point from May to 82 this month -another postrecession high, according to a University of Florida survey. June is the fourth consecutive month to show a rise in the sentiment of Floridians. Four of the ve components measured in the survey went up, and one remained the same. Respondents overall opinion that they are better off nancially now than a year ago rose three points to 70, while their belief that their personal nances will improve a year from now remained at 82. Their outlook for U.S. economic conditions over the coming year rose two points to 83. The surveytakers long-term view for the nations economic health over the next ve years rose one point to 83. Finally, the survey shows that consensus of whether now is a good time to buy a big-ticket item such as a television went up two points to a post-recession high of 93. The last time perception of current buying conditions reached this level was April of 2007, said Chris McCarty, director of UFs Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. That was the beginning of the collapse in the housing market. Several things help explain Floridians current optimism. The stock market reached record highs by early June. In addition, the states May unemployment rate was 7.1 percent compared with the national 7.6 percent gure. This decline from Aprils 7.2 percent jobless gure occurred as Floridas labor force was increasing, which meant it was due to an increase in jobs, McCarty said. Home prices have also kept rising. The median price for an existing singlefamily home is $171,000 -the last time it was that high in Florida was Sept. 2008. Consumer con dence could soon sag, however. As we continue to collect interviews through the rest of the month the index will almost certainly be lower when it is revised as the stock market has declined in the second half of June, McCarty said. However for now, most consumers are still not registering any fears about the effects of sequestration. They are more concerned that interest rates may rise now that the Federal Reserve has indicated it may reduce the amount of Treasury bonds and mortgagebacked securities it has been purchasing each month to spur the economy, McCarty said. Concern over this move, however, is likely overstated for two reasons, he said. First, the Fed is unlikely to reduce the purchases completely. Instead, it will gradually reduce them, unless the economy shows signs of weakness. In that case, the Fed could be expected to resume its intervention. Its also worth noting that conditions are not the same as they were in 2008 when the Fed began making these purchases, McCarty added. Though the current housing market is being helped by lower interest rates, there has also been a low rate of new construction and an increase in population. These two factors lead to pent-up demand. Housing prices may decline from their recent highs, McCarty said, but the underlying quality of loans is now very different from 2008. Current home buyers typically have good credit scores and put 20 percent down on their homes, both of which reduce the likelihood of another massive number of foreclosures like the ones that led to the last recession. The Fed has seen the economy through dangerous economic times, McCarty said, but the economy is now operating normally. There was nothing normal about 2008. Conducted June 1-20, the UF study re ects the responses of 434 individuals, representing a demographic crosssection of Florida. The index used by UF researchers is benchmarked to 1966, which means a value of 100 represents the same level of con dence for that year. The lowest index possible is a 2; the highest is 150. Details of the June survey can be found at http://www.bebr.u edu/cci John Dunn is a writer for the University of Florida News Desk. He can be reached at dunnj@embarqmail.comUF: Floridians con dence in economy buildsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County saw a slight rise in its unemployment rate in May, but the county was poised as the fourth best in the state for joblessness. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate in May rose twotenths of 1 percent, from 5.0 to 5.2 percent. The unemployment rolls added 17 people, growing from 273 to 290 people in search of work. The increase in joblessness occurred even as the workforce grew by 67 workers, from 5,457 to 5,524, which is larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,365 workers, and when the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 6.5 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture placed it just a few notches behind Monroe County, at 4.0 percent, the states lowest unemployment rate. This was followed by Walton (4.1 percent) and Okaloosa (4.8 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. Strong population growth was also a contributing factor. Franklin had the lowest unemployment rate in the tri-county Gulf Coast Workforce region. Bay Countys jobless rate remained steady at 6.3 percent, while Gulf Countys increased from 6.4 to 6.6 percent. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 7.1 percent in May 2013, the lowest since Sept. 2008 when it was 7.0 percent. The May rate was down 0.1 percentage point from the April rate of 7.2 percent and was 1.7 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 8.8 percent. There were 671,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.4 million. The U.S. May unemployment rate was 7.6 percent. Floridas unemployment rate was 0.5 percentage point lower than the U.S. rate and was below the national rate for the third consecutive month.Jobless rate ticks up a tad Special to the TimesNOAAs National Weather Service has discovered that 64 percent of lightning deaths since 2006 occurred while people were participating in leisure activities, with shing topping the list at 26 deaths. John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service, conducted the study by examining information on 238 deaths attributed to lightning over the last seven years. NOAA released these ndings on the rst day of National Lightning Safety Awareness Week to call attention to the danger of outdoor activities during a thunderstorm. Of the 152 deaths associated with leisure activities, shing is followed by camping, 15 deaths; boating, 14 deaths; soccer, 12 deaths and golf, eight deaths. The remaining 77 people were struck by lightning while participating in other leisure activities such as enjoying the beach, swimming, walking and running, riding recreational vehicles, and picnicking or relaxing in their yard. Between 2006 and 2012, 82 percent of people killed by lightning were male. When people think of lightning deaths, they usually think of golf, Jensenius said. While every outdoor activity is dangerous when a thunderstorm is in the area, outdoor activities other than golf lead to more lightning deaths. NOAA has made a concerted effort to raise lightning awareness in the golf community since we began the campaign in 2001, and we believe our outreach has made a huge difference since lightningrelated deaths on golf courses have decreased by 75 percent. Jensenius said the large number of shing, camping and boating lightning deaths may occur because these activities require extra time to get to a safe place. People often wait far too long to head to safety when a storm is approaching, and that puts them in a dangerous and potentially deadly situation, he said. Prior to the lightning safety campaign, lightning killed an average of 73 people each year in the United States. Since the National Weather Service launched the campaign, the average has dropped to 37. Seven people have died from lightning strikes so far this year. The best way for people to protect themselves against lightning injury or death is to monitor the weather and postpone or cancel outdoor activities when thunderstorms are in the forecast. Lightning can strike from 10 miles away, so if people can hear thunder, they are in danger of being struck by lightning. The only safe places to be during a thunderstorm are in a building with four walls and a roof or in a car. A hut, cabana, tent, or other rain shelter will not protect a person from being struck by lightning.Fishing, boating top lightning deaths The Fireworks Alliance is committed to educating people on the safe use of consumer reworks. The following guidelines are recommended to help you enjoy your reworks while minimizing the risk of an accident to yourself and others. Always read the instructions carefully before attempting to light a reworks item. Do not throw burned out sparklers on the ground. The hot debris left over from the sparkler can burn someone if they step on it. Always wear proper clothing whenever you use reworks. This includes cotton or denim clothing, long pants, eye protection, covered shoes, and (if necessary) ear protection. Never drink alcoholic beverages or take drugs when using reworks. Keep reworks away from open ames, including cigarettes. Do not smoke around reworks. Keep your reworks dry. Never attempt to light reworks that have become wet. Store reworks in a cool dry place, and away from children. Make sure small children cannot reach reworks, and never allow a child to eat reworks or put them in their mouth. Do not buy generic reworks that do not have labels identifying the manufacturer. All consumer reworks should be clearly labeled as Class C or 1.4G reworks. Do not buy illegal reworks. Many of these devices contain explosive compounds that are sensitive to shock and friction. Never allow children to use reworks without direct adult supervision. Children should be instructed on the safe use of reworks before allowing them to participate. Never throw or toss reworks at another person or animal. Do not light reworks in crowded areas. Use proper instruments for lighting reworks, such as instanton torches, safety ares, punk sticks, and other suitable tools that provide some distance between the reworks device and the person that is lighting it. Never pick up unlit or unexploded reworks. Malfunctioning reworks should be soaked in a bucket of water for one hour before disposing. Never attempt to re-light malfunctioning reworks. GEORGE OEHLERT Avoid accidents with reworks this Fourth

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, June 27, 2013 ONLY THEMOST ADVANCED HEARTCARE COULDSAVE MYLIFE. ITRUSTEDONE HEARTTEAMIN THEREGIONTO PERFORMIT.RussMarsh AvidTennisPlayer THREEYEARSAGO,IWASSERVINGTHEMATCHPOINTWHENI SUFFEREDAMASSIVEHEARTATTACK.LUCKILY,MYPARTNER IMMEDIATELYSTARTEDCPRWHILESOMEONECALLED911. THEHEARTTEAMATTMHUSEDANADVANCEDHYPOTHERMIA TECHNIQUETOSLOWDOWNMYHEARTANDALLOWITTO HEAL.TODAY,IHAVENOLASTINGEFFECTSANDAMBACKON THETENNISCOURT.TMHheart.org THEMOSTADVANCEDHEARTCENTERINTHEREGION. PERIOD tricts combined property tax valuation rose $19 million, from $1.696 billion to $1.715 billion, roughly 1.1 percent. Thats a good example right there of how much it (cap on non-homestead calculation increases) takes off of it (the tax base), Skipper said. You can see the real estate values are turning around a little bit. To underscore the effect the 10 percent nonhomestead cap has had, Skipper noted that of the countys 19,000 parcels of land, fewer than 2,000 were subject to sales last year. Only 2,000 could go to an actual market value this year and not be capped, she said, adding at the height of the market a few years ago, about 3,000 to 3,500 parcels were sold in a typical year. Youre not going to see a big jump in the future, she said. We are very limited with our increase as far as taxable value. Skipper, in her rst year as property appraiser after being elected without opposition last fall, said she believes the real estate is making a slow and steady comeback. The biggest increase was probably on St. George Island, she said. Weve had some areas over there that are really turning around big time, on the Gulf side. Carrabelle was the only taxing district to see an enlargement of its tax base, after having suffered an almost 26 percent decline last year. Carrabelles combined valuation this year will expand from $101.8 million to $102.7 million, an increase of $916,000, or almost 1 percent. The sharpest decline in the county was seen in the tax base of the Dog Island Conservation District, which went from $32.7 million to $29.4 million, a 10 percent drop of about $3.3 million. Skipper said erosion has taken away several lots that otherwise would have contributed to that tax base. A couple of areas are almost washed in two, she said. The next steepest drop in the county was seen in Apalachicola, where the tax base fell by about $8.6 million, from $126.4 million to $117.7 million, or 6.8 percent. The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is expected to see a 3.6 percent drop in its tax base, a loss of $2.5 million, from $68.3 million to $65.8 million. The Alligator Point Water and Sewer District will experience a drop in its tax base from $122.3 million to $119 million, a decline of $3.3 million, or about 2.6 percent. The Northwest Florida Water Management District, which is similar in size to the county base, will see a drop from $1.641 billion to $1.637 billion, a slide of $4 million, or about a 0.2 percent. Last year, the county levied 5.9637 mills in property taxes, but with the upcoming July 18-19 budget workshops, county commissioners will have to weigh whether to increase the millage, cut spending or a combination of both. Skipper said this years in-depth audit by the Florida Department of Revenue, which is conducted every two years, is about complete and that her ofce has been told the report will be a positive one. Were just waiting on an ofcial letter that weve passed, she said. TAX BASE from page A1Collector Jimmy Harris, the county sold 1,206 certificates, worth almost $1.04 million. This total was a little more than a third of the $2.94 million sold off in 2009, when 1,791 certicates were snatched up by investors. Over the past three years, the totals have steadily declined, from 1,668 certicates worth $2.36 million in 2010, to 1,585 tax certicates totaling $1.96 million in 2011, to 1,413 tax certicates worth $1.52 million last year. More peoples paying their taxes on time, or their mortgage companies, Harris said. The taxing districts are getting their money in a more timely fashion. As required by Florida statute, the county had to assume possession of all tax deeds under $250 for homesteaded properties, and these totaled $11,519, he said. The county received a 5 percent commission from the sale of $48,319, Harris said. Also paid for out of the tax sale proceeds were the costs of advertising for three weeks before the sale, which totaled $27,642. Harris, who was assisted at the sale by Sarah Braswell, one of the tax clerks, said about 65 people attended the sale, down by about a dozen from last year. He said the rates paid on the certicates were bid down considerably from a starting point of 1.5 percent per month, or 18 percent per year, simple interest. The rates were low this year, and they stayed low, he said. Its whatever the bidders are willing to take for their investments, and banks arent paying very much so theyre willing to take less to secure their investment. At least 60 of Floridas 67 counties have opted for online auctions, but Harris plans to keep the live sale the way it is, noting that the bidders, mostly local, prefer it that way. One Tampa group of investors spent about $270,000 on certicates at this years auction, Harris said. A recent investigation by the SunSentinel newspaper in Fort Lauderdale revealed going to an online format, in which anyone from anywhere can bid, could crowd out local investors. The reporters found many of the states online auctions have come to be dominated by large nancial institutions, which have dramatically increased their odds of winning by forming thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of proxy or shell companies to ood the auction, giving them a huge edge in tie bids where the winner is chosen by lottery. The majority of the smaller bidders are getting squeezed out or dropping out because they cannot effectively compete, said Miami real estate agent Murry Diamond, 60, a longtime participant in South Florida tax auctions. Im one of the people theyre driving out. In the online auctions, bids ood in from all over the world, from cyber competitors who can place thousands of offers within milliseconds with a few keystrokes, wrote the reporters. They noted that in online auctions, tie bids are broken by a random number generator, a computerized equivalent of how winning numbers are picked in the Florida Lottery. The result, they concluded, is that big investors now all agree to accept the theoretical minimum return, and swamp the system with simultaneous bids to increase their chances at being picked. DELINQUENT from page A1AIM funding, some community outreach activities have been suspended. Leslie Coon continues to offer pottery classes, and Jeanette Taylor has resumed Zumba classes after a hiatus. Both work as volunteers in formerly paid positions. Both classes are held in Apalachicola. Zumba and the pottery class were two of the best received AIM programs. They consider the work they are doing so important they chose to continue it, Taylor said. Liz Sisung, who was in charge of theater programs for AIM, said she has not been working with AIM for some time but would consider participating if AIM becomes more active. The grant application said AIM will add a new paid artist to the program during the 2013-14 funding cycle. Taylor said there will be a call for artists to identify this person. He mentioned Lane Autrey and Ed Springer as possible instructors. Based on the grants timeline, once funding is in hand next month, painting classes will resume in Carrabelle, and community outreach drama classes also will start back up. In August, a plein air art exhibit is planned at Weems and a new dramatization of the health care contributions of Dr. John Gorrie will be performed as part of the annual Festival of Ice. In September, there will be a photography workshop, and in December a program of caroling will be added to the ongoing bedside arts program. The grant application estimates 6,774 individuals will participate in 66 proposed events. Elders 65 and older account for 1,694 of the total; youth age 18 and under for 316 participants. AIM programs will take place in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty and Wakulla counties as well as Franklin, according to the application. The second grant will launch a program to provide art education opportunities to Franklin County students and the community at large. The funding will pay a part-time director for the Apalachicola School of Art, housed in the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art on Water Street, which is provided free of charge by the city, which also pays for utilities, maintenance and insurance. Based on the application, the program will conduct at least one dozen threeto four-day instructional workshops taught by leading artists, and six to 10 weekend instructional workshops serving at least 10 participants each. The grant application estimates the workshops will bring a total of $74,800 in lodging, $22,440 in meals and $14,960 in other spending to the county. It predicts an additional 3,500 attendees at special events related to the arts program will spend $42,000. On average, students attending the workshops will pay $300 each, generating $60,000, notes the grant. Sixty-ve percent of this is paid to the teachers, and the remaining $21,000 will support programs to bring art to the community. These community programs include developing and implementing an arts academy for children ages 6 to 18, which will offer at least 12 classes tailored to specic childrens age groups. Most of these classes will be at the center, but an outreach program will work within schools. Taylor said the academy probably will begin its work at the charter school and then expand to the Franklin School, to cover every student within the district. The School of Art will partner with AIM to address the creative and health needs of a diverse local population. The new arts director will also help organize at least three annual events to encourage arts and promote the area as a cultural arts destination. In addition, each year during high season, the arts center will offer works by local artists for sale, with part of the proceeds paid back to support the School of Arts. The application estimates 3,672 individuals will participate in 179 events over the 2013-14 season. Programs will be held in a dozen counties in addition to Franklin. The budget for the grant indicates the art directors salary will increase to $48,000 in the 2014-15 scal year, so presumably the director will become a full-time employee. We havent written a job description, Taylor said. They should have at minimum a background in art history, arts coordination or implementation. We hope to nd someone local. Honestly, we have nobody in mind for the job. ARTS from page A1Theyre typically more expensive because theres less of them. When theyre popular, theyre real expensive, he said. We just set out to get the best we could get, that we could afford. In Pickler, the festival found one of the nations fastest-rising stars, a North Carolina-born singer-songwriter who rst gained fame as a contestant on the fth season of American Idol, went on to release three popular albums and win a slew of awards and then topped it all off this past May by winning the 16th season of Dancing with the Stars with her partner Derek Hough. Solomon said the festival is planning several enhancements to mark the 50th anniversary of the festival, including a giant reworks show after Picklers concert. The festival will welcome back Billy Spikes to serve as grand marshal of the Saturday morning parade, Solomon said. Spikes, who now lives in Mount Dora, served as the rst president of the Florida Seafood Festival in 1963. A large exhibit will celebrate the history of the festivals ve decades. Also, the festival has decided to rejuvenate the King Retsyo Ball, which ended a few years ago because of a lack of attendance. The traditional event will be held Friday evening at the Armory. A lot of board members who are younger remember their parents going, Solomon said. Theres been a good response so far. JAMES HARRISTax collector PICKLER from page A1FLORIDA MM EMORY PROj J ECTThis photo, taken at the 1964 Florida Seafood Festival, shows from left Mrs. Gertrude George, Billy Spikes, (standing), Mrs. Billy Spikes and daughter, Jerry Allen and Louise Pendleton. Billy Spikes will serve as grand marshal of this years Florida Seafood Festival parade on Nov. 2. JOEOE TAYLOR TAYLOR

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 PUBLICNOTICE FCTDC2012-2013FiscalYear REMAININGMEETINGSCHEDULEATTHISTIME,SUBSEQUENTMEETINGSFORTHEBALANCEOFTHE FISCALYEARFOLLOWTHEREGULARSCHEDULEOFFIRST ANDTHIRDWEDNESDAY. BoardMeetingsWEDNESDAYFOLLOWINGFIRSTTUESDAYFCBOCCMEETING June5,2013, CarrabelleCityOfces,Carrabelle,3:00pm CANCELED:July3,2013, FranklinCountyCourthouseAnnex,3:00p.m. August7,2013, FranklinCountyCourthouseAnnex,3:00p.m. September4,2013, CarrabelleCityOfces,Carrabelle,3:00p.m. ATTHECITYOFAPALACHICOLACOMMUNITYROOM, 1BAYAVENUE,APALACHICOLA, BEGINNINGAT1:30PMFORGRANTS(IFSCHEDULED) ANDAT2:30PMFORMARKETING(IFSCHEDULED).CommitteeMeetingsWEDNESDAYFOLLOWINGTHIRDTUESDAYFCBOCCMEETING June19,2013, GrantsandMarketingCommittees,beginningat1:30pm July17,2013, GrantsandMarketingCommittees,beginningat1:30pm August21,2013, GrantsandMarketingCommittees,beginningat1:30pm September18,2013, GrantsandMarketingCommittees,beginningat1:30pm ForfurtherinformationpleasecontactFCTDCofces@17-1/2AvenueE,Apalachicola, 653-8678,orvisitourwebsite:www.anaturalescape.com/administration.THISISAPUBLICMEETINGANDTWOORMORE FRANKLINCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERSMAYATTEND. Rev6/12/13 CouponExpires:7-15-13CODE:AP00 NOTICEOFINTENTTOCONSIDER ADOPTINGCOUNTYORDINANCENoticeisherebygiventhatonJuly2,2013at10:10a.m.(ET)at34ForbesStreet, Apalachicola,FloridaattheCourthouseAnnex,theFranklinCountyBoardof CountyCommissionerswillholdapublichearingtoconsideradoptinganordinance captionedasfollows: ANORDINANCEAMENDINGTHEFRANKLINCOUNTYZONINGCODE ORDINANCE92-6,SECTION462,REGULATINGSTRUCTURESAND ESTABLISHINGTHEPERMITTEDHEIGHTLIMITANDMODIFICATIONS TONOMORETHAN47FEETATTHEROOFPEAK,NORACCOMMODATE MORETHANTHREEHABITABLEFLOORS,FROMHIGHESTNATURAL GRADE;PROVIDINGSEVERABILITYANDANEFFECTIVEDATE AcopyoftheproposedordinanceisonlewiththeClerkofCourt,33MarketStreet, Apalachicola,Floridaandmaybeviewedthere. InterestedPersonsmayappearatthemeetingandbeheardwithrespecttothe proposedordinance. Anypartywhomaywishtoappealthedecisionmadeatthispublichearingis responsibleformakingaverbatimtranscriptofthehearing. osepersonsrequiringassistancetoattendthemeetingmustcalldeputy clerkMichaelMoronat850-653-8861x100atleastthreebusinessdaysbeforethe meetingtomakearrangements. StartingJune3rdofficehourswillbechanging forbothWeemsMedicalCenterEastClinicand WeemsMedicalCenterWestClinic WeemsMedicalCenterEastMonday(extendedhours)8:00am-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-4:30pm Wednesday8:00-4:30pm Thursday8:00-4:30pm Friday(extendedhours)8:00-6:00pm Saturday8:00-4:00pm Note:appointmentswillbescheduledupto30min.priorto close(walk-insstillwelcomeupuntilclose) WeemsMedicalCenterWestMonday8:00-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-6:00pm Wednesday8:00-6:00pm Thursday8:00-6:00pm FAMILYANDSPECIALTYCARE850-653-8853,ext.118 Apalachicola 850-697-2345 Carrabelle There were few surprises when the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce chose a new governing board on June 5. The chamber elected a new board of directors for the 2013-14 scal year at their monthly business luncheon at Carolines in Apalachicola. Ofcers for this year are Donna Duncan, president for a second consecutive term, as is Bud Hayes vicepresident. Kristin Anderson, elected secretary/historian, has served in that position since 2009. Jerry Hall will remain treasurer. Bonnie Gomes, formerly of Oyster Radio100.5 FM, Mark Friedman, with Friedman Financial Advisors, and attorney Kristy Branch Banks, all retired from the board. New to the board and membership is Tom Morgan, owner of Apalach Outtters. Duncan, attorney with Sanders and Duncan; Hayes with the Franklin County Humane Society and the ABC School; Anderson, owner of LongDreamGallery.com; Mike Koun, owner of the Gibson Inn; Brenda Ash, with Centennial Bank; Jean Ulrich, a real estate agent with Jeff Galloway Real Estate and owner of Ulrich Construction; Ouida Tartt, owner of the House of Tartts, a guest cottage in downtown Apalachicola; Bev Hewitt and Hall, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill, the Soda Fountain, and the BackStreet Trading Company; attorney Michael Shuler; Ginny Griner with Weems Memorial Hospital; and Kevin Ward with Eagle Technology Services and 13 Mile Seafood,. The Apalachicola chamber currently has 480 members. It was started in the 1830s. Among its many presidents were ice machine inventor John Gorrie, and David Raney. In the 1980s, the chamber expanded its membership area to encompass Apalachicola Bay including Eastpoint and St. George Island. By LOIS SWOBODAChamber of commerce elects 2013-2014 ofcers James Clain, of Kenrick A. Clain and Son Nautical Antiques, has identied an artifact recently donated to the St. George Island Lighthouse Museum. The lamp pictured above is a 200 mm Lovell BU-48 lantern, used on piers and on some buoys. It was electrically operated and required 12 volts DC to operate. Some buoys had batteries and later solar to power it. The bird spike on the top is to keep gulls from sitting on it. Clain placed a value of at least $1,500 on the brass lamp. LIGHT SHED ON OlLD lLAMPLOIS OIS SS WO O BODA ODA | The Times This casually posed Vietnam era soldier is part of the expanded displays at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. The museum has also added a World War II tail gunner in full gear. Three World War II era exhibits, depicting the camp post ofce, inrmary and a typical civilian living room, are now complete and, as a nishing touch, recordings of vintage radio programs play in the background in the exhibition hall. If you havent visited the camp lately, now is a great time. Also on display at the museum are a set of three alternative plans for the proposed museum and monument to be built across US 98 from Carrabelle Beach Park. The plans were donated by Inovia, engineering consultants for the city of Carrabelle. The Camp Gordon Johnston Museum is open Monday through Thursday 1 to 4 p.m.; Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Camp Gordon Johnston expands displaysLOIS OIS SS WO O BODA ODA | The Times

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The Times | A7Thursday, June 27, 2013 Youloveyourcar.Butitmightbetimeto upgrade.Dishingoutalotofdougheach monthjusttokeepOldBetsyrunning maybecausingyourbudgettoscream, "It'stimeforachange! Cometothecreditunion.Wecanputyou inthedriver'sseatofanewcar.Membershipeligibilityrequired.Ratesarebasedoncreditscoreandaresubjecttochangewithoutnotice. 502WoodwardAvenue,PortSaintJoe,Ph:(850)227-1156 101EastRiverRoad,Wewahitchka,Ph:(850)639-5024 248USHighway98,Eastpoint,Ph:(850)670-1199 Toll-Free:1-877-874-0007Email: emeraldcoast@fairpoint.netwww.emeraldcoastfcu.com

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LILMAN!Thislittlesweetheartisa2year oldChihuahua/Terriercross.Heisa social,happylittleguywhowould dowellinahomewithoutsmall children.Heisaperfectsizefor someonelivinginanapartmentor whoislookingforalapdog.Heis heartwormnegative,vettedandneutered.Cometotheadoption centertomeetthisfineLilMan. VOLUNTEERSAREDESPERATELYNEEDED TOSOCIALIZEALLOFOURDOGSANDCATS. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofour animalsintotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytime youcansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat 670-8417 formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCounty HumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogon tothewebsiteat www.forgottenpets.org toseemoreofour adoptablepets. 4515017SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthCallTodayJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 PUBLICNOTICENOTICEOFINTENTISGIVENTHATFRANKLINCOUNTYWILLHOLDAPUBLICHEARINGTO CONSIDERADOPTINGANAMENDEDFLOODPLAINMANAGEMENTORDINANCE NoticeisherebygiventhatonJuly2,2013at10:00a.m.(ET)at34ForbesStreet,Apalachicola,Floridaat theCourthouseAnnex,theFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionerswillholdapublichearing toconsideradoptinganordinancecaptionedasfollows: ANORDINANCEBYTHEFRANKLINCOUNTYBOARDOFCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERS, AMENDINGTHEFRANKLINCOUNTYCODEOFORDINANCETOREPEALORDINANCE 2003-39;TOADOPTANEWFLOODPLAINMANAGEMENTORDINANCE;TOADOPTFLOOD HAZARDMAPS,TODESIGNATEAFLOODPLAINADMINISTRATOR,TOADOPTPROCEDURESANDCRITERIAFORDEVELOPMENTINFLOODHAZARDAREAS,ANDFOROTHERPURPOSES;TOADOPTLOCALADMINISTRATIVEAMENDMENTSTOTHEFLORIDA BUILDINGCODE;PROVIDINGFORAPPLICABILITY;REPEALER;SEVERABILITY;ANDAN EFFECTIVEDATE. AcopyoftheproposedordinanceisonlewiththeClerkofCourt,33MarketStreet,Apalachicola, Floridaandmaybeviewedthere. InterestedPersonsmayappearatthemeetingandbeheardwithrespecttotheproposedordinance. Anypartywhomaywishtoappealthedecisionmadeatthispublichearingisresponsibleformakingaverbatimtranscriptofthehearing. osepersonsneedingspecialassistancetoattendthemeetingmustcontactdeputyclerk,Michael Moron,at850-653-8861,extension100,threebusinessdayspriortothemeetingtomakearrangements forattendance. SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013Wheeler twins shower on SaturdayCourtney Giddens, Ottice Amison engagedMr. and Mrs. Johnny C. Giddens, of Fitzgerald, Ga., announce the engagement of their daughter, Courtney Elizabeth, to Mr. Ottice Dewey Amison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tim Amison, of Apalachicola. Miss Giddens is the granddaughter of Sara and James Phillips, Joyce Giddens and the late Alvin Giddens and John R. Giddens. A graduate of Georgia Southern University, she holds a bachelors degree in exercise science. She received an associates degree in nursing from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. Miss Giddens is employed as an RN at Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola. Mr. Amison is the grandson of the late Eddie Amison, Kitty Amison, Doris Bayles and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bodiford. He is a graduate of Apalachicola High School and served as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne, U.S. Army. He is co-owner and operator of Amison Seafood Inc. in Apalachicola. The couple will be married at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Peach Barn in Tifton, Ga. A reception at the same location will immediately follow the ceremony. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. EngagementHappy birthday, Eula RochelleHappy 73rd birthday on Friday, June 28, Mom. Love,From all your children and grandchildrenHappy birthday, Henry RochelleHappy 78th birthday, Dad, on Monday, July 1.Love,From all your children and grandchildren Happy BIrR ThHDaA Y Oh, by the way, there was a record crowd at the Lanark Village Boat Club, last Saturday, June 15. Thanks for your support and thanks to the members who prepared and served the breakfast. Well, here it is, almost time for the Fourth of July celebration. There will be reworks on Thursday July 4 at dark thirty. Come celebrate Fourth of July at the Lanark Village Boat Club on Thursday, July 4. Members will have a covered dish and they will prepare chicken and ribs. Donation is $3. Bring your favorite dish to share. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Be lookin for ya! Then on Saturday, July 6 come on down to the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and help us celebrate Independence Day. We will have a cook out with a half grilled chicken and two sides for a donation of $8. Serving begins at 5 p.m. and will continue until gone. See ya there! Been missing you at Thursdays lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center. Serving begins at noon. Come join us, why dont you? A minimum donation of $4 is required. Ann Wilson will be on hand to check your blood pressure, and probably someone will be there to have a display and information. Be lookin for ya! The center is at 201 Ave. F in Carrabelle. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, dont drink a fth on the Fourth! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry.Check your blood pressure at Thursday lunch LaANarARK NeEWSJim Welsh Two by Two, Twins are due, And we are tickled pink and blue! Please join us for a twin baby shower honoring Tanja Jewell Wheeler at the First Assembly of God Church, 307 Third Street NW, Carrabelle on Saturday, June 29 at 3 p.m. Registered at Burlington and Wal-Mart. All friends and family are invited. Twice the blessing, twice the love, Two little miracles sent from above. By BROOK PITTMANSpecial to the Times Franklin County Middle School science students recently completed a shoreline restoration project, planting more than 2,500 sea grass seedlings at the schools new marine science pier along U.S. 98 across from the campus. Teachers Spencer Tolbert and Pamela Marshall said the shoreline planting project is a follow-up environmental science activity that allows students to learn hands-on about habitat protection, preservation and restoration in the Apalachicola Bay. Two different seagrass species, the Spartina patens and Spartina alterniora, were selected to provide the students with an opportunity to study their differing growth and survival characteristics Tolbert said. It does not sound like much, but it underscores how important a simple thing like seagrass is to the bay. It prevents erosion, promotes ltration and provides habitat for a myriad of different living organisms. There are no better learning tools than getting out and doing the work yourself, he said. Technical advice and support was provided by the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the University of Florida/IFAS Franklin County Cooperative Extension Service. The project was fully funded by the Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District. This was a great opportunity to support the Franklin Middle Schools environmental science and education program, to recognize the leadership of Tolbert and Marshall, and to involve the next generation in being responsible stewards of our fragile ecosystem, the lifeblood of our economy and way of life here in paradise, said John Sink, a member of the district board. In addition to academic credit, the students earned community service hours that help them in honors programs and applications. Sowing the seedlings of stewardshipSS Pec EC Ial AL To O TheTHE TT IMe E SFranklin County Middle School students planted two kinds of seagrass near the marine science pier.

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NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget SacredHeartofJesusCatholicChurch-YourChurchontheCoast-2653Highway98East P.O.Box729,LanarkVillage,Fl32323Pastor:FatherEddieJones MassSchedule:Saturday:(Vigil)5:00PM Sunday:7:30AM(850)697-3669 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 Special to the TimesWith the blessing of Diocese Bishop S.J. Williams, presiding elder Bishop Frank Hogans, Jr., and her pastor, Elder Clifford Williams, Minister Kathy Williams will be empowered Sunday as co-pastor of the Apalachicola First Born Church of the Living God. The installation and consecration service will be held at 4 p.m. at the church, at 194 Eleventh Street, in Apalachicola, Minister Kathy Williams was saved March 18, 1977, receiving the baptism of the Holy Ghost during a revival service in Apalachicola, conducted by Evangelist Nancy Spearman and Evangelist Geraldine Johnson. Born and raised in Port St. Joe, Williams graduated in 1971 from Port St. Joe High School. She received her early religious training from Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church, in Port St. Joe, under the pastorate of the Rev. Charles P. Price. On Aug. 13, 1972, she married Apalachicola minister Clifford Williams, and God blessed them with four girls and one son. Early in her marriage, she accompanied her husband to Tacoma, Washington, and assisted him in the church Bishop R. B. Thompson had assigned him. In 1975, Minister Clifford Williams returned with his family to Apalachicola, and they all joined the Apalachicola First Born Church of the Living God, under the pastorate of Elder Ernest Johnson. This began Kathy Williams work in this church, which is a member of the Greater Apalachicola District and the West Florida Diocese. Appointed in 1978 by Johnson as a deaconess and youth mother, Kathy Williams worked faithfully in those positions at her church. Also in 1978, Elder Williams was assigned a church in Pensacola, and she began commuting there with him during the two-year assignment, continuing her duties as a deaconess in both churches. Her service as a deaconess continued until Nov. 1993, when after giving her introductory message in Crawfordville, she became licenses as a minister by Presiding Elder W. L. McQueen, Jr. Minister Kathy Williams has served in several roles in the district and diocese, working faithfully as a Godly woman, loyal to her God. Promoted by Elder McQueen to union directress of the district in the early 2000s, she continues to work in that capacity. In Oct, 2010, Elder Williams, pastor of the Apalachicola First Born Church, recommended Minister Williams for ordination to the presiding elder, Bishop Hogans, who in turn recommended her to Diocese Bishop Williams. Later that month, she appeared before the Presbytery Board, passed the ordination examination and on the third Sunday of the month, Minster Williams was officially ordained, with all rights of an ordained elder.Kathy Williams to co-pastor First Born church KATHY WILLIAMS Michael Louis Red Hendels was born April 12, 1985, in Panama City. He passed away Saturday, June 15, 2013, in Apalachicola. He is survived by his mother, Marie Estes; daughter; Kelsey Hendels; sister; Amy Foreman; brothers; Dwayne Hendels and Shawn Ward; grandfather; Robert Estes; numerous aunts, uncles, cousins; and other family and a host of friends. He was preceded in death by his father; Wayne Hendels; and grandparents, Gloria Estes, Mildred and Coddie Hendels. Funeral services were Friday, June 21, at Kelley Funeral Home with burial in Magnolia Cemetery, with Pastor Susan Roach ofciating.MMICHAEL HHENDELSMona Maxwell Moon was born Feb. 3, 1925, in Apalachicola. She passed away Friday, June 21, 2013, in Carrabelle at the age of 88. She was preceded in death by her husband of 55 years, retired Army Sgt. E-7 Cullen L. Moon; her parents, Homer and Laura Maxwell; and brothers, Edmund, Elmo, and Dolphus (Mac) Maxwell. She is survived by one sister-in-law, Anna Maxwell; numerous nieces and nephews; and care-givers, Charles and Betty Scott. Mrs. Moon was a member of Fellowship Baptist Church. She was a life member of Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary. She graduated from Chapman High School in 1943 and attended Belle Isle Business College in West Palm Beach. Before returning to Apalachicola in 1977, she worked as a steno for the Department of the Army at Ft. Bliss, Texas; Ft. Stewart, Ga.; and Okinawa, Japan. She also was a secretary for RCA at AUTEC Andros Island, Bahamas. Graveside services were Sunday, June 23, in Magnolia Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handling all arrangements.MMONA MMAXwWELL MMOON ObituariesLL ove and generosityA much-loved native son passed away on June 9, 2013. Gary M. Shiver, my brother, succumbed to his illness, leaving behind a grieving widow, two sons, a daughter, two grandsons and two granddaughters. Unfortunately, the family funds were very low and the funeral home demanded full payment before they would do anything. Thats when the good people of Apalachicola and Eastpoint came through with heartwarming donations of enough money to give Gary an elegant and decent funeral and burial. As a woman of 72 years, I have never seen such an outpouring of love and generosity as I have witnessed in this hour of need. Thank you again, Apalach and Eastpoint.Caroline (Shiver) DrouinHudson, Florida The themes for this summer are Beneath the Surface for teens 13-18, Dig into Reading for ages 5-12, and Groundbreaking Reads for those over 18 years of age. Looking beyond the surface of the world around us offers some interesting and exciting weekly activities and reads. The SLP program for teens began June 20 and runs through Aug. 1. It will be held at the library in Carrabelle from 3-5 p.m. There is a limit of 12 students so be sure to call the library at 697-2366 and speak to Tonia Chisolm to enroll in the program. These programs are offered at no cost to the participant but a permission form must be completed by parents and caregivers to participate. A guest speaker, Sondra Taylor-Furbee who is a certied yoga instructor, kicked off the SLP for the teens on June 20. Children ages 5 to 12 will explore gardening, pirate adventures, sea creatures, pyramids and mummies over the six week SLP which began June 21, 10 a.m. to noon. Once again, seating is limited so call 697-2366 to enroll your child. The librarys Eastpoint Branch is moving! During the month of June we will be leaving the site on Island Drive and moving into the new building at 160 Hickory Dip. We will be setting up the new library during July so stay turn for an opening date. A grand opening celebration is planned for early fall. This is a very exciting time for our libraries!Summer library program begins Card of TTHANkKSMichael Lee Creek, Sr., of Carrabelle, passed away Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at the age of 63. Michael worked as a newspaper deliverer and was a truck driver for construction debris cleanup. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam conict. Michael was of the Protestant faith. He was preceded in death by his dad, William Wendell Creek. Survivors include his wife, Cheryl (Yelvington) Creek, of Carrabelle; son, Michael L. Creek, Jr. and ance Kim Norman, of Monticello; a daughter, Michelle Thomas and husband Jody, of Hackberry, La.; ve grandchildren, Brandon L. Creek, Kerstin R. Creek, Brittany M. Thomas, Bashby D. Thomas, and Joseph N. Thomas; his mother, Mildred Creek Stacy, of Washington Courthouse, Ohio; a brother, Bill Creek and wife Shirley, of Sabrina, Ohio; a sister, Drue Reveal and husband Jr., of Aberdeen, Ohio; and several nieces and nephews. A Celebration of Life service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at First Baptist Church in Carrabelle, with the Rev. Rick Steward ofciating. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the service, from 10 to 11 a.m. at the church. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the service. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.MMICHAEL LLEE CCREEkK, SSR. FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, June 27, 2013The Fellowship Baptist Church, at 10 Ellis Van Vleet St., Apalachicola, will have Judge Ken Hosford and Fortress in concert on Sunday, June 30, at 10:30 a.m. All are welcome to come and share the blessing. This Independence Day weekend, Audubon is reminding Floridians to take care with Floridas original beach babies, rare and declining species of birds that nest on Floridas beaches and coastal islands. The beginning of July is a critical time for some of Floridas most iconic coastal birds and their uffy chicks. Roseate spoonbills, black skimmers, snowy plovers, American oystercatchers, least terns and more are using Floridas beaches and islands right now to raise their young. Unfortunately, when boaters or beachgoers approach nesting birds too closely, they may unintentionally cause the death of chicks and eggs. When parents are ushed from their nests, chicks and eggs are left vulnerable to predators, overheating by the summer sun, crushing under foot, or falling and drowning in water beneath the nest. A single ill-timed disturbance can destroy an entire colony. Please respect posted areas, even if you dont see birds inside them. Birds, eggs and nests are well-camouaged with the beach environment, and disturbance by people can cause the abandonment of an entire colony. Avoid disturbing groups of birds. If birds take ight or appear agitated, you are too close. Give colony islands a wide berth, and when shing, be sure not to leave any equipment behind. Always dispose of shing line and tackle appropriately. Audubon asks for help on beachesFellowship Baptist hosts Sunday concert

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Saturday, the staff at Bald Point State Park was amazed by a huge turnout for a turtle release party. Event organizer Dustin Allen, a park spokesman, said the park normally has 300 visitors on a busy weekend. Park staff thought they might see 500 to 700 for the release of Allie, the turtle. More than 1,500 turned out. Allen said this was the rst event hosted by Bald Point its 13-year history and the rst collaboration with the Gulf Specimens Marine Lab. The park provided a venue for the party, and the Gulf Lab arranged for publicity. Two turtles released Saturday had both received medical treatment at the lab. Advertising, including two Tallahassee billboards, promised Allie, a loggerhead turtle, would be released at 2 p.m. About 30 minutes before Allies return to the Gulf, Jack Rudloe, director of the Gulf Lab, released a small Kemps Ridley turtle that was found with a shhook in its mouth about a week earlier. Volunteers from the park, the lab and the Alligator Point volunteer turtlers collaborated to make the day special. In preparation for the event, park staff created a temporary trail of MobiMat, a strong recycled polyester fabric, to the beach to protect the dunes and make the event ADA compliant. Allen said Bald Point brought in extra wheelchairs designed for beach use. He said attendees with limited mobility expressed their gratitude for the consideration. As the crowd amassed on the Bald Point beach, things began to get rowdy. With only three paid staff members, the park relied heavily on volunteers for parking and crowd control. Volunteers attempted to manage the multitude and shoo them back from the proposed release point and out of the water. One volunteer repeatedly shouted Get out of the water. She wont know the difference between you and her lunch. He was largely ignored. Children and adults remained in the water throughout the release in spite of pleas and warnings that they were violating Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission rules. Rangers were able to clear the area directly in front of Allie, and her release went well. She was off without a glance back, resurfacing once to the delight of onlookers. Allen said if the park hosts another event, Bald Point will de nitely borrow additional staff from other parks. We think it went well, all things considered, Allen said. The turtle was safe. We didnt have any traf c mishaps and nobody got hurt. This was de nitely a learning experience. The loggerhead turtle had been found by commercial sherman in Alligator Harbor who turned the distressed animal over to Rudloes lab in hopes it could be saved. Rudloe said at the lab, Allie gained her target weight for release, and the mass in her chest disappeared, during her yearlong rehabilitation. This represents a major triumph, he said. It is a story of uncommon cooperation commercial shermen working side-by-side with biologists. Loggerheads are one of ve species of sea turtle that nest on Floridas shores; all are endangered. The communities of Alligator Point and Bald Point hosted a record-breaking 47 nests during last years season, according to Bill Wargo, Alligator Point Sea Turtle Patrol. Wargo advocates keeping the beaches in their natural state, the best protection for the endangered animals being minimal disruption of their breeding habitats. He reports that area residents are largely supportive of protection efforts, and consider wildlife an essential part of the community. Sea turtles are important sentinels, Wargo said. They let us know what is happening in the environment. Ultimately, what is best for them is best for us. COMEJOINUSFORTHE... 4 TH OFJULY SIDEWALKSALE! JULY3RD&4TH WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,June2789 7830% Fri,June2889 7940% Sat,June2988 7840% Sun,June3088 7840% Mon,July0188 7860% Tues,July0288 7860% Wed,July0388 7960% JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVAL ALSOCLEANGUTTERSAND IRRIGATIONINSTALLATION, PLANTINGANDBEDDING AVAILABLE CALLJOE@850-323-0741 ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM4514911SPONSORTHEWEEKLYALMANACCALLTODAY!8502277847 SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore/BottomRed snapper shing will come to a close Friday in federal waters. This year we have seen some good-sized sh, with some over 30 pounds. As the summer continues, the red snapper shing will be in state waters only after Friday. High air and water temps will drive most of the bigger sh deeper and out of the 9-mile zone well into July. With June fast coming to an end, the areas lakes and creeks are heating up fast. Most creeks are near the 90-degree mark and will top that in July. This makes for some tough shing, forcing us to go deep and sh early as we can. Most action out on the bay is top water trout and live LY shing. Flounder are being caught in good numbers in the Fire Tower area and along the Pig Island channel this weekPage 10By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Century plants are owering across the county. In case you havent noticed, scores of the big succulents are shooting up huge bloom spikes. Thats a good thing, because the ower spikes are interesting and impressive. Its also a bad thing because once a century plant, also known as blue agave, owers, it dies leaving behind a mass of small pups. Ive received numerous calls about the agave owers, including several from folks claiming to have the largest owering century plant. So far, the biggest Ive seen is one in the backyard of Willie Irvines island home, but the agave on the corner of Avenue F by the Bryant House bed and breakfast in Apalachicola and one near Chillas Hall in Lanark Village are both close seconds. Why are they all blooming? asked Terry Kemp of St. George Island. Mark Weathington, assistant director of the Raulston Arboretum at North Carolina State University, said the age of the plant and unusual weather could play a role. He said in the wild, under desert conditions, century plants actually might take 80 to 100 years to mature and ower; hence the name. In richer soil and with irrigation, they usually take only 10 to 20 years to reach maturity. Weathington said it was possible weather conditions, including abundant rainfall last summer, could have helped trigger the widespread owering. Don Harrigan, a forecaster for the National Weather Service in Tallahassee, said last summer was a wet one here. Most residents will remember Tropical Storm Debbie brought record rains in June, and the wet weather continued through September. Tony Avent of Plant Delights Nursery, also in North Carolina, is an agave expert. He said the owering process began in 2012, likely last summer. He agreed agaves that are watered mature more rapidly than those growing wild. At some point, the plant switches from vegetative growth to owering, he said. Once that happens, you cant turn back. Its kind of like being pregnant. By the way, removing the ower spike will not stop the plant from dying. Avent suggested the mass owering might be related more to the origin of the plants than weather conditions. Its possible many of the plants are second-generation clones of a single parent, he said. Plants with the same origin planted in the same yard wont all ower at once, but they will ower within a few years of each other. He suggested because Franklin County receives about seven times as much rain as the agaves native habitat, the plants might mature about seven times as fast, putting the year of origin of all the clones owering now at around 2000. On a related note, Weatherington said he spent his summers at Indian Pass as a child at a beach house belonging to his grandfather, Tom Weatherington, who was a physician for Franklin Countys health department. Marks father, Lee, grew up in Apalachicola. Thursday, June 27, 2013EVIE MORTON | Special to the TimesJack Rudloe displays a Kemps-Ridley turtle before its release.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesA volunteer attempts to herd onlookers away from the turtle release site.Day-trippers ock to see Allie the turtle released Century plants owering in FranklinLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAgave owers tower at Willie Irvines two-story house on St. George Island. BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda

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2012AnnualDrinkingWaterQualityReport LanarkVillageWater&SewerDistrict WearepleasedtopresenttoyouthisyearsAnnualWater QualityReport.Thisreportisdesignedtoinformyouaboutthequality waterandserviceswedelivertoyoueveryday.Ourconstantgoalisto informyouaboutthequalitywaterandserviceswedelivertoyouevery day.Ourconstantgoalistoprovideyouwithasafeanddependable supplydrinkingwater.Wewantyoutounderstandtheeffortswemake tocontinuallyimprovethewatertreatmentprocessandprotectour waterresources.Wearecommittedtoensuringthequalityofyour water.Ourwatersourceisgroundwaterfromtwowells.Thewells drawfromtheFloridanAquifer.Becauseoftheexcellentqualityof ourwater,theonlytreatmentsrequiredarechlorinefordisinfection purposesandAquamag,whichisaplyphosphatecompoundinjectedas asequesteringagentthatneutralizesscaleandcorrosion. In2012theDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtectionperformed aSourceWaterAssessmentonoursystemandasearchofthedata sourcesindicatednopotentialsourcesofcontaminationnearour wells.TheassessmentresultsareavailableontheFDEPSourceWater AssessmentandProtectionProgramwebsiteat www.dep.state..us/ swapp. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsaboutthisreportorconcerningyour waterutility,pleasecontactKeithMock,WaterSuperintendent,at (850)251-9106.Weencourageourvaluedcustomerstobeinformed abouttheirwaterutility.Ifyouwanttolearnmore,pleaseattendany ofourregularlyscheduledmeetings.TheyareheldatTheCarrabelle MunicipalComplex,1001GrayAvenue,ontherstTuesdayofeach monthat6:00p.m. TheLanarkVillageWater&SewerDistrict(LVWSD)routinely monitorsforcontaminantsinyourdrinkingwateraccordingtoFederal andStatelaws,rulesandregulations.Exceptwhereindicatedotherwise, thisreportisbasedontheresultsofourmonitoringfortheperiodof January1toDecember31,2012.DataobtainedbeforeJanuary1,2012, andpresentedinthisreportarefromthemostrecenttestingdonein accordancewiththelaws,rules,andregulations. Inthetablesbelow,youmayndunfamiliartermsand abbreviations.Tohelpyoubetterunderstandthesetermswehave providedthefollowingdenitions: MaximumContaminantLevelorMCL:Thehighestlevelofa contaminantthatisallowedindrinkingwater.MCLsaresetascloseto theMCLGsasfeasibleusingthebestavailabletreatmenttechnology. MaximumContaminantLevelGoalorMCLG:Thelevelofa contaminantindrinkingwaterbelowwhichthereisnoknownor expectedrisktohealth.MCLGsallowforamarginofsafety. ActionLevel(AL):Theconcentrationofacontaminantwhich,if exceeded,triggerstreatmentorotherrequirementsthatawatersystem mustfollow. InitialDistributionSystemEvaluation(IDSE):Animportantpartof theStage2DisinfectionByproductsRule(DBPR).TheIDSEisaonetimestudyconductedbywatersystemstoidentifydistributionsystem locationswithhighconcentrationsoftrihalomethanes(THMs)and haloaceticacids(HAAs).WatersystemswilluseresultsfromtheIDSE, inconjunctionwiththeirStage1DBPRcompliancemonitoringdata,to selectcompliancemonitoringlocationsfortheStage2DBPR. MaximumresidualdisinfectantlevelorMRDL:Thehighesrlevelofa disinfectantallowedindrinkingwater.Thereisaconvincingevidence thatadditionsofadisinfectantisnecessaryforcontrolofmicrobial contaminants. MaximumresidualdisinfectantlevelgoalorMRDLG:Thelevelofa drinkingwaterdisinfectantbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpected risktohealth.MRDLGsdonotreectthebenetsoftheuseof disinfectantstocontrolmicrobialcontaminants. Nonaaplicable(NA):Doesnotapply Non-Detect(ND):meansnotdetectedandindicatesthatthesubstance wasnotfoundbylaboratoryanalysis. Partspermillion(ppm)orMilligramsperliter(mg/l):onepartby weightofanalyteto1millionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Partsperbillion(ppb)orMicrogramsperliter(g/il):onepartby weightofanalyteto1millionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Picocurleperliter(pci/L)measureoftheradioactivityinwater. Ifpresent,elevatedlevelsofleadcancauseserioushealth problems,especiallyforpregnantwomenandyoungchildren.Leadin drinkingwaterisprimarilyfrommaterialsandcomponentsassociated withservicelinesandhomeplumbing.LVWSDisresponsiblefor providinghighqualitydrinkingwater,butcannotcontrolthevariety ofmaterialsusedinplumbingcomponents.Whenyourwaterhas beensittingforseveralhours,youcanminimizethepotentialforlead exposurebyushingyourtapfor30secondsto2minutesbeforeusing waterfordrinkingorcooking.Ifyouareconcernedaboutleadinyour water,youmaywishtohaveyourwatertested.Informationonleadin drinkingwater,testingmethods,andstepsyoucantaketominimize exposureisavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineorathttp:// www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. Thesourcesofdrinkingwater(bothtapwaterandbottledwater) includerivers,lakes,streams,ponds,reservoirs,springs,andwells. Aswatertravelsoverthesurfaceofthelandorthroughtheground,it dissolvednaturallyoccurringmineralsand,insomecases,radioactive material,andcanpickupsubstancesresultingfromthepresenceof animalsorfromhumanactivity. Contaminantsthatmaybepresentinsourcewaterinclude: (A)Microbialcontaminants,suchasvirusesandbacteria,which maycomefromsewagetreatmentplants,septicsystems,agricultural livestockoperations,andwildre. (B)Inorganiccontaminants,suchassaltsandmetals,which canbenaturally-occurringorresultfromurbanstormwaterrunoff, industrialordomesticwastewaterdischarges,oilandgasproduction, mining,orfarming. (C)Pesticidesandherbicides,whichmaycomefromavariety ofsourcessuchasagriculture,urbanstormwaterrunoff,andresidential uses. (D)Organicchemicalcontaminants,includingsynthetic andvolatileorganicchemicals,whichareby-productsofindustrial processesandpetroleumproduction,andcanalsocomefromgas stations,urbanstormwaterrunoff,andsepticsystems. (E)Radioactivecontaminants,whichcanbenaturallyoccurring orbetheresultofoilandgasproductionandminingactivities. Inordertoensurethattapwaterissafetodrink,theEPAprescribes regulations,whichlimittheamountofcertaincontaminantsinwater providedbypublicwatersystems.TheFoodandDrugAdministration (FDA)regulationsestablishlimitsforcontaminantsinbottledwater, whichmustprovidethesameprotectionforpublichealth. Drinkingwater,includingbottledwater,mayreasonablybeexpected tocontainatleastsmallamountsofsomecontaminants.Thepresence ofcontaminantsdoesnotnecessarilyindicatethatthewaterposesa healthrisk.Moreinformationaboutcontaminantsandpotentialhealth effectscanbeobtainedbycallingtheEnvironmental ProtectionAgencysSafeDrinkingWaterHotline at1-800-426-4791.Thankyouforallowingustocontinueprovidingyourfamily withclean,qualitywaterthisyear.Inordertomaintainasafeand dependablewatersupply,wesometimesneedtomakeimprovements thatwillbenetallofourcustomers.Theseimprovementsare sometimesreectedasratestructureadjustments.Thankyoufor understanding. Somepeoplemaybemorevulnerabletocontaminantsindrinking waterthanthegeneralpopulation.Immuno-compromisedpersonssuch aspersonswithcancerundergoingchemotherapy,personswhohave undergoneorgantransplants,peoplewithHIV/AIDSorotherimmune systemdisorder,someelderly,andinfantscanbeparticularlyatrisk frominfections.Thesepeopleshouldseekadviceaboutdrinkingwater fromtheirhealthcareproviders.EPA/CDCguidelinesonappropriate meanstolessentheriskofinfectionbyCryptoaporidiumandother microbiologicalcontaminantsareavailablefromtheSafeDrinking WaterHotline(800-426-4791). Weworktoprovidetopqualitywatertoeverytap.Weaskthatall ourcustomershelpusprotectourwatersources,whicharetheheart ofourcommunity,ourwayoflifeandourchildrensfuture. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsorconcernsabouttheinformationprovided, pleasefeelfreetocallanyofthenumberslisted. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Basketball Academy 16 and under basketball team has played well this summer, but isnt willing to settle for second best. The team placed second in the Tallahassee Comets Explosion Tournament on May 10-12, defeating the Quincy Warriors 48-28 to make it to the championship. Kelsey Jones and Logan McLeod made the AllTournament team. Players who also participated in the tourney include Cameron White, Marshall Sweet, Tyler Howard, KK Wilson, Josue Barahona, Quantavious Fuller, Tanner Boone and Tyler Farmer. On May 31, the team opened up its rst tourney games against the Tallahassee Heat which had members from Godby, Lincoln, and FAMU high schools. Coach Michael Sweatt said the team played well but lost in double overtime. The last play of the game Jones hit a three-pointer to tie the game but one referee claimed his toe was on the line and called it a twopointer so the Seahawks lost 53-52. This meant they had to win the rest of their games Saturday and Sunday to make it to the championship game. Boy, did our team respond to that, said Sweatt. The team opened up Saturday morning at 10 a.m. with the Wildcats from Taylor County. It was a tight game at the half, with Franklin County down 19-17. The second half we jumped on them with our full court pressure led by Sweet, White, and Jones in the backcourt and outscored them 42-19, nalizing the score of 59-38, Sweatt said. An offensive spark from Barahona who hit six three-pointers in the game helped out. The next game wasnt until 6 p.m. so the team went and watched a movie and hung out at the mall. They played the Georgia Rams, which had them beat in size but again speed and determination led to the victory. The Seahawks led the entire game and won with a defensive stop at the last play, with a nal of 49-47. McLeod fronted the post, as designed in the timeout, so they had to lob it over the top to their big man and there were Jones and White on the weak side to meet him. He threw up Hoopsters not content with second placeCARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 27, 2013 APage 11Section BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 U.S.98COMMLOTS BELOWCITY.APP.PRICE C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,500COMM.BLDG.ON98&GULF FORRENT$500/MTH.MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 See HOOPSTERS A12 Members of the Franklin County Basketball Academy 16 and Under team include Kelsey Jones, Logan McLeod, Cameron White, Marshall Sweet, Tyler Howard, KK Wilson, Josue Barahona, Quantavious Fuller, Tanner Boone, Matt Murray and Tyler Farmer. Franklin School hosts Friday golf tourneyGo out and play golf to support the students, at the Franklin County Schools golf tournament. Tee time is Friday June 28 at 1 p.m. at St. James Bay Golf Resort Prizes awarded for rst, second and third places will be a cash payout. Amounts will be based on the participation of players and sponsors. Prizes for Closest to the Pin, The Longest Drive winner will receive a free round of golf donated by Rob Burlison, head golf professional at St. James Bay Country Club. A buffet will be provided. For sponsor questions call Shannon Venable, Franklin County Schools, 670-2810 ext. 4105 or svenable@franklin.k12. .us. For tournament questions contact Burlison at 697-9606 or rob@ stjamesbay.comSacred Heart to offer free physicalsSacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, in Port St. Joe, will be conducting free physicals for all middle school and high school boys and girls in Franklin County at the Franklin County High School gymnasium from 5 to 8 p.m. on Monday, July 22 and Thursday, Aug. 15. The physicals are open to students at all schools in Franklin County. Call Coach Michael Sweatt at 670-2800 ext. 1924 for details or any questions that are of concern. Physical forms can be uploaded and printed out at: http://www.fhsaa. org/forms/general You can print out the EL02, EL03, and EL3CH forms and go ahead and get the general information lled out before you come. If not, then they will have copies here at the school the day of the physical dates listed above. Try to have a parent accompanying your child. If you are planning on playing a sport or even think you might be playing any sports at all then you will have to have a sports physical. So please take advantage of this free opportunity to get your physical now. A sports physical will last you one year for every sport, so you will not have to worry about it the entire school Sports BRIEFSSee BRIEFS A12

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 The Dixie Debs, for girls age 18 and under, will be headed to the state tournament in Brooksville July 5 to 8. Back row, from left, are Coach Matt Kelley, Coach Kevin Newell, Morgan Newell, Christina Collins, Shannon Pridgeon, Brittany King, Ally Millender and Coach Allen Millender. Front row, from left, are Gracyn Kirvin, Maddie Newell, Morgan Kelley, Ashley Carroll and Marlyn Lee. Not pictured is Hannah Winkler. DIXIE DEBS BOUNdD FOR STATE HOOPSTERS from page A11a wild contested shot and Jones secured the rebound for the victory. On that play McLeod tweaked the knee he hurt during the jamboree football game. We thought we werent going to have him on Sunday morning, Sweatt said. Sunday the game started at 8 a.m. which meant the team left Apalachicola at 5:50 a.m. The team was sore and tired but everybody showed up ready to win. And who was at the gym at FAMU waiting? Logan. We played the Aucilla Attack team that morning and had a shaky rst half, Sweatt said. They ran a collapsing 2/3 zone and we were settling for contested shots and not running the play. We were down at the half 19-16. The Seahawks played solid man defense led by Howard who shut their best player down the entire second half. They only scored six points and the nal score was 39-25. Farmer did really well, controlling the offense at the point in the second half too, Sweatt said. With a three-game win streak, the Seahawks were in the championship game, facing the 4-0 Tallahassee Heat. The only dilemma was it didnt start until 3:30 p.m. Sunday afternoon, so another drag time of waiting, Sweatt said. We went to the mall then came back and watched some ball. The championship game started off rough. We had way too many turnovers throughout the whole game. Even though we turned the ball over, we played great defense, said the coach. The Seahawks were down by four midway through the second half when McLeod went down again, and the team ended up losing by double digits. Even though we lost in the championship game our guys represented our county very well, Sweatt said. Second place did not sit well with the team though, as this is now back-to-back tournaments in which we have been runner-up. I like that our team is not settling for second and is not happy with it. I am proud of how hard we fought though. Jones was named to the All-Tournament Team again. Kids in this tournament included Howard, Sweet, McLeod, Wilson, Jones, Barahona, White, Farmer, and Matt Murray. The teams next tournament was June 22 in Panama City. They are also playing on Tuesday evenings in Tallahassee at Dade Street Community Rec Center, in a 17-andunder league. On Tuesday, the team played against Port St Joe and Liberty County. They opened with a 41-29 win over Liberty and then lost to St. Joe in the nightcap 50-37. We played well considering we were missing players, said Sweatt. Kelsey Jones led scorers in the Liberty game with a double-double 16 points and 12 rebounds. In the second game White stood out with his hustle on defense and his dribble drive penetration, nishing with 11 points and ve steals. Barahona hit six three-pointers in the game and led scorers with 18 points. McLeod did not participate in the St Joe game, and Jones played sparingly due to a strained hip. Other players who participated and played well were Howard, Farmer, Murray, and Nathan Jones. Overall I liked the effort from the team and we are really improving and working hard, said Sweatt. We started at the end of March with our offseason basketball and the past three months have been great for our older team and our younger team. We have been working three days a week and some four days a week on fundamentals and gaming. We have another month left in gaming for the offseason before fall basketball workouts start. The 16 and under team has 3 tournaments left in the month of July. he said. I want to thank our sponsors again Gander Auto Parts, Inc., Fishermans Choice, Sandy Beach Properties, C and S Service, Barbers Seafood, and Gulf Coast Auto Parts, said Sweatt. NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDS TheFranklinBoardofCountyCommissionerswillreceivesealedbidsqualiedperson,company orcorporationinterestedinconstructing. PLUMBINGRENOVATIONSATTHEFRANKLINJAILANDSHERIFF'SOFFICE Theprojectislocatedat270StateRoad65,Eastpoint,Florida,andconsistsofreplacing plumbingcomponentsonexistingxturesattheCountyJailandSheriff'sOfce. Completiondateforthisprojectwillbe60daysfromthedateoftheNoticetoProceedpresented tothesuccessfulbidder. Amandatorypre-bidwalk-thruisscheduledforMonday,July8,2013,at10:00a.m.Thewalk-thru willbeheldattheCountyJailat270StateRoad,Eastpoint,Florida. Liquidateddamagesforfailuretocompletetheprojectonthespecieddatewillbesetat$200.00 perday. Thesealedbidmustbeclearlymarkedontheoutsideoftheenvelope "PLUMBING RENOVATIONSATCOUNTYJAIL". TheenvelopeshouldalsobearontheoutsidetheBidder's name,addressandlicensenumber,ifapplicable. Bidswillbereceiveduntil4:30p.m.(EST)onMonday,July15,2013,attheFranklinCountyClerk's Ofce,FranklinCountyCourthouse,33MarketStreet,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida323202317,andwillbeopenedandreadaloudonTuesday,July16,2013,attheCountyCommission meetingheldattheCourthouseAnnex,34ForbesStreet,Apalachicola,Florida. TheFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionersreservestherighttowaiveanyinformalityin anybid,toacceptand/orrejectanyorallbids,andtoacceptthebidthatintheirbestjudgement willbeinthebestinterestofFranklinCounty.Allbidsshallremainformforaperiodofsixtydays afteropening. AllbiddersshallcomplywithallapplicableStateandlocallawsconcerninglicensingregistration andregulationofcontractorsdoingbusinessintheStateofFlorida. QuestionsshouldbeaddressedtoAlanPierce,DirectorofAdministrativeServices, at850-653-9783,Ext.161oralanp@fairpoint.net PUBLISHDATES: Thursday,June27,2013 BILLTO: FRANKLINCOUNTYBOCC Thursday,July4,2013 Attn:LindaPhillips 33MarketStreet,Suite203 Apalachicola,FL32320 On Sunday, June 23, the Dixie Youth League Belles won the District 2 championship in Wewahitchka, by defeating Port St. Joe and then Sneads in the championship. The team for girls age 15 and under will now compete in the state tournament on July 5 and 6 in Brooksville. Pictured above are back row, from left, are Sami Bearden, Anna Riley, Myranda McLeod, Summer Medley and Allie Kirvin. Middle row, from left, are Krista Martina, and Vanessa Simmons. Front row, from left, are Madison Smith, Kimberly Boone, Sophia Kirvin, Adriana Butler and Lacey Hutchins. Coaches are Gary Martina, left, and Ward Kirvin. BBELLES HEAdDEdD TO STATE TOURNEY year until next summer. Sweatt also extended his thanks to Dana Whaley and the county health department for providing free sport physicals to the Seahawk football team in the spring. LL etter of support for trail conceptOn June 18, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve a resolution supporting the concept of the Capital City to Sea Trail corridor so long as it does not interfere with existing hunting activities and to seek planning funds from the Florida Department of Transportation to evaluate potential corridors for the bike trail. This is for a study only, said County Planner Alan Pierce. The results will come back to the board and the board will have to take approve any further action. BRIEFS from page A11

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, June 27, 2013By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Startcroft@starfl.comWewahitchka author Michael Lister is celebrating an award by giving back to the area that informs so much of his writing. In addition to a book signing Friday at the No Name Caf in Port St. Joe, Lister will be part of a River Day Celebration on Saturday at Gaskin Park, at the end of Lake Grove Road in Wewahitchka. He will also donate a portion of book prots from his award-winning novel to an organization advocating for the health of the Apalachicola River and Bay. Lister recently won his second Florida Book Award, a Silver Medal in Popular Fiction, for the fth volume in his John Jordan mystery series, Blood Sacrice. Lister won a Bronze Medal in General Fiction for Double Exposure in 2009. The Silver Medal was of particular import because the John Jordan series is the springboard for everything Lister has written in the past 15 years. It was really a surprise, Lister said. It meant so much to me. That was so special. I didnt see it coming. I was just thrilled. To date, Lister has had 11 novels, three short-story collections, and three non-ction books published. I have written a lot of other books, but I always return to John Jordan, Lister said. There is a soft spot in my heart for that series. My rst published novel was a John Jordan mystery and now 15 years later for the fth book in the series to be honored in this way means so much to me. Lister serves on the board of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper, a non-prot organization advocating for the health of the Apalachicola River, its tributaries and watersheds as well as Apalachicola Bay. And as Double Exposure and Blood Sacrice touched on issues surrounding the river and swamps that surround it, Lister saw a great opportunity to do something. That something is two days of celebration of his writings and the river, with a portion of proceeds going to the Riverkeeper organization. Lister will donate half of all prots from every copy of Blood Sacrice sold this summer to the organization. Winning a Florida Book Award really helps boost the prole of the book and the series and the other things you have written, Lister said. There is no question you get a bump from that for everything you write. Part of the mystery/thriller plot of Blood Sacrice involves key environmental issues facing Florida so its a natural t to use sales of the book for this cause. Serving on the Riverkeeper board he understands the dire need for and the importance of the organization. With all the water wars and issues we are facing, the collapse of the bay especially, there is a real challenge here, Lister said. It seems like there is no reasonableness, nothing makes sense. And there are solutions. We can do so much more with less water. There is a great deal of concern among Riverkeeper for the bay and I am equally concerned about the rivers and the swamps. I just love this area so much and I am mindful of the issues we are facing. If we just rely on our elected ofcials, we are screwed. Alabama and Florida seem to be on the same page, but the way Georgia and the (U.S. Army) Corps have managed things, how do you get someone who has everything they want to the table. Lister will hold a book signing at No Name Caf and the following day the River Day Celebration promises something for all ages. Wewa Search and Rescue will offer free boat rides on the river, including sonar so passengers can get a glimpse of life below the surface. There will be a boat poker run and a biker rally which will begin in Bay County, meander through Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka and end at Gaskin Park. Dave Lloyd out of Bay County will be on hand to provide live music throughout the day, there will be a boat and car wash and a rides, pony and bounzee, for the kids. Lister will be reading from his writings and the photography of Clyde Butcher will be on display. I just thought it would be a great idea to meet at the river and on it and entire thing is a fundraiser for Riverkeeper. Entry to the event is free, though there will be charges for some activities. Ive always wanted my books to be highly entertaining, but not just that, Lister said. I want them to make a difference in the lives of their readers, to enrich them, to expand them in some small way. Partnering with Riverkeeper is doing the same thingtrying to make a difference. Blood Sacrice and Listers other books are available in hardcover, paperback, ebook, and audiobook, and can be found online, at bookstores, and at his website www.MichaelLister.com For more information call Dawn at 628-4559 or email Pulpwood Press at PulpwoodPress@gmail.com. Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 4515031 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 PUBLICNOTICETHEFRANKLINCOUNTYADVISORYBOARDOFADJUSTMENTWILLHOLDA PUBLICHEARINGONWEDNESDAY,JULY3,2013,AT10:00A.M.INTHECOUNTY COMMISSIONMEETINGROOMOFTHECOURTHOUSEANNEXTOCONSIDER THEFOLLOWINGVARIANCES,APPEALS,ANDSPECIALEXCEPTIONS:1-CONSIDERATIONOFAREQUESTFORAVARIANCETOCONSTRUCTA VERTICALSEAWALLWITHINTHECRITICALHABITATZONEON PROPERTYDESCRIBEDASLOT5,BLOCKB,MAGNOLIABLUFFS,123 NBAYSHOREDRIVE,EASTPOINT,FRANKLINCOUNTYFLORIDA. REQUESTSUBMITTEDBYMICHAELL.ANDERSON,AGENTFOR EMERSONC.JOHNS,JR.,OWNER.THEBOARDOFCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERSACTINGASTHEBOARDOFADJUSTMENTWILLADDRESSTHISREQUESTATTHEIRMEETINGONJULY16,2013. *PersonswishingtocommentmaydosoinpersonorinwritingtotheFranklinCounty Planning&ZoningDepartment,34ForbesStreet,Suite1,Apalachicola,Fl32320. Transactionsofthishearingwillnotberecorded,personswishingtorecordtheproceedings mustmakethenecessaryarrangementsforrecording. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesIndependence Day celebrations across the county By LOIS SWOBODA The Times Independence Day celebrations are planned across the county. Independence Day begins on July 3 this year with the second annual Old Apalachicola Independence Day Celebration sponsored by Historic Apalachicola Main Street. The Red, White and Blue Parade begins at 6:30 p.m. at Lafayette Park and will wind its way down Avenue C, under the bridge at Battery Park and along Water Street to end at Riverfront Park. The parade will be followed by a traditional ice cream social. The shrimp boat Lady Louise will act as a stage for live music. The Hillside Community Choir will provide stirring patriotic tunes on the docks. In addition, there will be an All American Kids Corner with unique games and activities for the youngsters. The highlight of the evening begins at dark thirty (approximately 9:15 p.m.) when revelers will be treated to a professional reworks display over the Apalachicola River. Bill Grimes of Tallahassee has graciously donated his barge as a launch vehicle for the pyrotechnic extravaganza. This commitment along with the tremendous generosity of many residents, businesses and friends of Apalachicola has allowed Main Street to increase the reworks display twofold over last year. Please take time to observe our sponsors board located in Riverfront Park. These are the wonderful people, along with many Main Street volunteers who made our Independence Day celebration a reality. For more information or to volunteer, call Jim Bachrach at 899-8689 or Harry Arnold at 524-0770. Carrabelle and St. George Island plan celebrations for July 4. In Carrabelle, there will be a professional reworks display at dark-thirty. Come downtown to enjoy local businesses and a spectacular show. On St. George Island, July 4 begins with a holiday parade hosted by the St. George Island Business Association. Decorate your vehicle and join in. Anyone in costume, on a oat or in a decorated vehicle can participate in the parade. Bring your squirt guns and plan to get wet! Line up at the intersection of First Street West and West Pine starting at 10 a.m. Parade begins at 11 a.m. Prize for the best decorated golf cart. At dark thirty, there will be reworks on the beach at the Blue Parrot. On July 5, the St. George Island Trash Patrol and anyone who wants to help will meet to clean up the central part of the island. Gather by the lighthouse at 9 a.m. Trash bags, gloves, water, and T-shirts will be provided. Lanark Village will observe Independence Day too. At the Lanark Village Boat Club, on July 4, members will prepare chicken and ribs. Donation is $3. Bring your favorite covered dish to share. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Then on Saturday, July 6 come to the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 for a cookout with a half grilled chicken and two sides for a donation of $8. Serving begins at 5 p.m. Lister book signing to benet Riverkeeper MICHAEL LISTER

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 AA14| The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91430T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-000087-CA CIRCUITCIVILDIVISION SUPERIOR BANK, f/k/a THE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. SMITH; MICHAELL. HAMMOND; and CARRAWAYBAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that in accordance with the entered on May 28th, 2013 in above-styled 2013 at 11:00 A.M.(CST), at the Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 for property: Lot 51, Carraway Bay the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat ida. Property Address: Lot 51 Carraway Bay Plantation, Carrabelle, FL 32322 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: May 31, 2013 MARCIAM. JOHNSON, FRANKLIN COUNTY CIRCUITCOURT By: Michele Maxwell 91446T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.12000377CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CARLTON JACKSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RICKY R. REGIST A/K/A RICKY R. REGISTER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICKY R. REGIST RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5553 SPRING HILL ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32305 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 1 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 2, BLOCK 128 (E-10), OF PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the The Apalachicola Times. DATED: March 6, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File No. 33981 June 20, 27, 2013 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST A S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF F RANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 93951T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-129 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-129 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, whereStaff ReportsSkip Foster, a veteran publisher and Florida native, a veteran publisher and Florida native, will be the next publisher of the Northwest Florida Daily News and oversee weekly newspapers in Milton, Crestview, Destin and Walton County. Friday mornings announcement followed a nearly twomonth search that drew candidates from across the country and ended with the hiring of Foster, publisher of the Shelby Star in Cleveland County, N.C., since 2007. Im excited, said Roger Quinn, central regional publisher for Halifax Media Group, which also owns the Shelby Star. We looked across the country and found that the best candidate was one of our own. He has a proven track record of not just leading awardwinning newspapers, but of making a newspaper and himself an integral part of the community it serves. Before assuming the publishers role at the Shelby Star, Foster served as its editor for 10 years. During that time it was part of the chain of newspapers that included the Northwest Florida Daily News, giving him familiarity with the unbelievable beauty of the region and its newspapers. I am honored to lead such a tremendous team in this growing and vibrant market, Foster said. No one provides better content and better marketing solutions than The Daily News. I cant wait to get to know this community, he continued. My favorite part of being publisher is connecting the newspaper with readers, businesses and organizations in the markets we serve. Foster leaves a legacy of community involvement in Shelby. Just this month, he was awarded the H. Eugene LeGrand Lifetime Achievement award from the United Way of Cleveland County. He was also named most outstanding volunteer on the 2007 United Way campaign and the 2010 volunteer of the year for the organization. In 2009, Foster founded Connect, Commit to Change, a community event which brings together two groups: agencies that help children and new volunteers. The effort was launched in the wake of a shooting death in Shelby, after which a Shelby Star reporter heard a young child matter-of-factly ask Who got killed? Foster wrote a column asking the community to commit to doing more for the communitys children. A board was formed and last year, during the now-annual event, more than 200 volunteers signed commitment cards to help one of the more than 50 agencies that help children. Foster has also served on the board of the Cleveland County Chamber and the legislative committee of the N.C. Press Association. He has served two stints on the vestry of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer and is a member of the Shelby Rotary Club. At The Shelby Star, he helped launch and sustain a content innovation project that earned the paper international attention. In 2007, Foster was invited to speak in Paris, France, about The Shelby Stars forays into multimedia journalism. Foster was a 2002 Ethics Fellow with the Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Fla., and helped write Poynters Journalism without Scandal report in 2003. A native of Lakeland, Foster began his career as a sports writer in Hickory, N.C., in 1988, after graduating from the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn. He moved to The Gaston Gazette in Gastonia, N.C., in 1989 and eventually was promoted to managing editor. Foster is married to District Court Judge Anna F. (Dina) Foster, who will be resigning her seat to relocate to the Panhandle. They have three children: Mary Frances, 18; Matthew, 15; and Will, 11. Halifax names new publisher in Fort Walton Beach, weekly newspapers SKIP FOs STERThe following is the honor roll for the fourth and nal nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School for the 2012-13 school year.All As First GradeA. Carlton: Hannah Grace Abel, Peyton Blackburn, Leonard Conway, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Taylor Pendleton, Isabella Price, Aubrie Thompson, Kiana Weeks L. Allen: Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Esteban Bernabe, Malic ONealSecond GradeJ. Mallon: Eric Lau, Jayden Nichols, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, John Michael Thompson S. Herrington: Kendall Hill, Lucy Neill, Arav Patel, Jabara Pearson, Timothy Poloronis, Kylah Ross, Brianna Stephens, Mark WillisTT hird GradeW. Martina: Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Andrew Monod, Genevieve Montgomery, Sophia Salman, Nico ValenzuelaT T Moses: Meredith Alford, Weston Bockelman, Gracie SmithFourth GradeM. Lee: Kaylee Hicks, Livia Monod, Arryonna Cargill, Jon Michael Cates, Ava Neill L. Bockelman: Alex Joanos, Abby Johnson, Caden TurrellFifth GradeB. Linane: Krista Kelley, Alyssa Martina, Camille WilliamsSixth GradeGrayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Kevin Flores, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer, Adria Valenzuela, Becca WillisSeventh GradeSavannah Montgomery, Faith Sapp, Lucas SasnettEE ighth GradeJayla Alley, Eve Bond, Corie Cates, Holly Chambers, Emily Crosby, Logan Crosby, Allie Kirvin, Mikayla Lloyd, Alexis ONeal, Astrid Ramirez, Mallorie Shiver, Alina ValenzuelaA/B First GradeA. Carlton: Alexicia McNair Martin, Jayla White L. Allen: Cody Abercrombie, Amontaye Austin, Caelyn Constantine, Trinity Creamer, Conner Lolley, Taylor Mallon, Charles McClain, Emma RowlandSecond GradeJ. Mallon: Johnathan Carter, Laithan Kent, Colin Weng, Leah Wren S. Herrington: Henry Abercrombie, Alisha Arroyo, Caleb Cassidy, Miranda Diaz, Emily Hooten, Mason Moses, Jackson Segree, Mahaley ShulerTT hird GradeW. Martina: Caleb Abel, Sevryn Everritt, Leslie Rowland, Jeremy ShulerT T Moses: Lanie Allen, Colin Amison, Lauren Conway, Carson Davis, Myia Maxwell, Jasmine Richards, John Sanders, Wil VarnesFourth GradeM. Lee: Devin Daniels, Leslie Escobar, Kelsey Grifn, Lamarius Martin, Kiersten Prince, Avery Scott L. Bockelman: Dorian Fleming, Skye Huber, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clinton Rester, Lyndsey Stiefel, Gregory WilsonFifth GradeB. Linane: Tanner Amison, Janacia Bunyon, Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Cade Juno, Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Jake Norred, Allison Register, Alyssa Robinson, Gabriel SmithSixth GradeAlexus Johnson, Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Steven Hicks, Karolynn Myers, Daijon Penamon, Cameron WynnSeventh GradeChristian Amison, Michaela Cassidy, Katelynn Denney, Simon Hodgson, Nick Joanos, Brooke Martina, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Andrew Nguyen, Madison SmithEE ighth GradeCash Creamer, Tia Cummings, Max Davis, Jaylon Gainer, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bianca Huber, Bobbie Kilgore, Zachary May, Alexis Segree, Alyssa Shiver, Anna Smith, Katy Spann, Marshall Sweet, Xuripha Tiller, KK Wilson, Emily Zingarelli ABC SchCHOOlL HONOR RROllLL

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 27, 2013 The Times | A15 Are you Looking for a Babysitter?I am trained in CPR and First Aid. I have 40hr of credit in child Devlopment, plus many additional hours of training in on the Job services. CDAcertification, Currently employed with Early Education and Care. Now need to be home. If intrested call Patricia at 850-323-0996 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 1109849 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:ShipfitterS pipefitterS pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the:chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations:13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace 4515128The City of Carrabelle is accepting applications for Water /Wastewater LaborersUnder the supervision of the Water /Wastewater Superintendent, the employee will be responsible to perform manual labor in maintaining water and sewer lines for the City of Carrabelle. Responsibilities include installing new water and sewer service, repairing water and sewer lines, manholes, meter readings, and all other assigned tasks. Employee is responsible for the operation of heavy equipment used in the performance of assigned tasks. High School Diploma/GED required. Experience is preferred. Salary will be discussed at time of interview. Applications can be picked up at City Hall, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL 32322, all previous applicants need to re-apply. Deadline for all applications is July 8, 2013. The City is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free workforce. 1115104Refrigeration Technician WANTED Must have 1 year of commercial refrigeration experiences EPA Certification Clean MVR Must be a self-starter Company vehicle & uniforms All interested applicants must apply online: www.winndixie.com/careers Click on Apply Now Logistics 4515123EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLEThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is seeking applications for a eld position in operations and maintenance. Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District Oce, 40 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 during normal business hours, Monday thru Friday 8:30 am 4:30 pm EST.The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and is a drug free workplace. Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4515133 50 % Commission PT/FT Flexible Schedule Paul Mitchell Focus Salon Advanced Training Must be Florida Licensed Cosmet ologist or Nail Tech Apply within at 147 W. Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL Stylist & Nail Tech Needed Very busy location with lots of walk-ins. or Call Cindy at (850) 653.5207 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ....................................................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD .................................................. $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ............................................... $7501BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650 OtherYouth & Family AdvocateSeveral available positions as full-time counselor in an innovative agency serving adolescents and their families in outlying counties (Taylor, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson & Madison). These services may include initial screenings, crisis intervention, case planning, internal and external referrals, progress evaluation, individual, group and family counseling. Masters Degree in a Counseling Related Field required. Travel Required. Mail your resume to 2407 Roberts Ave., Tall, FL 32310 or fax 576-2580. In order to process applications more efficiently, we ask that you please refrain from calling the office to confirm receipt of resumes. Web ID#: 34255232 Text FL55232 to 56654 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Southern Cross-28Ft, Good condition, Dsl Eng, 2-Spd Winchs, New stainless rig, Awlgrip Hull, West Bottom. Health, $7,500 OBO. Call 850 866-6989. Text FL55153 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairHousekeepersExperienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34256831 OtherProperty ServicesOpportunity for energetic person to work with our uniformed property services team and learn valuable customer service skills while performing duties including landscape, pool cleaning, janitorial & general maintenance. Great wage, work 32-40 hours weekly. To apply start with a call to CMS at 850-927-4911. Web ID#: 34255273 Text FL55273 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairDISPATCHERS AND MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANSNational cleaning and outsourcing company needs experienced staff for above positions for a large, luxury property in the Santa Rosa Beach area. Dispatchers -$10 $12 per hour, shifts from 8am to 10pm, weekends required. Maintenance Techs must be experienced $12 -$16 per hour, nights and weekends required and some overnight on-call shifts. Voluntary benefits available after 90 days. Call Jennifer at (850) 231-1422 or (850) 461-2854. Web ID#: 34256011 txt FL56011 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 ADOPT' :Actor/Director & Executive long for 1st baby to LOVE; Home cooking awaits!' 1-800-552-0045'Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Wanted: A place to board my horse in Franklin County. 850-274-1321Text FL55658 to 56654 GUN SHOWJuly 6th & 7th Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 in CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of AUGUST, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Commence at the Northeasterly corner of Lot 1, Block 16, Unit 4, Lanark Village, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 6, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and run South 67 degrees 13 minutes 35 seconds East 261.30 feet to a point lying on the Northerly right-ofway boundary of State Road No. 30, thence run South 62 degrees 13 minutes 55 seconds West along said right of way boundary 574.40 feet to a concrete monument (marked 4261) marking the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-ofway boundary run North 27 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds West 191.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence run North 88 degrees 41 minutes 17 seconds West 164.32 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261); thence run South 15 degrees 38 minutes 56 seconds East 277.04 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261) lying on the Northwesterly right of way of State Road No. 30; thence run North 62 degrees 13 minutes, 55 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 201.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 93953T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-128 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-128 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Block B, Saint James Island Park (Unit No. 1), according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO Js TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 219.13 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 200.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 232.45 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE AFOREMENTIONED RIGHT-OF-WAY, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AND A CURVE RUN WESTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 200.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 631.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE LEAVING SAID POINT GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (US HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET, THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHTOF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 19 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 44.86 FEET (CHORD=44.86 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST) TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 208.74 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 3: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 11 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1315.07 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY SECTION LINE, GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 676.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG A LINE ESTABLISHED BY REMNANTS OF A WIRE FENCE WITH CEDAR POSTS FOR A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID FENCE REMNANTS, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 222.99 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98), SAID POINT BEING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET; THENCE GO NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 5645.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 10 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.44 FEET (CHORD= 100.44 FEET, CHORD BEARING= NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST) TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 213.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN AND BEING A PORTION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DATED: June 20, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 2013 93983T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-21-CA APALACHICOLA INTERNATIONAL AVIATION TRAINING CENTER, INC., a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE P. HAMM, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 28th day of May, 2013, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by public sale, on the 10th day of July, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 33 Market Street in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: 1981 PIPER PA-44-180, SERIAL NO. 44-8195009, FAA REGISTRATION No. N8307E, LYCOMING 0-360A1D ENGINE TOGETHER WITH ACCESSORIES AND EQUIPMENT INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL LOGBOOKS (ENGINE, AIRCRAFT AND PROPELLER), PARTS, RADIOS, AVIONICS, AND PROPELLERS. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 3rd day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 OtherFranklin County S.H.I.P. ProgramThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on July 19, 2013 for the Down Payment Assistance Program, to buy existing housing only, Owner Occupied Rehabilitation and Emergency Repair programs. The deadline for submitting applications will be August 30, 2013. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, June 27, 2013 RealEstatePicks BestValueson theForgottenCoastOurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhat theyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!Discoverthebest realestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe, Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland, Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD This1BR/2BAcondoatPiratesLandingon thebeautifulCarrabelleRiveroverlooksthe poolandhottubandistastefullyfurnishedto maximizespaceandprovideeverythingyou needtorelaxontheweekend.Launchyour boatattheadjacentramp.Fullyfurnished. 850-528-4141l850-697-1010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty 4515098STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com REDUCED JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#248579$649,900St.GeorgeIslandSHELLHARBORBAYFRONT4BR,4.5BA,GuestCottage,boat/RVgarage,Gulf viewfromofce/den,Bayviewloungeareacould be5thBR,Screenedporches,Guestcottagewith kitchenette,fullbath&screenedporch,Dock,Quality Construction,lotsofstorage,beautifulsunsets! MLS#249568$45,000 16510thSt ST.APALACHICOLA,FL LushlyvegetatedlotinApalachicola'snorthhistoric district.Convenientlylocatedclosetodowntownandall ofthegreatarearestaurantsandshops.Greatlocationto buildahomeinthischarmingsoutherntown.MarySeymour,JeffGallowayRealEstate 850-728-8578 MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,299,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#248242$279,900St.GeorgeIsland4515102 1STTIERPLANTATIONLOTGreatGulfViews!Panoramicviewstotheeast&north, Attentionpilots!nearthePlantationairport;Oneacrelot, AdjacenttoboardwalktoGulf,Oneofthehighestlotson theIsland,AmenitiesincludeNewClubhouse&Pool. SeasideDrive,NicksHole. MLS#248598$95,000 PRICEDREDUCEDonthisgreatFisherman's getaway!Wellmaintained3bedroom/2bath mobilehomewithlargescreenedporch,12'x24' storageshed,carportandgreenhouseon3/4acre. Lessthan1/2milefromtheCarrabellemarinaMarySeymour,JeffGallowayRealEstate 850-728-8578 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Thousand Island dressing was named for the islands of which river? Niagara, Ohio, St. Lawrence, Mackenzie 2) Whats the biggest city in the largest-sized geographical state? New York, Dallas, Anchorage, Los Angeles 3) Of these actresses, who was not born in California? Lisa Kudrow, Kirsten Dunst, Helen Hunt, Teri Hatcher 4) Per capita, from where are the most chicken-eaters? Mexico, Venezuela, Italy, Saudi Arabia 5) What are a rattlesnakes belly scales called? Scutes, Scuds, Skits, Scowls 6) How many times does the earth go around the sun yearly? 1, 7, 24, 365 7) Who was the rst U.S. president to pardon a dog? Monroe, Tyler, Harding, LBJ 8) What means to talk through your nose? Snoach, Lute, Noose, Aedicule 9) Churchill Downs is a horseracing track in Kentucky, but where is Pimlico, another track? Missouri, Florida, Virginia, Maryland 10) Of these actors who was not born in California? Robert Duvall, Jack Nicholson, Kevin Costner, James Cromwell 11) Whats the average time lapse in hours between high and low tides on Earth? 2, 4, 6, 8 12) Near which countrys town of Jerez does Sherry (wine) originate? Chile, Italy, Spain, Peru 13) What are the rotating blades on a windmill called? Primers, Sails, Grubs, Leaves 14) Where did pajamas originate? India, Panama, Ireland, Egypt ANSWERS 1) St. Lawrence. 2) Anchorage. 3) Kirsten Dunst. 4) Saudi Arabia. 5) Scutes. 6) 1. 7) Harding. 8) Snoach. 9) Maryland. 10) Jack Nicholson. 11) 6. 12) Spain. 13) Sails. 14) India. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Oyster licenses on sale through FridaySale of the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License will continue through Friday, June 28, at the $100 rate. Staff will sell the license from the old DEP-ANERR building at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. (formerly Seventh Street) in Apalachicola.Apalachicola historical society to meet SaturdayThe annual meeting of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at the home of Lynn and Bill Spohrer, 127 Ave. B, in Apalachicola. Elections will be held for members of the board. Mel Livingston will discuss his restoration of the old Economy Cash Building in the Bowery, also known as the Bucket of Blood Street to many local old-timers. Amanda Pace will talk about a landscaping plan for the Raney House. President Tom Daly will speak briey about his research into an endowment program for the society. Plantation photo contest seeks entriesThe St. George Plantation 2013 Photo Contest continues through Aug. 28. The Plantation is asking photographers to submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photos. You may submit up to two photographs in the competition with a required $5 entry fee. Prizes include rst place $150, second place $100, third place $50 and Peoples Choice $50. For more information, go to www. sgpoa.com.Seafood workers to meet July 8The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will meet at 6 p.m. July 8 at the re house in Eastpoint, on the corner of Sixth Street and CC Land Road. Workers will discuss association business and conduct elections to seat replacement ofcers for the secretary, treasury and second vice president seats. For more information, call Shannon at 653-5190.KidCare/Medicaid assistance availableThe Florida Department of Health in Franklin County is offering KidCare/Medicaid assistance. For more information or to sign up, stop by the county health department ofces. Visit the Apalachicola location at 139 12th St. on Thursdays or the Carrabelle location, 106 N.E. Fifth St, on third Tuesdays. For questions, call 653-2111. News BRIEfsFS

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ST.JOENURSERYANDSUPPLY Celebratethis 4thofJuly the "RITE" Way! Visitour3Locations:218Hwy71S Wewahitchka,FL (850)639.2252302CecilG.Costin Sr.Blvd. PortSt.Joe,FL (850)227.7099117Hwy98 Apalachicola,FL (850)653.8825RemembertoPICKUPYOURPRESCRIPTIONS BEFORETHEFUNBEGINS! Home(850)670-8893B NOWOPEN!!Flowers&GiftsforAllOccasions CircleECandles HandCraftedJewelry byLocalArtists BalloonBouquets51MarketSt.,SuiteA Apalachicola,FL ( 850 ) 899-1588 CarrabelleBayView$449,0003Bdr3Ba|3,000SqFt qualityconstruction,spaciousrooms,ownerbuiltbayviewhome Nooodinsurancerequired,2largeguestbedrooms&fullbath, largemastersuite,masterbathw/gardentub&separateshower isroomy&affordsgreatnaturallight.Largeporchessomeopen somescreenedsurroundthehome.Spaciouskitchen,open familyroom,formallivingroomw/diningarea,&screenedin backporch.Largelaundryroom,2cargarage&workshop. Detachedin-lawsuite SGIEastEndBayFront$689,0004Bdr4Ba|2,328SqFt Lovely2story4bed/4.5bathhomew/screenedheatedpool onthebayStepinsidetoatiledopenlivingareaw/walltowall windowsfacingthescreenedporch&bay.Thediningareais opentokitchenw/granitecounters&abundantcabinets.Master bedroom&bathw/apowderroom.Upstairsconsistsofanother 3bedroomseachw/theirownbath&alaundryroom.Pathto privatebeach,communitydock&privatepool! GreaterApalachicola$169,0001Bdr1Ba|1,564SqFt Lovelycountrycottagelocatedonapristine1acre lotinApalachicola.Aninvitingporchwelcomes you,onesideisopen&theotherisscreened. Largefamilyroomw/vaultedceilings&adjacent toitisthediningarea&graciouskitchenwith abundantcabinets&counterspace.Thelaundry area&computernookisconvenientlysituated nexttothekitchen.Thelargebedroom&master bathisbeautifullyappointed.Thefullacrehas notbeenclearedfortheintentionofmaintaining privacy.Plentyofspacetoparkboats,RVorany otherutilityorrecreationvehicle. SGIGulfBeaches1stTierGulf$625,0003Bdr2Ba|1,537SqFt "SummerDreams"-1sttierbeachcottage locatedonSGI!Thehomeisimpeccableinside &outwithtopofthelineupgrades,furnishings &dcor.Granitecountertops,customcabinets &backsplashinthegourmetkitchen.Thefamily roomhasagasreplace&leseatingfora numberofguests;themasterbedroomislarge withviewsofthegulf.Extrabedroomssharea bath.Anopenporchspansthefrontofthehome overlookingabeautifullylandscapedyard.Fish cleaningsink,shower,picnictable&additional storageforaboat,jetski'setc. SGIGulfBeachesBayFront$429,0004Bdr2Ba1,000SqFt This4bedroom2bathgemhasbeenmeticulouslymaintained&is afavoriteontherentalprogramforboaters&shermanalike!The exterioramenitiesincludeaprivateboardwalk,shingpier,dock withboatlift&sh-cleaningstation,opendecks&alarge12'x26' pool.Thespaciousyetcozyinteriorissplashedwithairycolors& furnishingswithcomfort&relaxationspecicallyinmind,Gorgeous views¢rallylocatedtoalltheshops&restaurants. SGIEastEndGulfView$279,0002Bdr2Ba1,396sqft FabulousOceanMiletownhomewithgorgeousviewsdirectly overlookingthepoolandouttothebeach!Newtileoors,new furniture,newdecks&newwindows&doors&tastefullydecorated. Therentalhistoryonthispropertyisfantasticwithmanyloyalrenters .TheprimelocationontheEastEndwiththeStateParkashortwalk downthebeachisaplus.Thistownhomeisamustsee! KaraLandiss,Realtor, ABR,CDPE,GRI Your"ForgottenCoast RealEstatePartner"PrudentialShimmeringSandsRealty 123E.GulfBeach,Dr. St.GeorgeIsland,FL32328www.beachdreamsnow.com www.forgottencoastorida.com(800)974-2666ext.143 (850)653-7753 (888)651-0883CallKaraLandisstoViewTheseExceptionalProperties! HAPPY4THOFJULY! fromeveryoneattheGulfsideIGA Checkoutourweeklymailer.Itsanexplosionofsavings! CALLLOISAT653-5857WEOFFERMOSQUITO&NOSEEUMCONTROLHappy4thofJulyfrom -AlohaBugPestManagement

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Seeusforyourinsuranceneedsat 61Ave.E,Apalachicola,FL32320 WTG FourthofJulyBlastontheBeach LIVEMUSIC9:00PM-12:00AMwithTheRedneckMothersFIREWORKSSPECTACULAR@DarkPartyattheTikiBarorEnjoydinnerandthereworksbeachsideinthediningareaoronthedeck.ComeearlyandStayLate!RestaurantServing 11:00AM-10:00PM (850)927-2987 68WestGorrieDr. SaintGeorgeIsland,FL32328 SeeOurLIVEWEBCAM www.BlueParrotSGI.com

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OfferingAffordable,FamilyFriendlyBeachVacationsandRomanticCoastalGetaways forover30Years. Callorvisitusonlinetoday. Offeir ngfAfdorbale ,mFailyri Fendly 4515080 4515082 July3rd,20132ndAnnualOldApalachicolaIndependenceDay6:30PMeRed,White,andBlueParade Aerparade-TraditionalIceCreamSocial, LiveMusic,HillsideCommunityChoir, GamesandActivitiesfortheKids. 9:15PMDarkirtyFireworksover eApalachicolaRiver CarrabelleJuly4th,20139:00PMDarkirtyComedowntowntoenjoylocalbusinesses andaSpectacularshow! St.GeorgeIslandJuly4th,2013-eIslandBlast! 11:00AMEddyTeachs WettestandWildest 4thofJulyParadeDressupyourGolf CartorComeWatch.Bringyourwaterguns andwaterballoons,meetupatthecornerof 3rdStreetW.andW.Pinebeginningat10:30 a.m.andgetreadyforawetandwildparade youwontforget! Apalachicola 9:00PMDarkirty-FireworksontheBeach@eBlueParrot.Oneofthebestpartiesoftheyear.LiveMusic,TikiBar,andaBeachFrontFireworksDisplaythatNeverDisappoints.ComeJoinUs!

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328BruceStreet90x150Enjoybeautiful bayviewsfromthislot. Locatedinaneighborhoodof mostlypermanentandsecond homes.Theneighboringlotis alsoforsale,offeringanopportunitytodesignandbuilt auniquehomewithplenty ofroomforboatstorageand privacy.Onlyhalfamileto thecenteroftheislandwhere youcanenjoyrestaurants, shoppingorputyourboatin thepubliclandingunderthe bridge!Beachaccessjustfive shortblocksdown6thSt. Lovelybayfrontlotwith stunningmarshviewsinSt. GeorgePlantation.Located onAvocetLanewhichisthe firststreetinthePlantationso youwon'thavefartodrive! Anelevatedhousewouldoffer westernvistasoverlookingthe marshtowardsthesunset. Thelothastall,maturepine treeswhichwillprovideshade andbirdhabitatsforexcellent birdwatchingopportunities. Abeautifulhomesitefora naturelover! 355BruceStreetIfyoulikeDEEPWATERDOCKAGEonopenwater,you'lllove thislot.Deepchannelislessthan 100'fromshorelineattheendof adjacentdocks.Dockpermitpreviouslyobtainedbyowner(now expired)endedatthechanneland wouldhaveaccomodateda30+ footboat.Viewsfromthefirst levelofahomewouldbeincredible.Protectedbyrockseawall. Verynicehomesinneigborhood andgoodneighbors.RecentDevelopmentFeasibilityAssessment infileshowing1,654squarefeet availablefor1stfloorhomeplus plentyofroomforon-siteseptic systemanddrainfield. VeryniceGulffront townhome.Thisunithas beenrecentlyremodeled throughoutwithanew kitchen,anewceramic tiledmasterbath,ceramictiledfloors,andnew livingroomfurniture. Enjoybeautifulviews oftheGulf.Subdivision offers2largeswimming poolsandislocatednear theStatePark. WaterbirdWatchlivesuptoits namewithincrediblebayviews overlookingnaturalwildlife habitats.Thewraparounddeck isextrawidetoaccommodate hammocks,loungechairsand birderswithbinoculars!Allthe decksandexteriorstairsareTREX decknomaintenance.Insideare twolivingareassoeveryonecan haveabitofprivacy.Thekitchen isononeendofthegreatroom wherethewholefamilycangather todiscussthedayssights.One ofthefourbedroomsisacustom builtbunkroomthatwilldelight thekids.Thoughchancesare, theywillprobablyspendmostof theirtimeintheheated,screened swimmingpool.Currentlyonthe rentalmarketandverypopular withnaturelovers! SuccessfulSt.GeorgeIsland businessforsale!TheIsland Emporiumhasbeenanisland fixturefor22years.Itisthego-to spotontheislandtofindanything tomakeabeachvacationmore enjoyable;games,kites,swimsuits,beachtowels,t-shirts,hats, seafoodcookbooks,sandpails &shovels,andmementos.This saleincludestherealestateand business.Therealestateconsists ofa3,431totalsq.ft.buildingon threetropicallylandscapedlots zonedC-4mixeduseallowingfor residentiallivingspace.Building sitsontwolotssothethirdcould beusedforexpansion.Business includesallinventory,fixturesand equipmentalongwithanoutstandingreputationandexclusivelines ofmerchandiseonlyavailableat theIslandEmporium.Excellent opportunitytopurchaseturnkey businesswithrepeatcustomers androomforgrowth! Lovelyfirsttiercypresshome nestledunderpinesandoaks onaprivatelot.BuiltbyWilliam Solburgthisthreebedroom,2 bathhomefeatureswonderful decksandscreenporcheson theeastandwestsideofthe house.Enjoythesunrisesand sunsetsinshaded,screened comfort!Theefficientlydesigned kitchenfeaturesabreakfastbar overlookingthediningareaand livingroom.Awonderfultopfloor livingareawithfireplace,grand windowswithviewsoftheGulf andvaultedceilingissuretobea favoritespotforeveryone.Located justafewhundredfeetfromthe beachaccessandquickbikeride tothecommunitycenterwith pool,tenniscourtsandPlantation amenities! Beautiful,highbeachfrontlotin theprestigioussubdivisionof SunsetBeachthatisnexttothe StatePark.Thissubdivisionoffers acommunitypool,clubhouse,and tenniscourt.Lotislocatedatthe endofthecul-de-sacsoit'savery privateareanexttotheboardwalk. OWNERFINANCINGAVAILABLE TOQUALIFIEDBUYERWITH25% DOWN,30YR.AMORTIZATION SCHEDULEWITHA5YR. BALOON.INTERESTAT53/4% FIXEDFORFIRST3YRS.;PRIME RATE+21/2%for4th&5th yrs.Seller'slenderisofferingan unprecedented3.25%construction loantoqualifiedbuyers. Stunning100'widebeachfront lotintheheartoftheSt.George Plantation.Idealbuildingsitefor yourcustombeachfrontdream home!Nestleyourhomeamongst thedwarfbeachoaksinthe middleofthelotwhileenjoying theprivacyofferedbythelow,sea oat-coveredduneprotectingthe beachfront.Locatedattheendof thestreet,connecttothecommunityboardwalktokeepyour panoramicGulfviewpristine.The newlybuiltPlantationclubhouse, withfitnessroom,swimmingpool andtenniscourtsarejuststeps away,offeringalltheamenities ofthiswonderfulcommunity rightaroundthecorner.Perfect opportunityforadiscriminating buyerwhowantstodesigntheir ownpieceofcoastalparadise! Victorianelegancebytheseathatis builtfortheIslandlifestyle.Grand livingwithsecondfloormaster suitethatincludeslivingarea, fireplace,breakfastnook,exercise room,andofficearea.Thegarden tuboverlooksthefabulousviews oftheGulf.Thespaciousliving areaopenstoacoveredporchand sundeck,andtheelegantdining roomislargeenoughtoseatthe wholefamily.Lotsofattention giventodetailswithrecessed lighting,crownmolding,energy efficientappliances,3HVACunitsonebrandnewTraneunitonupper level.Twofireplaces,andsecurity system.GulfandBayviewsfrom thewidow'swalk.Enjoythesoft islandbreezesinthegazeboor relaxinthehottub.Locatednextto beachaccess. Thisspacioushomeoffers everythingyoucouldwantina beachfrontsetting.Ithas5private bedroomsuites,2livingareas,large coveredporchesonbothlevels,an abundanceofwindowsandglass doorsthatallowlotsoflightand fantasticviewsoftheGulf,agoodsizeheatedswimmingpool,anda privateboardwalktothebeachwith adune-topsundeckfromwhichyou canwatchgeorgoussunrises.The topfloorgreatroomisawonderful openspacelargeenoughfor everyoneinthefamilytorelaxand watchTV,playboardgamesorhelp inthekitchen.Thediningareahasa largepicturewindowwithgoodbay viewssoyoucanevenwatchthe sunsets.Itisnicelylandscapedwith apalm-linedgraveldrivewaytothe house.Suchafunhome! Twoacrebayfrontestate intheSt.GeorgePlantation,just1000totheCut! 3BR/4BAcustomhome situatedinthemiddleof twofencedacresunder maturepinesandpalm treeswithaprivatetennis court.Highceilings, crownmolding,largelight filledkitchen,expansive decksoverlookingthe ApalachicolaBay.200of bayfrontagewithriprap inplace! Fantastic6BR/6.5BAbeachfront homeinthegatedcommunityof SunsetBeach.Freshlypainted,updatedwithnewfurniture,thiswarm andinvitinghomesaysleaveyour worriesatthedoorandenjoyisland time!Gulffacinggreatroomboasts openkitchen,cornergasfireplace andseveralseatingareasopeningto thebeachfrontdecks.Thiskitchenis laidouttoentertainforbiggroups withtwoovens,twodishwashers, alargeislandandloadsofcounter space.Fivemastersuitesofferprivacyforallmembersofthefamily,or sendthekidstothetopfloortheater roomwithbigscreenTVandwet bar,allaccessiblebyelevator!Whole housesoundsystemplaysbeach tunesthroughouthomeandtothe numerousbeachandbayfacing! Pictureyourselfawakeningeach morningtothesunrisingfroma horizondottedwithfishingboats whiledolphinsswimbyinthesurf. ThisgorgeousMediterraneanstyle homehasbeenasecondhomefor thecurrentownersforyears.This eleganthomefeaturesacustom kitchenwith42"cabinetsandgranite countertops.Theadjacentdining arealooksontothedeckandthe pristinebeach.Thelivingroom includesagasfireplaceandopen comfortableseatingspace.Thereare threeprivatemasterbedroomsuites, withexpansiveclosets,plusan additionalbedroomwithbathanda fifthfullbath.Thesecondfloorliving areaoffersadditionalroomforfamily gatheringscompletewithwetbar. Elegantandspacioushomelocated ona1acrelotwithbeautifulGulf viewsanddirectbeachaccessthat isforthemostdiscriminatingbuyer. Thishomefeatures7bedrooms (stackedfornoisecontrol),8full baths,&2halfbaths;4equally appointedmastersuites;2children's suiteswithbuilt-inbunks,cribs, playrooms,&baths;andamaster bedroomonthe3rdfloorthatcan belockedasanowner'sarea.A livingareaoneachfloor.Entertainin thehometheaterthathasstadium seatingfor11andanadditional minikitchen&gameroomwitha foosballtable.Thegourmetkitchen has2refrigerators,dishwashers, ovensandsinks;stainlesssteel appliances,lotsofcabinets,granite countertops,andbutler'spantrywith additionalsink. VeryniceFlorida Cottagestyle3 bedroomswith21/2 bathshome.Currentlyarentalhome alongwithhousenext doorat257Prado. Bothpropertiesare forsale.SeeMLS 241347.(Shared driveways)Currently rentsfor$700/month. DelightfulcottageinApalachicola's Historicnorthside!Beautiful hardwoodfloorsthroughoutwith trayedceilingsinthelivingroomand kitchenaddingtothespaciousness oftheopenfloorplan.Thelarge dine-inkitchenhasextensive tiledcountertops,abreakfastbar andplentyofcabinets.Thereisa halfbathoffthekitchentowards screenedbackporch.Themaster bedroomhasFrenchdoorsopening toashadeddeckthatalsoconnects tothescreenedbackporch. Completelyrenovatedin2002,you canenjoymodern,low-maintenance conveniencesinacharmingsetting -sitonyourfrontporchandbe neighborlyorwalkfiveshortblocks todowntown. Remarks:OriginalNewUrbanism! LiveandworkintherevitalizedBoweryDistrictofHistoricApalachicola. TheoldCocaColaBottlingbuilding offerstwostoriesofhistory.The firstfloorhasbeenrenovatedintoa charmingretailspacewithdistinct areastoshowcaseuniqueproducts. Approximately2100sq.feeton thefirstfloorwithakitchenarea, halfbath,storageroomandoffice -allcooledwithwindow/wallACs. Upstairsis2100sq.ft.ofclassic warehouseloft;soaringceilings andwoodplankfloors.Partially renovatedwithstyrofoaminsulation ontheceiling,afirewall/insulation/ sheetrockonthenorthwall,and sheetrockonthesouthwall. MatchmakersforBuyersandSellers ontheCoastforover15years#1insalesbyvolumesince2007CONTACT:Susanat(850)323-0092,sbassett@stgeorgewired.com