<%BANNER%>

The Apalachicola times ( June 20, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 06-20-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00226

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 2013
Publication Date: 06-20-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00226

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA AND DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com County mammography services will be shifted to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf because of outdated equipment at Weems Memorial Hospital. Franklin Needs Inc., a volunteer group of Franklin County women who have been instrumental in raising funds for breast cancer screenings, has announced beginning this month, all the mammograms they fund will be performed at Sacred Heart. The decision to direct business to the hospital in Port St. Joe came as a result of a perfect storm of factors: a breakdown in Weems’ outdated analog mammography machine, the preference by physicians for digital mammograms and Sacred Heart’s competitive pricing for the diagnostic procedure. “The program is moving to the next closest hospital (to Weems) which is Sacred Heart,” said Elaine Kozlowsky, Franklin Needs board member. “They have given us a better price than either Weems or Bay Radiology, a at fee for screening digital mammogram, diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound.” Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth said between November 2011 and October 2012, Weems conducted 58 mammography tests. They have done about 20 in the past seven months. “The majority of those were being diverted already, even when the machine was up and working, because the analog (equipment) was no longer able to meet the requirements of the diagnosing physicians,” Brownsworth said. “They (women) would come here and get re-sent over to Bay Medical at the time.” Brownsworth said there had been a drop-off in utilization before the decision by Franklin Needs, which came after a meeting with the CEO. “They met with me prior to the decision and sought my input, which I greatly appreciate,” Brownsworth said. “In that meeting, I shared our plan to replace our older technology and to once again provide mammography services to the women of Franklin County. They were supportive and expressed a desire to resume our relationship in the future.” “We’re hoping to have this equipment at our hospital someday,” Kozlowsky said. “Our original plan was to be self-suf cient and for all the money raised to remain in Franklin County.” She said two members of the Franklin Needs board also serve Work stalls on island shing pier Repairs were to be completed July 1 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Commissioners want answers about delays in repairing the St. George Island shing pier. At Tuesday morning’s county meeting, Preble Rish spokesman Clay Smallwood told commissioners he is trying to meet with Gulf Group, the rm charged with repairing the pier, to discuss delays. Gulf Group’s contract calls for the work to be completed by July 1, but Smallwood said he does not believe the work will be nished. “I’ve been receiving a lot of calls about this,” said Commissioner Pinki Jackel, whose district includes St. George Island. “There’s not a lot of entertainment for visitors on the island. A lot of people use that shing pier. A meeting about the delay needs to happen sooner, not later.” Chairwoman Cheryl Sanders said she had hoped the repairs would be done by Memorial Day but now doesn’t think they will be complete by Independence Day. Smallwood said he believed the remaining work will take a minimum of 30 days to complete. Commissioner William Massey said he believed it would take longer based on the progress already made. After the meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce said he agreed with Massey and would not speculate on the cause of the delay or when the work will be done. In January, Gulf Group bid $566,200 for the project. If Gulf Group does not nish on time, they can be ned $300 per day after the July 1 deadline. Pierce said the company has not yet received most of the payment. He suggested to commissioners that $9,000 might be deducted from the next scheduled payment to cover the anticipated delay. Pierce said the revetment next to the pier also needed to be repaired using Federal Emergency Management Agency funds. He said he had hoped Both public schools show gains By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A look at the recently released standardized test results for Franklin County’s two public schools reveals good news, especially when it comes to math scores. At Franklin County School, where the administration embarked last year on a renewed emphasis on math, the percentage of students performing at grade level or better rose at every grade level. Among third-graders, the percentage almost doubled, from 15 percent last year to 29 this year. Among fourth-graders, the percentage rose to 57 percent at grade level, especially noteworthy because this was the class that had performed at just a 15 percent level one year ago. Among Franklin fth-graders, more than 60 percent were at grade level, a 10 percentage point improvement and the highest percentage among all the grade levels. Though there again was a drop-off in performance among Franklin sixthand seventh-graders compared to the younger grades, both classes saw improvement, to roughly 40 percent at grade level. An impressive rise was seen among Franklin eighthgraders, where more than half were at grade level, better than 34 percent last year and 25 percent two years ago. At the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, the percentage of fth-graders performing at or above grade level was identical to that of Franklin fth-graders, 61 FCAT math scores improve LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Members of the Franklin County All-Stars AA Team hefted sh during Sunday’s charity auction at the Moorings in Carrabelle to earn money for a June 29 trip to the Florida Dixie Youth Baseball State Tournament at Wildwood. Taking hold of this winning wahoo are, from left, Carter Kembro, Cody Abercrombie, Wyatt Abercrombie, John Michael Thompson, Devin Daniels, Weston Bockelman, Ethan Kembro and Mason Moses. For more on the Big Bend Saltwater Classic, see Page A10 For more on the All-Stars, see Page A11 Mammograms shift to Sacred Heart “We are ... evaluating the possibility of mobile digital mammography. It will be a strategic decision related to capital. It is a service that we’d like to provide to the community we serve, but I’m going to have to nd a cost-effective means of doing that.” Ray Brownsworth CEO, Weems Memorial Hospital See PIER A6 See MAMMOGRAMS A6 See FCAT A6 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . A11-A12 Classi eds . . . . A13 VOL. 127 ISSUE 8 Thursday, June 20, 2013 Summertime service, A2 IT TAKES A TEAM Turtle release party Saturday Allie the loggerhead turtle will return to her natural environment at 2 p.m. Saturday (high tide) at Bald Point State Park. Festivities begin at 1 p.m. The Florida Parks Service is providing free admission for the day, and PepsiCo will be on hand with refreshments. Come see her off and have your hand stamped for free admission to the Gulf Specimens Marine Lab in Panacea on the same afternoon. For more information, call 349-9146. Full moon climb at Lighthouse Sunday From 8-9:30 a.m. Sunday, watch the sun set and the full moon rise from the top of the Cape St. George Light. Tickets are $15, $10 for St. George Lighthouse Association members, and include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. After sunset, additional climbers are welcome at the top for a view of the full moon, as time and space permit for $10 per person or $5 for association members. Reservations are recommended by calling 927-7745 or by stopping by the Keeper’s House Museum. Summer bingo on the island At 7 p.m. Tuesdays, enjoy Summer Bingo at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. Cards are 25 cents. For information, call 927-2654. All about sea turtles From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in June, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve and the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers present a talk on “Sea Turtles: Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors.” The reserve is at 108 Island Drive and provides a wealth of exhibits on the local plants and animals. For more information, call 670-7700 or visit www. SeaTurtlesAtRisk.org.

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 PUB LI C N O TI CE N O TI CE O F INTENT IS GIVEN TH A T FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTIN G AN AMEND ED FL O O D P L AIN MAN A GEMENT O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t o n J u l y 2, 2013 a t 10:00 a.m. (E T) a t 34 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a n o r din a n ce c a p t io n e d a s f o l lo ws: AN O RD IN AN CE BY THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS, AMEND IN G THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y C O D E O F O RD IN AN CE T O REP EAL O RD IN AN CE 2003-39; T O AD O PT A NEW FLO O D P L AIN MAN A GEMENT O RD IN AN CE; T O AD O PT FLO O D H AZ ARD MAPS, T O D ES I GN A TE A FLO O D P L AIN AD MINIS TR A T O R T O AD O PT P R O CE D URES AND CRITERI A FO R D EVELO PMENT IN FLO O D H AZ ARD AREA S, AND FO R O TH ER PURPOS ES; T O AD O PT LO CAL AD MINIS TR A TIVE AMEND MENT S T O THE FLO RID A B UILD IN G C O D E; P R O VID IN G FO R AP P LI CAB ILIT Y ; REP EALER; S EVER AB ILIT Y ; AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE. A co p y o f t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h t h e C ler k o f C o ur t, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a n d m a y b e v ie w e d t h er e I n t er es t e d P er s o n s m a y a p p e a r a t t h e m e et in g a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r es p e c t t o t h e p r o p os e d o r di n an c e A n y p a r t y w h o m a y w i s h t o a p p e a l t h e de ci sio n m ade a t t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r m a k in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e h e a r in g os e p er s o n s n e e din g s p e ci a l a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e m e et in g m u s t co n t ac t dep u t y c ler k, M ic h ae l M o r o n, a t 850-653-8861, ext en sio n 100, t hr e e b u sin es s d a ys p r io r t o t h e m e et in g t o m a k e a r ra n g em en ts f o r a t t en d a n ce JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com A small Baptist church in south west Georgia made a big impression on Franklin County last week. About 50 people from the First Baptist Church of Dawson, Ga., a congregation of about 175 families in the farm community just north of Albany, were here June 8-15 for a “SPLASH the Forgotten Coast” mission trip, designed to minister to people in Franklin County alongside churches in the community. SPLASH, an acronym for “Show ing People Love and Sharing Him,” brought parents and children to engage in a series of activities that ranged from serving breakfast to working oystermen to repairing the Apalachicola Youth Center. “It was a family-type mission trip, babies and everybody,” Pastor Jay Thomason said. Thomason and Youth Minister Chance Belk helped lead the trip, which was housed at the St George Island Christian Retreat Center for the week. The volunteers worked closely with Lee and Amy Howell, directors of the retreat center, to put together the pieces of the trip. “It’s been a tough area. With all the oystermen, we heard about was going on,” Thomason said. “It was about doing random projects that we can tell people that God loves them.” The shing pier at the retreat cen ter was in close proximity to where oystermen are handling the shelling project in the bay. So, on two morn ings, the families prepared bags of nonperishable food items, like gra nola bars, that could be offered to the oystermen for breakfast. “They would pull up to the dock, and they were very appreciative,” Thomason said. “It was something we could do to help the kids get in volved in. They were out with their parents helping them.” Another project for the Georgia families was the sharing of disaster relief kits, 5-gallon buckets lled with such necessities as personal toiletry items, ashlight batteries and clean ing supplies. Thomason said they worked with Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise, to line up Apalachicola families to receive the disaster relief buckets. He said Apalachicola vol unteer Gladys Gatlin “helped us go around to the places and she helped bridge the gap for us when people asked, ‘Who are these people?’ That opened the door for us.” In addition to the buckets, the Georgia volunteers presented the households with peanuts roasted and cooked from the Terrell County area, known for peanuts as well as corn, cotton and soybeans. “We also gave them a Bible, if they wanted to receive it, and we offered to have prayer with them,” Thoma son said. “Some of the programs they went on are federally funded, so they couldn’t evangelize.” In Eastpoint, those knowledge able about home construction went to work on the mobile home of Dodie Chase. “Fire had melted the vinyl siding, and this home didn’t have any siding on it,” Thomason said. “They put a new roof over the house and put siding around the house.” At the Apalachicola Youth Cen ter, which is the former Apalachicola High School gymnasium, a crew came in and built a snack counter and completed a series of other im provements to the site, which be came renowned as “The Matchbox” when the Sharks made their run to the Class A state basketball Final Four in Lakeland. It was not all work for the Georgia visitors, who took some time to enjoy a little vacation with their ministry, “We had fun in the afternoons and enjoyed the beach,” Thomason said. “We all went out to eat one night. We tried to have fun with families.” The pastor said a key to the trip’s success was that each member of the group played a different role, suitable to them, to assist in the overall effort. “Some ladies came and did child care in the morning, they just watched the kids for us,” Thomason said. “There was another group that cooked for us. It was all around a big team effort.” By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A large group of ser vice-oriented Christians lavished love on Carrabelle last week. Seth Green is a student at the New Orleans Baptist Theological Academy and plans a career as a fam ily and marriage counselor. He had worked on commu nity aid projects repairing homes for the elderly and in rm. He and his wife, Katie, felt they wanted to do more. Inspired by Scripture, they founded “One:27,” an or ganization to spread God’s word with hammers and paintbrushes. Their motto is “Sharing Christ to meet practical needs.” For their pilot project, the Greens wanted an area where there was great need. “We wanted the community to know that people cared about them,” Katie said. Aaron Batey, pastor of the United Methodist Church in Carrabelle, of fered the solution. “We have been friends since we were 12 and both called to the ministry,” Green said. “When he told me there was great need here, I felt it was a sign.” The Greens organized a party of 57 volunteers. “They were people Seth had met and worked with before and people from our home church,” Katie said. The plan was to repair ve Carrabelle homes iden tied by Batey over a oneweek period. The group split up into ve teams, The Avenue D Roofers; 7th Street Roofers; 12th Street Overhaulers, Highway 98 Painters and Carl King Carpenters. Each group had a crew chief, and though many participants were youngsters, there was an adult man and woman on each site at all times. Seth said insurance was provided through the Meth odist church, and all par ticipants or their parents, including homeowners, signed a notarized waiver. In addition to construc tion, volunteers led worship and performed music. One group came from Jonesville Baptist Church in Newbury. A second was from Burning Bush Baptist Church in Ringold, Ga. A family from Georgia with three children participated. Tasks ranged from paint ing to oor replacement to roof repair. Seth said the hardest part was raising the money for the project. Much of the money was raised through donations and a carwash. Volunteers paid about $200 each for the privilege of helping others. They slept at the Car rabelle Christian Center, where breakfast and dinner, prepared by Mark Collins, were served most days. Volunteers from Carra belle, organized by Aaron’s wife, Meagan, delivered lunch to the work sites. “Everyone here has been amazing and really embraced us,” Katie said. “Without the Carrabelle Methodist Church, the project would not have happened.” Materials for the repairs were donated by Carrabelle businesses. The visit was not all work. There was a worship service every night at 7 p.m. On Wednesday, the teams took a half day off to explore the town. On Friday, they hosted a cook-out for the community at the Sands Park on U.S. 98. The Greens said the ex perience was wonderful, and they want to continue in their work and return to Carrabelle. “Of the places we have volunteered, this is the most beautiful,” Katie said. The work of One:27 is based on Scripture from the book of James: “Religion that is pure and undeled before God, the father, is this: to visit orphans and widows in their afiction, and to keep oneself un stained from the world.” LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Seth and Katie Green brought helpful hands to Carrabelle. Below, a sheltering live oak provided shade on this Carrabelle work site. PHo O T os OS bB Y ST. GEo O R g G E I sla SLA N d D CHRis IS T ia IA N RR ETREa A T CENTER | Special to The TimesTT OP: Volunteers hand out breakfast bags from the dock of the St. George Island Christian Retreat Center to oystermen reshelling the bay. ABOV EE : Volunteers make repairs to the mobile home of Dodie Chase in Eastpoint. SUMMERTIME SERVICEGeorgia Baptist church members make a ‘SPLAS HH ’ 60 Samaritans come to Carrabelle

PAGE 3

The Times | A3 Thursday, June 20, 2013 St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle 1111 8 1 0 Conventional/FHA/VA Lot Loans | Refinancing Adjustable & Fixed Rate USDA Rural Housing Affordable Housing Construction / Permanent Financing Whether you’re buying your first home or just need room to grow, our customized approach to mortgage lending can get you moving. Call us today or apply online at www.ccbg.com Moving in the right direction. MEMBER FDIC All products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all markets or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Loans are not made or originated by the FHA, VA, HUD or any other governmental entity. 2013-14 GR ANT C ALEND AR M a y 8, 2013 FCBOC C appr o v ed TDC r ec ommenda tion f or 2013-14 G r an ts P r o c ess June 5, 2013 – F inal TDC B oar d A ppr o v al f or 2013-14 g r an ts pr oc ess – June 13, 2013 – r elease Gr an t inf or ma tion and A pplica tion F or ms online; use FC TDC g r an t in t er est email da tabases t o inf or m new guidelines 2013-14 FC TDC E v en ts Gr an t P r oc ess June 13, 20, 27, 2013 P ublish TIMES public notic e tha t FC TDC 2013-14 online g r an t mar keting inf or ma tion is on the FC TDC w ebsit e P r e c er tica tion is r equir ed f or elig ibilit y and must be included with or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t inf or ma tion. T he deadline t o apply f or inclusion in the 2013-14 ev en t mar keting pr og r am is June 30, 2013 July 3, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting is c anc eled July 17, 2013 TDC C ommitt ee M eeting C it y of A palachic ola M eeting R oom, beg inning a t 1:30 pm. Gr an t A pplica tions f or mar keting the individual or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t will be r eview ed and r ec ommended f or appr o v al if qualied – July 19, 2013 – TDC S ta t o E-mail notic e t o or ganiza tion ’ s c on tr ac t manager of appr o v al f or inclusion in Gr an ts pr oc ess f or 2013-14 A ugust 7, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting F r ank lin C oun t y C our thouse A nne x, 3:00 p .m. A palachic ola F inal appr o v al of applican ts P r esen ta tion of TDC P r omotions Budget f or initial appr o v al On or bef or e A ugust 20, 2013, FC TDC S ta will issue ocial emailed notica tion as t o sta tus of inclusion f or or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t applica tion Oc t ob er 1, 2013 new scal y ear beg ins f or FC TDC 2013-14 ONLINE GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS M A Y BE A C CESSED ONLINE ON JUNE 13, 2013 A T W W W .SAL T Y FL ORID A.C OM/GR ANT S. THE DEADLINE T O SUBMIT THE 201314 GR ANT APPLIC A TION FOR Y OUR E VENT IS JUNE 30, 2013. IF Y OU WISH T O C OMPLE TE A GR ANT APPLIC A TION O THER THAN ONLINE PLEASE TELEPHONE THE FC TDC ADMINISTR A TIVE OFFICE A T 653-8678 T O REQUEST A C OP Y OR ST OP B Y THE FC TDC OFFICE A T 17-1/2 A VENUE E AP AL A CHIC OL A, FL ORID A. ALL 2013-14 GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS MUST BE SUBMIT TED ONLINE OR T O THE TDC OFFICE NO L A TER THAN JUNE 30, 2013. Coupon Expir es: 6-30-13 CODE: AP00 Special to the Times In the early hours of June 13, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce, with the assistance of the Apala chicola and Carrabelle police de partments, executed a drug/narcot ics roundup. Eight subjects were arrested on various drug/narcotic charges in cluding sale or possession of crack cocaine, prescription medication and cannabis. While executing the warrants, additional charges were led when ofcers said they discovered two subjects in physical possession of narcotics. “The Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce Narcotics Division has been working diligently to rid the streets of Franklin County of illegal drugs,” Sheriff Mike Mock said. The following is a list of the in dividuals arrested in the roundup. Additional arrests are pending in reference to this investigation. All arrests were made by FCSO. • Christian A. McIntyre, 21, Apalachicola, two counts of sale or possession of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, sale of a controlled substance and possession of less than 20 grams • Melonie R. Dellagatto, 40, Car rabelle, sale of a controlled sub stance within 1,000 feet of public housing • Rasha J. Cummings, 21, Apala chicola, four counts of sale or pos session of controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia • Audra L. Murray, 44, Carra belle, sale of a prescription drug This report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and FCSO. All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 11 Deanna L. Schmidt, 45, Carrabelle, lewd or lascivious molestation – victim under age 12 (CPD) Tommy E. Carr, 44, Hays, North Carolina, burglary or attempted burglary of a structure, and grand theft (FCSO) JUNE 13 Alice A. Amerson, 23, Carrabelle, sale of a prescription drug (CPD) Charles L. Fasbenner, 44, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Harry Pierce, 55, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 14 Jesse G. Smith, Jr., 47, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Alice A. Amerson, 23, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 15 Jeffrey D. Nowling, 24, Eastpoint, trespass after warning (FCSO) JUNE 16 Erik A. Tatum, 33, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Roy P. Thompson, 28, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) JUNE 17 George R. Needer, 55, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Special to The Times The pilot of a small plane over central Georgia report ed a slight loss of oil pres sure, then said his engine had stopped, according to a report by federal investigators. The pilot of the single-en gine plane initially asked air trafc control for permission to land at Middle Georgia Regional Airport in Macon. Then, the pilot said his en gine stopped and that he wasn’t going to make it there, according to the preliminary report from National Trans portation Safety Board. The pilot then requested a landing at nearby Robins Air Force Base. The controller at Macon’s airport coordinated with the base and advised the aircraft to contact the tower at the base. However, the pilot never established communication with the base’s tower before crashing just under a mile northeast of Robins on May 27, the report states. Julius Gilreath, 71, of Greenville, S.C.; and Antho ny Cabeza, 58, of Greer, S.C., were killed in the crash of the Piper PA-32. Their ight had departed from Apalachicola Municipal Airport and was headed for Greenville Down town Airport in Greenville, S.C., when it crashed in a swampy area about 500 yards off Georgia Highway 247. “Smoke was seen from WRB tower and veried by an airborne aircraft,” the re port states, referring to the Robins tower. “First respond ers discovered the wreckage in a heavily wooded area ap proximately 20 minutes af ter the last radar and radio communications.” The report is preliminary, and it typically takes inves tigators several months and sometimes years to make a nal determination on the cause of air crashes. Law Enforcement CHRISTIAN M cICI NTYRE MELONIE DELLAGATTO RR ASHA CU mmMM INGS AA U dD RA MURRAY AA N dD REW BUTLER RR OSS Ed ED WARdD S GG EORGE W W AR dD JR. AA PRIL T T URNEY NTSB: Pilot said engine stopped before crash • Andrew L. Butler, 41, Apalachicola, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and withholding child support • Ross W. Edwards, 46, Apalachicola, sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell • George W. Ward Jr., 33, Apalachicola, sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell • April L. Turney, 37, Apalachicola, sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell 8 nabbed in drug sweep Arrest REPORTREPORT

PAGE 4

USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 20, 2013 A Page 4 Section Editor’s note: This poem was written by Mike Cummings, about his uncle Red Butler, who grew up here with his brothers in Apalachicola. The poem was based on stories that Butler used to tell his nephew when they visited in Tampa. He’s a Great War Vet He was only sixteen when Pearl was hit He was gonna enlist, but his mama wouldn’t let him, He had a way set in his mind, She just didn’t know it, yet! He was a future Great War Vet! He asked her three times, and three times, “No!” His big brothers were shippin’, why couldn’t he go? He could not stay in Apalach, He had a date with a ship to catch! He was a Great American Patriot! Well, he got papers and signed his name, Then he practiced real hard and he signed her name! She was standin’ on the porch when he said “Bye” Before he actually left, they had tears in their eye. He was a Great War Ensign! He sailed down from Jefferson on the mighty Mississipp Around Florida, all the way to New York, Then hit the high seas across the pond, D-Day was comin’, it wouldn’t be long. He as a Great War Sailor! He was on a ship, but got stones (sick) on the way, They dropped him in England, saving his life that day, They headed to Omaha, to Utah, the beach, Most of his mates, never would reach. He was a Great War lucky man! Soon as he could, he was back on his feet, He had an enemy he needed to meet, He got to the theater, kicked some Axis around, Then soon found himself on African ground. He was a Great War Vet! Uncle Sam sent him ‘round the world, Along the way he had met a girl, The Paci c called, and he answered her, too, Just a few months of war, and then he was through. He was a Great War Vet! His brothers had served, like most of the rest, And the history books show they all were the best! His mama was proud, his daddy was, too, He had put himself out there, for me and for you! If you have not done so lately, Even if it’s one you have never met, Please say a prayer for, and thank, A Great War Vet! Uncle Ed is still with us, Uncle Milfred’s with God, Uncle Doty still makes his path where no-one has trod, They showed what we’re made of, Americans at heart, Savor their memories before they depart! He’s a great war vet The Poet’s VOICE James E. Red Butler, with the Navy in 1943. James E. Red Butler, with the Air Force in 1964. Special to the Times Recently, it has become fashionable to disparage the use of paper in favor of electronic devices and transmittals. Like a lot of fashions, this makes no sense. The premise of anti-paper campaigns is that paper is bad for the environment and unnecessarily consumes vital natural resources. In reality, using paper and other forest products provides environmental bene ts that electronics cannot match. Paper comes from trees, which are a renewable resource. When trees are cut down to make paper, more are planted and grown to take their place. Through this cycle, working forests provide habitat for wildlife, recharge areas for clean water and a natural process for removing carbon from the air. The electronic alternatives being pushed to replace paper are not as environmentally friendly as their supporters would have you believe. Science of the Total Environment, an international research journal, estimates that discarded devices create approximately 50 million tons of electronic waste each year. These products contain a variety of nonrenewable materials that are not only harmful to the environment but also to the people living in the areas where they are dumped. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that only 8 percent of mobile devices are recycled. The rate for recycling computers is 38 percent. The rate for recycling paper? More than 63 percent. Recycled paper lls a variety of needs. Among others things, it is used to make dollar bills. This is especially appropriate considering the forest industry’s $14.7 billion impact to our state’s economy. In addition to the many environmental bene ts, working forests also provide jobs to 90,000 Floridians. The connection between the environmental bene ts and the economic impact cannot be emphasized enough. Sustainable forests are not free; proper land management costs money. Our government cannot afford to own or maintain all the forestland that is needed for environmental purposes or public use. Without the forest industry, private landowners cannot afford to, either. The market for forest products is a key element in the ability to maintain forestlands. Without a demand for wood from mills and other forest product users, working forests would have to be converted to more pro table crops or to neighborhoods. As Florida becomes more and more urbanized, the pressure to grow houses instead of trees continues to intensify. Like all of us, forests must work if they are going to survive. By buying and using paper and other forest products, consumers help maintain the health and sustainability of working forests. In turn, working forests help maintain a healthy environment and strengthen the economy. Anti-paper campaigns might be trendy right now, but the truth is that working forests were “green” long before green was in fashion. Lynetta Usher Griner is president of the Florida Forestry Association, a statewide membership association that promotes the responsible and sustainable use of Florida’s forest resources (http:// oridaforest.org). Anti-paper campaigns make no environmental sense LYNETTA GRINER President of the Florida Forestry Association Special to the Times Heatstroke! You’ve heard of it, you knew it affected people, and you were even vaguely aware that it could affect your pet. But how does it happen? And most important, how can you help your pet avoid it? Heatstroke is a deadly disease that can kill your beloved companion, even with emergency treatment. The best way to avoid this terrible situation is prevention, and it’s all up to you. Everyone knows that the inside of a car on a hot summer’s day can be lethal. But Fido needs you to know more than that to keep him safe in the deadly sun. Days above 90 degrees, especially with high humidity, are inherently dangerous for your pet. Humidity interferes with animals’ ability to rid themselves of excess body heat. When we overheat we sweat, and when the sweat dries it takes excess heat with it. Our four-legged friends only perspire around their paws, which is not enough to cool the body. To rid themselves of excess heat, animals pant. Air moves through the nasal passages, which picks up excess heat from the body. As it is expelled through the mouth, the extra heat leaves along with it. Although this is a very ef cient way to control body heat, it is severely limited in areas of high humidity or when the animal is in close quarters. The shape of an animal’s nasal passages can contribute to an animal’s tendency to overheat. Pug-nosed dogs are more prone to heatstroke because their nasal passages are smaller and it’s more dif cult for them to circulate suf cient air for cooling. Overweight dogs are also more prone to overheating because their extra layers of fat act as insulation, which traps heat in their bodies and restricts their breathing capabilities. Age can also be a factor in an animal’s tendency to overheat — very young animals may not have a fully developed temperature regulating system, and older pets’ organ systems may not be functioning at 100 percent, leaving them prone to heat-related damage. So where are the danger zones? The most obvious is your car: It can become a death trap even on a mild sunny day — and can insidiously raise the car’s temperature to well above 120 degrees! Cracking the windows of your car doesn’t cut it. Never, ever leave your pet inside the car. If Fido can’t come with you when you get out of the car, leave him at home. What are some other dangerous situations for your pets? Leaving animals outdoors without shelter is just as dangerous as leaving them inside a hot car. Be sure they are not left in a cage in the hot sun, on a chain in the backyard, or outdoors in a run without suf cient shade or air circulation. Their lives are in your hands. Heatstroke is a medical emergency. If you suspect your pet has heatstroke, you must act quickly and calmly. Have someone call a veterinarian immediately. In the meantime, lower the animal’s body temperature by applying towels soaked in cool water to the hairless areas of the body. Often the pet will respond after only a few minutes of cooling, only to falter again with his temperature soaring back up or falling to well below what is normal. With this in mind, remember that it is imperative to get the animal to a veterinarian immediately. Once your pet is in the veterinarian’s care, treatment may include further cooling techniques, intravenous fluid therapy to counter shock, or medication to prevent or reverse brain damage. Even with emergency treatment, heatstroke can be fatal. The best cure is prevention, and Fido and Fluffy are relying on you to keep them out of harm’s way. Summer does not have to be fraught with peril, with ample precaution; both you and your furry friends can enjoy those long, hot, dog-days of summer. Signs of heatstroke are panting, staring, anxious expression, refusal to obey commands, warm, dry skin, high fever, rapid heartbeat, vomiting and collapse. To avoid heatstroke, if your pet lives outdoors, ensure adequate shelter from sun/midday heat. Outdoor kennels should be well-ventilated and in the shade. Provide plenty of fresh water in a bowl that cannot be tipped over and avoid excessive exercise on hot days. Talk with your local veterinarian to determine if your longhaired Fido needs a summer haircut. This column is presented as a public service by the American Animal Hospital Association. For pets, cars can become ovens Golf carts in Eastpoint should be permitted Editor’s note: The following letter was sent to members of the Franklin County Commission. Good Morning. I am writing to ask that you please allow golf-cart travel on North Bayshore Drive and the paved trail on the east side of North Bayshore Drive. The trail is a half-mile long by eight feet in width. A golf cart is 3 1/2 feet wide which would leave 4 1/2 feet for passage. We have used the trail most every day since it was paved, and have never seen a hazard. There are 15 drives across the trail and nine mailboxes. The trail is used by the mail carrier, as well as the newspaper carrier. North Bayshore Drive and Twin Lakes Road are each 20 feet wide and Old Ferry Dock Road is 18 feet wide. The three roads each have the same speed limit of 35 miles per hour. Twin Lakes Road and Old Ferry Dock Road each have a blind curve. North Bayshore Road has no blind areas. We believe the three roads should be permitted for golf-cart use. My wife and I use the golf-cart for transportation to the post of ce, bank, restaurants, friends’ homes, accountant, lawyer, chiropractor and other businesses in Eastpoint. My wife, Harrette, is now 90 years of age, and gave up her driver’s license voluntarily. She has been declared physically handicapped, thus making the golf-cart her only means of transportation. Also, a golf-cart was recommended for me rather than an electric wheelchair after I suffered a stroke several years ago. For my wife and I, the golf cart is not just for recreational use, but for needed transportation, and is one of the ways we go green. Our golf-cart use would be restricted to our homestead if neither North Bayshore Drive or the trail were permitted. Thank you for your consideration. Willis A Kennedy Eastpoint Letter to the EDITOR

PAGE 5

Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 20, 2013 N O TI CE O F GENER AL ELECTI O N CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A D A TE: S EPTEMB ER 3, 2013 PO LLIN G P L A CE: CARR AB ELLLE MUNI CIP AL C O MP LEX 1001 GR A Y A VE. CARR AB ELLE, FL 32322 PO LLS O P EN A T 7:00 AM AND CLOS E 7:00 PM V O TE FO R: CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CAND ID A TES MA Y Q U ALIFY B EGINNIN G 12:00 N O O N, JUNE 24, 2013 UNTIL N O O N JUNE 28, 2013 (M O ND A Y THR U FRID A Y D URIN G REGUL AR W O RKIN G H O URS). Q U ALIFYIN G FEES IS $45.00 P L US 1% O F ANNU AL SAL AR Y O NL Y P ERSO NS REGIS TERED T O V O TE WITHIN THE CIT Y LIMIT S O F THE CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE WILL B E REC O GNIZED A S Q U ALIFIED ELECT O RS AND ALLO WED T O V O TE O R Q U ALIFY FO R CAND ID A CY CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A WILB URN MESS ER M AY O R T OBA CCO C ESSA T ION C LASS S CHEDULE Please visit the f ollo wing w ebsit es t o vie w a c urrent schedule of t obacco cessa tion classes tha t are being held in F ranklin County a t w w w .bigbendahec .org/quit-no w and w w w .ahec t obacco .com T o r egist er f or a class please c all Big B end AHEC a t 850-224-1177 THERE IS NO COS T T O A TT END! T H URSD A Y JUN E 2 0 2 0 1 3 5:30 P .M. 7:30 P .M. Geor ge E W eems Memorial H ospital 135 A v enue G Apalachicola, FL 32320 F r ee nic otine pa t ches and gum will b e pr o vided t o par ticipan ts who c omplet e each class while supplies last =48C 8K4TT FT 4 COVS  ON = UFL = T = TTF ON Special to The Times A St. George Island resident has recounted the story of one of Franklin County’s most colorful citi zens, the legendary “The Oyster King,” in a newly published work of prose, poetry and pictures. The idea a poet and evangelist could buy all of St. George Island on the basis of a series of ro mance novels is strange but true. James L. Hargrove, a retired professor of nutri tion from the University of Georgia who lives on St. George Island, will sign copies of his new book on the legendary William Lee Popham this Saturday from 1-3 p.m. at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St., in Apalachicola. Popham purchased the island in 1916 from a Tal lahassee banker, George Saxon, using publishing rights to his novels as down payment. Popham became known as “The Oyster King” when he tried to use oyster harvesting to gen erate an income for inves tors who bought land on St. George Island. Readers of The Oyster King will learn how an ‘inlander’ be came an ‘island er,’ a resident of Apalachicola and eventually its mayor – only to meet his downfall after accusations of mail fraud and rivalries with oystermen cap sized his plan to develop St. George Island. The book traces Popham from his teen age years near Louisville, Ky., as he developed su perb speaking abilities that captivated audiences in the Southeast on the Chautauqua Circuit at the beginning of the 20th cen tury. Popham augmented his income by churning out romance novels, ser monettes, advice and poems. Although written as a narrative, “The Oyster King” is rooted in his torical fact and describes the pristine beauty that drew Wil liam and Maude Popham to Apalachicola. More than that, the book de scribes little-known facts about the life history of oysters Popham tried to exploit to provide divi dends for his investors. To lighten the nar rative, “The Oyster King” contains many humorous quotations about oysters penned by people as diverse as Andrew Carne gie, Cole Porter and Thom as Henry Huxley. The book is replete with recent and period photographs, illus trations and even a cartoon about Sex on the Beach, which is composed more tastefully than it sounds. “The Oyster King” provides examples of Popham’s original poetry and sermons on love he gave in Apalachicola and elsewhere. It concludes with his trial for mail fraud and shows how these events led to later develop ment of Saint George Is land and Apalachicola. This entertaining book is recommended as a ‘beach read’ for any visi tor who would like to know more about the colorful history of Saint George Island. Signed copies of the book are available at Downtown Books as well as the Cape St. George Lighthouse Gift Shop. Hargrove’s prior books are scientic: for example, Muscadine Health (2008) and Health Benets of Pe cans (2013). Special to The Times The Carrabelle Light house Association elected ofcers for the 2013-2015 bi ennium at its monthly meet ing on June 4. They are President De lores Hardin; Vice Presi dent for Special Events and Public Relations Lesley Cox; Vice President for Member ship and Fundraising Sha ron Rider; Secretary Arlene Oehler; Treasurer Kathy Swaggerty; and Historian John Canetta. Hardin, the past CLA treasurer, brings a variety of management experiences to her new position. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, where she received an associate of arts degree with honors from Contra Costa Community College and Medanos College. Most of her art was abstract wood assemblage inspired by Lou ise Nevelson. In 1981, she moved to Arkansas, where she was the ofce manager for the Hardin Family sawmill. She then moved to Little Rock in 1991 and worked at the Uni versity of Arkansas at Little Rock until retirement in 2007. Her rst year at UALR was spent working with the Arkansas Space Grant Con sortium and NASA Epscore Program. She spent subse quent years working in the UALR art department ofce and taking additional art classes. She is married to Rob ert Vernon Hardin (Vern) and has an adult son and a daughter and a pet yellow Lab, which is about three years old, named Tramp, aka Mr. T. Delores began taking trips to the Gulf Coast with her family and moved here in 2002-3. They found their dream lot six miles west of Carrabelle. She has volun teered for Relay for Life, Big Bend Hospice and the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival. She spends the majority of her time volun teering at the library and for the Carrabelle Lighthouse Association. She believes the light house is important because it represents a big part of Carrabelle history and can be a great resource to bring tourists to the Franklin County area. She said the lighthouse and museum draw fans from all over the world. She just met a couple from Sweden. The Crooked River Lighthouse Keeper’s House Museum is open 20 hours a week with Crooked River Lighthouse climbing on Saturday and Sunday after noons. Between Oct. 2010 and Jan. 2013, 7,478 visitors have signed the guest book.SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S Lesley Cox, right, congratulates Delores Hardin. Hardin elected Carrabelle lighthouse president Author to sign new Popham book SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S James Hargrove’s book chronicles the story of Franklin County’s most colorful citizen, William Lee Popham. “The Oyster King” provides numerous examples of Popham’s original poetry and sermons on love he gave in Apalachicola and elsewhere. It concludes with his trial for mail fraud and points out how these events led to later development of Saint George Island and Apalachicola. WILLIAM LL EE P P OPHAM

PAGE 6

Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 CIT Y OF AP ALA CHIC OLA M A Y OR ’ S ELEC TION PR OCLA M A TION I, the undersig ned V AN W JOHNSON, SR., M a y or of the C it y of A palachic ola, b y author it y of la w and pursuan t t o C it y Or dinanc e No 91-4, do her eb y pr oclaim tha t on T uesda y S ept ember 3, 2013 an elec tion will be held t o ll the oc es as f ollo w s: C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 3 f or a t er m of f our y ears and C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 4 f or a t er m of f our y ears and a RunO Elec tion, if nec essar y will be held on T uesda y S ept ember 17, 2013. C andida t es wishing t o qualify ma y do so a t the C it y O c e fr om 12 Noon M onda y June 24, 2013 un til 12 Noon F r ida y June 28, 2013. C it y O c e is loca t ed a t #1 A v enue E and r egular oc e hours ar e fr om 8:00 A M t o 4:00 P M, M onda y -F r ida y Each C andida t e must pa y t o the C it y Cler k a t the time of qualifying a qualifying f ee of 4.5% of the rst y ear ’ s salar y must be a r esiden t of the C it y of A palachic ola, and must also be a qualied v ot er of the S ta t e of F lor ida, C oun t y of F r ank lin, and the C it y of A palachic ola. A ll persons not pr eviously r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ma y r eg ist er t o v ot e an ytime fr om no w up t o 4:30 P M on M onda y A ugust 5, 2013 f or the G ener al Elec tion, and M onda y A ugust 19, 2013 f or the RunO Elec tion a t the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions loca t ed a t 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida, hours 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M, M onda y -F r ida y T he polling plac e will be a t the Na tional Guar d A r mor y loca t ed a t 66 4th S tr eet in the C it y of A palachic ola and will be open a t 7:00 A M and close a t 7:00 P M. A bsen t ee ballots ma y be obtained b y c on tac ting the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions a t plac e and time not ed pr eviously Only qualied elec t ors will be per mitt ed t o v ot e Ear ly v oting will be c onduc t ed fr om A ugust 26, 2013 t o A ugust 30, 2013 (5 da y s only) a t the Super visor of Elec tions O c e 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida fr om 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M. A ll r esiden ts of the C it y of A palachic ola not cur r en tly r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ar e ur ged t o r eg ist er and take par t in this elec tion. __________________________________ V an W Johnson, Sr ., M a y or C it y of A palachic ola, F lor ida N O TI CE O F INTENT T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTIN G C O UNT Y O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t o n J u l y 2, 2013 a t 10:10 a.m. (E T) a t 34 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a n o r din a n ce c a p t io n e d a s f o l lo ws: AN O RD IN AN CE AMEND IN G THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y ZO NIN G C O D E O RD IN AN CE 92-6, S ECTI O N 462, REGUL A TIN G S TR UCTURES AND ES T AB LIS HIN G THE P ERMIT TED HEI GHT LIMIT AND M O D IFI CA TI O NS T O N O M O RE TH AN 47 FEE T A T THE R O O F P EAK, N O R A C C O MM O D A TE M O RE TH AN THREE H AB IT AB LE FL O O RS, FR O M HI GHES T N A TUR AL GR AD E; P R O VID IN G S E VER AB ILIT Y AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE A co p y o f t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h t h e C ler k o f C o ur t, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a n d m a y b e v ie w e d t h er e I n t er es t e d P er s o n s m a y a p p e a r a t t h e m e et in g a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r es p e c t t o t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce A n y p a r t y w h o m a y w i s h t o a p p e a l t h e de ci sio n m ade a t t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r m a k in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e h e a r in g os e p er s o n s r e q uir in g a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e m e et in g m u s t c a l l dep u t y c ler k M ic h ae l M o r o n a t 850-653-8861 x100 a t le a s t t hr e e b u sin es s d a ys b ef o r e t h e m e et in g t o m a k e a r ra n g em en ts. to begin that task when the pier was complete but now intends to seek bids for the revetment immediately. “The FEMA money must be spent by January 2014,” he said. A section of the pier was destroyed when a barge belonging to Orion Marine Contractors, of Houston, Texas, broke its moorings during Tropical Storm Deb by in June 2012. Orion, who was in the area as a subcontractor for Progress Energy, is deny ing liability for the damage, calling the storm an “act of God.” The company main tains the barge was prop erly moored. The county retained Robert Dees, certied by the Florida Bar in maritime and admiralty law, in the event the county’s insur ance carrier denies cover age and payment is sought from Progress Energy or Orion for the damages. In the interim, commis sioners voted to fund the re pairs out of the $1.66 million in the bridge fund, which was set up by the state af ter it built the new bridge to St. George Island a decade ago. percent. But among its sixth-, seventhand eighth-graders, Franklin once again saw a slide backward among students at grade level. At the same time, the ABC School saw even higher percentages of top perform ers in its middle school students, topped by a whopping 82 percent of its seventhgraders at grade level or better in math. Among ABC School eighth-graders in math, the percentage at grade level or better was almost as strong, at 75 per cent, more than 41 percentage points better than at the charter school two years ago. Sophomore reading scores decline In reading scores, Franklin’s fourth grade was the only grade level to have at least half of its students perform on the standardized test at or above grade lev el. In contrast, each of the ABC School’s grade levels had at least 60 percent of its students at or above grade level, with a high of 75 percent of its sixth-graders at grade level. One trend in the reading scores at the Franklin School is that the percent ages at grade level or better in the lower grades — third through sixth — are all lower than they were two years ago, and in the case of third-graders signicantly lower. In contrast, the percentages in the seventh, eighth and ninth grades are all better than they were two years ago, and in the case of the freshmen, signicantly better, with almost half at grade level; it was just one-third two years ago. Among sophomores, though, the per centage at grade level or better in read ing drops to 27 percent, meaning only a tad more than one in four students can read at grade level. This is a drop of 11 percentage points below last year’s 38 percent. Writing scores jump In writing scores, with the test ad ministered only in the fourth and eighth grades, Franklin students improved by six percentage points, to 47 percent at grade level, slightly better than the ABC School’s 44 percent. In the case of the charter school, the fourth-graders saw a sharp rise from last year’s 28 percent at grade level. “It was signicant, and they were thrilled,” ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said. Among eighth-graders, at Franklin, only one in four was tested as procient in writing, while at the ABC School, it was half the students. Among Franklin sophomores, the percentage improved to 42 percent at writing prociency, a 10 percentage point jump. The state gave students an entire hour, 15 more minutes than last year, to do the writing exam and set 3.5, rather than 3.0, as the threshold for indicating prociency. Still, the entire test perplex es educators like Johnson. “With reading and math, the data is right there in front of you,” she said. “With the writing, the only thing you get back is the scores and a sample of the essay. “There’s no feedback from the state on why that child scored a 3.5, no real clear indication,” Johnson said. “It’s been hard for teachers to judge, not real good indication of feedback. Do I focus on mechanics more? A rich vocabulary? Transitional phrases? To me this a very frustrating assessment. “You should allow students to go back and proofread an essay. I feel like that’s the opportunity the students need.” In science, which is given in the fth and eighth grades, the ABC School had two-thirds of its students at grade level or better. In the case of the eighth-graders, it was a jump of 15 percentage points. At Franklin School, slightly more than half the fth-graders showed prociency in science, an improvement over the pre vious year. Among eighth-graders, there were 43 percent at grade level or better, a jump of 13 percentage points. With the trend toward school choice shown when parents place their children in either of the two schools, or migrate to neighboring counties, ABC School educators make clear how their school compares. A look at state averages and at performances in neighboring Gulf, Wakulla and Liberty counties shows how well the school is doing. “I am extremely proud of all our stu dents and staff who surpassed state av erages on all subjects in all grades four through eighth,” Johnson said. “Most levels and subjects surpassed other schools in surrounding districts.” on the board of the Weems Foundation. “We are hoping support from the com munity for the Weems Foundation to raise the money for equipment for the program,” she said. So far this year, Franklin Needs has raised $40,000, she said. Brownsworth said repairing the ana log machine, which was purchased in 2009 through a grant written by former Weems CEO Chuck Colvert, would not make sense. “The processor has broken, and rath er than x it, for the low volume of tests we get, (we) prefer to reinvest in new technology, in digital mammography,” he said, noting a used digital machine could cost in the range of $175,000. “We are also evaluating the possibil ity of mobile digital mammography,” Brownsworth said. “It will be a strategic decision related to capital. It is a service that we’d like to provide to the communi ty we serve, but I’m going to have to nd a cost-effective means of doing that.” Kozlowsky said about 100 women have been served by Franklin Needs since its inception. “Many have had repeated ex aminations,” she said. Eligibility is limited to county resi dents who have no health insurance and are aged 35-64, she said. Those who are transportation disadvantaged can ap ply for assistance at Croom’s Transpor tation, 133 US 98, Apalachicola, and if granted, it would cost them only $4 per trip. If a biopsy is required, it is performed at Bay Radiology, Kozlowsky said. She said for those who have had mammo grams performed at Bay Radiology, Sa cred Heart will request the records when an appointment is scheduled. “We will continue to pay for testing up to diagnosis as long as funds are avail able,” she said. FCAT from page A1 PIER from page A1 MAMMOGRAMS from page A1 “With the writing, the only thing you get back is the scores and a sample of the essay. It’s been hard for teachers to judge, not real good indication of feedback. Do I focus on mechanics more? A rich vocabulary? Transitional phrases? To me this a very frustrating assessment.” Chimene Johnson ABC School principalPHOTOs S BY DEBB BB IE HOOHOO PER | joebay.com Work on the St. George Island shing pier was to be completed July 1. If Gulf Group does not nish on time, they can be ned $300 per day after the July 1 deadline.

PAGE 7

Local The Times | A7 Thursday, June 20, 2013 AMEND ED N O TI CE O F T A X FO R SCH O O L CAP IT AL O U TL A Y e S c h o o l B o a r d o f F ra n k lin C o un t y w i l l s o o n co n sider a m e a s ur e t o a m en d t h e u s e o f p r o p er t y t ax f o r t h e c a p i t a l o u t l a y p r o j e c ts p r e v io u s l y ad v er t i s e d f o r t h e 2011 t o 2012 s c h o o l y e a r. N e w p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: C O NS TR UCTI O N AND REM O D ELIN G P a y m en t f o r FCS B a yside En v ir o nm en t a l L a b NE W AND REP L A CEMENT EQ UIPMENT C O MPUTERS AND ELECTR O NI C LEARNIN G D E VI CES AND ENTERP RIS E RESO UR CE SO FT W ARE P a y m en t f o r M a n a g em en t I nf o r m a t io n S ys t em s S o wa r e P a y m en t f o r E le c t r o nic R e co r d s R et en t io n S c a nnin g S ys t em A me nd e d p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: No n e P r o je c ts t o b e d e l e t e d: No n e A l l co n cer n e d ci t izen s a r e in v i t e d t o a p u b lic h e a r in g t o b e h e ld o n J un e 25, 2013 a t 5:00 P .M. in t h e W i l lie S p e e d B o a r d R o o m, E a s t p o in t, Flo r id a. A D ECIS I O N o n t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t t o t h e p r o j e c ts f un de d f r o m CAP IT AL O UTL A Y T AXES w i l l b e m ade a t t hi s m e et in g AMEND ED N O TI CE O F T A X FO R SCH O O L CAP IT AL O U TL A Y e S c h o o l B o a r d o f F ra n k lin C o un t y w i l l s o o n co n sider a m e a s ur e t o a m en d t h e u s e o f p r o p er t y t ax f o r t h e c a p i t a l o u t l a y p r o j e c ts p r e v io u s l y ad v er t i s e d f o r t h e 2012 t o 2013 s c h o o l y e a r. N e w p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: NE W AND REP L A CEMENT EQ UIPMENT C O MPUTERS AND ELECTR O NI C LEARNIN G D E VI CES AND ENTERP RIS E RESO UR CE SO FT W ARE M a n a g em en t I nf o r m a t io n S ys t em s S o wa r e E le c t r o nic R e co r d s R et en t io n S c a nnin g S ys t em MAINTEN AN CE, REN O V A TI O N, AND REP AIR R es ur facin g o f G y mn a si um Flo o r A me nd e d p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: No n e P r o je c ts t o b e d e l e t e d: P A Y MENT S FO R RENTIN G AND LEA S IN G ED UCA TI O N AL F A CILITIES AND S ITES P a y m en t f o r FCS B a yside En v ir o nm en t a l L a b A l l co n cer n e d ci t izen s a r e in v i t e d t o a p u b lic h e a r in g t o b e h e ld o n J un e 25, 2013 a t 5:00 P .M. in t h e W i l lie S p e e d B o a r d R o o m, E a s t p o in t, Flo r id a. A D ECIS I O N o n t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t t o t h e p r o j e c ts f un de d f r o m CAP IT AL O UTL A Y T AXES w i l l b e m ade a t t hi s m e et in g Special to the Times Thirty-ve eighth graders at the Apala chicola Bay Charter School were given an emotional farewell before a packed Chap man Auditorium June 6, as they prepared to enter high school in the fall. The soaring ceremony was conducted by ABC Middle School teachers Tara Ward, Melanie Copeland, Anna Keel and Tanya Joanos, along with Principal Chi mene Johnson and Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin. Graduates honored in the pinning cer emony included Jayla Alley, Eve Bond, Co rie Cates, Holly Chambers, Cash Creamer, Greyson Creamer, Emily Crosby, Logan Crosby, Tia Cummings, Max Davis, Landon Flowers, Jaylon Gainer, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bianca Huber, Robert Kilgore, Allie Kirvin, Mikayla Lloyd, Zack May, Austin McKee, Alexis O’Neal, Tyler Pendleton, Astrid Ramirez, Corbin Rest er, Alexis Segree, Alyssa Shiver, Mallorie Shiver, Anna Smith, Katy Spann, Marshall Sweet, Tony Taunton, Ali Valenzuela, KK Wilson and Emily Zingarelli. Students who received all A’s all year included Alley, Cates, Lloyd, O’Neal and Ramirez. Students on the A/B Honor Roll all year included Segree, Valenzuela, Mal lorie Shiver, Kirvin, Alyssa Shiver, Huber, Gainer, Creamer, Spann, Chambers, Em ily Crosby, Cummings, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Howard and Bobby Kilgore. Special to the Times The 2013-14 grant cycle for non-prots groups interested in applying for Franklin County Tourist Development Council (TDC) marketing assistance opened on June 13. Interested applicants are en couraged to ll out an application online at www.saltyorida.com/ grants prior to the grant cycle deadline of June 30. This year’s marketing pro gram differs from the past. Beginning this fall, non-prot groups looking to the TDC for help in promoting their events and activities will be able to tap into a marketing pool of more than $300,000 to help promote lo cal nonprot events. The plan, developed by the TDC and approved by the county commission earlier this spring, would combine event promotion funds with funds used to promote the Franklin County brand and would enable local organizations to benet from the full marketing resources of the TDC instead of the previous grant program that parceled out small allocations to individual groups for marketing. Eligible non-prot groups would also be eligible to receive a package of marketing services that could include print design, video and web-based marketing specically designed for their event. According to TDC Administra tor Curt Blair, the proposed plan is scheduled to go into effect this fall and is intended to provide an equal playing eld for all eligible event promotion requests as it will allow the TDC to pool its marketing resources to purchase advertising in bulk from media in proven geo-demographic mar kets as well as specically tar geted outlets. “We expect this plan will allow us to make bigger ad buys and reach more people than would be possible from individual grant promoters working with small advertising budgets,” he said. Non-prots groups interested in applying for Franklin County TDC marketing assistance may ll out an application online at www.saltyorida.com/grants Eligible applicants would be entered into the pool of events promoted as part of the TDC’s countywide event advertising program. The deadline to participate in the 2013-14 grant program is June 30. Notication of award will be sent to successful applicants by July 19 pending approval by the TDC grant committee at its July 17 meeting. If non-prots choose to forgo the marketing pool package, groups may continue to apply for small $500 stipends, said Blair. Since its inception in 2005, Franklin County’s tourist tax has generated more than $9 million in revenue used for promotion of events and activities. TDC polls marketing funds for grant recipients Eighth graders soar from ABC School DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The ABC School eight graders prepare to soar. Corbin Rester was among the 35 ABC eight graders. Kacey Howard gets pinned.

PAGE 8

A8 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 `= =G S=Y B ODI E B o d i e i s a 9 w e ek o l d L a b r a do r R e t r i e v e r w i t h a s p l as h of C a t a h o u l a H i s one b l ue e y e a nd m e r l e c o l o r e d l e g s m a k e h i m a v e r y u n iq ue a nd a p p e a l i n g l o o k i n g p up B e s ide s b e i n g u n iq ue l y a do r a b l e he i s a l s o v e r y s w e e t a nd p l a y f u l C om e me e t t h i s c u t i e a nd a l l t he o t he r p e r f e c t l y w onde r f u l a n i m a l s wa i t i n g f o r t he i r f o r e v e r h om e a t t he a do pt i on c e n t e r! V O L U N T EER S A RE D E S P ER A T EL Y N EED ED T O S O C I A LI Z E A LL O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e npe t s o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Society By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Eastpoint artist Joyce Estes is inspired by both the natural and spiritual world to create lovely de signs with silk and dye. Estes has been creating silk paintings for more than 30 years. Although silk painting has been an art form in the Far East for about 2,000 years, it appeared in Europe in the early 1800s. It was not widely known in the US until the 1970s, so Estes was among the rst North American silk painters and an early member of Silk Paint ers International (SPIN). Today, she both wearable and liturgical silk art and is the presi dent of SPIN. “I started painting when I an swered an ad and traveled to Bal timore to study with Diane Tuck man, founder of SPIN. Tuckman coauthored the rst English lan guage book on silk painting with Jan Janas,” Estes said. “ I call her a little Jewish bulldog. Once she gets hold of you, she doesn’t let go.” Works by Estes will be featured in Tuckman’s next publication. Estes said she did not take her work in silk seriously, at rst, but now she is on a mission to have silk painting recognized as a ne art form, not dismissed as a craft. To this end, as president of SPIN she is reaching out to other textile artists, especially those in the South, to explore silk art. “Quilters and other textile art ists need to understand that they are welcome to join SPIN. The one requirement is that 75 percent of a textile project consists of silk,” said Estes. One way she is seeking to ex pand membership is by hosting a minifestival for SPIN at the LeMoyne Gallery in Tallahassee. “The big annual silk show is al ways held in Santa Fe, New Mexi co because most silk artists are in California or New York and Santa Fe is a major center for the arts,” she said. Estes said the Tallahassee event, sanctioned by the SPIN board, will be held August 7 through 11. There will be a recep tion on August 9 and an accompa nying exhibition at LeMoyne will hang Aug. 2-31. You can get more information about the festival, vis it www.lemoyne.org Estes work reects her love of nature. A new series of oral designs with string lilies, dragonies and magnolias was inspired by paddle trips with the Apalachicola River keepers ”Fourth Saturday” paddle program. Another powerful source of ar tistic inspiration is her faith. Estes began creating liturgical art to hang behind the altars of the Apalachicola/St. George Island United Methodist Church Coop erative Parish. She soon added stoles for women ministers to her repertoire. A devout churchwoman, her work caught the attention of the governing members of the UMC church and she is now the ofcial artist and artistic chair for the group’s General Conference. She has designed silk hangings for prayer gardens, created as aids to meditation for attendees at large church gatherings. Last year, Es tes attended all ve regional juris dictional conferences to promote prayer gardens, which are actu ally a series of meditation stations created around a central altar to provoke thought. For the 2012 General Confer ence of the United Methodist Church in Tampa, Estes created altar draperies centered around a “Vortex of Creation” using 70 yards of silk. The actual physical work of dyeing the hangings took a month but she said creating the design took much longer. Estes said she begins a work with plain white silk, stretched on a Moyer frame and treated with sizing. From there, the technique varies and new techniques are be ing developed every day. “It’s a ne art and people need to realize that,” said Estes. “We need to get organized to share with one another.” Caro-Walden shower July 13 There will be a baby shower in honor of Alexis Caro and Brennan Walden on Saturday, July 13 at 6 p.m. at the First Assembly of God Fellowship Hall in Carrabelle. The shower will be hosted by Donna Bar ber and Denise Massey. Please come and help us to prepare to welcome home baby boy A’Brailyn Bren nan Walden. Wheeler twins’ shower June 29 Two by Two, Twins are due, And we are tick led pink and blue! Please join us for a twin baby shower honoring Tanja Jewell Wheeler at the First Assembly of God Church, 307 Third Street NW, Carrabelle on Saturday, June 29 at 3 p.m. Registered at Burlington and Wal-Mart. All friends and family are invited. Twice the blessing, twice the love, Two little miracles sent from above Myra Ponder, left, receives engraved crystal vase from Carrie Frye. Ponder honored at educators’ state convention The Florida (Mu) State Organization of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International held its state convention at the Orlando Airport Marriott Hotel from April 19 to 21. Ofcers were elected for the 2013-2015 biennium and Myra Ponder, who has been treasurer for the state organization since 2003, was given a very spe cial gift by the outgoing president, Carrie Frye. Frye presented her with an engraved crystal vase at the Celebration Banquet on Saturday, April 20. Ponder has worked with the treasurers of the 94 Florida chapters during the 10-year period she has served as state treasurer. Myra’s husband Charles was able to attend as well as Arlene Oehler and her husband, Paul. Delta Kappa Gamma is an international organi zation of more than 94,000 educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Anna Rose Timm was inspired by the beauty of the Apalachicola River and Bay to clean up her own river back in Georgia. Day Magee and her son Davis met Timm when Davis was only 7 years old and Anna was 10. Davis was having trouble learning to read and Anna’s father, Scott Timm, was a reading facilitator. Scott, who suffered from a learning disorder himself, left a successful career in transportation to become a reading coach. At 7, Davis was the youngest student Scott had accepted but the boy made spectacular progress. Day Magee said Scott was the catalyst that turned Davis’ studies around. Scott became an important part of Davis’ life, attending sports events and school conferences. The next year, Day invited Scott and his family to use her beach house for a week and, in exchange, Scott mentored Davis. The Magees and the Timms became fast friends and Anna Rose and her parents have returned at least once a year since. Anna Rose, Davis and Scott loved to visit the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Center (ANERR) and participated in International Coastal Cleanup Day on the island for several years. Scott and Anna Rose also volunteered for Estuary Day. “She’s always been conscious of litter and picked things up when we were at the beach,” Scott Timm said. Anna Rose is now 18 and graduated from high school this year. Each of the students in her class carried out a senior project. Inspired by ANERR and her love of the natural world, Anna Rose chose to host her own environmental initiative. With help from about 30 friends, Timm organized a clean-up of the Little River, a tributary of the Etowah, in Georgia, north of Atlanta. Scott Timm said she recruited volunteers, procured supplies and even arranged for lunch to be served when the work was done. Anna Rose has been accepted by the University of Georgia and plans a career in environmental engineering. Inspired by the river Creamer inducted into Phi Kappa Phi honor society The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is pleased to an nounce that Jonathan Creamer, of Apalachicola, was recently initiated into Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all aca demic disciplines. Creamer will earn a master’s of arts in physical edu cation in July 2013 from the University of South Florida, where he has maintained a 4.0 grade point average. A 1999 graduate of Apalachicola High School, Cream er is the son of Ray Creamer and Terri Pridgen, both of Apalachicola. In 2012, he graduated from Florida State University with a bachelor’s of science in social science and educa tion. Creamer was inducted into both the Garnet Key and Golden Key honor societies. Creamer is among approximately 32,000 students, fac ulty, professional staff and alumni to be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation and re quires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff, and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction. Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine and head quartered in Baton Rouge, La., Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective all-discipline honor society. The society has chapters on more than 300 col lege and university campuses in North America and the Philippines. Since its founding, more than 1 million members have been initiated. Some of the organization’s more no table members include former President Jimmy Carter, NASA astronaut Wendy Lawrence, novelist David Bal dacci and YouTube cofounder Chad Hurley. The society has awarded approximately $15 million since the incep tion of its awards program in 1932. Today, $1 million is awarded each biennium to qualifying students and mem bers through graduate fellowships, undergraduate study abroad scholarships, member and chapter awards and grants for local and national literacy initiatives. For more information, visit www.PhiKappaPhi.org JOYCE ESTES | Special to the Times A silk painting created by Estes for the SPIN conference held each year in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Spiritual inspiration fuels Estes’ silk designs Baby SHOWERS ANN aA R oseOSE TIMM LOI I S SWOBODA | The Times Joyce Estes displays a piece of her wearable art. JOYCE ESTES | Special to the Times The ora and fauna of the Panhandle inspire much of Estes’ work.

PAGE 9

The Times | A9 Thursday, June 20, 2013 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith ZEMER LEVAV TO PERFORM SATURDAY Zemer Levav, which means Song of the Heart, is a messianic Jewish music ministry that will be in concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at First Baptist Church of St. George Island, 501 E. Bayshore Drive. Zemer Levav sets Biblical lyrics to music with a folksy Celtic and Sephardic Jewish avor. Choreographer Shimrit Hanes weaves Israeli dance into this familys music, which creates a unique worship experience. The Hanes family has been traveling and playing music professionally for more than 10 years. They play guitar, harp, lyre, oud, utes and Middle Eastern percussion.F IR S T BAPTI S T BI BL E SCHOO L S TART S M ONDAY The First Baptist Church of Apalachicola, 46 Ninth St. will have Vacation Bible School from 6-8:30 p.m. June 24-28. The theme is Colossal Coaster World 2 Timothy 1:7. There will be fun songs to learn, fun crafts to make, delicious snacks and exciting Bible stories to hear. Charles Ernest Gay, 89, of Carrabelle, passed away on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Tallahassee. He was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. He was a member of Carrabelle First Baptist Church. He was a former school board member of Franklin County. He was a retired boat captain and sherman. He also retired from Florida State University Marine Biology Laboratory. He will always be remembered as a wonderful husband, father, grandfather and solider. He was an Army veteran, serving in World War II. He is survived by his wife, Della Gay, of Carrabelle; a son: Mickey Gay (Jackie), of Carrabelle; three daughters, Clara Moeck, of San Diego, Calif., Patsy Putnal (Bevin) of Carrabelle, and Tina Varnes (Michael), of Pascagoula, Miss.; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. He was predeceased in death by his rst wife, Myrt Gay; and his parents, Howard and Clara Gay. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements.Charles Ernest Gay CHARLES ERNEST GAY Alonzo M. Lonnie Cooper, age 87, passed away Sunday, June 16, 2013, after a short illness in Panama City. Born May 6, 1926, he was a lifelong resident of Apalachicola. He was a World War II veteran, having served in the Air Force as a B-24 gunner and military police. After the military years, he briey lived in Texas, where he met his loving wife, Dorothy, and they shared 53 years together. Lonnie was a retired shrimp boat captain and enjoyed his retirement years working in his yard. Other than his wife, Dorothy, he is survived by his twin brother, Levy Cooper, of Apalachicola; and devoted niece, Betty Davis (Larry), of Tallahassee. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Tuesday, June 18, graveside in Magnolia Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handling all arrangements.Alonzo Lonnie Cooper First of all, I would like to thank the two men who helped me up after my tumble last week. Oh yeah, I couldnt have fallen at home on the carpet, I had to fall on the concrete. Im a little skinned up but otherwise alright. Thanks again, guys. Did you get to enjoy the full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club last Saturday? I just know you did. Then there was the June Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 last Saturday evening. The place should have been rocking. A nice crowd of us gathered at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. Hope you can join us next month on Sunday, July 20. All you need to bring is a dish to share, a donation and your empty stomach. Be lookin for you! Keep the following in your prayers: Earnest Gay, Margaret Stitts, Ernie Harmsen and Carl Swenson. Pray for the repose of their souls and for strength and comfort for their families. Ernie Harmsen passed away Wednesday, June 13. His family and Janice Rhinehart were at his bedside. Cards may be sent to Janice Rhinehart, and Ernies family, 100 Charlotte Place, Fayetteville, GA 30215. Janice will be back in Lanark in October. Margaret Stitts was a longtime snowbird from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Her home here was on Pine Street. She was a very ne lady and a good friend and neighbor. Those of us who were close to her will miss her a lot. Margaret, family and friends had celebrated her 98th birthday on Thursday, May 16, and the angels took her home on Monday, May 20. Ernest Gay was a gentleman and a scholar and a good friend and neighbor. There is a big empty spot in Carrabelle and the area. Carl Swenson was taken up on Saturday, June 16. Carl and his wife, Dorothy, lived in the village for a long time on Parker Avenue. He was always there to pitch in and help. He will be missed by many. Attention, all of you who rip up and down Oak Street like you were Kyle Busch at Daytona. The posted speed limit is 20 mph. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, volunteers make it happen; become one today! Keep smiling you may not feel better, but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 lswoboda@star.com Jennifer Duncan loves to sing the old songs. When she croons forgotten melodies, she awakens memories of lost loves and youthful pleasures. Duncan is a songbird with a specialty. She sings the songs of the 1930s and 40s to the original Big Band arrangements that made swing music great. She is also a historian who can recount the stories behind the songs she loves to sing. On June 8, Duncan visited the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum and before a captivated audience, performed the music of the war years. Duncan performs for reunions and other functions. Years ago, she was asked to learn the Nat King Cole hit (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons for a Valentines Day banquet. She grew up with a musical mother and a father who was a veteran of both World War II and Korea. She found herself moved by the songs and by the audiences warm reception of the old music. Around the same time, her husband asked her what she wanted for her birthday. I want my music, she replied, meaning the music she grew up with in the 1970s and 80s. It was then she realized what a powerful gift the music of youth can be. It takes people back and helps them recapture their happiest times, she said. People are so surprised when they hear me sing the songs from World War II. They ask me, How do you know that? She said she once entertained at a Christmas party and was told not to expect too much enthusiasm from her elderly audience. They got up and started dancing! Duncan said. It doesnt matter if your knees are bad and your back hurts. Sometimes, you have to get up and dance because the music makes you feel so good. Duncan increased her repertoire of swing tunes and romantic ballads from the early 20th century and now frequently performs at high school and veterans reunions. She has also entertained during breakfast at ve Honor Flights that embarked from Columbus, Ga. The Honor Flight Network is a nonprot organization that transports veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit and reect at their memorials. Recently, Duncan performed about a dozen songs for an audience, beginning with the romantic ballad I Only Have Eyes for You from the 1934 musical Dames. Performing with recordings of the original Big Band arrangements, she treated listeners to songs including Summertime, When You Wish Upon a Star and God Bless America. The audience joined in singing the patriotic anthem. The early arrangements contain stretches of instrumental music to showcase soloists in the band. During these musical interludes, Duncan recounted tales about the songs and the era that created and loved them. She nished the set with (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons, which drew rousing applause. A resident of Columbus, Ga., Duncans family has been traveling to St. George Island for almost 40 years. She said they come in the summer to enjoy the beach, and now that the children are grown, she and her husband return every December to celebrate their wedding anniversary. Red Anthony Family To the family and many friends of the late D. Fred Red Anthony, we wish to extend our sincere thanks for your many kindnesses, prayers, condolences, owers, cards, food and visits. We are sincerely grateful to Ginny Griner and Charles Thompson for the music presented at Reds funeral service. We also send our gratitude and appreciation to the members and clergy of Fort Gaines Baptist Church and Fellowship Baptist Church of Apalachicola. Please know that these acts of kindness and sympathy continue to be a great comfort to us in our time of sorrow. Annette Anthony and the whole Anthony family Card of THANKS Obituaries Faith BRIEFS Prayers for those who touched Lanark community LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh She sings for sentimental reasons A TRIP TO REMEMBERL OI S S WO B ODA | The Times Jennifer Duncan performs at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum on June 8.L OI S S WO B ODA | The Times On June 8, World War II veteran Bob Franklin of Lanark Village shared a photo album of his trip to the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., with Linda Minichiello. Franklin made the trip in May accompanied by his son Ken, along with 80 other WWII vets. E A S TPOINT BAPTI S T BI BL E SCHOO L S TART S M ONDAY The First Baptist Church of Eastpoint will have Vacation Bible School on June 24-28. Children ages 3 and up are invited, starting with a free dinner at 5:30 p.m. daily. The VBS sessions have a Colossal Coaster World theme and will be 6-8:30 p.m. at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint.

PAGE 10

The mimosa, Albizia julibrissin, is also known as Persian silk tree, pink silk tree, pink siris, Lenkoran acacia and bastard tamarind, and is a member of the bean family. In China, where it originated, it is known as the “sleeping tree” because the delicate, fernlike leaves fold when contacted and after sunset. Mimosa is widely employed as a garden ornamental. The seeds are food for livestock and wildlife and the fragrant owers are attractive to bees and butter ies. Mimosa is a deciduous tree that can grow 20 to 40 feet tall. It is a shortlived tree that grows about twice as broad as it is tall in specimen plants. It is capable of xing nitrogen and improving the soil where it grows. The bark is light brown and smooth while young stems are lime green in color. Each leaf is composed of 20 to 60 lea ets giving the tree a feathery appearance. Mimosa owering occurs from May through July. Its uffy owers are generally pink although white and cream varieties are known. Cultivar ‘Summer Chocolate’ has red foliage ageing to dark bronze, with pale pink owers. ‘Ishii Weeping’ has a drooping growth habit. Unfortunately, mimosa is highly invasive because of the tremendous amount of seed produced. Since its introduction 250 years ago, it has spread over most of North America. Its dense foliage, shades out native plants. Efforts are underway to breed trees that will not set seed. Also on the downside, mimosa is prone to fungal disease, especially in warmer climates and many consider the tree to be messy since it sheds both leaves and owers over a long period of the year. Mimosa bark is sometimes called “happiness bark” in traditional and herbal medicine because it is said to act as an antidepressant. The bark is also used to treat in ammation, abscesses and swelling. The shredded bark is sometimes found in oriental markets and health food stores. "$ # # COME JOIN US FOR THE . 4 TH OF JUL Y SIDEW ALK SALE! By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The 425 anglers who shed in the 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic battled rough seas. Matt Lambert, chairman of the tournament, said several captains ended the day early on Saturday, with fewer sh weighed than last year. “We still weighed a lot of sh though,” said Lambert. Paul Osterbye, who shes out of Carrabelle every weekend, said his team experienced six to eight foot waves for most of the day Saturday. Rough water didn’t dampen everyone’s enthusiasm. Osterbye’s 7year-old granddaughter, Jaylyn Middleton, still managed to haul in more than 50 sh although none made it onto the leaderboard. It was a real Father’s Day tournament this year. Osterbye shed with his son Danny who is not quite as old as the venerable tourney. Danny Osterbye began competing in the Juniors Division some years ago. His weekend featured seasickness, and snagging his hair in his line while reeling in a king mackerel. Ouch! Danny caught the same mackerel twice. Having dropped it while of oading at the Moorings, he dove in the drink to retrieve the big bruiser and slashed his palm on barnacles in the process. Also shing as a team were Mike, Gage and Riley Runyan, of Crawfordville. Daddy Mike was glowing with pride during the Junior Division awards as he watched both boys receive medals in their rst tournament.. Nine-year-old Gage took rst place for a 17.3 pound snapper that set a record for the juniors, the only record set in this year’s competition. Little brother Riley hauled in a snapper that weighed nearly 11 pounds to win third place. Mateo La Sorsa, of Orlando, shing in the Junior Division for the second time, maintained his rst place status for grouper for the second year and took additional medals for snapper, king mackerel and Spanish mackerel. Marilyn and Gary Lawhon of Carrabelle took rst and third place respectively for ounder in the Recreational Division. Team Big sh SGI was fourth on the leaderboard for the Masters Division with 250 points and Capt. Clint Taylor took rst place for snapper with a 21-pound beauty, and third for king mackerel with a sh that tipped the scales at 24.5 pounds. This year, the tournament changed its venue for the rst time since 2006. The competition was staged from the Moorings, the site of the original competition. “The Moorings is where we started and, for our silver anniversary, we thought we would like to get back to our roots,” Lambert said. “It’s a great space and a great staff.” He said he plans to stage the competition at the Moorings again next year with very few changes. On Sunday, the Franklin County All-stars AA baseball team passed the hat and helped out at the charity sh auction. Proceeds from the auction will help pay the boys’ way to Florida Dixie Youth Baseball State Tournament at Wildwood on June 29. Members of the Seahawks varsity football team also lent a hand in this year’s tourney working in shifts throughout the competition. Lambert said in spite of having fewer sh to offer, the auction netted more than last year, and raised more than $1,000 for the young athletes. Voice stress analysis employed Another change in this year’s competition was the introduction of voice stress analysis to spot check anglers and prevent the propagation of sh tales. According to Lambert, the tournament has used polygraph equipment for at least the four years he has served on the board. The voice stress analysis was used to screen potential polygraph subjects. He said the tests are given over the phone and must be performed in a silent room. The time required for the process slowed the processing of winners slightly this year. “We have always done spot checks and performed tests when the angler or sh was suspect. (Voice stress analysis) saves the tournament some money,” said Lambert. “Polygraph tests are more expensive. We just want to make sure the integrity of the tournament is intact. People will cheat if you let them. We try not to let them. “ Lambert said an angler who refuses a spot test will not receive his or her check but added that the tournament has never had to withhold payment. As always, the Saltwater Classic bene ted the Organization for Arti cial Reefs (OAR). Founded in 1985, OAR serves the recreational saltwater shing industry of Florida’s Big Bend Gulf Coast by promoting the professional development of public arti cial reefs. Since 1987, OAR has created or enhanced over 30 named reefs in the Big Bend Gulf. OAR collaborates with cities and counties as well as state and federal governments to create and maintain arti cial reefs. OAR also collaborates with marine research agencies, other arti cial reef groups, and the academic community. High seas hamper Saltwater Classic Mimosa is beautiful but an aggressive invasive species Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, June 20, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Red snapper continues to be the best bet in offshore fishing right now and will be until the season closes on June 28th in Federal waters. Big snapper are holding on near shore and offshore wrecks from 60-150ft of water. Live bait will prove to be the best for bigger fish, however snapper will eat cut bait as well. Try fishing 20 feet off the bottom with a live grunt or pinfish for a trophy red snapper. As the summer time weather patterns start to set in, bay fishing will be a game of early and late. Early morning top water action will produce nice trout and redfish catches. Late afternoon fishing will be mainly live bait and grubs and jigs and as the water cools down, try switching back to a top water hard bait for a trophy red fish or trout. Flounder are showing up in the normal places this week from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu June 20 87 75 30 % F ri, June 21 86 75 40 % S a t June 22 87 75 30 % Sun, June 23 87 76 40 % M on, June 24 88 76 20 % T ues June 25 88 77 20 % W ed June 26 87 77 60 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Proud dad, Mike Runyan displays the prize-winning snapper caught by sons Gage, left, and Riley. Gage’s sh set a tournament record for the Junior Division at 17.3 pounds; Riley’s weighed a respectable 10.65 pounds.

PAGE 11

N O TI CE O F CH AN GE O F RE-ZO NIN G e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g p ur s u a n t t o S e c t io n 163.3184, Flo r id a S t a t u t es, t o co n sider ado p t in g p r o p os e d c h a n g es t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y Z o nin g M a ps s er ies f o r : L o ts 1, 2, 3, 4 a n d L o t 5, B lo c k 9, U ni t 1 E a s t, S t. G e o r g e I s l a n d F ra n k lin C o un t y Flo r id a t o b e r e-zo n e d f r o m C-2 C o mm er ci a l B u sin es s t o C-4 C o mm er ci a l M ix e d U s e A p u b lic h e a r in g o n t h e p r o p os e d c h a n g es t o t h e Z o nin g M a p s er ies w i l l b e h e ld o n T ues d a y J u l y 2, 2013, a t 10:15 a.m., a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex in A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a. M o r e inf o r m a t io n m a y b e in s p e c t e d a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a, T e lep h o n e (850) 653-9783. P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n a t t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, S ui t e 203, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g s h o u ld m a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts t o a s s ur e t h a t a v erb a t im r e co r d i s m ade in c l udin g t es t im o n y a n d e v iden ce if a n y u p o n w hic h t h e a p p e a l i s t o b e b a s e d PUB LIS H D A TE: ur s d a y J un e 20, 2013 CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 20, 2013 A Page 11 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A crew of energetic young boys, ages 7 and 8, are headed to the state tourney in Wildwood next week, after they won their district tournament in Gulf County last week. The Franklin County All-Stars AA Division team, in an age bracket where the players hit off the pitching machine, won the District 4 championship in Port St. Joe June 10. The team went undefeated and now advances to the state tournament on Friday, June 28 in Wildwood. Head Coach Eddie Moses said the team downed Wewahitchka 18-6 on June 7, and then defeated Port St. Joe 169 on June 8, and again 16-11 on June 10. The assistant coaches are Ricky Abercrombie, Bobby Varnes, and Timmy Poloronis. “Going undefeated was a major feat,” Moses said. “I cannot recall it ever being done, and we’ve been doing it 7-8 years. We have a very talented little baseball team right now.” Moses said brackets for the state tourney will soon be announced, once the other districts have all nished their play. The state event is a double-elimination tournament. “You stay until you’re eliminated, or you win it all,” he said. The county commission on Tuesday gave the team $2,500 for the state tourney, similar to the $2,500 they gave to each of the other three All-Star teams. The team, which has held multiple fundrasiers, raised a nice chunk last week at the Big Bend Saltwater Classic. Moses said the AA and AAA All-Stars both assisted in the fundraiser. “The boys were actually dockmasters, from the boats to the weigh stations, then in the auction Sunday,” said Moses. In AA baseball, where the games last six innings, players are served up ve total pitches, and there are no walks. “You swing at three strikes and you’re out but you can let one pass,” said Moses. AA All-Stars headed to Wildwood SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The Franklin County AAA All-Star Team, managed by Justin Odom, and coached by Lanny Rester and Bert Davis, won the AAA district crown for 9 and 10 year olds June 11 in Port St. Joe. They are now headed to the AAA state tourney July 13 in Freeport. Pictured above are teammates Carson Davis, Gage Boone, Clint Rester, Colin Amison, Caleb Abel, Caden Turrell, Joshua Odom, Lamarius Martin, Tanner Amison, Ashton Topham, Devin Daniels and Kelson Smith. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Friday, June 7, 12 teams squared off at St. James Bay Golf Resort to compete in the Franklin and Wakulla County Sheriffs’ Of ce Golf Tournament. Forty-six players participated in the event. Team Centennial Bank Wally Dodson, Dustin Grubbs, Larry Tromley and David Hoover won the day in the best ball tourney and walked away with a $500 purse. A tie for second place between Team Duke Energy and Team Coastline, both shooting 56, was broken in a scorecard playoff and Team Duke Energy walked with the $300 second place purse with Coastline nishing third for a $200 purse. Tony Sapp and Bruce Ashley, the only two-man team, won four shing poles for nishing “dead ass last” with a score of 75. David Hoover was on his game. In addition to playing on the winning team, he was closest to the pin on holes 6 and 11. Conner Smith was closest on hole 2 and Warren Roddenberry on hole 17. Each won a free round of golf. Tyler Poloronis and Connor Smith each won a $50 gift certi cate for the Crooked River Grill for the longest drive on holes 7 and 18 respectively. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce was represented by the team of Capt. Brad Segree, Brock Johnson, Robbie Johnson and Brett Johnson. The event was organized with help from St. James Bay’s capable new golf pro, Rob Burlison. Burlison hails from Greene, a small town in upstate New York. He was 9 when he rst took up clubs following in the steps of his parents. He attended Broome Community College and the Golf Academy of the South in Altamont Springs. He has played competitive golf for 20 years. He was assistant pro at St. James Bay from 2004 to 2008. “I love the area and enjoy our owner,” Burlison said. “The facility itself is beautiful. When I got the opportunity to come back, I jumped. I returned in Dec. 2012.” Proceeds from the tourney bene t the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches whose mission is to prevent delinquency and develop strong, lawful, resilient, and productive citizens through a fourfold philosophy of work, study, play and pray. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Team Centennial takes sheriff’s ranch tourney SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Members of the Franklin County AA All-Stars are, front row, from left, Jabara Pearson, Mason Moses, Cody Abercrombie, Owen Poloronis, Dax Chitty and Marcus Clayton. Middle row, from left, is Ethan Kembro, Wil Varnes, John Michael Thompson, Weston Bockelman, Evan Stanley, and Wyatt Abercrombie. AAA ALL-STARS GOING TO STATE GOLF TOURNAMENT WINNERS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The winning team, from Centennial Bank, was represented by Wally Dodson, Dustin Grubbs, Larry Tromley and David Hoover.

PAGE 12

T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % GET YOUR AD IN TRADES & SER VICES CALL TODA Y! 653-8868 Sports A12 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 Franklin County’s ball elds have new mascots. Three-foot tall baseballs are now on display at each of the county’s three ball elds. Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender said she had noticed an oversized baseball by US 98 in St. James and told her mother she wanted similar ornaments for the ball elds. Her mother was bearwatching in Lanark one day and happened on a second big ball in the yard of Albert Smythe. She asked him about the ball and he gave it to her. Millender had the ball painted with a Seahawk at Sign Design in Eastpoint and placed it at the entrance to Kendrick Field. Later, Millender noticed a truck in the yard of the home where she had seen the original ball. On impulse, she pulled in and Ray Miller welcomed her into his home and gave her two more balls. Miller acquired the balls after they were part of a failed fundraiser for the Atlanta Braves. Millender said one of the balls is also on display at Turner Field in Atlanta. By Lois Swoboda LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LET’ sS P laLA Y ballBALL FR aA NK liLI N SCH oolOOL T oO H osOS T G olfOLF T oO URNEY Play golf to support the students at the Franklin County Schools golf tournament. Tee time is 1 p.m. June 28 at St. James Bay Golf Resort Prizes for rst, second and third places will be a cash payout. For sponsor questions contact Shannon Venable at 670-2810, ext. 4105 or svenable@ franklin.k12.fl.us. For tournament questions, contact Burlison at 6979606 or rob@stjamesbay. com.STU dD ENT aA TH lL ETE sS sS EEK assis ASSIS T a A NCE Two graduating seniors are seeking donations as they prepare to take part in summer athletic teams. David Butler will attend the USA Junior Basketball National in Columbus, Ohio, on July 8. Skyler Hutchinson will attend the Under Armour Baseball Nationals Omaha, Neb., on July 22. To help Butler or Hutchinson, contact Michael Sweatt at sweattfamu@hotmail. com, 566-3434 or 899-1742. Sports b B R iI E fsFS A12 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91374T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192012CA000348CAXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 26, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000348CA XXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, is the Plaintiff and JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON; CENTENNIAL BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on July 10, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND IN THE N.E. OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 27, T8S, R8W HEREBY FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY INTERSECTION (CON.MON.) OF TWO PROPOSED 66 FOOT ROADS, 1765 FEET DUE NORTH AND 218.5 FEET WEST OF THE S.W. CORNER (CON.MON.) OF THE N.E. OF SAID SECTION 27, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE ROAD, 144 FEET TO A PONT FOR BEGINNING; RUN THENCE, CONTINUING ALONG ROAD, 200 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE CREEK; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG CREEK TO A POINT NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST OF THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES WEST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-08104 June 13, 20, 2013 91430T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-000087-CA CIRCUITCIVILDIVISION SUPERIOR BANK, f/k/a THE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. SMITH; MICHAELL. HAMMOND; and CARRAWAYBAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that in accordance with the 3ODLQWLIIV)LQDO-XGJ PHQWRI)RUHFORVXUH entered on May 28th, 2013 in above-styled FDXVH,ZLOOVHOOWRWKH KLJKHVWDQGEHVWELGGHU IRUFDVKRQ-XO\WK 2013 at 11:00 A.M.(CST), at the )UDQNOLQ&RXQW\&RXUW KRXVHORFDWHGDW Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 for WKHIROORZLQJGHVFULEHG property: Lot 51, Carraway Bay 3ODQWDWLRQDFFRUGLQJWR the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat %RRN3DJHRI WKH3XEOLF5HFRUGVRI )UDQNOLQ&RXQW\)ORU ida. Property Address: Lot 51 Carraway Bay Plantation, Carrabelle, FL 32322 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: May 31, 2013 MARCIAM. JOHNSON, FRANKLIN COUNTY CIRCUITCOURT By: Michele Maxwell 'HSXW\&OHUN -XQH 91446T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.12000377CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CARLTON JACKSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RICKY R. REGIST A/K/A RICKY R. REGISTER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICKY R. REGIST RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5553 SPRING HILL ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32305 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 1 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 2, BLOCK ‘128’ (E-10), OF PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the The Apalachicola Times. DATED: March 6, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File No. 33981 June 20, 27, 2013 91514T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice its issuance of a permit (File Number 19-0315851001EI) to St George Cara Bay, LLC/William Vester, c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc. P.O. Box 385, Apalachicola, FL 32329 to construct a breakwater 66 linear foot with two fishery corridors on each end, within the landward extent of St George Sound, a Class II, and Outstanding Florida Waterbody. Breakwater is to be installed no more than 10’ waterward of Mean High Water. The permittee is also required to plant Spartina alterniflora 1 foot centers behind the breakwater located at 1155 Russell Way, Lot 1, Cara Bay Estates, Section 29, Township 09 South 06 West on St George Island, Franklin County, Florida, in St George Sound, Class II, OFW in St George Island, Florida. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. Petitions must be filed within 21 days of publication of this notice. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd MS 55, Tallahassee, Florida

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, June 20, 2013 The Times | A13 Rowell Auctions, Inc. 800-323-8388 RowellAuctions.com ell Auctions, Inc 0 0-323-8388 we llA uc ti o n s.co m 10% Buyers Premium € AU 479, AB 296For Additional Property Information Visit RowellAuctions.com AUCTION ONLINE ONLY € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation Ro we ellAuctionsInc For Additional Proper t ty Information Visit ns.com RowellAuctio n € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation A AU AU C C T O I O N ONLINE ONLY LINEONLY Bidding Ends Wed., June 26th, 2pmSubject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature 9 Bank Owned Properties GA & FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL € € € T € T € T €T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T €T T T T T ier ier ier ier ier er er er ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Lt Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lt L L L Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot ot ot € Tier 1 Lot € € € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 €1 1 1 1 Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl l l Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl ock ock ock ock ock k k k ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of h th th th th th th th th th h h th th th th th th th th e e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B eB eB eB eB eB eB eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h € 1 Block of the Beach € J € € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J J J J J J ust ust ust ust t t t ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi i Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi t t t t t t t t t nut nut nut nut nut nut nut es es es es s s s s es s es es es f f f f fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro m m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m m B m B mB mB mB eau eau eau eau ea eau eau eau e t tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif l l l ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul € J ust Mi nut es from B eau tif ul G G G Gu Gu Gul Gul Gul ul G Gu G f f f C f C f C f C f C f C f C fC f C f C f C oas oas oas a oas oas oa t tF t F t F t F t F t F F F F t F F i i ish ish ish ish sh i i ing ng g ing ing ing ng ng g g g g g g & & & & & & & & & & & & Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec R rea rea rea rea rea rea re re re ti tio io tio tio n n n n n n n n n Gulf Coast Fish ing & Recreation G G G G Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul fC fC fC fC fC C C C fC fC fC fC fC fC f f oas oas oas oas oas oas oas oas t t t t tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF ish ish ih ish ih ih ih h h h ish ish ish ish ish ish ish i i ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & R R R Rec Rec Rec R R R Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec rea rea rea rea rea rea rea rea ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti tio tio tio tio tio tio tio n n n n n n n n n n n n GulfCoastFishing&Recreation 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 86 86 86 Me Me Me M Me Me Me Me Me Me Me Me rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rc ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry y y Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan L L L Lan L Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan an an e e e e e e e e e e e e e e Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por t S t S S S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S tS tS tS tS tS S t. t. t. t. t. t t. t. t t t t t t J J J Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap ap ap e e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S eS eS eS eS eS eS d d d d d d d and and and d and and and and and and and Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) FL FL FL FL FL L L L L L L L FL FL FL L FL FL FL FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL Also Available:36 Janet Drive Crawfordville (Shell Point), FL 3 Bd, 2 Ba Mobile Home 1739 Lark Lane St. George Island, FL Excellent Lot Located in the Plantation 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr. Port St. Joe, FL Excellent Home Site Pisces Dr., Santa Rosa Beach, FL -Canal Front Lot w/Dock 2090212 1112349 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ................... ............... ..................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD ................... ............... ................ $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND .............. ..... ............................ $750 1BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650 32399-3000. June 20, 2013 93941T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on July 18, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property PARCEL 1: Lot 58, PHASE 4, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION PHASES 3 AND 4, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. PARCEL 2: All of Lots 1 through 8, Block 99, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 900.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31 for 459.73 feet to the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 693.63 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West along the Western right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway for 246.99 feet, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 575.16 feet to the Point of Beginning. AND All of Lots 1 through 6, Block 100, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 1359.73 feet to the Northern right-ofway of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 743.63 feet to the Point of Beginning. From this Point of Beginning continue North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road for 300.00 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West for 126.23 feet to the Northeast corner of Lot 6, Block 100, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 317.36 feet to the Eastern right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway, thence South 19 degrees 02 minutes East for 229.74 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, INC. a/k/a GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN, INC.; JEFFERY A. DYKES; KELLY J. DYKES; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; GOLD KEY HOLDINGS, II, LLC, Defendants and the docket number of which is 2013 CA 000063 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 3rd day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 93861T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012 CA 000325 AUDIE E. LANGSTON Plaintiff, vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT Defendant NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Chris Cartwright, Defendant, and to all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against Defendant, and all parties having or claiming to have and right, title or interest in the real property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated as defendant in a legal proceeding filed against you for foreclosure on real property purchased from Audie E. Langston. The action involves real property in Franklin County, Florida, more fully described as follows: LOT 91 LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East Along the North boundary of said section 35 a distance of 2855.93 Feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 760.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING From Said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds East 40.89 feet to a point on the Northwesterly right-ofway Boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway said point lying on a curve. Concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Northeasterly along said Right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3410.00 Feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds for an arc distance of 447.51 feet, the chord of said arc being North 38 degrees 27 minutes 47 seconds East 447.19 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 319.25 feet to th POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.40 acres, more or less. The action was instituted in the Second Judicial Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida, and is styled AUDIE E. LANGSTON vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT, et al. Case No.: 2012 CA 00325. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Daniel W. Hartman, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is PO Box 10910, Tallahassee, FL 32302, on or before July 30, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Daniel W. Hartman or immediately after service, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff’s interest which will be binding upon you. DATED: April 23, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 93951T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-129 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-129 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of AUGUST, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Commence at the Northeasterly corner of Lot 1, Block 16, Unit 4, Lanark Village, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 6, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and run South 67 degrees 13 minutes 35 seconds East 261.30 feet to a point lying on the Northerly right-ofway boundary of State Road No. 30, thence run South 62 degrees 13 minutes 55 seconds West along said right of way boundary 574.40 feet to a concrete monument (marked 4261) marking the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-ofway boundary run North 27 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds West 191.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence run North 88 degrees 41 minutes 17 seconds West 164.32 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261); thence run South 15 degrees 38 minutes 56 seconds East 277.04 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261) lying on the Northwesterly right of way of State Road No. 30; thence run North 62 degrees 13 minutes, 55 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 201.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 93953T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-128 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-128 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Block B, Saint James Island Park (Unit No. 1), according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 93983T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-21-CA APALACHICOLA INTERNATIONAL AVIATION TRAINING CENTER, INC., a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE P. HAMM, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 28th day of May, 2013, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by public sale, on the 10th day of July, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 33 Market Street in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: 1981 PIPER PA-44-180, SERIAL NO. 44-8195009, FAA REGISTRATION No. N8307E, LYCOMING 0-360A1D ENGINE TOGETHER WITH ACCESSORIES AND EQUIPMENT INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL LOGBOOKS (ENGINE, AIRCRAFT AND PROPELLER), PARTS, RADIOS, AVIONICS, AND PROPELLERS. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 3rd day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 j j ADOPT j j : Actor/Director & Executive long for 1st baby to LOVE; Home cooking awaits! j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW Wanted: A place to board my horse in Franklin County. 850-274-1321 Text FL55658 to 56654 Carabelle : Carabelle Flea Market (Behind the IGA) Friday & Saturday June 21st and June 22nd, 8am until Venders Welcome Education Early Education and Care, Inc. Center Director position available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Logistics/TransportDrivers: Drivers: Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. Call: 1-888-880-5911 Text FL55307 to 56654 HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to newsletter@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at 850-927-2900. Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair DISPATCHERS AND MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS National cleaning and outsourcing company needs experienced staff for above positions for a large, luxury property in the Santa Rosa Beach area. Dispatchers -$10 $12 per hour, shifts from 8am to 10pm, weekends required. Maintenance Techs must be experienced $12 -$16 per hour, nights and weekends required and some overnight on-call shifts. Voluntary benefits available after 90 days. Call Jennifer at (850) 231-1422 or (850) 461-2854. Web ID#: 34256011 txt FL56011 to 56654 Other Property Services Opportunity for energetic person to work with our uniformed property services team and learn valuable customer service skills while performing duties including landscape, pool cleaning, janitorial & general maintenance. Great wage, work 32-40 hours weekly. To apply start with a call to CMS at 850-927-4911. Web ID#: 34255273 Text FL55273 to 56654 Other Youth & Family Advocate Several available positions as full-time counselor in an innovative agency serving adolescents and their families in outlying counties (Taylor, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson & Madison). These services may include initial screenings, crisis intervention, case planning, internal and external referrals, progress evaluation, individual, group and family counseling. Master’s Degree in a Counseling Related Field required. Travel Required. Mail your resume to 2407 Roberts Ave., Tall, FL 32310 or fax 576-2580. In order to process applications more efficiently, we ask that you please refrain from calling the office to confirm receipt of resumes. Web ID#: 34255232 Text FL55232 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Ford Taurus ‘04. $675 Down. Total is $4900. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Ford Explorer 2002. $675 Down Total price is $5500. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Dodge Ram X/Cab ‘02 $975 Down Total price is $5900. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Chevy Silverado 2004 Ext. Cab $1500 Down Total price $7500. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Southern Cross-28Ft, Good condition, Dsl Eng, 2-Spd Winchs, New stainless rig, Awlgrip Hull, West Bottom. Health, $7,500 OBO. Call 850 866-6989. Text FL55153 to 56654 Are you Looking for a Babysitter? I am trained in CPR and First Aid. I have 40hr of credit in child Devlopment, plus many additional hours of training in “on the Job” services. CDAcertification, Currently employed with Early Education and Care. Now need to be home. If intrested call Patricia at 850-323-0996 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

PAGE 14

Local A14 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) The last thing to happen is the ultimate, but what is the next-to-last called? Postultimate, Antepenultimate, Dultimate, Penultimate 2) As founded in 1850, what was “Thomas Cook” the world’s rst? Steam locomotive, Soda fountain, Travel agency, Roller coaster 3) Both Lincoln and JFK were assassinated on what day of the week? Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 4) What breakfast food arrived at its name from the German word for stirrup? Wafe, Hash browns, Croissant, Bagel 5) What U.S. state was almost called Kanawha? Florida, West Virginia, Idaho, Maine 6) What term describes when about 50 percent of us live within 50 miles of our birthplace? Milarepa, Propinquity, Cryptomnesia, Darden 7) In his earlier days who was known as the “Preaching Windmill?” Billy Graham, Joel Osteen, Robert Tilton, Ernest Angley 8) History’s most prolic writer, Mary Faulkner, wrote how many books? 171, 360, 809, 904 9) When in the shower around what percent of people wash from top to bottom? 45, 60, 75, 84 10) What does an eirmonger ordinarily sell? Eggs, Apples, Matches, Newspapers 11) A politician with no interest in issues or principles is called a what? Snollygoster, Selfcoater, Smudgecoaster, Sirixie 12) The world’s rst TV news helicopter was introduced in what city in 1958? Seattle, Los Angeles, Honolulu, Atlanta 13) The average American looks at how many houses before buying one? 4, 6, 8, 10 14) What are “counties” called in Alaska? Frontiers, Parishes, Zones, Divisions ANSWERS 1) Penultimate. 2) Travel agency. 3) Friday. 4) Bagel. 5) West Virginia. 6) Propinquity. 7) Billy Graham. 8) 904. 9) 75. 10) Eggs. 11) Snollygoster. 12) Los Angeles. 13) 8. 14) Divisions. Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D # Co u nt r y living in a nice ly seclude d 3 BR / 2 BA ho me no r t h o f to wn but clo s e to all ame n it ie s o u r co a stal to wn ha s to o f f er Large 3.6 acre lo t wit h two po n ds an d a two sto r y 12 x 24 sto r age shed wit h bo a t/ ca r po rt. 850-899-9988 l 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyinf o .co m ## ## V acan t L ot C it y of P or t S t Joe APPRO VED SHOR T SALE B eautiful home sit e loc a t ed G arrison A v e C lose t o new schools and hospital L ot has dir ec t ac c ess t o the new bik e pa th. G r ea t c orner loc a tion. W ar d R idge is an ar ea wher e new c onstr uc tion is f ound buy this lot “R igh t ” and build y our dr eam home L ot siz e is 83’ x 117’ X ood Z one w w w .capesanblas .net L oc a t ed on a peninsula within the ga t ed Plan ta tion c ommunit y and surr ounded b y beautiful views of the B a y and marsh, this home is the per f ec t peac eful plac e t o enjo y na tur e and t o in vit e o v ernigh t guests t o their priv a t e quar t ers! Main house includes living and dining r ooms k it chen, mast er suit e with out door sho w er scr eened por ch with indoor/out door r eplac e G uest wing includes 3 bedr ooms living r oom, morning k it chen and laundr y! V er y priv a t e out door hot tub ac c essible fr om both ar eas of this unique home o v erlooks the marsh with outstanding views T his c ust om built home with beautiful c abinets pine oors/trim, lots of c ar eful details giving a f eeling of a secluded geta w a y w as lo vingly cr af t ed b y the o wners C o v er ed gar age w a t er ltr a tion syst em, cir c ular driv e beautiful landsc aping mak e this a must see home! S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .1431P elic anL ane .com ### T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4514983 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248831 $108,500 Eastpoint 451 4981 COMM./RES. (ZONED C-4) Us e ha lf as an of c e & st or ag e an d li v e in th e ot he r ha lf OR us e th e wh ol e bl dg as sm al l pr of es si on al of c e OR us e it as a 2 BR 2 B A ho us e (h as a fu ll ea tin ki tc he n) 10 ft ce il in gs 6 ft ch ai n li nk fe nc ed ba ck ya rd wi th 2 la r ge g at es st or ag e bl dg 30 6 Hw y 98 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249609 $75,000 St. Geor ge Island CORNER L OT 2 lots fr om corner of 11th Str eet tha t leads dir ectl y to the Gulf lots of tr ees and v egeta tion, dry lot, nearb y tw o story houses on pilings ha v e r emar ka b l y good Gulf V ie ws b uy no w to b uild or k eep as in v estment. Br o wn Str eet and W est Pine A v en ue 451 4982 MLS# 249258 $150,000 31 Re x Buzzett ST AP ALACHICOLA, FL Grea t curb a ppeal with this nicely remodelled 3 bedroom/2 ba th home in a quiet area of A palachicola sitting on 4 city lots. Grea t property for 1st time homebuyer or investment. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 ## MLS# 248667 $329,000 1356 Acacia Dr ., St. George Island, FL Charming 3 bedroom/2 ba th Planta tion beach cotta ge situa ted on lushly vegeta ted one acre lot with easy beach access. One of the best priced homes on the island. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 ## Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com The Nest hosts bake sale Saturday The Nest Afterschool Summer Program Carrabelle facility will have a fundraiser bake sale from 9 a.m. until noon Saturday at the IGA on U.S. 98 in Carrabelle. All proceeds benet the Carrabelle branch of The Nest. Come out, rain or shine, and get a tasty treat and make a donation to support the kids. You can also stop in at the Landmark Market and boat ramp and get a treat and make a donation on your way to catch the big one. Oyster licenses on sale through June 28 Sale of the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License will continue through June 28 at the $100 rate. Staff will be selling the license from the old DEP-ANERR building at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. (formerly, 7th Street) in Apalachicola. County can’t work on private roads At the June 18 county meeting, Howard Nabors, representing the county’s Department of Public Works, told commissioners the department has had numerous complaints about the condition of Buck Street in Eastpoint and Hill Street and Paradise Lane east of Apalachicola. All three are private roads. Paradise Lane and Buck Street have both received one-time upgrades from the county in the past. Chair Cheryl Sanders said the board asked County Attorney Michael Shuler to get an opinion from the Attorney General on repairing private roads. Shuler said the attorney general declined to give a specic opinion on Franklin County, but, based on past opinions, the county cannot legally use public equipment to repair private roads. He said public equipment can only be used on private property during a declared state of emergency. Shuler said he specically mentioned the presence of a handicapped child on Buck Street and the need for ambulance access, but the attorney general did not offer an exception. “I hate that because I’ve got Hickory Hammock,” Sanders said, referring to a road in her district. Shuler said the county might accept the roads if they were brought up to county standards. He said he didn’t believe any work had been done by the owners to improve them. Bergeron tapped for debris removal The county commission voted unanimously Tuesday to award the county contract for disaster debris management to Bergeron Emergency Services of Ft. Lauderdale, a subsidiary of Bergeron Land Development. The emergency management and solid waste departments met Feb. 7 to rank the debris contractors by experience, price and availability. Eastpoint Library closed during move The Eastpoint Library is temporarily closed for the transfer of xtures to the new library building. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce told commissioners the library has encountered problems with installing lines for internet access and cannot check out books. He said he believes the library will remain closed for up to two weeks. The Carrabelle library remains open. News b B RI efsEFS



PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA AND DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com County mammography services will be shifted to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf because of outdated equipment at Weems Memorial Hospital. Franklin Needs Inc., a volunteer group of Franklin County women who have been instrumental in raising funds for breast cancer screenings, has announced beginning this month, all the mammograms they fund will be performed at Sacred Heart. The decision to direct business to the hospital in Port St. Joe came as a result of a perfect storm of factors: a breakdown in Weems’ outdated analog mammography machine, the preference by physicians for digital mammograms and Sacred Heart’s competitive pricing for the diagnostic procedure. “The program is moving to the next closest hospital (to Weems) which is Sacred Heart,” said Elaine Kozlowsky, Franklin Needs board member. “They have given us a better price than either Weems or Bay Radiology, a at fee for screening digital mammogram, diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound.” Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth said between November 2011 and October 2012, Weems conducted 58 mammography tests. They have done about 20 in the past seven months. “The majority of those were being diverted already, even when the machine was up and working, because the analog (equipment) was no longer able to meet the requirements of the diagnosing physicians,” Brownsworth said. “They (women) would come here and get re-sent over to Bay Medical at the time.” Brownsworth said there had been a drop-off in utilization before the decision by Franklin Needs, which came after a meeting with the CEO. “They met with me prior to the decision and sought my input, which I greatly appreciate,” Brownsworth said. “In that meeting, I shared our plan to replace our older technology and to once again provide mammography services to the women of Franklin County. They were supportive and expressed a desire to resume our relationship in the future.” “We’re hoping to have this equipment at our hospital someday,” Kozlowsky said. “Our original plan was to be self-suf cient and for all the money raised to remain in Franklin County.” She said two members of the Franklin Needs board also serve Work stalls on island shing pier Repairs were to be completed July 1 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Commissioners want answers about delays in repairing the St. George Island shing pier. At Tuesday morning’s county meeting, Preble Rish spokesman Clay Smallwood told commissioners he is trying to meet with Gulf Group, the rm charged with repairing the pier, to discuss delays. Gulf Group’s contract calls for the work to be completed by July 1, but Smallwood said he does not believe the work will be nished. “I’ve been receiving a lot of calls about this,” said Commissioner Pinki Jackel, whose district includes St. George Island. “There’s not a lot of entertainment for visitors on the island. A lot of people use that shing pier. A meeting about the delay needs to happen sooner, not later.” Chairwoman Cheryl Sanders said she had hoped the repairs would be done by Memorial Day but now doesn’t think they will be complete by Independence Day. Smallwood said he believed the remaining work will take a minimum of 30 days to complete. Commissioner William Massey said he believed it would take longer based on the progress already made. After the meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce said he agreed with Massey and would not speculate on the cause of the delay or when the work will be done. In January, Gulf Group bid $566,200 for the project. If Gulf Group does not nish on time, they can be ned $300 per day after the July 1 deadline. Pierce said the company has not yet received most of the payment. He suggested to commissioners that $9,000 might be deducted from the next scheduled payment to cover the anticipated delay. Pierce said the revetment next to the pier also needed to be repaired using Federal Emergency Management Agency funds. He said he had hoped Both public schools show gains By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A look at the recently released standardized test results for Franklin County’s two public schools reveals good news, especially when it comes to math scores. At Franklin County School, where the administration embarked last year on a renewed emphasis on math, the percentage of students performing at grade level or better rose at every grade level. Among third-graders, the percentage almost doubled, from 15 percent last year to 29 this year. Among fourth-graders, the percentage rose to 57 percent at grade level, especially noteworthy because this was the class that had performed at just a 15 percent level one year ago. Among Franklin fth-graders, more than 60 percent were at grade level, a 10 percentage point improvement and the highest percentage among all the grade levels. Though there again was a drop-off in performance among Franklin sixthand seventh-graders compared to the younger grades, both classes saw improvement, to roughly 40 percent at grade level. An impressive rise was seen among Franklin eighthgraders, where more than half were at grade level, better than 34 percent last year and 25 percent two years ago. At the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, the percentage of fth-graders performing at or above grade level was identical to that of Franklin fth-graders, 61 FCAT math scores improve LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Members of the Franklin County All-Stars AA Team hefted sh during Sunday’s charity auction at the Moorings in Carrabelle to earn money for a June 29 trip to the Florida Dixie Youth Baseball State Tournament at Wildwood. Taking hold of this winning wahoo are, from left, Carter Kembro, Cody Abercrombie, Wyatt Abercrombie, John Michael Thompson, Devin Daniels, Weston Bockelman, Ethan Kembro and Mason Moses. For more on the Big Bend Saltwater Classic, see Page A10 For more on the All-Stars, see Page A11 Mammograms shift to Sacred Heart “We are ... evaluating the possibility of mobile digital mammography. It will be a strategic decision related to capital. It is a service that we’d like to provide to the community we serve, but I’m going to have to nd a cost-effective means of doing that.” Ray Brownsworth CEO, Weems Memorial Hospital See PIER A6 See MAMMOGRAMS A6 See FCAT A6 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . A11-A12 Classi eds . . . . A13 VOL. 127 ISSUE 8 Thursday, June 20, 2013 Summertime service, A2 IT TAKES A TEAM Turtle release party Saturday Allie the loggerhead turtle will return to her natural environment at 2 p.m. Saturday (high tide) at Bald Point State Park. Festivities begin at 1 p.m. The Florida Parks Service is providing free admission for the day, and PepsiCo will be on hand with refreshments. Come see her off and have your hand stamped for free admission to the Gulf Specimens Marine Lab in Panacea on the same afternoon. For more information, call 349-9146. Full moon climb at Lighthouse Sunday From 8-9:30 a.m. Sunday, watch the sun set and the full moon rise from the top of the Cape St. George Light. Tickets are $15, $10 for St. George Lighthouse Association members, and include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. After sunset, additional climbers are welcome at the top for a view of the full moon, as time and space permit for $10 per person or $5 for association members. Reservations are recommended by calling 927-7745 or by stopping by the Keeper’s House Museum. Summer bingo on the island At 7 p.m. Tuesdays, enjoy Summer Bingo at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. Cards are 25 cents. For information, call 927-2654. All about sea turtles From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in June, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve and the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers present a talk on “Sea Turtles: Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors.” The reserve is at 108 Island Drive and provides a wealth of exhibits on the local plants and animals. For more information, call 670-7700 or visit www. SeaTurtlesAtRisk.org.

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 PUB LI C N O TI CE N O TI CE O F INTENT IS GIVEN TH A T FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTIN G AN AMEND ED FL O O D P L AIN MAN A GEMENT O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t o n J u l y 2, 2013 a t 10:00 a.m. (E T) a t 34 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a n o r din a n ce c a p t io n e d a s f o l lo ws: AN O RD IN AN CE BY THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS, AMEND IN G THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y C O D E O F O RD IN AN CE T O REP EAL O RD IN AN CE 2003-39; T O AD O PT A NEW FLO O D P L AIN MAN A GEMENT O RD IN AN CE; T O AD O PT FLO O D H AZ ARD MAPS, T O D ES I GN A TE A FLO O D P L AIN AD MINIS TR A T O R T O AD O PT P R O CE D URES AND CRITERI A FO R D EVELO PMENT IN FLO O D H AZ ARD AREA S, AND FO R O TH ER PURPOS ES; T O AD O PT LO CAL AD MINIS TR A TIVE AMEND MENT S T O THE FLO RID A B UILD IN G C O D E; P R O VID IN G FO R AP P LI CAB ILIT Y ; REP EALER; S EVER AB ILIT Y ; AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE. A co p y o f t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h t h e C ler k o f C o ur t, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a n d m a y b e v ie w e d t h er e I n t er es t e d P er s o n s m a y a p p e a r a t t h e m e et in g a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r es p e c t t o t h e p r o p os e d o r di n an c e A n y p a r t y w h o m a y w i s h t o a p p e a l t h e de ci sio n m ade a t t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r m a k in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e h e a r in g os e p er s o n s n e e din g s p e ci a l a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e m e et in g m u s t co n t ac t dep u t y c ler k, M ic h ae l M o r o n, a t 850-653-8861, ext en sio n 100, t hr e e b u sin es s d a ys p r io r t o t h e m e et in g t o m a k e a r ra n g em en ts f o r a t t en d a n ce JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT FULL LA WN SERVICES TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM ! # ! % $ # # # # # # # $ # ! GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star.com A small Baptist church in south west Georgia made a big impression on Franklin County last week. About 50 people from the First Baptist Church of Dawson, Ga., a congregation of about 175 families in the farm community just north of Albany, were here June 8-15 for a “SPLASH the Forgotten Coast” mission trip, designed to minister to people in Franklin County alongside churches in the community. SPLASH, an acronym for “Show ing People Love and Sharing Him,” brought parents and children to engage in a series of activities that ranged from serving breakfast to working oystermen to repairing the Apalachicola Youth Center. “It was a family-type mission trip, babies and everybody,” Pastor Jay Thomason said. Thomason and Youth Minister Chance Belk helped lead the trip, which was housed at the St George Island Christian Retreat Center for the week. The volunteers worked closely with Lee and Amy Howell, directors of the retreat center, to put together the pieces of the trip. “It’s been a tough area. With all the oystermen, we heard about was going on,” Thomason said. “It was about doing random projects that we can tell people that God loves them.” The shing pier at the retreat cen ter was in close proximity to where oystermen are handling the shelling project in the bay. So, on two morn ings, the families prepared bags of nonperishable food items, like gra nola bars, that could be offered to the oystermen for breakfast. “They would pull up to the dock, and they were very appreciative,” Thomason said. “It was something we could do to help the kids get in volved in. They were out with their parents helping them.” Another project for the Georgia families was the sharing of disaster relief kits, 5-gallon buckets lled with such necessities as personal toiletry items, ashlight batteries and clean ing supplies. Thomason said they worked with Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise, to line up Apalachicola families to receive the disaster relief buckets. He said Apalachicola vol unteer Gladys Gatlin “helped us go around to the places and she helped bridge the gap for us when people asked, ‘Who are these people?’ That opened the door for us.” In addition to the buckets, the Georgia volunteers presented the households with peanuts roasted and cooked from the Terrell County area, known for peanuts as well as corn, cotton and soybeans. “We also gave them a Bible, if they wanted to receive it, and we offered to have prayer with them,” Thoma son said. “Some of the programs they went on are federally funded, so they couldn’t evangelize.” In Eastpoint, those knowledge able about home construction went to work on the mobile home of Dodie Chase. “Fire had melted the vinyl siding, and this home didn’t have any siding on it,” Thomason said. “They put a new roof over the house and put siding around the house.” At the Apalachicola Youth Cen ter, which is the former Apalachicola High School gymnasium, a crew came in and built a snack counter and completed a series of other im provements to the site, which be came renowned as “The Matchbox” when the Sharks made their run to the Class A state basketball Final Four in Lakeland. It was not all work for the Georgia visitors, who took some time to enjoy a little vacation with their ministry, “We had fun in the afternoons and enjoyed the beach,” Thomason said. “We all went out to eat one night. We tried to have fun with families.” The pastor said a key to the trip’s success was that each member of the group played a different role, suitable to them, to assist in the overall effort. “Some ladies came and did child care in the morning, they just watched the kids for us,” Thomason said. “There was another group that cooked for us. It was all around a big team effort.” By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com A large group of ser vice-oriented Christians lavished love on Carrabelle last week. Seth Green is a student at the New Orleans Baptist Theological Academy and plans a career as a fam ily and marriage counselor. He had worked on commu nity aid projects repairing homes for the elderly and in rm. He and his wife, Katie, felt they wanted to do more. Inspired by Scripture, they founded “One:27,” an or ganization to spread God’s word with hammers and paintbrushes. Their motto is “Sharing Christ to meet practical needs.” For their pilot project, the Greens wanted an area where there was great need. “We wanted the community to know that people cared about them,” Katie said. Aaron Batey, pastor of the United Methodist Church in Carrabelle, of fered the solution. “We have been friends since we were 12 and both called to the ministry,” Green said. “When he told me there was great need here, I felt it was a sign.” The Greens organized a party of 57 volunteers. “They were people Seth had met and worked with before and people from our home church,” Katie said. The plan was to repair ve Carrabelle homes iden tied by Batey over a oneweek period. The group split up into ve teams, The Avenue D Roofers; 7th Street Roofers; 12th Street Overhaulers, Highway 98 Painters and Carl King Carpenters. Each group had a crew chief, and though many participants were youngsters, there was an adult man and woman on each site at all times. Seth said insurance was provided through the Meth odist church, and all par ticipants or their parents, including homeowners, signed a notarized waiver. In addition to construc tion, volunteers led worship and performed music. One group came from Jonesville Baptist Church in Newbury. A second was from Burning Bush Baptist Church in Ringold, Ga. A family from Georgia with three children participated. Tasks ranged from paint ing to oor replacement to roof repair. Seth said the hardest part was raising the money for the project. Much of the money was raised through donations and a carwash. Volunteers paid about $200 each for the privilege of helping others. They slept at the Car rabelle Christian Center, where breakfast and dinner, prepared by Mark Collins, were served most days. Volunteers from Carra belle, organized by Aaron’s wife, Meagan, delivered lunch to the work sites. “Everyone here has been amazing and really embraced us,” Katie said. “Without the Carrabelle Methodist Church, the project would not have happened.” Materials for the repairs were donated by Carrabelle businesses. The visit was not all work. There was a worship service every night at 7 p.m. On Wednesday, the teams took a half day off to explore the town. On Friday, they hosted a cook-out for the community at the Sands Park on U.S. 98. The Greens said the ex perience was wonderful, and they want to continue in their work and return to Carrabelle. “Of the places we have volunteered, this is the most beautiful,” Katie said. The work of One:27 is based on Scripture from the book of James: “Religion that is pure and undeled before God, the father, is this: to visit orphans and widows in their afiction, and to keep oneself un stained from the world.” LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Seth and Katie Green brought helpful hands to Carrabelle. Below, a sheltering live oak provided shade on this Carrabelle work site. PHo O T os OS bB Y ST. GEo O R g G E I sla SLA N d D CHRis IS T ia IA N RR ETREa A T CENTER | Special to The TimesTT OP: Volunteers hand out breakfast bags from the dock of the St. George Island Christian Retreat Center to oystermen reshelling the bay. ABOV EE : Volunteers make repairs to the mobile home of Dodie Chase in Eastpoint. SUMMERTIME SERVICEGeorgia Baptist church members make a ‘SPLAS HH ’ 60 Samaritans come to Carrabelle

PAGE 3

The Times | A3 Thursday, June 20, 2013 St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle 1111 8 1 0 Conventional/FHA/VA Lot Loans | Refinancing Adjustable & Fixed Rate USDA Rural Housing Affordable Housing Construction / Permanent Financing Whether you’re buying your first home or just need room to grow, our customized approach to mortgage lending can get you moving. Call us today or apply online at www.ccbg.com Moving in the right direction. MEMBER FDIC All products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all markets or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Loans are not made or originated by the FHA, VA, HUD or any other governmental entity. 2013-14 GR ANT C ALEND AR M a y 8, 2013 FCBOC C appr o v ed TDC r ec ommenda tion f or 2013-14 G r an ts P r o c ess June 5, 2013 – F inal TDC B oar d A ppr o v al f or 2013-14 g r an ts pr oc ess – June 13, 2013 – r elease Gr an t inf or ma tion and A pplica tion F or ms online; use FC TDC g r an t in t er est email da tabases t o inf or m new guidelines 2013-14 FC TDC E v en ts Gr an t P r oc ess June 13, 20, 27, 2013 P ublish TIMES public notic e tha t FC TDC 2013-14 online g r an t mar keting inf or ma tion is on the FC TDC w ebsit e P r e c er tica tion is r equir ed f or elig ibilit y and must be included with or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t inf or ma tion. T he deadline t o apply f or inclusion in the 2013-14 ev en t mar keting pr og r am is June 30, 2013 July 3, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting is c anc eled July 17, 2013 TDC C ommitt ee M eeting C it y of A palachic ola M eeting R oom, beg inning a t 1:30 pm. Gr an t A pplica tions f or mar keting the individual or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t will be r eview ed and r ec ommended f or appr o v al if qualied – July 19, 2013 – TDC S ta t o E-mail notic e t o or ganiza tion ’ s c on tr ac t manager of appr o v al f or inclusion in Gr an ts pr oc ess f or 2013-14 A ugust 7, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting F r ank lin C oun t y C our thouse A nne x, 3:00 p .m. A palachic ola F inal appr o v al of applican ts P r esen ta tion of TDC P r omotions Budget f or initial appr o v al On or bef or e A ugust 20, 2013, FC TDC S ta will issue ocial emailed notica tion as t o sta tus of inclusion f or or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t applica tion Oc t ob er 1, 2013 new scal y ear beg ins f or FC TDC 2013-14 ONLINE GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS M A Y BE A C CESSED ONLINE ON JUNE 13, 2013 A T W W W .SAL T Y FL ORID A.C OM/GR ANT S. THE DEADLINE T O SUBMIT THE 201314 GR ANT APPLIC A TION FOR Y OUR E VENT IS JUNE 30, 2013. IF Y OU WISH T O C OMPLE TE A GR ANT APPLIC A TION O THER THAN ONLINE PLEASE TELEPHONE THE FC TDC ADMINISTR A TIVE OFFICE A T 653-8678 T O REQUEST A C OP Y OR ST OP B Y THE FC TDC OFFICE A T 17-1/2 A VENUE E AP AL A CHIC OL A, FL ORID A. ALL 2013-14 GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS MUST BE SUBMIT TED ONLINE OR T O THE TDC OFFICE NO L A TER THAN JUNE 30, 2013. Coupon Expir es: 6-30-13 CODE: AP00 Special to the Times In the early hours of June 13, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce, with the assistance of the Apala chicola and Carrabelle police de partments, executed a drug/narcot ics roundup. Eight subjects were arrested on various drug/narcotic charges in cluding sale or possession of crack cocaine, prescription medication and cannabis. While executing the warrants, additional charges were led when ofcers said they discovered two subjects in physical possession of narcotics. “The Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce Narcotics Division has been working diligently to rid the streets of Franklin County of illegal drugs,” Sheriff Mike Mock said. The following is a list of the in dividuals arrested in the roundup. Additional arrests are pending in reference to this investigation. All arrests were made by FCSO. • Christian A. McIntyre, 21, Apalachicola, two counts of sale or possession of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, sale of a controlled substance and possession of less than 20 grams • Melonie R. Dellagatto, 40, Car rabelle, sale of a controlled sub stance within 1,000 feet of public housing • Rasha J. Cummings, 21, Apala chicola, four counts of sale or pos session of controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia • Audra L. Murray, 44, Carra belle, sale of a prescription drug This report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests were made by ofcers from the Carrabelle Police Department and FCSO. All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JUNE 11 Deanna L. Schmidt, 45, Carrabelle, lewd or lascivious molestation – victim under age 12 (CPD) Tommy E. Carr, 44, Hays, North Carolina, burglary or attempted burglary of a structure, and grand theft (FCSO) JUNE 13 Alice A. Amerson, 23, Carrabelle, sale of a prescription drug (CPD) Charles L. Fasbenner, 44, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Harry Pierce, 55, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 14 Jesse G. Smith, Jr., 47, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Alice A. Amerson, 23, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) JUNE 15 Jeffrey D. Nowling, 24, Eastpoint, trespass after warning (FCSO) JUNE 16 Erik A. Tatum, 33, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Roy P. Thompson, 28, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) JUNE 17 George R. Needer, 55, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Special to The Times The pilot of a small plane over central Georgia report ed a slight loss of oil pres sure, then said his engine had stopped, according to a report by federal investigators. The pilot of the single-en gine plane initially asked air trafc control for permission to land at Middle Georgia Regional Airport in Macon. Then, the pilot said his en gine stopped and that he wasn’t going to make it there, according to the preliminary report from National Trans portation Safety Board. The pilot then requested a landing at nearby Robins Air Force Base. The controller at Macon’s airport coordinated with the base and advised the aircraft to contact the tower at the base. However, the pilot never established communication with the base’s tower before crashing just under a mile northeast of Robins on May 27, the report states. Julius Gilreath, 71, of Greenville, S.C.; and Antho ny Cabeza, 58, of Greer, S.C., were killed in the crash of the Piper PA-32. Their ight had departed from Apalachicola Municipal Airport and was headed for Greenville Down town Airport in Greenville, S.C., when it crashed in a swampy area about 500 yards off Georgia Highway 247. “Smoke was seen from WRB tower and veried by an airborne aircraft,” the re port states, referring to the Robins tower. “First respond ers discovered the wreckage in a heavily wooded area ap proximately 20 minutes af ter the last radar and radio communications.” The report is preliminary, and it typically takes inves tigators several months and sometimes years to make a nal determination on the cause of air crashes. Law Enforcement CHRISTIAN M cICI NTYRE MELONIE DELLAGATTO RR ASHA CU mmMM INGS AA U dD RA MURRAY AA N dD REW BUTLER RR OSS Ed ED WARdD S GG EORGE W W AR dD JR. AA PRIL T T URNEY NTSB: Pilot said engine stopped before crash • Andrew L. Butler, 41, Apalachicola, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and withholding child support • Ross W. Edwards, 46, Apalachicola, sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell • George W. Ward Jr., 33, Apalachicola, sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell • April L. Turney, 37, Apalachicola, sale or possession of controlled substance with intent to sell 8 nabbed in drug sweep Arrest REPORTREPORT

PAGE 4

USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 20, 2013 A Page 4 Section Editor’s note: This poem was written by Mike Cummings, about his uncle Red Butler, who grew up here with his brothers in Apalachicola. The poem was based on stories that Butler used to tell his nephew when they visited in Tampa. He’s a Great War Vet He was only sixteen when Pearl was hit He was gonna enlist, but his mama wouldn’t let him, He had a way set in his mind, She just didn’t know it, yet! He was a future Great War Vet! He asked her three times, and three times, “No!” His big brothers were shippin’, why couldn’t he go? He could not stay in Apalach, He had a date with a ship to catch! He was a Great American Patriot! Well, he got papers and signed his name, Then he practiced real hard and he signed her name! She was standin’ on the porch when he said “Bye” Before he actually left, they had tears in their eye. He was a Great War Ensign! He sailed down from Jefferson on the mighty Mississipp Around Florida, all the way to New York, Then hit the high seas across the pond, D-Day was comin’, it wouldn’t be long. He as a Great War Sailor! He was on a ship, but got stones (sick) on the way, They dropped him in England, saving his life that day, They headed to Omaha, to Utah, the beach, Most of his mates, never would reach. He was a Great War lucky man! Soon as he could, he was back on his feet, He had an enemy he needed to meet, He got to the theater, kicked some Axis around, Then soon found himself on African ground. He was a Great War Vet! Uncle Sam sent him ‘round the world, Along the way he had met a girl, The Paci c called, and he answered her, too, Just a few months of war, and then he was through. He was a Great War Vet! His brothers had served, like most of the rest, And the history books show they all were the best! His mama was proud, his daddy was, too, He had put himself out there, for me and for you! If you have not done so lately, Even if it’s one you have never met, Please say a prayer for, and thank, A Great War Vet! Uncle Ed is still with us, Uncle Milfred’s with God, Uncle Doty still makes his path where no-one has trod, They showed what we’re made of, Americans at heart, Savor their memories before they depart! He’s a great war vet The Poet’s VOICE James E. Red Butler, with the Navy in 1943. James E. Red Butler, with the Air Force in 1964. Special to the Times Recently, it has become fashionable to disparage the use of paper in favor of electronic devices and transmittals. Like a lot of fashions, this makes no sense. The premise of anti-paper campaigns is that paper is bad for the environment and unnecessarily consumes vital natural resources. In reality, using paper and other forest products provides environmental bene ts that electronics cannot match. Paper comes from trees, which are a renewable resource. When trees are cut down to make paper, more are planted and grown to take their place. Through this cycle, working forests provide habitat for wildlife, recharge areas for clean water and a natural process for removing carbon from the air. The electronic alternatives being pushed to replace paper are not as environmentally friendly as their supporters would have you believe. Science of the Total Environment, an international research journal, estimates that discarded devices create approximately 50 million tons of electronic waste each year. These products contain a variety of nonrenewable materials that are not only harmful to the environment but also to the people living in the areas where they are dumped. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that only 8 percent of mobile devices are recycled. The rate for recycling computers is 38 percent. The rate for recycling paper? More than 63 percent. Recycled paper lls a variety of needs. Among others things, it is used to make dollar bills. This is especially appropriate considering the forest industry’s $14.7 billion impact to our state’s economy. In addition to the many environmental bene ts, working forests also provide jobs to 90,000 Floridians. The connection between the environmental bene ts and the economic impact cannot be emphasized enough. Sustainable forests are not free; proper land management costs money. Our government cannot afford to own or maintain all the forestland that is needed for environmental purposes or public use. Without the forest industry, private landowners cannot afford to, either. The market for forest products is a key element in the ability to maintain forestlands. Without a demand for wood from mills and other forest product users, working forests would have to be converted to more pro table crops or to neighborhoods. As Florida becomes more and more urbanized, the pressure to grow houses instead of trees continues to intensify. Like all of us, forests must work if they are going to survive. By buying and using paper and other forest products, consumers help maintain the health and sustainability of working forests. In turn, working forests help maintain a healthy environment and strengthen the economy. Anti-paper campaigns might be trendy right now, but the truth is that working forests were “green” long before green was in fashion. Lynetta Usher Griner is president of the Florida Forestry Association, a statewide membership association that promotes the responsible and sustainable use of Florida’s forest resources (http:// oridaforest.org). Anti-paper campaigns make no environmental sense LYNETTA GRINER President of the Florida Forestry Association Special to the Times Heatstroke! You’ve heard of it, you knew it affected people, and you were even vaguely aware that it could affect your pet. But how does it happen? And most important, how can you help your pet avoid it? Heatstroke is a deadly disease that can kill your beloved companion, even with emergency treatment. The best way to avoid this terrible situation is prevention, and it’s all up to you. Everyone knows that the inside of a car on a hot summer’s day can be lethal. But Fido needs you to know more than that to keep him safe in the deadly sun. Days above 90 degrees, especially with high humidity, are inherently dangerous for your pet. Humidity interferes with animals’ ability to rid themselves of excess body heat. When we overheat we sweat, and when the sweat dries it takes excess heat with it. Our four-legged friends only perspire around their paws, which is not enough to cool the body. To rid themselves of excess heat, animals pant. Air moves through the nasal passages, which picks up excess heat from the body. As it is expelled through the mouth, the extra heat leaves along with it. Although this is a very ef cient way to control body heat, it is severely limited in areas of high humidity or when the animal is in close quarters. The shape of an animal’s nasal passages can contribute to an animal’s tendency to overheat. Pug-nosed dogs are more prone to heatstroke because their nasal passages are smaller and it’s more dif cult for them to circulate suf cient air for cooling. Overweight dogs are also more prone to overheating because their extra layers of fat act as insulation, which traps heat in their bodies and restricts their breathing capabilities. Age can also be a factor in an animal’s tendency to overheat — very young animals may not have a fully developed temperature regulating system, and older pets’ organ systems may not be functioning at 100 percent, leaving them prone to heat-related damage. So where are the danger zones? The most obvious is your car: It can become a death trap even on a mild sunny day — and can insidiously raise the car’s temperature to well above 120 degrees! Cracking the windows of your car doesn’t cut it. Never, ever leave your pet inside the car. If Fido can’t come with you when you get out of the car, leave him at home. What are some other dangerous situations for your pets? Leaving animals outdoors without shelter is just as dangerous as leaving them inside a hot car. Be sure they are not left in a cage in the hot sun, on a chain in the backyard, or outdoors in a run without suf cient shade or air circulation. Their lives are in your hands. Heatstroke is a medical emergency. If you suspect your pet has heatstroke, you must act quickly and calmly. Have someone call a veterinarian immediately. In the meantime, lower the animal’s body temperature by applying towels soaked in cool water to the hairless areas of the body. Often the pet will respond after only a few minutes of cooling, only to falter again with his temperature soaring back up or falling to well below what is normal. With this in mind, remember that it is imperative to get the animal to a veterinarian immediately. Once your pet is in the veterinarian’s care, treatment may include further cooling techniques, intravenous fluid therapy to counter shock, or medication to prevent or reverse brain damage. Even with emergency treatment, heatstroke can be fatal. The best cure is prevention, and Fido and Fluffy are relying on you to keep them out of harm’s way. Summer does not have to be fraught with peril, with ample precaution; both you and your furry friends can enjoy those long, hot, dog-days of summer. Signs of heatstroke are panting, staring, anxious expression, refusal to obey commands, warm, dry skin, high fever, rapid heartbeat, vomiting and collapse. To avoid heatstroke, if your pet lives outdoors, ensure adequate shelter from sun/midday heat. Outdoor kennels should be well-ventilated and in the shade. Provide plenty of fresh water in a bowl that cannot be tipped over and avoid excessive exercise on hot days. Talk with your local veterinarian to determine if your longhaired Fido needs a summer haircut. This column is presented as a public service by the American Animal Hospital Association. For pets, cars can become ovens Golf carts in Eastpoint should be permitted Editor’s note: The following letter was sent to members of the Franklin County Commission. Good Morning. I am writing to ask that you please allow golf-cart travel on North Bayshore Drive and the paved trail on the east side of North Bayshore Drive. The trail is a half-mile long by eight feet in width. A golf cart is 3 1/2 feet wide which would leave 4 1/2 feet for passage. We have used the trail most every day since it was paved, and have never seen a hazard. There are 15 drives across the trail and nine mailboxes. The trail is used by the mail carrier, as well as the newspaper carrier. North Bayshore Drive and Twin Lakes Road are each 20 feet wide and Old Ferry Dock Road is 18 feet wide. The three roads each have the same speed limit of 35 miles per hour. Twin Lakes Road and Old Ferry Dock Road each have a blind curve. North Bayshore Road has no blind areas. We believe the three roads should be permitted for golf-cart use. My wife and I use the golf-cart for transportation to the post of ce, bank, restaurants, friends’ homes, accountant, lawyer, chiropractor and other businesses in Eastpoint. My wife, Harrette, is now 90 years of age, and gave up her driver’s license voluntarily. She has been declared physically handicapped, thus making the golf-cart her only means of transportation. Also, a golf-cart was recommended for me rather than an electric wheelchair after I suffered a stroke several years ago. For my wife and I, the golf cart is not just for recreational use, but for needed transportation, and is one of the ways we go green. Our golf-cart use would be restricted to our homestead if neither North Bayshore Drive or the trail were permitted. Thank you for your consideration. Willis A Kennedy Eastpoint Letter to the EDITOR

PAGE 5

Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 20, 2013 N O TI CE O F GENER AL ELECTI O N CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A D A TE: S EPTEMB ER 3, 2013 PO LLIN G P L A CE: CARR AB ELLLE MUNI CIP AL C O MP LEX 1001 GR A Y A VE. CARR AB ELLE, FL 32322 PO LLS O P EN A T 7:00 AM AND CLOS E 7:00 PM V O TE FO R: CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CAND ID A TES MA Y Q U ALIFY B EGINNIN G 12:00 N O O N, JUNE 24, 2013 UNTIL N O O N JUNE 28, 2013 (M O ND A Y THR U FRID A Y D URIN G REGUL AR W O RKIN G H O URS). Q U ALIFYIN G FEES IS $45.00 P L US 1% O F ANNU AL SAL AR Y O NL Y P ERSO NS REGIS TERED T O V O TE WITHIN THE CIT Y LIMIT S O F THE CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE WILL B E REC O GNIZED A S Q U ALIFIED ELECT O RS AND ALLO WED T O V O TE O R Q U ALIFY FO R CAND ID A CY CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A WILB URN MESS ER M AY O R T OBA CCO C ESSA T ION C LASS S CHEDULE Please visit the f ollo wing w ebsit es t o vie w a c urrent schedule of t obacco cessa tion classes tha t are being held in F ranklin County a t w w w .bigbendahec .org/quit-no w and w w w .ahec t obacco .com T o r egist er f or a class please c all Big B end AHEC a t 850-224-1177 THERE IS NO COS T T O A TT END! T H URSD A Y JUN E 2 0 2 0 1 3 5:30 P .M. 7:30 P .M. Geor ge E W eems Memorial H ospital 135 A v enue G Apalachicola, FL 32320 F r ee nic otine pa t ches and gum will b e pr o vided t o par ticipan ts who c omplet e each class while supplies last =48C 8K4TT FT 4 COVS  ON = UFL = T = TTF ON Special to The Times A St. George Island resident has recounted the story of one of Franklin County’s most colorful citi zens, the legendary “The Oyster King,” in a newly published work of prose, poetry and pictures. The idea a poet and evangelist could buy all of St. George Island on the basis of a series of ro mance novels is strange but true. James L. Hargrove, a retired professor of nutri tion from the University of Georgia who lives on St. George Island, will sign copies of his new book on the legendary William Lee Popham this Saturday from 1-3 p.m. at Downtown Books, 67 Commerce St., in Apalachicola. Popham purchased the island in 1916 from a Tal lahassee banker, George Saxon, using publishing rights to his novels as down payment. Popham became known as “The Oyster King” when he tried to use oyster harvesting to gen erate an income for inves tors who bought land on St. George Island. Readers of The Oyster King will learn how an ‘inlander’ be came an ‘island er,’ a resident of Apalachicola and eventually its mayor – only to meet his downfall after accusations of mail fraud and rivalries with oystermen cap sized his plan to develop St. George Island. The book traces Popham from his teen age years near Louisville, Ky., as he developed su perb speaking abilities that captivated audiences in the Southeast on the Chautauqua Circuit at the beginning of the 20th cen tury. Popham augmented his income by churning out romance novels, ser monettes, advice and poems. Although written as a narrative, “The Oyster King” is rooted in his torical fact and describes the pristine beauty that drew Wil liam and Maude Popham to Apalachicola. More than that, the book de scribes little-known facts about the life history of oysters Popham tried to exploit to provide divi dends for his investors. To lighten the nar rative, “The Oyster King” contains many humorous quotations about oysters penned by people as diverse as Andrew Carne gie, Cole Porter and Thom as Henry Huxley. The book is replete with recent and period photographs, illus trations and even a cartoon about Sex on the Beach, which is composed more tastefully than it sounds. “The Oyster King” provides examples of Popham’s original poetry and sermons on love he gave in Apalachicola and elsewhere. It concludes with his trial for mail fraud and shows how these events led to later develop ment of Saint George Is land and Apalachicola. This entertaining book is recommended as a ‘beach read’ for any visi tor who would like to know more about the colorful history of Saint George Island. Signed copies of the book are available at Downtown Books as well as the Cape St. George Lighthouse Gift Shop. Hargrove’s prior books are scientic: for example, Muscadine Health (2008) and Health Benets of Pe cans (2013). Special to The Times The Carrabelle Light house Association elected ofcers for the 2013-2015 bi ennium at its monthly meet ing on June 4. They are President De lores Hardin; Vice Presi dent for Special Events and Public Relations Lesley Cox; Vice President for Member ship and Fundraising Sha ron Rider; Secretary Arlene Oehler; Treasurer Kathy Swaggerty; and Historian John Canetta. Hardin, the past CLA treasurer, brings a variety of management experiences to her new position. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, where she received an associate of arts degree with honors from Contra Costa Community College and Medanos College. Most of her art was abstract wood assemblage inspired by Lou ise Nevelson. In 1981, she moved to Arkansas, where she was the ofce manager for the Hardin Family sawmill. She then moved to Little Rock in 1991 and worked at the Uni versity of Arkansas at Little Rock until retirement in 2007. Her rst year at UALR was spent working with the Arkansas Space Grant Con sortium and NASA Epscore Program. She spent subse quent years working in the UALR art department ofce and taking additional art classes. She is married to Rob ert Vernon Hardin (Vern) and has an adult son and a daughter and a pet yellow Lab, which is about three years old, named Tramp, aka Mr. T. Delores began taking trips to the Gulf Coast with her family and moved here in 2002-3. They found their dream lot six miles west of Carrabelle. She has volun teered for Relay for Life, Big Bend Hospice and the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival. She spends the majority of her time volun teering at the library and for the Carrabelle Lighthouse Association. She believes the light house is important because it represents a big part of Carrabelle history and can be a great resource to bring tourists to the Franklin County area. She said the lighthouse and museum draw fans from all over the world. She just met a couple from Sweden. The Crooked River Lighthouse Keeper’s House Museum is open 20 hours a week with Crooked River Lighthouse climbing on Saturday and Sunday after noons. Between Oct. 2010 and Jan. 2013, 7,478 visitors have signed the guest book.SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S Lesley Cox, right, congratulates Delores Hardin. Hardin elected Carrabelle lighthouse president Author to sign new Popham book SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S James Hargrove’s book chronicles the story of Franklin County’s most colorful citizen, William Lee Popham. “The Oyster King” provides numerous examples of Popham’s original poetry and sermons on love he gave in Apalachicola and elsewhere. It concludes with his trial for mail fraud and points out how these events led to later development of Saint George Island and Apalachicola. WILLIAM LL EE P P OPHAM

PAGE 6

Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 CIT Y OF AP ALA CHIC OLA M A Y OR ’ S ELEC TION PR OCLA M A TION I, the undersig ned V AN W JOHNSON, SR., M a y or of the C it y of A palachic ola, b y author it y of la w and pursuan t t o C it y Or dinanc e No 91-4, do her eb y pr oclaim tha t on T uesda y S ept ember 3, 2013 an elec tion will be held t o ll the oc es as f ollo w s: C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 3 f or a t er m of f our y ears and C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 4 f or a t er m of f our y ears and a RunO Elec tion, if nec essar y will be held on T uesda y S ept ember 17, 2013. C andida t es wishing t o qualify ma y do so a t the C it y O c e fr om 12 Noon M onda y June 24, 2013 un til 12 Noon F r ida y June 28, 2013. C it y O c e is loca t ed a t #1 A v enue E and r egular oc e hours ar e fr om 8:00 A M t o 4:00 P M, M onda y -F r ida y Each C andida t e must pa y t o the C it y Cler k a t the time of qualifying a qualifying f ee of 4.5% of the rst y ear ’ s salar y must be a r esiden t of the C it y of A palachic ola, and must also be a qualied v ot er of the S ta t e of F lor ida, C oun t y of F r ank lin, and the C it y of A palachic ola. A ll persons not pr eviously r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ma y r eg ist er t o v ot e an ytime fr om no w up t o 4:30 P M on M onda y A ugust 5, 2013 f or the G ener al Elec tion, and M onda y A ugust 19, 2013 f or the RunO Elec tion a t the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions loca t ed a t 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida, hours 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M, M onda y -F r ida y T he polling plac e will be a t the Na tional Guar d A r mor y loca t ed a t 66 4th S tr eet in the C it y of A palachic ola and will be open a t 7:00 A M and close a t 7:00 P M. A bsen t ee ballots ma y be obtained b y c on tac ting the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions a t plac e and time not ed pr eviously Only qualied elec t ors will be per mitt ed t o v ot e Ear ly v oting will be c onduc t ed fr om A ugust 26, 2013 t o A ugust 30, 2013 (5 da y s only) a t the Super visor of Elec tions O c e 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida fr om 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M. A ll r esiden ts of the C it y of A palachic ola not cur r en tly r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ar e ur ged t o r eg ist er and take par t in this elec tion. __________________________________ V an W Johnson, Sr ., M a y or C it y of A palachic ola, F lor ida N O TI CE O F INTENT T O C O NS ID ER AD O PTIN G C O UNT Y O RD IN AN CE N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t o n J u l y 2, 2013 a t 10:10 a.m. (E T) a t 34 F o rb es S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a t t h e C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex, t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g t o co n sider ado p t in g a n o r din a n ce c a p t io n e d a s f o l lo ws: AN O RD IN AN CE AMEND IN G THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y ZO NIN G C O D E O RD IN AN CE 92-6, S ECTI O N 462, REGUL A TIN G S TR UCTURES AND ES T AB LIS HIN G THE P ERMIT TED HEI GHT LIMIT AND M O D IFI CA TI O NS T O N O M O RE TH AN 47 FEE T A T THE R O O F P EAK, N O R A C C O MM O D A TE M O RE TH AN THREE H AB IT AB LE FL O O RS, FR O M HI GHES T N A TUR AL GR AD E; P R O VID IN G S E VER AB ILIT Y AND AN EFFECTIVE D A TE A co p y o f t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce i s o n le w i t h t h e C ler k o f C o ur t, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a a n d m a y b e v ie w e d t h er e I n t er es t e d P er s o n s m a y a p p e a r a t t h e m e et in g a n d b e h e a r d w i t h r es p e c t t o t h e p r o p os e d o r din a n ce A n y p a r t y w h o m a y w i s h t o a p p e a l t h e de ci sio n m ade a t t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g i s r es p o n si b le f o r m a k in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t o f t h e h e a r in g os e p er s o n s r e q uir in g a s si s t a n ce t o a t t en d t h e m e et in g m u s t c a l l dep u t y c ler k M ic h ae l M o r o n a t 850-653-8861 x100 a t le a s t t hr e e b u sin es s d a ys b ef o r e t h e m e et in g t o m a k e a r ra n g em en ts. to begin that task when the pier was complete but now intends to seek bids for the revetment immediately. “The FEMA money must be spent by January 2014,” he said. A section of the pier was destroyed when a barge belonging to Orion Marine Contractors, of Houston, Texas, broke its moorings during Tropical Storm Deb by in June 2012. Orion, who was in the area as a subcontractor for Progress Energy, is deny ing liability for the damage, calling the storm an “act of God.” The company main tains the barge was prop erly moored. The county retained Robert Dees, certied by the Florida Bar in maritime and admiralty law, in the event the county’s insur ance carrier denies cover age and payment is sought from Progress Energy or Orion for the damages. In the interim, commis sioners voted to fund the re pairs out of the $1.66 million in the bridge fund, which was set up by the state af ter it built the new bridge to St. George Island a decade ago. percent. But among its sixth-, seventhand eighth-graders, Franklin once again saw a slide backward among students at grade level. At the same time, the ABC School saw even higher percentages of top perform ers in its middle school students, topped by a whopping 82 percent of its seventhgraders at grade level or better in math. Among ABC School eighth-graders in math, the percentage at grade level or better was almost as strong, at 75 per cent, more than 41 percentage points better than at the charter school two years ago. Sophomore reading scores decline In reading scores, Franklin’s fourth grade was the only grade level to have at least half of its students perform on the standardized test at or above grade lev el. In contrast, each of the ABC School’s grade levels had at least 60 percent of its students at or above grade level, with a high of 75 percent of its sixth-graders at grade level. One trend in the reading scores at the Franklin School is that the percent ages at grade level or better in the lower grades — third through sixth — are all lower than they were two years ago, and in the case of third-graders signicantly lower. In contrast, the percentages in the seventh, eighth and ninth grades are all better than they were two years ago, and in the case of the freshmen, signicantly better, with almost half at grade level; it was just one-third two years ago. Among sophomores, though, the per centage at grade level or better in read ing drops to 27 percent, meaning only a tad more than one in four students can read at grade level. This is a drop of 11 percentage points below last year’s 38 percent. Writing scores jump In writing scores, with the test ad ministered only in the fourth and eighth grades, Franklin students improved by six percentage points, to 47 percent at grade level, slightly better than the ABC School’s 44 percent. In the case of the charter school, the fourth-graders saw a sharp rise from last year’s 28 percent at grade level. “It was signicant, and they were thrilled,” ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said. Among eighth-graders, at Franklin, only one in four was tested as procient in writing, while at the ABC School, it was half the students. Among Franklin sophomores, the percentage improved to 42 percent at writing prociency, a 10 percentage point jump. The state gave students an entire hour, 15 more minutes than last year, to do the writing exam and set 3.5, rather than 3.0, as the threshold for indicating prociency. Still, the entire test perplex es educators like Johnson. “With reading and math, the data is right there in front of you,” she said. “With the writing, the only thing you get back is the scores and a sample of the essay. “There’s no feedback from the state on why that child scored a 3.5, no real clear indication,” Johnson said. “It’s been hard for teachers to judge, not real good indication of feedback. Do I focus on mechanics more? A rich vocabulary? Transitional phrases? To me this a very frustrating assessment. “You should allow students to go back and proofread an essay. I feel like that’s the opportunity the students need.” In science, which is given in the fth and eighth grades, the ABC School had two-thirds of its students at grade level or better. In the case of the eighth-graders, it was a jump of 15 percentage points. At Franklin School, slightly more than half the fth-graders showed prociency in science, an improvement over the pre vious year. Among eighth-graders, there were 43 percent at grade level or better, a jump of 13 percentage points. With the trend toward school choice shown when parents place their children in either of the two schools, or migrate to neighboring counties, ABC School educators make clear how their school compares. A look at state averages and at performances in neighboring Gulf, Wakulla and Liberty counties shows how well the school is doing. “I am extremely proud of all our stu dents and staff who surpassed state av erages on all subjects in all grades four through eighth,” Johnson said. “Most levels and subjects surpassed other schools in surrounding districts.” on the board of the Weems Foundation. “We are hoping support from the com munity for the Weems Foundation to raise the money for equipment for the program,” she said. So far this year, Franklin Needs has raised $40,000, she said. Brownsworth said repairing the ana log machine, which was purchased in 2009 through a grant written by former Weems CEO Chuck Colvert, would not make sense. “The processor has broken, and rath er than x it, for the low volume of tests we get, (we) prefer to reinvest in new technology, in digital mammography,” he said, noting a used digital machine could cost in the range of $175,000. “We are also evaluating the possibil ity of mobile digital mammography,” Brownsworth said. “It will be a strategic decision related to capital. It is a service that we’d like to provide to the communi ty we serve, but I’m going to have to nd a cost-effective means of doing that.” Kozlowsky said about 100 women have been served by Franklin Needs since its inception. “Many have had repeated ex aminations,” she said. Eligibility is limited to county resi dents who have no health insurance and are aged 35-64, she said. Those who are transportation disadvantaged can ap ply for assistance at Croom’s Transpor tation, 133 US 98, Apalachicola, and if granted, it would cost them only $4 per trip. If a biopsy is required, it is performed at Bay Radiology, Kozlowsky said. She said for those who have had mammo grams performed at Bay Radiology, Sa cred Heart will request the records when an appointment is scheduled. “We will continue to pay for testing up to diagnosis as long as funds are avail able,” she said. FCAT from page A1 PIER from page A1 MAMMOGRAMS from page A1 “With the writing, the only thing you get back is the scores and a sample of the essay. It’s been hard for teachers to judge, not real good indication of feedback. Do I focus on mechanics more? A rich vocabulary? Transitional phrases? To me this a very frustrating assessment.” Chimene Johnson ABC School principalPHOTOs S BY DEBB BB IE HOOHOO PER | joebay.com Work on the St. George Island shing pier was to be completed July 1. If Gulf Group does not nish on time, they can be ned $300 per day after the July 1 deadline.

PAGE 7

Local The Times | A7 Thursday, June 20, 2013 AMEND ED N O TI CE O F T A X FO R SCH O O L CAP IT AL O U TL A Y e S c h o o l B o a r d o f F ra n k lin C o un t y w i l l s o o n co n sider a m e a s ur e t o a m en d t h e u s e o f p r o p er t y t ax f o r t h e c a p i t a l o u t l a y p r o j e c ts p r e v io u s l y ad v er t i s e d f o r t h e 2011 t o 2012 s c h o o l y e a r. N e w p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: C O NS TR UCTI O N AND REM O D ELIN G P a y m en t f o r FCS B a yside En v ir o nm en t a l L a b NE W AND REP L A CEMENT EQ UIPMENT C O MPUTERS AND ELECTR O NI C LEARNIN G D E VI CES AND ENTERP RIS E RESO UR CE SO FT W ARE P a y m en t f o r M a n a g em en t I nf o r m a t io n S ys t em s S o wa r e P a y m en t f o r E le c t r o nic R e co r d s R et en t io n S c a nnin g S ys t em A me nd e d p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: No n e P r o je c ts t o b e d e l e t e d: No n e A l l co n cer n e d ci t izen s a r e in v i t e d t o a p u b lic h e a r in g t o b e h e ld o n J un e 25, 2013 a t 5:00 P .M. in t h e W i l lie S p e e d B o a r d R o o m, E a s t p o in t, Flo r id a. A D ECIS I O N o n t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t t o t h e p r o j e c ts f un de d f r o m CAP IT AL O UTL A Y T AXES w i l l b e m ade a t t hi s m e et in g AMEND ED N O TI CE O F T A X FO R SCH O O L CAP IT AL O U TL A Y e S c h o o l B o a r d o f F ra n k lin C o un t y w i l l s o o n co n sider a m e a s ur e t o a m en d t h e u s e o f p r o p er t y t ax f o r t h e c a p i t a l o u t l a y p r o j e c ts p r e v io u s l y ad v er t i s e d f o r t h e 2012 t o 2013 s c h o o l y e a r. N e w p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: NE W AND REP L A CEMENT EQ UIPMENT C O MPUTERS AND ELECTR O NI C LEARNIN G D E VI CES AND ENTERP RIS E RESO UR CE SO FT W ARE M a n a g em en t I nf o r m a t io n S ys t em s S o wa r e E le c t r o nic R e co r d s R et en t io n S c a nnin g S ys t em MAINTEN AN CE, REN O V A TI O N, AND REP AIR R es ur facin g o f G y mn a si um Flo o r A me nd e d p r o je c ts t o b e fund e d: No n e P r o je c ts t o b e d e l e t e d: P A Y MENT S FO R RENTIN G AND LEA S IN G ED UCA TI O N AL F A CILITIES AND S ITES P a y m en t f o r FCS B a yside En v ir o nm en t a l L a b A l l co n cer n e d ci t izen s a r e in v i t e d t o a p u b lic h e a r in g t o b e h e ld o n J un e 25, 2013 a t 5:00 P .M. in t h e W i l lie S p e e d B o a r d R o o m, E a s t p o in t, Flo r id a. A D ECIS I O N o n t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t t o t h e p r o j e c ts f un de d f r o m CAP IT AL O UTL A Y T AXES w i l l b e m ade a t t hi s m e et in g Special to the Times Thirty-ve eighth graders at the Apala chicola Bay Charter School were given an emotional farewell before a packed Chap man Auditorium June 6, as they prepared to enter high school in the fall. The soaring ceremony was conducted by ABC Middle School teachers Tara Ward, Melanie Copeland, Anna Keel and Tanya Joanos, along with Principal Chi mene Johnson and Assistant Principal Elizabeth Kirvin. Graduates honored in the pinning cer emony included Jayla Alley, Eve Bond, Co rie Cates, Holly Chambers, Cash Creamer, Greyson Creamer, Emily Crosby, Logan Crosby, Tia Cummings, Max Davis, Landon Flowers, Jaylon Gainer, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bianca Huber, Robert Kilgore, Allie Kirvin, Mikayla Lloyd, Zack May, Austin McKee, Alexis O’Neal, Tyler Pendleton, Astrid Ramirez, Corbin Rest er, Alexis Segree, Alyssa Shiver, Mallorie Shiver, Anna Smith, Katy Spann, Marshall Sweet, Tony Taunton, Ali Valenzuela, KK Wilson and Emily Zingarelli. Students who received all A’s all year included Alley, Cates, Lloyd, O’Neal and Ramirez. Students on the A/B Honor Roll all year included Segree, Valenzuela, Mal lorie Shiver, Kirvin, Alyssa Shiver, Huber, Gainer, Creamer, Spann, Chambers, Em ily Crosby, Cummings, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Howard and Bobby Kilgore. Special to the Times The 2013-14 grant cycle for non-prots groups interested in applying for Franklin County Tourist Development Council (TDC) marketing assistance opened on June 13. Interested applicants are en couraged to ll out an application online at www.saltyorida.com/ grants prior to the grant cycle deadline of June 30. This year’s marketing pro gram differs from the past. Beginning this fall, non-prot groups looking to the TDC for help in promoting their events and activities will be able to tap into a marketing pool of more than $300,000 to help promote lo cal nonprot events. The plan, developed by the TDC and approved by the county commission earlier this spring, would combine event promotion funds with funds used to promote the Franklin County brand and would enable local organizations to benet from the full marketing resources of the TDC instead of the previous grant program that parceled out small allocations to individual groups for marketing. Eligible non-prot groups would also be eligible to receive a package of marketing services that could include print design, video and web-based marketing specically designed for their event. According to TDC Administra tor Curt Blair, the proposed plan is scheduled to go into effect this fall and is intended to provide an equal playing eld for all eligible event promotion requests as it will allow the TDC to pool its marketing resources to purchase advertising in bulk from media in proven geo-demographic mar kets as well as specically tar geted outlets. “We expect this plan will allow us to make bigger ad buys and reach more people than would be possible from individual grant promoters working with small advertising budgets,” he said. Non-prots groups interested in applying for Franklin County TDC marketing assistance may ll out an application online at www.saltyorida.com/grants Eligible applicants would be entered into the pool of events promoted as part of the TDC’s countywide event advertising program. The deadline to participate in the 2013-14 grant program is June 30. Notication of award will be sent to successful applicants by July 19 pending approval by the TDC grant committee at its July 17 meeting. If non-prots choose to forgo the marketing pool package, groups may continue to apply for small $500 stipends, said Blair. Since its inception in 2005, Franklin County’s tourist tax has generated more than $9 million in revenue used for promotion of events and activities. TDC polls marketing funds for grant recipients Eighth graders soar from ABC School DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The ABC School eight graders prepare to soar. Corbin Rester was among the 35 ABC eight graders. Kacey Howard gets pinned.

PAGE 8

A8 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 `= =G S=Y B ODI E B o d i e i s a 9 w e ek o l d L a b r a do r R e t r i e v e r w i t h a s p l as h of C a t a h o u l a H i s one b l ue e y e a nd m e r l e c o l o r e d l e g s m a k e h i m a v e r y u n iq ue a nd a p p e a l i n g l o o k i n g p up B e s ide s b e i n g u n iq ue l y a do r a b l e he i s a l s o v e r y s w e e t a nd p l a y f u l C om e me e t t h i s c u t i e a nd a l l t he o t he r p e r f e c t l y w onde r f u l a n i m a l s wa i t i n g f o r t he i r f o r e v e r h om e a t t he a do pt i on c e n t e r! V O L U N T EER S A RE D E S P ER A T EL Y N EED ED T O S O C I A LI Z E A LL O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l wa y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g one of o ur a n i m a l s i n t o t he i r h om e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r va r i o us ne e ds. A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e gr e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r mo r e de t a i l s o r v i s i t t he F r a n k l i n C o u n t y H u m a ne S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E as t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o gon t o t he w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e npe t s o r g t o s e e mo r e of o ur a do pt a b l e p e t s. 4515017 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Society By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Eastpoint artist Joyce Estes is inspired by both the natural and spiritual world to create lovely de signs with silk and dye. Estes has been creating silk paintings for more than 30 years. Although silk painting has been an art form in the Far East for about 2,000 years, it appeared in Europe in the early 1800s. It was not widely known in the US until the 1970s, so Estes was among the rst North American silk painters and an early member of Silk Paint ers International (SPIN). Today, she both wearable and liturgical silk art and is the presi dent of SPIN. “I started painting when I an swered an ad and traveled to Bal timore to study with Diane Tuck man, founder of SPIN. Tuckman coauthored the rst English lan guage book on silk painting with Jan Janas,” Estes said. “ I call her a little Jewish bulldog. Once she gets hold of you, she doesn’t let go.” Works by Estes will be featured in Tuckman’s next publication. Estes said she did not take her work in silk seriously, at rst, but now she is on a mission to have silk painting recognized as a ne art form, not dismissed as a craft. To this end, as president of SPIN she is reaching out to other textile artists, especially those in the South, to explore silk art. “Quilters and other textile art ists need to understand that they are welcome to join SPIN. The one requirement is that 75 percent of a textile project consists of silk,” said Estes. One way she is seeking to ex pand membership is by hosting a minifestival for SPIN at the LeMoyne Gallery in Tallahassee. “The big annual silk show is al ways held in Santa Fe, New Mexi co because most silk artists are in California or New York and Santa Fe is a major center for the arts,” she said. Estes said the Tallahassee event, sanctioned by the SPIN board, will be held August 7 through 11. There will be a recep tion on August 9 and an accompa nying exhibition at LeMoyne will hang Aug. 2-31. You can get more information about the festival, vis it www.lemoyne.org Estes work reects her love of nature. A new series of oral designs with string lilies, dragonies and magnolias was inspired by paddle trips with the Apalachicola River keepers ”Fourth Saturday” paddle program. Another powerful source of ar tistic inspiration is her faith. Estes began creating liturgical art to hang behind the altars of the Apalachicola/St. George Island United Methodist Church Coop erative Parish. She soon added stoles for women ministers to her repertoire. A devout churchwoman, her work caught the attention of the governing members of the UMC church and she is now the ofcial artist and artistic chair for the group’s General Conference. She has designed silk hangings for prayer gardens, created as aids to meditation for attendees at large church gatherings. Last year, Es tes attended all ve regional juris dictional conferences to promote prayer gardens, which are actu ally a series of meditation stations created around a central altar to provoke thought. For the 2012 General Confer ence of the United Methodist Church in Tampa, Estes created altar draperies centered around a “Vortex of Creation” using 70 yards of silk. The actual physical work of dyeing the hangings took a month but she said creating the design took much longer. Estes said she begins a work with plain white silk, stretched on a Moyer frame and treated with sizing. From there, the technique varies and new techniques are be ing developed every day. “It’s a ne art and people need to realize that,” said Estes. “We need to get organized to share with one another.” Caro-Walden shower July 13 There will be a baby shower in honor of Alexis Caro and Brennan Walden on Saturday, July 13 at 6 p.m. at the First Assembly of God Fellowship Hall in Carrabelle. The shower will be hosted by Donna Bar ber and Denise Massey. Please come and help us to prepare to welcome home baby boy A’Brailyn Bren nan Walden. Wheeler twins’ shower June 29 Two by Two, Twins are due, And we are tick led pink and blue! Please join us for a twin baby shower honoring Tanja Jewell Wheeler at the First Assembly of God Church, 307 Third Street NW, Carrabelle on Saturday, June 29 at 3 p.m. Registered at Burlington and Wal-Mart. All friends and family are invited. Twice the blessing, twice the love, Two little miracles sent from above Myra Ponder, left, receives engraved crystal vase from Carrie Frye. Ponder honored at educators’ state convention The Florida (Mu) State Organization of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International held its state convention at the Orlando Airport Marriott Hotel from April 19 to 21. Ofcers were elected for the 2013-2015 biennium and Myra Ponder, who has been treasurer for the state organization since 2003, was given a very spe cial gift by the outgoing president, Carrie Frye. Frye presented her with an engraved crystal vase at the Celebration Banquet on Saturday, April 20. Ponder has worked with the treasurers of the 94 Florida chapters during the 10-year period she has served as state treasurer. Myra’s husband Charles was able to attend as well as Arlene Oehler and her husband, Paul. Delta Kappa Gamma is an international organi zation of more than 94,000 educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Anna Rose Timm was inspired by the beauty of the Apalachicola River and Bay to clean up her own river back in Georgia. Day Magee and her son Davis met Timm when Davis was only 7 years old and Anna was 10. Davis was having trouble learning to read and Anna’s father, Scott Timm, was a reading facilitator. Scott, who suffered from a learning disorder himself, left a successful career in transportation to become a reading coach. At 7, Davis was the youngest student Scott had accepted but the boy made spectacular progress. Day Magee said Scott was the catalyst that turned Davis’ studies around. Scott became an important part of Davis’ life, attending sports events and school conferences. The next year, Day invited Scott and his family to use her beach house for a week and, in exchange, Scott mentored Davis. The Magees and the Timms became fast friends and Anna Rose and her parents have returned at least once a year since. Anna Rose, Davis and Scott loved to visit the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Center (ANERR) and participated in International Coastal Cleanup Day on the island for several years. Scott and Anna Rose also volunteered for Estuary Day. “She’s always been conscious of litter and picked things up when we were at the beach,” Scott Timm said. Anna Rose is now 18 and graduated from high school this year. Each of the students in her class carried out a senior project. Inspired by ANERR and her love of the natural world, Anna Rose chose to host her own environmental initiative. With help from about 30 friends, Timm organized a clean-up of the Little River, a tributary of the Etowah, in Georgia, north of Atlanta. Scott Timm said she recruited volunteers, procured supplies and even arranged for lunch to be served when the work was done. Anna Rose has been accepted by the University of Georgia and plans a career in environmental engineering. Inspired by the river Creamer inducted into Phi Kappa Phi honor society The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is pleased to an nounce that Jonathan Creamer, of Apalachicola, was recently initiated into Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all aca demic disciplines. Creamer will earn a master’s of arts in physical edu cation in July 2013 from the University of South Florida, where he has maintained a 4.0 grade point average. A 1999 graduate of Apalachicola High School, Cream er is the son of Ray Creamer and Terri Pridgen, both of Apalachicola. In 2012, he graduated from Florida State University with a bachelor’s of science in social science and educa tion. Creamer was inducted into both the Garnet Key and Golden Key honor societies. Creamer is among approximately 32,000 students, fac ulty, professional staff and alumni to be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation and re quires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff, and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction. Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine and head quartered in Baton Rouge, La., Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective all-discipline honor society. The society has chapters on more than 300 col lege and university campuses in North America and the Philippines. Since its founding, more than 1 million members have been initiated. Some of the organization’s more no table members include former President Jimmy Carter, NASA astronaut Wendy Lawrence, novelist David Bal dacci and YouTube cofounder Chad Hurley. The society has awarded approximately $15 million since the incep tion of its awards program in 1932. Today, $1 million is awarded each biennium to qualifying students and mem bers through graduate fellowships, undergraduate study abroad scholarships, member and chapter awards and grants for local and national literacy initiatives. For more information, visit www.PhiKappaPhi.org JOYCE ESTES | Special to the Times A silk painting created by Estes for the SPIN conference held each year in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Spiritual inspiration fuels Estes’ silk designs Baby SHOWERS ANN aA R oseOSE TIMM LOI I S SWOBODA | The Times Joyce Estes displays a piece of her wearable art. JOYCE ESTES | Special to the Times The ora and fauna of the Panhandle inspire much of Estes’ work.

PAGE 9

The Times | A9 Thursday, June 20, 2013 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice R. Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith ZEMER LEVAV TO PERFORM SATURDAY Zemer Levav, which means Song of the Heart, is a messianic Jewish music ministry that will be in concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at First Baptist Church of St. George Island, 501 E. Bayshore Drive. Zemer Levav sets Biblical lyrics to music with a folksy Celtic and Sephardic Jewish avor. Choreographer Shimrit Hanes weaves Israeli dance into this familys music, which creates a unique worship experience. The Hanes family has been traveling and playing music professionally for more than 10 years. They play guitar, harp, lyre, oud, utes and Middle Eastern percussion.F IR S T BAPTI S T BI BL E SCHOO L S TART S M ONDAY The First Baptist Church of Apalachicola, 46 Ninth St. will have Vacation Bible School from 6-8:30 p.m. June 24-28. The theme is Colossal Coaster World 2 Timothy 1:7. There will be fun songs to learn, fun crafts to make, delicious snacks and exciting Bible stories to hear. Charles Ernest Gay, 89, of Carrabelle, passed away on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Tallahassee. He was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. He was a member of Carrabelle First Baptist Church. He was a former school board member of Franklin County. He was a retired boat captain and sherman. He also retired from Florida State University Marine Biology Laboratory. He will always be remembered as a wonderful husband, father, grandfather and solider. He was an Army veteran, serving in World War II. He is survived by his wife, Della Gay, of Carrabelle; a son: Mickey Gay (Jackie), of Carrabelle; three daughters, Clara Moeck, of San Diego, Calif., Patsy Putnal (Bevin) of Carrabelle, and Tina Varnes (Michael), of Pascagoula, Miss.; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. He was predeceased in death by his rst wife, Myrt Gay; and his parents, Howard and Clara Gay. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements.Charles Ernest Gay CHARLES ERNEST GAY Alonzo M. Lonnie Cooper, age 87, passed away Sunday, June 16, 2013, after a short illness in Panama City. Born May 6, 1926, he was a lifelong resident of Apalachicola. He was a World War II veteran, having served in the Air Force as a B-24 gunner and military police. After the military years, he briey lived in Texas, where he met his loving wife, Dorothy, and they shared 53 years together. Lonnie was a retired shrimp boat captain and enjoyed his retirement years working in his yard. Other than his wife, Dorothy, he is survived by his twin brother, Levy Cooper, of Apalachicola; and devoted niece, Betty Davis (Larry), of Tallahassee. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Tuesday, June 18, graveside in Magnolia Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handling all arrangements.Alonzo Lonnie Cooper First of all, I would like to thank the two men who helped me up after my tumble last week. Oh yeah, I couldnt have fallen at home on the carpet, I had to fall on the concrete. Im a little skinned up but otherwise alright. Thanks again, guys. Did you get to enjoy the full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club last Saturday? I just know you did. Then there was the June Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 last Saturday evening. The place should have been rocking. A nice crowd of us gathered at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish luncheon. Hope you can join us next month on Sunday, July 20. All you need to bring is a dish to share, a donation and your empty stomach. Be lookin for you! Keep the following in your prayers: Earnest Gay, Margaret Stitts, Ernie Harmsen and Carl Swenson. Pray for the repose of their souls and for strength and comfort for their families. Ernie Harmsen passed away Wednesday, June 13. His family and Janice Rhinehart were at his bedside. Cards may be sent to Janice Rhinehart, and Ernies family, 100 Charlotte Place, Fayetteville, GA 30215. Janice will be back in Lanark in October. Margaret Stitts was a longtime snowbird from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Her home here was on Pine Street. She was a very ne lady and a good friend and neighbor. Those of us who were close to her will miss her a lot. Margaret, family and friends had celebrated her 98th birthday on Thursday, May 16, and the angels took her home on Monday, May 20. Ernest Gay was a gentleman and a scholar and a good friend and neighbor. There is a big empty spot in Carrabelle and the area. Carl Swenson was taken up on Saturday, June 16. Carl and his wife, Dorothy, lived in the village for a long time on Parker Avenue. He was always there to pitch in and help. He will be missed by many. Attention, all of you who rip up and down Oak Street like you were Kyle Busch at Daytona. The posted speed limit is 20 mph. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, volunteers make it happen; become one today! Keep smiling you may not feel better, but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 lswoboda@star.com Jennifer Duncan loves to sing the old songs. When she croons forgotten melodies, she awakens memories of lost loves and youthful pleasures. Duncan is a songbird with a specialty. She sings the songs of the 1930s and 40s to the original Big Band arrangements that made swing music great. She is also a historian who can recount the stories behind the songs she loves to sing. On June 8, Duncan visited the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum and before a captivated audience, performed the music of the war years. Duncan performs for reunions and other functions. Years ago, she was asked to learn the Nat King Cole hit (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons for a Valentines Day banquet. She grew up with a musical mother and a father who was a veteran of both World War II and Korea. She found herself moved by the songs and by the audiences warm reception of the old music. Around the same time, her husband asked her what she wanted for her birthday. I want my music, she replied, meaning the music she grew up with in the 1970s and 80s. It was then she realized what a powerful gift the music of youth can be. It takes people back and helps them recapture their happiest times, she said. People are so surprised when they hear me sing the songs from World War II. They ask me, How do you know that? She said she once entertained at a Christmas party and was told not to expect too much enthusiasm from her elderly audience. They got up and started dancing! Duncan said. It doesnt matter if your knees are bad and your back hurts. Sometimes, you have to get up and dance because the music makes you feel so good. Duncan increased her repertoire of swing tunes and romantic ballads from the early 20th century and now frequently performs at high school and veterans reunions. She has also entertained during breakfast at ve Honor Flights that embarked from Columbus, Ga. The Honor Flight Network is a nonprot organization that transports veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit and reect at their memorials. Recently, Duncan performed about a dozen songs for an audience, beginning with the romantic ballad I Only Have Eyes for You from the 1934 musical Dames. Performing with recordings of the original Big Band arrangements, she treated listeners to songs including Summertime, When You Wish Upon a Star and God Bless America. The audience joined in singing the patriotic anthem. The early arrangements contain stretches of instrumental music to showcase soloists in the band. During these musical interludes, Duncan recounted tales about the songs and the era that created and loved them. She nished the set with (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons, which drew rousing applause. A resident of Columbus, Ga., Duncans family has been traveling to St. George Island for almost 40 years. She said they come in the summer to enjoy the beach, and now that the children are grown, she and her husband return every December to celebrate their wedding anniversary. Red Anthony Family To the family and many friends of the late D. Fred Red Anthony, we wish to extend our sincere thanks for your many kindnesses, prayers, condolences, owers, cards, food and visits. We are sincerely grateful to Ginny Griner and Charles Thompson for the music presented at Reds funeral service. We also send our gratitude and appreciation to the members and clergy of Fort Gaines Baptist Church and Fellowship Baptist Church of Apalachicola. Please know that these acts of kindness and sympathy continue to be a great comfort to us in our time of sorrow. Annette Anthony and the whole Anthony family Card of THANKS Obituaries Faith BRIEFS Prayers for those who touched Lanark community LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh She sings for sentimental reasons A TRIP TO REMEMBERL OI S S WO B ODA | The Times Jennifer Duncan performs at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum on June 8.L OI S S WO B ODA | The Times On June 8, World War II veteran Bob Franklin of Lanark Village shared a photo album of his trip to the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., with Linda Minichiello. Franklin made the trip in May accompanied by his son Ken, along with 80 other WWII vets. E A S TPOINT BAPTI S T BI BL E SCHOO L S TART S M ONDAY The First Baptist Church of Eastpoint will have Vacation Bible School on June 24-28. Children ages 3 and up are invited, starting with a free dinner at 5:30 p.m. daily. The VBS sessions have a Colossal Coaster World theme and will be 6-8:30 p.m. at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint.

PAGE 10

The mimosa, Albizia julibrissin, is also known as Persian silk tree, pink silk tree, pink siris, Lenkoran acacia and bastard tamarind, and is a member of the bean family. In China, where it originated, it is known as the “sleeping tree” because the delicate, fernlike leaves fold when contacted and after sunset. Mimosa is widely employed as a garden ornamental. The seeds are food for livestock and wildlife and the fragrant owers are attractive to bees and butter ies. Mimosa is a deciduous tree that can grow 20 to 40 feet tall. It is a shortlived tree that grows about twice as broad as it is tall in specimen plants. It is capable of xing nitrogen and improving the soil where it grows. The bark is light brown and smooth while young stems are lime green in color. Each leaf is composed of 20 to 60 lea ets giving the tree a feathery appearance. Mimosa owering occurs from May through July. Its uffy owers are generally pink although white and cream varieties are known. Cultivar ‘Summer Chocolate’ has red foliage ageing to dark bronze, with pale pink owers. ‘Ishii Weeping’ has a drooping growth habit. Unfortunately, mimosa is highly invasive because of the tremendous amount of seed produced. Since its introduction 250 years ago, it has spread over most of North America. Its dense foliage, shades out native plants. Efforts are underway to breed trees that will not set seed. Also on the downside, mimosa is prone to fungal disease, especially in warmer climates and many consider the tree to be messy since it sheds both leaves and owers over a long period of the year. Mimosa bark is sometimes called “happiness bark” in traditional and herbal medicine because it is said to act as an antidepressant. The bark is also used to treat in ammation, abscesses and swelling. The shredded bark is sometimes found in oriental markets and health food stores. "$ # # COME JOIN US FOR THE . 4 TH OF JUL Y SIDEW ALK SALE! By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The 425 anglers who shed in the 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic battled rough seas. Matt Lambert, chairman of the tournament, said several captains ended the day early on Saturday, with fewer sh weighed than last year. “We still weighed a lot of sh though,” said Lambert. Paul Osterbye, who shes out of Carrabelle every weekend, said his team experienced six to eight foot waves for most of the day Saturday. Rough water didn’t dampen everyone’s enthusiasm. Osterbye’s 7year-old granddaughter, Jaylyn Middleton, still managed to haul in more than 50 sh although none made it onto the leaderboard. It was a real Father’s Day tournament this year. Osterbye shed with his son Danny who is not quite as old as the venerable tourney. Danny Osterbye began competing in the Juniors Division some years ago. His weekend featured seasickness, and snagging his hair in his line while reeling in a king mackerel. Ouch! Danny caught the same mackerel twice. Having dropped it while of oading at the Moorings, he dove in the drink to retrieve the big bruiser and slashed his palm on barnacles in the process. Also shing as a team were Mike, Gage and Riley Runyan, of Crawfordville. Daddy Mike was glowing with pride during the Junior Division awards as he watched both boys receive medals in their rst tournament.. Nine-year-old Gage took rst place for a 17.3 pound snapper that set a record for the juniors, the only record set in this year’s competition. Little brother Riley hauled in a snapper that weighed nearly 11 pounds to win third place. Mateo La Sorsa, of Orlando, shing in the Junior Division for the second time, maintained his rst place status for grouper for the second year and took additional medals for snapper, king mackerel and Spanish mackerel. Marilyn and Gary Lawhon of Carrabelle took rst and third place respectively for ounder in the Recreational Division. Team Big sh SGI was fourth on the leaderboard for the Masters Division with 250 points and Capt. Clint Taylor took rst place for snapper with a 21-pound beauty, and third for king mackerel with a sh that tipped the scales at 24.5 pounds. This year, the tournament changed its venue for the rst time since 2006. The competition was staged from the Moorings, the site of the original competition. “The Moorings is where we started and, for our silver anniversary, we thought we would like to get back to our roots,” Lambert said. “It’s a great space and a great staff.” He said he plans to stage the competition at the Moorings again next year with very few changes. On Sunday, the Franklin County All-stars AA baseball team passed the hat and helped out at the charity sh auction. Proceeds from the auction will help pay the boys’ way to Florida Dixie Youth Baseball State Tournament at Wildwood on June 29. Members of the Seahawks varsity football team also lent a hand in this year’s tourney working in shifts throughout the competition. Lambert said in spite of having fewer sh to offer, the auction netted more than last year, and raised more than $1,000 for the young athletes. Voice stress analysis employed Another change in this year’s competition was the introduction of voice stress analysis to spot check anglers and prevent the propagation of sh tales. According to Lambert, the tournament has used polygraph equipment for at least the four years he has served on the board. The voice stress analysis was used to screen potential polygraph subjects. He said the tests are given over the phone and must be performed in a silent room. The time required for the process slowed the processing of winners slightly this year. “We have always done spot checks and performed tests when the angler or sh was suspect. (Voice stress analysis) saves the tournament some money,” said Lambert. “Polygraph tests are more expensive. We just want to make sure the integrity of the tournament is intact. People will cheat if you let them. We try not to let them. “ Lambert said an angler who refuses a spot test will not receive his or her check but added that the tournament has never had to withhold payment. As always, the Saltwater Classic bene ted the Organization for Arti cial Reefs (OAR). Founded in 1985, OAR serves the recreational saltwater shing industry of Florida’s Big Bend Gulf Coast by promoting the professional development of public arti cial reefs. Since 1987, OAR has created or enhanced over 30 named reefs in the Big Bend Gulf. OAR collaborates with cities and counties as well as state and federal governments to create and maintain arti cial reefs. OAR also collaborates with marine research agencies, other arti cial reef groups, and the academic community. High seas hamper Saltwater Classic Mimosa is beautiful but an aggressive invasive species Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, June 20, 2013 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Red snapper continues to be the best bet in offshore fishing right now and will be until the season closes on June 28th in Federal waters. Big snapper are holding on near shore and offshore wrecks from 60-150ft of water. Live bait will prove to be the best for bigger fish, however snapper will eat cut bait as well. Try fishing 20 feet off the bottom with a live grunt or pinfish for a trophy red snapper. As the summer time weather patterns start to set in, bay fishing will be a game of early and late. Early morning top water action will produce nice trout and redfish catches. Late afternoon fishing will be mainly live bait and grubs and jigs and as the water cools down, try switching back to a top water hard bait for a trophy red fish or trout. Flounder are showing up in the normal places this week from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu June 20 87 75 30 % F ri, June 21 86 75 40 % S a t June 22 87 75 30 % Sun, June 23 87 76 40 % M on, June 24 88 76 20 % T ues June 25 88 77 20 % W ed June 26 87 77 60 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Proud dad, Mike Runyan displays the prize-winning snapper caught by sons Gage, left, and Riley. Gage’s sh set a tournament record for the Junior Division at 17.3 pounds; Riley’s weighed a respectable 10.65 pounds.

PAGE 11

N O TI CE O F CH AN GE O F RE-ZO NIN G e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g p ur s u a n t t o S e c t io n 163.3184, Flo r id a S t a t u t es, t o co n sider ado p t in g p r o p os e d c h a n g es t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y Z o nin g M a ps s er ies f o r : L o ts 1, 2, 3, 4 a n d L o t 5, B lo c k 9, U ni t 1 E a s t, S t. G e o r g e I s l a n d F ra n k lin C o un t y Flo r id a t o b e r e-zo n e d f r o m C-2 C o mm er ci a l B u sin es s t o C-4 C o mm er ci a l M ix e d U s e A p u b lic h e a r in g o n t h e p r o p os e d c h a n g es t o t h e Z o nin g M a p s er ies w i l l b e h e ld o n T ues d a y J u l y 2, 2013, a t 10:15 a.m., a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex in A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a. M o r e inf o r m a t io n m a y b e in s p e c t e d a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a, T e lep h o n e (850) 653-9783. P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n a t t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, S ui t e 203, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g s h o u ld m a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts t o a s s ur e t h a t a v erb a t im r e co r d i s m ade in c l udin g t es t im o n y a n d e v iden ce if a n y u p o n w hic h t h e a p p e a l i s t o b e b a s e d PUB LIS H D A TE: ur s d a y J un e 20, 2013 CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 20, 2013 A Page 11 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A crew of energetic young boys, ages 7 and 8, are headed to the state tourney in Wildwood next week, after they won their district tournament in Gulf County last week. The Franklin County All-Stars AA Division team, in an age bracket where the players hit off the pitching machine, won the District 4 championship in Port St. Joe June 10. The team went undefeated and now advances to the state tournament on Friday, June 28 in Wildwood. Head Coach Eddie Moses said the team downed Wewahitchka 18-6 on June 7, and then defeated Port St. Joe 169 on June 8, and again 16-11 on June 10. The assistant coaches are Ricky Abercrombie, Bobby Varnes, and Timmy Poloronis. “Going undefeated was a major feat,” Moses said. “I cannot recall it ever being done, and we’ve been doing it 7-8 years. We have a very talented little baseball team right now.” Moses said brackets for the state tourney will soon be announced, once the other districts have all nished their play. The state event is a double-elimination tournament. “You stay until you’re eliminated, or you win it all,” he said. The county commission on Tuesday gave the team $2,500 for the state tourney, similar to the $2,500 they gave to each of the other three All-Star teams. The team, which has held multiple fundrasiers, raised a nice chunk last week at the Big Bend Saltwater Classic. Moses said the AA and AAA All-Stars both assisted in the fundraiser. “The boys were actually dockmasters, from the boats to the weigh stations, then in the auction Sunday,” said Moses. In AA baseball, where the games last six innings, players are served up ve total pitches, and there are no walks. “You swing at three strikes and you’re out but you can let one pass,” said Moses. AA All-Stars headed to Wildwood SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The Franklin County AAA All-Star Team, managed by Justin Odom, and coached by Lanny Rester and Bert Davis, won the AAA district crown for 9 and 10 year olds June 11 in Port St. Joe. They are now headed to the AAA state tourney July 13 in Freeport. Pictured above are teammates Carson Davis, Gage Boone, Clint Rester, Colin Amison, Caleb Abel, Caden Turrell, Joshua Odom, Lamarius Martin, Tanner Amison, Ashton Topham, Devin Daniels and Kelson Smith. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Friday, June 7, 12 teams squared off at St. James Bay Golf Resort to compete in the Franklin and Wakulla County Sheriffs’ Of ce Golf Tournament. Forty-six players participated in the event. Team Centennial Bank Wally Dodson, Dustin Grubbs, Larry Tromley and David Hoover won the day in the best ball tourney and walked away with a $500 purse. A tie for second place between Team Duke Energy and Team Coastline, both shooting 56, was broken in a scorecard playoff and Team Duke Energy walked with the $300 second place purse with Coastline nishing third for a $200 purse. Tony Sapp and Bruce Ashley, the only two-man team, won four shing poles for nishing “dead ass last” with a score of 75. David Hoover was on his game. In addition to playing on the winning team, he was closest to the pin on holes 6 and 11. Conner Smith was closest on hole 2 and Warren Roddenberry on hole 17. Each won a free round of golf. Tyler Poloronis and Connor Smith each won a $50 gift certi cate for the Crooked River Grill for the longest drive on holes 7 and 18 respectively. The Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce was represented by the team of Capt. Brad Segree, Brock Johnson, Robbie Johnson and Brett Johnson. The event was organized with help from St. James Bay’s capable new golf pro, Rob Burlison. Burlison hails from Greene, a small town in upstate New York. He was 9 when he rst took up clubs following in the steps of his parents. He attended Broome Community College and the Golf Academy of the South in Altamont Springs. He has played competitive golf for 20 years. He was assistant pro at St. James Bay from 2004 to 2008. “I love the area and enjoy our owner,” Burlison said. “The facility itself is beautiful. When I got the opportunity to come back, I jumped. I returned in Dec. 2012.” Proceeds from the tourney bene t the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches whose mission is to prevent delinquency and develop strong, lawful, resilient, and productive citizens through a fourfold philosophy of work, study, play and pray. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Team Centennial takes sheriff’s ranch tourney SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Members of the Franklin County AA All-Stars are, front row, from left, Jabara Pearson, Mason Moses, Cody Abercrombie, Owen Poloronis, Dax Chitty and Marcus Clayton. Middle row, from left, is Ethan Kembro, Wil Varnes, John Michael Thompson, Weston Bockelman, Evan Stanley, and Wyatt Abercrombie. AAA ALL-STARS GOING TO STATE GOLF TOURNAMENT WINNERS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The winning team, from Centennial Bank, was represented by Wally Dodson, Dustin Grubbs, Larry Tromley and David Hoover.

PAGE 12

T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % GET YOUR AD IN TRADES & SER VICES CALL TODA Y! 653-8868 Sports A12 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 Franklin County’s ball elds have new mascots. Three-foot tall baseballs are now on display at each of the county’s three ball elds. Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender said she had noticed an oversized baseball by US 98 in St. James and told her mother she wanted similar ornaments for the ball elds. Her mother was bearwatching in Lanark one day and happened on a second big ball in the yard of Albert Smythe. She asked him about the ball and he gave it to her. Millender had the ball painted with a Seahawk at Sign Design in Eastpoint and placed it at the entrance to Kendrick Field. Later, Millender noticed a truck in the yard of the home where she had seen the original ball. On impulse, she pulled in and Ray Miller welcomed her into his home and gave her two more balls. Miller acquired the balls after they were part of a failed fundraiser for the Atlanta Braves. Millender said one of the balls is also on display at Turner Field in Atlanta. By Lois Swoboda LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LET’ sS P laLA Y ballBALL FR aA NK liLI N SCH oolOOL T oO H osOS T G olfOLF T oO URNEY Play golf to support the students at the Franklin County Schools golf tournament. Tee time is 1 p.m. June 28 at St. James Bay Golf Resort Prizes for rst, second and third places will be a cash payout. For sponsor questions contact Shannon Venable at 670-2810, ext. 4105 or svenable@ franklin.k12.fl.us. For tournament questions, contact Burlison at 6979606 or rob@stjamesbay. com.STU dD ENT aA TH lL ETE sS sS EEK assis ASSIS T a A NCE Two graduating seniors are seeking donations as they prepare to take part in summer athletic teams. David Butler will attend the USA Junior Basketball National in Columbus, Ohio, on July 8. Skyler Hutchinson will attend the Under Armour Baseball Nationals Omaha, Neb., on July 22. To help Butler or Hutchinson, contact Michael Sweatt at sweattfamu@hotmail. com, 566-3434 or 899-1742. Sports b B R iI E fsFS A12 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91374T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192012CA000348CAXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 26, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000348CA XXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, is the Plaintiff and JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON; CENTENNIAL BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on July 10, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND IN THE N.E. OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 27, T8S, R8W HEREBY FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY INTERSECTION (CON.MON.) OF TWO PROPOSED 66 FOOT ROADS, 1765 FEET DUE NORTH AND 218.5 FEET WEST OF THE S.W. CORNER (CON.MON.) OF THE N.E. OF SAID SECTION 27, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE ROAD, 144 FEET TO A PONT FOR BEGINNING; RUN THENCE, CONTINUING ALONG ROAD, 200 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE CREEK; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG CREEK TO A POINT NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST OF THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES WEST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-08104 June 13, 20, 2013 91430T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-000087-CA CIRCUITCIVILDIVISION SUPERIOR BANK, f/k/a THE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. SMITH; MICHAELL. HAMMOND; and CARRAWAYBAY, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that in accordance with the 3ODLQWLIIV)LQDO-XGJ PHQWRI)RUHFORVXUH entered on May 28th, 2013 in above-styled FDXVH,ZLOOVHOOWRWKH KLJKHVWDQGEHVWELGGHU IRUFDVKRQ-XO\WK 2013 at 11:00 A.M.(CST), at the )UDQNOLQ&RXQW\&RXUW KRXVHORFDWHGDW Market Street, Apalachicola, FL32320 for WKHIROORZLQJGHVFULEHG property: Lot 51, Carraway Bay 3ODQWDWLRQDFFRUGLQJWR the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat %RRN3DJHRI WKH3XEOLF5HFRUGVRI )UDQNOLQ&RXQW\)ORU ida. Property Address: Lot 51 Carraway Bay Plantation, Carrabelle, FL 32322 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: May 31, 2013 MARCIAM. JOHNSON, FRANKLIN COUNTY CIRCUITCOURT By: Michele Maxwell 'HSXW\&OHUN -XQH 91446T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.12000377CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CARLTON JACKSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RICKY R. REGIST A/K/A RICKY R. REGISTER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICKY R. REGIST RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 5553 SPRING HILL ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32305 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 1 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 2, BLOCK ‘128’ (E-10), OF PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the The Apalachicola Times. DATED: March 6, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk of the Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File No. 33981 June 20, 27, 2013 91514T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF AGENCY ACTION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice its issuance of a permit (File Number 19-0315851001EI) to St George Cara Bay, LLC/William Vester, c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc. P.O. Box 385, Apalachicola, FL 32329 to construct a breakwater 66 linear foot with two fishery corridors on each end, within the landward extent of St George Sound, a Class II, and Outstanding Florida Waterbody. Breakwater is to be installed no more than 10’ waterward of Mean High Water. The permittee is also required to plant Spartina alterniflora 1 foot centers behind the breakwater located at 1155 Russell Way, Lot 1, Cara Bay Estates, Section 29, Township 09 South 06 West on St George Island, Franklin County, Florida, in St George Sound, Class II, OFW in St George Island, Florida. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. Petitions must be filed within 21 days of publication of this notice. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd MS 55, Tallahassee, Florida

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, June 20, 2013 The Times | A13 Rowell Auctions, Inc. 800-323-8388 RowellAuctions.com ell Auctions, Inc 0 0-323-8388 we llA uc ti o n s.co m 10% Buyers Premium € AU 479, AB 296For Additional Property Information Visit RowellAuctions.com AUCTION ONLINE ONLY € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation Ro we ellAuctionsInc For Additional Proper t ty Information Visit ns.com RowellAuctio n € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation A AU AU C C T O I O N ONLINE ONLY LINEONLY Bidding Ends Wed., June 26th, 2pmSubject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature 9 Bank Owned Properties GA & FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL € € € T € T € T €T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T €T T T T T ier ier ier ier ier er er er ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Lt Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lt L L L Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot ot ot € Tier 1 Lot € € € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 €1 1 1 1 Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl l l Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl ock ock ock ock ock k k k ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of h th th th th th th th th th h h th th th th th th th th e e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B eB eB eB eB eB eB eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h € 1 Block of the Beach € J € € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J J J J J J ust ust ust ust t t t ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi i Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi t t t t t t t t t nut nut nut nut nut nut nut es es es es s s s s es s es es es f f f f fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro m m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m m B m B mB mB mB eau eau eau eau ea eau eau eau e t tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif l l l ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul € J ust Mi nut es from B eau tif ul G G G Gu Gu Gul Gul Gul ul G Gu G f f f C f C f C f C f C f C f C fC f C f C f C oas oas oas a oas oas oa t tF t F t F t F t F t F F F F t F F i i ish ish ish ish sh i i ing ng g ing ing ing ng ng g g g g g g & & & & & & & & & & & & Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec R rea rea rea rea rea rea re re re ti tio io tio tio n n n n n n n n n Gulf Coast Fish ing & Recreation G G G G Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul fC fC fC fC fC C C C fC fC fC fC fC fC f f oas oas oas oas oas oas oas oas t t t t tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF ish ish ih ish ih ih ih h h h ish ish ish ish ish ish ish i i ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & R R R Rec Rec Rec R R R Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec rea rea rea rea rea rea rea rea ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti tio tio tio tio tio tio tio n n n n n n n n n n n n GulfCoastFishing&Recreation 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 86 86 86 Me Me Me M Me Me Me Me Me Me Me Me rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rc ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry y y Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan L L L Lan L Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan an an e e e e e e e e e e e e e e Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por t S t S S S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S tS tS tS tS tS S t. t. t. t. t. t t. t. t t t t t t J J J Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap ap ap e e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S eS eS eS eS eS eS d d d d d d d and and and d and and and and and and and Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) FL FL FL FL FL L L L L L L L FL FL FL L FL FL FL FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL Also Available:36 Janet Drive Crawfordville (Shell Point), FL 3 Bd, 2 Ba Mobile Home 1739 Lark Lane St. George Island, FL Excellent Lot Located in the Plantation 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr. Port St. Joe, FL Excellent Home Site Pisces Dr., Santa Rosa Beach, FL -Canal Front Lot w/Dock 2090212 1112349 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ................... ............... ..................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD ................... ............... ................ $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND .............. ..... ............................ $750 1BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650 32399-3000. June 20, 2013 93941T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on July 18, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property PARCEL 1: Lot 58, PHASE 4, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION PHASES 3 AND 4, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. PARCEL 2: All of Lots 1 through 8, Block 99, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 900.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31 for 459.73 feet to the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 693.63 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West along the Western right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway for 246.99 feet, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 575.16 feet to the Point of Beginning. AND All of Lots 1 through 6, Block 100, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 1359.73 feet to the Northern right-ofway of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 743.63 feet to the Point of Beginning. From this Point of Beginning continue North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road for 300.00 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West for 126.23 feet to the Northeast corner of Lot 6, Block 100, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 317.36 feet to the Eastern right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway, thence South 19 degrees 02 minutes East for 229.74 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, INC. a/k/a GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN, INC.; JEFFERY A. DYKES; KELLY J. DYKES; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; GOLD KEY HOLDINGS, II, LLC, Defendants and the docket number of which is 2013 CA 000063 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 3rd day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 93861T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012 CA 000325 AUDIE E. LANGSTON Plaintiff, vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT Defendant NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Chris Cartwright, Defendant, and to all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against Defendant, and all parties having or claiming to have and right, title or interest in the real property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated as defendant in a legal proceeding filed against you for foreclosure on real property purchased from Audie E. Langston. The action involves real property in Franklin County, Florida, more fully described as follows: LOT 91 LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03 seconds East Along the North boundary of said section 35 a distance of 2855.93 Feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 760.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING From Said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds East 40.89 feet to a point on the Northwesterly right-ofway Boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway said point lying on a curve. Concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Northeasterly along said Right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3410.00 Feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds for an arc distance of 447.51 feet, the chord of said arc being North 38 degrees 27 minutes 47 seconds East 447.19 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 319.25 feet to th POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.40 acres, more or less. The action was instituted in the Second Judicial Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida, and is styled AUDIE E. LANGSTON vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT, et al. Case No.: 2012 CA 00325. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Daniel W. Hartman, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is PO Box 10910, Tallahassee, FL 32302, on or before July 30, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Daniel W. Hartman or immediately after service, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff’s interest which will be binding upon you. DATED: April 23, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 93951T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-129 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-129 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of AUGUST, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Commence at the Northeasterly corner of Lot 1, Block 16, Unit 4, Lanark Village, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 6, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and run South 67 degrees 13 minutes 35 seconds East 261.30 feet to a point lying on the Northerly right-ofway boundary of State Road No. 30, thence run South 62 degrees 13 minutes 55 seconds West along said right of way boundary 574.40 feet to a concrete monument (marked 4261) marking the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-ofway boundary run North 27 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds West 191.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence run North 88 degrees 41 minutes 17 seconds West 164.32 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261); thence run South 15 degrees 38 minutes 56 seconds East 277.04 feet to a re-rod (marked 4261) lying on the Northwesterly right of way of State Road No. 30; thence run North 62 degrees 13 minutes, 55 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 201.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 93953T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-128 CA CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER, Husband and Wife, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2013, in Case Number 11-128 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, as successor by Merger with Superior Bank, N.A., as successor in interest to Superior Bank, FSB, is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. HAWKER and MARY S. HAWKER are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the 8th day of August, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 13, Block B, Saint James Island Park (Unit No. 1), according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 5th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 93983T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-21-CA APALACHICOLA INTERNATIONAL AVIATION TRAINING CENTER, INC., a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE P. HAMM, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 28th day of May, 2013, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by public sale, on the 10th day of July, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 33 Market Street in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: 1981 PIPER PA-44-180, SERIAL NO. 44-8195009, FAA REGISTRATION No. N8307E, LYCOMING 0-360A1D ENGINE TOGETHER WITH ACCESSORIES AND EQUIPMENT INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ALL LOGBOOKS (ENGINE, AIRCRAFT AND PROPELLER), PARTS, RADIOS, AVIONICS, AND PROPELLERS. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 3rd day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, 2013 j j ADOPT j j : Actor/Director & Executive long for 1st baby to LOVE; Home cooking awaits! j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW Wanted: A place to board my horse in Franklin County. 850-274-1321 Text FL55658 to 56654 Carabelle : Carabelle Flea Market (Behind the IGA) Friday & Saturday June 21st and June 22nd, 8am until Venders Welcome Education Early Education and Care, Inc. Center Director position available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Logistics/TransportDrivers: Drivers: Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. Call: 1-888-880-5911 Text FL55307 to 56654 HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to newsletter@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at 850-927-2900. Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair DISPATCHERS AND MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS National cleaning and outsourcing company needs experienced staff for above positions for a large, luxury property in the Santa Rosa Beach area. Dispatchers -$10 $12 per hour, shifts from 8am to 10pm, weekends required. Maintenance Techs must be experienced $12 -$16 per hour, nights and weekends required and some overnight on-call shifts. Voluntary benefits available after 90 days. Call Jennifer at (850) 231-1422 or (850) 461-2854. Web ID#: 34256011 txt FL56011 to 56654 Other Property Services Opportunity for energetic person to work with our uniformed property services team and learn valuable customer service skills while performing duties including landscape, pool cleaning, janitorial & general maintenance. Great wage, work 32-40 hours weekly. To apply start with a call to CMS at 850-927-4911. Web ID#: 34255273 Text FL55273 to 56654 Other Youth & Family Advocate Several available positions as full-time counselor in an innovative agency serving adolescents and their families in outlying counties (Taylor, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson & Madison). These services may include initial screenings, crisis intervention, case planning, internal and external referrals, progress evaluation, individual, group and family counseling. Master’s Degree in a Counseling Related Field required. Travel Required. Mail your resume to 2407 Roberts Ave., Tall, FL 32310 or fax 576-2580. In order to process applications more efficiently, we ask that you please refrain from calling the office to confirm receipt of resumes. Web ID#: 34255232 Text FL55232 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Ford Taurus ‘04. $675 Down. Total is $4900. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Ford Explorer 2002. $675 Down Total price is $5500. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Dodge Ram X/Cab ‘02 $975 Down Total price is $5900. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Chevy Silverado 2004 Ext. Cab $1500 Down Total price $7500. 0% Interest. Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 215-1769 Southern Cross-28Ft, Good condition, Dsl Eng, 2-Spd Winchs, New stainless rig, Awlgrip Hull, West Bottom. Health, $7,500 OBO. Call 850 866-6989. Text FL55153 to 56654 Are you Looking for a Babysitter? I am trained in CPR and First Aid. I have 40hr of credit in child Devlopment, plus many additional hours of training in “on the Job” services. CDAcertification, Currently employed with Early Education and Care. Now need to be home. If intrested call Patricia at 850-323-0996 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

PAGE 14

Local A14 | The Times Thursday, June 20, 2013 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) The last thing to happen is the ultimate, but what is the next-to-last called? Postultimate, Antepenultimate, Dultimate, Penultimate 2) As founded in 1850, what was “Thomas Cook” the world’s rst? Steam locomotive, Soda fountain, Travel agency, Roller coaster 3) Both Lincoln and JFK were assassinated on what day of the week? Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 4) What breakfast food arrived at its name from the German word for stirrup? Wafe, Hash browns, Croissant, Bagel 5) What U.S. state was almost called Kanawha? Florida, West Virginia, Idaho, Maine 6) What term describes when about 50 percent of us live within 50 miles of our birthplace? Milarepa, Propinquity, Cryptomnesia, Darden 7) In his earlier days who was known as the “Preaching Windmill?” Billy Graham, Joel Osteen, Robert Tilton, Ernest Angley 8) History’s most prolic writer, Mary Faulkner, wrote how many books? 171, 360, 809, 904 9) When in the shower around what percent of people wash from top to bottom? 45, 60, 75, 84 10) What does an eirmonger ordinarily sell? Eggs, Apples, Matches, Newspapers 11) A politician with no interest in issues or principles is called a what? Snollygoster, Selfcoater, Smudgecoaster, Sirixie 12) The world’s rst TV news helicopter was introduced in what city in 1958? Seattle, Los Angeles, Honolulu, Atlanta 13) The average American looks at how many houses before buying one? 4, 6, 8, 10 14) What are “counties” called in Alaska? Frontiers, Parishes, Zones, Divisions ANSWERS 1) Penultimate. 2) Travel agency. 3) Friday. 4) Bagel. 5) West Virginia. 6) Propinquity. 7) Billy Graham. 8) 904. 9) 75. 10) Eggs. 11) Snollygoster. 12) Los Angeles. 13) 8. 14) Divisions. Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! (850)81 4 -7377 (850)22 7 -7847 S O L D # Co u nt r y living in a nice ly seclude d 3 BR / 2 BA ho me no r t h o f to wn but clo s e to all ame n it ie s o u r co a stal to wn ha s to o f f er Large 3.6 acre lo t wit h two po n ds an d a two sto r y 12 x 24 sto r age shed wit h bo a t/ ca r po rt. 850-899-9988 l 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyinf o .co m ## ## V acan t L ot C it y of P or t S t Joe APPRO VED SHOR T SALE B eautiful home sit e loc a t ed G arrison A v e C lose t o new schools and hospital L ot has dir ec t ac c ess t o the new bik e pa th. G r ea t c orner loc a tion. W ar d R idge is an ar ea wher e new c onstr uc tion is f ound buy this lot “R igh t ” and build y our dr eam home L ot siz e is 83’ x 117’ X ood Z one w w w .capesanblas .net L oc a t ed on a peninsula within the ga t ed Plan ta tion c ommunit y and surr ounded b y beautiful views of the B a y and marsh, this home is the per f ec t peac eful plac e t o enjo y na tur e and t o in vit e o v ernigh t guests t o their priv a t e quar t ers! Main house includes living and dining r ooms k it chen, mast er suit e with out door sho w er scr eened por ch with indoor/out door r eplac e G uest wing includes 3 bedr ooms living r oom, morning k it chen and laundr y! V er y priv a t e out door hot tub ac c essible fr om both ar eas of this unique home o v erlooks the marsh with outstanding views T his c ust om built home with beautiful c abinets pine oors/trim, lots of c ar eful details giving a f eeling of a secluded geta w a y w as lo vingly cr af t ed b y the o wners C o v er ed gar age w a t er ltr a tion syst em, cir c ular driv e beautiful landsc aping mak e this a must see home! S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .1431P elic anL ane .com ### T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4514983 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248831 $108,500 Eastpoint 451 4981 COMM./RES. (ZONED C-4) Us e ha lf as an of c e & st or ag e an d li v e in th e ot he r ha lf OR us e th e wh ol e bl dg as sm al l pr of es si on al of c e OR us e it as a 2 BR 2 B A ho us e (h as a fu ll ea tin ki tc he n) 10 ft ce il in gs 6 ft ch ai n li nk fe nc ed ba ck ya rd wi th 2 la r ge g at es st or ag e bl dg 30 6 Hw y 98 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249609 $75,000 St. Geor ge Island CORNER L OT 2 lots fr om corner of 11th Str eet tha t leads dir ectl y to the Gulf lots of tr ees and v egeta tion, dry lot, nearb y tw o story houses on pilings ha v e r emar ka b l y good Gulf V ie ws b uy no w to b uild or k eep as in v estment. Br o wn Str eet and W est Pine A v en ue 451 4982 MLS# 249258 $150,000 31 Re x Buzzett ST AP ALACHICOLA, FL Grea t curb a ppeal with this nicely remodelled 3 bedroom/2 ba th home in a quiet area of A palachicola sitting on 4 city lots. Grea t property for 1st time homebuyer or investment. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 ## MLS# 248667 $329,000 1356 Acacia Dr ., St. George Island, FL Charming 3 bedroom/2 ba th Planta tion beach cotta ge situa ted on lushly vegeta ted one acre lot with easy beach access. One of the best priced homes on the island. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 ## Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com The Nest hosts bake sale Saturday The Nest Afterschool Summer Program Carrabelle facility will have a fundraiser bake sale from 9 a.m. until noon Saturday at the IGA on U.S. 98 in Carrabelle. All proceeds benet the Carrabelle branch of The Nest. Come out, rain or shine, and get a tasty treat and make a donation to support the kids. You can also stop in at the Landmark Market and boat ramp and get a treat and make a donation on your way to catch the big one. Oyster licenses on sale through June 28 Sale of the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License will continue through June 28 at the $100 rate. Staff will be selling the license from the old DEP-ANERR building at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. (formerly, 7th Street) in Apalachicola. County can’t work on private roads At the June 18 county meeting, Howard Nabors, representing the county’s Department of Public Works, told commissioners the department has had numerous complaints about the condition of Buck Street in Eastpoint and Hill Street and Paradise Lane east of Apalachicola. All three are private roads. Paradise Lane and Buck Street have both received one-time upgrades from the county in the past. Chair Cheryl Sanders said the board asked County Attorney Michael Shuler to get an opinion from the Attorney General on repairing private roads. Shuler said the attorney general declined to give a specic opinion on Franklin County, but, based on past opinions, the county cannot legally use public equipment to repair private roads. He said public equipment can only be used on private property during a declared state of emergency. Shuler said he specically mentioned the presence of a handicapped child on Buck Street and the need for ambulance access, but the attorney general did not offer an exception. “I hate that because I’ve got Hickory Hammock,” Sanders said, referring to a road in her district. Shuler said the county might accept the roads if they were brought up to county standards. He said he didn’t believe any work had been done by the owners to improve them. Bergeron tapped for debris removal The county commission voted unanimously Tuesday to award the county contract for disaster debris management to Bergeron Emergency Services of Ft. Lauderdale, a subsidiary of Bergeron Land Development. The emergency management and solid waste departments met Feb. 7 to rank the debris contractors by experience, price and availability. Eastpoint Library closed during move The Eastpoint Library is temporarily closed for the transfer of xtures to the new library building. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce told commissioners the library has encountered problems with installing lines for internet access and cannot check out books. He said he believes the library will remain closed for up to two weeks. The Carrabelle library remains open. News b B RI efsEFS