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The Apalachicola times ( June 13, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 13, 2013
Publication Date: 06-13-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00225

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 13, 2013
Publication Date: 06-13-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00225

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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Thursday, June 13, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 7 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com From the moment it began, and athletic director Michael Sweatt had the audience in awe at his powerful rendition of the National Anthem, the sixth annual Franklin County High School commencement Friday evening was a moving expression of community pride and joy. Principal George Oehlert and Superintendent Nina Marks presented diplomas to 59 graduates, the highlight of a ceremony that included both the tradition of presenting owers to family members and the innovation of a giant slide presentation of the graduation seniors. “To our teachers, thank you for so unsel shly sharing you time, talent and knowledge with us,” Salutatorian Morgan Walker said in her address. “You took the time to explain assignments, sometimes repeatedly because we weren’t paying attention. You put in the effort to make lessons more interesting so we wouldn’t just tune out. You demanded excellence from us whether or not we wanted to give it. You set the bar high and challenged us to live up to it.” Former housing director indicted xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . A9-10 Classi eds . . . . A11 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Noblit accused of using AHA funds for personal use By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A former director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority has been charged with stealing thousands of dollars in federal housing funds and spending them on personal items. Selena Jo Noblit, 42, of Panama City, appeared June 6 in federal court in Panama City, charged with stealing funds from a program that received federal grant money from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. According to the criminal indictment, between June 2011 and May 2012, while serving as the director of the housing authority, Noblit allegedly embezzled and misapplied at least $5,000 for her personal gain and for the bene t of others who were not entitled to the funds. The indictment did not specify how much had been taken. Noblit, who worked as executive director beginning in July 2008, was terminated from her job one year ago by the ve-member board that governs the public housing program. First established in 1962, the housing authority oversees 54 public housing units on two sites within the city. The allegations against Noblit, which informed sources said pertained to the use of a housing authority credit card to purchase personal items including clothing and vacations, rst surfaced in connection with an August 2011 technical assistance visit by representatives of the Jacksonville Of ce of Public Housing. That visit, intended to address what HUD of cials called “basic operational challenges,” found SELENA NOBLIT PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Clockwise from top left: Mindy Kelley prepares to kiss her daughter, Class President Morgan Kelley. Billy Harris holds his younger sister, Marissa Gilbert. Darrell Dart stands with his greatgrandmothers, Bernice Whit eld, left, and Donnie Bellew White. Shaquana Weaver stands with her grandmother Ruby Benjamin, left, and mom, Erika Townsend. Below, Cheyenne Diorio cries at her graduation, and Annalyse Wharrie smiles with her mom, Maxine Creamer. ‘We can do anything’ FCHS sends 59 Seahawks soaring into the world School board re ects on test scores By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County School Board did some vocal soul-searching last week, as members discussed candidly the comparative success and shortcomings of the district’s two public schools. Last Friday’s release of standardized test scores from each of the state’s 67 counties showed healthy gains in reading, math and writing throughout the Franklin County elementary and middle schools. At its June 6 meeting, the school board had only the third-grade scores to consider, which were released last month. “I hate this time of the year because FCAT scores come out,” Board Member George Thompson said in opening the discussion. “I had a friend tell me FCAT scores are embarrassing in this county. I want to know, what are we doing wrong? Andrea brings needed rain By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Last week, Tropical Storm Andrea came and went with more of a whimper than a roar. In the course of the storm, from Wednesday evening, June 5, to Thursday evening, June 6, the county received about 8 inches of rain. Peak winds were less than 35 miles per hour. But because rainfall for the month was 4 inches below average, the water was welcome. No damage has been reported from the storm. About See SCHOOL A5 See HOUSING A5 See SEAHAWKS A2 See ANDREA A2 Community cookout Friday in Carrabelle On Friday, June 14, there will be a community cookout hosted by the visiting One:27 Christian service group. The fun begins at 5 p.m. Food will be supplied by Hog Wild Barbeque, and there will be live music. This event is free and open to the public, and everyone is invited. For more information, call 352-3175039. Athletes bene t from Sunday sh auction The Franklin County High School football team will be helping Will Dance, producer of “The Morning Show with Preston Scott” 100.7 FM WFLA, as they direct this year’s 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic in Carrabelle this weekend, June 13-16. The team will be out in force on Auction Day on Sunday, beginning at 10 a.m. at The Moorings, 1000 N.W. Ave. A in Carrabelle. Proceeds from all sh auctioned off go to the football team only. Summer bingo on the island Every Tuesday, enjoy Summer Bingo upstairs at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. at 7 p.m. Cards are 25 cents. This event is sponsored by and bene ts the St. George Island Civic Club. For information, call 9272654. Everyone welcome. Learn all about sea turtles From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in June, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve and the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers present a talk on “Sea Turtles: Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors.” The reserve is at 108 Island Drive and provides a wealth of exhibits on the local plants and animals. For more information, call 670-7700 or visit www. SeaTurtlesAtRisk.org.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 Walker expressed the gratitude of her classmates in her speech, thanking the whole spectrum of school district employees, from principals, coaches, office staff and advisors to custodial staff and lunchroom attendants who cleaned up after everyone. “You know better than anyone else what slobs we’ve been,” she joked. “You actually deserve some kind of medal.” Walker directed her thanks to the many parents who filled the gymnasium to capacity. “Thank you for supporting us in more ways than it’s possible to count,” she said. “You dragged us out of bed each morning, made sure we were fed and clothed for school. You herded us out the door to the bus stop or drove us to school yourselves. You helped us with homework, paid our class fees and listened to our complaints. “You came to our plays, attended our sporting events and chaperoned our dances. You commiserated over our daily dramas, but you tried to give us enough space to learn how to work things out for ourselves,” she said. In her valedictory address, Stephanie Marxsen both thanked the many individuals who had a hand in educating the Class of 2013 and saluted the scholastic and athletic achievements of the school over the first five years it has been opened. She cited the soccer teams, the Brain Bowl and Odyssey of the Mind teams and the band. “In the ve years that Franklin County School has existed, we have already accomplished so much,” Marxsen said. “However, we can only continue to succeed if we set aside our differences and work together. We have proven that when we all come together as a school, as a team, we can do anything. It’s not all about just one teacher, or one group of students. What is most important is representing Franklin County, and this school, in a positive way.” After the Pledge of Allegiance led by Senior Class Second Vice-President Zach Howze, and the National Anthem, senior class rst vice president Katie Wood led the invocation. “Dear Heavenly Father,” she began. “We are so thankful for all the blessings you have given to our graduating class. As we prepare to enter a new phase in our lives, we pray that you would guide us and protect us. “Here in this room, we see all the people who have encouraged us and cared for us. Parents, brothers and sisters, friends and teachers; their love and care is a blessing that we are truly thankful for. Thank you for having brought us to this special night, Lord. If it was not for your love and guidance, we may not be here tonight. Give us courage, strength and wisdom as we step out on our own. Help us achieve our goals as we live for your honor and glory.” The class president, Morgan Kelley, then offered a welcome address, followed by a presentation of the valedictorian and salutatorian plaques by Oehlert and guidance counselor Roderick Robinson. The presentation of diplomas followed. Along with Marxsen and Walker, also receiving highest honors was Elton Olvera. Earning high honors were Christina Collins, Emily Cash, Elisha Patriotis and Katie Wood. A diploma with honors went to Skyler Hutchinson, Brittany Bryant, Ryne Fisher, Annalyse Wharrie, Cheyenne Martin, Karl Sanford, Miranda Pilger, Zachary Howze, Shelby Myers, Karlie Tucker, Kerri Williams, Che’na Segree, David Butler, Morgan Kelley and Austin Ward. Receiving diplomas were Roxana Barahona, Thomas Benitez, Savannah Boone, Brittney Carr, Daniel Carrino, William Collins, Codee Crum, Darrell Dart, Alissia Dempsey, Cheyenne Diorio, Direek Farmer, Chase Golden, William Harris, Carli Hunt, Tevin Jones, David Langston, Anna Rose Lee, Haley Mathes, Yvonne Mitchell, Jeffery Murray, Hannah Oxendine, Rahkeim Pierce, Julio Ramirez, Joshua Reeder, Chantel Rhine, Ladarius Rhodes, Seth Rogers, Katelyn Rowland, Kayla Sanford, Casey Sapp, TaShay Sewell, Jacob Shuler, Whitney Vause, Shaquana Weaver, Tyler Webb, Lanae Wilson and Ellis Wilson. The audience then was treated to a slide show presentation of the graduates’ years in high school, accompanied by popular music selections. Class Secretary Che’na Segree then narrated a tribute to the class sponsors, Dolores Croom and Stephanie Howze Jones, with plaques presented by Zach Howze and Ladarius Rhodes. In his farewell remarks, Oehlert, who is retiring this year after serving as principal throughout this class’ four years at the high school, thanked the students and promised Seahawk Nation would forever live with him. 2013-14 GR ANT C ALEND AR M a y 8, 2013 FCBOC C appr o v ed TDC r ec ommenda tion f or 2013-14 G r an ts P r o c ess June 5, 2013 – F inal TDC B oar d A ppr o v al f or 2013-14 g r an ts pr oc ess – June 13, 2013 – r elease Gr an t inf or ma tion and A pplica tion F or ms online; use FC TDC g r an t in t er est email da tabases t o inf or m new guidelines 2013-14 FC TDC E v en ts Gr an t P r oc ess June 13, 20, 27, 2013 P ublish TIMES public notic e tha t FC TDC 2013-14 online g r an t mar keting inf or ma tion is on the FC TDC w ebsit e P r e c er tica tion is r equir ed f or elig ibilit y and must be included with or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t inf or ma tion. T he deadline t o apply f or inclusion in the 2013-14 ev en t mar keting pr og r am is June 30, 2013 July 3, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting is c anc eled July 17, 2013 TDC C ommitt ee M eeting C it y of A palachic ola M eeting R oom, beg inning a t 1:30 pm. Gr an t A pplica tions f or mar keting the individual or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t will be r eview ed and r ec ommended f or appr o v al if qualied – July 19, 2013 – TDC S ta t o E-mail notic e t o or ganiza tion ’ s c on tr ac t manager of appr o v al f or inclusion in Gr an ts pr oc ess f or 2013-14 A ugust 7, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting F r ank lin C oun t y C our thouse A nne x, 3:00 p .m. A palachic ola F inal appr o v al of applican ts P r esen ta tion of TDC P r omotions Budget f or initial appr o v al On or bef or e A ugust 20, 2013, FC TDC S ta will issue ocial emailed notica tion as t o sta tus of inclusion f or or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t applica tion Oc t ob er 1, 2013 new scal y ear beg ins f or FC TDC 2013-14 ONLINE GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS M A Y BE A C CESSED ONLINE ON JUNE 13, 2013 A T W W W .SAL T Y FL ORID A.C OM/GR ANT S. THE DEADLINE T O SUBMIT THE 201314 GR ANT APPLIC A TION FOR Y OUR E VENT IS JUNE 30, 2013. IF Y OU WISH T O C OMPLE TE A GR ANT APPLIC A TION O THER THAN ONLINE PLEASE TELEPHONE THE FC TDC ADMINISTR A TIVE OFFICE A T 653-8678 T O REQUEST A C OP Y OR ST OP B Y THE FC TDC OFFICE A T 17-1/2 A VENUE E AP AL A CHIC OL A, FL ORID A. ALL 2013-14 GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS MUST BE SUBMIT TED ONLINE OR T O THE TDC OFFICE NO L A TER THAN JUNE 30, 2013. St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle C oup on Expir es: 6-30-13 ANDREA from page A1 500 Duke Energy customers in Apalachicola were without power for three hours on Thursday afternoon. Franklin County schools closed at 11 a.m. Thursday but reopened Friday. The campground at Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park was evacuated for 24 hours, but the park remained open through the storm. As Andrea stalled in the Gulf on Wednesday night, county commissioners declared a local state of emergency. Director of Emergency Management Pam Brownell said the declaration was purely precautionary. She said the commissioners are the ultimate authority to order evacuations and declare any state of emergency. “I call and advise them of the situation, and they make the decision,” she said. “If we don’t declare an emergency and there’s enough damage for a FEMA declaration, we won’t be eligible for aid.” She said a local emergency declaration also makes it simpler to apply for help and supplies, like sandbags, from the state. “It allows the county to bypass regular procurement procedures,” Brownell said. Once the storm is in progress, law enforcement is responsible for closing roads and bridges, she said. Law enforcement also uses the new Code Red emergency noti cation system to provide subscribers with information about storms or other emergencies. At 10 a.m. June 6, Code Red broadcast a notice to 4,900 residents warning that if winds reached 45 mph, evacuations and bridge closures were possible. Some recipients thought closures were imminent, which led to confusion and worried calls to the emergency management center and law enforcement. Brownell said it is important for people to understand an emergency declaration is not an evacuation order. The Code Red system replaces the WENS emergency notication formerly used by the county. People who subscribed to WENS are not automatically switched to the Code Red system and must reregister to receive noti cations. The registration form is available on the sheriff’s website, www.franklinsheriff.com. Sgt. John Solomon said Code Red is much faster than WENS and has a downloadable app for Droids and iPhones that allows subscribers to receive local noti cations while traveling if they are in any area served by Code Red. The app is downloaded using iTunes. Noti cations received from Code Red could be identi ed in a number of ways on a cell phone. The sender may appear as 866-419-5000; Emergency Comm; 855-969-4636; or ECN Community. To set your own identi er for Code Red calls, access your account through the sheriff’s website and initiate a test call. You can then save the number to your contacts and name it whatever you want. With storm season upon us, county emergency management urges everyone to have a disaster plan in place and a storm kit ready for travel, and stay informed of weather conditions. More information is available in the 2013 Hurricane Survival Guide, downloadable at www. nhc.noaa.gov/prepare. Brownell urged everyone to enroll in the emergency noti cation system and listen carefully to emergency noti cations. Also check to make sure you have a current county re-entry card for after the storm. You can request a card online or stop by the Emergency Management Center at 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. PAM BROWNELL PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Above, four generations pose, from left: mom Angela Bryant, Brittany Bryant, grandmother Connie Carver and great-grandmother Maureen Garaja. Below is graduate Whitney Vause. SEAHAWKS from page A1

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The Times | A3 Thursday, June 13, 2013 4 51 4 9 51 W e a r e p le a s e d t o p r es en t t o y o u t hi s y e a r's A nn u a l W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t. i s r ep o r t i s desig n e d t o inf o r m y o u a b o u t t h e q u a li t y wa t er a n d s er v ices w e de li v er t o y o u e v er y d a y O ur co n s t a n t g o a l i s t o p r o v ide y o u w i t h a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le s u p p l y o f dr in k in g wa t er W e wa n t y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o en s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er O ur wa t er s o ur ce i s t w o w e l l s dra w n f r o m t h e Flo r id a n A q uif er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex ce l len t q u a li t y o f o ur wa t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en t r e q uir e d i s c h lo r in e f o r di sinf e c t io n p ur p os es. I n 2012 t h e D ep a r t m en t o f En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n p er f o r m e d a S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t o n o ur sys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o ur ces in dic a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o ur ces o f co n t a min a t io n n e a r o ur w e l l s. e a s s es sm en t r es u l ts a r e a va i l a b le o n t h e FD EP S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t a n d P r o t e c t io n P r og ra m w e bsi t e a t w w w dep .s t a t e .u s/swa p p I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s a b o u t t hi s r ep o r t o r co n cer nin g y o ur wa t er u t i li t y p le a s e co n t ac t K ei t h M o c k, W a t er S u p er in t en den t, a t (850) 251-9106. W e en co ura g e o ur va l ue d c u s t o m er s t o b e inf o r m e d a b o u t t h eir wa t er u t i li t y I f y o u wa n t t o le a r n m o r e p le a s e a t t en d a n y o f o ur r egu l a r l y s c h e d u le d m e et in gs. e y a r e h e ld a t e C a r ra b e l le M unici p a l C o m p lex, 1001 G ra y A v en ue o n t h e r s t ur s d a y o f e ac h m o n t h a t 6:00 p .m. e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le r o u t in e l y m o ni t o r s f o r co n t a min a n ts in y o ur dr in k in g wa t er acco r din g t o F e dera l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. E x cep t w h er e in dic a t e d o t h er w i s e t hi s r ep o r t i s b a s e d o n t h e r es u l ts o f o ur m o ni t o r in g f o r t h e p er io d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e cem b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a in e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r es en t e d in t hi s r ep o r t a r e f r o m t h e m os t r e cen t t es t in g do n e in acco r d a n ce w i t h t h e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. I n t h e t a b les b e lo w y o u m a y n d unfa mi li a r t er m s a n d a b b r e v i a t io n s. T o h e l p y o u b et t er un der s t a n d t h es e t er m s w e h a v e p r o v ide d t h e f o l lo w in g de ni t io n s: A c t io n L e v e l (AL): e co n cen t ra t io n o f a co n t a min a n t w hic h, if ex ce e de d t r ig g er s t r e a t m en t o r o t h er r e q uir em en ts t h a t a wa t er sys t em m u s t f o l lo w I ni t i a l Di s t r i b u t io n S ys t em E va l u a t io n (IDS E): A n im p o r t a n t p a r t o f t h e S t a g e 2 Di sinf e c t io n B yp r o d uc ts R u le (D B P R). e IDS E i s a o n e-t im e s t ud y co n d uc t e d b y wa t er sys t em s t o iden t if y di s t r i b u t io n sys t em lo c at io n s w i t h hig h co n cen t ra t io n s o f t r i h a lo m et h a n es (THMs) a n d h a lo acet ic acid s (H AA s). W a t er sys t em s w i l l u s e r es u l ts f r o m t h e IDS E, in co n j un c t io n w i t h t h eir S t a g e 1 D B P R co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g d a t a, t o s e le c t co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g lo c a t io n s f o r t h e S t a g e 2 D B P R M axim um C o n t a min a n t L e v e l o r M CL: e hig h es t le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t t h a t i s a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er M CLs a r e s et a s c los e t o t h e M CL Gs a s f e a si b le u sin g t h e b es t a va i l a b le t r e a t m en t t e c hn o log y M axim um C o n t a min a n t L e v e l G o a l o r M CL G: e le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t in dr in k in g wa t er b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. M CL Gs a l lo w f o r a m a r g in o f s a f et y P a g e 2 o f 4 M axim um R esid u a l Di sinf e c t a n t L e v e l o r MRD L: e hig h es t le v e l o f a di sinf e c t a n t a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er er e i s co n v in cin g e v iden ce t h a t addi t io n o f a di sinf e c t a n t i s n e ces s a r y f o r co n t r o l o f micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. M axim um R esid u a l Di sinf e c t a n t L e v e l G o a l o r MRD L G: e le v e l o f a dr in k in g wa t er di sinf e c t a n t b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. MRD L Gs do n o t r e e c t t h e b en e ts o f t h e u s e o f di sinf e c t a n ts t o co n t r o l micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. N o n a p p lic a b le (N/A): D o es n o t a p p l y N o n-D et e c t (ND): m e a n s n o t det e c t e d a n d in dic a t es t h a t t h e s u bs t a n ce wa s n o t f o un d b y l a b o ra t o r y a n a l ysi s. P a r ts p er mi l lio n (p p m) o r M i l lig ra m s p er li t er (m g/l): o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 mi l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P a r ts p er b i l lio n (p p b) o r M icr og ra m s p er li t er (g/l): o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 b i l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P ico c ur ie p er li t er (pCi/L): m e a s ur e o f t h e radio ac t i v i t y in wa t er I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in kin g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h t t p://w w w .ep a.g o v/s a f e wa t er/le ad e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di ss o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) M icr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I n o r ga nic co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t icides a n d h erb icides, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Or ga nic c h emic a l co n t a min a n ts, in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b yp r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adio ac t i v e co n t a min a n ts, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t rat io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791. a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r e e c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o m e p e o p le m a y b e m o r e vu ln era b le t o co n t a min a n ts in dr in k in g wa t er t h a n t h e g en era l p o p u l a t io n. I mm un o-co m p r o mi s e d p er s o n s s uc h a s p er s o n s w i t h c a n cer un der g o in g c h em o t h era p y p er s o n s w h o h a v e un der g o n e o r ga n t ra n s p l a n ts, p e o p le w i t h HIV/AIDS o r o t h er imm un e sys t em di s o r der s, s o m e P a g e 4 o f 4 e lder l y a n d infa n ts c a n b e p a r t ic u l a r l y a t r i s k f r o m inf e c t io n s. es e p e o p le s h o u ld s e e k ad v ice a b o u t dr in k in g wa t er f r o m t h eir h e a l t h c a r e p r o v ider s. EP A/CD C guide lin es o n a p p r o p r i a t e m e a n s t o les s en t h e r i s k o f inf e c t io n b y Cr yp t os p o r idi um a n d o t h er micr o b io log ic a l co n t a min a n ts a r e a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e (800-426-4791). W e w o r k t o p r o v ide t o p q u a li t y wa t er t o e v er y t a p W e a s k t h a t a l l o ur c u s t o m er s h e l p u s p r o t e c t o ur wa t er s o ur ces, w hic h a r e t h e h e a r t o f o ur co mm uni t y o ur wa y o f lif e a n d o ur c hi ldr en s f u t ur e I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s o r co n cer n s a b o u t t h e inf o r m a t io n p r o v ide d p le a s e f e e l f r e e t o c a l l a n y o f t h e n um b er s l i s te d. Law Enforcement By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@starfl.co m Quick thinking by an off-duty Eastpoint law enforcement ofcer saved two young swimmers last week from dangerous rip currents. On Wednesday, June 5, Deputy Lawrence Brannan and his wife were sunbathing on the public beach near the Blue Parrot with his youngest son. Five to six foot waves were breaking on the shore and Brannan had just cautioned his son, who was newly arrived from Kentucky, about rip currents. Brannan said the family had been on the beach about 30 min utes when he noticed two men at the edge of the water who ap peared to be in distress. While he watched, they attempted to swim into the Gulf but were knocked down by the waves and forced to return to the beach. On rising, Brannan spotted two heads bobbing beyond the break ing surf and realized someone had been dragged offshore and was trapped on a sandbar. While he continued to watch, a kayaker tried to reach the swimmers, both boys in their early teens, but the boater failed to reach them and was forced back to shore. I thought nobody was going to be able to reach them and, being from here, I grew up swimming, Brannan said. I decided I needed to help. Brannan ran to the scene and learned that one of the men who rst attempted to reach the boys was their father. The deputy en tered the water and brought the younger of the two children back to the beach. He had taken on some water and was in more distress, Bran nan said. Brannan then retrieved the older boy. First Responders soon arrived on the scene. Susan Ficklen, who examined the boys, said they did not need to be hospitalized. She said the family returned home to Woodville imme diately after the incident. It was a good ending; thats what we like, said Brannan. Brannan stressed that he is a strong swimmer and cautioned others not to enter dangerous water. A Blue Parrot employee who saw the incident said sheriffs deputies and Fire Chief Jay Abbott patrolled the beach afterwards, or dering people to leave the water because of the dan gerous currents. Ficklen said there have been a number of calls for swimmers in distress over the last week. Over Memorial Day weekend, with double red ags ying, many people ignored instructions from rangers to leave the water at the Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park. One man was pulled from the water in front of the west ern pavilions and hospitalized. The same afternoon, rescue workers were called to aid a group of eight swimmers trapped offshore at the eastern pavilions. Brannan warned about lack of respect for strong Gulf cur rents. When you think you got it whooped, its gonna beat you back down, he said. The National Weather Service offers the following advice to stay safe when swimming in coastal waters. Never swim alone and learn the meaning of warning ags. A double red ag means the beach is closed to the public. If you are caught in a rip cur rent, also called an undertow, re main calm to conserve energy and think clearly. Never ght the cur rent; swim parallel the shoreline. When out of the current, swim at an angle away from the current and towards shore. If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, oat or calmly tread water. When out of the cur rent, swim towards shore. If you are still unable to reach shore, draw attention to yourself by waving your arm and yelling for help. If you see someone in trouble, get help from a lifeguard or by dial ing 911. Throw the rip current vic tim something that oats and yell instructions on how to escape. Remember, many people drown while trying to save some one else from a rip current. The following report is pro vided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by ofcers from Apalachicola Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva tion Commission (FWC) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are considered innocent un til proven guilty in a court of law. June 4 April R. Hutchinson, 29, Eastpoint, driving while li cense suspended or revoked, possession of a controlled substance, violation of proba tion and introduction of con traband into a correctional facility (APD) June 5 Makkaya D. Langley, 22, Eastpoint, Bay County war rant for failure to appear (FCSO) Kevin C. Rhodes, 48, Ho mosassa, violation of proba tion (FCSO) Rasmas Simeon, 32, Polk City, introduction of contra band into a correctional facil ity, and possession of a con trolled substance (FCSO) Glenn A. Richards, Jr., 23, Eastpoint, violation of proba tion, and trespass on prop erty (FCSO) Lance A. Flowers, 33, Apalachicola, violation of pro bation (FCSO) Kenneth R. Rucker, 55, Eastpoint, DUI, refusal to submit to a breath test and corruptions by threat to a public servant (FCSO) June 6 Tonya C. Seamon, 40, Car rabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Michael L. Crutcheld, Jr., 30, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) June 7 Melinda G. Denney, 31, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and sale or possession of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a church(FCSO) Santana L. Pilotti, 21, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) Jonathan E. Cooper, 31, Apalachicola, domestic bat tery (FCSO) June 8 Jimmy R. Shiver, III, 21, Bristol, violation of probation (APD) June 9 Robert S. Parks, 30, Car rabelle, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Jeremy L. Matheny, 33, Eastpoint, violation of proba tion and retail theft (FCSO) June 10 Douglas D. Dewall, 57, Tallahassee, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of paraphernalia and posses sion of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) Abbi N. Bolick, 28, Craw fordville, possession of a con trolled substance with intent to sell, possession of para phernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and driving while license sus pended or revoked (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 45, Apalachicola, failure to ap pear (FCSO) Darren L. Wallace, 44, Apalachicola, Gulf County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Kenneth M. Parker, 23, Carrabelle, violation of pro bation (FCSO) Maranda Coatney, 21, Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO) Ofcers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission earlier this month arrested a man for shing despite having had his shing privileges revoked. Ofcers Matt Gore and Jason Lipford spotted a ve hicle in the area of 8-Mile. The vehicle was identied as one operated by an in dividual who received a judgment permanently revoking his recreational and commercial shing privileges. The two of cers tracked two subjects from the vehicle to the shoreline of Apalachicola Bay, and from a position of concealment, watched as the two subjects used cast nets to catch mullet. The ofcers then identied themselves, and directed the subjects to return to the shore for a license and sh inspection. The subject with the revoked shing privileges began to discard the sh from his bag and returned to shore with no sh. The subject was arrested for shing while his license was revoked and for failure to permit inspection. Ofcers continue to work complaints of illegal shellsh harvesting. Of cer John Allen was on wa ter patrol in Apalachicola Bay when he set up sur veillance on a commercial vessel engaged in harvest ing oysters. When the individuals started to leave the area, Allen conducted a vessel stop and found the indi viduals in possession of three bags of oysters. The individual harvesting the oysters was cited for tak ing oysters between sun set and sunrise. Allen re turned the product back to the bay. The vessel opera tor was issued six boating safety warnings. FWC REPORT Deputy rescues two from riptide LAWRENCE BRANNAN Arrest REPORT

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Each year, an estimated 2 million acres of America’s farms, ranches, forests, wildlife habitat, and other open spaces are fragmented into smaller parcels or lost to development, according to the President’s Annual Economic Report to Congress. Continued losses of this open space can adversely affect rural economies. These losses reduce opportunities for hunting, fishing, and other outdoor recreation and impact wildlife, water, and other resources. The good news is there are ways for both landowners and Congress to slow down this troubling trend. Donating a permanent conservation easement (development restriction) to a qualified organization, such as a land trust, enables farmers and ranchers to maintain their current operations and conserve the natural assets of rural America. In return, landowners may deduct the value of the easement from their income taxes. This tax incentive is a major reason why there now are 1,700 nonprofit land trusts nationwide that protect 47 million acres of farms, ranches, forests, wildlife habitat, and other open spaces – twice as many acres as a decade ago and a larger land area than the state of Wisconsin, according to the 2010 National Land Trust Census. Despite this remarkable success, land trusts increasingly face frivolous sixand seven-figure lawsuits from developers seeking to undermine these development restrictions on land that they directly own or manage. Half of the land trusts in a 2010 national survey reported a legal challenge, and one-quarter of those land trusts were hindered by nancial barriers in pursuing a legal challenge. There is no commercial or nonprofit insurance available to cover this liability, which far exceeds most land trusts’ legal reserve funds. The IRS has stated that a land trust could lose its tax status or ability to accept further donations if it does not have sufficient resources to monitor or defend conservation easements. To protect their investments in conservation, over 420 land trusts that protect more than six million acres of land joined with the Land Trust Alliance to launch their own insurance risk pool last month with $4 million in capital funding from eight major foundations. Thanks to this insurance risk pool, Terrafirma Risk Retention Group LLC, which covers 75 percent of the more than 8 million acres conserved by land trusts that cannot afford to self-insure themselves individually, land trusts can now assure their communities, donors, the IRS, other regulators, and legislators that they have the financial capacity to sustain their conserved lands in perpetuity. But if we want to slow down the fragmentation or development of farms, ranches, forests, wildlife habitat, and other open spaces, Congress must make permanent a temporary 2006 law that increased tax incentives to conserve land. Since its passage, this temporary law has encouraged additional conservation easements by raising the maximum annual deduction a landowner can take for the donation of a conservation easement and extends the period to claim the deduction after the time of the donation from 5 to 15 years. The enhanced tax incentive expired in 2009, but Congress temporarily renewed it through the end of this year when it passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. In the last Congress, 28 senators from both parties co-sponsored a bill to make this tax incentive permanent, including the chairman of the Senate committee with jurisdiction over the legislation: Max Baucus (D-Mont.). More than 310 members of the House co-sponsored a similar bill, including majorities of both parties and the leaders of the House committee with jurisdiction over the legislation: Ways & Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) and Ranking Member Sander Levin (D-Mich.). However, Congress recessed for the election before taking action on the bills, so they expired. In March, Baucus was joined by Finance Committee Ranking Republican Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) in reintroducing the tax incentive bill, The Rural Heritage Conservation Extension Act of 2013 (S. 526). Congressmen Jim Gerlach (R-Pa.) and Mike Thompson (D-Calif.) are seeking cosponsors to introduce similar legislation in the House. Passage of a tax incentive bill would help save open spaces that otherwise could disappear. Making this expanded tax incentive permanent would further bolster land conservation and sustain working lands, helping to keep landowners on their property and achieve a broad range of conservation outcomes, including improving water quality and reducing soil erosion. Norman “Norm” Dicks was the U.S. Representative for Washington’s 6th congressional district from 1977 to 2013 and served as the chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee for Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies as well as ranking member of the full House Appropriations Committee. Lynn Scarlett was the deputy secretary of the Interior Department during the Bush administration from 2005 to 2009 and currently is co-director of Resources for the Future’s Center for the Management of Ecological Wealth. Column provided by American Forum. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 13, 2013 A Page 4 Section Noted American satirist and journalist H.L. Mencken once said, “For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple and wrong.” That’s an observation worth remembering as we seek to restore and protect Florida’s Gulf Coast in the wake of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. With passage of the RESTORE Act, 80 percent of Clean Water Act nes paid by BP and other parties responsible for the spill now will be used to fund projects that bene t the Gulf of Mexico’s coastal resources. This is an unprecedented opportunity to support on-the-ground projects to restore Gulf environments, helping communities become more resilient to adversity. Unfortunately, it also opens the door to “quick x” projects that may appear to provide simple solutions, but in reality lack a critical sciencebased foundation. Currently Gulf coastal states are collecting proposals for restoration projects from management agencies, municipalities, county governments, citizens’ groups, non-pro ts, and others. The amount of funding likely to be available is unprecedented. While the process of selecting projects is still to be determined, the approaches used can bene t from key lessons learned in similar efforts. First, projects must have a foundation in science. Natural resource management decisions for restoring unique environments like the Gulf are complex problems without simple solutions. Yet it is human nature, especially when faced with incomplete or contradictory information, to accept the simplest explanation rst, then to try to solve the problem with intuition and quick action. Unfortunately, there are many examples around the world where this approach has been ineffective. In the Chesapeake Bay, for instance, hatcheries have produced hundreds of millions of oyster larvae to help clean the bay’s polluted water and boost the once-thriving oyster industry, but these efforts have had limited success. Why? Because the conditions for survival remain poor due to impaired water quality, depleted substrate and prevalent parasitic diseases. A hatchery might be a partial restoration tool, but the simple solution of building hatcheries to provide more larvae was the wrong answer to the complicated problem of restoring natural populations. Closer to home, the commercial harvest of oysters from Apalachicola Bay has declined signi cantly and for unknown reasons. Working with management agencies and the local community, University of Florida researchers have assessed a range of possible causes – record low freshwater ows, disease, overharvest – that singularly or in combination could all cause the oyster population to collapse. The RESTORE Act provides an opportunity to begin to restore the Apalachicola Bay oyster population and the associated coastal economy, while also teaching us how to make the environment more resilient to future threats. Many of the ideas proposed are intuitively simple, but we know from experience that the solution is likely more complicated than it initially appears. In addition to a rm foundation in science, we must also acknowledge uncertainty in how ecosystems respond to restoration actions. This doesn’t mean restoration can’t be successful. Instead, these uncertainties force us to design restoration projects as deliberate experiments we can learn from. We could, for instance, learn a lot about how freshwater ows from the Apalachicola River in uence oyster abundance in the bay simply by restoring some oyster bars near the river mouth, where freshwater from the river creates lower salinity habitats, and others farther away from the river mouth where salinity is higher. Finally, it is critical that restoration projects have community support. Along the Gulf coast, residents and industries must actively participate in restoration projects to reinforce stewardship of coastal resources. In Apalachicola Bay, UF is helping oystermen and others whose livelihoods depend on the oyster harvest plan for sustainably using the resource. They have contributed to eld research and restoration activities, and are ambassadors in the community, helping a broader segment of the population understand the importance of environmental stewardship to their quality of life and their economic future. The Deepwater Horizon spill was a terrible disaster that resulted in the tragic loss of human life and long-term harm to people’s livelihoods. The spill also damaged large areas of the Gulf of Mexico, perhaps permanently. Three years later, the RESTORE Act aims to provide restoration and research projects to repair some of this harm to the Gulf’s coastal communities. To make the most of this opportunity, we must adopt a deliberate approach to evaluate and select projects that maximize learning, embrace uncertainty and involve local communities. In so doing, we increase the likelihood of achieving our true goal of restoring and protecting Florida’s Gulf of Mexico environments and economies. Jack Payne is senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the University of Florida. Gulf restoration calls for science, community support School board members need to visit classes After listening to many Franklin County Schools teacher and staff comments following the Thursday school board meeting, I decided to share some reasons why the morale of the Franklin County School employees is so low. When a board member says how embarrassed he is of us, and then a discussion comparing our test scores with the charter school follows, it is apparent that some of our leaders are out of touch with what is happening on our campus. If you are an elected of cial it is important that you strive for excellence, not try to pass the buck and blame the people who work every day with students and administration. I have been an employee of Franklin County School Board for 23 years and can only recall twice when a school board member came to my class. If you base your embarrassment on test scores, then maybe you could come in once a week and tutor or even get your community to encourage the students do well. The charter school is a ne school, many of us taught their teachers and live in the same community, and yes, even support them. Mr. Hinton was correct when he said that the charter school enrolled students whose parents support learning, and yes the climate has changed a great deal since its inception, but our school also has supportive parents. Many of our parents work more than one job and are unable to take time off. They are not able to pay for the gas to drive to extra events or after-school tutoring. Another factor for the inequality of FCAT scores is the ABC School has an aide in every class, and they keep their class size in compliance with state mandates. This, along with the apparent support of the school board and administration, creates a positive, atmosphere that the Franklin County School campus is not privy to. It is my hope that our county will support all children, teachers and staff. It is difficult to change the culture of our school; it takes support, not criticism, by all members. If you are embarrassed, resign and let Governor Rick Scott appoint a board member who has experience and credentials to be a successful leader. Sincerely, Carol Weyrich Franklin County Schools teacher Letter to the EDITOR Losses of open space harm rural economies JACK PAYNE Senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, University of Florida NORMAN DICKS guest columnist LYNN SCARLETT guest columnist

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 13, 2013 “Everyone around us is doing a great job,” he said, referring to the Apala chicola Bay Charter School and schools in neighboring counties. Thompson said he has heard people in Wakulla and other neighboring counties complain teachers there spend too much time preparing students for the test, but he suggested per haps teachers here might learn from that approach. “That’s what the state wants you to do,” he said to Superintendent Nina Marks. “If I was in your shoes, all of the teachers would nd out what they’re doing. “When you’re next to the last in the state of Florida, we’re doing a ter rible job, and that is what’s embarrassing. I’m out on the street every day, all day long, and people hit me up on it,” said Thompson, a letter carrier for the postal service. “What can I tell them we’re working on?” Marks said she met with elementary teachers the previous week and found there to be a productive ex change of ideas. “They’re coming up with solutions themselves,” she said. “They want to x it. They just, I guess, need a little bit more tightening up, and they’re starting all of that.” Thompson recalled his early days as a volleyball coach at Carrabelle High School and how he turned to David Walker, the coach of arch-rival Apalachicola High School, for help with his new assignment. “You got to have pride,” he said. “Why not pick up a phone and call another teacher and say, ‘Tell me what you’re doing.’ Swallow your pride, and let’s make this school what everybody wants it to be.” The discussion then took a turn toward how best to use school teaching and counseling resources, as board member Pam Shiver suggested the district con sider expanding the avail ability of the school’s guid ance counselor. “That’s not enough time for them (parents) to meet with the guidance counsel or and make plans for their child’s future,” she said. “Is there any way we can make that guidance counselor a little more available to parents?” Principal Eric Bidwell noted that a 12-month con tract would add additional costs and time to the job, and coverage over the Eas ter and Christmas holiday vacations might not be needed. Board member David Hinton used the analogy of how in the aftermath of their 1997 World Series victory, the Florida Mar lins traded away their top players and then took six more years before mak ing it back in the winner’s circle. He suggested the ABC School has had better success with testing be cause it has been able to attract the district’s most academically committed students. “Some people say the school is better. I don’t think the school is bet ter,” he said. “I say it’s the players.” Hinton proposed the district consider send ing lower performers on the FCAT, those who are one and two years behind grade level, to the charter school to sharpen their skills. “Why don’t we re quire them to go to the charter school?” he asked. “That’s something the at torney needs to look into. I would like to see some way we could require lower performing students to en roll in the charter school.” Thompson replied with a suggestion of his own. “Why don’t we just petition the state and make our school a charter school?” he said. “We haven’t lost our good players.” Hinton then introduced a commonly heard obser vation, that the charter school attracts only the more afuent students and fewer minorities, but went on to clarify that the com position of the ABC School is different than when it started a decade ago. “They (the two school’s student bodies) are not far off anymore,” he said. “They’re very close.” Shiver said she believed “there are a lot of miscon ceptions and rumors” surrounding the charter school. “I had someone tell me that they knew for a fact that two students who were enrolled in the char ter school were asked for their FCAT scores,” she said. But “the parent said, ‘No, that is not true. As a matter of fact, my son is a very low performer.” Hinton expanded on his views. “I do know that students who have parents who are highly concerned are the best students,” he said. “Those type of par ents insist their children go to the charter school. That tells me the potential top performers are go ing to the charter school. They all have the backing of parents, and that’s very important. “I just know that the cream of the crop went to the charter school when it rst started,” he said. “Whether it’s true any more I don’t know.” Marks offered her views on the best approach to wards improving student test scores. “You cannot put our kids in a box and say they had bad teach ers,” she said. “There are a lot of things that have to be studied; there could have been a number of dif ferent reasons. “Some of them were just right there teeter ing on the fence,” Marks said. “We can’t throw them backwards; we have to push them up. They (the teachers) see they have to come up with solutions, and they’re working on it.” Hinton, a former Carra belle High School teacher, reiterated his support for faculty. “The school is ba sically the teachers, and I think they’re just as good as anybody else,” he said. School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander said he did not concur with Hinton’s characterization about parents. “I take offense at that. I believe that parents who send their children to the Franklin County School are just as interest ed,” he said. “The charter school is a part of Franklin County. We’re all one; it’s not us and them. “The biggest problem we’ve had in the past year in our school system has been morale,” he said. “They (staff) don’t feel like they’re part of the deci sion-making process. They feel like they’re given the decision. “It starts with that and the working environment, and it grows from that be ing positive to this being positive,” Gander said. Cathy Wood, represen tative of the local teachers union, saluted the “cama raderie of teachers at ABC. If we could work together like teachers at ABC.” “The best and the brightest were lured away from us in the beginning (to the ABC School). In the beginning it did create some animosity.” She said she saw teach ers at the Franklin County School “working diligently. The rst thing they say is ‘we need more time.’” Wood said the school has suffered from a loss of paraprofessionals and called for “an additional adult in a typical class room, not a special needs classroom. When you have a second adult, you can delegate, and that very often makes a difference in those environments as well.” The discussion came to a close with the appear ance before the board of Jim Bachrach, a member of the ABC School board. He stressed that the char ter school considers itself an essential part of the en tire district and is strongly supportive of the district’s educational mission. Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-268-7718 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders Single T ooth Implant $ 1 7 95 Dentur e Implants $ 1 495 $ 1 8 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upper Ar c h 20144-1-T4 N O TI CE O F GENER AL ELECTI O N CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A D A TE: S EPTEMB ER 3, 2013 PO LLIN G P L A CE: CARR AB ELLLE MUNI CIP AL C O MP LEX 1001 GR A Y A VE. CARR AB ELLE, FL 32322 PO LLS O P EN A T 7:00 AM AND CLOS E 7:00 PM V O TE FO R: CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CAND ID A TES MA Y Q U ALIFY B EGINNIN G 12:00 N O O N, JUNE 24, 2013 UNTIL N O O N JUNE 28, 2013 (M O ND A Y THR U FRID A Y D URIN G REGUL AR W O RKIN G H O URS). Q U ALIFYIN G FEES IS $45.00 P L US 1% O F ANNU AL SAL AR Y O NL Y P ERSO NS REGIS TERED T O V O TE WITHIN THE CIT Y LIMIT S O F THE CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE WILL B E REC O GNIZED A S Q U ALIFIED ELECT O RS AND ALLO WED T O V O TE O R Q U ALIFY FO R CAND ID A CY CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A WILB URN MESS ER M AY O R problems with the gov ernance, stafng levels and maintenance opera tion, including an aver age cost per work or der that was more than 10 times the national average. “It was noted that the properties were strewn with debris, toys, and boats (used for employment) and in a few instances, mul tiple vehicles appear ing to be inoperable,” read the report. “Most notable were the elec tric dryers that were connected to exterior electrical outlets and found on several front porches.” Also, the report not ed, “the stafng levels of the AHA appear dispro portionately large to the size of the public hous ing property.” A follow-up visit to the public housing units in spring 2012 found “none of the improve ments needed had taken place,” according to an Aug. 6, 2012, email from Gloria Shanahan, with HUD’s Ofce of Public Affairs. “HUD also found that federal funds were inap propriately used,” Sha nahan wrote. “The mat ter was serious enough to inform the board of the Housing Author ity (which) decided to terminate the employ ment of the executive director.” In 2011, the hous ing authority received about $256,000 in fed eral funding. Paul Mills, director of the Spring eld Housing Authority, was brought in July 24, 2012, to serve as acting director of the housing authority. Mills worked to over see a series of improve ments to the local hous ing authority’s opera tion. He expanded ofce hours and stabilized the authority’s bank ac counts. He cleared up shoddy paperwork re lated to operations in general and to govern ment entities such as the Internal Revenue Service and workmen’s compensation. And he brought the policies and practices of the authority in line with federal housing rules and safe practices. Repair of units were stepped up, as well as improvements to main tenance, weatherization and installation of new electrical and plumb ing xtures to cut down on what had been ex cessive costs of water and sewer. Trees were trimmed and units were inspected, Mills said, and adjustments were made to ensure the size of family units best t the available space, to eliminate what is known as overhousing. Mills retired earlier this year and was re placed by Steve Lanier, an Apalachicola native and former comptrol ler at Weems Memorial Hospital. Lanier com pleted a Navy career a few years ago in Key West. Noblit is scheduled for trial Aug. 5, before Judge Robert L. Hinkle. She is facing a possible maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, three years of supervised re lease, a $250,000 ne and a $100 special monetary assessment. U.S. Attorney Marsh praised the work of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Ofce of Inspector General, whose investigation led to the indictment in the case. The case is being prosecuted by assistant U.S. attorneys Winifred Acosta NeSmith and Eric K. Mountin. HOUSING from page A1 “When you’re next to the last in the state of Florida, we’re doing a terrible job, and that is what’s embarrassing. I’m out on the street every day, all day long, and people hit me up on it. What can I tell them we’re working on?” George Thompson Franklin County School Board member SCHOOL from page A1 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas

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A6 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 `= =G S=Y S P O T S P O T . . nam e d t hat f o r o b v i o u s r e a s o n s H e i s a 1 y r o l d t e r r i e r m i x w i t h a f u n l o v i n g d i sp o si t i o n an d ha p p y d e m e an o r H e i s s o c ia l w i t h o t h e r d o g s an d l o v e s p e o p l e H e i s h e a r t w o r m p o si t i v e an d w i l l n e e d t o b e t r e at e d b e f o r e b e i n g r e l e a s e d b u t y o u m a y c l ai m h i m a s y o u r s w i t h a d e p o si t h o l d W e w i l l ha v e h i m t r e at e d f o r h e a r t w o r m s an d n e u t e r e d i n p r e p a r at i o n f o r h i s n e w h o m e S P O T O N V O L U NTE E R S A R E D E S P E R A TE L Y N E E D E D T O S O C IA L I Z E A L L O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f or go t t enpe t s or g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e pet s 451501 1 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 CIT Y OF AP ALA CHIC OLA M A Y OR ’ S ELEC TION PR OCLA M A TION I, the undersig ned V AN W JOHNSON, SR., M a y or of the C it y of A palachic ola, b y author it y of la w and pursuan t t o C it y Or dinanc e No 91-4, do her eb y pr oclaim tha t on T uesda y S ept ember 3, 2013 an elec tion will be held t o ll the oc es as f ollo w s: C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 3 f or a t er m of f our y ears and C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 4 f or a t er m of f our y ears and a RunO Elec tion, if nec essar y will be held on T uesda y S ept ember 17, 2013. C andida t es wishing t o qualify ma y do so a t the C it y O c e fr om 12 Noon M onda y June 24, 2013 un til 12 Noon F r ida y June 28, 2013. C it y O c e is loca t ed a t #1 A v enue E and r egular oc e hours ar e fr om 8:00 A M t o 4:00 P M, M onda y -F r ida y Each C andida t e must pa y t o the C it y Cler k a t the time of qualifying a qualifying f ee of 4.5% of the rst y ear ’ s salar y must be a r esiden t of the C it y of A palachic ola, and must also be a qualied v ot er of the S ta t e of F lor ida, C oun t y of F r ank lin, and the C it y of A palachic ola. A ll persons not pr eviously r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ma y r eg ist er t o v ot e an ytime fr om no w up t o 4:30 P M on M onda y A ugust 5, 2013 f or the G ener al Elec tion, and M onda y A ugust 19, 2013 f or the RunO Elec tion a t the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions loca t ed a t 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida, hours 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M, M onda y -F r ida y T he polling plac e will be a t the Na tional Guar d A r mor y loca t ed a t 66 4th S tr eet in the C it y of A palachic ola and will be open a t 7:00 A M and close a t 7:00 P M. A bsen t ee ballots ma y be obtained b y c on tac ting the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions a t plac e and time not ed pr eviously Only qualied elec t ors will be per mitt ed t o v ot e Ear ly v oting will be c onduc t ed fr om A ugust 26, 2013 t o A ugust 30, 2013 (5 da y s only) a t the Super visor of Elec tions O c e 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida fr om 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M. A ll r esiden ts of the C it y of A palachic ola not cur r en tly r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ar e ur ged t o r eg ist er and take par t in this elec tion. __________________________________ V an W Johnson, Sr ., M a y or C it y of A palachic ola, F lor ida Society Morgan Newell, Jason Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Newell, of Apalachicola, proudly announce the engagement of their daughter, Morgan Elizabeth Newell, to Jason Lee Thompson, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Thompson, of Eastpoint. Morgan’s grandparents are Ms. Nancy Horton and Mr. Larry McKuhen, and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Newell, all of Apalachicola. Jason’s grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Lee Roy Langley, of Eastpoint, and Mrs. Julie Thompson, of Carrabelle, and the late Vernon Thompson. A September 2013 wedding is planned. Aunt Flossie Ward turns 90 Family and friends are invited to attend a birthday celebration and family reunion this Saturday, June 15 at the Apalachicola Community Center at Battery Park, starting at 11 a.m. The celebration will honor the 90th birthday of Aunt Flossie Ward, who was born June 14, 1923. The event will also serve as an extended family reunion. All guests are invited to bring a covered dish. Any questions, please call Andrea Register at 653-5105. Fred and Mary Buskens, of Overstreet, will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Saturday, June 15 with an afternoon reception given by their children. This event will take place in the Fellowship Hall at Highland View Baptist Church, at 310 Ling Street in Highland View. The Buskens family would like to invite all of their friends and family to come and help celebrate this joyous occasion from 3 to 6 p.m. EST. The couple was married June 12, 1953 at The Lagoon Baptist Church in Gulf Shores, Ala. They are blessed with three children, June Davis and husband Eddie, Frederick Buskens and wife Rose, and Kim Gainey and husband Mike; eight grandchildren, and ve great-grandchildren. The Buskens are members of Highland View Baptist Church. Serenity Pouncey born Christopher and LaToya Pouncey, of Carrabelle, are pleased to announce the birth of their daughter, Serenity Nicole Pouncey. She was born on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 6:59 p.m. EST at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee. She weighed six pounds, 7.3 ounces, and 19 inches long. Paternal grandparents are Diana Monroy and Donnie Dean, of Carrabelle, and Corkey Dykes, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Cecil Pouncey and Frances Hutchins, of Carrabelle, and Alicia Pouncey, of Texas. Serenity was welcomed home by her big sister Cassiddi Lynn and family. OK all you dads, have a great Father’s Day! Lots of luck in hooking the big one if you’re going to be in the Big Bend Saltwater Classic This weekend. The sugar x will be prepared and served for you at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday, June 15. The members will be on hand to prepare and serve pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee and still only for a donation of $5. How about that?! Later on, you can dance the night away at the June Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 here in the village. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come in the door. Don’t forget about our monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall. Doors will open on Sunday, June 16 at 12:30 p.m. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to share, your appetite, a donation and enjoy the afternoon with your friends and neighbors. Let’s hear it for all the volunteers! They work hard to get things ready for us to enjoy. You can nd them at the food bank, the senior center, Chillas Hall, the thrift shop, re department, boat club and Post 82, just to name a few. Be sure to let them know that you appreciate them. Well, we dodged Andrea. Hope you had your survival kit handy and your escape plan. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, volunteers make it happen; become one today! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. All you dads have a happy Father’s Day LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Brent and Donna Barber, of Carrabelle, and John Carroll, of Lantana, are pleased to announce the forthcoming marriage of their children, Caden Rush Barber and Tiffany Lillian Carroll. Both are full-time honor students at Tallahassee Community College. Caden is employed at the Carrabelle Boat Club and Tiffany at the St. James Bay Golf Resort. The joining in marriage will take place in early 2014 and invitations will be sent to family and friends. Tiffany Carroll, Caden Barber EE NGAGEMENTS Buskens celebrate 60 years of marriage

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Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Weems ER To the emergency department of Weems Memorial Hospital, I had the pleasure of having to use the emergency services on Tuesday, May 14 at 7 a.m. I would like to commend Dr. James M. McCready and all the nurses and staff what were on duty at the time. Dr. McCready and the nursing staff were very knowledgeable in performing their duties. Mr. McCready had the knowledge to perform the necessary tests to diagnose my problem and took the time to talk to me and explain the results of my tests. He and the nurses were very nice and kind and I thank them for that. I think they deserve to be commended for the services they provide working in the environment they work in. The citizens of Franklin County should be thankful to have these people working at Weems Hospital performing the services they do. Sincerely, McArthur (Buddy) Mixon Friendship Missionary Baptist Church I want to thank Jesus for allowing me to have this wonderful Men’s Day program at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church. And I want to thank Teresa Ann Martin for presiding and also thank our Pastor James Williams for the wonderful message. I want to thank the Brotherhood Ministry from Panama City, Brother Bernard Simmons, the Heavenly Angels dance ministry, the Open Door Church of Quincy, the Ingram Brothers of Enterprise, Ala., the Master’s Choice of Enterprise Ala. and all the local churches. With love Deacon Henry Brown Chairman Jennifer McClain Family With grateful hearts, the family of Jennifer McClain would like to thank you for your many expressions of kindness, love and sympathy. It is our prayer that God will bless you tremendously. Words will never be able to express our sincerest gratitude The Family Kelly Brother Shiver Dec. 20, 2012 May 7, 2013 Another one of God’s Little Angels has been called home. Lord, if we could have but one wish today, it would be that our little Kelley could still be here on earth with us. To be able to hold him in our arms and see his pretty little face again, but Lord I know it was your wish for you to have him with you now. Thank you for what Time you gave us with him, here on earth with all his loved ones. Though our pain is deep and our family misses him here with us, we know he is with you now, and his loved ones who went before him. We will all carry him in our hearts until we meet again some sweet day in heaven, some sweet day. We all love and miss you, my love. God bless you, Your grandmother Louise, Daddy, and greatgrandfather, Mary Lou and all your family IN LOV iI NG M emEM O rR Y Charles Ernest Gay, 89, of Carrabelle, passed away on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Tallahassee. He was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. He was a member of Carrabelle First Baptist Church. He was a former school board member of Franklin County. He was a retired boat captain and sherman. He also retired from Florida State University Marine Biology Laboratory. He will always be remembered as a wonderful husband, father, grandfather and solider. He was an Army veteran serving in World War II. He is survived by his wife, Della Gay, of Carrabelle; a son: Mickey Gay (Jackie), of Carrabelle; three daughters, Clara Moeck, of San Diego, Calif., Patsy Putnal (Bevin) of Carrabelle, and Tina Varnes (Michael), of Pascagoula, Miss.; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. He is predeceased in death by his rst wife: Myrt Gay, and his parents, Howard and Clara Gay. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements.Charles Ernest GG ay Gary McArthur Shiver was born June 18, 1944, in Port St. Joe to the now late Lovie and Lester Shiver. He passed away Sunday, June 9, 2013 surrounded by family in Panama City at the age of 68. Gary was a commercial sherman. He is survived by his wife; Jane Shiver; children, Bobby Shiver (Arlene), Melissa Lee (Timmy), and Duane Shiver; siblings, Caroline Drouin, Margaret, Johnny Shiver, Darlene Estes, Charlotte Turner, Charles King, Albert Johnson and Richard Johnson; eight grandchildren, and ve great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his Raymond. Funeral services will be 2 p.m. on Thursday, June 13 at Kelley Funeral Home with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Viewing was Wednesday, June 12 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Kelley Funeral Home. GG ary Shiver Judith Lynn Bos, 74, passed away Saturday, May 18, 2013, at Eden Springs Nursing Home. Daughter of the late Jacob (Jack) William and Frieda Gnerich Bos, Judie was born March 22, 1939, in Detroit, Michigan. A member of Gray Memorial United Methodist Church, she was a former kindergarten teacher and medical transcriber, had a lifelong love of dogs and commitment to rescuing them, enjoyed sketching and drawing, and treasured time at the beach, especially St. George Island. She had resided in Tallahassee for the past 46 years, having come from Boca Raton. She recalled fondly her happy childhood in Holland, Michigan, and her dear friends there. She is survived by her daughters, Tippy Timmons Hiott and Tonni Timmons Dola, and stepgrandchildren Mark Hiott, Ben Hiott and Jesse Hiott. She was preceded in death by her children, Timmy Joe Timmons and Terri Lynn Paddon. In keeping with her wishes, no formal services will be held. In her honor, please consider a donation to the Best Friends Animal Society, www.bestfriends. org. Judith Lynn Bos Delma Fred “Red” Anthony, 82, died Saturday, June 8, 2013, at his home. Red, a native of Apalachicola, resided most of his life there. He was preceded in death by his parents, Fred and Goldie Chason Anthony; one sister, Betty Carrol; two brothers, Louis and Calvin; a grandson, Fred Clayton Anthony II. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Annette; two daughters, Janet Anthony and Rhonda Traweek (Jim); a son, Fred Clayton Anthony; a grandson, Andrew Traweek; a granddaughter, Heather Belcher; two great-grandchildren, Keagan Belcher and Jaiden Belcher; family friends, Bob Pearce, Catherine Ann Coulter, and Tessa Daniels; and brothers-in-law, Terry Hutto, Harry Braswell, and Wallace Braswell; sistersin-law, Annette M. Anthony, Julia Anthony, Lorraine Nash, Linda Hutto, and Reba Braswell; and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday morning, June 12 at Fellowship Baptist Church with the Rev. Charles Scott ofciating. Red was born June 26, 1930. He attended Chapman School and graduated in 1949. He attended Florida State University for three years before joining the U.S. Army. He served 16 months in Korea. After being honorably discharged in Nov. 1955, he returned home and then rejoined the National Guard where he was honorably discharged in April 1956. Red began working in the family business, The Grill Restaurant, in Nov. 1955. After his dad died in April 1966, his mother continued to work until she retired in 1974. At that time, Red and his brother, Louis, continued to operate The Grill until they retired in Dec. 1983. Red and Annette married in 1958. Red will be greatly missed by his family, friends and his church where he was a faithful member. Kelley Funeral Handled all arrangements. Delma ‘Red’ Anthony Steven Richard White, of Port St. Joe, passed away after a brief illness on Friday, May 31, 2013, at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee. Steve was born in Hastings, Mich., on June 4, 1951. In 1956, he and his family moved to Apalachicola where he attended Chapman Schools, and he graduated from Chapman High School in 1970. After graduation Steve joined the U.S. Navy and was honorably discharged on July 1, 1976. Steve worked at the St. Joe Paper Co. until it closed in 1998, and then for Century Boat Co. in Panama City, until it closed in 2007. Steve’s lifelong hobby was airplanes. He designed, built, and ew radio controlled airplanes. He was a member of the Five Points R/C Flyers in Port St. Joe. Steven was preceded in death by his father Richard N. White, in 1978. He is survived by his two sons. Michael White (Sherry), of Eastpoint, and Daniel White (Jeana), of St. George Island; his mother, Irene White, of Apalachicola; his sister Sandra Bradley (Wayne), of Chipley; grandsons, Cameron, Chandler, and Chance White, of Eastpoint; and his nephews, Nick Vathis Jr., of Panama City, and Richard Vathis, of Chipley. A memorial service will be held on Friday, June 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God. Visitation will be from 66:30 p.m. Steven Richard White Obituaries Cards of TH aA N ksKS Fish fry benets hospice patients Special to the Times On May 24, the Franklin County Advisory Council of Big Bend Hospice held a benet sh fry to raise funds for patients and families in Franklin County. A.J. Smith wanted to give back to both his community and to Big Bend Hospice. This rst-time event started an unexpected obstacle. Ronnie Segree and his sons graciously volunteered to provide the sh for the event and caught 300 pounds of mullet. However, before they could deliver the goods, a hungry bear found their treasure and ate almost 150 pounds of it. That’s when Water Street Seafood stepped up with a generous donation of 150 pounds of mullet. But Ronnie wasn’t going to be outplayed by a bear; he went back and caught another 100 pounds of mullet. So how do you sell, cook and serve this much sh? With the help of Johnny Turner, Gene Osborne, Mark Creamer, Anthony Croom, Tony Phillips, Robin Myers, Fonda Davis, director of county solid waste, and Palmer Philyaw. Adding to the main dish were wonderful desserts donated by Pam Mahr, Judy Cook and Mary McMahan. Others who helped make this event a success included Susie Harrison; Danny Itzkovitz at Tamara’s, Joe Taylor from Franklin’s Promise, the Piggly Wiggly, Ace Hardware, and the city of Apalachicola. Last, but not least, Ed Lyon, and Linda Gannaway, members of the Big Bend Hospice, Franklin County team, did a wonderful job coordinating everyone’s talents and efforts. By the time the grease cooled, the sh fry exceeded its goal of $2,000! “Thanks to all those who helped and to those who purchased meals, we were able to exceed our goal,” said Smith, member of the Franklin County Advisory Council. “These funds will be used to help Big Bend Hospice serve patients and families in our area.”

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m Spiranthes, commonly called Ladies’-tresses, is a group of orchids with owers, usually white, that form a spiral around a slender stem. The many species are found throughout North and South America and, in northern Florida, some are in bloom almost constantly. Right now, Spiranthes vernalis or spring ladies’tress is common on the roadsides. This slender and delicate plant blooms late March through June but peaks in May. Spiranthes are perennial terrestrial orchids, meaning they grow in soil and return from rootstock rather than seed. The name Spiranthes is derived from the ancient Greek words for twisted ower. Traditionally it was used as a tonic for headaches and as an aphrodisiac. It is still given as a headache remedy in homeopathic medicine. Spiranthes cernua or nodding ladies’-tress is a wonderful ornamental plant for temperate gardens and is one of the more popular hardy orchids for sale. It is hardy throughout the South and prefers moist, rich, well-drained soil. Nodding ladies’-tress is produced commercially as a cut ower. To learn more about these and some of the other native orchids found in Florida, visit www. nativeorchids.co m Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Ha ppy F a t her's Day!!! WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu June 13 90 78 20 % F ri, June 14 90 76 30 % S a t June 15 88 76 20 % Sun, June 16 86 75 20 % M on, June 17 86 75 20 % T ues June 18 87 76 20 % W ed June 19 87 76 0 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT • FULL LA WN SERVICES • TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL • ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOESLA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore/Bottom Red snapper continues to be the best bet in offshore fishing right now and will be until the season closes on June 28th in Federal waters. Big snapper are holding on near shore and offshore wrecks from 60-150ft of water. Live bait will prove to be the best for bigger fish, however snapper will eat cut bait as well. Try fishing 20 feet off the bottom with a live grunt or pinfish for a trophy red snapper. As the summer time weather patterns start to set in, bay fishing will be a game of early and late. Early morning top water action will produce nice trout and redfish catches. Late afternoon fishing will be mainly live bait and grubs and jigs and as the water cools down, try switching back to a top water hard bait for a trophy red fish or trout. Flounder are showing up in the normal places this week from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. Page 8 Thursday, June 13, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m “Drift cards” will soon be washing up on Franklin County beaches as part of a research project at Texas A&M University to study ocean currents. The bright yellow cards have contact information and a request that nders report where they were found. The project is the brainchild of Piers Chapman who has done similar research in Africa. There he released thousands of plastic cards. About 2 percent were recovered in places as far ung as Brazil and India. “That was a much larger current system,” he said. Chapman expects to recover a much larger percentage here. Twentyve percent of the rst 250 released on April 6 and 8 off the Louisiana coast have already been returned. If you nd and return a card, you become eligible for a monthly drawing, with the prize a $25 gift card. The rst winner was an Ohio native vacationing in Lynn Haven where she found her winning entry. “It’s a fun way to track currents and to get people involved,” said Chapman. He said the drift cards released in the Gulf will be biodegradable, in keeping with the international Mapol Convention which bans putting plastic in ocean waters. Scientists on research cruises, funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI), will drop these cards at various locations in the Gulf and keep a detailed record of the point of entry. GoMRI is a 10-year, $500 million independent research program established by an agreement between BP and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance to study the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the associated impact on the environment and public health. Chapman said the funding is administered by a board of distinguished scientists who report to BP annually but operate without oversight from the company. The drift card project was one of nine funded out of 200 applications during a national competition. Over the next six to eight months, 5,000 cards will be released. Chapman relies on cooperators including Florida State University and the University of South Florida to actually deploy the cards for him. Ten cards are released at each site and Chapman plans to cover the entire northern Gulf. Posters dealing with the cards are now being posted in areas where they are expected to come ashore. The cards will enable oceanographers to improve prediction models and see how gas and oil travel along the currents of the Gulf. Chapman said he is especially interested to see if any drift cards escape the Gulf and come ashore on the East Coast. Each bright yellow card has instructions in both Spanish and English on how to report its recovery using an online form or a phone number. Learn more about the project and see interactive maps of where cards have been released and found by visiting gisr.tamu.edu Chapman said, especially with the recent in uence of Tropical Storm Andrea, cards may arrive on our beaches in the very near future. Ladies’-tress orchids common on roadsides LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Spiranthes vernalis or spring ladies’-tress BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Commercial oyster harvest on the summer oyster bars of Apalachicola Bay waters will be shortened from seven days a week to ve days a week starting June 1, when the summer bars open to harvest. Bay oyster populations have suffered mainly due to lack of freshwater ow over the past few years. This temporary rule was established via executive order of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). State of cials, working with the oyster industry, concluded that these changes would help conserve oyster resources throughout the summer harvesting season and serve as a proactive measure to balance availability of harvestable oysters with efforts to restore oyster populations. Commercial harvest of oysters will be closed on Fridays and Saturdays. The temporary rule will expire Aug. 31, when the summer bars close and the winter oyster bars reopen for harvest. All other bag limits, seasons and size limits remain unchanged. Apalachicola Bay includes all waters within St. George Sound, East Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Vincent Sound in Franklin County and Indian Lagoon in Gulf County. This change does not apply to active oyster leases or recreational harvest. Apalachicola Bay oysters account for about 92 percent of Florida’s oyster landings and about 8 percent of all landings in the United States (average from 2007-2011). This closure is one of many efforts from various state and local agencies to help rebuild and conserve the important oyster population in Apalachicola Bay. Other efforts have included relocating oysters from closed areas to open areas and adding shell to existing oyster bars, which provides a base on which juvenile oysters can build. The FWC will continue to coordinate closely with the oyster industry and local community and agency partners to evaluate current and future measures needed to help address these concerns regarding oyster resources in Apalachicola Bay and other important oyster-producing areas along Florida’s Gulf coast. To view the Executive Order, visit MyFWC.com/About and click on “Inside FWC,” “Executive Director” and “Executive Orders.” Temporary commercial oyster closures to help population rebuild Watch out for drift cards

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 o Z ‘ ¨ f ¦ £ ˆ ‘  } ‘ ¨ €  „ ¤  b   b ‘ ‘ ”  ¨ ¨  { ” ¨ — ˆ ‘  ‚ ¨ W e a r e p le a s e d t o p r es en t t o y o u t hi s y e a r's A nn u a l W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t. i s r ep o r t i s desig n e d t o inf o r m y o u a b o u t t h e q u a li t y wa t er a n d s er v ices w e de li v er t o y o u e v er y d a y O ur co n s t a n t g o a l i s t o p r o v ide y o u w i t h a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le s u p p l y o f dr in k in g wa t er W e wa n t y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o en s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er O ur wa t er s o ur ce i s t w o w e l l s dra w n f r o m t h e Flo r id a n A q uif er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex ce l len t q u a li t y o f o ur wa t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en t r e q uir e d i s c h lo r in e f o r di sinf e c t io n p ur p os es. I n 2012 t h e D ep a r t m en t o f En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n p er f o r m e d a S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t o n o ur sys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o ur ces in dic a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o ur ces o f co n t a min a t io n n e a r o ur w e l l s. e a s s es sm en t r es u l ts a r e a va i l a b le o n t h e FD EP S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t a n d P r o t e c t io n P r og ra m w e bsi t e at w w w .d e p .s t a t e. .u s/s wa p p I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s a b o u t t hi s r ep o r t o r co n cer nin g y o ur wa t er u t i li t y p le a s e co n t ac t K ei t h M o c k, W a t er S u p er in t en den t, a t (850) 251-9106. W e en co ura g e o ur va l ue d c u s t o m er s t o b e inf o r m e d a b o u t t h eir wa t er u t i li t y I f y o u wa n t t o le a r n m o r e p le a s e a t t en d a n y o f o ur r egu l a r l y s c h e d u le d m e et in gs. e y a r e h e ld a t e C a r ra b e l le M unici p a l C o m p lex, 1001 G ra y A v en ue o n t h e r s t ur s d a y o f e ac h m o n t h a t 6:00 p .m. e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le r o u t in e l y m o ni t o r s f o r co n t a min a n ts in y o ur dr in k in g wa t er acco r din g t o F e dera l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. E x cep t w h er e in dic a t e d o t h er w i s e t hi s r ep o r t i s b a s e d o n t h e r es u l ts o f o ur m o ni t o r in g f o r t h e p er io d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e cem b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a in e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r es en t e d in t hi s r ep o r t a r e f r o m t h e m os t r e cen t t es t in g do n e in acco r d a n ce w i t h t h e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. I n t h e t a b les b e lo w y o u m a y n d unfa mi li a r t er m s a n d a b b r e v i a t io n s. T o h e l p y o u b et t er un der s t a n d t h es e t er m s w e h a v e p r o v ide d t h e f o l lo w in g de ni t io n s: A c t i o n L e v e l (AL): e co n cen t ra t io n o f a co n t a min a n t w hic h, if ex ce e de d t r ig g er s t r e a t m en t o r o t h er r e q uir em en ts t h a t a wa t er sys t em m u s t f o l lo w I ni t i a l Dis t ri b u t i o n S y s t e m E va l u a t i o n (IDS E): A n im p o r t a n t p a r t o f t h e S t a g e 2 Di sinf e c t io n B yp r o d uc ts R u le (D B P R). e IDS E i s a o n e-t im e s t ud y co n d uc t e d b y wa t er sys t em s t o iden t if y di s t r i b u t io n sys t em lo c at io n s w i t h hig h co n cen t ra t io n s o f t r i h a lo m et h a n es (THMs) a n d h a lo acet ic acid s (H AA s). W a t er sys t em s w i l l u s e r es u l ts f r o m t h e IDS E, in co n j un c t io n w i t h t h eir S t a g e 1 D B P R co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g d a t a, t o s e le c t co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g lo c a t io n s f o r t h e S t a g e 2 D B P R M axim um C o n ta mina n t L e v e l o r M CL: e hig h es t le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t t h a t i s a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er M CLs a r e s et a s c los e t o t h e M CL Gs a s f e a si b le u sin g t h e b es t a va i l a b le t r e a t m en t t e c hn o log y M axim um C o n ta mina n t L e v e l G o a l o r M CLG: e le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t in dr in k in g wa t er b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. M CL Gs a l lo w f o r a m a r g in o f s a f et y M axim um R es i d u a l Dis inf e c ta n t L e v e l o r MRD L: e hig h es t le v e l o f a di sinf e c t a n t a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er er e i s co n v in cin g e v iden ce t h a t addi t io n o f a di sinf e c t a n t i s n e ces s a r y f o r co n t r o l o f micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. M axim um R es i d u a l Dis inf e c ta n t L e v e l G o a l o r MRD LG : e le v e l o f a dr in k in g wa t er di sinf e c t a n t b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. MRD L Gs do n o t r e e c t t h e b en e ts o f t h e u s e o f di sinf e c t a n ts t o co n t r o l micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. N o n a p p li c a b l e (N/A): D o es n o t a p p l y N o n-D e t e c t (ND): m e a n s n o t det e c t e d a n d in dic a t es t h a t t h e s u bs t a n ce wa s n o t f o un d b y l a b o ra t o r y a n a l ysi s. P a r ts p e r mi l li o n (p p m) o r Mi l lig r a ms p e r li t e r (m g/l) : o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 mi l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P a r ts p e r b i l li o n (p p b) o r Mi cr o g r a ms p e r li t e r (g/l): o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 b i l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P i c o c uri e p e r li t e r (pC i/L): m e a s ur e o f t h e radio ac t i v i t y in wa t er I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in kin g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h ttp://w w w .e pa.go v/s a f e w a t e r/l ea d e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di ss o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) Mi cr o b i a l c o n ta mina n ts s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I no rg a ni c c o n ta mina n ts s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t i ci d es a nd he rb i ci d es w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Org a ni c che mi c a l c o n ta mina n ts in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b yp r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adi o ac t iv e c o n ta mina n ts w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uct io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t rat io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y’ s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791. a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r e e c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o me p e o p l e ma y b e mo r e v u lne r a b l e t o c o n ta mina n ts in drin k in g wa t e r tha n the ge ne r a l p o p u l at i o n. I mm uno-c o m p r o mis e d p e rs o ns s u ch as p e rs o ns w i th c a nc e r und e rgo in g che mo the r a p y p e r s o ns w ho ha v e und e rgo ne o rg a n t r a ns p l a n ts, p e o p l e w i th HIV/AIDS o r o the r imm une s y s t e m dis o r d e rs, s o me e l d e rly a nd inf a n ts c a n b e p a r t i c u l a rly a t ris k f r o m inf e c t i o ns. es e p e o p l e s ho u l d s e e k adv i c e a b o u t drin k in g wa t e r f r o m the ir he a l th c a r e p r o v i d e rs. EP A/CD C g ui d e lines o n a p p r o p ri a t e me a ns t o l ess e n the ris k o f inf e c t i o n b y C r y p t os p o ri di um a nd o the r mi cr o b i o l o g i c a l c o n ta mina n ts a r e a va i l a b l e f r o m the S a f e Drin k in g W a t e r H o tline (800-426-4791). W e w o rk t o p r o v i d e t o p q u a l i t y w a t e r t o e v e r y t a p W e a s k t h a t a ll o u r c u s t o m e rs h e l p u s p r o t ec t o u r w a t e r s o u r c e s, w h i c h a r e t h e h ea r t o f o u r c o m m u n i t y o u r w a y o f l i f e a n d o u r c h il d r e n ’ s f u tu r e. I f y o u h a v e a n y q u e s ti o n s o r c o n c e r n s a bo u t t h e i n f o r m a ti o n p r o v i d ed p l ea s e f ee l f r ee t o c a ll a n y o f t h e n u m be rs l i s t ed By David Adlerstein 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com What a difference out of bounds makes. In a stunning and dramatic upset Saturday on St. George Island, longtime mullet champ Hunter Bartley, gunning for his sixth straight title and the leader after the regular competition, was unseated in the toss-off by former champ Chip Sanders. Sanders, who last won the mullet toss a half dozen years ago, had strong backto-back throws, of 124’ and 132’ to earn a berth in the nals in the 22nd annual competition, held on the beach behind the Blue Parrot Restaurant. But his best was easily outdistanced by Bartley’s best of 151’ which enabled him to easily sail into the nals. In his rst time competing in the mullet toss, Jody Ledford, 43, from Thomasville, Ga., quali ed for the nals with a 124’ throw. In a last-minute appearance, former champion Robert Wilhoit threw out of bounds, and 120’, to narrowly miss the nals. Brett Johnson, 30, who had slung the sh 152’ last year to make it to the nals, also had no such luck this year. His one throw was just 91’ and his other sliced out of bounds to the right and struck an onlooker. “A free pitcher of beer if you get hit,” joked emcee Brian Bowen. So the stage was set for the toss-off on the hot afternoon, marked by a brisk southeasterly wind. Bowen and George Joanos, the Blue Parrot’s co-owner, had overseen the competition since mid-morning. In the toss-off, Sanders threw 128’ to take the lead. Ledford, a former tight end for Georgia Tech, then sliced his throw out of bounds to the right. “The wind kind of caught me,” he said. “It was a rookie mistake.” Bartley then hooked his throw out of bounds to ensure Sanders’ crown and the $200 rst prize. Bartley said it was his third time losing in the nals after having thrown the farthest in the regular competition. “The mullet tore on me,” he said. “I knew it was gone.” Bartley raised the question politely as to why the traditional rules governing the toss-off had been set aside this year. “Last year there were two throws. This year we only did one,” he said. Bartley was gracious in defeat, noting that both he and Sanders live on 13th Street in Apalachicola. “Our street can throw the mullet,” he said. “He’s the man.” Sanders danced for joy after his victory in the competition, that drew about 30 entrants in the men’s division. “There’s a new sheriff in town,” he said. “I knew I just needed to go out here and win. CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 13, 2013 A Page 9 Section Sanders back as mullet toss champ See MULLET A10 The Franklin County AAA All-Star Team, managed by Justin Odom, and coached by Lanny Rester and Bert Davis, won the AAA district crown for 9 and 10 year olds Tuesday night in Port St. Joe. They are now headed to the AAA state tourney July 13 in Freeport. Pictured above are teammates Carson Davis, Gage Boone, Clint Rester, Colin Amison, Caleb Abel, Caden Turrell, Joshua Odom, Lamarius Martin, Tanner Jamison, Ashton Topham and Kelson Smith. The Franklin County AA boys, who hit off a pitching machine, also won the district title and are headed to the state tourney June 29 in Wildwood. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Chip Sanders tossing the mullet. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 AAA BOYS STATE BOUND PHOTO COURTESY OF CHALA PARISH Sports BRIEFS Athletes to bene t from Saltwater Classic auction The Franklin County High School football team will be helping Will Dance, producer of The Morning Show with Preston Scott 100.7 FM WFLA Tallahassee’s Talk Radio, as they direct this year’s 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic in Carrabelle June 13-16. “The team will be out in force on Auction Day on Sunday. We need as many people in the community there to buy auctioned sh that are caught during the tournament,” said athletic director Mike Sweatt. “The proceeds from all sh auctioned off go to the football team only. We will also be accepting donations throughout.” Franklin School hosts June 28 golf tourney Go out and play golf to support the students, at the Franklin County Schools golf tournament. Tee time is Friday, June 28, at 1 p.m. at St. James Bay Golf Resort Cash prizes awarded for rst, second and third places. Amounts will be based on the participation of players and sponsors. Prizes for “Closest to the Pin” and The “Longest Drive” winner will receive a free round of golf donated by See BRIEFS A10

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T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM Sports A10 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 MULLETT from page A9 “It’s like any sport. I’m just com petitive when I get in the sport. I don’t let no other man take me down. I don’t care how big they are. You just go out there and be competitive,” Sanders said. In the women’s category, of about two dozen entrants, Brett’s wife, Carrie Johnson, made up for her husband’s errant throw by winning the women’s competition, and $200, with a throw of 90’. Last year, she took home third place with a throw of a little more than 86’. Last year’s runner-up, Talla hassee’s Laura Davis, repeated as runner-up with a throw of 88’ six feet shorter than her best toss last year. Finishing third was Talla hassee’s Miranda Ard, who threw the sh 85 ’. In the freestyle category, in which competitors shoot mullet out of a gi ant tube, powered by compressed air, the team of 5150, which is police code for someone who is crazy and on the loose, won the $100 rst prize for a shot of 380’. That team included Paul Ard, Wesley Jones, Trey Gerk ing, Hunter Bartley and Michael Lu berto. Finishing second for a 329’ pro pulsion, and winning a grille, was the Ace of Spades team, including Mike Willis, Mark Willis and Rio Shiver. The team of Punkin’ Nuts was third. In the kids 10-and-under, Apala chicola’s Lamarius “Monk” Martin won the bicycle with a throw of 71’, followed by St. George Island’s Alex Joanos, who threw for 64’. In third place was a young person with the rst name of Blake, who pitched the mullet 59’. Among the 11 to 13 year olds, the winner was Carter Kirkpatrick, from Madison, Ga., with a throw of 95’, with Davis McGee, of St. George Is land second with a throw of 88 ’. In third place was St. George Island’s Nick Joanos, who threw for 83’. Among the 14 to 16 year olds, the winner was James Durham, from Apalachicola, with a throw of 85’, with Jackson Groom of Thomasville, Ga., with a toss of 82’. In third place was Cole Spivey, from Tallahassee, who threw the sh 75’. All monies raised by the event go to the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Rob Burlison, head golf pro fessional at St. James Bay Country Club. A buffet will be provided. For sponsor information contact Shannon Venable, Franklin County Schools, 670-2810 ext. 4105 or sven able@franklin.k12..us. Sponsorships are available: $100, $200, $300 and $400. For tournament info con tact Burlison at 697-9606 or rob@stjamesbay.com. Student athletes seek assistance Two graduating seniors are seeking donations as they prepare to take part in summer athletic teams. David Butler will attend the USA Junior Basketball National in Columbus, Ohio on July 8. Skyler Hutchin son will attend the Under Armour Baseball Nationals Omaha, Neb. on July 22. Both young men are seeking sponsors to help offset the costs in taking part in an impressive array of outstanding student-ath letes. To help, contact Franklin County High School athletic director Michael Sweatt at sweattfamu@hotmail.com. Or at 566-3434 or 899-1742. BRIEFS from page A9 A10 | The Times June 13, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91374T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192012CA000348CAXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 26, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000348CA XXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, is the Plaintiff and JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON; CENTENNIAL BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on July 10, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND IN THE N.E. OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 27, T8S, R8W HEREBY FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY INTERSECTION (CON.MON.) OF TWO PROPOSED 66 FOOT ROADS, 1765 FEET DUE NORTH AND 218.5 FEET WEST OF THE S.W. CORNER (CON.MON.) OF THE N.E. OF SAID SECTION 27, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE ROAD, 144 FEET TO A PONT FOR BEGINNING; RUN THENCE, CONTINUING ALONG ROAD, 200 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE CREEK; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG CREEK TO A POINT NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST OF THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES WEST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-08104 June 13, 20, 2013 91396T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Grit Water USA, located at 312 Hwy 98, in the County of Franklin, in the City of East Point, Florida, 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at East Point, Florida, this 7th day of June, 2013. Leola Jolly Martin June 13, 2013 93803T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000020 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN E. SEGER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 13, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2012-CA-000020 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and STEVEN E. SEGER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEVEN E. SEGER; MERRIE J. SEGER; ONE CHARLESTON PLACE HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 27th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 2 BLOCK 2 EAST, ST GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT 1 A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. A/K/A 159 GUNN STREET, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 323282879 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 14, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11039170 June 6, 13, 2013 93819T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-281-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 28th day of May, 2013, in Case Number 11-281 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR., is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 10th day of July, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 6, Block C, Range 3, McKissack Beach Subdivision, as per map or Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 29th day of May, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By:/s/ Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 6, 13, 2013 93837T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-000148-CA JOHN EARLE PERKINS, III, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR FRANCIS PERKINS, JR., and HERBERT DAIGRE PERKINS, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Partition Sale in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: The West 17 feet of Lot 2 and the East 55 feet of Lot 3 of Block “C” of Perkins Beach according to map or plat thereof in Plat Book 1, Page 7 on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit a/k/a 4322 Highway 98, St. Teresa Beach, Franklin County, FL 32358 at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. EDT on June 25, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 31st day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 June 6, 13, 2013 93861T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012 CA 000325 AUDIE E. LANGSTON Plaintiff, vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT Defendant NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Chris Cartwright, Defendant, and to all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against Defendant, and all parties having or claiming to have and right, title or interest in the real property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated as defendant in a legal proceeding filed against you for foreclosure on real property purchased from Audie E. Langston. The action involves real property in Franklin County, Florida, more fully described as follows: LOT 91 LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03

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CLASSIFIEDS June 13, 2013 The Times | A11 Rowell Auctions, Inc. 800-323-8388 RowellAuctions.com ell Auctions, Inc 0 0-323-8388 we llA uc ti o n s.co m 10% Buyers Premium € AU 479, AB 296For Additional Property Information Visit RowellAuctions.com AUCTION ONLINE ONLY € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation Ro we ellAuctionsInc For Additional Proper t ty Information Visit ns.com RowellAuctio n € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation A AU AU C C T O I O N ONLINE ONLY LINEONLY Bidding Ends Wed., June 26th, 2pmSubject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature 9 Bank Owned Properties GA & FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL € € € T € T € T €T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T €T T T T T ier ier ier ier ier er er er ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Lt Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lt L L L Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot ot ot € Tier 1 Lot € € € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 €1 1 1 1 Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl l l Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl ock ock ock ock ock k k k ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of h th th th th th th th th th h h th th th th th th th th e e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B eB eB eB eB eB eB eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h € 1 Block of the Beach € J € € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J J J J J J ust ust ust ust t t t ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi i Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi t t t t t t t t t nut nut nut nut nut nut nut es es es es s s s s es s es es es f f f f fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro m m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m m B m B mB mB mB eau eau eau eau ea eau eau eau e t tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif l l l ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul € J ust Mi nut es from B eau tif ul G G G Gu Gu Gul Gul Gul ul G Gu G f f f C f C f C f C f C f C f C fC f C f C f C oas oas oas a oas oas oa t tF t F t F t F t F t F F F F t F F i i ish ish ish ish sh i i ing ng g ing ing ing ng ng g g g g g g & & & & & & & & & & & & Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec R rea rea rea rea rea rea re re re ti tio io tio tio n n n n n n n n n Gulf Coast Fish ing & Recreation G G G G Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul fC fC fC fC fC C C C fC fC fC fC fC fC f f oas oas oas oas oas oas oas oas t t t t tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF ish ish ih ish ih ih ih h h h ish ish ish ish ish ish ish i i ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & R R R Rec Rec Rec R R R Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec rea rea rea rea rea rea rea rea ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti tio tio tio tio tio tio tio n n n n n n n n n n n n GulfCoastFishing&Recreation 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 86 86 86 Me Me Me M Me Me Me Me Me Me Me Me rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rc ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry y y Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan L L L Lan L Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan an an e e e e e e e e e e e e e e Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por t S t S S S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S tS tS tS tS tS S t. t. t. t. t. t t. t. t t t t t t J J J Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap ap ap e e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S eS eS eS eS eS eS d d d d d d d and and and d and and and and and and and Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) FL FL FL FL FL L L L L L L L FL FL FL L FL FL FL FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL Also Available:36 Janet Drive Crawfordville (Shell Point), FL 3 Bd, 2 Ba Mobile Home 1739 Lark Lane St. George Island, FL Excellent Lot Located in the Plantation 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr. Port St. Joe, FL Excellent Home Site Pisces Dr., Santa Rosa Beach, FL -Canal Front Lot w/Dock 2090212 FLORIDA PROPERTIES 10% BUYER'S PREMIUM Broker Compensation Available! 55 Tue., June 25, 1:00 P.M. EDT Sale Site: Hotel Duval 415 N. Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 All Properties Sell Absolute Live & Online Bidding ProperesinTheseCounes:Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden,Gulf,Jeerson, Leon, Liberty, Wakulla, Walton&WashingtonCounes,FLProperesInclude:Homes, Condos, Gulf Front, Bay Front and OtherResidenalLots; Commercial Buildings, Land and Acreage Tracts. ForDetailed Informaon johndixon.com 800.479.1763 FLAL# AB-0001488 JOHN DIXONA UCTIONS M ARKETING & A SSOCIATES 1112349 AUCTION BANK ORDERED Member FDIC 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ................... ............... ..................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD ................... ............... ................ $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND .............. ..... ............................ $750 1BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW seconds East Along the North boundary of said section 35 a distance of 2855.93 Feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 760.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING From Said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds East 40.89 feet to a point on the Northwesterly right-ofway Boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway said point lying on a curve. Concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Northeasterly along said Right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3410.00 Feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds for an arc distance of 447.51 feet, the chord of said arc being North 38 degrees 27 minutes 47 seconds East 447.19 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 319.25 feet to th POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.40 acres, more or less. The action was instituted in the Second Judicial Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida, and is styled AUDIE E. LANGSTON vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT, et al. Case No.: 2012 CA 00325. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Daniel W. Hartman, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is PO Box 10910, Tallahassee, FL 32302, on or before July 30, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Daniel W. Hartman or immediately after service, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff’s interest which will be binding upon you. DATED: April 23, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 93941T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on July 18, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property PARCEL 1: Lot 58, PHASE 4, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION PHASES 3 AND 4, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. PARCEL 2: All of Lots 1 through 8, Block 99, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 900.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31 for 459.73 feet to the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 693.63 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West along the Western right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway for 246.99 feet, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 575.16 feet to the Point of Beginning. AND All of Lots 1 through 6, Block 100, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 1359.73 feet to the Northern right-ofway of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 743.63 feet to the Point of Beginning. From this Point of Beginning continue North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road for 300.00 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West for 126.23 feet to the Northeast corner of Lot 6, Block 100, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 317.36 feet to the Eastern right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway, thence South 19 degrees 02 minutes East for 229.74 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, INC. a/k/a GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN, INC.; JEFFERY A. DYKES; KELLY J. DYKES; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; GOLD KEY HOLDINGS, II, LLC, Defendants and the docket number of which is 2013 CA 000063 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 3rd day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 j j ADOPT j j : At-Home-Mom & Prof Dad yearn to share everything with baby. Expenses Paid. 800-552-0045. j Chris & Carolyn j jj FLBar42311 jj GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl June 15th & 16th 8:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL53032 to 56654 Flood Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Receptionist Weekends Required Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34252703 Text FL52703 to 56654 Food Serv/HospitalityOyster Shuckers (Apalachicola, FL) -21 temporary positions. Wearing rubber gloves, boots & caps, shucker opens & washes oysters, uses shucking knife to gently pry open oyster shell & separate from muscle so that meat can be frozen, canned, packed or otherwise disposed of as necessary. No exp or edu reqd. From 6am-3pm, M-F, with no OT. Temp employment from 06/11/2013 to 6/10/2014. Wage paid is $9 /hr. Work location: 101 Water St., Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apply to: Leavins Seafood, Attn: Darren Guillotte, Owner, PO Box 520, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or via email: lsi@gtcom.net or telephone at (850) 653-8823 Web ID: 34254618 Text FL54618 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!PTHousekeeper and PT Bartender Experience preferred. Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C. Web ID#: 34254465 Quality Assurance Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc St George Island Full and Part Time PositionsCollins Vacation Rentals, Inc is now interviewing for Full and Part Time positions in Administration, Front Desk, Reservations, Housekeeping and Maintenance departments. Applicants must have excellent communication and computer skills. Prior experience in Customer Service and Vacation Rentals helpful. If you enjoy greeting and assisting visitors on St. George Island, we want to talk to you! Applications available at our main office at 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $575 ‘98 Ford Taurus T ot al Price $3,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $675 ‘01 Chevy Monte Carlo T ot al Price $3,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $675 ‘02 Chevy Monte Carlo T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $675 ‘02 Ford Taurus T ot al Price $4,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775 ‘02 Chevy Blazer T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775 ‘02 Chevy Blazer T ot al Price $4,200 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $875 1999 Ford F-150 -X/Cab T ot al Price $5,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $975 2000 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T ot al Price $5,200 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $875 2001 Ford F-150 -X/Cab T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $1275 2002 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T ot al Price $6,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $975 ‘04 Dodge Ram T ot al Price $6,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Southern Cross-28Ft, Good condition, Dsl Eng, 2-Spd Winchs, New stainless rig, Awlgrip Hull, West Bottom. Health, $7,500 OBO. Call 850 866-6989. Text FL55153 to 56654 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified. CALL 747-5020 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper.For Fast Results, Call 747-5020 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! 1109848EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 247279 $348,000 St. Geor ge Island 2ND TIER GULF VIEW Da wg Daz e 4 BR, 3 B A, Hea ted P ool, Florida r oom of f li ving r oom opens to decks o v er looking pool, Fir eplace tile & carpet ooring, laundry r oom, 2 car gar a ge nicel y landsca ped with wide dri v e w a y P opular R ental, Short Sale W est Gulf Beach Dri v e 451 4900 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248242 $279,900 St. Geor ge Island 451 490 1 1ST TIER PLANT A TION LO T Gr ea t Gu lf V ie ws P an or am ic vi e ws to th e ea st & no rt h, At te nt io n pi lo ts ne ar th e Pl an ta ti on ai rp or t; On e ac re lo t, Ad ja ce nt to bo ar dw al k to Gu lf On e of th e hi gh es t lo ts on th e Is la nd Am en it ie s in cl ud e Ne w Cl ub ho us e & Po ol Se as id e Dr i v e, Ni ck ’ s Ho le Th i s cu te 3 B R / 1 B A co ttag e has been co mpl etel y r en o v ated o v er the pas t 2 year s with a new r o o f deck and centr al heat and air unit. It is j us t a s ho r t wal k to the Car r ab el l e Har bo r 850-899-5104 l 850-697-1010 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m 451 496 4 T his c ust om des ign ed hom e in the pr est igi ous Mag nol ia B a y ga t ed c omm uni t y S unr oom scr een ed & ope n por che s hot tub o MBR sui t e lar ge mas t er til ed ba th w/ ope n sho w er and gar den tub det ach ed gar age gas r epl ac e gr ani t e c oun t er t ops sta inl ess k it che n, win e c ool er bui ltin c orn er c abi net s A men iti es inc lud e c omm uni t y doc k poo l t enn is c our ts Mai n liv ing ar ea & mas t er on 1st oo r w/g ues tr oom s ups tai rs f or pri v ac y w/ pri v a t e por ch. S him mer ing S and s R eal ty 451 496 2 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com "" "" && &# $'$ B eautifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular B a y and B ridge views with man y new upda t es Remodeled k it chen (new c abinets c oun t er t ops sink disposal st o v e dish w asher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea t r e ec tiv e windo w lm; 3 lg BRs with new mast er BA; priv a t e o c e just o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2 w alk -in closets T his house is per f ec t f or en t er taining with a huge fr on t por ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and w ood burning r eplac e L andsc ape has irriga tion w ell and na tiv e plan ts High e cienc y hea t pump new r oof 6 additional in r oof insula tion. S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .332C ookS tr eet .com ( (( # ! & % %& S O L D O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! (In this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) What will you ordinarily lose 94 of during the course of your life? Purse or wallet, Keys, Combs or brushes, Bones 2) Which state uses the slogan “Wild, Wonderful” for its license plates? W. Virginia, Montana, Vermont, Oregon 3) The rst neon sign was made in 1923 for what type of dealership? Frigidaire, Singer, Ford, Packard 4) A “big banger” is a large one of what in auto-racing circles? Sandwich, Engine, Tire iron, Pit crew 5) What does a pintle ordinarily hold together? Lamp, Lock, Hinge, Kettle 6) Which dart score is dubbed “Sunset Strip”? 11, 21, 77, 100 7) On the human body what’s a scapula? Kneecap, Shoulder blade, Forehead, Nostril 8) How old was Booth when he assassinated Lincoln? 26, 31, 42, 58 9) Baseball umpires are commonly referred to as what color? Red, Blue, Black, Green 10) Who invented the wheelbarrow? Chinese, Romans, Egyptians, Irish 11) When was the rst diet soft drink called the “No-Cal Beverage” launched? 1944, 1952, 1969, 1974 12) Who was the rst NBA guard to average 30 points a game for the season? Robertson, Selvy, Frazier, Cousy 13) Willys-Overland was the rst owner of what popular trademark? Civic, Beetle, BMW, Jeep 14) What per-say is the safest shellsh to eat raw? Shrimp, Lobster, Scallops, Oysters ANSWERS 1) Bones. 2) W. Virginia. 3) Packard. 4) Engine. 5) Hinge. 6) 77. 7) Shoulder blade. 8) 26. 9) Blue. 10) Chinese. 11) 1952. 12) Robertson. 13) Jeep. 14) Scallops. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com FPAN seeks summer library volunteers Every summer the public libraries in Florida host a summer reading program. This summer’s theme is “Dig into Reading,” and this has the Florida Public Archeology Network very excited and busy. The FPAN North Central Ofce is looking for a few good volunteers to help with youth summer library programming. Good candidates will have experience working with children of all ages, be reliable and be comfortable speaking in front of large groups. Training will be provided prior to the programs. There are 15 counties in the North Central region, and we will work with volunteers to ensure they visit the libraries closest to them. Email Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf.edu if you are interested. KidCare/Medicaid assistance available The Florida Department of Health in Franklin County in partnership with George E. Weems Memorial Hospital is now offering KidCare/Medicaid assistance. For more information or to sign up for either of these services, stop by the county health department ofces. Visit the Apalachicola location at 139 12th St. on Thursdays or the Carrabelle location, 106 N.E. Fifth St., on third Tuesdays. For questions, call 653-2111. Community conversation on ‘Our Children, Our Future’ Please join the Department of Juvenile Justice for a “Community Engagement Conversation” and share issues facing our children within our communities. The meeting is open to the public and will be noon to 2 p.m. June 21 at the Holy Family Senior Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries St./Seventh Street, Apalachicola. The DJJ’s mission is to increase public safety by reducing juvenile delinquency through effective prevention, intervention and treatment services that strengthen families and turn around the lives of troubled youth. They would like to hear from communities on such topics as what are the needs of Franklin County communities? How can DJJ engage Franklin County communities and its unique requirements? Celebrate independence on July 3-4 The Historic Apalachicola Main Street program will sponsor the second annual Old Apalachicola Independence Day Celebration on July 3. In Carrabelle, the citysponsored reworks will be held on July 4. The Red, White and Blue Parade begins at 6:30 p.m. at Lafayette Park and will wind its way down Avenue C, under the bridge at Battery Park and down Water Street to end at Riverfront Park. The parade will be followed by a traditional ice cream social. The shrimp boat Lady Louise will act as a stage for live music. The Hillside Community Choir led by Pastor Solomon will provide stirring patriotic tunes on the docks. In addition, there will be an All American Kids’ Corner with many unique games and activities. The highlight of the evening begins at dark thirty (about 9:15 p.m.) when revelers will be treated to a professional reworks display over the Apalachicola River. For more information or to volunteer, call Jim Bachrach at 8998689 or Harry Arnold at 524-0770. Hurricane guides hot off the press Hurricane Guides for 2013 have been received and are available at the Franklin County Emergency Management Center, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola. Download a copy at www. franklinemergencymanagement. com. During storm season, the center’s website also provides a number of other resources including information on road and bridge closures, a link to NOAA hurricane information. To contact emergency management, call 653-3653. Duke Power can stage at airport On June 4, the county commission voted unanimously to allow Duke Power to use a staging area at the airport in the event they want to stage equipment after a hurricane, subject to county attorney review. Preble-Rish awarded Alligator Point contract At the regular June 4 county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to award Preble-Rish engineers the $122,000 contract to design and engineer the multi-use path to be constructed at Alligator Point. All fees for the future construction will be paid out of DOT funds. News B rR IE fF S



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Thursday, June 13, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 7 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com From the moment it began, and athletic director Michael Sweatt had the audience in awe at his powerful rendition of the National Anthem, the sixth annual Franklin County High School commencement Friday evening was a moving expression of community pride and joy. Principal George Oehlert and Superintendent Nina Marks presented diplomas to 59 graduates, the highlight of a ceremony that included both the tradition of presenting owers to family members and the innovation of a giant slide presentation of the graduation seniors. “To our teachers, thank you for so unsel shly sharing you time, talent and knowledge with us,” Salutatorian Morgan Walker said in her address. “You took the time to explain assignments, sometimes repeatedly because we weren’t paying attention. You put in the effort to make lessons more interesting so we wouldn’t just tune out. You demanded excellence from us whether or not we wanted to give it. You set the bar high and challenged us to live up to it.” Former housing director indicted xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . A9-10 Classi eds . . . . A11 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Noblit accused of using AHA funds for personal use By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A former director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority has been charged with stealing thousands of dollars in federal housing funds and spending them on personal items. Selena Jo Noblit, 42, of Panama City, appeared June 6 in federal court in Panama City, charged with stealing funds from a program that received federal grant money from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. According to the criminal indictment, between June 2011 and May 2012, while serving as the director of the housing authority, Noblit allegedly embezzled and misapplied at least $5,000 for her personal gain and for the bene t of others who were not entitled to the funds. The indictment did not specify how much had been taken. Noblit, who worked as executive director beginning in July 2008, was terminated from her job one year ago by the ve-member board that governs the public housing program. First established in 1962, the housing authority oversees 54 public housing units on two sites within the city. The allegations against Noblit, which informed sources said pertained to the use of a housing authority credit card to purchase personal items including clothing and vacations, rst surfaced in connection with an August 2011 technical assistance visit by representatives of the Jacksonville Of ce of Public Housing. That visit, intended to address what HUD of cials called “basic operational challenges,” found SELENA NOBLIT PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Clockwise from top left: Mindy Kelley prepares to kiss her daughter, Class President Morgan Kelley. Billy Harris holds his younger sister, Marissa Gilbert. Darrell Dart stands with his greatgrandmothers, Bernice Whit eld, left, and Donnie Bellew White. Shaquana Weaver stands with her grandmother Ruby Benjamin, left, and mom, Erika Townsend. Below, Cheyenne Diorio cries at her graduation, and Annalyse Wharrie smiles with her mom, Maxine Creamer. ‘We can do anything’ FCHS sends 59 Seahawks soaring into the world School board re ects on test scores By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County School Board did some vocal soul-searching last week, as members discussed candidly the comparative success and shortcomings of the district’s two public schools. Last Friday’s release of standardized test scores from each of the state’s 67 counties showed healthy gains in reading, math and writing throughout the Franklin County elementary and middle schools. At its June 6 meeting, the school board had only the third-grade scores to consider, which were released last month. “I hate this time of the year because FCAT scores come out,” Board Member George Thompson said in opening the discussion. “I had a friend tell me FCAT scores are embarrassing in this county. I want to know, what are we doing wrong? Andrea brings needed rain By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Last week, Tropical Storm Andrea came and went with more of a whimper than a roar. In the course of the storm, from Wednesday evening, June 5, to Thursday evening, June 6, the county received about 8 inches of rain. Peak winds were less than 35 miles per hour. But because rainfall for the month was 4 inches below average, the water was welcome. No damage has been reported from the storm. About See SCHOOL A5 See HOUSING A5 See SEAHAWKS A2 See ANDREA A2 Community cookout Friday in Carrabelle On Friday, June 14, there will be a community cookout hosted by the visiting One:27 Christian service group. The fun begins at 5 p.m. Food will be supplied by Hog Wild Barbeque, and there will be live music. This event is free and open to the public, and everyone is invited. For more information, call 352-3175039. Athletes bene t from Sunday sh auction The Franklin County High School football team will be helping Will Dance, producer of “The Morning Show with Preston Scott” 100.7 FM WFLA, as they direct this year’s 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic in Carrabelle this weekend, June 13-16. The team will be out in force on Auction Day on Sunday, beginning at 10 a.m. at The Moorings, 1000 N.W. Ave. A in Carrabelle. Proceeds from all sh auctioned off go to the football team only. Summer bingo on the island Every Tuesday, enjoy Summer Bingo upstairs at the St. George island re station, 324 E. Pine Ave. at 7 p.m. Cards are 25 cents. This event is sponsored by and bene ts the St. George Island Civic Club. For information, call 9272654. Everyone welcome. Learn all about sea turtles From 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays in June, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve and the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers present a talk on “Sea Turtles: Franklin County’s Oldest Visitors.” The reserve is at 108 Island Drive and provides a wealth of exhibits on the local plants and animals. For more information, call 670-7700 or visit www. SeaTurtlesAtRisk.org.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 Walker expressed the gratitude of her classmates in her speech, thanking the whole spectrum of school district employees, from principals, coaches, office staff and advisors to custodial staff and lunchroom attendants who cleaned up after everyone. “You know better than anyone else what slobs we’ve been,” she joked. “You actually deserve some kind of medal.” Walker directed her thanks to the many parents who filled the gymnasium to capacity. “Thank you for supporting us in more ways than it’s possible to count,” she said. “You dragged us out of bed each morning, made sure we were fed and clothed for school. You herded us out the door to the bus stop or drove us to school yourselves. You helped us with homework, paid our class fees and listened to our complaints. “You came to our plays, attended our sporting events and chaperoned our dances. You commiserated over our daily dramas, but you tried to give us enough space to learn how to work things out for ourselves,” she said. In her valedictory address, Stephanie Marxsen both thanked the many individuals who had a hand in educating the Class of 2013 and saluted the scholastic and athletic achievements of the school over the first five years it has been opened. She cited the soccer teams, the Brain Bowl and Odyssey of the Mind teams and the band. “In the ve years that Franklin County School has existed, we have already accomplished so much,” Marxsen said. “However, we can only continue to succeed if we set aside our differences and work together. We have proven that when we all come together as a school, as a team, we can do anything. It’s not all about just one teacher, or one group of students. What is most important is representing Franklin County, and this school, in a positive way.” After the Pledge of Allegiance led by Senior Class Second Vice-President Zach Howze, and the National Anthem, senior class rst vice president Katie Wood led the invocation. “Dear Heavenly Father,” she began. “We are so thankful for all the blessings you have given to our graduating class. As we prepare to enter a new phase in our lives, we pray that you would guide us and protect us. “Here in this room, we see all the people who have encouraged us and cared for us. Parents, brothers and sisters, friends and teachers; their love and care is a blessing that we are truly thankful for. Thank you for having brought us to this special night, Lord. If it was not for your love and guidance, we may not be here tonight. Give us courage, strength and wisdom as we step out on our own. Help us achieve our goals as we live for your honor and glory.” The class president, Morgan Kelley, then offered a welcome address, followed by a presentation of the valedictorian and salutatorian plaques by Oehlert and guidance counselor Roderick Robinson. The presentation of diplomas followed. Along with Marxsen and Walker, also receiving highest honors was Elton Olvera. Earning high honors were Christina Collins, Emily Cash, Elisha Patriotis and Katie Wood. A diploma with honors went to Skyler Hutchinson, Brittany Bryant, Ryne Fisher, Annalyse Wharrie, Cheyenne Martin, Karl Sanford, Miranda Pilger, Zachary Howze, Shelby Myers, Karlie Tucker, Kerri Williams, Che’na Segree, David Butler, Morgan Kelley and Austin Ward. Receiving diplomas were Roxana Barahona, Thomas Benitez, Savannah Boone, Brittney Carr, Daniel Carrino, William Collins, Codee Crum, Darrell Dart, Alissia Dempsey, Cheyenne Diorio, Direek Farmer, Chase Golden, William Harris, Carli Hunt, Tevin Jones, David Langston, Anna Rose Lee, Haley Mathes, Yvonne Mitchell, Jeffery Murray, Hannah Oxendine, Rahkeim Pierce, Julio Ramirez, Joshua Reeder, Chantel Rhine, Ladarius Rhodes, Seth Rogers, Katelyn Rowland, Kayla Sanford, Casey Sapp, TaShay Sewell, Jacob Shuler, Whitney Vause, Shaquana Weaver, Tyler Webb, Lanae Wilson and Ellis Wilson. The audience then was treated to a slide show presentation of the graduates’ years in high school, accompanied by popular music selections. Class Secretary Che’na Segree then narrated a tribute to the class sponsors, Dolores Croom and Stephanie Howze Jones, with plaques presented by Zach Howze and Ladarius Rhodes. In his farewell remarks, Oehlert, who is retiring this year after serving as principal throughout this class’ four years at the high school, thanked the students and promised Seahawk Nation would forever live with him. 2013-14 GR ANT C ALEND AR M a y 8, 2013 FCBOC C appr o v ed TDC r ec ommenda tion f or 2013-14 G r an ts P r o c ess June 5, 2013 – F inal TDC B oar d A ppr o v al f or 2013-14 g r an ts pr oc ess – June 13, 2013 – r elease Gr an t inf or ma tion and A pplica tion F or ms online; use FC TDC g r an t in t er est email da tabases t o inf or m new guidelines 2013-14 FC TDC E v en ts Gr an t P r oc ess June 13, 20, 27, 2013 P ublish TIMES public notic e tha t FC TDC 2013-14 online g r an t mar keting inf or ma tion is on the FC TDC w ebsit e P r e c er tica tion is r equir ed f or elig ibilit y and must be included with or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t inf or ma tion. T he deadline t o apply f or inclusion in the 2013-14 ev en t mar keting pr og r am is June 30, 2013 July 3, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting is c anc eled July 17, 2013 TDC C ommitt ee M eeting C it y of A palachic ola M eeting R oom, beg inning a t 1:30 pm. Gr an t A pplica tions f or mar keting the individual or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t will be r eview ed and r ec ommended f or appr o v al if qualied – July 19, 2013 – TDC S ta t o E-mail notic e t o or ganiza tion ’ s c on tr ac t manager of appr o v al f or inclusion in Gr an ts pr oc ess f or 2013-14 A ugust 7, 2013 TDC B oar d M eeting F r ank lin C oun t y C our thouse A nne x, 3:00 p .m. A palachic ola F inal appr o v al of applican ts P r esen ta tion of TDC P r omotions Budget f or initial appr o v al On or bef or e A ugust 20, 2013, FC TDC S ta will issue ocial emailed notica tion as t o sta tus of inclusion f or or ganiza tion ’ s ev en t applica tion Oc t ob er 1, 2013 new scal y ear beg ins f or FC TDC 2013-14 ONLINE GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS M A Y BE A C CESSED ONLINE ON JUNE 13, 2013 A T W W W .SAL T Y FL ORID A.C OM/GR ANT S. THE DEADLINE T O SUBMIT THE 201314 GR ANT APPLIC A TION FOR Y OUR E VENT IS JUNE 30, 2013. IF Y OU WISH T O C OMPLE TE A GR ANT APPLIC A TION O THER THAN ONLINE PLEASE TELEPHONE THE FC TDC ADMINISTR A TIVE OFFICE A T 653-8678 T O REQUEST A C OP Y OR ST OP B Y THE FC TDC OFFICE A T 17-1/2 A VENUE E AP AL A CHIC OL A, FL ORID A. ALL 2013-14 GR ANT APPLIC A TIONS MUST BE SUBMIT TED ONLINE OR T O THE TDC OFFICE NO L A TER THAN JUNE 30, 2013. St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle C oup on Expir es: 6-30-13 ANDREA from page A1 500 Duke Energy customers in Apalachicola were without power for three hours on Thursday afternoon. Franklin County schools closed at 11 a.m. Thursday but reopened Friday. The campground at Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park was evacuated for 24 hours, but the park remained open through the storm. As Andrea stalled in the Gulf on Wednesday night, county commissioners declared a local state of emergency. Director of Emergency Management Pam Brownell said the declaration was purely precautionary. She said the commissioners are the ultimate authority to order evacuations and declare any state of emergency. “I call and advise them of the situation, and they make the decision,” she said. “If we don’t declare an emergency and there’s enough damage for a FEMA declaration, we won’t be eligible for aid.” She said a local emergency declaration also makes it simpler to apply for help and supplies, like sandbags, from the state. “It allows the county to bypass regular procurement procedures,” Brownell said. Once the storm is in progress, law enforcement is responsible for closing roads and bridges, she said. Law enforcement also uses the new Code Red emergency noti cation system to provide subscribers with information about storms or other emergencies. At 10 a.m. June 6, Code Red broadcast a notice to 4,900 residents warning that if winds reached 45 mph, evacuations and bridge closures were possible. Some recipients thought closures were imminent, which led to confusion and worried calls to the emergency management center and law enforcement. Brownell said it is important for people to understand an emergency declaration is not an evacuation order. The Code Red system replaces the WENS emergency notication formerly used by the county. People who subscribed to WENS are not automatically switched to the Code Red system and must reregister to receive noti cations. The registration form is available on the sheriff’s website, www.franklinsheriff.com. Sgt. John Solomon said Code Red is much faster than WENS and has a downloadable app for Droids and iPhones that allows subscribers to receive local noti cations while traveling if they are in any area served by Code Red. The app is downloaded using iTunes. Noti cations received from Code Red could be identi ed in a number of ways on a cell phone. The sender may appear as 866-419-5000; Emergency Comm; 855-969-4636; or ECN Community. To set your own identi er for Code Red calls, access your account through the sheriff’s website and initiate a test call. You can then save the number to your contacts and name it whatever you want. With storm season upon us, county emergency management urges everyone to have a disaster plan in place and a storm kit ready for travel, and stay informed of weather conditions. More information is available in the 2013 Hurricane Survival Guide, downloadable at www. nhc.noaa.gov/prepare. Brownell urged everyone to enroll in the emergency noti cation system and listen carefully to emergency noti cations. Also check to make sure you have a current county re-entry card for after the storm. You can request a card online or stop by the Emergency Management Center at 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. PAM BROWNELL PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Above, four generations pose, from left: mom Angela Bryant, Brittany Bryant, grandmother Connie Carver and great-grandmother Maureen Garaja. Below is graduate Whitney Vause. SEAHAWKS from page A1

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The Times | A3 Thursday, June 13, 2013 4 51 4 9 51 W e a r e p le a s e d t o p r es en t t o y o u t hi s y e a r's A nn u a l W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t. i s r ep o r t i s desig n e d t o inf o r m y o u a b o u t t h e q u a li t y wa t er a n d s er v ices w e de li v er t o y o u e v er y d a y O ur co n s t a n t g o a l i s t o p r o v ide y o u w i t h a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le s u p p l y o f dr in k in g wa t er W e wa n t y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o en s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er O ur wa t er s o ur ce i s t w o w e l l s dra w n f r o m t h e Flo r id a n A q uif er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex ce l len t q u a li t y o f o ur wa t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en t r e q uir e d i s c h lo r in e f o r di sinf e c t io n p ur p os es. I n 2012 t h e D ep a r t m en t o f En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n p er f o r m e d a S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t o n o ur sys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o ur ces in dic a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o ur ces o f co n t a min a t io n n e a r o ur w e l l s. e a s s es sm en t r es u l ts a r e a va i l a b le o n t h e FD EP S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t a n d P r o t e c t io n P r og ra m w e bsi t e a t w w w dep .s t a t e .u s/swa p p I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s a b o u t t hi s r ep o r t o r co n cer nin g y o ur wa t er u t i li t y p le a s e co n t ac t K ei t h M o c k, W a t er S u p er in t en den t, a t (850) 251-9106. W e en co ura g e o ur va l ue d c u s t o m er s t o b e inf o r m e d a b o u t t h eir wa t er u t i li t y I f y o u wa n t t o le a r n m o r e p le a s e a t t en d a n y o f o ur r egu l a r l y s c h e d u le d m e et in gs. e y a r e h e ld a t e C a r ra b e l le M unici p a l C o m p lex, 1001 G ra y A v en ue o n t h e r s t ur s d a y o f e ac h m o n t h a t 6:00 p .m. e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le r o u t in e l y m o ni t o r s f o r co n t a min a n ts in y o ur dr in k in g wa t er acco r din g t o F e dera l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. E x cep t w h er e in dic a t e d o t h er w i s e t hi s r ep o r t i s b a s e d o n t h e r es u l ts o f o ur m o ni t o r in g f o r t h e p er io d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e cem b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a in e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r es en t e d in t hi s r ep o r t a r e f r o m t h e m os t r e cen t t es t in g do n e in acco r d a n ce w i t h t h e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. I n t h e t a b les b e lo w y o u m a y n d unfa mi li a r t er m s a n d a b b r e v i a t io n s. T o h e l p y o u b et t er un der s t a n d t h es e t er m s w e h a v e p r o v ide d t h e f o l lo w in g de ni t io n s: A c t io n L e v e l (AL): e co n cen t ra t io n o f a co n t a min a n t w hic h, if ex ce e de d t r ig g er s t r e a t m en t o r o t h er r e q uir em en ts t h a t a wa t er sys t em m u s t f o l lo w I ni t i a l Di s t r i b u t io n S ys t em E va l u a t io n (IDS E): A n im p o r t a n t p a r t o f t h e S t a g e 2 Di sinf e c t io n B yp r o d uc ts R u le (D B P R). e IDS E i s a o n e-t im e s t ud y co n d uc t e d b y wa t er sys t em s t o iden t if y di s t r i b u t io n sys t em lo c at io n s w i t h hig h co n cen t ra t io n s o f t r i h a lo m et h a n es (THMs) a n d h a lo acet ic acid s (H AA s). W a t er sys t em s w i l l u s e r es u l ts f r o m t h e IDS E, in co n j un c t io n w i t h t h eir S t a g e 1 D B P R co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g d a t a, t o s e le c t co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g lo c a t io n s f o r t h e S t a g e 2 D B P R M axim um C o n t a min a n t L e v e l o r M CL: e hig h es t le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t t h a t i s a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er M CLs a r e s et a s c los e t o t h e M CL Gs a s f e a si b le u sin g t h e b es t a va i l a b le t r e a t m en t t e c hn o log y M axim um C o n t a min a n t L e v e l G o a l o r M CL G: e le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t in dr in k in g wa t er b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. M CL Gs a l lo w f o r a m a r g in o f s a f et y P a g e 2 o f 4 M axim um R esid u a l Di sinf e c t a n t L e v e l o r MRD L: e hig h es t le v e l o f a di sinf e c t a n t a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er er e i s co n v in cin g e v iden ce t h a t addi t io n o f a di sinf e c t a n t i s n e ces s a r y f o r co n t r o l o f micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. M axim um R esid u a l Di sinf e c t a n t L e v e l G o a l o r MRD L G: e le v e l o f a dr in k in g wa t er di sinf e c t a n t b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. MRD L Gs do n o t r e e c t t h e b en e ts o f t h e u s e o f di sinf e c t a n ts t o co n t r o l micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. N o n a p p lic a b le (N/A): D o es n o t a p p l y N o n-D et e c t (ND): m e a n s n o t det e c t e d a n d in dic a t es t h a t t h e s u bs t a n ce wa s n o t f o un d b y l a b o ra t o r y a n a l ysi s. P a r ts p er mi l lio n (p p m) o r M i l lig ra m s p er li t er (m g/l): o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 mi l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P a r ts p er b i l lio n (p p b) o r M icr og ra m s p er li t er (g/l): o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 b i l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P ico c ur ie p er li t er (pCi/L): m e a s ur e o f t h e radio ac t i v i t y in wa t er I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in kin g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h t t p://w w w .ep a.g o v/s a f e wa t er/le ad e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di ss o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) M icr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I n o r ga nic co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t icides a n d h erb icides, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Or ga nic c h emic a l co n t a min a n ts, in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b yp r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adio ac t i v e co n t a min a n ts, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t rat io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791. a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r e e c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o m e p e o p le m a y b e m o r e vu ln era b le t o co n t a min a n ts in dr in k in g wa t er t h a n t h e g en era l p o p u l a t io n. I mm un o-co m p r o mi s e d p er s o n s s uc h a s p er s o n s w i t h c a n cer un der g o in g c h em o t h era p y p er s o n s w h o h a v e un der g o n e o r ga n t ra n s p l a n ts, p e o p le w i t h HIV/AIDS o r o t h er imm un e sys t em di s o r der s, s o m e P a g e 4 o f 4 e lder l y a n d infa n ts c a n b e p a r t ic u l a r l y a t r i s k f r o m inf e c t io n s. es e p e o p le s h o u ld s e e k ad v ice a b o u t dr in k in g wa t er f r o m t h eir h e a l t h c a r e p r o v ider s. EP A/CD C guide lin es o n a p p r o p r i a t e m e a n s t o les s en t h e r i s k o f inf e c t io n b y Cr yp t os p o r idi um a n d o t h er micr o b io log ic a l co n t a min a n ts a r e a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e (800-426-4791). W e w o r k t o p r o v ide t o p q u a li t y wa t er t o e v er y t a p W e a s k t h a t a l l o ur c u s t o m er s h e l p u s p r o t e c t o ur wa t er s o ur ces, w hic h a r e t h e h e a r t o f o ur co mm uni t y o ur wa y o f lif e a n d o ur c hi ldr en s f u t ur e I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s o r co n cer n s a b o u t t h e inf o r m a t io n p r o v ide d p le a s e f e e l f r e e t o c a l l a n y o f t h e n um b er s l i s te d. Law Enforcement By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@starfl.co m Quick thinking by an off-duty Eastpoint law enforcement ofcer saved two young swimmers last week from dangerous rip currents. On Wednesday, June 5, Deputy Lawrence Brannan and his wife were sunbathing on the public beach near the Blue Parrot with his youngest son. Five to six foot waves were breaking on the shore and Brannan had just cautioned his son, who was newly arrived from Kentucky, about rip currents. Brannan said the family had been on the beach about 30 min utes when he noticed two men at the edge of the water who ap peared to be in distress. While he watched, they attempted to swim into the Gulf but were knocked down by the waves and forced to return to the beach. On rising, Brannan spotted two heads bobbing beyond the break ing surf and realized someone had been dragged offshore and was trapped on a sandbar. While he continued to watch, a kayaker tried to reach the swimmers, both boys in their early teens, but the boater failed to reach them and was forced back to shore. I thought nobody was going to be able to reach them and, being from here, I grew up swimming, Brannan said. I decided I needed to help. Brannan ran to the scene and learned that one of the men who rst attempted to reach the boys was their father. The deputy en tered the water and brought the younger of the two children back to the beach. He had taken on some water and was in more distress, Bran nan said. Brannan then retrieved the older boy. First Responders soon arrived on the scene. Susan Ficklen, who examined the boys, said they did not need to be hospitalized. She said the family returned home to Woodville imme diately after the incident. It was a good ending; thats what we like, said Brannan. Brannan stressed that he is a strong swimmer and cautioned others not to enter dangerous water. A Blue Parrot employee who saw the incident said sheriffs deputies and Fire Chief Jay Abbott patrolled the beach afterwards, or dering people to leave the water because of the dan gerous currents. Ficklen said there have been a number of calls for swimmers in distress over the last week. Over Memorial Day weekend, with double red ags ying, many people ignored instructions from rangers to leave the water at the Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park. One man was pulled from the water in front of the west ern pavilions and hospitalized. The same afternoon, rescue workers were called to aid a group of eight swimmers trapped offshore at the eastern pavilions. Brannan warned about lack of respect for strong Gulf cur rents. When you think you got it whooped, its gonna beat you back down, he said. The National Weather Service offers the following advice to stay safe when swimming in coastal waters. Never swim alone and learn the meaning of warning ags. A double red ag means the beach is closed to the public. If you are caught in a rip cur rent, also called an undertow, re main calm to conserve energy and think clearly. Never ght the cur rent; swim parallel the shoreline. When out of the current, swim at an angle away from the current and towards shore. If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, oat or calmly tread water. When out of the cur rent, swim towards shore. If you are still unable to reach shore, draw attention to yourself by waving your arm and yelling for help. If you see someone in trouble, get help from a lifeguard or by dial ing 911. Throw the rip current vic tim something that oats and yell instructions on how to escape. Remember, many people drown while trying to save some one else from a rip current. The following report is pro vided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by ofcers from Apalachicola Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva tion Commission (FWC) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are considered innocent un til proven guilty in a court of law. June 4 April R. Hutchinson, 29, Eastpoint, driving while li cense suspended or revoked, possession of a controlled substance, violation of proba tion and introduction of con traband into a correctional facility (APD) June 5 Makkaya D. Langley, 22, Eastpoint, Bay County war rant for failure to appear (FCSO) Kevin C. Rhodes, 48, Ho mosassa, violation of proba tion (FCSO) Rasmas Simeon, 32, Polk City, introduction of contra band into a correctional facil ity, and possession of a con trolled substance (FCSO) Glenn A. Richards, Jr., 23, Eastpoint, violation of proba tion, and trespass on prop erty (FCSO) Lance A. Flowers, 33, Apalachicola, violation of pro bation (FCSO) Kenneth R. Rucker, 55, Eastpoint, DUI, refusal to submit to a breath test and corruptions by threat to a public servant (FCSO) June 6 Tonya C. Seamon, 40, Car rabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Michael L. Crutcheld, Jr., 30, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) June 7 Melinda G. Denney, 31, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and sale or possession of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a church(FCSO) Santana L. Pilotti, 21, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) Jonathan E. Cooper, 31, Apalachicola, domestic bat tery (FCSO) June 8 Jimmy R. Shiver, III, 21, Bristol, violation of probation (APD) June 9 Robert S. Parks, 30, Car rabelle, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Jeremy L. Matheny, 33, Eastpoint, violation of proba tion and retail theft (FCSO) June 10 Douglas D. Dewall, 57, Tallahassee, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, possession of paraphernalia and posses sion of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) Abbi N. Bolick, 28, Craw fordville, possession of a con trolled substance with intent to sell, possession of para phernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and driving while license sus pended or revoked (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 45, Apalachicola, failure to ap pear (FCSO) Darren L. Wallace, 44, Apalachicola, Gulf County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Kenneth M. Parker, 23, Carrabelle, violation of pro bation (FCSO) Maranda Coatney, 21, Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO) Ofcers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission earlier this month arrested a man for shing despite having had his shing privileges revoked. Ofcers Matt Gore and Jason Lipford spotted a ve hicle in the area of 8-Mile. The vehicle was identied as one operated by an in dividual who received a judgment permanently revoking his recreational and commercial shing privileges. The two of cers tracked two subjects from the vehicle to the shoreline of Apalachicola Bay, and from a position of concealment, watched as the two subjects used cast nets to catch mullet. The ofcers then identied themselves, and directed the subjects to return to the shore for a license and sh inspection. The subject with the revoked shing privileges began to discard the sh from his bag and returned to shore with no sh. The subject was arrested for shing while his license was revoked and for failure to permit inspection. Ofcers continue to work complaints of illegal shellsh harvesting. Of cer John Allen was on wa ter patrol in Apalachicola Bay when he set up sur veillance on a commercial vessel engaged in harvest ing oysters. When the individuals started to leave the area, Allen conducted a vessel stop and found the indi viduals in possession of three bags of oysters. The individual harvesting the oysters was cited for tak ing oysters between sun set and sunrise. Allen re turned the product back to the bay. The vessel opera tor was issued six boating safety warnings. FWC REPORT Deputy rescues two from riptide LAWRENCE BRANNAN Arrest REPORT

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Each year, an estimated 2 million acres of America’s farms, ranches, forests, wildlife habitat, and other open spaces are fragmented into smaller parcels or lost to development, according to the President’s Annual Economic Report to Congress. Continued losses of this open space can adversely affect rural economies. These losses reduce opportunities for hunting, fishing, and other outdoor recreation and impact wildlife, water, and other resources. The good news is there are ways for both landowners and Congress to slow down this troubling trend. Donating a permanent conservation easement (development restriction) to a qualified organization, such as a land trust, enables farmers and ranchers to maintain their current operations and conserve the natural assets of rural America. In return, landowners may deduct the value of the easement from their income taxes. This tax incentive is a major reason why there now are 1,700 nonprofit land trusts nationwide that protect 47 million acres of farms, ranches, forests, wildlife habitat, and other open spaces – twice as many acres as a decade ago and a larger land area than the state of Wisconsin, according to the 2010 National Land Trust Census. Despite this remarkable success, land trusts increasingly face frivolous sixand seven-figure lawsuits from developers seeking to undermine these development restrictions on land that they directly own or manage. Half of the land trusts in a 2010 national survey reported a legal challenge, and one-quarter of those land trusts were hindered by nancial barriers in pursuing a legal challenge. There is no commercial or nonprofit insurance available to cover this liability, which far exceeds most land trusts’ legal reserve funds. The IRS has stated that a land trust could lose its tax status or ability to accept further donations if it does not have sufficient resources to monitor or defend conservation easements. To protect their investments in conservation, over 420 land trusts that protect more than six million acres of land joined with the Land Trust Alliance to launch their own insurance risk pool last month with $4 million in capital funding from eight major foundations. Thanks to this insurance risk pool, Terrafirma Risk Retention Group LLC, which covers 75 percent of the more than 8 million acres conserved by land trusts that cannot afford to self-insure themselves individually, land trusts can now assure their communities, donors, the IRS, other regulators, and legislators that they have the financial capacity to sustain their conserved lands in perpetuity. But if we want to slow down the fragmentation or development of farms, ranches, forests, wildlife habitat, and other open spaces, Congress must make permanent a temporary 2006 law that increased tax incentives to conserve land. Since its passage, this temporary law has encouraged additional conservation easements by raising the maximum annual deduction a landowner can take for the donation of a conservation easement and extends the period to claim the deduction after the time of the donation from 5 to 15 years. The enhanced tax incentive expired in 2009, but Congress temporarily renewed it through the end of this year when it passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. In the last Congress, 28 senators from both parties co-sponsored a bill to make this tax incentive permanent, including the chairman of the Senate committee with jurisdiction over the legislation: Max Baucus (D-Mont.). More than 310 members of the House co-sponsored a similar bill, including majorities of both parties and the leaders of the House committee with jurisdiction over the legislation: Ways & Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) and Ranking Member Sander Levin (D-Mich.). However, Congress recessed for the election before taking action on the bills, so they expired. In March, Baucus was joined by Finance Committee Ranking Republican Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) in reintroducing the tax incentive bill, The Rural Heritage Conservation Extension Act of 2013 (S. 526). Congressmen Jim Gerlach (R-Pa.) and Mike Thompson (D-Calif.) are seeking cosponsors to introduce similar legislation in the House. Passage of a tax incentive bill would help save open spaces that otherwise could disappear. Making this expanded tax incentive permanent would further bolster land conservation and sustain working lands, helping to keep landowners on their property and achieve a broad range of conservation outcomes, including improving water quality and reducing soil erosion. Norman “Norm” Dicks was the U.S. Representative for Washington’s 6th congressional district from 1977 to 2013 and served as the chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee for Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies as well as ranking member of the full House Appropriations Committee. Lynn Scarlett was the deputy secretary of the Interior Department during the Bush administration from 2005 to 2009 and currently is co-director of Resources for the Future’s Center for the Management of Ecological Wealth. Column provided by American Forum. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 13, 2013 A Page 4 Section Noted American satirist and journalist H.L. Mencken once said, “For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple and wrong.” That’s an observation worth remembering as we seek to restore and protect Florida’s Gulf Coast in the wake of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. With passage of the RESTORE Act, 80 percent of Clean Water Act nes paid by BP and other parties responsible for the spill now will be used to fund projects that bene t the Gulf of Mexico’s coastal resources. This is an unprecedented opportunity to support on-the-ground projects to restore Gulf environments, helping communities become more resilient to adversity. Unfortunately, it also opens the door to “quick x” projects that may appear to provide simple solutions, but in reality lack a critical sciencebased foundation. Currently Gulf coastal states are collecting proposals for restoration projects from management agencies, municipalities, county governments, citizens’ groups, non-pro ts, and others. The amount of funding likely to be available is unprecedented. While the process of selecting projects is still to be determined, the approaches used can bene t from key lessons learned in similar efforts. First, projects must have a foundation in science. Natural resource management decisions for restoring unique environments like the Gulf are complex problems without simple solutions. Yet it is human nature, especially when faced with incomplete or contradictory information, to accept the simplest explanation rst, then to try to solve the problem with intuition and quick action. Unfortunately, there are many examples around the world where this approach has been ineffective. In the Chesapeake Bay, for instance, hatcheries have produced hundreds of millions of oyster larvae to help clean the bay’s polluted water and boost the once-thriving oyster industry, but these efforts have had limited success. Why? Because the conditions for survival remain poor due to impaired water quality, depleted substrate and prevalent parasitic diseases. A hatchery might be a partial restoration tool, but the simple solution of building hatcheries to provide more larvae was the wrong answer to the complicated problem of restoring natural populations. Closer to home, the commercial harvest of oysters from Apalachicola Bay has declined signi cantly and for unknown reasons. Working with management agencies and the local community, University of Florida researchers have assessed a range of possible causes – record low freshwater ows, disease, overharvest – that singularly or in combination could all cause the oyster population to collapse. The RESTORE Act provides an opportunity to begin to restore the Apalachicola Bay oyster population and the associated coastal economy, while also teaching us how to make the environment more resilient to future threats. Many of the ideas proposed are intuitively simple, but we know from experience that the solution is likely more complicated than it initially appears. In addition to a rm foundation in science, we must also acknowledge uncertainty in how ecosystems respond to restoration actions. This doesn’t mean restoration can’t be successful. Instead, these uncertainties force us to design restoration projects as deliberate experiments we can learn from. We could, for instance, learn a lot about how freshwater ows from the Apalachicola River in uence oyster abundance in the bay simply by restoring some oyster bars near the river mouth, where freshwater from the river creates lower salinity habitats, and others farther away from the river mouth where salinity is higher. Finally, it is critical that restoration projects have community support. Along the Gulf coast, residents and industries must actively participate in restoration projects to reinforce stewardship of coastal resources. In Apalachicola Bay, UF is helping oystermen and others whose livelihoods depend on the oyster harvest plan for sustainably using the resource. They have contributed to eld research and restoration activities, and are ambassadors in the community, helping a broader segment of the population understand the importance of environmental stewardship to their quality of life and their economic future. The Deepwater Horizon spill was a terrible disaster that resulted in the tragic loss of human life and long-term harm to people’s livelihoods. The spill also damaged large areas of the Gulf of Mexico, perhaps permanently. Three years later, the RESTORE Act aims to provide restoration and research projects to repair some of this harm to the Gulf’s coastal communities. To make the most of this opportunity, we must adopt a deliberate approach to evaluate and select projects that maximize learning, embrace uncertainty and involve local communities. In so doing, we increase the likelihood of achieving our true goal of restoring and protecting Florida’s Gulf of Mexico environments and economies. Jack Payne is senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the University of Florida. Gulf restoration calls for science, community support School board members need to visit classes After listening to many Franklin County Schools teacher and staff comments following the Thursday school board meeting, I decided to share some reasons why the morale of the Franklin County School employees is so low. When a board member says how embarrassed he is of us, and then a discussion comparing our test scores with the charter school follows, it is apparent that some of our leaders are out of touch with what is happening on our campus. If you are an elected of cial it is important that you strive for excellence, not try to pass the buck and blame the people who work every day with students and administration. I have been an employee of Franklin County School Board for 23 years and can only recall twice when a school board member came to my class. If you base your embarrassment on test scores, then maybe you could come in once a week and tutor or even get your community to encourage the students do well. The charter school is a ne school, many of us taught their teachers and live in the same community, and yes, even support them. Mr. Hinton was correct when he said that the charter school enrolled students whose parents support learning, and yes the climate has changed a great deal since its inception, but our school also has supportive parents. Many of our parents work more than one job and are unable to take time off. They are not able to pay for the gas to drive to extra events or after-school tutoring. Another factor for the inequality of FCAT scores is the ABC School has an aide in every class, and they keep their class size in compliance with state mandates. This, along with the apparent support of the school board and administration, creates a positive, atmosphere that the Franklin County School campus is not privy to. It is my hope that our county will support all children, teachers and staff. It is difficult to change the culture of our school; it takes support, not criticism, by all members. If you are embarrassed, resign and let Governor Rick Scott appoint a board member who has experience and credentials to be a successful leader. Sincerely, Carol Weyrich Franklin County Schools teacher Letter to the EDITOR Losses of open space harm rural economies JACK PAYNE Senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, University of Florida NORMAN DICKS guest columnist LYNN SCARLETT guest columnist

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 13, 2013 “Everyone around us is doing a great job,” he said, referring to the Apala chicola Bay Charter School and schools in neighboring counties. Thompson said he has heard people in Wakulla and other neighboring counties complain teachers there spend too much time preparing students for the test, but he suggested per haps teachers here might learn from that approach. “That’s what the state wants you to do,” he said to Superintendent Nina Marks. “If I was in your shoes, all of the teachers would nd out what they’re doing. “When you’re next to the last in the state of Florida, we’re doing a ter rible job, and that is what’s embarrassing. I’m out on the street every day, all day long, and people hit me up on it,” said Thompson, a letter carrier for the postal service. “What can I tell them we’re working on?” Marks said she met with elementary teachers the previous week and found there to be a productive ex change of ideas. “They’re coming up with solutions themselves,” she said. “They want to x it. They just, I guess, need a little bit more tightening up, and they’re starting all of that.” Thompson recalled his early days as a volleyball coach at Carrabelle High School and how he turned to David Walker, the coach of arch-rival Apalachicola High School, for help with his new assignment. “You got to have pride,” he said. “Why not pick up a phone and call another teacher and say, ‘Tell me what you’re doing.’ Swallow your pride, and let’s make this school what everybody wants it to be.” The discussion then took a turn toward how best to use school teaching and counseling resources, as board member Pam Shiver suggested the district con sider expanding the avail ability of the school’s guid ance counselor. “That’s not enough time for them (parents) to meet with the guidance counsel or and make plans for their child’s future,” she said. “Is there any way we can make that guidance counselor a little more available to parents?” Principal Eric Bidwell noted that a 12-month con tract would add additional costs and time to the job, and coverage over the Eas ter and Christmas holiday vacations might not be needed. Board member David Hinton used the analogy of how in the aftermath of their 1997 World Series victory, the Florida Mar lins traded away their top players and then took six more years before mak ing it back in the winner’s circle. He suggested the ABC School has had better success with testing be cause it has been able to attract the district’s most academically committed students. “Some people say the school is better. I don’t think the school is bet ter,” he said. “I say it’s the players.” Hinton proposed the district consider send ing lower performers on the FCAT, those who are one and two years behind grade level, to the charter school to sharpen their skills. “Why don’t we re quire them to go to the charter school?” he asked. “That’s something the at torney needs to look into. I would like to see some way we could require lower performing students to en roll in the charter school.” Thompson replied with a suggestion of his own. “Why don’t we just petition the state and make our school a charter school?” he said. “We haven’t lost our good players.” Hinton then introduced a commonly heard obser vation, that the charter school attracts only the more afuent students and fewer minorities, but went on to clarify that the com position of the ABC School is different than when it started a decade ago. “They (the two school’s student bodies) are not far off anymore,” he said. “They’re very close.” Shiver said she believed “there are a lot of miscon ceptions and rumors” surrounding the charter school. “I had someone tell me that they knew for a fact that two students who were enrolled in the char ter school were asked for their FCAT scores,” she said. But “the parent said, ‘No, that is not true. As a matter of fact, my son is a very low performer.” Hinton expanded on his views. “I do know that students who have parents who are highly concerned are the best students,” he said. “Those type of par ents insist their children go to the charter school. That tells me the potential top performers are go ing to the charter school. They all have the backing of parents, and that’s very important. “I just know that the cream of the crop went to the charter school when it rst started,” he said. “Whether it’s true any more I don’t know.” Marks offered her views on the best approach to wards improving student test scores. “You cannot put our kids in a box and say they had bad teach ers,” she said. “There are a lot of things that have to be studied; there could have been a number of dif ferent reasons. “Some of them were just right there teeter ing on the fence,” Marks said. “We can’t throw them backwards; we have to push them up. They (the teachers) see they have to come up with solutions, and they’re working on it.” Hinton, a former Carra belle High School teacher, reiterated his support for faculty. “The school is ba sically the teachers, and I think they’re just as good as anybody else,” he said. School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander said he did not concur with Hinton’s characterization about parents. “I take offense at that. I believe that parents who send their children to the Franklin County School are just as interest ed,” he said. “The charter school is a part of Franklin County. We’re all one; it’s not us and them. “The biggest problem we’ve had in the past year in our school system has been morale,” he said. “They (staff) don’t feel like they’re part of the deci sion-making process. They feel like they’re given the decision. “It starts with that and the working environment, and it grows from that be ing positive to this being positive,” Gander said. Cathy Wood, represen tative of the local teachers union, saluted the “cama raderie of teachers at ABC. If we could work together like teachers at ABC.” “The best and the brightest were lured away from us in the beginning (to the ABC School). In the beginning it did create some animosity.” She said she saw teach ers at the Franklin County School “working diligently. The rst thing they say is ‘we need more time.’” Wood said the school has suffered from a loss of paraprofessionals and called for “an additional adult in a typical class room, not a special needs classroom. When you have a second adult, you can delegate, and that very often makes a difference in those environments as well.” The discussion came to a close with the appear ance before the board of Jim Bachrach, a member of the ABC School board. He stressed that the char ter school considers itself an essential part of the en tire district and is strongly supportive of the district’s educational mission. Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-268-7718 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders Single T ooth Implant $ 1 7 95 Dentur e Implants $ 1 495 $ 1 8 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upper Ar c h 20144-1-T4 N O TI CE O F GENER AL ELECTI O N CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A D A TE: S EPTEMB ER 3, 2013 PO LLIN G P L A CE: CARR AB ELLLE MUNI CIP AL C O MP LEX 1001 GR A Y A VE. CARR AB ELLE, FL 32322 PO LLS O P EN A T 7:00 AM AND CLOS E 7:00 PM V O TE FO R: CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER (TERM 4 YRS) CAND ID A TES MA Y Q U ALIFY B EGINNIN G 12:00 N O O N, JUNE 24, 2013 UNTIL N O O N JUNE 28, 2013 (M O ND A Y THR U FRID A Y D URIN G REGUL AR W O RKIN G H O URS). Q U ALIFYIN G FEES IS $45.00 P L US 1% O F ANNU AL SAL AR Y O NL Y P ERSO NS REGIS TERED T O V O TE WITHIN THE CIT Y LIMIT S O F THE CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE WILL B E REC O GNIZED A S Q U ALIFIED ELECT O RS AND ALLO WED T O V O TE O R Q U ALIFY FO R CAND ID A CY CIT Y C O MMISS I O NER CIT Y O F CARR AB ELLE, FLO RID A WILB URN MESS ER M AY O R problems with the gov ernance, stafng levels and maintenance opera tion, including an aver age cost per work or der that was more than 10 times the national average. “It was noted that the properties were strewn with debris, toys, and boats (used for employment) and in a few instances, mul tiple vehicles appear ing to be inoperable,” read the report. “Most notable were the elec tric dryers that were connected to exterior electrical outlets and found on several front porches.” Also, the report not ed, “the stafng levels of the AHA appear dispro portionately large to the size of the public hous ing property.” A follow-up visit to the public housing units in spring 2012 found “none of the improve ments needed had taken place,” according to an Aug. 6, 2012, email from Gloria Shanahan, with HUD’s Ofce of Public Affairs. “HUD also found that federal funds were inap propriately used,” Sha nahan wrote. “The mat ter was serious enough to inform the board of the Housing Author ity (which) decided to terminate the employ ment of the executive director.” In 2011, the hous ing authority received about $256,000 in fed eral funding. Paul Mills, director of the Spring eld Housing Authority, was brought in July 24, 2012, to serve as acting director of the housing authority. Mills worked to over see a series of improve ments to the local hous ing authority’s opera tion. He expanded ofce hours and stabilized the authority’s bank ac counts. He cleared up shoddy paperwork re lated to operations in general and to govern ment entities such as the Internal Revenue Service and workmen’s compensation. And he brought the policies and practices of the authority in line with federal housing rules and safe practices. Repair of units were stepped up, as well as improvements to main tenance, weatherization and installation of new electrical and plumb ing xtures to cut down on what had been ex cessive costs of water and sewer. Trees were trimmed and units were inspected, Mills said, and adjustments were made to ensure the size of family units best t the available space, to eliminate what is known as overhousing. Mills retired earlier this year and was re placed by Steve Lanier, an Apalachicola native and former comptrol ler at Weems Memorial Hospital. Lanier com pleted a Navy career a few years ago in Key West. Noblit is scheduled for trial Aug. 5, before Judge Robert L. Hinkle. She is facing a possible maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, three years of supervised re lease, a $250,000 ne and a $100 special monetary assessment. U.S. Attorney Marsh praised the work of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Ofce of Inspector General, whose investigation led to the indictment in the case. The case is being prosecuted by assistant U.S. attorneys Winifred Acosta NeSmith and Eric K. Mountin. HOUSING from page A1 “When you’re next to the last in the state of Florida, we’re doing a terrible job, and that is what’s embarrassing. I’m out on the street every day, all day long, and people hit me up on it. What can I tell them we’re working on?” George Thompson Franklin County School Board member SCHOOL from page A1 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas

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A6 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 `= =G S=Y S P O T S P O T . . nam e d t hat f o r o b v i o u s r e a s o n s H e i s a 1 y r o l d t e r r i e r m i x w i t h a f u n l o v i n g d i sp o si t i o n an d ha p p y d e m e an o r H e i s s o c ia l w i t h o t h e r d o g s an d l o v e s p e o p l e H e i s h e a r t w o r m p o si t i v e an d w i l l n e e d t o b e t r e at e d b e f o r e b e i n g r e l e a s e d b u t y o u m a y c l ai m h i m a s y o u r s w i t h a d e p o si t h o l d W e w i l l ha v e h i m t r e at e d f o r h e a r t w o r m s an d n e u t e r e d i n p r e p a r at i o n f o r h i s n e w h o m e S P O T O N V O L U NTE E R S A R E D E S P E R A TE L Y N E E D E D T O S O C IA L I Z E A L L O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f or go t t enpe t s or g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e pet s 451501 1 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 CIT Y OF AP ALA CHIC OLA M A Y OR ’ S ELEC TION PR OCLA M A TION I, the undersig ned V AN W JOHNSON, SR., M a y or of the C it y of A palachic ola, b y author it y of la w and pursuan t t o C it y Or dinanc e No 91-4, do her eb y pr oclaim tha t on T uesda y S ept ember 3, 2013 an elec tion will be held t o ll the oc es as f ollo w s: C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 3 f or a t er m of f our y ears and C it y C ommissioner f or S ea t 4 f or a t er m of f our y ears and a RunO Elec tion, if nec essar y will be held on T uesda y S ept ember 17, 2013. C andida t es wishing t o qualify ma y do so a t the C it y O c e fr om 12 Noon M onda y June 24, 2013 un til 12 Noon F r ida y June 28, 2013. C it y O c e is loca t ed a t #1 A v enue E and r egular oc e hours ar e fr om 8:00 A M t o 4:00 P M, M onda y -F r ida y Each C andida t e must pa y t o the C it y Cler k a t the time of qualifying a qualifying f ee of 4.5% of the rst y ear ’ s salar y must be a r esiden t of the C it y of A palachic ola, and must also be a qualied v ot er of the S ta t e of F lor ida, C oun t y of F r ank lin, and the C it y of A palachic ola. A ll persons not pr eviously r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ma y r eg ist er t o v ot e an ytime fr om no w up t o 4:30 P M on M onda y A ugust 5, 2013 f or the G ener al Elec tion, and M onda y A ugust 19, 2013 f or the RunO Elec tion a t the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions loca t ed a t 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida, hours 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M, M onda y -F r ida y T he polling plac e will be a t the Na tional Guar d A r mor y loca t ed a t 66 4th S tr eet in the C it y of A palachic ola and will be open a t 7:00 A M and close a t 7:00 P M. A bsen t ee ballots ma y be obtained b y c on tac ting the O c e of the F r ank lin C oun t y Super visor of Elec tions a t plac e and time not ed pr eviously Only qualied elec t ors will be per mitt ed t o v ot e Ear ly v oting will be c onduc t ed fr om A ugust 26, 2013 t o A ugust 30, 2013 (5 da y s only) a t the Super visor of Elec tions O c e 47 A v enue F A palachic ola, F lor ida fr om 8:30 A M t o 4:30 P M. A ll r esiden ts of the C it y of A palachic ola not cur r en tly r eg ist er ed t o v ot e ar e ur ged t o r eg ist er and take par t in this elec tion. __________________________________ V an W Johnson, Sr ., M a y or C it y of A palachic ola, F lor ida Society Morgan Newell, Jason Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Newell, of Apalachicola, proudly announce the engagement of their daughter, Morgan Elizabeth Newell, to Jason Lee Thompson, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Thompson, of Eastpoint. Morgan’s grandparents are Ms. Nancy Horton and Mr. Larry McKuhen, and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Newell, all of Apalachicola. Jason’s grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Lee Roy Langley, of Eastpoint, and Mrs. Julie Thompson, of Carrabelle, and the late Vernon Thompson. A September 2013 wedding is planned. Aunt Flossie Ward turns 90 Family and friends are invited to attend a birthday celebration and family reunion this Saturday, June 15 at the Apalachicola Community Center at Battery Park, starting at 11 a.m. The celebration will honor the 90th birthday of Aunt Flossie Ward, who was born June 14, 1923. The event will also serve as an extended family reunion. All guests are invited to bring a covered dish. Any questions, please call Andrea Register at 653-5105. Fred and Mary Buskens, of Overstreet, will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Saturday, June 15 with an afternoon reception given by their children. This event will take place in the Fellowship Hall at Highland View Baptist Church, at 310 Ling Street in Highland View. The Buskens family would like to invite all of their friends and family to come and help celebrate this joyous occasion from 3 to 6 p.m. EST. The couple was married June 12, 1953 at The Lagoon Baptist Church in Gulf Shores, Ala. They are blessed with three children, June Davis and husband Eddie, Frederick Buskens and wife Rose, and Kim Gainey and husband Mike; eight grandchildren, and ve great-grandchildren. The Buskens are members of Highland View Baptist Church. Serenity Pouncey born Christopher and LaToya Pouncey, of Carrabelle, are pleased to announce the birth of their daughter, Serenity Nicole Pouncey. She was born on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 6:59 p.m. EST at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee. She weighed six pounds, 7.3 ounces, and 19 inches long. Paternal grandparents are Diana Monroy and Donnie Dean, of Carrabelle, and Corkey Dykes, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Cecil Pouncey and Frances Hutchins, of Carrabelle, and Alicia Pouncey, of Texas. Serenity was welcomed home by her big sister Cassiddi Lynn and family. OK all you dads, have a great Father’s Day! Lots of luck in hooking the big one if you’re going to be in the Big Bend Saltwater Classic This weekend. The sugar x will be prepared and served for you at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday, June 15. The members will be on hand to prepare and serve pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee and still only for a donation of $5. How about that?! Later on, you can dance the night away at the June Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 here in the village. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come in the door. Don’t forget about our monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall. Doors will open on Sunday, June 16 at 12:30 p.m. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to share, your appetite, a donation and enjoy the afternoon with your friends and neighbors. Let’s hear it for all the volunteers! They work hard to get things ready for us to enjoy. You can nd them at the food bank, the senior center, Chillas Hall, the thrift shop, re department, boat club and Post 82, just to name a few. Be sure to let them know that you appreciate them. Well, we dodged Andrea. Hope you had your survival kit handy and your escape plan. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, volunteers make it happen; become one today! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. All you dads have a happy Father’s Day LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Brent and Donna Barber, of Carrabelle, and John Carroll, of Lantana, are pleased to announce the forthcoming marriage of their children, Caden Rush Barber and Tiffany Lillian Carroll. Both are full-time honor students at Tallahassee Community College. Caden is employed at the Carrabelle Boat Club and Tiffany at the St. James Bay Golf Resort. The joining in marriage will take place in early 2014 and invitations will be sent to family and friends. Tiffany Carroll, Caden Barber EE NGAGEMENTS Buskens celebrate 60 years of marriage

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Micha el Whale y P astor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Eƒ¤ {ƒ — ¡ƒ~ B{~” … —” 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Weems ER To the emergency department of Weems Memorial Hospital, I had the pleasure of having to use the emergency services on Tuesday, May 14 at 7 a.m. I would like to commend Dr. James M. McCready and all the nurses and staff what were on duty at the time. Dr. McCready and the nursing staff were very knowledgeable in performing their duties. Mr. McCready had the knowledge to perform the necessary tests to diagnose my problem and took the time to talk to me and explain the results of my tests. He and the nurses were very nice and kind and I thank them for that. I think they deserve to be commended for the services they provide working in the environment they work in. The citizens of Franklin County should be thankful to have these people working at Weems Hospital performing the services they do. Sincerely, McArthur (Buddy) Mixon Friendship Missionary Baptist Church I want to thank Jesus for allowing me to have this wonderful Men’s Day program at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church. And I want to thank Teresa Ann Martin for presiding and also thank our Pastor James Williams for the wonderful message. I want to thank the Brotherhood Ministry from Panama City, Brother Bernard Simmons, the Heavenly Angels dance ministry, the Open Door Church of Quincy, the Ingram Brothers of Enterprise, Ala., the Master’s Choice of Enterprise Ala. and all the local churches. With love Deacon Henry Brown Chairman Jennifer McClain Family With grateful hearts, the family of Jennifer McClain would like to thank you for your many expressions of kindness, love and sympathy. It is our prayer that God will bless you tremendously. Words will never be able to express our sincerest gratitude The Family Kelly Brother Shiver Dec. 20, 2012 May 7, 2013 Another one of God’s Little Angels has been called home. Lord, if we could have but one wish today, it would be that our little Kelley could still be here on earth with us. To be able to hold him in our arms and see his pretty little face again, but Lord I know it was your wish for you to have him with you now. Thank you for what Time you gave us with him, here on earth with all his loved ones. Though our pain is deep and our family misses him here with us, we know he is with you now, and his loved ones who went before him. We will all carry him in our hearts until we meet again some sweet day in heaven, some sweet day. We all love and miss you, my love. God bless you, Your grandmother Louise, Daddy, and greatgrandfather, Mary Lou and all your family IN LOV iI NG M emEM O rR Y Charles Ernest Gay, 89, of Carrabelle, passed away on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, in Tallahassee. He was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. He was a member of Carrabelle First Baptist Church. He was a former school board member of Franklin County. He was a retired boat captain and sherman. He also retired from Florida State University Marine Biology Laboratory. He will always be remembered as a wonderful husband, father, grandfather and solider. He was an Army veteran serving in World War II. He is survived by his wife, Della Gay, of Carrabelle; a son: Mickey Gay (Jackie), of Carrabelle; three daughters, Clara Moeck, of San Diego, Calif., Patsy Putnal (Bevin) of Carrabelle, and Tina Varnes (Michael), of Pascagoula, Miss.; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. He is predeceased in death by his rst wife: Myrt Gay, and his parents, Howard and Clara Gay. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements.Charles Ernest GG ay Gary McArthur Shiver was born June 18, 1944, in Port St. Joe to the now late Lovie and Lester Shiver. He passed away Sunday, June 9, 2013 surrounded by family in Panama City at the age of 68. Gary was a commercial sherman. He is survived by his wife; Jane Shiver; children, Bobby Shiver (Arlene), Melissa Lee (Timmy), and Duane Shiver; siblings, Caroline Drouin, Margaret, Johnny Shiver, Darlene Estes, Charlotte Turner, Charles King, Albert Johnson and Richard Johnson; eight grandchildren, and ve great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his Raymond. Funeral services will be 2 p.m. on Thursday, June 13 at Kelley Funeral Home with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Viewing was Wednesday, June 12 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Kelley Funeral Home. GG ary Shiver Judith Lynn Bos, 74, passed away Saturday, May 18, 2013, at Eden Springs Nursing Home. Daughter of the late Jacob (Jack) William and Frieda Gnerich Bos, Judie was born March 22, 1939, in Detroit, Michigan. A member of Gray Memorial United Methodist Church, she was a former kindergarten teacher and medical transcriber, had a lifelong love of dogs and commitment to rescuing them, enjoyed sketching and drawing, and treasured time at the beach, especially St. George Island. She had resided in Tallahassee for the past 46 years, having come from Boca Raton. She recalled fondly her happy childhood in Holland, Michigan, and her dear friends there. She is survived by her daughters, Tippy Timmons Hiott and Tonni Timmons Dola, and stepgrandchildren Mark Hiott, Ben Hiott and Jesse Hiott. She was preceded in death by her children, Timmy Joe Timmons and Terri Lynn Paddon. In keeping with her wishes, no formal services will be held. In her honor, please consider a donation to the Best Friends Animal Society, www.bestfriends. org. Judith Lynn Bos Delma Fred “Red” Anthony, 82, died Saturday, June 8, 2013, at his home. Red, a native of Apalachicola, resided most of his life there. He was preceded in death by his parents, Fred and Goldie Chason Anthony; one sister, Betty Carrol; two brothers, Louis and Calvin; a grandson, Fred Clayton Anthony II. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Annette; two daughters, Janet Anthony and Rhonda Traweek (Jim); a son, Fred Clayton Anthony; a grandson, Andrew Traweek; a granddaughter, Heather Belcher; two great-grandchildren, Keagan Belcher and Jaiden Belcher; family friends, Bob Pearce, Catherine Ann Coulter, and Tessa Daniels; and brothers-in-law, Terry Hutto, Harry Braswell, and Wallace Braswell; sistersin-law, Annette M. Anthony, Julia Anthony, Lorraine Nash, Linda Hutto, and Reba Braswell; and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday morning, June 12 at Fellowship Baptist Church with the Rev. Charles Scott ofciating. Red was born June 26, 1930. He attended Chapman School and graduated in 1949. He attended Florida State University for three years before joining the U.S. Army. He served 16 months in Korea. After being honorably discharged in Nov. 1955, he returned home and then rejoined the National Guard where he was honorably discharged in April 1956. Red began working in the family business, The Grill Restaurant, in Nov. 1955. After his dad died in April 1966, his mother continued to work until she retired in 1974. At that time, Red and his brother, Louis, continued to operate The Grill until they retired in Dec. 1983. Red and Annette married in 1958. Red will be greatly missed by his family, friends and his church where he was a faithful member. Kelley Funeral Handled all arrangements. Delma ‘Red’ Anthony Steven Richard White, of Port St. Joe, passed away after a brief illness on Friday, May 31, 2013, at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee. Steve was born in Hastings, Mich., on June 4, 1951. In 1956, he and his family moved to Apalachicola where he attended Chapman Schools, and he graduated from Chapman High School in 1970. After graduation Steve joined the U.S. Navy and was honorably discharged on July 1, 1976. Steve worked at the St. Joe Paper Co. until it closed in 1998, and then for Century Boat Co. in Panama City, until it closed in 2007. Steve’s lifelong hobby was airplanes. He designed, built, and ew radio controlled airplanes. He was a member of the Five Points R/C Flyers in Port St. Joe. Steven was preceded in death by his father Richard N. White, in 1978. He is survived by his two sons. Michael White (Sherry), of Eastpoint, and Daniel White (Jeana), of St. George Island; his mother, Irene White, of Apalachicola; his sister Sandra Bradley (Wayne), of Chipley; grandsons, Cameron, Chandler, and Chance White, of Eastpoint; and his nephews, Nick Vathis Jr., of Panama City, and Richard Vathis, of Chipley. A memorial service will be held on Friday, June 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God. Visitation will be from 66:30 p.m. Steven Richard White Obituaries Cards of TH aA N ksKS Fish fry benets hospice patients Special to the Times On May 24, the Franklin County Advisory Council of Big Bend Hospice held a benet sh fry to raise funds for patients and families in Franklin County. A.J. Smith wanted to give back to both his community and to Big Bend Hospice. This rst-time event started an unexpected obstacle. Ronnie Segree and his sons graciously volunteered to provide the sh for the event and caught 300 pounds of mullet. However, before they could deliver the goods, a hungry bear found their treasure and ate almost 150 pounds of it. That’s when Water Street Seafood stepped up with a generous donation of 150 pounds of mullet. But Ronnie wasn’t going to be outplayed by a bear; he went back and caught another 100 pounds of mullet. So how do you sell, cook and serve this much sh? With the help of Johnny Turner, Gene Osborne, Mark Creamer, Anthony Croom, Tony Phillips, Robin Myers, Fonda Davis, director of county solid waste, and Palmer Philyaw. Adding to the main dish were wonderful desserts donated by Pam Mahr, Judy Cook and Mary McMahan. Others who helped make this event a success included Susie Harrison; Danny Itzkovitz at Tamara’s, Joe Taylor from Franklin’s Promise, the Piggly Wiggly, Ace Hardware, and the city of Apalachicola. Last, but not least, Ed Lyon, and Linda Gannaway, members of the Big Bend Hospice, Franklin County team, did a wonderful job coordinating everyone’s talents and efforts. By the time the grease cooled, the sh fry exceeded its goal of $2,000! “Thanks to all those who helped and to those who purchased meals, we were able to exceed our goal,” said Smith, member of the Franklin County Advisory Council. “These funds will be used to help Big Bend Hospice serve patients and families in our area.”

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m Spiranthes, commonly called Ladies’-tresses, is a group of orchids with owers, usually white, that form a spiral around a slender stem. The many species are found throughout North and South America and, in northern Florida, some are in bloom almost constantly. Right now, Spiranthes vernalis or spring ladies’tress is common on the roadsides. This slender and delicate plant blooms late March through June but peaks in May. Spiranthes are perennial terrestrial orchids, meaning they grow in soil and return from rootstock rather than seed. The name Spiranthes is derived from the ancient Greek words for twisted ower. Traditionally it was used as a tonic for headaches and as an aphrodisiac. It is still given as a headache remedy in homeopathic medicine. Spiranthes cernua or nodding ladies’-tress is a wonderful ornamental plant for temperate gardens and is one of the more popular hardy orchids for sale. It is hardy throughout the South and prefers moist, rich, well-drained soil. Nodding ladies’-tress is produced commercially as a cut ower. To learn more about these and some of the other native orchids found in Florida, visit www. nativeorchids.co m Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Ha ppy F a t her's Day!!! WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu June 13 90 78 20 % F ri, June 14 90 76 30 % S a t June 15 88 76 20 % Sun, June 16 86 75 20 % M on, June 17 86 75 20 % T ues June 18 87 76 20 % W ed June 19 87 76 0 % JOE’S LA WN C ARE IF IT’S IN Y OUR Y ARD LET JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT • FULL LA WN SERVICES • TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL • ALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTING AND BEDDING A V AILABLE CALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOESLA WN@Y AHOO.COM 451491 1 SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C A L L T O D A Y 850 227 7847 SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore/Bottom Red snapper continues to be the best bet in offshore fishing right now and will be until the season closes on June 28th in Federal waters. Big snapper are holding on near shore and offshore wrecks from 60-150ft of water. Live bait will prove to be the best for bigger fish, however snapper will eat cut bait as well. Try fishing 20 feet off the bottom with a live grunt or pinfish for a trophy red snapper. As the summer time weather patterns start to set in, bay fishing will be a game of early and late. Early morning top water action will produce nice trout and redfish catches. Late afternoon fishing will be mainly live bait and grubs and jigs and as the water cools down, try switching back to a top water hard bait for a trophy red fish or trout. Flounder are showing up in the normal places this week from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. Page 8 Thursday, June 13, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.co m “Drift cards” will soon be washing up on Franklin County beaches as part of a research project at Texas A&M University to study ocean currents. The bright yellow cards have contact information and a request that nders report where they were found. The project is the brainchild of Piers Chapman who has done similar research in Africa. There he released thousands of plastic cards. About 2 percent were recovered in places as far ung as Brazil and India. “That was a much larger current system,” he said. Chapman expects to recover a much larger percentage here. Twentyve percent of the rst 250 released on April 6 and 8 off the Louisiana coast have already been returned. If you nd and return a card, you become eligible for a monthly drawing, with the prize a $25 gift card. The rst winner was an Ohio native vacationing in Lynn Haven where she found her winning entry. “It’s a fun way to track currents and to get people involved,” said Chapman. He said the drift cards released in the Gulf will be biodegradable, in keeping with the international Mapol Convention which bans putting plastic in ocean waters. Scientists on research cruises, funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI), will drop these cards at various locations in the Gulf and keep a detailed record of the point of entry. GoMRI is a 10-year, $500 million independent research program established by an agreement between BP and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance to study the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the associated impact on the environment and public health. Chapman said the funding is administered by a board of distinguished scientists who report to BP annually but operate without oversight from the company. The drift card project was one of nine funded out of 200 applications during a national competition. Over the next six to eight months, 5,000 cards will be released. Chapman relies on cooperators including Florida State University and the University of South Florida to actually deploy the cards for him. Ten cards are released at each site and Chapman plans to cover the entire northern Gulf. Posters dealing with the cards are now being posted in areas where they are expected to come ashore. The cards will enable oceanographers to improve prediction models and see how gas and oil travel along the currents of the Gulf. Chapman said he is especially interested to see if any drift cards escape the Gulf and come ashore on the East Coast. Each bright yellow card has instructions in both Spanish and English on how to report its recovery using an online form or a phone number. Learn more about the project and see interactive maps of where cards have been released and found by visiting gisr.tamu.edu Chapman said, especially with the recent in uence of Tropical Storm Andrea, cards may arrive on our beaches in the very near future. Ladies’-tress orchids common on roadsides LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Spiranthes vernalis or spring ladies’-tress BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Commercial oyster harvest on the summer oyster bars of Apalachicola Bay waters will be shortened from seven days a week to ve days a week starting June 1, when the summer bars open to harvest. Bay oyster populations have suffered mainly due to lack of freshwater ow over the past few years. This temporary rule was established via executive order of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). State of cials, working with the oyster industry, concluded that these changes would help conserve oyster resources throughout the summer harvesting season and serve as a proactive measure to balance availability of harvestable oysters with efforts to restore oyster populations. Commercial harvest of oysters will be closed on Fridays and Saturdays. The temporary rule will expire Aug. 31, when the summer bars close and the winter oyster bars reopen for harvest. All other bag limits, seasons and size limits remain unchanged. Apalachicola Bay includes all waters within St. George Sound, East Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Vincent Sound in Franklin County and Indian Lagoon in Gulf County. This change does not apply to active oyster leases or recreational harvest. Apalachicola Bay oysters account for about 92 percent of Florida’s oyster landings and about 8 percent of all landings in the United States (average from 2007-2011). This closure is one of many efforts from various state and local agencies to help rebuild and conserve the important oyster population in Apalachicola Bay. Other efforts have included relocating oysters from closed areas to open areas and adding shell to existing oyster bars, which provides a base on which juvenile oysters can build. The FWC will continue to coordinate closely with the oyster industry and local community and agency partners to evaluate current and future measures needed to help address these concerns regarding oyster resources in Apalachicola Bay and other important oyster-producing areas along Florida’s Gulf coast. To view the Executive Order, visit MyFWC.com/About and click on “Inside FWC,” “Executive Director” and “Executive Orders.” Temporary commercial oyster closures to help population rebuild Watch out for drift cards

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 o Z ‘ ¨ f ¦ £ ˆ ‘  } ‘ ¨ €  „ ¤  b   b ‘ ‘ ”  ¨ ¨  { ” ¨ — ˆ ‘  ‚ ¨ W e a r e p le a s e d t o p r es en t t o y o u t hi s y e a r's A nn u a l W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t. i s r ep o r t i s desig n e d t o inf o r m y o u a b o u t t h e q u a li t y wa t er a n d s er v ices w e de li v er t o y o u e v er y d a y O ur co n s t a n t g o a l i s t o p r o v ide y o u w i t h a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le s u p p l y o f dr in k in g wa t er W e wa n t y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o en s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er O ur wa t er s o ur ce i s t w o w e l l s dra w n f r o m t h e Flo r id a n A q uif er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex ce l len t q u a li t y o f o ur wa t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en t r e q uir e d i s c h lo r in e f o r di sinf e c t io n p ur p os es. I n 2012 t h e D ep a r t m en t o f En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n p er f o r m e d a S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t o n o ur sys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o ur ces in dic a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o ur ces o f co n t a min a t io n n e a r o ur w e l l s. e a s s es sm en t r es u l ts a r e a va i l a b le o n t h e FD EP S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t a n d P r o t e c t io n P r og ra m w e bsi t e at w w w .d e p .s t a t e. .u s/s wa p p I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s a b o u t t hi s r ep o r t o r co n cer nin g y o ur wa t er u t i li t y p le a s e co n t ac t K ei t h M o c k, W a t er S u p er in t en den t, a t (850) 251-9106. W e en co ura g e o ur va l ue d c u s t o m er s t o b e inf o r m e d a b o u t t h eir wa t er u t i li t y I f y o u wa n t t o le a r n m o r e p le a s e a t t en d a n y o f o ur r egu l a r l y s c h e d u le d m e et in gs. e y a r e h e ld a t e C a r ra b e l le M unici p a l C o m p lex, 1001 G ra y A v en ue o n t h e r s t ur s d a y o f e ac h m o n t h a t 6:00 p .m. e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le r o u t in e l y m o ni t o r s f o r co n t a min a n ts in y o ur dr in k in g wa t er acco r din g t o F e dera l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. E x cep t w h er e in dic a t e d o t h er w i s e t hi s r ep o r t i s b a s e d o n t h e r es u l ts o f o ur m o ni t o r in g f o r t h e p er io d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e cem b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a in e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r es en t e d in t hi s r ep o r t a r e f r o m t h e m os t r e cen t t es t in g do n e in acco r d a n ce w i t h t h e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. I n t h e t a b les b e lo w y o u m a y n d unfa mi li a r t er m s a n d a b b r e v i a t io n s. T o h e l p y o u b et t er un der s t a n d t h es e t er m s w e h a v e p r o v ide d t h e f o l lo w in g de ni t io n s: A c t i o n L e v e l (AL): e co n cen t ra t io n o f a co n t a min a n t w hic h, if ex ce e de d t r ig g er s t r e a t m en t o r o t h er r e q uir em en ts t h a t a wa t er sys t em m u s t f o l lo w I ni t i a l Dis t ri b u t i o n S y s t e m E va l u a t i o n (IDS E): A n im p o r t a n t p a r t o f t h e S t a g e 2 Di sinf e c t io n B yp r o d uc ts R u le (D B P R). e IDS E i s a o n e-t im e s t ud y co n d uc t e d b y wa t er sys t em s t o iden t if y di s t r i b u t io n sys t em lo c at io n s w i t h hig h co n cen t ra t io n s o f t r i h a lo m et h a n es (THMs) a n d h a lo acet ic acid s (H AA s). W a t er sys t em s w i l l u s e r es u l ts f r o m t h e IDS E, in co n j un c t io n w i t h t h eir S t a g e 1 D B P R co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g d a t a, t o s e le c t co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g lo c a t io n s f o r t h e S t a g e 2 D B P R M axim um C o n ta mina n t L e v e l o r M CL: e hig h es t le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t t h a t i s a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er M CLs a r e s et a s c los e t o t h e M CL Gs a s f e a si b le u sin g t h e b es t a va i l a b le t r e a t m en t t e c hn o log y M axim um C o n ta mina n t L e v e l G o a l o r M CLG: e le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t in dr in k in g wa t er b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. M CL Gs a l lo w f o r a m a r g in o f s a f et y M axim um R es i d u a l Dis inf e c ta n t L e v e l o r MRD L: e hig h es t le v e l o f a di sinf e c t a n t a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er er e i s co n v in cin g e v iden ce t h a t addi t io n o f a di sinf e c t a n t i s n e ces s a r y f o r co n t r o l o f micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. M axim um R es i d u a l Dis inf e c ta n t L e v e l G o a l o r MRD LG : e le v e l o f a dr in k in g wa t er di sinf e c t a n t b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. MRD L Gs do n o t r e e c t t h e b en e ts o f t h e u s e o f di sinf e c t a n ts t o co n t r o l micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. N o n a p p li c a b l e (N/A): D o es n o t a p p l y N o n-D e t e c t (ND): m e a n s n o t det e c t e d a n d in dic a t es t h a t t h e s u bs t a n ce wa s n o t f o un d b y l a b o ra t o r y a n a l ysi s. P a r ts p e r mi l li o n (p p m) o r Mi l lig r a ms p e r li t e r (m g/l) : o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 mi l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P a r ts p e r b i l li o n (p p b) o r Mi cr o g r a ms p e r li t e r (g/l): o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 b i l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P i c o c uri e p e r li t e r (pC i/L): m e a s ur e o f t h e radio ac t i v i t y in wa t er I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in kin g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h ttp://w w w .e pa.go v/s a f e w a t e r/l ea d e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di ss o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) Mi cr o b i a l c o n ta mina n ts s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I no rg a ni c c o n ta mina n ts s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t i ci d es a nd he rb i ci d es w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Org a ni c che mi c a l c o n ta mina n ts in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b yp r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adi o ac t iv e c o n ta mina n ts w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uct io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t rat io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y’ s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791. a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r e e c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o me p e o p l e ma y b e mo r e v u lne r a b l e t o c o n ta mina n ts in drin k in g wa t e r tha n the ge ne r a l p o p u l at i o n. I mm uno-c o m p r o mis e d p e rs o ns s u ch as p e rs o ns w i th c a nc e r und e rgo in g che mo the r a p y p e r s o ns w ho ha v e und e rgo ne o rg a n t r a ns p l a n ts, p e o p l e w i th HIV/AIDS o r o the r imm une s y s t e m dis o r d e rs, s o me e l d e rly a nd inf a n ts c a n b e p a r t i c u l a rly a t ris k f r o m inf e c t i o ns. es e p e o p l e s ho u l d s e e k adv i c e a b o u t drin k in g wa t e r f r o m the ir he a l th c a r e p r o v i d e rs. EP A/CD C g ui d e lines o n a p p r o p ri a t e me a ns t o l ess e n the ris k o f inf e c t i o n b y C r y p t os p o ri di um a nd o the r mi cr o b i o l o g i c a l c o n ta mina n ts a r e a va i l a b l e f r o m the S a f e Drin k in g W a t e r H o tline (800-426-4791). W e w o rk t o p r o v i d e t o p q u a l i t y w a t e r t o e v e r y t a p W e a s k t h a t a ll o u r c u s t o m e rs h e l p u s p r o t ec t o u r w a t e r s o u r c e s, w h i c h a r e t h e h ea r t o f o u r c o m m u n i t y o u r w a y o f l i f e a n d o u r c h il d r e n ’ s f u tu r e. I f y o u h a v e a n y q u e s ti o n s o r c o n c e r n s a bo u t t h e i n f o r m a ti o n p r o v i d ed p l ea s e f ee l f r ee t o c a ll a n y o f t h e n u m be rs l i s t ed By David Adlerstein 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com What a difference out of bounds makes. In a stunning and dramatic upset Saturday on St. George Island, longtime mullet champ Hunter Bartley, gunning for his sixth straight title and the leader after the regular competition, was unseated in the toss-off by former champ Chip Sanders. Sanders, who last won the mullet toss a half dozen years ago, had strong backto-back throws, of 124’ and 132’ to earn a berth in the nals in the 22nd annual competition, held on the beach behind the Blue Parrot Restaurant. But his best was easily outdistanced by Bartley’s best of 151’ which enabled him to easily sail into the nals. In his rst time competing in the mullet toss, Jody Ledford, 43, from Thomasville, Ga., quali ed for the nals with a 124’ throw. In a last-minute appearance, former champion Robert Wilhoit threw out of bounds, and 120’, to narrowly miss the nals. Brett Johnson, 30, who had slung the sh 152’ last year to make it to the nals, also had no such luck this year. His one throw was just 91’ and his other sliced out of bounds to the right and struck an onlooker. “A free pitcher of beer if you get hit,” joked emcee Brian Bowen. So the stage was set for the toss-off on the hot afternoon, marked by a brisk southeasterly wind. Bowen and George Joanos, the Blue Parrot’s co-owner, had overseen the competition since mid-morning. In the toss-off, Sanders threw 128’ to take the lead. Ledford, a former tight end for Georgia Tech, then sliced his throw out of bounds to the right. “The wind kind of caught me,” he said. “It was a rookie mistake.” Bartley then hooked his throw out of bounds to ensure Sanders’ crown and the $200 rst prize. Bartley said it was his third time losing in the nals after having thrown the farthest in the regular competition. “The mullet tore on me,” he said. “I knew it was gone.” Bartley raised the question politely as to why the traditional rules governing the toss-off had been set aside this year. “Last year there were two throws. This year we only did one,” he said. Bartley was gracious in defeat, noting that both he and Sanders live on 13th Street in Apalachicola. “Our street can throw the mullet,” he said. “He’s the man.” Sanders danced for joy after his victory in the competition, that drew about 30 entrants in the men’s division. “There’s a new sheriff in town,” he said. “I knew I just needed to go out here and win. CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 13, 2013 A Page 9 Section Sanders back as mullet toss champ See MULLET A10 The Franklin County AAA All-Star Team, managed by Justin Odom, and coached by Lanny Rester and Bert Davis, won the AAA district crown for 9 and 10 year olds Tuesday night in Port St. Joe. They are now headed to the AAA state tourney July 13 in Freeport. Pictured above are teammates Carson Davis, Gage Boone, Clint Rester, Colin Amison, Caleb Abel, Caden Turrell, Joshua Odom, Lamarius Martin, Tanner Jamison, Ashton Topham and Kelson Smith. The Franklin County AA boys, who hit off a pitching machine, also won the district title and are headed to the state tourney June 29 in Wildwood. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Chip Sanders tossing the mullet. BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K 1.27 A C L O T B C H A C C E S S $80,000 U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 3 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 AAA BOYS STATE BOUND PHOTO COURTESY OF CHALA PARISH Sports BRIEFS Athletes to bene t from Saltwater Classic auction The Franklin County High School football team will be helping Will Dance, producer of The Morning Show with Preston Scott 100.7 FM WFLA Tallahassee’s Talk Radio, as they direct this year’s 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic in Carrabelle June 13-16. “The team will be out in force on Auction Day on Sunday. We need as many people in the community there to buy auctioned sh that are caught during the tournament,” said athletic director Mike Sweatt. “The proceeds from all sh auctioned off go to the football team only. We will also be accepting donations throughout.” Franklin School hosts June 28 golf tourney Go out and play golf to support the students, at the Franklin County Schools golf tournament. Tee time is Friday, June 28, at 1 p.m. at St. James Bay Golf Resort Cash prizes awarded for rst, second and third places. Amounts will be based on the participation of players and sponsors. Prizes for “Closest to the Pin” and The “Longest Drive” winner will receive a free round of golf donated by See BRIEFS A10

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T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM Sports A10 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 MULLETT from page A9 “It’s like any sport. I’m just com petitive when I get in the sport. I don’t let no other man take me down. I don’t care how big they are. You just go out there and be competitive,” Sanders said. In the women’s category, of about two dozen entrants, Brett’s wife, Carrie Johnson, made up for her husband’s errant throw by winning the women’s competition, and $200, with a throw of 90’. Last year, she took home third place with a throw of a little more than 86’. Last year’s runner-up, Talla hassee’s Laura Davis, repeated as runner-up with a throw of 88’ six feet shorter than her best toss last year. Finishing third was Talla hassee’s Miranda Ard, who threw the sh 85 ’. In the freestyle category, in which competitors shoot mullet out of a gi ant tube, powered by compressed air, the team of 5150, which is police code for someone who is crazy and on the loose, won the $100 rst prize for a shot of 380’. That team included Paul Ard, Wesley Jones, Trey Gerk ing, Hunter Bartley and Michael Lu berto. Finishing second for a 329’ pro pulsion, and winning a grille, was the Ace of Spades team, including Mike Willis, Mark Willis and Rio Shiver. The team of Punkin’ Nuts was third. In the kids 10-and-under, Apala chicola’s Lamarius “Monk” Martin won the bicycle with a throw of 71’, followed by St. George Island’s Alex Joanos, who threw for 64’. In third place was a young person with the rst name of Blake, who pitched the mullet 59’. Among the 11 to 13 year olds, the winner was Carter Kirkpatrick, from Madison, Ga., with a throw of 95’, with Davis McGee, of St. George Is land second with a throw of 88 ’. In third place was St. George Island’s Nick Joanos, who threw for 83’. Among the 14 to 16 year olds, the winner was James Durham, from Apalachicola, with a throw of 85’, with Jackson Groom of Thomasville, Ga., with a toss of 82’. In third place was Cole Spivey, from Tallahassee, who threw the sh 75’. All monies raised by the event go to the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Rob Burlison, head golf pro fessional at St. James Bay Country Club. A buffet will be provided. For sponsor information contact Shannon Venable, Franklin County Schools, 670-2810 ext. 4105 or sven able@franklin.k12..us. Sponsorships are available: $100, $200, $300 and $400. For tournament info con tact Burlison at 697-9606 or rob@stjamesbay.com. Student athletes seek assistance Two graduating seniors are seeking donations as they prepare to take part in summer athletic teams. David Butler will attend the USA Junior Basketball National in Columbus, Ohio on July 8. Skyler Hutchin son will attend the Under Armour Baseball Nationals Omaha, Neb. on July 22. Both young men are seeking sponsors to help offset the costs in taking part in an impressive array of outstanding student-ath letes. To help, contact Franklin County High School athletic director Michael Sweatt at sweattfamu@hotmail.com. Or at 566-3434 or 899-1742. BRIEFS from page A9 A10 | The Times June 13, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91374T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192012CA000348CAXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 26, 2013, and entered in 192012CA000348CA XXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT3, is the Plaintiff and JUDITH A. THOMPSON A/K/A JUDITH THOMPSON; CENTENNIAL BANK, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, Front Steps 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on July 10, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND IN THE N.E. OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 27, T8S, R8W HEREBY FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FROM THE NORTHEASTERLY INTERSECTION (CON.MON.) OF TWO PROPOSED 66 FOOT ROADS, 1765 FEET DUE NORTH AND 218.5 FEET WEST OF THE S.W. CORNER (CON.MON.) OF THE N.E. OF SAID SECTION 27, RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE ROAD, 144 FEET TO A PONT FOR BEGINNING; RUN THENCE, CONTINUING ALONG ROAD, 200 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE CREEK; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG CREEK TO A POINT NORTH 24 DEGREES EAST OF THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES WEST 145 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of Court By Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File No. 12-08104 June 13, 20, 2013 91396T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Grit Water USA, located at 312 Hwy 98, in the County of Franklin, in the City of East Point, Florida, 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at East Point, Florida, this 7th day of June, 2013. Leola Jolly Martin June 13, 2013 93803T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000020 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN E. SEGER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 13, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2012-CA-000020 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and STEVEN E. SEGER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEVEN E. SEGER; MERRIE J. SEGER; ONE CHARLESTON PLACE HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 27th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 2 BLOCK 2 EAST, ST GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT 1 A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. A/K/A 159 GUNN STREET, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 323282879 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 14, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11039170 June 6, 13, 2013 93819T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-281-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 28th day of May, 2013, in Case Number 11-281 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR., is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 10th day of July, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 6, Block C, Range 3, McKissack Beach Subdivision, as per map or Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 29th day of May, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By:/s/ Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 6, 13, 2013 93837T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-000148-CA JOHN EARLE PERKINS, III, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR FRANCIS PERKINS, JR., and HERBERT DAIGRE PERKINS, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Partition Sale in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: The West 17 feet of Lot 2 and the East 55 feet of Lot 3 of Block “C” of Perkins Beach according to map or plat thereof in Plat Book 1, Page 7 on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit a/k/a 4322 Highway 98, St. Teresa Beach, Franklin County, FL 32358 at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. EDT on June 25, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 31st day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 June 6, 13, 2013 93861T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012 CA 000325 AUDIE E. LANGSTON Plaintiff, vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT Defendant NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Chris Cartwright, Defendant, and to all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against Defendant, and all parties having or claiming to have and right, title or interest in the real property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that you have been designated as defendant in a legal proceeding filed against you for foreclosure on real property purchased from Audie E. Langston. The action involves real property in Franklin County, Florida, more fully described as follows: LOT 91 LIGHTHOUSE RIDGE ESTATES UNIT 3 (UNRECORDED) Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 89 degrees 59 minutes 03

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CLASSIFIEDS June 13, 2013 The Times | A11 Rowell Auctions, Inc. 800-323-8388 RowellAuctions.com ell Auctions, Inc 0 0-323-8388 we llA uc ti o n s.co m 10% Buyers Premium € AU 479, AB 296For Additional Property Information Visit RowellAuctions.com AUCTION ONLINE ONLY € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation Ro we ellAuctionsInc For Additional Proper t ty Information Visit ns.com RowellAuctio n € Tier 1 Lot € 1 Block of the Beach € Just Minutes from Beautiful Gulf Coast Fishing & Recreation A AU AU C C T O I O N ONLINE ONLY LINEONLY Bidding Ends Wed., June 26th, 2pmSubject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature 9 Bank Owned Properties GA & FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL € € € T € T € T €T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T € T €T T T T T ier ier ier ier ier er er er ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier ier 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Lt Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lt L L L Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot Lot ot ot € Tier 1 Lot € € € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 € 1 €1 1 1 1 Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl l l Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl ock ock ock ock ock k k k ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock ock of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of h th th th th th th th th th h h th th th th th th th th e e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B e B eB eB eB eB eB eB eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac eac h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h € 1 Block of the Beach € J € € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J € J J J J J J ust ust ust ust t t t ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust ust Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi i Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi t t t t t t t t t nut nut nut nut nut nut nut es es es es s s s s es s es es es f f f f fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro fro m m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m B m m B m B mB mB mB eau eau eau eau ea eau eau eau e t tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif tif l l l ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul ul € J ust Mi nut es from B eau tif ul G G G Gu Gu Gul Gul Gul ul G Gu G f f f C f C f C f C f C f C f C fC f C f C f C oas oas oas a oas oas oa t tF t F t F t F t F t F F F F t F F i i ish ish ish ish sh i i ing ng g ing ing ing ng ng g g g g g g & & & & & & & & & & & & Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec R rea rea rea rea rea rea re re re ti tio io tio tio n n n n n n n n n Gulf Coast Fish ing & Recreation G G G G Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul Gul fC fC fC fC fC C C C fC fC fC fC fC fC f f oas oas oas oas oas oas oas oas t t t t tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF tF ish ish ih ish ih ih ih h h h ish ish ish ish ish ish ish i i ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing ing & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & R R R Rec Rec Rec R R R Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec Rec rea rea rea rea rea rea rea rea ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti tio tio tio tio tio tio tio n n n n n n n n n n n n GulfCoastFishing&Recreation 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 186 86 86 86 Me Me Me M Me Me Me Me Me Me Me Me rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rcu rc ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry ry y y Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan L L L Lan L Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan Lan an an e e e e e e e e e e e e e e Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por Por t S t S S S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S t S tS tS tS tS tS S t. t. t. t. t. t t. t. t t t t t t J J J Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe Joe ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap Cap ap ap e e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S e S eS eS eS eS eS eS d d d d d d d and and and d and and and and and and and Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) as) FL FL FL FL FL L L L L L L L FL FL FL L FL FL FL FL 186 Mercury Lane Port St. Joe ( Cape Sand Blas) FL Also Available:36 Janet Drive Crawfordville (Shell Point), FL 3 Bd, 2 Ba Mobile Home 1739 Lark Lane St. George Island, FL Excellent Lot Located in the Plantation 480 Ponderosa Pines Dr. Port St. Joe, FL Excellent Home Site Pisces Dr., Santa Rosa Beach, FL -Canal Front Lot w/Dock 2090212 FLORIDA PROPERTIES 10% BUYER'S PREMIUM Broker Compensation Available! 55 Tue., June 25, 1:00 P.M. EDT Sale Site: Hotel Duval 415 N. Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 All Properties Sell Absolute Live & Online Bidding ProperesinTheseCounes:Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden,Gulf,Jeerson, Leon, Liberty, Wakulla, Walton&WashingtonCounes,FLProperesInclude:Homes, Condos, Gulf Front, Bay Front and OtherResidenalLots; Commercial Buildings, Land and Acreage Tracts. ForDetailed Informaon johndixon.com 800.479.1763 FLAL# AB-0001488 JOHN DIXONA UCTIONS M ARKETING & A SSOCIATES 1112349 AUCTION BANK ORDERED Member FDIC 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ................... ............... ..................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD ................... ............... ................ $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND .............. ..... ............................ $750 1BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW seconds East Along the North boundary of said section 35 a distance of 2855.93 Feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 760.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING From Said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 00 degrees 01 minutes 59 seconds East 350.00 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds East 40.89 feet to a point on the Northwesterly right-ofway Boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway said point lying on a curve. Concave to the Southeasterly, thence run Northeasterly along said Right-of-way boundary and along said curve with a radius of 3410.00 Feet thru a central angle of 07 degrees 31 minutes 09 seconds for an arc distance of 447.51 feet, the chord of said arc being North 38 degrees 27 minutes 47 seconds East 447.19 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 58 minutes 01 seconds West 319.25 feet to th POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.40 acres, more or less. The action was instituted in the Second Judicial Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida, and is styled AUDIE E. LANGSTON vs. CHRIS CARTWRIGHT, et al. Case No.: 2012 CA 00325. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Daniel W. Hartman, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is PO Box 10910, Tallahassee, FL 32302, on or before July 30, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Daniel W. Hartman or immediately after service, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. The Court has authority in this suit to enter a judgment or decree in the Plaintiff’s interest which will be binding upon you. DATED: April 23, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 93941T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on July 18, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property PARCEL 1: Lot 58, PHASE 4, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION PHASES 3 AND 4, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. PARCEL 2: All of Lots 1 through 8, Block 99, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 900.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Thence continue South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31 for 459.73 feet to the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 693.63 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West along the Western right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway for 246.99 feet, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 575.16 feet to the Point of Beginning. AND All of Lots 1 through 6, Block 100, of an unrecorded subdivision in the Northwest Quarter of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of Fractional Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida, and thence run South along the West boundary of said Fractional Section 31, for 1359.73 feet to the Northern right-ofway of Old Ferry Road, thence North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along said right-of-way for 743.63 feet to the Point of Beginning. From this Point of Beginning continue North 70 degrees 58 minutes East along the Northern right-of-way of Old Ferry Road for 300.00 feet, thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes West for 126.23 feet to the Northeast corner of Lot 6, Block 100, thence North 89 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds West for 317.36 feet to the Eastern right-of-way line of a 50 foot wide roadway, thence South 19 degrees 02 minutes East for 229.74 feet to the Point of Beginning. pursuant to the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, INC. a/k/a GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN, INC.; JEFFERY A. DYKES; KELLY J. DYKES; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; GOLD KEY HOLDINGS, II, LLC, Defendants and the docket number of which is 2013 CA 000063 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 3rd day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 2013 j j ADOPT j j : At-Home-Mom & Prof Dad yearn to share everything with baby. Expenses Paid. 800-552-0045. j Chris & Carolyn j jj FLBar42311 jj GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl June 15th & 16th 8:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL53032 to 56654 Flood Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Receptionist Weekends Required Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34252703 Text FL52703 to 56654 Food Serv/HospitalityOyster Shuckers (Apalachicola, FL) -21 temporary positions. Wearing rubber gloves, boots & caps, shucker opens & washes oysters, uses shucking knife to gently pry open oyster shell & separate from muscle so that meat can be frozen, canned, packed or otherwise disposed of as necessary. No exp or edu reqd. From 6am-3pm, M-F, with no OT. Temp employment from 06/11/2013 to 6/10/2014. Wage paid is $9 /hr. Work location: 101 Water St., Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apply to: Leavins Seafood, Attn: Darren Guillotte, Owner, PO Box 520, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or via email: lsi@gtcom.net or telephone at (850) 653-8823 Web ID: 34254618 Text FL54618 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!PTHousekeeper and PT Bartender Experience preferred. Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C. Web ID#: 34254465 Quality Assurance Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc St George Island Full and Part Time PositionsCollins Vacation Rentals, Inc is now interviewing for Full and Part Time positions in Administration, Front Desk, Reservations, Housekeeping and Maintenance departments. Applicants must have excellent communication and computer skills. Prior experience in Customer Service and Vacation Rentals helpful. If you enjoy greeting and assisting visitors on St. George Island, we want to talk to you! Applications available at our main office at 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $575 ‘98 Ford Taurus T ot al Price $3,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $675 ‘01 Chevy Monte Carlo T ot al Price $3,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $675 ‘02 Chevy Monte Carlo T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $675 ‘02 Ford Taurus T ot al Price $4,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775 ‘02 Chevy Blazer T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775 ‘02 Chevy Blazer T ot al Price $4,200 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $875 1999 Ford F-150 -X/Cab T ot al Price $5,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $975 2000 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T ot al Price $5,200 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $875 2001 Ford F-150 -X/Cab T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $1275 2002 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T ot al Price $6,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $975 ‘04 Dodge Ram T ot al Price $6,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Southern Cross-28Ft, Good condition, Dsl Eng, 2-Spd Winchs, New stainless rig, Awlgrip Hull, West Bottom. Health, $7,500 OBO. Call 850 866-6989. Text FL55153 to 56654 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified. CALL 747-5020 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper.For Fast Results, Call 747-5020 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! 1109848EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, June 13, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 247279 $348,000 St. Geor ge Island 2ND TIER GULF VIEW Da wg Daz e 4 BR, 3 B A, Hea ted P ool, Florida r oom of f li ving r oom opens to decks o v er looking pool, Fir eplace tile & carpet ooring, laundry r oom, 2 car gar a ge nicel y landsca ped with wide dri v e w a y P opular R ental, Short Sale W est Gulf Beach Dri v e 451 4900 John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248242 $279,900 St. Geor ge Island 451 490 1 1ST TIER PLANT A TION LO T Gr ea t Gu lf V ie ws P an or am ic vi e ws to th e ea st & no rt h, At te nt io n pi lo ts ne ar th e Pl an ta ti on ai rp or t; On e ac re lo t, Ad ja ce nt to bo ar dw al k to Gu lf On e of th e hi gh es t lo ts on th e Is la nd Am en it ie s in cl ud e Ne w Cl ub ho us e & Po ol Se as id e Dr i v e, Ni ck ’ s Ho le Th i s cu te 3 B R / 1 B A co ttag e has been co mpl etel y r en o v ated o v er the pas t 2 year s with a new r o o f deck and centr al heat and air unit. It is j us t a s ho r t wal k to the Car r ab el l e Har bo r 850-899-5104 l 850-697-1010 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m 451 496 4 T his c ust om des ign ed hom e in the pr est igi ous Mag nol ia B a y ga t ed c omm uni t y S unr oom scr een ed & ope n por che s hot tub o MBR sui t e lar ge mas t er til ed ba th w/ ope n sho w er and gar den tub det ach ed gar age gas r epl ac e gr ani t e c oun t er t ops sta inl ess k it che n, win e c ool er bui ltin c orn er c abi net s A men iti es inc lud e c omm uni t y doc k poo l t enn is c our ts Mai n liv ing ar ea & mas t er on 1st oo r w/g ues tr oom s ups tai rs f or pri v ac y w/ pri v a t e por ch. S him mer ing S and s R eal ty 451 496 2 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED MLS 248897 ST GEORGE ISLAND $1,299,000 “P ositiv e S pace ” Immac ula t ely main tained c ust om home designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e on a one acr e landsc aped lot in pr estigious S t G eor ge Plan ta tion! T his one o wner home is beautifully furnished and f ea tur es G ulf views acr oss the en tir e southern w all of the house T he spacious mast er suit e t otally oc c upies the 2nd oor with easy ac c ess t o the laundr y r oom fr om the bedr oom. B oth guest bedr ooms ha v e priv a t e ba ths and the “ den ” c an ser v e as a 4th bedr oom with a half ba th or o c e / cr af t r oom. B eautiful full por ches f or easy en t er taining and enjo ying the G ulf view T his home also has a gas r eplac e and oak oors thr oughout the living/dining ar eas S quar e f ootage acr eage and lot dimensions ar e tak en fr om C oun t y P r oper t y A ppr aiser ’ s w ebsit e S himmering S ands R ealty STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .P ositiv eS paceH ome .com "" "" && &# $'$ B eautifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular B a y and B ridge views with man y new upda t es Remodeled k it chen (new c abinets c oun t er t ops sink disposal st o v e dish w asher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea t r e ec tiv e windo w lm; 3 lg BRs with new mast er BA; priv a t e o c e just o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2 w alk -in closets T his house is per f ec t f or en t er taining with a huge fr on t por ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and w ood burning r eplac e L andsc ape has irriga tion w ell and na tiv e plan ts High e cienc y hea t pump new r oof 6 additional in r oof insula tion. S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .332C ookS tr eet .com ( (( # ! & % %& S O L D O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! (In this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Times. 1) What will you ordinarily lose 94 of during the course of your life? Purse or wallet, Keys, Combs or brushes, Bones 2) Which state uses the slogan “Wild, Wonderful” for its license plates? W. Virginia, Montana, Vermont, Oregon 3) The rst neon sign was made in 1923 for what type of dealership? Frigidaire, Singer, Ford, Packard 4) A “big banger” is a large one of what in auto-racing circles? Sandwich, Engine, Tire iron, Pit crew 5) What does a pintle ordinarily hold together? Lamp, Lock, Hinge, Kettle 6) Which dart score is dubbed “Sunset Strip”? 11, 21, 77, 100 7) On the human body what’s a scapula? Kneecap, Shoulder blade, Forehead, Nostril 8) How old was Booth when he assassinated Lincoln? 26, 31, 42, 58 9) Baseball umpires are commonly referred to as what color? Red, Blue, Black, Green 10) Who invented the wheelbarrow? Chinese, Romans, Egyptians, Irish 11) When was the rst diet soft drink called the “No-Cal Beverage” launched? 1944, 1952, 1969, 1974 12) Who was the rst NBA guard to average 30 points a game for the season? Robertson, Selvy, Frazier, Cousy 13) Willys-Overland was the rst owner of what popular trademark? Civic, Beetle, BMW, Jeep 14) What per-say is the safest shellsh to eat raw? Shrimp, Lobster, Scallops, Oysters ANSWERS 1) Bones. 2) W. Virginia. 3) Packard. 4) Engine. 5) Hinge. 6) 77. 7) Shoulder blade. 8) 26. 9) Blue. 10) Chinese. 11) 1952. 12) Robertson. 13) Jeep. 14) Scallops. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com FPAN seeks summer library volunteers Every summer the public libraries in Florida host a summer reading program. This summer’s theme is “Dig into Reading,” and this has the Florida Public Archeology Network very excited and busy. The FPAN North Central Ofce is looking for a few good volunteers to help with youth summer library programming. Good candidates will have experience working with children of all ages, be reliable and be comfortable speaking in front of large groups. Training will be provided prior to the programs. There are 15 counties in the North Central region, and we will work with volunteers to ensure they visit the libraries closest to them. Email Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf.edu if you are interested. KidCare/Medicaid assistance available The Florida Department of Health in Franklin County in partnership with George E. Weems Memorial Hospital is now offering KidCare/Medicaid assistance. For more information or to sign up for either of these services, stop by the county health department ofces. Visit the Apalachicola location at 139 12th St. on Thursdays or the Carrabelle location, 106 N.E. Fifth St., on third Tuesdays. For questions, call 653-2111. Community conversation on ‘Our Children, Our Future’ Please join the Department of Juvenile Justice for a “Community Engagement Conversation” and share issues facing our children within our communities. The meeting is open to the public and will be noon to 2 p.m. June 21 at the Holy Family Senior Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries St./Seventh Street, Apalachicola. The DJJ’s mission is to increase public safety by reducing juvenile delinquency through effective prevention, intervention and treatment services that strengthen families and turn around the lives of troubled youth. They would like to hear from communities on such topics as what are the needs of Franklin County communities? How can DJJ engage Franklin County communities and its unique requirements? Celebrate independence on July 3-4 The Historic Apalachicola Main Street program will sponsor the second annual Old Apalachicola Independence Day Celebration on July 3. In Carrabelle, the citysponsored reworks will be held on July 4. The Red, White and Blue Parade begins at 6:30 p.m. at Lafayette Park and will wind its way down Avenue C, under the bridge at Battery Park and down Water Street to end at Riverfront Park. The parade will be followed by a traditional ice cream social. The shrimp boat Lady Louise will act as a stage for live music. The Hillside Community Choir led by Pastor Solomon will provide stirring patriotic tunes on the docks. In addition, there will be an All American Kids’ Corner with many unique games and activities. The highlight of the evening begins at dark thirty (about 9:15 p.m.) when revelers will be treated to a professional reworks display over the Apalachicola River. For more information or to volunteer, call Jim Bachrach at 8998689 or Harry Arnold at 524-0770. Hurricane guides hot off the press Hurricane Guides for 2013 have been received and are available at the Franklin County Emergency Management Center, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola. Download a copy at www. franklinemergencymanagement. com. During storm season, the center’s website also provides a number of other resources including information on road and bridge closures, a link to NOAA hurricane information. To contact emergency management, call 653-3653. Duke Power can stage at airport On June 4, the county commission voted unanimously to allow Duke Power to use a staging area at the airport in the event they want to stage equipment after a hurricane, subject to county attorney review. Preble-Rish awarded Alligator Point contract At the regular June 4 county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to award Preble-Rish engineers the $122,000 contract to design and engineer the multi-use path to be constructed at Alligator Point. All fees for the future construction will be paid out of DOT funds. News B rR IE fF S