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The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 07-18-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00227

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 07-18-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00227

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, July 18, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 12 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School was recognized this spring as one of just 16 Florida schools — out of more than 1,700 Title I schools across the state — to be worthy of an Exceeding Expectations award by a technical assistance center in Sanford. The award is particularly significant because it is an honor given only to Title I schools, which are those determined by the federal government to serve a high percentage of students from low-income families. A group of educators from the ABC School presented for two days at the Exceeding Expectations conference May 1415 in Orlando. Attending were ABC School Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin, Principal Chimene Johnson and teachers Heather Friedman and Tara Ward. To qualify for the award, presented by the East Coast Technical Assistance Center in Sanford, the school had to show improvement in elementary reading and math grades for all its subgroups, earn an A from the Department of Education and be above the state median in reading and math 5 vie for 2 Carrabelle commission spots By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com With no municipal elections to be held in Apalachicola this year, all eyes turn to Carrabelle, where a eld of ve will vie for the two seats. Apalachicola City Commissioners Brenda Ash and Frank Cook drew no challengers in the upcoming Sept. 3 nonpartisan election, so no election will be held and they will each be given another fouryear term. But in Carrabelle, the two incumbents, Cal Allen and Brenda La Paz, face three challengers, Franklin Daniels, Audrey Olivia Massey and Nikki Mock Millender. The top two vote getters in the Sept. 3 nonpartisan election will emerge the winners for the two four-year terms. Each paid a ling fee of $45 plus 1 percent of the position’s annual monthly pay of $315. Commissioners also are eligible for health insurance, and retirement pay after serving at least eight years. Earlier this month, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to install the two elected commissioners at the Sept. 5 city meeting, two days after the balloting. Allen said the swearing-in will take place after the meeting, because incoming commissioners will not have had the bene t of attending workshops or hearing past discussions of a number of important issues to be addressed at that meeting. Early voting runs from August 26 to 30, at Carrabelle City Hall, daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Study to compare renovation, new construction By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Weems Memorial Hospital is moving ahead with several capital expenditures, not the least of which is $50,000 for a revised feasibility study to determine how much debt makes sense to build a new facility or renovate the existing one. Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth told county commissioners Tuesday morning a debt capacity study, exploring scenarios ranging from $8 million to $12 million, would be needed to as part of a loan application with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “We can use some existing information, but have to revalidate that,” he said, noting the cost of the study and the $65,000 needed to le a letter of intent could come from preconstruction funds held in the county’s health care trust fund of monies from the 1 percent sales tax. Funding the debt capacity study passed unanimously after some grousing by the commissioners. “We paid the same rm already for a feasibility study.” Commissioner Pinki Jackel said. “It seems to me we already paid them $100,000.” Brownsworth said competition to the west, changes to the marketplace and reimbursement rate change have made the revised study necessary. “A colleague in a nearby town paid $130,000” for a similar study, he said, noting it would be good for Weems mulls new facility Receiving the Exceeding Expectations Award were, from left, ABC School Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin, Principal Chimene Johnson and teachers Heather Friedman and Tara Ward. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ABC School honored among state’s best RAY BROWNSWORTH PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times This Mooney M2OF Executive was damaged during a landing attempt on Saturday. The propeller, below and much of the undercarriage were damaged in the crash. None injured in plane crash Pilot: Damage about $70,000 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Nobody was hurt during a botched attempt to land a small plane at Cliff Randolph Field at the Apalachicola Regional Airport on Saturday evening. A pilot landed a Mooney M2OF Executive single-engine xed wing aircraft at the airport without putting the landing gear down. The plane received signi cant damage but was able to be moved off the runway. There were no injuries and no damage to the airport. On Tuesday, the pilot, who asked not to be named, said there was about $70,000 in damage to the aircraft, and because it was more than 75 percent of the total value of the plane, the insurance company probably would declare it a total loss. An appraisal of the damage was in progress during the interview. The undercarriage of the airplane, propeller and engine were all damaged beyond repair. The pilot said he had owned the plane for four months. A review of records indicates the plane was in the process of being registered in Panama City. The pilot said he plans to buy another small plane with the insurance settlement. “These things happen,” said Ted Mosteller, chairman of the airport advisory board and a veteran pilot. The Mooney M2OF Executive was manufactured by the Mooney Airplane Company during the late 1960s and 1970s. Several similar planes listed for sale on eBay are priced between $45,000 and $60,000. See WEEMS A3 See ABC A3 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 State tourney toughness, A9 C-Quarters readies for youth shing tourney C-Quarters Youth Fishing Tournament in Carrabelle will be Friday and Saturday, July 19-20, for children 16 and younger. After the Friday clinic, each child receives a rod and reel, T-shirt, hat and bait. There are nine categories of sh with three places and trophies in each. On Saturday morning, kids can sh from docks or, if they can go out on a boat, they are allowed to sh the Carrabelle River up to Dog Island. Lunch will be provided. All participants must be registered before the tournament at www. c-quartersmarina.com. Full Moon Climb Monday at lighthouse The July Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Monday, July 22. The sunset climb will be 8-9:30 p.m. and includes light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:38 p.m., and the moon will rise at 8:31 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. St. George Lighthouse Park is at the center of the island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Reservations are recommended. Call the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Discover county’s oldest visitors From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in July, enjoy a presentation about “Sea Turtles, Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors,” by the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve at 108 Island Drive. For more info call 670-7700.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA T ake the oppor tunit y t o nomina t e y our fa v or it e businesses people r estaur an ts or other ca t egor ies f or T he 2013 I naugur al Reader ’ s C hoic e GO T O star .c om OR apalach times .c om AND CLICK ON THE O nline N omina tions: July 25thJuly 31st O nline V oting: A ug 1st-12th T OP THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN e hoic s C ’ al Reader naugur I TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO TTEN GO R FO ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA T O M AKE Y OUR NOMINA TIONS o y t tunit ake the oppor T the F irst e v er … “B est of the F or gott en C oast ” … er v irst e the F ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 2 6 0 +25 5 2+% ) ,) ) )+2 52 2-) 5 ) 5 1 1 2+ ) 5 ) 2 ) $ 4! ) ,20 ) 6 (" 5 2 2 0 2 1 ) 2 1 55 + -2 0 0 2 ) 20 2 2 ) 16 ) ) 2 2 ) 5 50 2 ) 2+ ) ) 0 -6 1 2 2 2 ), )+ 1 20 ) 2 -2 + 4 )+ 4 3 21 2+ 2 ) ) ) 0 -6 -6 ) 5 $ ) 5-" 4 2 ) 0" ) 2 5 -6 ) 5 + 22+ -) 2 0 ) ) 6 / 4 2 ) +) ) 6 2+ 6 ) 50 ) 6 / -, 5 52+ 52 2 6 2+ +, + ) 6 ) 1 ) 2 -6 ) 5 ) 2,# -2 -6 ) 5 %" 2 5 5" 5 ) ),22 + 2 22 )+2' $ 2 4 5) 6 ) 0 ) 6 ,2+ ) 5 4 2 ) ) + 1 6 Three local artists — Susan Richard son, Lynn Wilson and Alice Jean Gibbs — all had artwork selected for the Artists League of Tallahassee’s annual summer show at the Florida State University’s Mu seum of Fine Arts. One of Richardson’s three works se lected for the show also received one of the exhibition’s six top awards. Richardson’s 8-by-10-inch oil paint ing “Old Salt Christo at 80,” completed last year, earned her a Frames + Award, which included a $50 gift certicate from the frame shop. “He let me take a whole bunch of photo graphs of him,” she said. “He has a framed copy of it.” Richardson also had two other works accepted in the show, which was titled “To Collaborate or Not to Collaborate,” be cause it allowed for works done by two or more artists. “It meant more than one person could work on a painting,” she said. “Often it’s just your work. Normally it would be dif cult to be in shows (if the work was by more than one artist).” Richardson’s two other works in the show, which featured 80 pieces overall, were “Clearing Fog,” a work she did in March that has earned her an Honorable Mention in the Atlanta Artistic Center’s Dogwood Show. “I live for ribbons,” she joked. “That’s what I do.” A third work, “The Man,” done last summer, was of a black man who frequent ed the Gibson Inn. Artist Alice Jean Gibbs had a large pas tel landscape in the show entitled “Spirit guides me,” while her daughter, Lynn Wil son has two pastels, “Mystic Morning,” which shows Eastpoint at sunrise, and “Tate’s Hell.” “Mom was thrilled, and it was so great for her to nally, after a life’s career, to be selected for the Museum of Fine Art,” Wil son said. The show closed today. — BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN Putnal hired by Carrabelle water and sewer At their July 11 meeting, the Carrabelle city commissioners hired William Wesley Putnal as the newest employee of the water and sewer department. City Manager Courtney Millender said the department needs two new employees because one worker will be out for at least six weeks on sick leave; a second, Jim Moore, recently retired on short notice; and Franklin Daniels left more than a year ago and was not replaced because budgetary concerns. Keith Mock, the department head, will be leaving on two weeks’ vacation at the end of July. City Clerk Keisha Smith said hiring the two employees at $10 per hour would put the city $9,000 over budget for the scal year. Millender said the budget can be amended. Fewer than half of the original nine applicants were present at the meeting. Smith said two of the applicants withdrew after indicating they would not work for less than $15 per hour. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider moved in favor of Putnal for the job and said he was highly qualied. Smith said Putnal will receive $10 per hour but, with benets, the job pays $35,000 annually. She said there was no conict of interest in hiring Putnal and “no nepotism conict with any potential employee.” After Putnal was hired, Commissioner Cal Allen moved to hire Michael Alday for the second position. Commissioners Allen, Schneider, Frank Mathes and Curley Messer voted to hire Alday, but Brenda LaPaz asked if Alday had a high school diploma or had passed a General Educational Development exam. Alday said he had not. Smith said commissioners could make his employment contingent on Alday completing the exam in a set period of time. She said there was a six-month probation period for all employees. LaPaz said she was concerned the job had only been advertised for a week, and many potential employees might not have seen it. Commissioners withdrew their votes and voted unanimously to advertise the second position for two more weeks, setting July 29 as the deadline for an application. The commission plans to hire the second water and sewer employee at the Aug. 1 meeting. Carrabelle seniors’ lunch closed until September The regular Thursday lunch at the Carrabelle Senior Citizens Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F, will not be served from July 25 through Aug. 29. Ed Pattillo, president of the senior center board, said the lunches will resume on Sept. 5. “We’re not going to x any meals for six weeks. What we’re doing, we’re giving the volunteers a little vacation and there’s some building maintenance that needs to be done,” he said. “There’ll be sawdust, and we don’t want that in people’s food.” By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com An audit released at the last Carra belle meeting said things look slightly brighter there. At the July 11 meeting, Mark Payne, representing certied public accoun tants James Moore and Company, presented results of an audit of Car rabelle’s 2011-12 scal year. Auditors found some slight improvements in the nancial outlook, but procedural prob lems noted last year are ongoing. The bottom line has not changed much. Carrabelle had $72 million in as sets, an increase of $1 million over 2011. Liabilities remain the same, $32 mil lion, leaving net assets of $40 million. Of that, $2.3 million is in unrestricted as sets, which is a $500,000 increase over the last audit. Most of the city’s wealth is tied up in property and vehicles. Once again, the city showed a small increase in government funds at the end of the scal year, with almost $4 million in receivables, including taxes owed, grants awarded and liquid as sets. Last year’s audit found $3.2 mil lion, which was an increase of $29,000 over the 2009-10 scal year. While governmental funds earned $80,000, the water and sewer and port authority lost $40,000. Payne praised the city for the sur plus and said many small cities consis tently wind up in the red. Mayor Curley Messer loudly agreed with Payne’s observation that the city has gone over budget in some areas. He called for more scal conservatism. Payne said the city has roughly $30 million in debt, most relating to the ex pansion of the sewer system. Commis sioner Brenda La Paz said she would explore that issue in an upcoming meeting with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, which funded the construction of the system. The audit found material weakness es in the city’s nancial statements. There have been improvements over last year’s situation. Water and Sewer has employed a collection agency to collect past due fees, but Payne still warned that uncollected receivables were an issue. “On water and sewer, you need to be looking at accounts that are past due,” Payne said. “Make sure you adhere to your policies.” He noted bank statements are not being reconciled in a timely fashion and recommended this procedure be carried out monthly immediately after the statements are issued. Payne found that reports requesting reimbursement from federal Commu nity Development Block Grants are not being led in a timely manner. He said this could affect the city’s ability to ac quire this kind of funding in the future. The auditor said overlapping duties of employees on the small city staff remains a problem. “You don’t have enough people to do everything with regards to checks and balances,” he said. The report said the city still does not have an employee trained to prepare the necessary reports for an audit. Like last year, Moore and Company’s audit said duties related to spending and receiving funds should be formally assigned to employees with checks and balances in place. It recommended mail be opened by an employee not respon sible for accounting who would record cash receipts and that bank statements and cancelled checks should also be received by someone other than the employee maintaining cash records. Anything out of the ordinary should be promptly investigated, cash depos ited daily, and signed checks mailed by someone other than the person respon sible for accounts payable, the audit advised. The report repeated a request for an inventory of physical assets and rec ommended that invoices document all expenses, and that better records be kept. Journal entries should include adequate documentation and be ap proved by an employee other than the one who prepared the entry, and all employee time sheets should be signed and approved by a supervisor, read the audit. It also advised that the city main tain an approved vendor list and seek bids for signicant expenses. The report also recommended the city prepare a detailed disaster recov ery plan and an accounting procedures manual. In a letter responding to the nd ings prepared by the commission and city staff including City Attorney Dan Hartman, the city promised to segre gate nancial reporting duties. The let ter said preparation of the accounting manual and inventory and the disaster response program are under way. Carrabelle audit nds few changes Carrabelle BRIEF sS Three local artists chosen for Tallahassee show SUsan SAN Ric IC H ardson ARDSON ’ s S Portrait ORTRAIT o O F CHristo RISTO Poloronis POLORONIS and AND Lynn YNN Wilson ILSON ’ s S “Mystic YSTIC Mornin ORNIN G”

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, July 18, 2013 Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: AP00 FREE T ools t o Quit P r ogr am If y ou'r e r ead y t o quit t obacco use w e'r e r ead y t o help with a per sonaliz ed tw o-hour pr ogr am. Ther e is no c har g e t o enr oll or f or mat er ials. The next T ools to Quit class will be held Thursday July 18th fr om 5:30pm to 7:30pm in the W eems Memorial Hospital cafeteria. F or mor e inf or mation or t o r egist er call 850-653-8853 e xt. 1 0 1 or 850-224-1 1 77 Fr e e C arbon Mono xide T esting Spir omet er (lung age/COPD Scr eening) Fr e e Nicotine P atches/Gum/Loz enges f or P r og r am P ar ticipants W hile Supplies Last Fr e e T ools t o Quit W or kbook Gr oups led b y tr ained t obacco cessation specialist C o v er s all f or ms of t obacco one to two years. “We’ve already paid them $250,000 for plans that don’t work,” Jackel said. “We’ve got to stop spending money on evalua tion. We’ve spent almost $400,000 on evaluation, and we don’t have anything to show for it. But, she conceded, “if we want a new hospital, we have to give them their information.” Commissioner Smokey Par rish wanted reassurance from Brownsworth the study would not be a case of throwing away more money. “Are we ready to move for ward? Because if not, it’s a waste of money,” Parrish said. “This is what we need to be ready to move forward in a time ly fashion,” Brownsworth said. “The feasibility study will con rm which of those, with great detail, will be possible. I assume we want to get the most bang for our buck. “I would like to be starting on a new hospital in a year. My charge since I’ve been hired here is to make this happen, and that’s what we’re going to do.” “I would like that, but we’ve got to have somebody to stay be hind this,” Jackel said. The CEO said the hospital might be 10 beds, with a medical ofce building or clinic attached. “We’re averaging three (patients) daily now, so that will give us a 400 percent increase, which is a gracious plenty,” Jackel said. Brownsworth said Dr. Ste phen Miniat’s former ofce is be ing converted into clinic space for Weems West, staffed by advanced registered nurse practitioner Su san Hardin. She sees about eight to 12 patients at her ofce inside the hospital, with the Weems East clinic’s two practitioners in Carrabelle seeing about 30 to 40 patients each day. Brownsworth said a primary care practitioner is expected to see about three or four patients per hour in a seven-hour day. “About 21 to 25 patients per day is what you are looking for, with complicated medical condi tions taking longer,” he said. He said a complete renovation could run as much as $350,000, an expenditure that did not make as much sense as spending under $50,000 to make the space suit able for Hardin, alongside a visit ing specialist. “Sometimes when you reno vate, it costs more than construc tion,” Jackel said. After the vote to approve the study was complete, Commis sioner Noah Lockley signaled his patience, too, was nearing its end, “Is this the last time we’re go ing to do this?” he asked. “Last time for me,” Commis sioner William Massey said. Electronic medical records next big expenditure Brownsworth said Weems is nearing the end of its evaluation of two vendors, Healthland and CSS, for its electronic medical record and health information management system. EMR and HIM provide for the business and billing activities as well as the documentation of a patient’s health record. “We are evaluating the ability of a system to meet our needs now and into the future,” he said. Comparing the cost of both systems begins with the pur chase price, which includes the cost of the software, hardware, peripherals, installation, inter faces, licenses, training and travel. Prices for the two vendors vary from $510,000 to $825,000. Brownsworth said a second consideration is the cost of op erating the software system, which requires annual support and maintenance fees. Factoring in these costs to the purchase price shows a comparatively close cost of ownership over a ve-year period, in the neighbor hood of about $1.5 million. After a contract is signed for a system, Weems will apply for Medicaid Incentive payments, which consultant estimates say could equal at least $300,000 or more. Once the system is installed, Brownsworth said, Weems will seek to receive these payments within the rst year of use and annually for several years after. “At this time, an estimate is not available for these pay ments,” he said. “Together, both incentive payments should meet a majority of the capital needs for the purchase of the com puter systems. Several options exist for the upfront payment of the software and equipment pending the receipt of incentive funds and nalization of pay off terms.” Though the purchase of EMR and HIM systems will improve productivity, continuity of care and allow for more timely billing and collection of revenues, the main reason for the purchase is the federal requirement to con vert to an electronic medical record or face declining reim bursement from Medicare and Medicaid, which together repre sent about half of the hospital’s patients. Brownsworth said he expects to recommend a nal vendor to the Weems board by month’s end, with that selection going to the county commission for nal approval. IT contract goes to new rm Earlier this month, Brown sworth reported to commission ers, he served BlueManta, the IT (information technology) vendor, with 30 days’ notice of termina tion of the contract. “This was due to concerns about their responsiveness to our requests and a failure to ad equately provide for business continuity services,” he said, not ing that over the last year, he had been able to lower Blue Manta’s monthly fee from $9,000 to $6,000. Brownsworth said system se curity controls and access were reset, as is typical for such a transition. The CEO has engaged Ea gle Tree Technologies, a newly formed company under the man agement of Kevin Ward, under an interim month-to-month service agreement for $4,100 per month. “Input from the county com missioners and the hospital board of directors will be sought related to a longer term agreement and the proper selection process,” Brownsworth said. The top two candidates for the newly created chief nancial ofcer position have declined Brownsworth’s offers. He said the rst, from the state of Wash ington, found housing costs were too high for what the job paid, and the second took a competing job offer to be within 30 miles of his grandchildren. Brownsworth said he planned to provide a tour of the facility this week to a new prospect. ABC from page A1 gains, including for the lowest quartile of students. For the middle school, the ABC School had to show an increase in profi ciency for its entire student population, as well as keep an A grade and be above the state median in reading and math. “I am extremely proud of the accom plishment of our staff and students this year,” Johnson said. In the educators’ presentation, they wrote that the vision of the 12-year-old school, which serves 328 students in kindergarten through eighth grade, “is to create a community-centered, facility that promotes student and parent par ticipation in a stimulating learning en vironment that is positive, hopeful, and exciting. It is the mission of ABC School that each child will achieve his or her academic and social potential.” The presentation cited the school’s extended learning day, which enables it to offer art, music, character educa tion, technology and foreign language instruction. “It is our belief that all students can learn, and we hold high expectations for students and staff,” read the summary, outlining how Individual Learning Plans prepared early each fall bring parents, students and teachers together to share ideas to increase the success of the child. “It is our belief that by using best practices, differentiated instruction and intervention strategies, our students will reach their full potential,” it said. Differentiated instruction allows teachers time necessary to learn the interests, learning styles and abilities of students, it said, describing how the elementary school consists of two het erogeneously grouped classes per grade level and are self-contained to give the teachers flexibility with scheduling and instruction. “Our school utilizes teacher assis tants to help provide differentiated in struction. It is our belief that small group instruction yields the greatest learning benefit for most students,” read the re port. “Our students generally rotate be tween the certified teacher, the teacher assistant, and a center during the day.” The presentation also described the “Response to Intervention” process, which it said has been an integral part of ABC School’s success for many years. “The process has evolved into an ef fective team approach for problem-solv ing,” it read. “We work to quickly identify students in need for additional support. Teachers or parents will refer a student if they feel a student is not working to their academic or social potential.” The weekly meetings bring together the assistant principal, guidance coun selor, Franklin County School psycholo gist, teachers, parents and, when appro priate, students. The teachers keep a Success Binder on each student, which contains student data and work samples, and which fol lows that student throughout their edu cational career at ABC School. “The team works through a problem solving approach to develop a plan for student success,” it described. “The teachers implement scientifically based interventions during the students’ day.” Title I dollars are used to fund a read ing teacher for intervention for identied students, as well as for additional tutor ing, after-school FCAT camps run by ABC teachers and intervention materials. “We know the power of building con nections with students. These connec tions are essential to be a successful school. Great instruction and inter ventions are fostered by positive rela tionships,” reported the ABC School presentation. The report said eld trips offer a great time for teachers, parents and students to connect outside of the school building and outlined the “rising” and “soaring” ceremonies that have marked student advancement into, and completion of, the middle school. “Historically, our former students have remained close in high school,” the report read. “It is wonderful to see stu dents’ excitement and appreciation when they see staff watching them play ball or attending an extracurricular function. Each morning our students are greeted by administration. Many teachers give students ‘chores’ and are able to be the classroom greeter. We have numerous opportunities for parental involvement throughout the year and parents are al ways welcome.” The report also shared the school’s methods of celebrating its students and staff, including how it prepares for and acknowledges the students’ performance on the FCAT. “Since the inception of ABC School, the board and administration has worked hard to apply best practices to both the educational programs and administrative activities while maintaining a nancially sound school. We spend the public fund ing we receive wisely and operate within a balanced budget,” read the presenta tion. “We strive to create a school culture that is positive and nurturing. Our teach ers and administration are held to a high standard and implementation of the new teacher evaluation system is evolving into an effective teaching tool for all.” WEEMS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The former ofces of Dr. Stephen Miniat soon will become the home of Weems West medical clinic.

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Page 4 Thursday, July 18, 2013 Special to the Times As Congress argues over farm subsidies and food stamps, rural Americans complain that elected of cials ignore small communities and fail to invest in their future. So found a comprehensive poll of rural Americans on the role of federal policy in creating economic opportunity for rural people and a future for their communities. The poll was conducted by the bipartisan polling team of Celinda Lake of Lake Research and Ed Goeas of The Tarrance Group and released last week by the Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons, Neb. It surveyed rural voters in the Great Plains, Midwest and Southeast. The poll found rural Americans united in their commitment to their way of life. Almost nine in 10 believe the rural and smalltown way of life is worth ghting for. But they sadly believe the rural way of life may be fading, and they want to stop it, reverse it and revitalize rural America, said pollsters Lake and Goeas. And they believe they are being ignored by politicians and government and blame them for the state of the rural economy. Nevertheless, the poll found divided views about the role of government and populist views about the economy and big institutions. Three fourths agree Americas future is weakened by a widening gap between the rich and families struggling to make ends meet. But they split evenly on whether its time for government to play a stronger role in strengthening rural communities and making the economy work for the average person in rural and small-town America or whether turning to big government to solve our problems will do more harm than good. Neither the conservative nor progressive ideological perspective has it right, Lake said. On the one hand, the language around lower taxes, smaller government and fewer regulations is one of the highest testing messages. On the other, they support policies that call for more job training, increased infrastructure investments, more technology and better preschools all requiring a role for government in making things better. It is too simplistic to believe rural America is anti-government and that there is nothing for progressives to say, nor is it possible to say that rural America wants bigger government and more spending, Goeas said. They want tax breaks, but they also support increased loans and grants to help people gain skills and open small businesses. They want more ef cient and effective government and view much of public policy as a fairness issue in which rural America has not received fair treatment. Among the results: More than half said owning my own business or farm is a big part of the American dream for me, and most agreed with helping small business through less government (cutting taxes, spending and regulation) and strengthened government (loans, tax credits, training and antitrust enforcement). Three-fourths agree too much of federal farm subsidies go to the largest farms, hurting smaller family farms. Three-fourths support tax credits and investment in new transmission lines for development of wind, solar and other renewable electric generation in rural areas. Eight in 10 support grants and loans to revitalize small towns through upgrades to water and sewer systems and investments in roads and bridges. Six in 10 say government has some or a lot of responsibility to help the working poor advance economically (versus a little or none). Eight in 10 support job training to improve earnings, Medicaid for health coverage and helping the working poor afford necessities through payroll tax refunds like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Eightyve percent favor preschool programs to prepare lowerincome children to succeed in school. Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years ago, Lake said. But rural Americans are somewhat optimistic that things will get better, said Goeas, and younger rural Americans are most optimistic. Center for Rural Affairs Executive Director Chuck Hassebrook said the optimism of the upcoming generation re ects the new entrepreneurial opportunities in rural America and growing appreciation for the rural way of life. They get it, Hassebrook said, and that gives them the capacity to lead their communities to a better future. Politically, he said, the poll reveals openings for candidates of either party willing to ght for federal policy that supports genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their communities. He pointed to the question asking voters whether they would nd it convincing if a U.S. Senate candidate made certain statements. Eighty-seven percent said they would nd it convincing for a Senate candidate to say: Small-town America is a big and important part of what makes America go. We are hardworking, patriotic, faithful and skilled. Making sure our families, our small business owners and our workers have the same chance as everyone else is fair and smart. That means supporting policies like investing more in helping our small businesses get started and bringing technology to our areas so we can be connected to the new economy. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http://www.cfra.org/ news/130625/rural-pollreleased-today. Established in 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs is a private, nonpro t organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. Franklin County leadership punched itself in the face twice this month when County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders lobbed a callous and careless ethnic slur against Jews during a heated debate at a July 2 meeting. A ridiculously weak apology this week has left a lingering bloody nose to public civility in the wake of such pathetic, but supposedly unintentional, hate mongering posing as leadership. How could it even happen today? Sanders nonchalant nastiness was a sobering but stupefying moment that is forever on the record as a disgraceful piece of modern history for the community. It cannot be ignored. It must have a strong and direct response. As the commission wrangled over how much to raise the salary of Howard Nabors, a longtime employee elevated to now head the road department, Sanders tried to cut through conversation about salaries of other department heads with this comment: Todays not the day to do it. Were here (for Nabors salary), not to be up here jewing over somebodys pay. What a stunning comment for anyone to make let alone a public of cial in a public meeting. Even worse than the anti-Semitic remark by Sanders was the fact that no one challenged her about it. Not one of her peers on the commission called her on her language; not one member of the audience spoke up in protest; and not even this newspaper, The Apalachicola Times, which quoted the remark in a long story about the Nabors appointment, ever took Sanders to task for it, in news columns or editorially. Under the best-case scenario and thats not a very good case Sanders might just be very ignorant. But that is hardly a good excuse for her words. I spoke with chair Sanders on Monday, July 15, when to her credit she returned a phone call from me. When I told her use of the word jewing was offensive, she initially denied she had said it. Instead, she offered, she had used the word jawing. Thats not true and, later in the brief call, she acknowledged that she had, indeed, said jewing in reference to the salary discussion. It was a slang, not a slur, Sanders told me. Actually, Sanders, it is a slur period. You cant get away with calling it slang now that you know its offensive to people. You owe yourself and surely the community better than to try to justify the word even after you used it and after youve been confronted about it. On Tuesday, July 16, Sanders offered a weak attempt at an apology that, in many ways, only ampli ed and magni ed her slur. Heres the text of it: On July 2 there was a statement I made that offended. I used a word that was offensive to some people. It was in the heat of argument and it was a poor choice of words and Im sorry. If I have caused any hardship to the people or employees of Franklin County, Im sorry. This is a heartfelt apology. If thats an apology, it lacks real contrition and when you have to describe your own apology as heartfelt, it probably is not. Candidly, Sanders admits she didnt know about the word jewing being an offensive slur as much as the N word is for blacks or, she never had time to learn that the term contributes to prejudicial and stereotypical myths about an entire group of people. That possibility might re ect a deeper level of ignorance by Sanders about other offensive words and phrases that slur Jews, blacks, women, Hispanics, elders, Asians, gay people, etc. You dont have to be black to be offended by racism; nor do you have to be Jewish to be appalled by anti-Semitism. We all know that racism, sexism, anti-Semitism and other isms still exist and they even ourish in some places, among some people. But, the example being set by Cheryl Sanders is unworthy of the people of Franklin County. The naked ugliness of hate borne of ignorance, displayed from the dais of a governmental body by someone who purports to be a leader, absolutely needs to be outed and confronted. Even if Sanders fails to get educated about slurs or to correct course away from the polluted path of prejudice she apparently travels along, let this be a teaching moment for the good people of the community she is serving. At least, her somewhat lame apology is a start. At most, Sanders needs to undergo sensitivity training and perhaps theres a good case to be made for a countywide antiprejudice campaign to take root. Barbara Goldstein, the director of the Big Bends areas Holocaust Education Resource Council, is just the right person to help create such an effort. She helped put Sanders slur into perspective with these words: Prejudice results when ignorance goes unchecked. For a county commissioner, more sensitive language should be used as an example of understanding diversity. In the aftermath of the moral and societal failures that made the Holocaust possible, confronting anti-Semitism and all forms of hatred is critical. Diversity in our community, state, nation and world is a great strength, not a weakness. Tolerance, acceptance and understanding among all people are what help to de ne our civilization, rather than diffuse it. One can only hope Sanders feels a need to go beyond her imsy mea culpa, publicly, and to decry her own choice of damaging words. Even more meaningful would be a genuine effort to foster and embrace a community that respects and celebrates diversity as a higher road for Franklin Countys future. Ron Sachs, CEO of Tallahassee-based Sachs Media Group, is a property owner and taxpayer in Franklin County. This is where I draw the line I am speaking out as a concerned citizen of Franklin County. In recent comments from a Franklin County commissioner in last weeks Apalachicola Times, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders made the following (racial) comment below: Todays not the day to do it, Sanders said. Were here (for Nabors salary), not to be up here jewing over somebodys pay. I cant believe that you all would put a man down who has worked here for 26 years because he dont have a high school education. Is this her true nature or is this just a matter-of-fact lifestyle example: Honey, Ive heard that all my life and have said it myself. I didnt know that was racial. This is where I draw the line. If you are going to represent your city, county or state, you should make it your responsibility to educate yourself, to be able to speak effectively. I guess what shocks me most about this is that no one, to my knowledge, has brought this to her attention. Ms. Sanders does not have any restaurants, TV shows, book deals etc.; however, if she did, Im con dent the Jewish citizens would make sure Paula Dean has some company. I am not of Jewish faith, but this is offensive to me, and it makes our entire county look uninformed and uneducated. Sincerely, Gaye Ellis SANDERS APOLOGIZES FOR WORD USE At Tuesday mornings county commission meeting, Chairman Cheryl Sanders apologized for her use earlier this month of a word widely viewed as an ethnic slur. At the July 2 county commission meeting, Sanders used the term jewing to characterize haggling and bickering among her colleagues surrounding raises for department heads in the context of hiring a new head of the road department. Todays not the day to do it, the Times quoted her as saying. Were not to be up here jewing over somebodys pay. I cant believe that you all would put a man down who has worked here for 26 years because he dont have a high school education. This led to a restorm of blogs, and even comment in the Washington Post and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, on the political correctness of the phrase. At Tuesdays meeting, Sanders opened the meeting with the following statement. On July 2 there was a statement I made that offended. I used a word that was offensive to some people. It was in the heat of argument, and it was a poor choice of words, and Im sorry. If I have caused any hardship to the people or employees of Franklin County, Im sorry. This is a heartfelt apology. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Poll: Rural voters reject simplistic categorization Ethnic slur re ects need for real apology RON SACHS Special to The TImes Letter to the EDITOR

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A6 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 Special to The Times Volunteers from Hot Springs, Ark., combined their love of recreational vehicles with their passion for building as they helped to make Habitat for Humanity’s fourth home in Eastpoint a dream come true. The group came down March 10-17, and in addition to arriving with skills and muscle, left behind a check for $2,500 to support Habitat’s future work in Franklin County. Mason Bean, a member of the Habitat board who worked closely with the volunteers, said the group came in an RV caravan and stayed at Ho Hum RV park, and then throughout the week, helped with wiring, insulation, sheetrock and cleanup. Mary Christians, a Hot Springs, Arkansas realtor, and her husband, Bob, a builder for 35 years and a member of the Garland County Habitat board, were among the crew’s leaders. “We are an older group, in our midto late 50s and 60s, so don’t expect a bunch of youngins,” Mary Christians wrote Bean in advance of their trip. “But we work hard, put in a full day and are experienced in several phases of the building process. Over the years we have raised walls, sided, roofed, painted, built staircases, etc.,” she wrote. “In Biloxi, Miss., we worked on house that were up on stilts. None of us were crazy about that, but we did it. Are you building on slabs or up on stilts?” “Last year in San Antonio, we spent one day laying sod, two days siding, and one day painting trim and raising already built walls,” wrote Mary Christians. “There is little we won’t try, but my husband says to tell you we can’t put up roof trusses. We’re too old for that.” Also part of the Arkansas contingent were Craig and Leslie Johnson, Roger and Char Feldt, Duane and Launa Kraase, Bob and Dianne McCabe, Al and Ardy Ness, Steve and Mary Seitz, John Symons and EJ Pangle, Jim and Barb Mika, Ed and JoAnne Thielbar, Tom and Neala Gunderson, Betty Bolte, and Steve and Jean Fetcko. Bean said the Arkansas volunteers were a special group of volunteers. “They were very impressed with our dedication plus how much we appreciated their support,” he said. “When they go on these blitz builds, there could be lots of volunteers, lost in the masses. This small build was very special to them, they really enjoyed being here, thus this contribution.” Active over the last decade, this is Habitat’s fourth house in the county. “We have to raise at least $50,000 before we can start our fth build,” said Bean. “We are getting close to nishing our fourth home, which is going to be a very cute. I think the neighborhood will be proud. “We continue to work every Saturday,” he said. “We need volunteers to nish our fourth home, and nancial donations toward our fth home for another Franklin County family!” M ember FDIC 3 3 W e s t G a r d e n S t r e e t P e n s a c o l a F L 3 2 5 0 2 850.202.9900 or 1.877.962.3224 1 7 S E E g l i n P a r k w a y F t W a l to n B e a c h F L 3 2 5 4 8 850.244.9900 or 1.866.362.3224 w w w .beachc ommunit ybank .c om ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com 2091548 K AT A L I N A K a t i s a 1 y r o l d Sh a r P e i / L a b r a d o r c r o s s Sh e i s v e r y f r i e n d l y a n d h a p p y J u s t l o o k a t th a t sm i l e Sh e l o v e s t o r u n a n d i s f a s t W e p u t h e r o u t i n th e p l a y y a r d w i th th e o th e r d o g s a n d sh e r u n s ci r cl e s a r o u n d th e m I f y o u a r e l o o k i n g f o r a j o g g i n g c o m p a ni o n o r a d o g t o ch a s e s ti ck s f o r h o u r s K a t i s f o r y o u ! V o l u n t e e r s a r e d e s p e r a t e l y n e e d e d t o s o c i a l i z e a l l o f o u r d o g s a n d c a t s W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l li n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r a ni m a l s i n t o th e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y ti m e y o u c a n sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e a tl y a p p r e cia t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 1 7 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t th e F r a n k li n C o u n t y H u m a n e S o ci e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o th e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r g o t t e n p e t s o r g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Society Obie Lee Pelt, one of God’s little angels, turned 2 years old on Friday, July 12, 2013. Obie is the son of Mary Rae Nowling and Willie Pelt. He has two sweet sisters, Shirah Pelt and Alina Pelt. His grandparents are Alini and William Murray, Kendell Shiver, the late Wayne Nowling, Steve Pelt and the Mary Pelt, who is now with our Lord. Great-grandparents are Charles and Mary Lou King, Johnny and Jean Shiver, Kenneth Shiver and the late Ottis E. Russell II. God bless you my love. Stay well and happy. Your greatgrandmother Mary Lou and Paw-Paw Charles King, Mama, Mary Rae and all your family and friends Birthdays Rylan Wood celebrated his 5th birthday on Monday, July 15. He is the son of LaDonna Granger of Eastpoint and Allen Wood of Carrabelle. We love you. Mommy, Daddy and Family! Happy 5th birthday, Rylan Wood! Obie Pelt turns 2 Royce S. Rolstad III, a longtime actor and director with the Panhandle Players, was elected earlier this month to head the county’s leading theatre troupe. In a balloting system in which members could cast up to 13 votes for ofcers and members of the board, Rolsatd was named president at the July 9 meeting at the Raney House Carriage House, with Bob Inguagiato as vice-president. Remaining as treasurer is John Inzetta and as secretary, Caroline Ilardi, Selected for the board of directors were Ed Aguiar, Sally Crown, Lydia Countryman, Melanie Inzetta, Robbie Johnson, Elaine Kozlowski, Hank Kozlowski, Judy Loftus and Katie McFarland. Rolstad joined the Panhandle Players in 2001 and acted for the rst time with the organization while still a student at Apalachicola High School. Through the years he has performed in several plays and directed the 2007 production of “A Christmas Carol”.” He was asked to join the board of directors in 2005 and served until 2010. Rolstad took a few years off from the board and acting and returned to the stage in April in this year’s drama, “The Jury Room. Rolstad takes over for Margy Oehlert and Bob Inguagiato who served as co-presidents in recent years. “The Panhandle Players hold a special place in my heart because this is where I got over my fear of public speaking. I am thrilled to be back on the board and serving as president of a great organization,” said Rolstad. “I am really looking forward to working with both new and old board members to continue bringing quality, professional productions to the Franklin County community.” – By DAVID ADLERSTEIN ROYC eE RO lstadLSTAD Rolstad to head Panhandle Players Habitat gets boost from Arkansas volunteers SPe E C ial IAL tT O THe E T i I M es ES

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The Times | A7 Thursday, July 18, 2013 By Jim Welsh Special to the Times Due to much needed repairs inside and outside of the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, the center will close after lunch today. Our Thursday lunches and other activities will resume in September. Lunch is served at noon. Please try to join us. You can get your monthly sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday, July 20. Orders for pancakes or French toast served with eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee are taken from 9 to 11 a.m. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Hope to see you there Our monthly Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, at 2316 Oak Street here in the Village, is also on Saturday. Come and enjoy the evening. As always, the public is invited. Party starts at 6 p.m.; fun starts when you walk in the door. Well of course the songbird will be on hand at the karaoke, along with Ann Merrell and others who will be on hand. Of course you know we also have bar bingo, pull tabs, shufeboard and your beverage of choice, served with a smile by Deb or Tim. Come on down and have fun with your friends and neighbors. After church this Sunday, July 21, you can nd us at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. All you need to bring is a dish to share, a donation and your appetite. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Be watchin for ya! When youre out and about, dont forget to place your old eyeglasses in the Lions Club collection boxes. The glasses are cleaned, repaired if necessary and sent all over the world for those in need. Members of the Lions Club International thank you. It wont be long now that you will nd collection boxes for school supplies for those who cant afford them. Try to donate pencils, paper and other school items when you can. The moving sale went very well. Thanks to those who worked and set up the sale and thank you to those who supported it. Starting August 4, there will be coffee in the church hall after the Sunday mass at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church. Mass is at 7:30 a.m. Be kind to one another check in on the sick and the housebound. And dont grumble about getting old, there are many who never get the opportunity. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor Sacr ed Heart of Jesus Catholic Chur c h -Y our Church on the Coast2653 Highw ay 98 East P .O Box 729, Lanark Village Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Sc hedule: Satur day: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Billy Glenn Lunsford, formerly of Franklin County, died on Thursday, July 4, 2013, in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Nell Lunsford, his daughter, Denise of Tallahassee, his son, Michael, of Spokane, Wash., and his son, Greg (Traci) of Rock Hill, South Carolina. He also is survived by his brother Rodney (Marillus) of Pace; his brotherin-law Gene Spears, Cantonment; seven grandchildren, Billy Lee (Shayla), Kellie, Germaine (Jacob), Morgan (Corey), Savannah, Jacob, and Emily; and four greatgrandchildren, Adaline, Elijah, Waylon and Mason. Mr. Lunsford was preceded in death by his parents, Robbie Lester Lunsford, Sr. and Edna Bynum Lunsford; his brothers Robbie Jr., Jimmy, Lomax, and Pete; his beloved sister, Gayle Lunsford Spears; his niece Linda Gayle Spears, and his nephew Wayne Lunsford. Billy was born on Aug. 16, 1932, in Slocomb, Ala. As a young child he and his family moved to Allentown, where he met his future wife, Nell. He was a member of the Church of Christ on Margaret Street in Milton. After graduating from Allentown High School in 1950, he served in the Air Force during the Korean War. After completing his tour in the Air Force, Billy and his wife returned to Santa Rosa County, where he began a long and distinguished 30-plus year career with the State of Florida. In 1964 Billy and his family moved to Apalachicola, where he continued to work for the states Department of Natural Resources until his retirement in 1987. He was a 32nd Degree Mason and member of Masonic Lodge 76 in Apalachicola, where he served as Worshipful Master in 1996. He was also a Shriner and member of the Shaddai Temple. He enjoyed music, especially the old country standards and bluegrass music. For several years he and Nell owned a home in Rosine, Kentucky, where they enjoyed attending and volunteering at the Bill Monroe Bluegrass Festival. Mr. and Mrs. Lunsford forged many close friendships during their time in Rosine, and leave behind Cindy Robinson and Kathy Sanderfur, who bought and now live in the Lunsfords Old Kentucky Home. A service for Mr. Lunsford was held in Tallahassee on July, 8 with burial in Sumatra Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made in Mr. Lunsfords honor to Big Bend Hospice (1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308) Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee assisted the family with their arrangements. Billy Lunsford BILL Y LUNSFORD Princess E. Russ Jones, of Apalachicola, passed away on Tuesday, July 9, 2013. Born to the late Henry and Beatrice Russ, she was a lifelong member of St. Paul AME Church and was deeply involved in its activities. She attended Wallace M. Quinn High School. She was well-known for her work as a net maker, seamstress and upholsterer. Mrs. Jones was preceded in death by her husband, Charles J. Jones II, of Danville, Va.; her infant son, Thomas Jones; her sisters, Annie Russ, Ramona Russ Conley, and Mamie Russ; and her brothers Francis Russ, Robert Russ, Eugene Russ, John Russ and Albert Russ. To cherish her memory, she leaves her devoted daughter, Martha Jones Greene; her sons, Jerome M. Jones, Vincent Jones (Martharine), Charles Miller, Charles J. Jones III (Frances) and Prince Jones; her sister, Cora Russ; her brother, Patton Russ; and a host of grandchildren, greatgrandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins and other relatives. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, July 13 at St. Paul A.M.E. Church, with burial at Snow Hill Cemetery. All services were under the direction of Tillman Funeral Home, Tallahassee.Princess E. Russ Jones Faith Senior center closed for repairs LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh I wish I could personally thank all my beloved friends for their love, prayers, calls, cards and visits during my road to recovery. With Gods healing blessing I will be back home in Carrabelle with my friends and thank you.Mary W estberg Another one of Gods little Angels has been called home. Lord, if we could have but one wish today, it would be that our little Kil Kil could still be here on earth with us. To be able to hold him in our arms and see his pretty little face again. But Lord I know it was your wish for you to have him with you now. Thank you for what Time you gave us with him here on earth. All the ones who loved him. Though our pain is deep and our family misses him here with us we know he is in your arms and with all the loved ones who went before him. We will all carry him in our hearts until we meet again some sweet day in heaven. We love and miss you my love. God bless you. Your great-grandmother Granny Louise, Daddy and all your family and friends. IN LOVING MEMORYKelley Brandon Shiver Dec. 20, 2012 to May 7, 2013 CARD OF THANKS Obituaries A HELPING HAND A handful of man, armed with tools, made short work of a new 48-foot ramp for the home of Lavar Sullivan west of Apalachicola last month. AJ Smith, Johnny Turner, Mark Creamer, Fonda Davis, Gene Osburn and other friend of the Sullivans all pitched in. The project was funded by a $1,000 gift card for material from Home Depot, provided by Franklins Promise. The ramp will be put to good use by wife Trina Sullivan. We had a good group of men turn out, said Smith. It went real well.L OIS SWO B ODA | The Times

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 11 86 78 30 % F ri, July 12 85 76 60 % S a t July 13 85 77 30 % Sun, July 14 87 78 40 % M on, July 15 87 78 30 % T ues July 16 86 78 30 % W ed July 17 86 78 60 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com If you want to bring color and activity to your garden, consider recracker plant (Russelia equisetiformis). Pow! Firecracker plant is a large perennial with slender, rushlike stems and leaves that are reduced to little more than small scales. The wiry branches cascade down in lengths as long as four feet and bloom here anytime of year. A member of the Plantaginaceae, it is related to the coarse lawn weeds plantains. Also known as fountain plant, coral plant or coral blow, this native of tropical America and Mexico produces masses of tubular scarlet owers attractive to butter ies, hummingbirds and bees. It does best in rich well-drained soil but will tolerate sandier conditions if water is available. It is mildly drought-tolerant and requires a minimum of four hours of direct sun to thrive. Firecracker plant does well in containers and hanging baskets, where it makes an attractive display, but potted specimens must be protected in the winter. This plant can be is propagated by division or by stem cuttings in spring. Traditionally used as a cure for snakebite, modern researchers have identi ed it as a powerful antioxidant and anti-in ammatory. Special to the Times Even though our area has experienced some recent rain, a lot of the wildland vegetation found along the coastal Panhandle can dry out relatively quickly, especially on windy days and become wild re “fuel.” Residents are allowed to burn yard waste and debris like leaves, sticks and limbs without having to obtain a burn authorization from the Florida Forest Service if they meet the required setbacks, guidelines and suggestions. The setbacks are 25 feet from the woods or forest, 25 feet from their own home or residence, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from any other occupied building. If these setbacks can be met on the property, they may burn if no local, city or county ordinances prohibit burning; smoke is not a hazard or nuisance; and the yard waste was generated on that property and will t in an 8-feet diameter pile or non-combustible container. The re must be ignited after 9 a.m. and be extinguished one hour before sunset. The re should never be left unattended even for a short time, and adequate suppression equipment (water hose, buckets of water, shovels, rakes, etc.) should be on-site. An area around the pile cleared down to bare soil will help prevent the re from spreading. Any type of outdoor burning that does not fall within these parameters might be illegal or require an authorization. If you have any questions, feel free to call the Florida Forest Service dispatch center at 547-7083. Also, it is illegal to burn household garbage (including paper products), treated lumber, plastics, rubber materials, tires, pesticides, paint and aerosol containers. The three leading causes of wild res each year on average are escaped debris burns, lightning and arson. For more information, visit the Florida Forest Service website at www. oridaforestservice.com. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com An estimated 739 hunters killed more than 800 deer in Franklin County over the 2011-12 season. Avid hunter Ray Tyre of Carrabelle said he believes the local deer population is down, and many hunters were disappointed here last year. The results of an annual telephone survey released by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission last month revealed that statewide, 137,000 hunters spent about 3 million days in the eld and harvested about 137,000 deer, but not everybody got a buck. About 88,500 hunters, just over half the licensed hunters, did not bag a buck last season. One out of ve hunters bagged one buck; one in 10 bagged two; one in 20 bagged three and one in 35 bagged more than three. An estimated 150 hunters bagged 10 bucks or more. Franklin County hunters did better than the state average, bagging a deer for every 11 days spent hunting. Statewide, hunters bagged one deer, on the average, for every 17 days spent hunting. The most successful hunters were in Indian River County; they took home one deer for every ve days spent hunting. Sarasota, Holmes and Bay counties all harvested more deer per day than the state average. In Florida, an estimated 124,000 hunters bagged 58,000 bucks and 26,000 does during general gun season. Archery season was the next biggest harvest, with around 70,000 hunters bagging 17,500 bucks and 18,500 does. About 53,000 hunters harvested 11,000 bucks and 850 does during muzzleloader season, and 11,000 crossbow hunters took 2,500 bucks and 2,000 does. The county with the most registered deer hunters last year was Marion, with more than 10,000, followed by Polk with 9,700 and Levy with 9,200. Pinellas had the fewest registered hunters with 56. Hunters statewide took about 100,000 deer on private land, more than three times the 31,000 deer taken on public land. About half the hunters questioned said they only hunted on private land. One in three said they hunted only on public land. “There is very little private land in Franklin County,” Tyre said. “There are a few hunting leases belonging to The St. Joe Company between Alligator Point and Lanark Village, but most of the county is public land.” Statewide, seven out of 10 hunters said they were happy with their hunting experience, and about two out of 10 said they were not. Over the four seasons prior to 2011-12, only about half said they were pleased with their hunting experience. Firecracker plants explode with color LOIS SWOBODA | The Times A recracker plant thrives without irrigation of a downtown street corner. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Thursday, July 18, 2013 Page 8 Know the law before you strike that match County hunters bag 800 deer FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE | Special to the Times SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Offshore fishing is slowing down now after the red snapper season closed in state waters this past weekend. Gag grouper will remain open in state and federal waters until Dec. 3, giving us a five-month season in our waters. King fish and Spanish mackerel are still thick close to shore. Inshore fishing has taken a back seat to scalloping in St. Joe Bay this week. As summer activities are still fresh on visitors mind, scalloping will be the main focus for the bay. This year the scallop count is almost double from last year with a 23.0 for our waters.

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s Majors All-Star team fell at the state tourney earlier this month to the secondand third-best teams in the state. The gentlemanly play of these 11and 12-year-olds, though, was rewarded as they took home the trophy for Best Sportsmanship. After the July 5 opening ceremonies of the state Dixie Youth Tournament in Arcadia, the boys opened against Brooksville. A tworun homer Brooksville clinched an 8-5 win. Game two against Bushnell American ended in a 7-4 loss for the Franklin County team. The boys, led by Ethan Riley’s speed, showed their hustle on the base paths, and “He’s just that fast!” became the quote of the tournament “We really didn’t do bad at all to be honest with you,” said Head Coach Greg Sasnett. “The games at the state level are played on a grass in eld, and it’s hard for our kids to adjust. We left too many on base. We could compete with them, but we weren’t completely on. “Our kids played hard and we are very proud of all of them. They were both good games,” he said. “Not bad to lose against No. 2 and 3 in the state out of the 11 teams. “We appreciate all the county and everybody does for us,” Sasnett said. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County’s youngest All-Star team, a crew of energetic boys ages 7 and 8, showed they could play some ball, even in the rain, at the state tourney in Wildwood last month. Coming off a District 4 tournament win in Gulf County, the team won its opener but then dropped the next two hard-fought battles, beset by the weather. “It rained and rained and rained,” Manager Eddie Moses said. “It was a really well put together tournament,” he said. “We’re very proud of our boys.” With support from coaches Ricky Abercrombie, Bobby Varnes, and Timmy Poloronis, the boys attended the June 28 opening ceremonies banquet. “We had several players win prizes like helmets, bat bags and Tampa Bay Rays autographed items,” Moses said. The rst game was June 29 against Malone, with Franklin County as the home team. The team won a 16-4 victory in the fth inning, the margin of victory cutting the game short. “The boys played very good offense and defense,” Moses said. In AA baseball, where the games last six innings, players are served up ve total pitches, and there are no walks. “You swing at three strikes, and you’re out but you can let one pass,” Moses said. “The next day, Sunday, was a very long day for us,” the manager said. “Our game was scheduled at 10 a.m., but with all of the rain delays, we didn’t end up playing until after 5 p.m. However, the boys got to experience something like they had never seen before. Airboats were brought in to dry the elds.” Once the elds were safe to play, Franklin County took on West Seminole. “The boys played a good rst two innings and then a few errors and good hits scored runs for the other team,” Moses said. “We weren’t able to catch up, falling short, and the game ended in the fourth inning.” July 1, in the double elimination tourney, Franklin County faced Calhoun County. “Our team hung with them until the end, when they had a big inning, scoring seven runs to seal the deal,” said Moses. “Overall, our boys played very well in this tournament,” Moses said. “The boys represented Franklin County well, with great sportsmanship, both on and off the eld. We have a great group of coaches, players and parents. We look forward to watching these young men do great things on and off if the diamond. We are very proud to be a part of this team.” Members of the Franklin County AA All-Stars include Jabara Pearson, Mason Moses, Cody Abercrombie, Owen Poloronis, Dax Chitty, Marcus Clayton, Ethan Kembro, Wil Varnes, John Michael Thompson, Weston Bockelman, Evan Stanley and Wyatt Abercrombie. Moses said he, the team and parents wished to thank their sponsors: Gunn Heating and Air, Ace Hardware, A.J’s Sports Bar and Grille, the city of Apalachicola, Franklin County Commission, Harry A’s, Kelley Funeral Home, Leavins Seafood, Water Street Seafood, Gander Distributors, Jeff Galloway Real Estate, Suburban Propane of Tallahassee and Suburban Propane of Wildwood. “We appreciate the support from our community through participating in fundraisers, individual and business donations,” he said. “Our youth are the future of Franklin County!” BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GET Y OUR AD IN! 227-7847 $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % ! # ! !# !# !# !# !# !# " 4515031 Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 LEANNE POLORONIS | Special to the Times The AA All-Stars are, front row, from left, Owen Poloronis, Jabara Pearson, Dax Chitty, Even Stanley, and Marcus Clayton. Second row, from left, are Wyatt Abercrombie, Wil Varnes, Mason Moses, Cody Abercrombie, John Michael Thompson, Weston Bockleman and Ethan Kembro. Back row, from left, are coaches Bobby Varnes, Ricky Abercrombie, Timmy Poloronis and Eddie Moses. AA All-Stars battle at rainy state tourney Page 9 BRANDILYN KENT | Special to the Times AAA All Stars include, back row, Coach Michael Newell, Christopher Newell pitcher, Ethan Riley center eld, Jesse Page right eld, Jan Lowe rst base, Manager Greg Sasnett, Jacob Pendleton second base, Bryce Kent third base, and Coach TJ Pendleton. Front row, from left, are Lucas Sasnett left eld, Christian Amison catcher, Micah McLeod shortstop, Tonner Segree catcher, Ethan Moses, right eld, and Matthew Gay left eld. Majors All-Stars take home sportsmanship trophy Thursday, July 18, 2013

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A10 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91638T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-185-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORA G. COLLINS; et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, entered in Case No. 12-185-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Debora G. Collins; Wendell Harrelson; Larry D. Everett and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Inside Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. on August 15, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: Lot 3, Block K of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements located thereon and a 1968 Fleetwood Mobile Home, ID# DK71268277. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 25th day of June, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 18, 25, 2013 91640T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 13-31-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY L. SPRUILL and TAMMY D. SPRUILL, husband and wife; et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated June 20, 2013, entered in Case No. 13-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Liberty County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and ANTHONY L. SPRUILL and TAMMY D. SPRUILL, husband and wife; CITIBANK, N.A.; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersighed will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front steps of the Liberty County Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, Florida, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. on August 27, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBIT A Commence at a old terra-cotta monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 2, Township 1 South, Range 7 West, Liberty County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 24 minutes 34 seconds East 30.00 feet to the Northerly right of way of a 60 wide roadway easement; thence Easterly along said right of way run South 89 degrees 43 minutes 44 seconds West 1595.25 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 43 minutes 44 seconds East 608.49 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run North 00 degrees 33 minutes 47 seconds East 966.69 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 81 degrees 09 minutes 19 seconds West 144.79 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 79 degrees 48 minutes 38 seconds East 420.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 79 degrees 48 minutes 36 seconds West 51.85 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 33 minutes 47 seconds West 1069.55 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 14.20 acres more or less. LOT 69. LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES, UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet, thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet. thence run South 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence run along said right-of-way boundary as follows: North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds East 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 657.49 feet, thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 234.42 feet, thence North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East 240.39 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 01 minutes 46 seconds for an arc distance of 418.02 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue Northeasterly along said right-of-way and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet, thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arc distance of 137.00 feet, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 50 degrees 21 minutes 54 seconds East 350.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 3000.00 feet, thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arc distance of 122.68 feet, the chord of said arc being South 38 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 122.67 feet, thence run North 52 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.04 acre, more or less. LOT 70, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet, thence run South 50 degrees, 41 minutes 26 seconds West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence ran North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radios of 657.49 fast thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an are distance of 234.42 feet, thence ran North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 240.39 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 22 minutes 21 seconds for an arc distance of 548.01 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 36 seconds for an arc distance of 137.01 feet, thence run South 48 degrees 01 minutes 18 seconds East 350.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 3000.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 36 seconds for an arc distance of 122.70 feet, the chord of said arc being South 40 degrees 48 minutes 24 seconds West 122.69 feet, thence run North 50 degrees 21 minutes 54 seconds West 350.00 toot to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.04 acre, more or less. Together with a 1992 SHAD Mobile Home VIN #146M7049A, Title #62802954 and 1992 SHAD Mobile Home VIN #146M7049B, Title #62802955 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 20th day of June, 2013. Kathy Brown Clerk of Circuit Court By: V. Summers Deputy Clerk July 18, 25, 2013 91672T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Franklin County Emergency Management will receive sealed proposals at the Franklin County Emergency Management office, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola, Fl 32320 until Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm for the following: DISASTER DEBRIS MONITORING Emergency Management may accept all or part of any proposal. Any proposals received after Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm will be retained by Emergency Management unopened and will not be considered. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the proposal in the best interest of Franklin County. Franklin County does not discriminate because of race, creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact the Emergency Management Office at 850-653-8977. July 11, 18, 2013 91688T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.13000022CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA A. TAYLOR, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MICHAEL D. BARDECKI RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 490 SAINT TROPEZ CIR NE, SAINT PETERSBURG, FL 33703 TO: MICHAEL D. BARDECKI RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 3247 TECH DRIVE N, SAINT PETERSBURG, FL 33716 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida: Lot 1, Block ‘I’, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit Number 2, a subdivistion as per Map or Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, page 15, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Apalachicola Times. Dated June 26th, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By Terry E Creamer Depty Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. PH # 32066 July 18, 25, 2013 91694T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE MATTER OF THE CITY OF BENTON, Plaintiff, and, MONET INVESTMENTS, LLC, THOMAS FRANK MOORE, VINOD C. GUPTA, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants, No. 2013-MR-11 PUBLICATION NOTICE TO: Monet Investments, LLC, Thomas Frank Moore, Vinod C. Gupta, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendants: This is Notice to you of the filing of Petitioner for Order Authorizing Demolition on the following property: LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK “A” IN PARKRIDGE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF BENTON, SUBJECT TO PRIOR RESERVATIONS, EXCEPTIONS AND CONVEYANCES OF THE COAL, OIL, GAS AND OTHER MINERALS UNDERLYING THE SAME, SITUATED IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN NUMBER: 08-20129-001 NOW THEREFORE, unless you file your response to the Petition filed herein, or otherwise make your appearance in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Illinois, within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this Notice, default may be entered against you at any time thereafter, and the relief request in such Petition for Order Authorizing Demolition may be granted. Nancy Hobbs Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Illinois July 18, 25, 2013 August 1, 2013 91722T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 11-000433CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD D. BROWN; RHONDA M. BROWN; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; OLIN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC.; SANDS OF CARRABELLE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on August 15, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 14, BLOCK 71, THE SANDS OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. This Notice dated this 25th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 18, 25, 2013 94249T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-422 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 24th day of June 2013, in Case Number 11-422 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern, on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Mariners Landing Phase III, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 4, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE 91732T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on July 25, 2013. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. Central Time at Panama City City Hall, Commission Chambers, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or alicia.stephen@ hdrinc.com. July 18, 2013

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, July 18, 2013 The Times | A11 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1115179 $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCING BORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation € Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 1110040 NURSING FACULTYRN TO BSN PROGRAM This individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. Salary commensurate with education and experience. Position open until lled.Apply at: GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 25th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94261T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-130 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 370 Apalachicola, Florida 32320, Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN S. HARDY, TAMMI L. HARDY, PINE COAST PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, and FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 15, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-67 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. S-67 A DISTANCE OF 1040.43 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE FOLLOWING 6 COURSES: NORTH 54 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 66.84 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 450.00 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 39 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 06 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 308.41 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 679.81 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 687.50 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 14 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.63 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 2131.26 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND), THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 233.94 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD 1739.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTERLINE OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS CLARKS LANDING ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD 2628.83 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 3849.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ITS EXTENSION THEREOF 1409.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 1269.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1269.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000131-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL W. BYRD, JR., ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash inside the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32329, at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 28, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 5 and 6, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17,of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 598.0 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 210.85 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 523.75 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF A TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 90, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID TRACT 209.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 915.57 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. NO. 90 STATE ROAD NO. 10 THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 24 MINUTES WEST (BEARING BASE) ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 815.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 203.48 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 24 SECONDS WEST 312.81 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE FROM A TANGENT BEARING OF NORTH 64 DEGREES, 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 177.17 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 32 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 309.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAINING 1.74 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 25, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94279T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, July 19, 2013. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #33 Marshall Sweet Contents-Household STORATE UNIT #64 Tanieia Bell Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #73 Charlene Fincher Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #111 Karen Knowles Content-Household July 11, 18, 2013 94311T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-0230-CA IN RE FORFEITURE OF: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665 $1,882.00 U.S. CURRENCY NOTICE OF FORFEITURE ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE FLORIDA CONTRABAND FORFEITURE ACT TO: MICHAEL SHAWN LANGLEY, c/c FRANKLIN COUNTY JAIL, 270 STATE ROAD 65, EASTPOINT, FL 32328 AND ANY UNKNOWN INTERESTED PARTIES. RE: In Re: Forfeiture of the Following Described Property: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665, Florida Tag No. ACFR12. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office has filed a Certificate of Compliance with Forfeiture Act and Complaint for Forfeiture with the Clerk of Court in Franklin County, Florida. An Order Finding Probable Cause has been entered requiring the Claimant and all persons or entities who claim an interest in the property described above to respond. Copies of the Complaint and Order of Probable Cause can be provided by the Franklin County Clerk of Court. You are required to file any responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses, within twenty (20) days of receiving notice, with the Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and to serve copies upon Donna Duncan, Counsel for the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., 80 Market Street, P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Failure to file your defenses will result in a default judgment being entered against you. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Clerk of the Court this 1st day of July, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple yearn for 1st baby. j Christine & Greg j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Lost Yellow Inflatable Raft with Fishing Equipment, Call 850-228-5778 COLLECTOR BUYING OLD FLORIDAWANTED: Advertising Signs & Displays, FL: Bottles, Tokens, Paper, Postcards, Photos, Primitives. Also Railroad Memorabilia, Pedal Cars, Toys (Pre-1970), Gas Station Items Including: Uniforms, Signs, Promo Give-Aways, Displays. Circus & Carnival Items, Fla. Souvenirs. Fair Prices In Cash !! Call Alan 352-538-0945 Apalachicola 1170 Bluff Road Sat. July 20, 9am-until Yard SaleHousehold items, clothes and much more! Text FL58913 to 56654 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Carrabelle: 212 NE Ave K. Sat, July 20th 8am-2pm Rain or Shine!! Estate SaleEverything is on the porch and in the house. There’s something for everyone. We’re also selling the house and 3 lots. For more information please call 850-728-6487 Txt FL58902 to 56654 East Point : 613 HWY 98, Sunday July 21st 9am-6pm Yard Sale Handyman’s Jackpot! Tools, parts, & much more! During week call Jim: 201-370-6596 Text FL57533 to 56654 Food ServiceCooks Apalachicola River Walk Cafe Needed for breakfast, lunch, dinner, flex hrs Mon -Sat. Apply in person at: 17 Ave. E., Apalachicola (Next to the Dixie Theater) Web ID#: 34258152 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk Needed At Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Pay based on prior experience. Call (850) 927-2163 Web ID: 34257518 Other Experienced Resident Innkeeper Salary plus fully furnished spacious apt and car and benefits. Send resume and photo to lynnwilson2@aol.com Web ID#: 34257878 Other Housekeepers Experienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. $9/hour (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34257877 Other Live-In Caregiver Looking for live-in caregiver for elderly woman. All utilities paid. No rent. Possible pay. Call for details. Located in Carrabelle. 850-209-4124 Web ID#: 34257391 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL58599 to 56654 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $76,000. Call (850) 524-1257 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 4515211 The City of Carrabelle is accepting applications for two Water /Wastewater LaborersUnder the supervision of the Water /Wastewater Superintendent, the employee will be responsible to perform manual labor in maintaining water and sewer lines for the City of Carrabelle. Responsibilities include installing new water and sewer service, repairing water and sewer lines, manholes, meter readings, and all other assigned tasks. Employee is responsible for the operation of heavy equipment used in the performance of assigned tasks. High School Diploma/GED required. Experience is preferred. Salary will be discussed at time of interview. Applications can be picked up at City Hall, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL 32322, all previous applicants need to re-apply. The City is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free workforce.

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A12 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 Real Estate Picks Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Our local real estate experts have identi ed what they feel are the best values around and are o ering them to you in Real Estate Picks! Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. 4514940 SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! ! (850)81 4-7377 (850)22 7-7847 SOL D Authen tic 3 BR / 2 BA bay fro nt log house constructed in the early 1900 s with local cypress woo d. Large beaut iful site (2 lots) buffered by thick vegetatio n fro m the Hwy with panoramic views acros s St George Sound. 850-899-9988 l 850-697-1010 www .coastalrealtyinfo.co m 4515199 T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com 4515201 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249082 $225,000 St. Geor ge Island 451 51 97 SEA GODDESS Light and airy 3 BR 2 B A island home, pri v ate scenic fresh w ater pond, lar ge deck, 2nd le v el sundeck, cheerfully furnished, ground le v el laundry/storage room, sh cleaning area & outside sho wer under home parking on pad, W est Pine A v enue, Listed by Janie Burk e 4515200 MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249164 $23,000 A palachicola L OT ON 21ST STREET B o r d e r e d b y s e v e r a l m a t u r e t r e e s i n c l u d i n g a m a j e s t i c c y p r e s s i n t e r i o r i s o p e n & e a s y t o w a l k a n d i n s p e c t q u i e t n e i g h b o r h o o d & c l o s e t o H i s t o r i c A p a l a c h i c o l a I d e a l f o r n e w c o n s t r u c t i o n o r a n i n v e s t m e n t p r o p e r t y o w n e r n a n c i n g L i s t e d b y M i c h a e l B i l l i n g s 4 51 51 9 6 Law Enforcement “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose quotes included, “Chop your own wood, and it will warm you twice”? Will Rogers, Daniel Boone, Henry Ford, Chuck Yeager 2) In 1959 Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of FDR, made a TV commercial for what product? Cigars, Toothpaste, Flour, Margarine 3) Who was the only normal-looking member of older TV’s “The Munsters”? Herman, Grandpa, Marilyn, Lily 4) Asteroids are mainly found between Mars and which other planet? Venus, Neptune, Saturn, Jupiter 5) By what is acetylsalicylic acid more commonly known? Garlic, Aspirin, Vitamin C, Meat tenderizer 6) What’s the largestsized breed of frog in the world? Goliath, Hercules, Everest, Atlas 7) “The Lisa” was whose rst model computer equipped with a mouse? IBM, Tandy, Apple, Morrow 8) Mick Jagger and Keith Richards are/ were known as which “Twins”? Domino, Glimmer, Moondog, Satisfaction 9) Who was the rst season winner of “American Idol”? Clay Aiken, Kelly Clarkson, Ruben Studdard, Bo Bice 10) Which airline innovated “frequent yer” miles? American, Southwest, Delta, United 11) What was the average number of yearly concerts performed by Elvis Presley the last eight years of his life? 47, 82, 91, 140 12) In 1902 what was pitched as “America’s Most Famous Dessert”? Apple pie, Banana split, Ice cream oat, Jell-O 13) In the “Richie Rich” comics what’s the name of the butler? Jeeves, Wilmington, Simpleton, Cadbury 14) What do you scratch if your dilator naris posterior is itching? Forehead, Back, Nose, Foot ANSWERS 1) Henry Ford. 2) Margarine. 3) Marilyn. 4) Jupiter. 5) Aspirin. 6) Goliath. 7) Apple. 8) Glimmer. 9) Kelly Clarkson. 10) American. 11) 140. 12) Jell-O. 13) Cadbury. 14) Nose. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com The following report is pro vided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests in this week’s report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. July 9 Amanda R. Yowell, 31, East point, Gulf County violation of probation (FCSO Michael L. Lee, 44, Car rabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Katie N. Matthews, 27, Dia mondhead, Miss., two counts of domestic battery and resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxica tion (FCSO) July 11 Patricia A. Keil, 44, East point, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) July 12 Donnie L. Newburn, 36, Tal lahassee, dui and refusal to sub mit to breath test (FHP) July 13 Susan A. Teasley, 38, Thom asville, Ga,, public affray (CPD) Shana R. Califf, 37, Thomas ville, Ga., public affray (CPD) July 15 Brittney E. Shiver, 26, Bristol, violation of probation (FCSO Brenda G. Lawrence, 60, Carrabelle, passing worthless bank checks (CPD) July 16 Alvin G. Martina Jr., 29, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Arrest REPO rtRT From Staff Reports Solid Waste Director Fonda Davis will continue to work four days a week during normal conditions. At Tuesday’s county meet ing, Commissioner Pinki Jackel questioned whether the commis sion was aware Davis normally worked 10 hours a day Monday through Thursday. She said the question stemmed from her attempts to reach Davis last Friday. “Several phone calls went to voicemail immediately,” Jackel said. “The landll operates ve days a week,” she told Davis. “When we hired you, we hired you to be superintendent ve days a week. In my opinion, the supervisor is responsible 24/7. Your phone needs to be on. If it’s something that can wait, I will wait till normal business hours. Supervisors are not limited to working 40 hours. In some circumstances, storms, they work many, many hours.” Davis said he has worked the four–day schedule since be ing hired by solid waste and recycling. “Some employees are on eighthour shifts and others are on 10. Albert Floyd will be in charge if I’m not there. It’s covered all the time,” Davis said. “I don’t understand where this is going,” Commissioner Smokey Parrish said. “Do we want him to knock off at eight hours and leave the men unsupervised for two hours? He has Albert (Floyd) in place. When you (Davis) are out, the person at the landll needs to direct the call to the supervisor that is on duty at the time.” Commissioner Noah Lockley suggested Davis keep the same schedule but provide the landll ofce with an emergency contact phone number. Davis offered to provide the commissioners with his personal cell phone number. “We’re saying then to all our supervisors if they work 40 hours, even in three days, it’s OK for their assistant to take over. They can work three days every week if they want,” Jackel said, “They could do it in two days,” Parrish said. “There’s 24 hours in a day. I don’t think that’s hap pening. I think we’re just trying to micromanage.” Jackel moved that supervisors be allowed to work any schedule they chose. The motion died for lack of a second. Commissioner William Massey said, as supervisor of roads in Carrabelle, he kept his phone on at all times except when he was on vacation. Parrish moved the commission instruct Davis to keep the same work schedule but leave his work phone on at all times. The motion passed with Jackel opposed. Davis to keep four-day workweek



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, July 18, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 12 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School was recognized this spring as one of just 16 Florida schools out of more than 1,700 Title I schools across the state to be worthy of an Exceeding Expectations award by a technical assistance center in Sanford. The award is particularly significant because it is an honor given only to Title I schools, which are those determined by the federal government to serve a high percentage of students from low-income families. A group of educators from the ABC School presented for two days at the Exceeding Expectations conference May 1415 in Orlando. Attending were ABC School Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin, Principal Chimene Johnson and teachers Heather Friedman and Tara Ward. To qualify for the award, presented by the East Coast Technical Assistance Center in Sanford, the school had to show improvement in elementary reading and math grades for all its subgroups, earn an A from the Department of Education and be above the state median in reading and math 5 vie for 2 Carrabelle commission spotsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com With no municipal elections to be held in Apalachicola this year, all eyes turn to Carrabelle, where a eld of ve will vie for the two seats. Apalachicola City Commissioners Brenda Ash and Frank Cook drew no challengers in the upcoming Sept. 3 nonpartisan election, so no election will be held and they will each be given another fouryear term. But in Carrabelle, the two incumbents, Cal Allen and Brenda La Paz, face three challengers, Franklin Daniels, Audrey Olivia Massey and Nikki Mock Millender. The top two vote getters in the Sept. 3 nonpartisan election will emerge the winners for the two four-year terms. Each paid a ling fee of $45 plus 1 percent of the positions annual monthly pay of $315. Commissioners also are eligible for health insurance, and retirement pay after serving at least eight years. Earlier this month, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to install the two elected commissioners at the Sept. 5 city meeting, two days after the balloting. Allen said the swearing-in will take place after the meeting, because incoming commissioners will not have had the bene t of attending workshops or hearing past discussions of a number of important issues to be addressed at that meeting. Early voting runs from August 26 to 30, at Carrabelle City Hall, daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.Study to compare renovation, new constructionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Weems Memorial Hospital is moving ahead with several capital expenditures, not the least of which is $50,000 for a revised feasibility study to determine how much debt makes sense to build a new facility or renovate the existing one. Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth told county commissioners Tuesday morning a debt capacity study, exploring scenarios ranging from $8 million to $12 million, would be needed to as part of a loan application with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We can use some existing information, but have to revalidate that, he said, noting the cost of the study and the $65,000 needed to le a letter of intent could come from preconstruction funds held in the countys health care trust fund of monies from the 1 percent sales tax. Funding the debt capacity study passed unanimously after some grousing by the commissioners. We paid the same rm already for a feasibility study. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said. It seems to me we already paid them $100,000. Brownsworth said competition to the west, changes to the marketplace and reimbursement rate change have made the revised study necessary. A colleague in a nearby town paid $130,000 for a similar study, he said, noting it would be good for Weems mulls new facilityReceiving the Exceeding Expectations Award were, from left, ABC School Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin, Principal Chimene Johnson and teachers Heather Friedman and Tara Ward.SPECIAL TO THE TIMESABC School honored among states best RAY BROWNSWORTHPHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThis Mooney M2OF Executive was damaged during a landing attempt on Saturday. The propeller, below, and much of the undercarriage were damaged in the crash. None injured in plane crashPilot: Damage about $70,000By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Nobody was hurt during a botched attempt to land a small plane at Cliff Randolph Field at the Apalachicola Regional Airport on Saturday evening. A pilot landed a Mooney M2OF Executive single-engine xed wing aircraft at the airport without putting the landing gear down. The plane received signi cant damage but was able to be moved off the runway. There were no injuries and no damage to the airport. On Tuesday, the pilot, who asked not to be named, said there was about $70,000 in damage to the aircraft, and because it was more than 75 percent of the total value of the plane, the insurance company probably would declare it a total loss. An appraisal of the damage was in progress during the interview. The undercarriage of the airplane, propeller and engine were all damaged beyond repair. The pilot said he had owned the plane for four months. A review of records indicates the plane was in the process of being registered in Panama City. The pilot said he plans to buy another small plane with the insurance settlement. These things happen, said Ted Mosteller, chairman of the airport advisory board and a veteran pilot. The Mooney M2OF Executive was manufactured by the Mooney Airplane Company during the late 1960s and 1970s. Several similar planes listed for sale on eBay are priced between $45,000 and $60,000. See WEEMS A3 See ABC A3Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11State tourney toughness, A9 C-Quarters readies for youth shing tourneyC-Quarters Youth Fishing Tournament in Carrabelle will be Friday and Saturday, July 19-20, for children 16 and younger. After the Friday clinic, each child receives a rod and reel, T-shirt, hat and bait. There are nine categories of sh with three places and trophies in each. On Saturday morning, kids can sh from docks or, if they can go out on a boat, they are allowed to sh the Carrabelle River up to Dog Island. Lunch will be provided. All participants must be registered before the tournament at www. c-quartersmarina.com.Full Moon Climb Monday at lighthouseThe July Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Monday, July 22. The sunset climb will be 8-9:30 p.m. and includes light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:38 p.m., and the moon will rise at 8:31 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. St. George Lighthouse Park is at the center of the island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Reservations are recommended. Call the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Discover countys oldest visitorsFrom 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in July, enjoy a presentation about Sea Turtles, Franklin Countys Oldest Visitors, by the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve at 108 Island Drive. For more info call 670-7700.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA Taketheopportunityto nominateyourfavorite businesses,people,restaurants orothercategoriesfor The2013 InauguralReadersChoiceGOTOstar.comORapalachtimes.comAND CLICKONTHEOnlineNominations:July25th-July31st OnlineVoting:Aug.1st-12thTOPTHREEWINNERSWILLBECHOSEN ehoics Cal Reader naugurI TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO TTENGORFO STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA STCOA TOMAKEYOURNOMINATIONS oy ttunit ake the oppor T theFirstever BestoftheForgottenCoast ervirst ethe F ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER VincentIvers,M.D.BCIM CSSKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit. CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening. www.iversmd.com VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070Mon-Tue-Thurs&Fri 9am-6pm Wed&Sat 9am-2pmALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED SERVICES Three local artists Susan Richardson, Lynn Wilson and Alice Jean Gibbs all had artwork selected for the Artists League of Tallahassees annual summer show at the Florida State Universitys Museum of Fine Arts. One of Richardsons three works selected for the show also received one of the exhibitions six top awards. Richardsons 8-by-10-inch oil painting Old Salt Christo at 80, completed last year, earned her a Frames + Award, which included a $50 gift certicate from the frame shop. He let me take a whole bunch of photographs of him, she said. He has a framed copy of it. Richardson also had two other works accepted in the show, which was titled To Collaborate or Not to Collaborate, because it allowed for works done by two or more artists. It meant more than one person could work on a painting, she said. Often its just your work. Normally it would be difcult to be in shows (if the work was by more than one artist). Richardsons two other works in the show, which featured 80 pieces overall, were Clearing Fog, a work she did in March that has earned her an Honorable Mention in the Atlanta Artistic Centers Dogwood Show. I live for ribbons, she joked. Thats what I do. A third work, The Man, done last summer, was of a black man who frequented the Gibson Inn. Artist Alice Jean Gibbs had a large pastel landscape in the show entitled Spirit guides me, while her daughter, Lynn Wilson has two pastels, Mystic Morning, which shows Eastpoint at sunrise, and Tates Hell. Mom was thrilled, and it was so great for her to nally, after a lifes career, to be selected for the Museum of Fine Art, Wilson said. The show closed today. BY DAVID ADLERSTEINPutnal hired by Carrabelle water and sewerAt their July 11 meeting, the Carrabelle city commissioners hired William Wesley Putnal as the newest employee of the water and sewer department. City Manager Courtney Millender said the department needs two new employees because one worker will be out for at least six weeks on sick leave; a second, Jim Moore, recently retired on short notice; and Franklin Daniels left more than a year ago and was not replaced because budgetary concerns. Keith Mock, the department head, will be leaving on two weeks vacation at the end of July. City Clerk Keisha Smith said hiring the two employees at $10 per hour would put the city $9,000 over budget for the scal year. Millender said the budget can be amended. Fewer than half of the original nine applicants were present at the meeting. Smith said two of the applicants withdrew after indicating they would not work for less than $15 per hour. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider moved in favor of Putnal for the job and said he was highly qualied. Smith said Putnal will receive $10 per hour but, with benets, the job pays $35,000 annually. She said there was no conict of interest in hiring Putnal and no nepotism conict with any potential employee. After Putnal was hired, Commissioner Cal Allen moved to hire Michael Alday for the second position. Commissioners Allen, Schneider, Frank Mathes and Curley Messer voted to hire Alday, but Brenda LaPaz asked if Alday had a high school diploma or had passed a General Educational Development exam. Alday said he had not. Smith said commissioners could make his employment contingent on Alday completing the exam in a set period of time. She said there was a six-month probation period for all employees. LaPaz said she was concerned the job had only been advertised for a week, and many potential employees might not have seen it. Commissioners withdrew their votes and voted unanimously to advertise the second position for two more weeks, setting July 29 as the deadline for an application. The commission plans to hire the second water and sewer employee at the Aug. 1 meeting.Carrabelle seniors lunch closed until SeptemberThe regular Thursday lunch at the Carrabelle Senior Citizens Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F, will not be served from July 25 through Aug. 29. Ed Pattillo, president of the senior center board, said the lunches will resume on Sept. 5. Were not going to x any meals for six weeks. What were doing, were giving the volunteers a little vacation and theres some building maintenance that needs to be done, he said. Therell be sawdust, and we dont want that in peoples food.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com An audit released at the last Carrabelle meeting said things look slightly brighter there. At the July 11 meeting, Mark Payne, representing certied public accountants James Moore and Company, presented results of an audit of Carrabelles 2011-12 scal year. Auditors found some slight improvements in the nancial outlook, but procedural problems noted last year are ongoing. The bottom line has not changed much. Carrabelle had $72 million in assets, an increase of $1 million over 2011. Liabilities remain the same, $32 million, leaving net assets of $40 million. Of that, $2.3 million is in unrestricted assets, which is a $500,000 increase over the last audit. Most of the citys wealth is tied up in property and vehicles. Once again, the city showed a small increase in government funds at the end of the scal year, with almost $4 million in receivables, including taxes owed, grants awarded and liquid assets. Last years audit found $3.2 million, which was an increase of $29,000 over the 2009-10 scal year. While governmental funds earned $80,000, the water and sewer and port authority lost $40,000. Payne praised the city for the surplus and said many small cities consistently wind up in the red. Mayor Curley Messer loudly agreed with Paynes observation that the city has gone over budget in some areas. He called for more scal conservatism. Payne said the city has roughly $30 million in debt, most relating to the expansion of the sewer system. Commissioner Brenda La Paz said she would explore that issue in an upcoming meeting with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, which funded the construction of the system. The audit found material weaknesses in the citys nancial statements. There have been improvements over last years situation. Water and Sewer has employed a collection agency to collect past due fees, but Payne still warned that uncollected receivables were an issue. On water and sewer, you need to be looking at accounts that are past due, Payne said. Make sure you adhere to your policies. He noted bank statements are not being reconciled in a timely fashion and recommended this procedure be carried out monthly immediately after the statements are issued. Payne found that reports requesting reimbursement from federal Community Development Block Grants are not being led in a timely manner. He said this could affect the citys ability to acquire this kind of funding in the future. The auditor said overlapping duties of employees on the small city staff remains a problem. You dont have enough people to do everything with regards to checks and balances, he said. The report said the city still does not have an employee trained to prepare the necessary reports for an audit. Like last year, Moore and Companys audit said duties related to spending and receiving funds should be formally assigned to employees with checks and balances in place. It recommended mail be opened by an employee not responsible for accounting who would record cash receipts and that bank statements and cancelled checks should also be received by someone other than the employee maintaining cash records. Anything out of the ordinary should be promptly investigated, cash deposited daily, and signed checks mailed by someone other than the person responsible for accounts payable, the audit advised. The report repeated a request for an inventory of physical assets and recommended that invoices document all expenses, and that better records be kept. Journal entries should include adequate documentation and be approved by an employee other than the one who prepared the entry, and all employee time sheets should be signed and approved by a supervisor, read the audit. It also advised that the city maintain an approved vendor list and seek bids for signicant expenses. The report also recommended the city prepare a detailed disaster recovery plan and an accounting procedures manual. In a letter responding to the ndings prepared by the commission and city staff including City Attorney Dan Hartman, the city promised to segregate nancial reporting duties. The letter said preparation of the accounting manual and inventory and the disaster response program are under way.Carrabelle audit nds few changes Carrabelle BRIEFsSThree local artists chosen for Tallahassee show SUsan SAN Ric IC Hardson ARDSON s S Portrait ORTRAIT o O F CHristo RISTO Poloronis POLORONIS and AND Lynn YNN Wilson ILSON s S Mystic YSTIC Mornin ORNIN G

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, July 18, 2013 CouponExpires:7-31-13CODE:AP00 FREE ToolstoQuitProgram Ifyou'rereadyto quittobaccouse,we'rereadyto helpwithapersonalizedtwo-hourprogram. Thereis nocharge toenrollorformaterials.ThenextToolstoQuitclasswillbeheld Thursday,July18thfrom5:30pmto7:30pm intheWeemsMemorialHospitalcafeteria.Formoreinformationortoregistercall 850-653-8853ext.101or850-224-1177Free CarbonMonoxideTestingSpirometer(lungage/COPDScreening) Free NicotinePatches/Gum/LozengesforProgramParticipants *WhileSuppliesLast Free ToolstoQuitWorkbookGroupsledbytrainedtobaccocessationspecialist Coversallformsoftobacco one to two years. Weve already paid them $250,000 for plans that dont work, Jackel said. Weve got to stop spending money on evaluation. Weve spent almost $400,000 on evaluation, and we dont have anything to show for it. But, she conceded, if we want a new hospital, we have to give them their information. Commissioner Smokey Parrish wanted reassurance from Brownsworth the study would not be a case of throwing away more money. Are we ready to move forward? Because if not, its a waste of money, Parrish said. This is what we need to be ready to move forward in a timely fashion, Brownsworth said. The feasibility study will conrm which of those, with great detail, will be possible. I assume we want to get the most bang for our buck. I would like to be starting on a new hospital in a year. My charge since Ive been hired here is to make this happen, and thats what were going to do. I would like that, but weve got to have somebody to stay behind this, Jackel said. The CEO said the hospital might be 10 beds, with a medical ofce building or clinic attached. Were averaging three (patients) daily now, so that will give us a 400 percent increase, which is a gracious plenty, Jackel said. Brownsworth said Dr. Stephen Miniats former ofce is being converted into clinic space for Weems West, staffed by advanced registered nurse practitioner Susan Hardin. She sees about eight to 12 patients at her ofce inside the hospital, with the Weems East clinics two practitioners in Carrabelle seeing about 30 to 40 patients each day. Brownsworth said a primary care practitioner is expected to see about three or four patients per hour in a seven-hour day. About 21 to 25 patients per day is what you are looking for, with complicated medical conditions taking longer, he said. He said a complete renovation could run as much as $350,000, an expenditure that did not make as much sense as spending under $50,000 to make the space suitable for Hardin, alongside a visiting specialist. Sometimes when you renovate, it costs more than construction, Jackel said. After the vote to approve the study was complete, Commissioner Noah Lockley signaled his patience, too, was nearing its end, Is this the last time were going to do this? he asked. Last time for me, Commissioner William Massey said.Electronic medical records next big expenditureBrownsworth said Weems is nearing the end of its evaluation of two vendors, Healthland and CSS, for its electronic medical record and health information management system. EMR and HIM provide for the business and billing activities as well as the documentation of a patients health record. We are evaluating the ability of a system to meet our needs now and into the future, he said. Comparing the cost of both systems begins with the purchase price, which includes the cost of the software, hardware, peripherals, installation, interfaces, licenses, training and travel. Prices for the two vendors vary from $510,000 to $825,000. Brownsworth said a second consideration is the cost of operating the software system, which requires annual support and maintenance fees. Factoring in these costs to the purchase price shows a comparatively close cost of ownership over a ve-year period, in the neighborhood of about $1.5 million. After a contract is signed for a system, Weems will apply for Medicaid Incentive payments, which consultant estimates say could equal at least $300,000 or more. Once the system is installed, Brownsworth said, Weems will seek to receive these payments within the rst year of use and annually for several years after. At this time, an estimate is not available for these payments, he said. Together, both incentive payments should meet a majority of the capital needs for the purchase of the computer systems. Several options exist for the upfront payment of the software and equipment pending the receipt of incentive funds and nalization of pay off terms. Though the purchase of EMR and HIM systems will improve productivity, continuity of care and allow for more timely billing and collection of revenues, the main reason for the purchase is the federal requirement to convert to an electronic medical record or face declining reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid, which together represent about half of the hospitals patients. Brownsworth said he expects to recommend a nal vendor to the Weems board by months end, with that selection going to the county commission for nal approval.IT contract goes to new rmEarlier this month, Brownsworth reported to commissioners, he served BlueManta, the IT (information technology) vendor, with 30 days notice of termination of the contract. This was due to concerns about their responsiveness to our requests and a failure to adequately provide for business continuity services, he said, noting that over the last year, he had been able to lower Blue Mantas monthly fee from $9,000 to $6,000. Brownsworth said system security controls and access were reset, as is typical for such a transition. The CEO has engaged Eagle Tree Technologies, a newly formed company under the management of Kevin Ward, under an interim month-to-month service agreement for $4,100 per month. Input from the county commissioners and the hospital board of directors will be sought related to a longer term agreement and the proper selection process, Brownsworth said. The top two candidates for the newly created chief nancial ofcer position have declined Brownsworths offers. He said the rst, from the state of Washington, found housing costs were too high for what the job paid, and the second took a competing job offer to be within 30 miles of his grandchildren. Brownsworth said he planned to provide a tour of the facility this week to a new prospect. ABC from page A1gains, including for the lowest quartile of students. For the middle school, the ABC School had to show an increase in proficiency for its entire student population, as well as keep an A grade and be above the state median in reading and math. I am extremely proud of the accomplishment of our staff and students this year, Johnson said. In the educators presentation, they wrote that the vision of the 12-year-old school, which serves 328 students in kindergarten through eighth grade, is to create a community-centered, facility that promotes student and parent participation in a stimulating learning environment that is positive, hopeful, and exciting. It is the mission of ABC School that each child will achieve his or her academic and social potential. The presentation cited the schools extended learning day, which enables it to offer art, music, character education, technology and foreign language instruction. It is our belief that all students can learn, and we hold high expectations for students and staff, read the summary, outlining how Individual Learning Plans prepared early each fall bring parents, students and teachers together to share ideas to increase the success of the child. It is our belief that by using best practices, differentiated instruction and intervention strategies, our students will reach their full potential, it said. Differentiated instruction allows teachers time necessary to learn the interests, learning styles and abilities of students, it said, describing how the elementary school consists of two heterogeneously grouped classes per grade level and are self-contained to give the teachers flexibility with scheduling and instruction. Our school utilizes teacher assistants to help provide differentiated instruction. It is our belief that small group instruction yields the greatest learning benefit for most students, read the report. Our students generally rotate between the certified teacher, the teacher assistant, and a center during the day. The presentation also described the Response to Intervention process, which it said has been an integral part of ABC Schools success for many years. The process has evolved into an effective team approach for problem-solving, it read. We work to quickly identify students in need for additional support. Teachers or parents will refer a student if they feel a student is not working to their academic or social potential. The weekly meetings bring together the assistant principal, guidance counselor, Franklin County School psychologist, teachers, parents and, when appropriate, students. The teachers keep a Success Binder on each student, which contains student data and work samples, and which follows that student throughout their educational career at ABC School. The team works through a problem solving approach to develop a plan for student success, it described. The teachers implement scientifically based interventions during the students day. Title I dollars are used to fund a reading teacher for intervention for identied students, as well as for additional tutoring, after-school FCAT camps run by ABC teachers and intervention materials. We know the power of building connections with students. These connections are essential to be a successful school. Great instruction and interventions are fostered by positive relationships, reported the ABC School presentation. The report said eld trips offer a great time for teachers, parents and students to connect outside of the school building and outlined the rising and soaring ceremonies that have marked student advancement into, and completion of, the middle school. Historically, our former students have remained close in high school, the report read. It is wonderful to see students excitement and appreciation when they see staff watching them play ball or attending an extracurricular function. Each morning our students are greeted by administration. Many teachers give students chores and are able to be the classroom greeter. We have numerous opportunities for parental involvement throughout the year and parents are always welcome. The report also shared the schools methods of celebrating its students and staff, including how it prepares for and acknowledges the students performance on the FCAT. Since the inception of ABC School, the board and administration has worked hard to apply best practices to both the educational programs and administrative activities while maintaining a nancially sound school. We spend the public funding we receive wisely and operate within a balanced budget, read the presentation. We strive to create a school culture that is positive and nurturing. Our teachers and administration are held to a high standard and implementation of the new teacher evaluation system is evolving into an effective teaching tool for all. WEEMS from page A1DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe former ofces of Dr. Stephen Miniat soon will become the home of Weems West medical clinic.

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Page 4 Thursday, July 18, 2013Special to the TimesAs Congress argues over farm subsidies and food stamps, rural Americans complain that elected of cials ignore small communities and fail to invest in their future. So found a comprehensive poll of rural Americans on the role of federal policy in creating economic opportunity for rural people and a future for their communities. The poll was conducted by the bipartisan polling team of Celinda Lake of Lake Research and Ed Goeas of The Tarrance Group and released last week by the Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons, Neb. It surveyed rural voters in the Great Plains, Midwest and Southeast. The poll found rural Americans united in their commitment to their way of life. Almost nine in 10 believe the rural and smalltown way of life is worth ghting for. But they sadly believe the rural way of life may be fading, and they want to stop it, reverse it and revitalize rural America, said pollsters Lake and Goeas. And they believe they are being ignored by politicians and government and blame them for the state of the rural economy. Nevertheless, the poll found divided views about the role of government and populist views about the economy and big institutions. Three fourths agree Americas future is weakened by a widening gap between the rich and families struggling to make ends meet. But they split evenly on whether its time for government to play a stronger role in strengthening rural communities and making the economy work for the average person in rural and small-town America or whether turning to big government to solve our problems will do more harm than good. Neither the conservative nor progressive ideological perspective has it right, Lake said. On the one hand, the language around lower taxes, smaller government and fewer regulations is one of the highest testing messages. On the other, they support policies that call for more job training, increased infrastructure investments, more technology and better preschools all requiring a role for government in making things better. It is too simplistic to believe rural America is anti-government and that there is nothing for progressives to say, nor is it possible to say that rural America wants bigger government and more spending, Goeas said. They want tax breaks, but they also support increased loans and grants to help people gain skills and open small businesses. They want more ef cient and effective government and view much of public policy as a fairness issue in which rural America has not received fair treatment. Among the results: More than half said owning my own business or farm is a big part of the American dream for me, and most agreed with helping small business through less government (cutting taxes, spending and regulation) and strengthened government (loans, tax credits, training and antitrust enforcement). Three-fourths agree too much of federal farm subsidies go to the largest farms, hurting smaller family farms. Three-fourths support tax credits and investment in new transmission lines for development of wind, solar and other renewable electric generation in rural areas. Eight in 10 support grants and loans to revitalize small towns through upgrades to water and sewer systems and investments in roads and bridges. Six in 10 say government has some or a lot of responsibility to help the working poor advance economically (versus a little or none). Eight in 10 support job training to improve earnings, Medicaid for health coverage and helping the working poor afford necessities through payroll tax refunds like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Eightyve percent favor preschool programs to prepare lowerincome children to succeed in school. Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years ago, Lake said. But rural Americans are somewhat optimistic that things will get better, said Goeas, and younger rural Americans are most optimistic. Center for Rural Affairs Executive Director Chuck Hassebrook said the optimism of the upcoming generation re ects the new entrepreneurial opportunities in rural America and growing appreciation for the rural way of life. They get it, Hassebrook said, and that gives them the capacity to lead their communities to a better future. Politically, he said, the poll reveals openings for candidates of either party willing to ght for federal policy that supports genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their communities. He pointed to the question asking voters whether they would nd it convincing if a U.S. Senate candidate made certain statements. Eighty-seven percent said they would nd it convincing for a Senate candidate to say: Small-town America is a big and important part of what makes America go. We are hardworking, patriotic, faithful and skilled. Making sure our families, our small business owners and our workers have the same chance as everyone else is fair and smart. That means supporting policies like investing more in helping our small businesses get started and bringing technology to our areas so we can be connected to the new economy. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http://www.cfra.org/ news/130625/rural-pollreleased-today. Established in 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs is a private, nonpro t organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. Franklin County leadership punched itself in the face twice this month when County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders lobbed a callous and careless ethnic slur against Jews during a heated debate at a July 2 meeting. A ridiculously weak apology this week has left a lingering bloody nose to public civility in the wake of such pathetic, but supposedly unintentional, hate mongering posing as leadership. How could it even happen today? Sanders nonchalant nastiness was a sobering but stupefying moment that is forever on the record as a disgraceful piece of modern history for the community. It cannot be ignored. It must have a strong and direct response. As the commission wrangled over how much to raise the salary of Howard Nabors, a longtime employee elevated to now head the road department, Sanders tried to cut through conversation about salaries of other department heads with this comment: Todays not the day to do it. Were here (for Nabors salary), not to be up here jewing over somebodys pay. What a stunning comment for anyone to make let alone a public of cial in a public meeting. Even worse than the anti-Semitic remark by Sanders was the fact that no one challenged her about it. Not one of her peers on the commission called her on her language; not one member of the audience spoke up in protest; and not even this newspaper, The Apalachicola Times, which quoted the remark in a long story about the Nabors appointment, ever took Sanders to task for it, in news columns or editorially. Under the best-case scenario and thats not a very good case Sanders might just be very ignorant. But that is hardly a good excuse for her words. I spoke with chair Sanders on Monday, July 15, when to her credit she returned a phone call from me. When I told her use of the word jewing was offensive, she initially denied she had said it. Instead, she offered, she had used the word jawing. Thats not true and, later in the brief call, she acknowledged that she had, indeed, said jewing in reference to the salary discussion. It was a slang, not a slur, Sanders told me. Actually, Sanders, it is a slur period. You cant get away with calling it slang now that you know its offensive to people. You owe yourself and surely the community better than to try to justify the word even after you used it and after youve been confronted about it. On Tuesday, July 16, Sanders offered a weak attempt at an apology that, in many ways, only ampli ed and magni ed her slur. Heres the text of it: On July 2 there was a statement I made that offended. I used a word that was offensive to some people. It was in the heat of argument and it was a poor choice of words and Im sorry. If I have caused any hardship to the people or employees of Franklin County, Im sorry. This is a heartfelt apology. If thats an apology, it lacks real contrition and when you have to describe your own apology as heartfelt, it probably is not. Candidly, Sanders admits she didnt know about the word jewing being an offensive slur as much as the N word is for blacks or, she never had time to learn that the term contributes to prejudicial and stereotypical myths about an entire group of people. That possibility might re ect a deeper level of ignorance by Sanders about other offensive words and phrases that slur Jews, blacks, women, Hispanics, elders, Asians, gay people, etc. You dont have to be black to be offended by racism; nor do you have to be Jewish to be appalled by anti-Semitism. We all know that racism, sexism, anti-Semitism and other isms still exist and they even ourish in some places, among some people. But, the example being set by Cheryl Sanders is unworthy of the people of Franklin County. The naked ugliness of hate borne of ignorance, displayed from the dais of a governmental body by someone who purports to be a leader, absolutely needs to be outed and confronted. Even if Sanders fails to get educated about slurs or to correct course away from the polluted path of prejudice she apparently travels along, let this be a teaching moment for the good people of the community she is serving. At least, her somewhat lame apology is a start. At most, Sanders needs to undergo sensitivity training and perhaps theres a good case to be made for a countywide antiprejudice campaign to take root. Barbara Goldstein, the director of the Big Bends areas Holocaust Education Resource Council, is just the right person to help create such an effort. She helped put Sanders slur into perspective with these words: Prejudice results when ignorance goes unchecked. For a county commissioner, more sensitive language should be used as an example of understanding diversity. In the aftermath of the moral and societal failures that made the Holocaust possible, confronting anti-Semitism and all forms of hatred is critical. Diversity in our community, state, nation and world is a great strength, not a weakness. Tolerance, acceptance and understanding among all people are what help to de ne our civilization, rather than diffuse it. One can only hope Sanders feels a need to go beyond her imsy mea culpa, publicly, and to decry her own choice of damaging words. Even more meaningful would be a genuine effort to foster and embrace a community that respects and celebrates diversity as a higher road for Franklin Countys future. Ron Sachs, CEO of Tallahassee-based Sachs Media Group, is a property owner and taxpayer in Franklin County. This is where I draw the lineI am speaking out as a concerned citizen of Franklin County. In recent comments from a Franklin County commissioner in last weeks Apalachicola Times, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders made the following (racial) comment below: Todays not the day to do it, Sanders said. Were here (for Nabors salary), not to be up here jewing over somebodys pay. I cant believe that you all would put a man down who has worked here for 26 years because he dont have a high school education. Is this her true nature or is this just a matter-of-fact lifestyle example: Honey, Ive heard that all my life and have said it myself. I didnt know that was racial. This is where I draw the line. If you are going to represent your city, county or state, you should make it your responsibility to educate yourself, to be able to speak effectively. I guess what shocks me most about this is that no one, to my knowledge, has brought this to her attention. Ms. Sanders does not have any restaurants, TV shows, book deals etc.; however, if she did, Im con dent the Jewish citizens would make sure Paula Dean has some company. I am not of Jewish faith, but this is offensive to me, and it makes our entire county look uninformed and uneducated.Sincerely,Gaye Ellis SANDERS APOLOGIZES FOR WORD USEAt Tuesday mornings county commission meeting, Chairman Cheryl Sanders apologized for her use earlier this month of a word widely viewed as an ethnic slur. At the July 2 county commission meeting, Sanders used the term jewing to characterize haggling and bickering among her colleagues surrounding raises for department heads in the context of hiring a new head of the road department. Todays not the day to do it, the Times quoted her as saying. Were not to be up here jewing over somebodys pay. I cant believe that you all would put a man down who has worked here for 26 years because he dont have a high school education. This led to a restorm of blogs, and even comment in the Washington Post and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, on the political correctness of the phrase. At Tuesdays meeting, Sanders opened the meeting with the following statement. On July 2 there was a statement I made that offended. I used a word that was offensive to some people. It was in the heat of argument, and it was a poor choice of words, and Im sorry. If I have caused any hardship to the people or employees of Franklin County, Im sorry. This is a heartfelt apology.USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASectionPoll: Rural voters reject simplistic categorization Ethnic slur re ects need for real apology RON SACHSSpecial to The TImes Letter to the EDITOR

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, July 18, 2013 On June 1 at the Dixie Theatre, the dancers came alive, as Pam Nobles Studio presented its 32nd annual recital to the theme of Dancers in Paradise. In two shows, afternoon and evening, the dancers kicked up their heels and strutted their stuff to a packed audience. PHOTOS BY DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The TimesLLeft: The Hot Flashes, performing On the Sunny Side of the Street, are, front row, from left, Pam Nobles, Debbie Ruffner, Linda Grifn and Rita Theis, and back row, from left, Tricia Perryman, June Gray and Wanda Bareld. RRight: Performing in God Bless America are from right Olivia Barineau and Skyler LayneDancing in ParadiseDancing to the song Baby Ballerinas are, from right, Bailey Allen, Macey Rae Benton and Ella McLain. Juggling as part of Hot, Hot, Hot are, from right, Olivia Poloronis, Shaylee Martina, Zariah Harvey and Emma WhiteAAbove right: Performing Sea Cruise are, from right, Meredith Alford, Lyndsey Stiefel, Kylee Smith and, in back row, Ella Friedman. AAbove left: Performing as the Hillside Dancers are, Tanaya Harris, Cheyenne Martin, Morgan Martin, Shine Pearson, India Sewell, Bayla Walker and Aaliyah West. LLeft: Dancing to Between the Raindrops are, from right, Jayla Alley, Bianca Huber, Eve Bond, and Amber Henning.Path, plumbing, lighting bids weighedAt Tuesday mornings meeting, county commissioners heard bids for the construction of three county projects. Although there were two attendees at a preconstruction conference on plumbing repairs at the county jail, only King Plumbing, based in Franklin County, offered a bid. The base bid was $61,536 with an alternative bid of $98,000. County Planner Alan Pierce said he expected the cost of the project to be under $50,000. The bid was given to Tommy Summereld of the sheriffs ofce, Pierce and Assistant County Planner Mark Curenton for evaluation. Two companies bid on lighting for the ball elds at Vrooman Park in Eastpoint. Anytime Electric of Crawfordville asked for $274,000 to do the work. Alternative Electric of Eastpoint offered a quote of just over $298,000. Pierce said both bids were more than the $250,000 available from the state to install energy efcient lighting. The bids were turned over to county staff for evaluation. The last bids to be opened were for construction of the Carrabelle Beach MultiUse Path. Gulf Coast Utility Contractors of Southport bid $318,543; CW Roberts of Hosford asked for $390,148 and Marshall Brothers of Lynn Haven bid $638,155 on the job, the latter drawing a gasp from Commissioner Noah Lockley. The low bidder was North Florida Construction of Clarksville at $307,270. The bids were turned over to county staff for evaluation. News BRIEF

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A6 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013Special to The TimesVolunteers from Hot Springs, Ark., combined their love of recreational vehicles with their passion for building as they helped to make Habitat for Humanitys fourth home in Eastpoint a dream come true. The group came down March 10-17, and in addition to arriving with skills and muscle, left behind a check for $2,500 to support Habitats future work in Franklin County. Mason Bean, a member of the Habitat board who worked closely with the volunteers, said the group came in an RV caravan and stayed at Ho Hum RV park, and then throughout the week, helped with wiring, insulation, sheetrock and cleanup. Mary Christians, a Hot Springs, Arkansas realtor, and her husband, Bob, a builder for 35 years and a member of the Garland County Habitat board, were among the crews leaders. We are an older group, in our midto late 50s and 60s, so dont expect a bunch of youngins, Mary Christians wrote Bean in advance of their trip. But we work hard, put in a full day and are experienced in several phases of the building process. Over the years we have raised walls, sided, roofed, painted, built staircases, etc., she wrote. In Biloxi, Miss., we worked on house that were up on stilts. None of us were crazy about that, but we did it. Are you building on slabs or up on stilts? Last year in San Antonio, we spent one day laying sod, two days siding, and one day painting trim and raising already built walls, wrote Mary Christians. There is little we wont try, but my husband says to tell you we cant put up roof trusses. Were too old for that. Also part of the Arkansas contingent were Craig and Leslie Johnson, Roger and Char Feldt, Duane and Launa Kraase, Bob and Dianne McCabe, Al and Ardy Ness, Steve and Mary Seitz, John Symons and EJ Pangle, Jim and Barb Mika, Ed and JoAnne Thielbar, Tom and Neala Gunderson, Betty Bolte, and Steve and Jean Fetcko. Bean said the Arkansas volunteers were a special group of volunteers. They were very impressed with our dedication plus how much we appreciated their support, he said. When they go on these blitz builds, there could be lots of volunteers, lost in the masses. This small build was very special to them, they really enjoyed being here, thus this contribution. Active over the last decade, this is Habitats fourth house in the county. We have to raise at least $50,000 before we can start our fth build, said Bean. We are getting close to nishing our fourth home, which is going to be a very cute. I think the neighborhood will be proud. We continue to work every Saturday, he said. We need volunteers to nish our fourth home, and nancial donations toward our fth home for another Franklin County family! Member FDIC 33WestGardenStreet Pensacola,FL32502850.202.9900or1.877.962.322417SEEglinParkway FtWaltonBeach,FL32548850.244.9900or1.866.362.3224 www.beachcommunitybank.com GARLICKCLEANINGSERVICEEXTERIORHOUSE CLEANINGMildewRemoval Experts!Since1995850-653-5564 JerryGarlick|Owner 31AveE.Apalachicola,FL32320 ggarlick@fairpoint.net 850-653-3550(S)850-653-5564(C) www.apalachspongecompany.com 2091548 KATALINA!Katisa1yroldSharPei/Labrador cross.Sheisveryfriendlyand happy.Justlookatthatsmile! Shelovestorunandisfast!We putheroutintheplayyardwith theotherdogsandsheruns circlesaroundthem.Ifyouare lookingforajoggingcompanionoradogtochasesticksfor hours,Katisforyou!! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededtosocializeallofour dogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofour animalsintotheirhometobefosteredforvariousneeds. Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatlyappreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklin CountyHumaneSocietyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.You maylogontothewebsiteatwww.forgottenpets.orgtosee moreofouradoptablepets. 4515017SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthCallTodayJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 SocietyObie Lee Pelt, one of Gods little angels, turned 2 years old on Friday, July 12, 2013. Obie is the son of Mary Rae Nowling and Willie Pelt. He has two sweet sisters, Shirah Pelt and Alina Pelt. His grandparents are Alini and William Murray, Kendell Shiver, the late Wayne Nowling, Steve Pelt and the Mary Pelt, who is now with our Lord. Great-grandparents are Charles and Mary Lou King, Johnny and Jean Shiver, Kenneth Shiver and the late Ottis E. Russell II. God bless you my love. Stay well and happy. Your greatgrandmother Mary Lou and Paw-Paw Charles King, Mama, Mary Rae and all your family and friends BirthdaysRylan Wood celebrated his 5th birthday on Monday, July 15. He is the son of LaDonna Granger of Eastpoint and Allen Wood of Carrabelle. We love you. Mommy, Daddy and Family! Happy 5th birthday, Rylan Wood!Obie Pelt turns 2Royce S. Rolstad III, a longtime actor and director with the Panhandle Players, was elected earlier this month to head the countys leading theatre troupe. In a balloting system in which members could cast up to 13 votes for ofcers and members of the board, Rolsatd was named president at the July 9 meeting at the Raney House Carriage House, with Bob Inguagiato as vice-president. Remaining as treasurer is John Inzetta and as secretary, Caroline Ilardi, Selected for the board of directors were Ed Aguiar, Sally Crown, Lydia Countryman, Melanie Inzetta, Robbie Johnson, Elaine Kozlowski, Hank Kozlowski, Judy Loftus and Katie McFarland. Rolstad joined the Panhandle Players in 2001 and acted for the rst time with the organization while still a student at Apalachicola High School. Through the years he has performed in several plays and directed the 2007 production of A Christmas Carol. He was asked to join the board of directors in 2005 and served until 2010. Rolstad took a few years off from the board and acting and returned to the stage in April in this years drama, The Jury Room. Rolstad takes over for Margy Oehlert and Bob Inguagiato who served as co-presidents in recent years. The Panhandle Players hold a special place in my heart because this is where I got over my fear of public speaking. I am thrilled to be back on the board and serving as president of a great organization, said Rolstad. I am really looking forward to working with both new and old board members to continue bringing quality, professional productions to the Franklin County community. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN ROYCeE ROlstadLSTADRolstad to head Panhandle Players Habitat gets boost from Arkansas volunteers SPe E Cial IAL tT O THe E Ti I Mes ES

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The Times | A7Thursday, July 18, 2013 By Jim WelshSpecial to the Times Due to much needed repairs inside and outside of the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center, the center will close after lunch today. Our Thursday lunches and other activities will resume in September. Lunch is served at noon. Please try to join us. You can get your monthly sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday, July 20. Orders for pancakes or French toast served with eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee are taken from 9 to 11 a.m. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Hope to see you there Our monthly Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, at 2316 Oak Street here in the Village, is also on Saturday. Come and enjoy the evening. As always, the public is invited. Party starts at 6 p.m.; fun starts when you walk in the door. Well of course the songbird will be on hand at the karaoke, along with Ann Merrell and others who will be on hand. Of course you know we also have bar bingo, pull tabs, shufeboard and your beverage of choice, served with a smile by Deb or Tim. Come on down and have fun with your friends and neighbors. After church this Sunday, July 21, you can nd us at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. All you need to bring is a dish to share, a donation and your appetite. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Be watchin for ya! When youre out and about, dont forget to place your old eyeglasses in the Lions Club collection boxes. The glasses are cleaned, repaired if necessary and sent all over the world for those in need. Members of the Lions Club International thank you. It wont be long now that you will nd collection boxes for school supplies for those who cant afford them. Try to donate pencils, paper and other school items when you can. The moving sale went very well. Thanks to those who worked and set up the sale and thank you to those who supported it. Starting August 4, there will be coffee in the church hall after the Sunday mass at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church. Mass is at 7:30 a.m. Be kind to one another check in on the sick and the housebound. And dont grumble about getting old, there are many who never get the opportunity. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService R.MichaelWhaley,Pastor SacredHeartofJesusCatholicChurch-YourChurchontheCoast-2653Highway98East P.O.Box729,LanarkVillage,Fl32323Pastor:FatherEddieJones MassSchedule:Saturday:(Vigil)5:00PM Sunday:7:30AM(850)697-3669 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 Billy Glenn Lunsford, formerly of Franklin County, died on Thursday, July 4, 2013, in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Nell Lunsford, his daughter, Denise of Tallahassee, his son, Michael, of Spokane, Wash., and his son, Greg (Traci) of Rock Hill, South Carolina. He also is survived by his brother Rodney (Marillus) of Pace; his brotherin-law Gene Spears, Cantonment; seven grandchildren, Billy Lee (Shayla), Kellie, Germaine (Jacob), Morgan (Corey), Savannah, Jacob, and Emily; and four greatgrandchildren, Adaline, Elijah, Waylon and Mason. Mr. Lunsford was preceded in death by his parents, Robbie Lester Lunsford, Sr. and Edna Bynum Lunsford; his brothers Robbie Jr., Jimmy, Lomax, and Pete; his beloved sister, Gayle Lunsford Spears; his niece Linda Gayle Spears, and his nephew Wayne Lunsford. Billy was born on Aug. 16, 1932, in Slocomb, Ala. As a young child he and his family moved to Allentown, where he met his future wife, Nell. He was a member of the Church of Christ on Margaret Street in Milton. After graduating from Allentown High School in 1950, he served in the Air Force during the Korean War. After completing his tour in the Air Force, Billy and his wife returned to Santa Rosa County, where he began a long and distinguished 30-plus year career with the State of Florida. In 1964 Billy and his family moved to Apalachicola, where he continued to work for the states Department of Natural Resources until his retirement in 1987. He was a 32nd Degree Mason and member of Masonic Lodge 76 in Apalachicola, where he served as Worshipful Master in 1996. He was also a Shriner and member of the Shaddai Temple. He enjoyed music, especially the old country standards and bluegrass music. For several years he and Nell owned a home in Rosine, Kentucky, where they enjoyed attending and volunteering at the Bill Monroe Bluegrass Festival. Mr. and Mrs. Lunsford forged many close friendships during their time in Rosine, and leave behind Cindy Robinson and Kathy Sanderfur, who bought and now live in the Lunsfords Old Kentucky Home. A service for Mr. Lunsford was held in Tallahassee on July, 8 with burial in Sumatra Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made in Mr. Lunsfords honor to Big Bend Hospice (1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308) Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee assisted the family with their arrangements.Billy Lunsford BIllLL Y LUNSFORDPrincess E. Russ Jones, of Apalachicola, passed away on Tuesday, July 9, 2013. Born to the late Henry and Beatrice Russ, she was a lifelong member of St. Paul AME Church and was deeply involved in its activities. She attended Wallace M. Quinn High School. She was well-known for her work as a net maker, seamstress and upholsterer. Mrs. Jones was preceded in death by her husband, Charles J. Jones II, of Danville, Va.; her infant son, Thomas Jones; her sisters, Annie Russ, Ramona Russ Conley, and Mamie Russ; and her brothers Francis Russ, Robert Russ, Eugene Russ, John Russ and Albert Russ. To cherish her memory, she leaves her devoted daughter, Martha Jones Greene; her sons, Jerome M. Jones, Vincent Jones (Martharine), Charles Miller, Charles J. Jones III (Frances) and Prince Jones; her sister, Cora Russ; her brother, Patton Russ; and a host of grandchildren, greatgrandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins and other relatives. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, July 13 at St. Paul A.M.E. Church, with burial at Snow Hill Cemetery. All services were under the direction of Tillman Funeral Home, Tallahassee.Princess E. RRuss Jones FaithSenior center closed for repairs LANARK NeEWSJim Welsh I wish I could personally thank all my beloved friends for their love, prayers, calls, cards and visits during my road to recovery. With Gods healing blessing I will be back home in Carrabelle with my friends and thank you.Mary WW estbergAnother one of Gods little Angels has been called home. Lord, if we could have but one wish today, it would be that our little Kil Kil could still be here on earth with us. To be able to hold him in our arms and see his pretty little face again. But Lord I know it was your wish for you to have him with you now. Thank you for what Time you gave us with him here on earth. All the ones who loved him. Though our pain is deep and our family misses him here with us we know he is in your arms and with all the loved ones who went before him. We will all carry him in our hearts until we meet again some sweet day in heaven. We love and miss you my love. God bless you.Your great-grandmother Granny Louise, Daddy and all your family and friends. IIN lLOVING memMEMORYKKelley Brandon SShiverDec. 20, 2012 to May 7, 2013 CARD OF THANKS Obituaries AA HelpELPING HANDA handful of man, armed with tools, made short work of a new 48-foot ramp for the home of Lavar Sullivan west of Apalachicola last month. AJ Smith, Johnny Turner, Mark Creamer, Fonda Davis, Gene Osburn and other friend of the Sullivans all pitched in. The project was funded by a $1,000 gift card for material from Home Depot, provided by Franklins Promise. The ramp will be put to good use by wife Trina Sullivan. We had a good group of men turn out, said Smith. It went real well.LOIS OIS SWOSWO BODA ODA | The Times

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Monday-Saturday:7:00AM-7:00PMEST Sunday:7:00AM-5:00PMEST FishingHeadquarters: WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,July1186 7830% Fri,July1285 7660% Sat,July1385 7730% Sun,July1487 7840% Mon,July1587 7830% Tues,July1686 7830% Wed,July1786 7860% JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFIT CALLJOE@850-323-0741 ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM4514911SPONSORTHEWEEKLYALMANACCALLTODAY!8502277847 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com If you want to bring color and activity to your garden, consider recracker plant (Russelia equisetiformis). Pow! Firecracker plant is a large perennial with slender, rushlike stems and leaves that are reduced to little more than small scales. The wiry branches cascade down in lengths as long as four feet and bloom here anytime of year. A member of the Plantaginaceae, it is related to the coarse lawn weeds plantains. Also known as fountain plant, coral plant or coral blow, this native of tropical America and Mexico produces masses of tubular scarlet owers attractive to butter ies, hummingbirds and bees. It does best in rich well-drained soil but will tolerate sandier conditions if water is available. It is mildly drought-tolerant and requires a minimum of four hours of direct sun to thrive. Firecracker plant does well in containers and hanging baskets, where it makes an attractive display, but potted specimens must be protected in the winter. This plant can be is propagated by division or by stem cuttings in spring. Traditionally used as a cure for snakebite, modern researchers have identi ed it as a powerful antioxidant and anti-in ammatory.Special to the TimesEven though our area has experienced some recent rain, a lot of the wildland vegetation found along the coastal Panhandle can dry out relatively quickly, especially on windy days and become wild re fuel. Residents are allowed to burn yard waste and debris like leaves, sticks and limbs without having to obtain a burn authorization from the Florida Forest Service if they meet the required setbacks, guidelines and suggestions. The setbacks are 25 feet from the woods or forest, 25 feet from their own home or residence, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from any other occupied building. If these setbacks can be met on the property, they may burn if no local, city or county ordinances prohibit burning; smoke is not a hazard or nuisance; and the yard waste was generated on that property and will t in an 8-feet diameter pile or non-combustible container. The re must be ignited after 9 a.m. and be extinguished one hour before sunset. The re should never be left unattended even for a short time, and adequate suppression equipment (water hose, buckets of water, shovels, rakes, etc.) should be on-site. An area around the pile cleared down to bare soil will help prevent the re from spreading. Any type of outdoor burning that does not fall within these parameters might be illegal or require an authorization. If you have any questions, feel free to call the Florida Forest Service dispatch center at 547-7083. Also, it is illegal to burn household garbage (including paper products), treated lumber, plastics, rubber materials, tires, pesticides, paint and aerosol containers. The three leading causes of wild res each year on average are escaped debris burns, lightning and arson. For more information, visit the Florida Forest Service website at www. oridaforestservice.com. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com An estimated 739 hunters killed more than 800 deer in Franklin County over the 2011-12 season. Avid hunter Ray Tyre of Carrabelle said he believes the local deer population is down, and many hunters were disappointed here last year. The results of an annual telephone survey released by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission last month revealed that statewide, 137,000 hunters spent about 3 million days in the eld and harvested about 137,000 deer, but not everybody got a buck. About 88,500 hunters, just over half the licensed hunters, did not bag a buck last season. One out of ve hunters bagged one buck; one in 10 bagged two; one in 20 bagged three and one in 35 bagged more than three. An estimated 150 hunters bagged 10 bucks or more. Franklin County hunters did better than the state average, bagging a deer for every 11 days spent hunting. Statewide, hunters bagged one deer, on the average, for every 17 days spent hunting. The most successful hunters were in Indian River County; they took home one deer for every ve days spent hunting. Sarasota, Holmes and Bay counties all harvested more deer per day than the state average. In Florida, an estimated 124,000 hunters bagged 58,000 bucks and 26,000 does during general gun season. Archery season was the next biggest harvest, with around 70,000 hunters bagging 17,500 bucks and 18,500 does. About 53,000 hunters harvested 11,000 bucks and 850 does during muzzleloader season, and 11,000 crossbow hunters took 2,500 bucks and 2,000 does. The county with the most registered deer hunters last year was Marion, with more than 10,000, followed by Polk with 9,700 and Levy with 9,200. Pinellas had the fewest registered hunters with 56. Hunters statewide took about 100,000 deer on private land, more than three times the 31,000 deer taken on public land. About half the hunters questioned said they only hunted on private land. One in three said they hunted only on public land. There is very little private land in Franklin County, Tyre said. There are a few hunting leases belonging to The St. Joe Company between Alligator Point and Lanark Village, but most of the county is public land. Statewide, seven out of 10 hunters said they were happy with their hunting experience, and about two out of 10 said they were not. Over the four seasons prior to 2011-12, only about half said they were pleased with their hunting experience.Firecracker plants explode with colorLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesA recracker plant thrives without irrigation of a downtown street corner. BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda Thursday, July 18, 2013 Page 8Know the law before you strike that match County hunters bag 800 deer FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE | Special to the Times SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomOffshore fishing is slowing down now after the red snapper season closed in state waters this past weekend. Gag grouper will remain open in state and federal waters until Dec. 3, giving us a five-month season in our waters. King fish and Spanish mackerel are still thick close to shore. Inshore fishing has taken a back seat to scalloping in St. Joe Bay this week. As summer activities are still fresh on visitors mind, scalloping will be the main focus for the bay. This year the scallop count is almost double from last year with a 23.0 for our waters.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys Majors All-Star team fell at the state tourney earlier this month to the secondand third-best teams in the state. The gentlemanly play of these 11and 12-year-olds, though, was rewarded as they took home the trophy for Best Sportsmanship. After the July 5 opening ceremonies of the state Dixie Youth Tournament in Arcadia, the boys opened against Brooksville. A tworun homer Brooksville clinched an 8-5 win. Game two against Bushnell American ended in a 7-4 loss for the Franklin County team. The boys, led by Ethan Rileys speed, showed their hustle on the base paths, and Hes just that fast! became the quote of the tournament We really didnt do bad at all to be honest with you, said Head Coach Greg Sasnett. The games at the state level are played on a grass in eld, and its hard for our kids to adjust. We left too many on base. We could compete with them, but we werent completely on. Our kids played hard and we are very proud of all of them. They were both good games, he said. Not bad to lose against No. 2 and 3 in the state out of the 11 teams. We appreciate all the county and everybody does for us, Sasnett said.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys youngest All-Star team, a crew of energetic boys ages 7 and 8, showed they could play some ball, even in the rain, at the state tourney in Wildwood last month. Coming off a District 4 tournament win in Gulf County, the team won its opener but then dropped the next two hard-fought battles, beset by the weather. It rained and rained and rained, Manager Eddie Moses said. It was a really well put together tournament, he said. Were very proud of our boys. With support from coaches Ricky Abercrombie, Bobby Varnes, and Timmy Poloronis, the boys attended the June 28 opening ceremonies banquet. We had several players win prizes like helmets, bat bags and Tampa Bay Rays autographed items, Moses said. The rst game was June 29 against Malone, with Franklin County as the home team. The team won a 16-4 victory in the fth inning, the margin of victory cutting the game short. The boys played very good offense and defense, Moses said. In AA baseball, where the games last six innings, players are served up ve total pitches, and there are no walks. You swing at three strikes, and youre out but you can let one pass, Moses said. The next day, Sunday, was a very long day for us, the manager said. Our game was scheduled at 10 a.m., but with all of the rain delays, we didnt end up playing until after 5 p.m. However, the boys got to experience something like they had never seen before. Airboats were brought in to dry the elds. Once the elds were safe to play, Franklin County took on West Seminole. The boys played a good rst two innings and then a few errors and good hits scored runs for the other team, Moses said. We werent able to catch up, falling short, and the game ended in the fourth inning. July 1, in the double elimination tourney, Franklin County faced Calhoun County. Our team hung with them until the end, when they had a big inning, scoring seven runs to seal the deal, said Moses. Overall, our boys played very well in this tournament, Moses said. The boys represented Franklin County well, with great sportsmanship, both on and off the eld. We have a great group of coaches, players and parents. We look forward to watching these young men do great things on and off if the diamond. We are very proud to be a part of this team. Members of the Franklin County AA All-Stars include Jabara Pearson, Mason Moses, Cody Abercrombie, Owen Poloronis, Dax Chitty, Marcus Clayton, Ethan Kembro, Wil Varnes, John Michael Thompson, Weston Bockelman, Evan Stanley and Wyatt Abercrombie. Moses said he, the team and parents wished to thank their sponsors: Gunn Heating and Air, Ace Hardware, A.Js Sports Bar and Grille, the city of Apalachicola, Franklin County Commission, Harry As, Kelley Funeral Home, Leavins Seafood, Water Street Seafood, Gander Distributors, Jeff Galloway Real Estate, Suburban Propane of Tallahassee and Suburban Propane of Wildwood. We appreciate the support from our community through participating in fundraisers, individual and business donations, he said. Our youth are the future of Franklin County! BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K1.27AC.LOTBCH. ACCESS$80,000 U.S.98COMMLOTS BELOWCITY.APP.PRICE C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,500COMM.BLDG.ON98&GULF FORRENT$500/MTH.MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$39,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 GETYOURADIN! 227-7847 4515031 Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LEANNE POLORONIS | Special to the TimesThe AA All-Stars are, front row, from left, Owen Poloronis, Jabara Pearson, Dax Chitty, Even Stanley, and Marcus Clayton. Second row, from left, are Wyatt Abercrombie, Wil Varnes, Mason Moses, Cody Abercrombie, John Michael Thompson, Weston Bockleman and Ethan Kembro. Back row, from left, are coaches Bobby Varnes, Ricky Abercrombie, Timmy Poloronis and Eddie Moses.AA All-Stars battle at rainy state tourneyPage 9BRANDILYN KENT | Special to the TimesAAA All Stars include, back row, Coach Michael Newell, Christopher Newell pitcher, Ethan Riley center eld, Jesse Page right eld, Jan Lowe rst base, Manager Greg Sasnett, Jacob Pendleton second base, Bryce Kent third base, and Coach TJ Pendleton. Front row, from left, are Lucas Sasnett left eld, Christian Amison catcher, Micah McLeod shortstop, Tonner Segree catcher, Ethan Moses, right eld, and Matthew Gay left eld.Majors All-Stars take home sportsmanship trophy Thursday, July 18, 2013

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A10| The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91638T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-185-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORA G. COLLINS; et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, entered in Case No. 12-185-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Centennial Bank is the Plaintiff, and Debora G. Collins; Wendell Harrelson; Larry D. Everett and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees or other claimants are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Inside Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola Florida 32320, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on August 15, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: Lot 3, Block K of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements located thereon and a 1968 Fleetwood Mobile Home, ID# DK71268277. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 25th day of June, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 18, 25, 2013 91640T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 13-31-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY L. SPRUILL and TAMMY D. SPRUILL, husband and wife; et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated June 20, 2013, entered in Case No. 13-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Liberty County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and ANTHONY L. SPRUILL and TAMMY D. SPRUILL, husband and wife; CITIBANK, N.A.; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersighed will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front steps of the Liberty County Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, Florida, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on August 27, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBIT A Commence at a old terra-cotta monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 2, Township 1 South, Range 7 West, Liberty County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 24 minutes 34 seconds East 30.00 feet to the Northerly right of way of a 60 wide roadway easement; thence Easterly along said right of way run South 89 degrees 43 minutes 44 seconds West 1595.25 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 43 minutes 44 seconds East 608.49 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run North 00 degrees 33 minutes 47 seconds East 966.69 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 81 degrees 09 minutes 19 seconds West 144.79 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 79 degrees 48 minutes 38 seconds East 420.00 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 79 degrees 48 minutes 36 seconds West 51.85 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 33 minutes 47 seconds West 1069.55 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 14.20 acres more or less. LOT 69. LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES, UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet, thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet. thence run South 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence run along said right-of-way boundary as follows: North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds East 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 657.49 feet, thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 234.42 feet, thence North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East 240.39 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 01 minutes 46 seconds for an arc distance of 418.02 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue Northeasterly along said right-of-way and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet, thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arc distance of 137.00 feet, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 50 degrees 21 minutes 54 seconds East 350.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 3000.00 feet, thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 35 seconds for an arc distance of 122.68 feet, the chord of said arc being South 38 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 122.67 feet, thence run North 52 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.04 acre, more or less. LOT 70, LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said section 35 a distance of 2855.93 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 1110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 14 minutes 41 seconds East 60.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 411.60 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds West 224.46 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 247.49 feet thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 88.22 feet, thence run South 50 degrees, 41 minutes 26 seconds West 270.37 feet, thence run South 37 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 410.12 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway, thence ran North 50 degrees 41 minutes 26 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 281.01 feet to a point of curve to the left, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radios of 657.49 fast thru a central angle of 20 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds for an are distance of 234.42 feet, thence ran North 30 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 240.39 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 09 degrees 22 minutes 21 seconds for an arc distance of 548.01 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue Northeasterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3350.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 36 seconds for an arc distance of 137.01 feet, thence run South 48 degrees 01 minutes 18 seconds East 350.00 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 3000.00 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 20 minutes 36 seconds for an arc distance of 122.70 feet, the chord of said arc being South 40 degrees 48 minutes 24 seconds West 122.69 feet, thence run North 50 degrees 21 minutes 54 seconds West 350.00 toot to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.04 acre, more or less. Together with a 1992 SHAD Mobile Home VIN #146M7049A, Title #62802954 and 1992 SHAD Mobile Home VIN #146M7049B, Title #62802955 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 20th day of June, 2013. Kathy Brown Clerk of Circuit Court By: V. Summers Deputy Clerk July 18, 25, 2013 91672T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Franklin County Emergency Management will receive sealed proposals at the Franklin County Emergency Management office, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola, Fl 32320 until Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm for the following: DISASTER DEBRIS MONITORING Emergency Management may accept all or part of any proposal. Any proposals received after Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 2:00 pm will be retained by Emergency Management unopened and will not be considered. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the proposal in the best interest of Franklin County. Franklin County does not discriminate because of race, creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact the Emergency Management Office at 850-653-8977. July 11, 18, 2013 91688T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.13000022CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA A. TAYLOR, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MICHAEL D. BARDECKI RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 490 SAINT TROPEZ CIR NE, SAINT PETERSBURG, FL 33703 TO: MICHAEL D. BARDECKI RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 3247 TECH DRIVE N, SAINT PETERSBURG, FL 33716 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida: Lot 1, Block I, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit Number 2, a subdivistion as per Map or Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, page 15, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Apalachicola Times. Dated June 26th, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By Terry E Creamer Depty Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. PH # 32066 July 18, 25, 2013 91694T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE MATTER OF THE CITY OF BENTON, Plaintiff, and, MONET INVESTMENTS, LLC, THOMAS FRANK MOORE, VINOD C. GUPTA, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants, No. 2013-MR-11 PUBLICATION NOTICE TO: Monet Investments, LLC, Thomas Frank Moore, Vinod C. Gupta, Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, Defendants: This is Notice to you of the filing of Petitioner for Order Authorizing Demolition on the following property: LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK A IN PARKRIDGE ADDITION TO THE CITY OF BENTON, SUBJECT TO PRIOR RESERVATIONS, EXCEPTIONS AND CONVEYANCES OF THE COAL, OIL, GAS AND OTHER MINERALS UNDERLYING THE SAME, SITUATED IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN NUMBER: 08-20129-001 NOW THEREFORE, unless you file your response to the Petition filed herein, or otherwise make your appearance in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Illinois, within thirty (30) days from the date of the first publication of this Notice, default may be entered against you at any time thereafter, and the relief request in such Petition for Order Authorizing Demolition may be granted. Nancy Hobbs Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Illinois July 18, 25, 2013 August 1, 2013 91722T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 11-000433CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD D. BROWN; RHONDA M. BROWN; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; OLIN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC.; SANDS OF CARRABELLE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on August 15, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: LOT 14, BLOCK 71, THE SANDS OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. This Notice dated this 25th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 18, 25, 2013 94249T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-422 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 24th day of June 2013, in Case Number 11-422 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and MARY W. LAWHON and JAMES M. LAWHON are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern, on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Mariners Landing Phase III, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 4, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE 91732T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on July 25, 2013. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. Central Time at Panama City City Hall, Commission Chambers, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or alicia.stephen@ hdrinc.com. July 18, 2013

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 18, 2013 The Times | A11 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ................................. $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1115179 $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCINGBORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 1110040 NURSING FACULTYRN TO BSN PROGRAMThis individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. Salary commensurate with education and experience. Position open until lled.Apply at: GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 25th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94261T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-130 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 370 Apalachicola, Florida 32320, Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN S. HARDY, TAMMI L. HARDY, PINE COAST PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, and FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on August 15, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-67 AND THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. S-67 A DISTANCE OF 1040.43 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE FOLLOWING 6 COURSES: NORTH 54 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 66.84 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 450.00 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 39 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 06 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 308.41 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 679.81 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 687.50 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 14 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.63 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 2131.26 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND), THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 233.94 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS COUNTY ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD 1739.30 FEET TO A RE-ROD (FOUND) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE CENTERLINE OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY KNOWN AS CLARKS LANDING ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD 2628.83 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF CLARKS LANDING ROAD WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 3849.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD KNOWN AS HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ITS EXTENSION THEREOF 1409.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 1269.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 05 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1455.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID HICKORY HAMMOCK ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1269.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000131-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL W. BYRD, JR., ET AL., Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash inside the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32329, at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 28, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 7, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 5 and 6, Block 51 of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 16-17,of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 2 WEST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 598.0 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 210.85 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 523.75 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF A TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 90, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID TRACT 209.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID TRACT, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, A DISTANCE OF 915.57 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. NO. 90 STATE ROAD NO. 10 THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 24 MINUTES WEST (BEARING BASE) ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 815.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 203.48 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 24 SECONDS WEST 312.81 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE FROM A TANGENT BEARING OF NORTH 64 DEGREES, 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 177.17 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 32 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 309.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAINING 1.74 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: June 25, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 94279T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes Self Service Storage Facility Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, July 19, 2013. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #33 Marshall Sweet Contents-Household STORATE UNIT #64 Tanieia Bell Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #73 Charlene Fincher Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #111 Karen Knowles Content-Household July 11, 18, 2013 94311T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2013-0230-CA IN RE FORFEITURE OF: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665 $1,882.00 U.S. CURRENCY NOTICE OF FORFEITURE ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE FLORIDA CONTRABAND FORFEITURE ACT TO: MICHAEL SHAWN LANGLEY, c/c FRANKLIN COUNTY JAIL, 270 STATE ROAD 65, EASTPOINT, FL 32328 AND ANY UNKNOWN INTERESTED PARTIES. RE: In Re: Forfeiture of the Following Described Property: 1987 CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC BROUGHAM SEDAN, 4 DOOR, GREEN, VIN NO. 1G1BU51H5HX202665, Florida Tag No. ACFR12. The Franklin County Sheriffs Office has filed a Certificate of Compliance with Forfeiture Act and Complaint for Forfeiture with the Clerk of Court in Franklin County, Florida. An Order Finding Probable Cause has been entered requiring the Claimant and all persons or entities who claim an interest in the property described above to respond. Copies of the Complaint and Order of Probable Cause can be provided by the Franklin County Clerk of Court. You are required to file any responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses, within twenty (20) days of receiving notice, with the Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and to serve copies upon Donna Duncan, Counsel for the Franklin County Sheriffs Office, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., 80 Market Street, P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Failure to file your defenses will result in a default judgment being entered against you. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Clerk of the Court this 1st day of July, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple yearn for 1st baby. Christine & Greg 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Lost Yellow Inflatable Raft with Fishing Equipment, Call 850-228-5778 COLLECTOR BUYING OLD FLORIDAWANTED: Advertising Signs & Displays, FL: Bottles, Tokens, Paper, Postcards, Photos, Primitives. Also Railroad Memorabilia, Pedal Cars, Toys (Pre-1970), Gas Station Items Including: Uniforms, Signs, Promo Give-Aways, Displays. Circus & Carnival Items, Fla. Souvenirs. Fair Prices In Cash !! Call Alan 352-538-0945 Apalachicola, 1170 Bluff Road Sat. July 20, 9am-untilYard SaleHousehold items, clothes and much more! Text FL58913 to 56654 If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Carrabelle: 212 NE Ave K. Sat, July 20th 8am-2pm Rain or Shine!!Estate SaleEverything is on the porch and in the house. Theres something for everyone. Were also selling the house and 3 lots. For more information please call 850-728-6487Txt FL58902 to 56654 East Point: 613 HWY 98, Sunday July 21st 9am-6pmYard Sale Handymans Jackpot!Tools, parts, & much more! During week call Jim: 201-370-6596 Text FL57533 to 56654 Food ServiceCooksApalachicola River Walk Cafe Needed for breakfast, lunch, dinner, flex hrs Mon -Sat. Apply in person at: 17 Ave. E., Apalachicola (Next to the Dixie Theater) Web ID#: 34258152 Food Svs/HospitalityDesk Clerk NeededAt Buccaneer Inn on St George Island. Must be able to work flexible hours, weekends, holidays and nights. Computer experience preferred. Pay based on prior experience. Call (850) 927-2163 Web ID: 34257518 OtherExperienced Resident InnkeeperSalary plus fully furnished spacious apt and car and benefits. Send resume and photo to lynnwilson2@aol.com Web ID#: 34257878 OtherHousekeepersExperienced housekeepers needed for bed & breakfast. $9/hour (850) 653-9199. Web ID#: 34257877 OtherLive-In CaregiverLooking for live-in caregiver for elderly woman. All utilities paid. No rent. Possible pay. Call for details. Located in Carrabelle. 850-209-4124 Web ID#: 34257391 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL58599 to 56654 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2 BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $76,000. Call (850) 524-1257 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 4515211 The City of Carrabelle is accepting applications for two Water /Wastewater LaborersUnder the supervision of the Water /Wastewater Superintendent, the employee will be responsible to perform manual labor in maintaining water and sewer lines for the City of Carrabelle. Responsibilities include installing new water and sewer service, repairing water and sewer lines, manholes, meter readings, and all other assigned tasks. Employee is responsible for the operation of heavy equipment used in the performance of assigned tasks. High School Diploma/GED required. Experience is preferred. Salary will be discussed at time of interview. Applications can be picked up at City Hall, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL 32322, all previous applicants need to re-apply. The City is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free workforce.

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A12 | The Times Thursday, July 18, 2013 Real Estate Picks Best Values on the Forgotten CoastOur local real estate experts have identi ed what they feel are the best values around and are o ering them to you in Real Estate Picks! Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. 4514940 SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD Authentic3BR/2BAbayfrontloghouse constructedintheearly1900 swithlocalcypress wood.Largebeautifulsite(2lots)bufferedby thickvegetationfromtheHwywithpanoramic viewsacrossStGeorgeSound. 850-899-9988l850-697-1010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com 4515199 ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com 4515201 JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#249082$225,000St.GeorgeIsland4515197 SEAGODDESSLightandairy3BR2BAislandhome,privatescenic freshwaterpond,largedeck,2ndlevelsundeck,cheerfully furnished,groundlevellaundry/storageroom,shcleaning area&outsideshower,underhomeparkingonpad,WestPine Avenue,ListedbyJanieBurke. 4515200 MLS248897ST.GEORGEISLAND$1,299,000 PositiveSpace -ImmaculatelymaintainedcustomhomedesignedbyarchitectLarryBurkeon aoneacrelandscapedlotinprestigiousSt.GeorgePlantation!Thisoneownerhomeisbeautifully furnishedandfeaturesGulfviewsacrosstheentiresouthernwallofthehouse.Thespaciousmaster suitetotallyoccupiesthe2ndoorwitheasyaccesstothelaundryroomfromthebedroom.Bothguestbedroomshaveprivatebathsandthedencanserveasa4thbedroomwithahalfbathoroce/ craftroom.BeautifulfullporchesforeasyentertainingandenjoyingtheGulfview.Thishomealso hasagasreplaceandoakoorsthroughouttheliving/diningareas.Squarefootage,acreageand lotdimensionsaretakenfromCountyPropertyAppraiserswebsite. ShimmeringSandsRealtySTEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 www.stevesisland.com www.PositiveSpaceHome.com JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#249164$23,000ApalachicolaLOTON21STSTREETBorderedbyseveralmaturetreesincludingamajestic cypress,interiorisopen&easytowalkandinspect, quietneighborhood&closetoHistoricApalachicola, Idealfornewconstructionoraninvestmentproperty, ownernancing.ListedbyMichaelBillings 4515196 Law EnforcementTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Whose quotes included, Chop your own wood, and it will warm you twice? Will Rogers, Daniel Boone, Henry Ford, Chuck Yeager 2) In 1959 Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of FDR, made a TV commercial for what product? Cigars, Toothpaste, Flour, Margarine 3) Who was the only normal-looking member of older TVs The Munsters? Herman, Grandpa, Marilyn, Lily 4) Asteroids are mainly found between Mars and which other planet? Venus, Neptune, Saturn, Jupiter 5) By what is acetylsalicylic acid more commonly known? Garlic, Aspirin, Vitamin C, Meat tenderizer 6) Whats the largestsized breed of frog in the world? Goliath, Hercules, Everest, Atlas 7) The Lisa was whose rst model computer equipped with a mouse? IBM, Tandy, Apple, Morrow 8) Mick Jagger and Keith Richards are/ were known as which Twins? Domino, Glimmer, Moondog, Satisfaction 9) Who was the rst season winner of American Idol? Clay Aiken, Kelly Clarkson, Ruben Studdard, Bo Bice 10) Which airline innovated frequent yer miles? American, Southwest, Delta, United 11) What was the average number of yearly concerts performed by Elvis Presley the last eight years of his life? 47, 82, 91, 140 12) In 1902 what was pitched as Americas Most Famous Dessert? Apple pie, Banana split, Ice cream oat, Jell-O 13) In the Richie Rich comics whats the name of the butler? Jeeves, Wilmington, Simpleton, Cadbury 14) What do you scratch if your dilator naris posterior is itching? Forehead, Back, Nose, Foot ANSWERS 1) Henry Ford. 2) Margarine. 3) Marilyn. 4) Jupiter. 5) Aspirin. 6) Goliath. 7) Apple. 8) Glimmer. 9) Kelly Clarkson. 10) American. 11) 140. 12) Jell-O. 13) Cadbury. 14) Nose. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Highway Patrol and the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. July 9 Amanda R. Yowell, 31, Eastpoint, Gulf County violation of probation (FCSO Michael L. Lee, 44, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Katie N. Matthews, 27, Diamondhead, Miss., two counts of domestic battery and resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) July 11 Patricia A. Keil, 44, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) July 12 Donnie L. Newburn, 36, Tallahassee, dui and refusal to submit to breath test (FHP) July 13 Susan A. Teasley, 38, Thomasville, Ga,, public affray (CPD) Shana R. Califf, 37, Thomasville, Ga., public affray (CPD) July 15 Brittney E. Shiver, 26, Bristol, violation of probation (FCSO Brenda G. Lawrence, 60, Carrabelle, passing worthless bank checks (CPD) July 16 Alvin G. Martina Jr., 29, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Arrest REPOrtRT From Staff ReportsSolid Waste Director Fonda Davis will continue to work four days a week during normal conditions. At Tuesdays county meeting, Commissioner Pinki Jackel questioned whether the commission was aware Davis normally worked 10 hours a day Monday through Thursday. She said the question stemmed from her attempts to reach Davis last Friday. Several phone calls went to voicemail immediately, Jackel said. The landll operates ve days a week, she told Davis. When we hired you, we hired you to be superintendent ve days a week. In my opinion, the supervisor is responsible 24/7. Your phone needs to be on. If its something that can wait, I will wait till normal business hours. Supervisors are not limited to working 40 hours. In some circumstances, storms, they work many, many hours. Davis said he has worked the fourday schedule since being hired by solid waste and recycling. Some employees are on eighthour shifts and others are on 10. Albert Floyd will be in charge if Im not there. Its covered all the time, Davis said. I dont understand where this is going, Commissioner Smokey Parrish said. Do we want him to knock off at eight hours and leave the men unsupervised for two hours? He has Albert (Floyd) in place. When you (Davis) are out, the person at the landll needs to direct the call to the supervisor that is on duty at the time. Commissioner Noah Lockley suggested Davis keep the same schedule but provide the landll ofce with an emergency contact phone number. Davis offered to provide the commissioners with h is personal cell phone number. Were saying then to all our supervisors if they work 40 hours, even in three days, its OK for their assistant to take over. They can work three days every week if they want, Jackel said, They could do it in two days, Parrish said. Theres 24 hours in a day. I dont think thats happening. I think were just trying to micromanage. Jackel moved that supervisors be allowed to work any schedule they chose. The motion died for lack of a second. Commissioner William Massey said, as supervisor of roads in Carrabelle, he kept his phone on at all times except when he was on vacation. Parrish moved the commission instruct Davis to keep the same work schedule but leave his work phone on at all times. The motion passed with Jackel opposed.Davis to keep four-day workweek