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The Apalachicola times ( June 6, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 6, 2013
Publication Date: 06-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00224

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: June 6, 2013
Publication Date: 06-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00224

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High School will present diplomas to 59 graduates at 7 p.m. Friday, led by two young ladies both of whom posted a better than 4.0 grade point average. Leading the Class of 2013 will be Valedictorian Stephanie Frances Marxsen and Salutatorian Morgan Anderson Walker. Also receiving highest honors will be Elton Ivan Olvera. Earning High Honors will be Christina Collins, Emily Brooke Cash, Elisha Patriotis and Katie Wood. A diploma with Honors will go to Skyler Eli Hutchinson, Brittany Nicole Bryant, Ryne Seth Fisher, Annalyse Elisabeth Wharrie, Cheyenne Elizabeth Martin, Karl Ray Sanford, Miranda Alexis Pilger, Zachary Lyle Howze, Shelby Melody Myers, Karlie Ann Tucker, Kerri xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, June 6, 2013 50¢ WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 127 ISSUE 6 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Tide Chart . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Wartime anguish, A4 FCHS to graduate 59 Friday Valedictorian Stephanie Marxsen. Salutatorian Morgan Walker. “We are afraid they won’t complete the work on schedule,” said County Planner Alan Pierce Tuesday. In January, Gulf Group, of Chipley bid $566,000 to remove debris and repair the pier. Pierce said they could receive a penalty of $300 a day if they fail to complete the work by June 30. “We have put them on notice with a letter and they have not asked us for an extension. There are reasons to grant an extension, but they have to ask.” Pierce said, adding that the contractor has not asked for an extension. Gulf Group began work on the pier in April. By LOIS SWOBODA BRIDGE CONTRACTORS UNDER THE GUN Special to the Times St. George Island’s Julian G. Bruce State Park has again been voted one of the Top 10 Beaches in the U.S., according to the Dr. Stephen Leatherman (Dr. Beach) annual ranking of beaches in the U.S. The St. George Island Beach moved up a notch from #4 in 2012 to the #3 spot for 2013. This is the third year that the ninemile beach park at the east end of St. George Island, has made Dr. Beach’s list. According to Dr. Beach, “The Florida panhandle beaches are known for their powdery, super white sands. The sand here is squeaky clean (just rub your feet on the sand and hear it squeak). The State Park beach is on the eastern end of the island. Pathways take you across the ‘walking’ dunes to the bayside.” Josh Hodson, St. George Island State Park manager, said the designation has done wonders for the park’s visitation. “This ranking has resulted in publicity on a national scale for the state park and our area,” he said. According to Hodson, visitation to the State Park has steadily increased in the past few years since the designations which began in 2011. Last year (2012) we had 210,000 visitors, up from 185,000 in 2011. It’ll be interesting to see what this year brings,” he said Because the St. George Island State Park is home to some threatened and endangered species, Hodson said visitors to this beach park are asked to be respectful of the wildlife, including the endangered loggerhead sea turtles which arrive annually at this time of year to nest on the beach. “We’ve already received our rst few loggerheads so please do not disturb any marked areas,” Hodson cautions. Visitors interested in learning about sea turtle nesting can attend 2 p.m. turtle orientation meetings on Wednesdays during June at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Visitor Center in Eastpoint. The presentations are hosted by the SGI Volunteer Turtlers and ANERR. Common sense turtle tips include removing all beach chairs and umbrellas at the end of the day and use red ltered ashlights when walking on the beach at night to avoid disorienting hatchlings. The St. George Island State Park Beach is one of a string of many beaches in Franklin County. Total, Franklin County features more than 250 miles of beach. To learn more about each of the county’s beaches and amenities, visit Salty orida.com TOP 10 BEACHES FOR 2013: 1: Main Beach, East Hampton, New York 2: Kahanamoku Beach, Waikiki, Oahu, Hawaii 3: St. George Island State Park, Florida Panhandle 4: Hamoa Beach, Maui, Hawaii 5: Waimanalo Bay Beach Park, Oahu, Hawaii 6: Barefoot Beach, Bonita Springs, Fla. 7: Cape Florida State Park, Key Biscayne, Fla. 8: Cape Hatteras, Outer Banks of N.C. 9: Coast Guard Beach, Cape Cod, Mass. 10: Beachwalker Park, Kiawah Island, S.C. Island beaches named again to Top 10 list By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Coombs Armory has termites. Adding to previously identi ed structural problems, the Armory is now known to harbor both drywood and subterranean termites and eradicating them could add an additional $100,000 to the cost of renovating the building. Two weeks ago, County Extension Agent Bill Mahan, whose of ce is in the Armory, noticed a swarm of insects emerging from the inside wall in the rear right corner of the building. On examination, the insects were found to be drywood termite swarmers. When adult termites are ready to mate, they grow wings and y away from their home colony to create a new nest. Swarming termites mean the parent colony is at least two years old and growing in size. Franklin County is on the northern edge of the natural range of drywood termites and, while they are found here, they are not as common as subterranean termites, which are the kind most often infesting structures in this area. Their colonies are larger than drywood Termites discovered in Armory LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Coombs Armory/Convention Center See FCHS A6 See TERMITES A14 Gulf Group behind schedule on repairs to the St. George Island shing pier Fish free on Saturday The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has declared Saturday, June 8 as free freshwater shing day. On that date, the state shing license requirement is waived for all recreational anglers. Swing Era relived Saturday Jennifer Duncan from Columbus, Ga. will perform tunes from the 1930s and ‘40s at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, Saturday, June 8 from 11 to 11:45 a.m. Jennifer has entertained for many historical, military and veterans groups. For more information call 697-8575. Mullet Toss Saturday on island The annual St. George Island Mullet Toss will be hosted Saturday by the Blue Parrot, 68 West Gorrie Drive. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Festivities begin at 11 a.m. Entry fee for adults $25, children $15. The event benefits the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. For information call 927-2987. Fisherman’s Choice kids tourney Saturday Charles and Rex Pennycuff host their Fisherman’s Choice youth fishing tournament Saturday, June 8 beginning at daylight. Kids 16 and under will fish for fresh and saltwater species. Each entry receives a t-shirt, and after the tournament, anglers are invited to attend a cookout at the Eastpoint pavilion where they will weigh in fish, and get great prizes. Weigh in starts at 1 p.m. and fishermen must be in line no later than 3 p.m. Prizes given for first, second, third and fourth places and include all major fish species. Entry is free. Call Fisherman’s Choice for more information 670-8808.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 T OBA CCO C ESSA T ION C LASS S CHEDULE Please visit the f ollo wing w ebsit es t o vie w a c urrent schedule of t obacco cessa tion classes tha t are being held in F ranklin County a t w w w .bigbendahec .org/quit-no w and w w w .ahec t obacco .com T o r egist er f or a class please c all Big B end AHEC a t 850-224-1177 THERE IS NO COS T T O A TT END! T H URSD A Y JUN E 2 0 TH 2 0 1 3 5:30 7:30 PM Geor ge E W eems Memorial H ospital 135 A v enue G Apalachicola, FL F r ee nic otine pa t ches and gum will b e pr o vided t o par ticipan ts who c omplet e each class while supplies last 8/3> 3F/OO AO / >JQN£JI 8 PAG 8 O 8 OOA JI R egistr ation Begins @ 1 0am ET Competition Begins @ 1 1am ET FREE T -Shir t w/ e v er y ENTR Y A dults: 1 7 and up $30 Kids: under 1 7 $20 $1,000 bonus for longest launch over *533 feet *Curr ent W orld Recor d Plus man y other pr iz es a w ar ded thr oughout the e v ent T he Blue P ar r ot is pr oud t o donat e pr oceeds t o the Apalac hicola Ba y Char t er Sc hool Men's Division $20 0 Kids 1 4-1 6 Y ear s Bic y c le Kids 1 1 -1 3 Y ear s F ishing P ole w/ T ac kle Bo x Kids 1 0 and Under F ishing P ole w/ T ac kle Bo x FREE S TYLE DIVISION $ 10 0 For Mor e Infor mation Call: (850) 927.2987 See Live Cam at BlueParr otSGI.com By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com New county personnel rules could designate an administra tor to play a role in disciplinary proceedings. Legal advisor Lucille Turner of the Carson and Adkins law rm presented commissioners with a draft of proposed county person nel rules on May 16. Commission ers discussed the rules at a public workshop on May 21. Turner said the proposed per sonnel code is based on informal policies already in use by the council. “This will be good for employ ees because they can look to writ ten rules and know what might get them in trouble and how much trouble,” Turner said. “And (it’s) good for supervisors to as sure consistent treatment of all employees.” The biggest single change in the new rules would be the appoint ment of a director of administrative services, to whom commissioners would delegate some authority to make disciplinary decisions. The administrator would research of fenses and grievances and make recommendations to the board but would not have the authority to ter minate an employee. The county commission remains the nal ap peal in the case of a grievance. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce was suggest ed for the job. He said if he accepts the new responsibility, some of his current duties would have to be passed to another employee. Also new is a written list of dis ciplinary actions triggered by spe cic offenses. Under the new rules, county employees need not reside in Franklin County but must get per mission from a supervisor to work a second job, even if self-employed. Commissioner William Massey said this is not a change from the county’s informal policy. One important change is all po sitions would have to be advertised in-house before they could be pub licly advertised. Turner said the hiring process would be more formalized under the new rules, and department heads are required to interview potential employees, although they need not interview every applicant. Applications will also be retained on le and might be reviewed for potential employees before a job is publicly advertised. At the same meeting, Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson provided an incomplete set of job descrip tions for county positions. John son said she has been attempt ing to compile a complete list for some time but several department heads have failed to provide her with descriptions. Johnson said the descrip tions are needed to determine if employees are fullling their jobs. “We’re really not even doing evaluations of employees,” she said. “ If they want to get raises and bonuses, this needs to be in place. Evaluations need to be done at least annually. Sometimes I might want to give a raise based on merit.” Finance department staffer Erin Grifth said the board re quested job descriptions from de partment heads in 2000. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said the commission will repeat the request at the next commis sion meeting. Commissioners said they will discuss the new rules at a future meeting after taking time to study the lengthy document. A $500 annual stipend paid to employees who supervise inmate workers at least 90 percent of the time was also discussed at the May 21 meeting. The bonus is paid because supervision of inmates is considered to be a dangerous activity. Most inmates work on a road crew; however, mosquito control uses inmates for eight months of the year to clear ditches. On the advice of Turner, the commission plans to prorate the stipend paid to mosquito control workers who supervise inmates for only part of the year. Turner said those employees would receive an additional 25 percent hourly when supervising crews. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The Florida Department of Transportation will fund 10 projects to improve county in frastructure next year, most of the almost $5 million in grants to upgrade or rehabilitate existing roads and airports. East end roads will get $1.35 million in upgrades next year. In Carrabelle, new sidewalk along Tallahassee Street (Coun ty Road 67) is planned from Av enue A to Crooked River Road. An existing sidewalk, damaged by the addition of sewer lines, will be replaced with a longer 2.26-mile walkway, with paved walkways on both sides of the road from U.S. 98 to Three Riv ers Road. In 2014, $44,000 has been earmarked for engineer ing the project; construction is scheduled for 2017-18 at an ap proximate cost of $500,000. Lake Morality Road, where deterioration has been a con stant problem since it was last repaved, will get new pavement markings and signage between C.R. 67 and U.S. 98, in 2014, at a cost of $115,000. Turkey Bayou Bridge on U.S. 98 near Sum merCamp will get a $28,000 makeover. In Lanark Village, more than a mile of Oak Street, from Arizo na Avenue to Doe Lane, will get a much needed renovation at a cost of $1.14 million. In Eastpoint, South Bay shore, North Bayshore and Twin Lakes Road to Otter Slide Road will be widened from 10-12 feet and given a small paved shoul der. The cost of refurbishing the 4.5 miles of roadway will be $1.7 million. Both the Apalachicola Re gional Airport and Thompson Carrabelle Airport will receive generous stipends as part of FDOT’s Aviation Preservation Project. In 2014, FDOT will spend $250,000 on upgrades to Carra belle’s aireld. The money was originally requested to build additional t-hangers but City Administrator Courtney Millen der said because there is insuf cient room to add more hang ers, the funds will be used to add security fencing, repave part of the runway and move the fuel farm. In 2015, another $182,000 in FDOT funds are earmarked to extend the runway under the Aviation Capacity Project. Upgrades to Thomson Field are ongoing and, earlier this year; the city added to the air port a re department annex where a re truck is housed for emergencies. Apalachicola’s Cleve Ran dolph Field will get $1,033,000 in FDOT funding next year; $840,000 for restoration of the runway 13/31 and $193,000 to up grade the aireld lighting. The airport will receive a total of $1.1 million from 2015-17 to improve runway 18/36. Renovation of runway 6/24 at is scheduled for 2018 at a cost of $306,000. Croom’s Transportation Inc. will receive $92,000 for op erations and administrative as sistance during the 2014 scal year. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Apalachicola Regional Airport is slated to receive more than $2 million in funding for improvements for the next four years. FDOT earmarks $4.6 million for Franklin County County mulls new work rules Nineteen students from the Franklin County High School Class of 2017 traveled last month to Washington D.C., where they visited the White House, among their many stops. For the complete story, see Page A9 SPe E C ial IAL tT O tT H e E T i I M es ES GO neNE tT O W as AS H ingtINGT O nN

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The Times | A3 Thursday, June 6, 2013 & $ & ' $ # "" "" $ $ & $ -. % -/$ # ( + + ,$ ( $ # ""(( 00 ) '' + 1 $ .0 '1 $0 & % $ )$. '1 $0 &%$ )% %1 502 W o o d wa r d A v en ue P o r t Sa in t J o e P h: (850) 227-1156 101 E a s t R i v er R o ad W e wa hi t c h ka, P h: (850) 639-5024 248 US H ig h wa y 98, E a s t p o in t, P h: (850) 670-1199 T o l l-F r e e: 1-877-874-0007 Em a i l: em era ldco a s t@fa ir p o in t.n et w w w .em era ldco a s t f c u .co m C oup on Expir es: 6-30-13 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce. Arrests in this week’s report were made by ofcers from Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and Franklin County Sheriff’s Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 28 Jana R. Walker, 35, Jacksonville, failure to appear (FCSO) May 29 Hunter R. Shiver, 19, Eastpoint, possession of paraphernalia and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) John Michael Davis, 48, Carrabelle, shing with saltwater product license revoked permanently, and failure to allow inspection (FWC) May 31 Linda J. Tucker, 53, Eastpoint, sale of a prescription drug (FCSO) Michael S. Langley, 27, Bristol, sale or possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Autumn B. Beebe, 32, Carrabelle, petit theft (CPD) June 1 Kimberly J. Wheeler, 41, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Jennifer M. Monroe, 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) June 2 Christopher D. Rose, 30, Carrabelle, reckless driving (FCSO) Special to The Times In the early morning of May 31, the Franklin County Sher iff’s Ofce, with the assistance of the Apalachicola and Carrabelle police departments, served nu merous drug offense warrants in the Franklin County area. Sheriff Mike Mock said this was the culmination of an extensive ve-month investigation led by the Franklin County Drug Unit. Charges range from the trafcking of narcotics to the sale or posses sion of narcotics, with numerous types of controlled substances be ing seized. The following people were ar rested, transported and booked on their charge or charges at the Franklin County Jail: z Brandy Davis, 22, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell, and sale of a prescription drug z Courtney Brownell, 24, East point, trafcking in a controlled substance z Victoria Estes, 26, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance, and sale of a prescription drug z Brittney Shiver, 26, Bristol, sale of a controlled substance with in 1000 feet of a church, and sale of a substance in lieu of cocaine z Jenny Nowling, 27, Eastpoint, two counts of sale of a controlled substance, and intent to sell a con trolled substance within a 1000 feet of a church z Sharon Garrett, 52, Carra belle, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell z Robert Thompson, 54, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance z Angela Law, 29, Eastpoint, sale of a substance in lieu of cocaine z Brittany Davis, 23, Apalachic ola, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and possession of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell z Kayla R. Langley, 29, East point, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell z Amber Vinson, 26, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell z Andrea D. McCoy, 29, Pana cea, two counts possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, and sale of a prescription drug z Theus J. Yowell, 34, East point, possession of a controlled substance and trafcking four grams or more illegal drugs z James L. Corley, 35, East point, sale of a substance within a 1000 ft. of public housing, and contributing to the delinquency or dependency of a minor z Leon Irvin, 49, Eastpoint, sale of controlled substance z Jesse Gordon Smith, 47, East point, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, and delivery of a controlled substance z Lance Flowers, 33, Apala chicola, trafcking in a controlled substance Arrest REPORT Drug sweep completes 5-month investigation B rR ANDY D D AVIS C oO U rtRTN eE Y B roRO WN eE LL VV I ctorCTOR IA ES teTE S B rR I ttTT N eE Y S S HIV erER J eE NNY No NO WLING SS HA roRO N G G A rrettRRETT R obertOBERT TH ompOMP S oO N AA NG eE LA L L AW B rR I ttTT ANY D D AVIS KAYLA R. L L ANGL eE Y AmberAMBER V V INS oO N AA ND reRE A DD M c C oO Y TH eE US J. Yo YO W eE LL JA meME S LL C orOR L eE Y LeoLEO N Ir IR VIN J eE SS eE Sm SM I tT H LL AN ceCE FL oO W erER S Law Enforcement

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 4 Thursday, June 6, 2013 A Jewish man re ects on Holocaust Students of the Franklin County eighth grade wrote the following re ections after listening to Mr. Chuck Itzkovitz speak about the Holocaust on May 28. Teacher Lydia Countryman said students and staff were deeply grateful and honored to hear Mr. Itzkovitz bear witness to history, and the grace he showed while sharing his perspective will play a part in ensuring that such horri c tragedies will not reoccur. Our students do not often hear from cultures different from their own, and this experience will be indelible. Thank you, Mr. Itzkovitz. zzz Mr. Itzkovitz is a positive person. He spoke about the Holocaust and said it was a blessing to survive the Holocaust. He said it affected the Jewish community deeply and sincerely. — Ronald I thought the way Mr. Itzkovitz explained the Holocaust was interesting. HE ANSWERED ONE OF MY QUESTIONS! He was very informative about his experience even though he wasn’t a victim of the Holocaust. I feel sad that he experienced prejudice for being Jewish when he was growing up. — Dylan Mr. Itzkovitz knows a lot about the Holocaust. He also knows a lot about the Jewish heritage. He has a nice accent. He added more knowledge about the Holocaust to me. — Levi Mr. Itzkovitz talked about the Holocaust and what it meant to him. What bothers me the most is that people lived in their homes thinking it would go away but it didn’t. I don’t know how those people lived their lives knowing that they knew people were getting killed. It is sad to me. — Myranda The Holocaust was just brutal and plain ugly. People died for no good reason. Being Jewish is not a race but a way of life. Being Jewish is not bad. No one should have died for being different. — Jonathan The Holocaust breaks my heart. It makes me feel like this world is chaotic. It’s full of hatred and evil. But it makes me grateful to live in a free country. — Melody Mr. Itzkovitz is a nice man who if he was in the Holocaust, I would feel bad. The Holocaust was a terrible thing orchestrated by an abused child who failed art school. Do I need to go into more detail? Hitler was a jerk; the kind of jerk that kills 6,000,000 plus people. — Preston I think Mr. Itzkovitz is very strong, emotionally. It took a lot of bravery, courageousness and guts to go to an eighth grade class and tell about his heritage. To me, I think the Holocaust was horrible. It makes me mad. It makes me sad. If this is the way I think about it, then I wonder how Mr. Itzkovitz feels? — Dylan Mr. Itzkovitz is very nice and very smart. The Holocaust makes me sick. I hate hearing about it. Many of my people were killed. I hate what the Nazis did. Just hearing about them makes me want to puke. — Abby Mr. Itzkovitz is a Jewish man who was born in America and did not personally go through the Holocaust but knew people who did and is still affected by it. The Holocaust was a cruel and harsh, mass killing of the Jewish people. It was horrible and very cruel and I feel sympathetic toward the people who had to go through it. We should not hate others. — Ann The Holocaust was a catastrophic injustice to the Jewish people. Hitler blamed the Jewish people for the loss of the Great War. Mr. Chuck Itzkovitz was kind enough to let us know how horrible the Holocaust was from his perspective. Mr. Chuck told us of good and bad, good as being expected to this day and bad as all the troubles, and sorrows, the Jewish people and others went through. — Quantavius I didn’t really know that much about the Holocaust before this year but now I know a lot. It makes me feel very sad and mad at the same time. I went to Washington, D.C. and went to the Holocaust Memorial Museum. Seeing how the Jewish people were treated made me cry. Going through Daniel’s house made me cry. I am glad people don’t have to go through that anymore. — Sabrina The Holocaust. Ghettos, concentration camps that turned into death camps. Some Jewish people went into hiding in German homes for a while until the Holocaust ended. — Makenzie When I think about the Holocaust it makes me think about a sad time for Jewish people and how diabolical Hitler and other people were. When Mr. Itzkovitz was talking about the Holocaust I felt sad for him. I also thought that he was a strong man for being able to talk about a sensitive subject. — Marty Mr. Itzkovitz is a very good speaker. He told us details of what happened in the Holocaust such as dates, people, and locations. To me, the Holocaust was a vile, sick and heartbreaking event. — Bryan Now when I hear the word “Holocaust” it makes me think of all the bad things Jewish people have been through. Like how the Nazis would make the people dig trenches and then shoot them so they would fall in the trench. Also, how people would get shots from the camp’s doctor. Jewish people have been through a lot. — Misty The Holocaust was cruel. So many people died and so many people suffered from torture, starvation, and diseases. I hate the Holocaust, and prejudices, but we must remember it to prevent it from happening again. — Clay Mr. Itzkovitz is a really great speaker. He gave us information on the Holocaust and the way life was during that time. Hearing what he had to say made me feel really sad about the way Jewish people were treated. — Lett I thought the meeting with Mr. Itzkovitz was great. He gave us information that changed my perspective. The Holocaust was a brutal killing of Jewish people. I felt that Hitler was not right for what he did. The Holocaust should be taught in EVERY school so students will know what happened and the knowledge of this will probably prevent this from happening again. — Tyanna The Holocaust was genocide. The Nazis were human poachers. The Holocaust upsets me. It also makes me scared. Adolf Hitler was an extremely horrible man. The people who agreed with Hitler were horrible. — Mercedes It was an honor to have Mr. Itzkovitz tell us about what he knew about the Holocaust. The Holocaust was horrible, just horrible. I am glad Mr. Itzkovitz came to our school to talk to us about the Holocaust and anti-Semitism. — Natasia Mr. Itzkovitz shed light on the topic of the Holocaust by sharing his personal insights on it. The term “Holocaust” is a word that represents a horri c event that can never be forgotten. — Charles Mr. Itzkovitz is a very intelligent man. I already knew facts about the Holocaust but it’s always nice to know more. It was a very intriguing lecture. It was quite informing. I am glad he came to speak with us. — Reese Mr. Itzkovitz is a great speaker. He really caught my attention. He taught me about the horrible events that took place in the Holocaust. The Holocaust was so terrible. What happened can never be forgotten. It was horrid. — Amanda My vote on the Water Resources Development Act By MARCO RUBIO Special to the Times The Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) that passed the Senate May 15 could have had a positive effect on Florida’s natural resources, industries and residents. Every Floridian is impacted by the work conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers in our state. Unfortunately, politics were chosen over sound public policy, and the state’s best interests were left out of the nal bill. When this legislation was rst passed by the Environment and Public Works Committee, it contained a provision that would have worked to resolve a multi-decade water dispute between our state, the state of Alabama and the state of Georgia. Floridians in Apalachicola Bay have known all too well how this dispute has created economic havoc for our once vibrant oyster industry, as well as all the other industries that are so dependent on the harvesting and sale of that great resource. To address this issue, I worked with several other senators to make restoring ows out of Atlanta and towards the Apalachicola Bay – my top priority as we began debate on the WRDA. Unfortunately, the language addressing this dispute was taken out of the bill after the committee approved it, and my amendment to reinstate this important policy was not included in the nal bill. Despite this setback, I will not give up on restoring ows towards the Apalachicola Bay. I’ve requested a eld hearing in the Apalachicola Bay area so that my colleagues in the Senate can better understand why this issue simply cannot continue to be held hostage to the broken politics of Washington. Another top priority for me on this legislation was to make sure that funds paid into the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund are used for harbor maintenance, not ransacked by Washington appropriators for other pet projects around the country. But once again, the Democrat majority in the Senate chose politics over policy by removing a provision in the bill that would prohibit funds for harbor maintenance from being used elsewhere. This does not serve Florida’s interests, nor the American taxpayer’s interest. And, while this legislation authorized several projects important to the Everglades, it did not authorize the Central Everglades Planning Project, the next major step towards complete restoration. This legislation could have done much more for the natural resources and industries of Florida, but it is clear that Washington has a long way to go when it comes to choosing good policy over politics. I share in the frustration of many Floridians, but will remain committed to achieving the best policy for my state of Florida. Marco Rubio is the Republican junior senator from Florida. MARCO RUBIO Mr. Itzkovitz’s visit SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Chuck Itzkovitz talks to Franklin County eighth graders about the Holocaust.

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 6, 2013 W e a r e p l e as e d t o p r e s en t t o yo u t h i s ye a r's A n n u a l W a t er Q u a l i t y Rep o r t i s r ep o r t i s d e s i g n e d t o i n f o r m yo u a b o u t t h e q u a l i t y wa t er a n d s er v i c e s we d e l i ver t o yo u e ver y d a y O u r c o ns t a n t go a l i s t o p r o v i d e yo u w i t h a s a f e a n d d ep en d a b l e s u p p l y o f d r i n k i n g wa t er W e wa n t yo u t o u n d er s t a n d t h e e o r ts we m a k e t o c o n t i n u a l l y i m p r o ve t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o c e s s a n d p r o t e c t o u r wa t er r e s o u r c e s. W e a r e c o m m i tt e d t o ens u r i n g t h e q u a l i t y o f yo u r d r i n k i n g wa t er O u r wa t er s o u r c e i s g r o u n d wa t er f r o m s ix we l l s d r a w n f r o m t h e Fl o r i d a n A q u i f er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex c e l l en t q u a l i t y o f o u r wa t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en ts r e q u i r e d a r e c h l o r i n e f o r d i s i n f e c t i o n p u r p o s e s a n d A q u a G o l d, wh i c h i s a p o l y p h o s p h a t e c o m p o u n d i n j e c t e d as a s e q u e s t er i n g a gen t t h a t n eu t r a l iz e s s c a l e a n d c o r r o s i o n. I n 2012 t h e D ep a r t m en t o f E n v i r o n m en t a l Pr o t e c t i o n p er f o r m e d a S o u r c e W a t er A s s e s s m en t o n o u r s ys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o u r c e s i n d i c a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o u r c e s o f c o n t a m i n a t i o n n e a r o u r we l l s. e as s e s s m en t r e s u l ts a r e a va i l a b l e o n t h e FD EP S o u r c e W a t er A s s e s s m en t a n d Pr o t e c t i o n Pr og r a m we b s i t e a t w w w .d ep .s t a t e. .u s/s wa p p I f yo u h a ve a n y q u e s t i o ns a b o u t t h i s r ep o r t o r c o n c er n i n g yo u r wa t er u t i l i t y p l e as e c o n t a c t A l l i ga t o r P o i n t W a t er Re s o u r c e D i s t r i c t (APWRD), S a r a T u r n er a t (850) 349-2274. W e en c o u r a ge o u r va l u e d cu s t o m er s t o b e i n f o r m e d a b o u t t h ei r wa t er u t i l i t y I f yo u wa n t t o l e a r n m o r e, p l e as e a tt en d a n y o f o u r r e g u l a r l y s c h e d u l e d m e e t i n g s. e y a r e h e l d m o n t h l y o n t h e t h i r d S a t u r d a y o f e a c h m o n t h a t 9:00 a.m., a t t h e APWRD O c e, 1378 A l l i ga t o r D r i ve. A l l i ga t o r P o i n t r o u t i n e l y m o n i t o r s f o r c o n t a m i n a n ts i n yo u r d r i n k i n g wa t er a c c o r d i n g t o F e d er a l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u l e s, a n d r e g u l a t i o ns. E x c ep t wh er e i n d i c a t e d o t h er w i s e, t h i s r ep o r t i s b as e d o n t h e r e s u l ts o f o u r m o n i t o r i n g f o r t h e p er i o d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e c em b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a i n e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r e s en t e d i n t h i s r ep o r t a r e f r o m t h e m o s t r e c en t t e s t i n g d o n e i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h t h e l a ws, r u l e s, a n d r e g u l a t i o ns. I n t h e t a b l e b e l o w yo u m a y n d u n f a m i l i a r t er ms a n d a b b r e v i a t i o ns. T o h e l p yo u b e tt er u n d er s t a n d t h e s e t er ms we h a ve p r o v i d e d t h e f o l l o w i n g d e n i t i o ns: A c t i o n L e v e l (AL) : e c o nc e n t r a t i o n o f a c o n ta mina n t w hi ch, if e x c e e d e d t rigge rs t r e a t me n t o r o the r r e q uir e me n ts tha t a wa t e r s y s t e m m us t f o l l o w I ni t i a l Dis t ri b u t i o n S y s t e m E va l u a t i o n (IDS E) : A n im p o r ta n t p a r t o f the S tage 2 Dis inf e c t i o n B y-P r o d u c ts R u l e (D B P R). e IDS E is a o ne-t ime s t u dy c o nd u c t e d b y wa t e r s y s t e ms t o i d e n t if y dis t ri b u t i o n s y s t e m l o c a t i o ns w i th hig h c o nc e n t r a t i o ns o f t ri ha l o me tha nes (THMs) a nd ha l o ac e t i c aci ds (H AA s). W a t e r s y s t e ms w i l l us e r es u l ts f r o m the IDS E, in c o n j unc t i o n w i th the ir S tage 1 D B P R c o m p li a nc e mo ni t o rin g d a ta, t o s e l e c t c o m p li a nc e mo ni t o rin g l o c a t i o ns f o r the S tage 2 D B P R L o c a t i o na l R unnin g A nn u a l A v e r age (LR AA) : the a v e r age o f s a m p l e a na ly t i c a l r es u l ts f o r s a m p l es ta ke n a t a p a r t i c u l a r mo ni t o rin g l o c a t i o n d urin g the p r e v i o us f o ur c a l en d ar q u ar t er s M axim um C o n ta mina n t L e v e l o r M CL: e hig hes t l e v e l o f a c o n ta mina n t tha t is a l l o w e d in drin k in g wa t e r M CLs a r e s e t as cl os e t o the M CLGs as f e as i b l e us in g the b es t a va i l a b l e t r e a t me n t t e chno l o g y M axim um C o n ta mina n t L e v e l G o a l o r M CLG: e l e v e l o f a c o n ta mina n t in drin k in g wa t e r b e l o w w hi ch the r e is no k no w n o r e xp e c t e d ris k t o he a l th. M CLGs a l l o w f o r a ma rg in o f s a f e t y M axim um R es i d u a l Dis inf e c ta n t L e v e l o r MRD L: e hig hes t l e v e l o f a dis inf e c ta n t a l l o w e d in drin k in g wa t e r e r e is c o n v incin g e v i d e nc e tha t ad di t i o n o f a dis inf e c ta n t is ne c ess a r y f o r c o n t r o l o f mi cr o b i a l c o n ta mina n ts. M axim um R es i d u a l Dis inf e c ta n t L e v e l G o a l o r MRD LG: e l e v e l o f a drin k in g wa t e r dis inf e c ta n t b e l o w w hi ch the r e is no k no w n o r e xp e c t e d ris k t o he a l th. MRD LGs d o no t r e e c t the b e ne ts o f the us e o f dis inf e c ta n ts t o c o n t r o l mi cr o b i a l c o n ta mina n ts. N o n-A p p li c a b l e (N/A): D o es no t a p p ly N o n-D e t e c t (ND): me a ns no t d e t e c t e d a nd indi c a t es tha t the s u bs ta nc e was no t f o und b y l a b o r a t o r y a na ly s is. P a r ts p e r mi l li o n (p p m) o r Mi l lig r a ms p e r li t e r (m g/l): o ne p a r t b y w e ig h t o f a na ly t e t o 1 mi l li o n p a r ts b y w e ig h t o f the wa t e r s a m p l e P a r ts p e r b i l li o n (p p b) o r Mi cr o g r a ms p e r li t e r (g/l): o ne p a r t b y w e ig h t o f a na ly t e t o 1 b i l li o n p a r ts b y w e ig h t o f the wa t e r s a m p l e P i c o c uri e p e r li t e r (pC i/L): me as ur e o f the r adi o ac t iv i t y in wa t e r I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g APWRD i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in k in g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h ttp://w w w .e pa.go v/s a f e wa t e r/le a d. e S t a t e o f Flo r id a D ep a r t m en t o f En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n (D EP) s ets dr in k in g wa t er s t a n d a r d f o r s e co n d a r y co n t a min a n ts a n d h a s det er min e d t h a t C h lo r ide a n d T o t a l Di s s o l v e d S o lid s a r e aes t h et ic co n cer n s a t cer t a in le v e l s o f exp os ur e C h lo r ide a n d T o t a l Di s s o l v e d S o lid s w er e s a m p le d in A ugu s t 2012 a n d w er e f o un d in hig h er le v e l s t h a n a r e a l lo w e d b y t h e S t a t e (M CL v io l a t io n s). C h lo r ide a n d T o t a l Di s s o l v e d S o lid s, a s s e co n d a r y dr in k in g wa t er co n t a min a n ts, do n o t p os e a h e a l t h r i s k. W e w i l l co n t in ue t o s a m p le a s r e q uir e d b y r u le e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di s s o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) Mi cr o b i a l c o n ta mina n ts s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I no rg a ni c c o n ta mina n ts s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t i ci d es a nd he rb i ci d es w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Org a ni c che mi c a l c o n ta mina n ts in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b y-p r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adi o ac t iv e c o n ta mina n ts w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t ra t io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791. a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r e e c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o me p e o p l e ma y b e mo r e v u lne r a b l e t o c o n ta mina n ts in drin k in g wa t e r tha n the ge ne r a l p o p u l a t i o n. I mm unoc o m p r o mis e d p e rs o ns s u ch as p e rs o ns w i th c a nc e r und e rgo in g che mo the r a p y p e rs o ns w ho ha v e und e rgo ne o rg a n t r a ns p l a n ts, p e o p l e w i th HIV/AIDS o r o the r imm une s y s t e m dis o r d e rs, s o me e l d e rly a nd inf a n ts c a n b e p a r t i c u l a rly a t ris k f r o m inf e c t i o ns. es e p e o p l e s ho u l d s e e k adv i c e a b o u t drin k in g wa t e r f r o m the ir he a l th c a r e p r o v i d e rs. EP A/ CD C g ui d e lines o n a p p r o p ri a t e me a ns t o l ess e n the ris k o f inf e c t i o n b y C r y p t os p o ri di um a nd o the r mi cr o b i o l o g i c a l c o n ta mina n ts a r e a va i l a b l e f r o m the S a f e Drin k in g W a t e r H o tline (800-426-4791). W e w o rk t o p r ov i d e t o p q u a li t y wa t e r t o e v e r y t a p W e ask tha t a l l o ur c u s t o me rs he l p u s p r o t e c t o ur wa t e r s o ur ces w hi c h a r e the he a r t o f o ur co mm uni t y o ur wa y o f lif e a nd o ur c hi l dr e n s f u t ur e I f y o u ha v e a n y q u es t i o n s o r co nce rn s a b o u t the inf o rma t i o n p r ov i d e d p l e as e f e e l f r e e t o c a l l a n y o f the n um b e rs li s t e d

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Local 6 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 Congratulatio n 's to All the SENIORS!! Congratulatio n 's & Good Luck Class of 2013!! Congratulatio ns Love, Anita Grove Christina Collins! Congratulatio n 's & Best W ishes to All the 2013 Graduates!! fr om the 's & Best W Congratulatio n ishes 's & Best W Congratulatio n ishes The Franklin County High School Class of 2013 har vested more than $150,000 in academic and athletic scholar ships Friday night. After Katie Wood, vice president of the class, led the Pledge of Allegiance, Shamekia Lake, a member of the Class of 2015, offered a stir ring rendition of the National Anthem. Zach Howze, class second vice president, led the in vocation, followed by a welcome from Mor gan Kelley, the class president. Superintendent Nina Marks offered greetings, followed by special recognition of Cathy Creamer and Missy Cumbie, both of whom are retiring this year after long teaching careers. A poem put to gether by members of the class was read by Carli Hunt, who had assembled her class mates’ memories. Principal George Oehlert then an nounced the class valedictorian, Steph anie Marxsen, and salutatorian, Mor gan Walker, and both were given medals. Several scholar ships were then pre sented, followed by a passing of the torch through a candle lighting ceremony between class of cers of 2013 and 2014. The evening closed with an ap preciative sharing by class sponsors Delores Croom and Stephanie Howze Jones. CLASS OF 2013 SCHOLARSHIPS The following is a list of the scholarships, the name of the presenter and the recipients: Apalachicola Bay Charter School (Chimene Johnson): two $250 scholarships to Emily Cash and Zach Howze Apalachicola Bay Rotary (Alan Pierce): $1,000 scholarship to Morgan Walker Barbara Massey Memorial (Laura Baney): scholarship to Miranda Pilger Butler Family Memorial (Denise Butler): two $1,200 scholarships to Gulf Coast State College, in the names of Emily Burnett Butler and Jose Miguel Dosal, to David Butler and Kerri Williams Centennial Bank (Brenda Ash): two $500 scholarships to Emily Cash and Katie Wood College for Every Student (Eric Bidwell): two $3,000 scholarships to Morgan Kelley and Katie Wood Donnie Wilson Memorial (Roderick Robinson): two $500 scholarships to Christina Collins and Zach Howze DAR Good Citizens Award (Elinor Mount Simmons): scholarship to Christina Collins FairPoint Communications (Kerry Anthony): scholarship to Katie Wood Florida Seafood Festival (Carl Whaley): four $500 scholarships to Savannah Boone, Cheyenne Martin, Che’na Segree and Karli Tucker Forgotten Coast Builders Association: Katie Wood Franklin County Education Foundation (Lois Catlin): scholarships to Direek Farmer and Yvonne Mitchell Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council (Carol Bareld): scholarship to Savannah Boone Franklin County Teachers’ Association (Laura Baney): scholarships to Zach Howze and, Whitney Vause Franklin Educational Support Personnel (Roderick Robinson): scholarships to Kerri Williams, Lanae Wilson and Katie Wood Franklin County School Board (Pam Shiver and Teresa Ann Martin): scholarships to David Butler, Skyler Hutchinson, Stephanie Marxsen and Annalyse Wharrie Franklin County School Trust: $1,200 scholarships to David Butler and Cheyenne Martin H’COLA (Elinor Mount Simmons): two $250 scholarships to Skyler Hutchinson and Cheyenne Martin Loretta Taylor Memorial: one $500 scholarship to Zach Howze Love & Worship Center School of Arts (Jathan Martin): scholarships to Cheyenne Martin and LaDarius Rhodes Montgomery Foundation: three $500 scholarships to Shelby Myers, Skyler Hutchinson and Direek Farmer; two $700 scholarships to Savannah Boone and Whitney Vause; and four $900 scholarships to Emily Cash, Zach Howze, Morgan Kelley, and Elisha Patriotis, Phoenix Family (Lois Catlin): a $200 book scholarship to Hannah Oxedine Philaco Women’s Club (Ginny Griner): one $1,000 scholarship to Morgan Walker Project HOPE: scholarships to Direek Farmer, Tevin Jones, Cheyenne Martin, Rahkeim Pierce, LaDarius Rhodes, TaShay Sewell and William Collins Seahawk Boosters: four $1,000 scholarships to David Butler, Christina Collins, Zach Howze and Che’na Segree SWAT: scholarships to Cheyenne Martin, Rahkeim Pierce, LaDarius Rhodes, TaShay Sewell Take Stock in Children (Lois Catlin): twoand four-year scholarships to Cheyenne Martin, Yvonne Mitchell, Karlie Tucker Willie Speed Memorial (Orion Speed): scholarship to Cheyenne Martin Yent Family Memorial: $1,000 scholarship to Stephanie Marxsen Gulf Coast State College: two-year full scholarship to Katie Wood Enterprise State Community College: softball scholarship to Anna Lee Lurleen B. Wallace Community College: softball scholarship to Che’na Segree Troy University: scholarship to Zach Howze Class of 2013 reaps academic rewardsP ho HO T os OS BY DAVID ADLERST T EIN | The Times Ofcers from the class of 2013 are, from left, Historian Emily Cash, Treasurer Christina Collins, Secretary Che’na Segree, Second Vice President Zach Howze, and First Vice President Katie Wood. Not pictured is President Morgan Kelley. Recepients of the H’COLA scholarship are Skyler Hutchinson and Cheyenne Martin. Students from the Class of 2013. The Class of 2013 listens to a speaker. Elayne Williams, Che’na Bre anne Segree, David Wade Butler, Morgan Aylse Kelley and Austin Seth Ward. Receiving standard high school diplomas will be Mirian Roxana Barahona, Thomas An thony Benitez, Savannah Dani elle Boone, Brittney Marie Carr, Daniel Robert Carrino, William Nathaniel Collins, Codee Shi anne Crum, Darrell Dewayne Dart, Alissia Dempsey, Chey enne Nicole Diorio, Direek Ant woin Farmer, Christopher Chase Golden, Michael William Harris, Carli Danielle Hunt, Tevin Juan Jones, David Leon Langston, Anna Rose Lee, Haley Nicole Mathes, Yvonne Marie Mitchell, Jeffery James Murray, Hannah Elizabeth Oxendine, Rahkeim Leeshon Pierce, Julio Caesar Ramirez, Kevin Joshua Reeder Marjorie Chantel Rhine, Ladari us D’Wayne Rhodes, Seth Hanson Rogers, Katelyn Marie Rowland, Kayla Lynn Sanford, Casey Shae Sapp, TaShay Shamir Sewell, Jacob Peyton Shuler, Whitney Ann Vause, Shaquana Altrice Weaver, Tyler Wayne Webb, Di anne Lanae Wilson and Ellis William Wilson. On Friday, at senior recogni tion night, more than $150,000 in scholarships was awarded to the class (See A6) as they celebrated their commitment to learning. “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit,” a quote by Aris totle, is the class motto. The class colors are silver and pink, and the class ower yellow poppy, a symbol of wealth and success. Parents traditionally re ceive a ower from their son or daughter after each has received their diploma in the high school gymnasium Friday. The audience can also ex pect to hear a version of the in strumental class song ““We Are Young.” FCHS from page A1

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The Times | A7 Thursday, June 6, 2013 Graduation 2013 Franklin County High School Mirian Roxana Barahona Thomas Anthony Benitez Savannah Danielle Boone Brittany Nicole Bryant David Wade Butler Brittney Marie Carr Daniel Robert Carrino Karl Ray Sanford Kayla Lynn Sanford Casey Shae Sapp Che’na Breanne Segree TaShay Shamir Sewell Jacob Peyton Shuler Karlie Ann Tucker Miranda Alexis Pilger Julio Caesar Ramirez Kevin Joshua Reeder Marjorie Chantel Rhine Ladarius D’Wayne Rhodes Seth Hanson Rogers Katelyn Marie Rowland Yvonne Marie Mitchell Jeffery James Murray Shelby Melody Myers Elton Ivan Olvera Hannah Elizabeth Oxendine Elisha Aaron Patriotis Rahkeim Leeshon Pierce Tevin Juan Jones Morgan Aylse Kelley David Leon Langston Anna Rose Lee Cheyenne Elizabeth Martin Stephanie Frances Marxsen Haley Nicole Mathes Direek Antwoin Farmer Ryne Seth Fisher Christopher Chase Golden Michael William Harris Zachary Lyle Howze Carli Danielle Hunt Skyler Eli Hutchinson Emily Brooke Cash Christina Michelle Collins William Nathaniel Collins Codee Shianne Crum Darrell Dewayne Dart Alissia Dempsey Cheyenne Nicole Diorio Morgan Anderson Walker Austin Seth Ward Shaquana Altrice Weaver Tyler Wayne Webb Annalyse Elisabeth Wharrie Kerri Elayne Williams Whitney Ann Vause Dianne Lanae Wilson Ellis William Wilson Katie Danielle Wood CLASS OF 2013 Congratulations, GRADUATES!

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A8 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 Braden Wes Grifn will celebrate his sixth birthday on Friday, June 7. This occasion comes one week after Braden graduated from kindergarten May 29 at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. He is the son of Kayla and Eli Grifn, of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Arlene and Bobby Shiver, and Barry Thompson, all of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Delores and Larry Grifn, of Eastpoint. Braden will celebrate his birthday with family and friends at a pool party on Sunday, June 9 at 3:30 p.m. at the family home. Love, Mom, Dad and Kelsey. Bay Community School raised $2,500 with its fourth annual student art sale. Dozens of patrons of education and the arts gathered on May 31 to support Apalachicola’s littlest students and share some fun. Bay School Director Tonya King said 95 pieces of art created by the kindergarten and preschool classes were sold. A group project titled “You Are My Sunshine,” netted the highest bid, $40. This year, dinner was provided by Tamara’s Caf Floridita. King said this was the rst year the event had private sponsors. “The sponsors were a huge, huge help this year,” she said. “They pretty much paid to put it on. We made the most money ever because of their help.” The art auction was the brainchild of Marissa Getter whose children attended the Bay School. King, who has worked at the school since 2004, will be leaving next week to become a stay-athome mom. She will be replaced by Ashley Allen of Apalachicola who holds an associate’s degree in child development from Gulf Coast State College. Allen, a Franklin County native, teaches the toddler class and has worked at the school since 2007. King and Allen wished to thank Tamara’s Caf, Cathy and Michael Bailey, Artemis Gallery, Charlie and Carrie Kienzle, Charming Comforts, Erin Rodriguez Construction, June Dosik, Paulette Moss, Jim and Susan Bachrach, Piggly Wiggly, Bayside Weddings and Events, House of Tartts and Water Street Seafood for their help in staging this year’s student art auction. — BY LOIS S S WOb B ODA `= =G S=Y S T E L L A! S w e e t S T E L L A L o o k a t t h a t f a c e W e d o n ’ t t h i n k s h e c o u l d b e a n y c u t e r S t e l l a ’ s m o m i s a B ox e r T h a t ’ s w h e r e S t e l l a g e t s t h a t c u t e e x p r e s s i o n a n d e x p r e s s i ve e y e s D a d d y m u s t h a ve b e e n a L a b b e c a u s e s h e a d o r e s t h e w a t e r a l m o s t a s m u c h a s s h e l o ve s c h a s i n g a b a l l. T h i s l i t t l e g i r l i s 6 m o n t h s o l d, s p a y e d a n d h e a r t w o r m n e g a t i ve S h e i s g e n t l e p l a y f u l a n d f u n l o v i n g I f y o u h a ve b e e n w a i t i n g t o a d o p t a d o g f o r y o u r c h i l d r e n u n t i l s c h o o l i s o u t f o r t h e s u m m e r c o m e b y a n d m e e t S t e l l a S h e m a y b e t h e m o s t p e r f e c t f a m i l y p e t e ve r V O L U N TE E R S A R E D E S P E R A TE L Y N E E D E D T O S O C I A L I Z E A L L O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r a n i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c a n s p a r e w o u l d b e g r e a t l y ap p r e c i at e d. C a l l K a r e n a t 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r m o r e d e t a i l s o r v i s i t t h e F r a n k l i n Co u n t y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 2 4 4 S t a t e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b s i t e a t w w w f o r go t t e npe t s o r g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e p e t s 451501 1 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 GARLI CK CLEANIN G S ER VI CE E X TE RI O R H O US E C L EA N IN G M i l d e w R e mo va l E xp e r ts! S ince 1995 850-653-5564 J er r y Garlic k | Owner 31 A v e E. Apalachicola, FL 32320 g garlic k@fair point.net 850-653-3550 (S) 850-653-5564 (C) www .a palachspong ecompan y .com 2091939 Society On June 1, 1957, Major Ellis Camp and Barbara Ann Marchant, both of Ty Ty, Ga., were married in a civil ceremony when Ellis returned home following basic training for the U.S. Coast Guard in Cape May, N.J. Ellis had received his orders and was on his way to Miami where he would serve on board the USS Gentian. Later, he was stationed at Mayport, Fla., and after his tour of duty returned to Georgia where he and Barbara raised their family. On Saturday, June 1, 2013, Ellis and Barbara Camp, now of Carrabelle, were honored by their six children in celebration of 56 years of marriage. The daylong celebration included a barbecue cookout, cake and champagne toast. Those in attendance included hosts Danny and Lynn Camp Palmer, of Elmodel, Ga.; Bryant and Amber Palmer Jensen, Newton, Ga.; Scott and Diane Camp Wolcott, Buford, Ga.; Donnie Camp, Camilla, Ga.; Tonya Camp Bradshaw, Gracie Bradshaw and Macie Bradshaw, Kaleb Palmer and Will Palmer, Camilla, Ga.; Tony and Tricia Edwards Camp, Gerald Camp, Tiffany Camp and Caleb Cromer, Albany, Ga.; Cindy Camp Duke, Kiln, Miss.; Sherry Camp Thompson, Carrabelle; and Brandy Herndon, Brandon Polous and Jackson Polous, Eastpoint. Couple celebrates 56 years of marriage Anniversary The ravages of global warming on the planet, and stress on the human body, highlighted the topics shared by the winners of the 20th annual countywide 4-H Tropicana Public Speaking Competition May 24 at the Franklin County School. In the fourth and fth grade division, Katie Newman, a student in Ms. King’s class at the Franklin County School, won with a speech on “Global Warming” in which she made vivid the threat that rising temperatures pose to the planet. In the sixth grade division, Steven Hicks, a student in Ms. Joanos’s class at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, won with a speech on “Stress.” “People stress all the time, they just don’t do anything about it,” he said. “Stop, take a deep breath and relax.” Livia Monod, a student in Ms. Lee’s class at the ABC School, was runner-up among fourth graders with a speech on “Phones,” while Adrian Pruett, a student in Ms. Linane’s class at ABC, was third with a speech on “Kittens.” Cale Barber, a student in Ms. Parrish’s class at Franklin, was fourth, with a moving speech on his positive relationship with a family member who is incarcerated. Robyn Suiter, a sixth grader in Ms. Keuchel’s class at Franklin, was runner-up with a speech on bullying, while Grayson Constantine, a student in Ms. Joanos’ class at ABC, was third with “The Secret Agent.” Hunter Kelly, a student in Ms. Keuchel’s class at Franklin, was fourth with a speech on “The Present’s A Gift.” “Each of the students did an excellent job presenting their speech so our panel of judges had their work cut out for them,” said Extension Agent Bill Mahan, who oversaw the completion, with his secretary, Christy Murphy serving as scorekeeper. Serving as judges were Anita Grove, director of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce; Marcia Mathis, area representative for State Sen. Bill Montford; Sue Cronkite, a former newspaper reporter and editor who now works at the Apalachicola Library. Teresa Ann Martin, school board member; and the Rev. John Sink, a retired Methodist minister, retired Navy captain and retired college professor. — By DADA V IDID ADAD LER SS TE II N Bay Community art sale a success Special to The Times On May 23, 2013, United States Army Pvt. Kristopher Woodrow Duncan graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He was assigned to the 165th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, Echo Company, 1st Platoon Bonecrushers. During the nine weeks of training, Duncan studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rie marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map-reading eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches, and eld training exercise. Duncan will continue his advanced individualized training at Fort Lee, Virginia. Duncan is the son of Donna Duncan and stepson of Joseph W. Gander, grandson of Carl “Pap” Duncan and Dianne Duncan, and great-grandson of Ollie Ruth Houseman, Milton and Joan Houseman and the late Woodrow and Lorene Duncan of Apalachicola. He is a 2012 graduate of Franklin County High School.K rR IS DD U nN CA nN Duncan graduates basic combat trainingL OIS OIS SWOSWO B ODA ODA | The Times June Dosik, left, and Mel Remy were two of the art lovers in attendance Friday night. For more photos of student art, visit www.apalachtimes.com Tropicana speakers project their thoughtsDADA V ID ID ADAD LERS S TEI I N | The Times Left: Fourth/fth grade district winners were, from left, Katie Newman, rst; Livia Monod, second; Cale Barber, fourth; and Adrian Pruett, third. Right: Sixth grade district winners are, from left, Hunter Kelly, fourth; Grayson Constantine, third; Robyn Suiter, second; and Steven Hicks, rst. Braden Grifn turns 6 Birthday

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The Times | A9 Thursday, June 6, 2013 Dorcas Elizabeth Bledsoe Boden heimer of Wake For est, North Carolina, died May 22, 2013, under the care of Hospice of Wake County and the staff at Carolina House of Wake Forest. Dorcas was born in Winston-Salem, NC, Oct. 1, 1914, one of 11 children of Laurens Hinton and Susan Libes Bledsoe. Her parents and siblings predeceased her. She graduated from RJ Reynolds High School and completed a three-year nurses training at City Hos pital in Winston-Salem in 1938. She began her nursing career with R.J Reynolds Tobacco Company in the medical department and later worked as a private duty nurse in Winston-Salem, retiring in 1976. She served in the US Army as a nurse dur ing the early days of World War II at Station Hospital, Ft. Bragg, NC. She married Ted Eugene Bodenheimer also of Win ston-Salem, in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1944, where he was serving in the US Army Air Corps. After the war, Dorcas and Ted re turned to Winston-Salem where they lived and raised their two children, Susan and Ted, Jr. Dorcas continued her nursing career until retire ment at age 62. She and Ted moved to Raleigh, NC in 1987. Dorcas was a member of St. Pauls Episcopal Church in Winston-Salem for many years, and later St Michaels in Raleigh. She joyously recalled throughout her life accepting Jesus Christ as her Lord and Savior at the age of three. Dorcas was a proud member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Daughters of the American Colonies. She was an accomplished bridge play er, loved reading and study ing religion and theology, and reading and writing poetry. There was not an antique store anywhere that she did not seek out and enjoy browsing in for hours. Dorcas always said the loves of her life were her family and Jesus. She is survived by her daughter Susan Thomas Antekeier (Andy) of East point; son Ted E. Bodenheimer, Jr. of Raleigh, NC, a loving and special grand son John Clayton Bart (Shelley) Norcross, Ga., and adored great grandchildren Ainsley and John Clayton, also of Norcross. She was also a loving grandmother to three stepgrandchildren, Grant R. Jones (Heather), of Greenvile, NC, Todd Behre, of Raleigh, NC, and Randy Behre of Portland, Ore. A graveside service was held Monday morning, May 27 at Forsyth Memorial Park. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions suggested to Hospice of Wake County 250 Hospice Circle, Raleigh, NC 27607. Online condolences may be made through www. Dorcas Bodenheimer DORCAS BO D ENHEIMER Re v Stac y Hilliard SPRI N G REVIV AL REVIV AL R e v Stac y Hilliar d serv es as the Inter na tional P entecostal Holiness Chur ch Multiplica tion Dir ector in Oklahoma City OK. Hilliar d also serv es as the African American Ministries Dir ector He is an anointed speak er and y ou will lo v e to hear him minister the Gospel of Christ. Ev ery one is W elcome!! 4514857 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 4515030 Jesus Christ the same yesterday and today and forever Heb. 13:8 Look and Live! Faith T aber nacle 2540 Fairland A ve. Panama City FL Ph: (850) 785-8679 Pastor Horace Slay (Visit link to hear message Look. http://branham.or g/messageplayer/63-0428) 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith OBITUARY CARDS OF THANKSJulia Fisher Julia Fisher, also known as Jewel, and family would like to thank everyone for the prayers, ramp, benet, time, visits, cards and the list goes on and on. Words cannot express our sincere appreciation. We are forever grateful. Please continue to keep her in your prayers and may each and every one of you be blessed! Nash Family Thanks to all our friends and loved ones for your prayers and good food during the loss of our husband, father and grandfather. To Michelle Sizemore, Ginger Coulter and Michael Cassidy for the ministry of music during the funeral service. Also, big thanks to our pastor Gwennell Wilson, Comforter Funeral Home, pallbearers and the Franklin County Sheriffs Department. God Bless Everyone, The Nash Family Fish fry Saturday for Gary Shiver On Saturday June 8, starting at 11 a.m., there will be a benet sh fry for Gary Shiver, who is currently receiving treatments for cancer. The benet will be at Apalachicolas Riverfront Park and will feature mullet dinners. The cost is $7 and includes mullet, Cole slaw, baked beans and hush puppies.Project ONE: 27 to restore homes Volunteers are needed for a faith-based home improvement outreach known as Project ONE: 27. At the June 4 county meeting, Pastor Aaron Batey of the Carrabelle United Methodist Church told commissioners local churches are working with a group of visitor volunteers next week to restore the homes of people in need. The visitors will stay at the Carrabelle Christian Center June 8 through 15. The group will work on ve houses in Carrabelle at a cost of $2,500 per home, and are seeking donations of building supplies. Batey said another group of volunteers will work on the west end of the county, mainly in Eastpoint. Batey said volunteers who want to help with the work are also welcome. This wont be the only time we do this, he told commissioners, Too often we depend on our government ofcials. The commission voted unanimously to waive building license fees for the project but asked Batey to ll in the paper work on projects. That way, in the future, we will know how the work got done, said County Planner Alan Pierce, noting that the sites will be visited by the county building inspector. If you want to help, contact Batey at 322-1058 or dtaaronb@gmail.com. FAITH BRIEFS Special to the Times On Tuesday May 21, at 1:45 am, 19 students from the Franklin County High School Class of 2017 met their class sponsors in front of Franklin County School to begin an exciting trip to our nations capital, Washington DC! The group ew out of Tallahassee and landed in DC around noon, where they stayed for a total of four days and three nights. The students who par ticipated in the trip were Kimmie Boone, Bryan Boyd, Adriana Butler, Jill Diestelhorst, Luke Hames, Abigail Harris, Melody Hat eld, Dylan Lance, Myranda McLeod, Sabrina McQueen, Ann Reeder, Chelsea Reg ister, Mercedes Rice, Marty Sawesky, Scout Segree, Connor Smith, Jackson Sub barao, Thomas Subbarao and Ellie Weldon. Jaime Duhart and Hil ary Stanton attended as school chaperones as well as Roger Smith as a parent chaperone. The group toured nonstop, visiting the many sites and attractions the capital has to offer. They paid trib ute to our veterans while visiting various war memori als including the World War Two Memorial, Korean War Memorial and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall. In total, the group visited more than 10 memorials that recognized veterans, past presidents, and American heroes like Martin Luther King, Jr. They attended the wreath laying ceremony and the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers at Arlington Na tional Cemetery. They also had the opportunity to see the Constitution up close at The National Archives as well as visiting two Smithso nian Museums, The Library of Congress, Mount Vernon, Fords Theatre, The Holo caust Museum, The Capitol, The White House, and the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial. This is the rst time a group of students from Franklin County School have visited DC and the beginning of an amazing tradition for our eighth grade students. For many students that participated, it was the rst time they have ever own or even been to an airport! It gave them opportunity for a wonderful experience they wont forget! The students of the Class of 2017 would like to thank everyone that helped make this trip possible. They would like to send out a spe cial THANK YOU to the lo cal businesses that sent in a $100 donation toward the trip: Taylors Building Supply, Jimmys Auto, Aqua Magic Pool and Spa, Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union, Hometown BP and Deli of Carrabelle and Marks In surance Agency Inc. Eighth-graders renew Washington trip tradition First of all, I want to apologize to the family of Vera Snider. Last week, in my column, I put a y instead of an i in her last name, Please, forgive me. Coffee hour at Chillas Hall is closed for the summer. See you in the fall. Have a safe and great summer, and thank you for your support. The thrift shop in the Lanark Village Plaza will still be open Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m. to noon. Thank you for your support. Of course we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday nights at Camp Gordon American Johnston Legion Post 82 here in the village. Orders are taken from 5 to 7 p.m. Donation of $6 is required. Eat in or to go. Sunday night is always pizza night at Post 82, 5 to 7 p.m. Pizza by the slice is $1 each Whole pizza, eat in is $8 and pizza to go is $10. Your donation will be collected in the lounge. To place your order call 697-9998. Coming attractions, with the public invited to all the following meals and parties. There will be a golf tournament on our golf course Saturday, June 8. Tee time is 1 p.m. A donation of $5 each will be required. Fore! Friday, June 14 through Sunday June 16 will be the 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic. You can come and watch the contestants weigh in their catch in Carrabelle, St. Marks and Port St. Joe. You can register online at www. saltwaterclassic.com. Our monthly covered dish luncheon follows on Fathers Day, Sunday, June 16. The doors to Chillas Hall will open at 12:30 p.m. Serving begins at 1 p.m. All you need to bring is your growling stomach, a dish to share and a donation. Enjoy the afternoon with your friends and neighbors. See you there. Like mothers, God gave us each one father to love and cherish. You fathers have a great day. On Saturday, June 15, you can get your sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club. The members will prepare and serve pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee and still only a $5 donation. In the evening on Saturday, June 15, you can have a fun lled evening at the June Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon American Johnston Legion Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come throu8gh the door. Okie dokie! The memorial service for our friend and neighbor Michael Maloche was held Monday, June 3 at our Legion Post 82. We gathered at 2 p.m. to celebrate Mikes life. We will miss him very much. Pray for his eternal peace and for strength for his wife, Debbie and his family. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and the housebound and smile, Jesus loves you! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. Coffee hour closed until fall, thrift shop open LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net It’s been a long time coming, but the 2013 red snapper season opened June 1 in the Gulf of Mexico in both state and federal waters. The seasons begin in unison but end in what some observers call chaos. Because Florida’s Game & Freshwater Fish Commission refused to go along with federal regulations, Florida, like several other Gulf states, is being penalized by the National Marine Fisheries Service with a shortened season in federal waters, those more than 9 nautical miles from shore. Unfortunately for anglers, though there’s fair snapper shing inside the 9NM line, the great shing is mostly beyond it in deeper water. The season will be just 26 days long in federal waters, closing June 27, at 12:01 a.m., local time. Florida state waters are open June 1 to July 14. Federal regulators say the rules are for the good of the sh — and ultimately of the shermen. But most experienced reef anglers say red snapper shing is now better than it has been in 40 years thanks to an extended period of tight harvest regulations, and perhaps in some measure because of the success of sh excluder devices on shrimp nets, allowing millions of juvenile snapper to escape when in the past they would have wound up as by-catch. So why don’t the feds want to pony up longer seasons and more generous bag limits? Because of a bizarre twist in the way they calculate the harvest — they measure in pounds, and when their best estimate of a conservationsmart harvest is achieved, they call for closure. But snapper grow fast and live a long time, and consequently anglers are now catching tons of whoppers, which means they can catch a lot fewer before they reach those limits set by the feds, even though everybody agrees there are more and bigger snapper than there have been in decades. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will review the 2013 red snapper population assessment during their June meeting in Pensacola. The council may request an emergency rule to increase the quota again based on the new scienti c information and request NOAA Fisheries to reopen the recreational season for red snapper later in the year. But NOAA seems in a combative mood when it comes to releasing “their” sh. Capt. Bob Zales of Panama City Beach, past president of the National Association of Charterboat Operators and one of the leaders in seeking reasonable regulation in offshore waters, is among many pushing for pure state management of federal waters — and these days, it’s really starting to make sense. The checks and balances of recreational anglers and conservationists weigh in for keeping the maximum number of quality-sized sh in the water — and even the saltiest old commercial harvesters have nally come to realize that it just simply makes sense to guard the resource, so that they can not only make money shing today, but also tomorrow, next month and next year. It should be noted that thanks goes to not only state agencies but also federal biologists for much of the research on offshore species that has made this awakening happen. In any event, there are some tactics that consistently produce results on red snapper. HOW TO GET ‘EM Anglers who regularly target red snapper say they are “bottom-relating” sh, but not “bottom sh.” They’re usually found over structure, but not as often in the structure like grouper. Experts seek out what they call a “Christmas tree” show on their sh nder screens before dropping a line. The pyramid or “tree” is the shape made by a school of snapper, with most deep, fewer at the top. In 200 feet of water, the stack may extend as much as 50 feet off bottom. Red snapper are typically found in 60 foot depths and more, on out to the edge of the continental shelf at around 250 to 280 feet. The Panhandle has a unique shery in that there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of “private” reefs — junk skippers have dropped on otherwise barren sand bottom to attract snapper. It’s not legal, but there are still many of these reefs around, and smart skippers have dozens of them in their GPS machines. There are also numerous legally placed arti cial reefs, including tugboats, barges and ships as well as demolition rubble, that attract lots of sh; these can be found on any good offshore chart, or visit www.myfwc.com and type “arti cial reefs” in the search box. A much easier way to get on the sh, however, is simply to join a charterboat trip; the Panhandle area has one of the largest and most active reef shing eets in the nation, and any angler interested in a trip can readily nd just the right boat for his buddies or his family. Prices range from around $350 for a halfday to $800 for a full day, and that fee can be split by up to six anglers on most boats. Party boats or “head boats” are also numerous in Panhandle ports, and these big boats can handle up to 40 anglers, at prices typically around $45 each for four hours, $65 each for six hours. Kids under 5 are not accepted on some offshore boats — check in advance. Red snapper these days typically average 5 to 8 pounds, though 20pounders are not unheard of. The limit is two per angler per day, minimum size 16 inches. Red snapper are among the tastiest of all sh and are great broiled, fried or baked. Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu June 06 84 74 30 % F ri, June 07 86 76 40 % S a t June 08 86 77 30 % Sun, June 09 87 76 40 % M on, June 10 86 76 40 % T ues June 11 86 76 30 % W ed June 12 86 76 30 % SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Red snapper season kicked off this past weekend with a bang. Huge sh were caught in the car bodies, but as the season gets hotter, the sh will move deeper. Better sh are in 100-150 feet of water, and live bait will help you land a big one. Pin sh, grunts, and larger bait sh are easy to nd right now around docks and in the grass. Great trout catches are being reported from Town’s Beach and Fire Tower areas using top water baits this week. Early morning and late afternoon will prove to be the best times for the action. Flounder are just about everywhere in the bay as well. Try using a live bull minnow on a Carolina rig. Page 10 Thursday, June 6, 2013 RED SNAPPER NEW DAY, NEW WAY Florida’s favorite snapper legal as of June 1 — but season will be short DAVID RAINER, ADCNR | Special to The Times Anglers all along the northern Gulf of Mexico caught snapper like these on almost every trip last season, and many are wondering why more liberal federal regulations have not been forthcoming. If you want to bring color and activity to your garden, consider recracker plant (Russelia equisetiformis). Firecracker plant is a large perennial with slender, rushlike stems and leaves that are reduced to little more than small scales. The wiry branches cascade down in lengths as long as 4 feet and bloom here any time of year. A member of the Plantaginaceae, it is related to the coarse lawn weeds plantains. Also known as fountain plant, coral plant or coral blow, this native of tropical America and Mexico produces masses of tubular scarlet owers that are attractive to butter ies, hummingbirds and bees. It does best in rich welldrained soil but will tolerate sandier conditions if water is available. It is mildly drought tolerant and requires a minimum of four hours of direct sun to thrive. Firecracker plant does well in containers and hanging baskets, where it makes an attractive display, but potted specimens must be protected in the winter. This plant can be is propagated by division or by stem cuttings in spring. Traditionally used as a cure for snakebite, modern researchers have identi ed it as a powerful antioxidant and anti-in ammatory. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda CRIMSON TIDE LANDS TARPON CHRIS ROBINSON | Special to the Times Parker Barrineau, a walk-on wide receiver for the University of Alabama, landed this tarpon on a three-day offshore shing weekend with Capt. Chris Robinson. Sophomore Barrineau wears number 87. Firecracker plant attractive and healing LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At a soccer banquet last month at the high school, members of the 2012-13 Franklin County High School boys varsity soccer team were honored. The team nished as district runners-up for the second year in a row and lost to Lafayette Mayo in the regional quarter nal. Named Most Valuable Player was senior mid elder Zach Howze. He scored 12 goals for the year and was nominated to the alldistrict team. Selected by the coaches as Best Offensive Player was junior forward Graham Kirvin. He had 17 goals on the year, and also received an all-district team nod. The team’s Best Defensive Player honors went to senior defenseman Julio Ramirez, who was also all district. Rounding out the all-district choices was junior mid elder James Harris, who received an honorable mention. “I’m very happy for our goals leader, Graham Kirvin, who showed his great spirit and passion for soccer,” said coach Ramon Valenzuela. “He is a great leader and a great player that will help us a lot next year.” The head coach also praised the play of MVP Howze. “He showed his skill and passion for soccer, and I wish him a good luck in college, same as the other six seniors that will be missed,” Valenzuela said. “Julio ‘The Wall’ Ramirez will be irreplaceable this coming year and we are looking for someone like him, I know as a coach we can train someone like him but it takes time to develop his system and stronger kicking.” Also graduating this week are goalie Casey Sapp, who scored two goals on the year, Josh Reeder, who had two goals on the year, goalie Daniel Carrino, who missed his senior year due to injury, and Elisha Patriotis, who scored one goal this season. Patriotis won the scholastic award for having the team’s best grade point average. Receiving the honor of Most Improved Player was junior Alex Causey. “I am very con dent that he will continue to work on his soccer skills during this summer and looking forward to work with him next year,” said Valenzuela. Also receiving varsity letters this season was Joshua Patriotis, James Newell, James Bailey, Jacob Montgomery, Walker DeVaughn, Dalyn Parrish, Austin Carter, Stefan DeVaughn (who had two goals on the year), Christian Jones (who had one goal) Logan Allen, Billy Harris (who had one goal), and Tyler Pendelton. “As far as the year went, I am very happy how the boys developed their improvement throughout the season,” said Valenzuela, who was assisted this season by Stacy Kirvin. “It was a new endeavor for me since I only coached girls for 10 years during my previous coaching experience back in Ohio. “This past season was the rst high school boys soccer team that I have coached and hopefully not the last. “I will miss some of the boys next year but I am very happy will all of those that would return and the new ones,” said the coach. “We are looking a little rough in the coming season, now with the new district teams, but I am con dent that we can go out, play and win. Next year the Region 1, District 1 Class 1A district is set to include Franklin County, Lafayette Mayo, Maclay, John Paul II, Port St. Joe, Rocky Bayou Christian and West Gadsden. “I would like to take this opportunity to thank my assistant coach, Stacy Kirvin, for his support and commitment to the soccer program,” said Valenzuela. “I know that I couldn’t have done too much without him.” BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N BUY S 2 BED APT 2 6 OR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y APP PRICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 CRNR L O T S BLK $ ST ORE REDUCED $ 4 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 N O TI CE O F CH AN GE O F RE-ZO NIN G e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g p ur s u a n t t o S e c t io n 163.3184, Flo r id a S t a t u t es, t o co n sider ado p t in g p r o p os e d c h a n g es t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y Z o nin g M a ps s er ies f o r : L o ts 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 a n d L o t 64, B lo c k A, a n d L o ts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 19 a n d L o t 20, B lo c k F L a n a r k B e ac h, U ni t 1, L a n a r k, F ra n k lin C o un t y Flo r id a t o b e r ezo n e d f r o m R -1 S in g le F a mi l y R esiden t i a l t o R -2 S in g le F a mi l y M o b i le H o m e A p u b lic h e a r in g o n t h e p r o p os e d c h a n g es t o t h e Z o nin g M a p s er ies w i l l b e h e ld o n T ues d a y J un e 18, 2013, a t 10:00 a.m., a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y C o ur t h o u s e A nn ex in A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a. M o r e inf o r m a t io n m a y b e in s p e c t e d a t t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a, T e lep h o n e (850) 653-9783. P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n a t t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmi s sio n er s, 33 M a r k et S t r e et, S ui t e 203, A p a l ac hico l a, Flo r id a 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s p u b lic h e a r in g s h o u ld m a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts t o a s s ur e t h a t a v erb a t im r e co r d i s m ade in c l udin g t es t im o n y a n d e v iden ce if a n y u p o n w hic h t h e a p p e a l i s t o b e b a s e d Thursday, June 6, 2013 Page 11 Boys soccer team honored at banquet CORRECTION In last week’s Times, there was an error in the cutline for the photo of the winning team in the recent Golf Gone Wild golf tournament. The four team members included Nola Tolbert, Robbie Johnson, Rob Olin and Brett Johnson. CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times Graduating Seahawk seniors include, from left, Julio Ramirez, Zach Howze, Billy Harris, Josh Reeder, Elisha Patriotis and Casey Sapp.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center L I C E NS E D A ND I N S U RE D • 20 Y E A R S E X P E RI E NC E P .O Bo x 439 C ar r abelle, FL 32322 697 -2783 or Mobile 566-2603 R C 0 066499 R G0 065255 JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle Museum to feature WWII songs The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum in Carrabelle will have Jennifer Duncan from Columbus, Ga., as a special guest on Saturday. Jennifer will be singing and entertaining with some of the great songs from the 1930s and 1940s; the program is from 1111:45 a.m. Jennifer has entertained many historical, military and veterans groups including the Military Ofcers Association of America, World War II Heritage Days, The National Infantry Museum and the West Georgia Honor Flights for WWII veterans. Admission is by donation. County to re-advertise for roads chief The search for a new head of the county roads department will start from scratch. At Tuesday’s county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to refuse all applications already received and advertise for an additional two weeks in house for the job. The decision came after Commissioner Noah Lockley said he had been approached by a senior employee who said he was told not to apply for the position because he was not qualified. Lockley said the person did not want to be identified. Chair Cheryl Sanders, who also knew about the situation, said the employee refused to name the person who told them not to apply. If the position cannot be filled in house, the county will advertise in the local newspaper. BP Funds earmarked for NFWF At Tuesday’s county meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce reported to commissioners on the status of some BP funding at the request of Commissioner Smokey Parrish. Parrish asked for the report because of reports of available money for various projects. “BP has made a $2.4 billion settlement with the federal government of which $335 million will go to Florida,” Pierce said. “However, all of these funds will go to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) who in turn will distribute the money. They’ve never had this much money before and they are just trying to deal with it.” Parrish noted people in Florida could submit projects. Pierce said the SMARRT Council is trying to put together a proposal package for the funding. He said the SMARRT proposals for environmental and economic restoration will probably be funded “in different parts from several different sources. “It’s clear now that the community resiliency portion of their package will not be funded out of environmental restoration money,” he said. Pierce said the NFWF has not yet developed an application process for distributing the funds. “From going to the meetings around the state, I can tell you Franklin County is going to have more bang from our buck if we go in with Gulf or Wakulla,” Chair Cheryl Sanders said. “We need to look at the regional approach. It’s going to be a pretty good while before we see anything. We need to wait for the rules to come down. We could be in meetings every day and we don’t know yet what we’re meeting about.” Collection donated to St. George Light Lighthouse lover Derith Bennett of Valrico (near Tampa) has donated her collection of 169 Harbour Lights miniatures and 49 Harbour Lights and Barlow Christmas ornaments to the St. George Lighthouse Association. Derith collected the lighthouses from states she visited, including Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, California, Oregon and Washington. The collection includes miniature lighthouses from various special editions and the Harbour Lights series, as well as historical buildings, accessories, Fresnel lens miniatures, and Little Lights of Mine. The current plan is to display as much of the collection as possible in the lighthouse museum. Museum docents needed The St. George Island Lighthouse Association needs volunteers to work as docents in the museum during the summer months. Docents receive training about the museum displays and potential problem spots and can sign up for shifts of several hours or ll in when needed. It’s a fun way to meet visitors, share your knowledge about the lighthouse and feel good about helping out. If you can help, call the gift shop at 927-7745 and your name will be given to Docent Coordinator Pam Vest. New Lighthouse ofcers chosen The St. George Island Lighthouse Association annual meeting took place on May 11. Lighthouse Keeper Stanley Colvin reported that 73,560 lighthouse enthusiasts have climbed to the top of the historic structure since reconstruction was completed in December of 2008. The association now has about 400 members, according to Secretary Terry Kemp. She welcomed new Lifetime Patrons Susan and Mark Baldino, Dawn and Richard Radford, Sherri and Eric Roberts, and Mary and Tom Slocum. Director Vito Bell highlighted by-law changes which include term limits for ofcers and directors, creation of standing board committees, and a reduction in the maximum number of board members from 12 to nine. Ofcers elected for the coming year are Dennis Barnell, president; Jim Kemp, vice president; Terry Kemp, secretary; and Phyllis Vitale-Lewis, treasurer. In addition to the ofcers, members of the board of directors are Vito Bell, Kristy Branch Banks, Bud Hayes, Richard Saucer, and Fred Stanley. The board welcomed new member Kristy Branch Banks, and extended best wishes and appreciation to retiring board members Joe Bacher and Doug Brandt. How to save money on your insurance On Wednesday, June 12 from 5-7 p.m., the Florida Foundation and Florida Division of Emergency Management will host a workshop on “How to save money on your insurance cost” at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola For more information, call 653-6748. News b B R iI E fsFS THE E APALACHICOLA TIME E S FIn N D US O n N FACEBOOK

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, June 6, 2013 The Times | A13 2090209 FLORIDA PROPERTIES 10% BUYER'S PREMIUM Broker Compensation Available! 55 Tue., June 25, 1:00 P.M. EDT Sale Site: Hotel Duval 415 N. Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 All Properties Sell Absolute Live & Online Bidding ProperesinTheseCounes:Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden,Gulf,Jeerson, Leon, Liberty, Wakulla, Walton&WashingtonCounes,FLProperesInclude:Homes, Condos, Gulf Front, Bay Front and OtherResidenalLots; Commercial Buildings, Land and Acreage Tracts. ForDetailed Informaon johndixon.com 800.479.1763 FLAL# AB-0001488 JOHN DIXONA UCTIONS M ARKETING & A SSOCIATES 1112349 AUCTION BANK ORDERED Member FDIC 1109885 INSTRUCTIONAL BIOLOGY LAB COORDINATORResponsible for daily operations of the Biology Lab. Ensures all safety regulations are met, orders and maintains supplies while overseeing budget. Hires, trains, & supervises student lab assistants. Manages adjunct faculty, is responsible for course development and coordinates STEM activities with area middle & high schools. Requires Bachelors degree in Biological Sciences/Masters degree and Lab experience preferred. SALARY STARTS AT $40,800. APPLY BY 7/8/13. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW 93803T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000020 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN E. SEGER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 13, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2012-CA-000020 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and STEVEN E. SEGER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEVEN E. SEGER; MERRIE J. SEGER; ONE CHARLESTON PLACE HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 27th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 2 BLOCK 2 EAST, ST GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT 1 A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. A/K/A 159 GUNN STREET, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 323282879 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 14, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11039170 June 6, 13, 2013 91308T REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Gulf Coast Workforce Board announces the availability of a Request for Proposal (RFP) titled “Workforce Center Telephone System”. The purpose of the RFP is to seek proposals from qualified vendors to install new telephone system located at the Workforce Center, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida. The intent is to enter into a contract with a single prime contractor. Bidder will submit proposals by 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. For a copy of the proposal and further information, contact: Gulf Coast Workforce Board Lucy Cantley 5230 W. Highway 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-913-3285 lcantley@gcwb.org Minority businesses are encouraged to apply. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. June 6, 2013 93819T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-281-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 28th day of May, 2013, in Case Number 11-281 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR., is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 10th day of July, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 6, Block C, Range 3, McKissack Beach Subdivision, as per map or Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 29th day of May, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By:/s/ Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 6, 13, 2013 93837T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-000148-CA JOHN EARLE PERKINS, III, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR FRANCIS PERKINS, JR., and HERBERT DAIGRE PERKINS, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Partition Sale in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: The West 17 feet of Lot 2 and the East 55 feet of Lot 3 of Block “C” of Perkins Beach according to map or plat thereof in Plat Book 1, Page 7 on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit a/k/a 4322 Highway 98, St. Teresa Beach, Franklin County, FL 32358 at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. EDT on June 25, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 31st day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 June 6, 13, 2013 ADOPT : At-Home-Mom & Prof Dad yearn to share everything with baby. Expenses Paid. 800-552-0045. Chris & Carolyn Port Saint Joe 674 Jones Homestead Rd, Friday, Saturday and Sunday June 7th, 8th and 9th, 8am to 5pm. 2 Family Yard Sale Lots of Items! Text FL54213 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl June 15th & 16th 8:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL53032 to 56654 Flood Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Receptionist Weekends Required Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34252703 Text FL52703 to 56654 Admin/Clerical Office Coordinator St. George Plantation Owners’ Assoc (SGPOA) This position reports to the Manager of SGPOA. The individual should be a team player and be able to work toward common goals. The position is customer service orientated, interfacing with owners, staff, board members and committee members answering questions and performing requested tasks. This will require an individual that is detailed oriented and has strong multi-tasking skills. Strong computer skills are a must for this position, specifically Word, Outlook, Excel and PowerPoint. The position is the first point of contact for the SGPOA for Architectural Review, attending monthly Architectural Review Committee meetings, taking minutes and processing applications. This is a front office position with duties that include but are not limited to phones, emails, and answering questions from owners and guests. Wages are competitive and based on skills. Must be able to provide references upon request. Full-time position with excellent benefits. Please remit resume to Manager Karen Rudder, SGPOA, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, Fl 32328. Fax 850-927-3039; email: gmanager@sgpoa.com Web ID#: 34254454 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *Bussers BLUE PARROT Now HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & Grill Now Hiring All Positions Apply in person only HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part Time Front Desk and Part Time Bartender Experience preferred. Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C. Web ID#: 34254465 Medical/Health Weems Memorial Is now hiring for the following positions: Licensed Medical Technologist Paramedic EMT RN Dietary Registration Applications are available at: www weemsmemorial.com & may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34253531 Text FL253531to 56654 Quality Assurance Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc St George Island Full and Part Time PositionsCollins Vacation Rentals, Inc is now interviewing for Full and Part Time positions in Administration, Front Desk, Reservations, Housekeeping and Maintenance departments. Applicants must have excellent communication and computer skills. Prior experience in Customer Service and Vacation Rentals helpful. If you enjoy greeting and assisting visitors on St. George Island, we want to talk to you! Applications available at our main office at 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. LOW INTEREST FINANCING Borrow up to $20K, pay $386/month. 8 % interest 6 year term. Personal and Small Business loans, debt consolodiation, bad credit ok. Call 888-994-0029 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1200 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $79,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Total Down Pmt $675 ‘02 Chevy Impala T ot al Price $4,800 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775 02 Chevy Trailblazer T ot al Price $4,900 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $11752002 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T ot al Price $6,500 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified. CALL 747-5020 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday Newspapers For fast results, call 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ................... ............... ..................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD ................... ............... ................ $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND .............. ..... ............................ $750 1BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650

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Local 14 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! (In this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas ound alues ar e the best v eel ar t they f ed wha ti e iden v ts ha xper e e t eal esta al r ur loc O Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 249406 $235,000 A palachicola IMMA CULA TEL Y MAINT AINED 3 BR, 2 B A, tastefull y furnished & decor a ted, r ecentl y r eno v a ted, r enished har d w ood oors & ne w upscale kitchen a ppliances r eplace Florida r oom, pa tio spacious back y ar d, co v er ed par king, stor a ge b uilding, pr operty occupies six lots F r ed Mey er Str eet. 451 4871 Lar g e 5 BR / 2 BA ho m e lo cated in T hr ee Riv er s Subdi v is io n. T his ho m e f eatur es wo o d and tile f l o o r ing thr o ugho ut the ho m e, a f ir eplace, the kitchen has plenty o f co unter and cabinet s pac e, o n j us t o v er half an acr e and co mpletel y f enced 850-545-5852 l 850-697-1010 www .co astalrealtyinf o .co m SELL YOUR LIST I NGS HERE! (850)81 4-7377 (850)22 7-7847 S O L D 4514872 St G eor ge Island Plan ta tion C omf or table laidback qualit y -built W ill S olber g home in e x clusiv e C asa del Mar subdivision within w alk ing distanc e t o "F ishing a t T he C ut" f ea tur es lar ge living ar ea, o c e nook and mast er suit e on main lev el opening on t o spacious G ulf S ide por ch with boar dw alk t o the B each, F an tastic G ulf of Me xic o views fr om the living ar ea, MBR, and por ch! MBA has bidet jett ed tub separ a t e sho w er and lar ge 2-sink v anit y and w alk -in closet bet w een Mast er BR/BA. Upper oor has 2 e x tr a lar ge bedr ooms each with lar ge priv a t e ba ths E lev a t or fr om gr ound lev el t o t op oor! T his home w as c ust om designed b y ar chit ec t L arr y B urk e and f ea tur es c ust om c ypr ess in t erior trim. S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .st e v esisland .com w w w .2224S ail shD riv e .com UNDER CONTRACT! John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248790 $99,900 St. Geor ge Island 451 5037 GULF BEA CHES LO T Hi gh du ne y lo t on th e no rt h si de of Gu lf Be ac h Dr i v e. Bi k e pa th ac ro ss th e st re et 3r d lo t fr om th e co rn er of 6t h St re et Ea st pu ts yo u cl os e to th e be ac h fo r un de r $1 00 ,0 00 No cl ea ri ng ne ce ss ar y 1/ 3 ac re Hi gh (d ry ) el e v at io n. Bu y to b ui ld or k ee p as in v es tm en t. T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty 4514873 STE VE HARRIS C ell: 850-890-1971 st e v e@st e v esisland .com w w w .288magnoliaba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisland .com REDUCED termites’ and cause more damage, more quickly. While subterranean ter mites must normally maintain contact with the ground for a constant wa ter supply, drywood ter mites can build a nest that has no contact with the ground. Subterranean termites are most often treated by injecting pesticides into the ground around the in fested structure. Drywood termites are treated by tenting the structure with tarps and pumping in poi son gas. Two pest control opera tors who evaluated the in festation at the Armory es timated the cost of treating the drywood termites be tween $60,000 to $100,000. An inspector working for the county noticed ad ditional wings in the front entry of the Armory and, on examination; these proved to be from subter ranean termites indicating the Armory also has an in festation of those insects. Also, there is visible dam age from subterranean termites in a door frame in the storage area at the rear of the building. The estimated cost of treatment for subterra nean termites is $6,000 or more. Since the Armory is constructed primarily of brick, the damage is be lieved to be restricted to the wooden inner walls, stairway and second story oors. County Planner Alan Pierce said he will examine the area behind the wall where the drywood swarm emerged. He said it is un likely the county will pay to have the Armory tented to treat the drywood infesta tion due to the high cost. “We will investigate the extent of the damage and probably simply replace the damaged wood,” said Pierce. Both Mahan and Nikki Millender, the county parks and recreation director who also has an ofce in the building, said this was the rst time either had seen termites emerge. Anthony Taranto, who was a longtime caretaker of the structure, said that, to his knowledge, there was never a termite infes tation during his tenure. He said that, in addition to foot-thick brick walls, massive pine beams were used in the construction of the fort. Pierce said he was not surprised to nd termites in the building given its advanced age. Restoration of the Ar mory and its conversion to a convention center has been under way for a year, using funds provided by the Tourist Development Council (TDC). To date, most of the money was spent on repairing the roof of an addition to the right side of the building and re placing wood damaged by water from a leak. On April 16, commis sioners unanimously ap proved the nal payment on the rst phase of the Ar mory restoration project. “The budget from the TDC for repairs was $248,000 and the con struction costs, includ ing a change order, were $186,771,” Pierce said. “There were architectur al fees in addition to the construction fees so the total cost of the current renovations was about $230,000. Therefore, there is still some $18,000 in funds available for other repairs.” He said Millender, who also manages the Armory, requested the remaining money be used to hire an electrician to x the out side light that shines over the entrance door, and to clean up the kitchen area. Commissioners ap proved the request and instructed Millender to get three bids for work on the kitchen. She said a contractor has yet to be selected for those tasks. In a telephone inter view, Millender said a con tractor has not been cho sen for either task. At the same meeting, Chairman Cheryl Sanders instructed Pierce to send a letter to the TDC asking when the next allocation of funds for the Armory proj ect will be available. A historical marker erected near the armory in 2004 reads, “The Frank lin Guards, a company of Infantry organized in Apalachicola in 1884 by J.H. Coombs and Fred Bet tereld, erected the rst building in the city to be used solely as an armory in 1898. Made of simulated brick, it was located at the corner of High Street and Center Avenue. On May 25, 1900, re destroyed it and much of the downtown. On July 3, 1900, a commit tee was formed to build a new armory. The facil ity was designed by Frank and Thomas Lockwood of Columbus, Georgia and constructed by John H. Hecker. It was completed in 1901 at a cost of $12,000. The replacement armory features real brick walls and a gable roof with a ga ble parapet. Solid massing of the walls, slit windows, and a corner tower that re sembles a medieval watch tower make this an impos ing military structure. Fort Coombs is a unique example of fortress ar chitecture in Florida, and has served as the military and social nexus of Apala chicola for more than a century. Units stationed here have been mobilized for service in World Wars I and II, the Gulf War and the War with Iraq. Bronze plaques located on the ex terior front wall memorial ize the names of genera tions of Apalachicola and Franklin County citizens who have served their State and Nation.” TERMITES from page A1 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Besides Louisiana which of these also has land below sea level? Florida, S. Carolina, Alaska, California 2) In 1967 who voted 12,138 to 44 to remain British? Northern Ireland, Bangladesh, Gibraltar, Madagascar 3) What was the main color of Abraham Lincoln’s eyes? Blue, Gray, Green, Brown 4) In 1908 who became the rst airplane fatality? Selfridge, Tobin, Gallagher, Cooper 5) Who was the rst U.S. president to resign? Van Buren, Taft, Mondale, Nixon 6) What’s a silver drinking-cup? Zibeline, Zoarium, Zegedine, Zona 7) In 1913 Pittsburgh who opened the U.S.’ rst drive-in service station? Shell, Esso, Pure, Gulf 8) What are the nger cymbals used in belly dancing called? Zinke, Ziti, Zebu, Zill 9) Nitrous oxide is also known as what gas? Laughing, Natural, Tear, Unleaded 10) What former president retired to Gettysburg? Wilson, Truman, Eisenhower, LBJ 11) A galactic year is how many million Earthyears? 1, 100, 250, 500 12) What’s the shaddock closely related to? Crawsh, Grapefruit, Sparrow, Banana 13) For what construction project were hard hats rst invented and used? Interstates, Empire State Bldg, Lincoln Memorial, Hoover Dam 14) What Louisiana city is called the “Most Cajun Place on Earth”? Jennings, Bogalusa, Kaplan, Walker ANSWERS 1) California. 2) Gibraltar. 3) Gray. 4) Selfridge. 5) Nixon. 6) Zegedine. 7) Gulf. 8) Zill. 9) Laughing. 10) Eisenhower. 11) 250. 12) Grapefruit. 13) Hoover Dam. 14) Kaplan. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com



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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High School will present diplomas to 59 graduates at 7 p.m. Friday, led by two young ladies both of whom posted a better than 4.0 grade point average. Leading the Class of 2013 will be Valedictorian Stephanie Frances Marxsen and Salutatorian Morgan Anderson Walker. Also receiving highest honors will be Elton Ivan Olvera. Earning High Honors will be Christina Collins, Emily Brooke Cash, Elisha Patriotis and Katie Wood. A diploma with Honors will go to Skyler Eli Hutchinson, Brittany Nicole Bryant, Ryne Seth Fisher, Annalyse Elisabeth Wharrie, Cheyenne Elizabeth Martin, Karl Ray Sanford, Miranda Alexis Pilger, Zachary Lyle Howze, Shelby Melody Myers, Karlie Ann Tucker, Kerri xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, June 6, 2013 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 127 ISSUE 6Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Tide Chart . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Wartime anguish, A4 FCHS to graduate 59 FridayValedictorian Stephanie Marxsen. Salutatorian Morgan Walker.We are afraid they wont complete the work on schedule, said County Planner Alan Pierce Tuesday. In January, Gulf Group, of Chipley bid $566,000 to remove debris and repair the pier. Pierce said they could receive a penalty of $300 a day if they fail to complete the work by June 30. We have put them on notice with a letter and they have not asked us for an extension. There are reasons to grant an extension, but they have to ask. Pierce said, adding that the contractor has not asked for an extension. Gulf Group began work on the pier in April. By LOIS SWOBODA BRIDGE CONTRACTORS UNDER THE GUNSpecial to the Times St. George Islands Julian G. Bruce State Park has again been voted one of the Top 10 Beaches in the U.S., according to the Dr. Stephen Leatherman (Dr. Beach) annual ranking of beaches in the U.S. The St. George Island Beach moved up a notch from #4 in 2012 to the #3 spot for 2013. This is the third year that the ninemile beach park at the east end of St. George Island, has made Dr. Beachs list. According to Dr. Beach, The Florida panhandle beaches are known for their powdery, super white sands. The sand here is squeaky clean (just rub your feet on the sand and hear it squeak). The State Park beach is on the eastern end of the island. Pathways take you across the walking dunes to the bayside. Josh Hodson, St. George Island State Park manager, said the designation has done wonders for the parks visitation. This ranking has resulted in publicity on a national scale for the state park and our area, he said. According to Hodson, visitation to the State Park has steadily increased in the past few years since the designations which began in 2011. Last year (2012) we had 210,000 visitors, up from 185,000 in 2011. Itll be interesting to see what this year brings, he said Because the St. George Island State Park is home to some threatened and endangered species, Hodson said visitors to this beach park are asked to be respectful of the wildlife, including the endangered loggerhead sea turtles which arrive annually at this time of year to nest on the beach. Weve already received our rst few loggerheads so please do not disturb any marked areas, Hodson cautions. Visitors interested in learning about sea turtle nesting can attend 2 p.m. turtle orientation meetings on Wednesdays during June at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve Visitor Center in Eastpoint. The presentations are hosted by the SGI Volunteer Turtlers and ANERR. Common sense turtle tips include removing all beach chairs and umbrellas at the end of the day and use red ltered ashlights when walking on the beach at night to avoid disorienting hatchlings. The St. George Island State Park Beach is one of a string of many beaches in Franklin County. Total, Franklin County features more than 250 miles of beach. To learn more about each of the countys beaches and amenities, visit Salty orida.com TOP 10 BEACHES FOR 2013:1: Main Beach, East Hampton, New York 2: Kahanamoku Beach, Waikiki, Oahu, Hawaii 3: St. George Island State Park, Florida Panhandle 4: Hamoa Beach, Maui, Hawaii 5: Waimanalo Bay Beach Park, Oahu, Hawaii 6: Barefoot Beach, Bonita Springs, Fla. 7: Cape Florida State Park, Key Biscayne, Fla. 8: Cape Hatteras, Outer Banks of N.C. 9: Coast Guard Beach, Cape Cod, Mass. 10: Beachwalker Park, Kiawah Island, S.C.Island beaches named again to Top 10 list By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Coombs Armory has termites. Adding to previously identi ed structural problems, the Armory is now known to harbor both drywood and subterranean termites and eradicating them could add an additional $100,000 to the cost of renovating the building. Two weeks ago, County Extension Agent Bill Mahan, whose of ce is in the Armory, noticed a swarm of insects emerging from the inside wall in the rear right corner of the building. On examination, the insects were found to be drywood termite swarmers. When adult termites are ready to mate, they grow wings and y away from their home colony to create a new nest. Swarming termites mean the parent colony is at least two years old and growing in size. Franklin County is on the northern edge of the natural range of drywood termites and, while they are found here, they are not as common as subterranean termites, which are the kind most often infesting structures in this area. Their colonies are larger than drywood Termites discovered in Armory LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesCoombs Armory/Convention CenterSee FCHS A6 See TERMITES A14 Gulf Group behind schedule on repairs to the St. George Island shing pierFish free on SaturdayThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has declared Saturday, June 8 as free freshwater shing day. On that date, the state shing license requirement is waived for all recreational anglers. Swing Era relived SaturdayJennifer Duncan from Columbus, Ga. will perform tunes from the 1930s and 40s at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, Saturday, June 8 from 11 to 11:45 a.m. Jennifer has entertained for many historical, military and veterans groups. For more information call 697-8575.Mullet Toss Saturday on islandThe annual St. George Island Mullet Toss will be hosted Saturday by the Blue Parrot, 68 West Gorrie Drive. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Festivities begin at 11 a.m. Entry fee for adults $25, children $15. The event benefits the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. For information call 927-2987.Fishermans Choice kids tourney SaturdayCharles and Rex Pennycuff host their Fishermans Choice youth fishing tournament Saturday, June 8 beginning at daylight. Kids 16 and under will fish for fresh and saltwater species. Each entry receives a t-shirt, and after the tournament, anglers are invited to attend a cookout at the Eastpoint pavilion where they will weigh in fish, and get great prizes. Weigh in starts at 1 p.m. and fishermen must be in line no later than 3 p.m. Prizes given for first, second, third and fourth places and include all major fish species. Entry is free. Call Fishermans Choice for more information 670-8808.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 TOBACCOCESSATIONCLASSSCHEDULE Pleasevisitthefollowingwebsitestoviewacurrentscheduleoftobacco cessationclassesthatarebeingheldinFranklinCountyat www.bigbendahec.org/quit-nowandwww.ahectobacco.comToregisterforaclass,pleasecall BigBendAHECat850-224-1177THEREISNOCOSTTOATTEND! THURSDAY,JUNE20TH,2013 5:30-7:30PMGeorgeE.WeemsMemorialHospital 135AvenueG-Apalachicola,FLFreenicotinepatchesandgumwillbeprovidedto participantswhocompleteeachclass whilesupplieslast. RegistrationBegins@10amET CompetitionBegins@11amETFREET-Shirt w/every ENTRYAdults:17 andup-$30 Kids:under 17-$20$1,000bonusforlongestlaunchover*533feet *CurrentWorldRecord PlusmanyotherprizesawardedthroughouttheeventTheBlueParrotisproudtodonateproceedstotheApalachicolaBayCharterSchool Men'sDivision $200 Kids14-16Years Bicycle Kids11-13YearsFishingPolew/TackleBox Kids10andUnderFishingPolew/TackleBox FREESTYLEDIVISION$100ForMoreInformationCall:(850)927.2987 SeeLiveCamatBlueParrotSGI.com By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com New county personnel rules could designate an administrator to play a role in disciplinary proceedings. Legal advisor Lucille Turner of the Carson and Adkins law rm presented commissioners with a draft of proposed county personnel rules on May 16. Commissioners discussed the rules at a public workshop on May 21. Turner said the proposed personnel code is based on informal policies already in use by the council. This will be good for employees because they can look to written rules and know what might get them in trouble and how much trouble, Turner said. And (its) good for supervisors to assure consistent treatment of all employees. The biggest single change in the new rules would be the appointment of a director of administrative services, to whom commissioners would delegate some authority to make disciplinary decisions. The administrator would research offenses and grievances and make recommendations to the board but would not have the authority to terminate an employee. The county commission remains the nal appeal in the case of a grievance. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce was suggested for the job. He said if he accepts the new responsibility, some of his current duties would have to be passed to another employee. Also new is a written list of disciplinary actions triggered by specic offenses. Under the new rules, county employees need not reside in Franklin County but must get permission from a supervisor to work a second job, even if self-employed. Commissioner William Massey said this is not a change from the countys informal policy. One important change is all positions would have to be advertised in-house before they could be publicly advertised. Turner said the hiring process would be more formalized under the new rules, and department heads are required to interview potential employees, although they need not interview every applicant. Applications will also be retained on le and might be reviewed for potential employees before a job is publicly advertised. At the same meeting, Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson provided an incomplete set of job descriptions for county positions. Johnson said she has been attempting to compile a complete list for some time but several department heads have failed to provide her with descriptions. Johnson said the descriptions are needed to determine if employees are fullling their jobs. Were really not even doing evaluations of employees, she said. If they want to get raises and bonuses, this needs to be in place. Evaluations need to be done at least annually. Sometimes I might want to give a raise based on merit. Finance department staffer Erin Grifth said the board requested job descriptions from department heads in 2000. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said the commission will repeat the request at the next commission meeting. Commissioners said they will discuss the new rules at a future meeting after taking time to study the lengthy document. A $500 annual stipend paid to employees who supervise inmate workers at least 90 percent of the time was also discussed at the May 21 meeting. The bonus is paid because supervision of inmates is considered to be a dangerous activity. Most inmates work on a road crew; however, mosquito control uses inmates for eight months of the year to clear ditches. On the advice of Turner, the commission plans to prorate the stipend paid to mosquito control workers who supervise inmates for only part of the year. Turner said those employees would receive an additional 25 percent hourly when supervising crews.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com The Florida Department of Transportation will fund 10 projects to improve county infrastructure next year, most of the almost $5 million in grants to upgrade or rehabilitate existing roads and airports. East end roads will get $1.35 million in upgrades next year. In Carrabelle, new sidewalk along Tallahassee Street (County Road 67) is planned from Avenue A to Crooked River Road. An existing sidewalk, damaged by the addition of sewer lines, will be replaced with a longer 2.26-mile walkway, with paved walkways on both sides of the road from U.S. 98 to Three Rivers Road. In 2014, $44,000 has been earmarked for engineering the project; construction is scheduled for 2017-18 at an approximate cost of $500,000. Lake Morality Road, where deterioration has been a constant problem since it was last repaved, will get new pavement markings and signage between C.R. 67 and U.S. 98, in 2014, at a cost of $115,000. Turkey Bayou Bridge on U.S. 98 near SummerCamp will get a $28,000 makeover. In Lanark Village, more than a mile of Oak Street, from Arizona Avenue to Doe Lane, will get a much needed renovation at a cost of $1.14 million. In Eastpoint, South Bayshore, North Bayshore and Twin Lakes Road to Otter Slide Road will be widened from 10-12 feet and given a small paved shoulder. The cost of refurbishing the 4.5 miles of roadway will be $1.7 million. Both the Apalachicola Regional Airport and Thompson Carrabelle Airport will receive generous stipends as part of FDOTs Aviation Preservation Project. In 2014, FDOT will spend $250,000 on upgrades to Carrabelles aireld. The money was originally requested to build additional t-hangers but City Administrator Courtney Millender said because there is insufcient room to add more hangers, the funds will be used to add security fencing, repave part of the runway and move the fuel farm. In 2015, another $182,000 in FDOT funds are earmarked to extend the runway under the Aviation Capacity Project. Upgrades to Thomson Field are ongoing and, earlier this year; the city added to the airport a re department annex where a re truck is housed for emergencies. Apalachicolas Cleve Randolph Field will get $1,033,000 in FDOT funding next year; $840,000 for restoration of the runway 13/31 and $193,000 to upgrade the aireld lighting. The airport will receive a total of $1.1 million from 2015-17 to improve runway 18/36. Renovation of runway 6/24 at is scheduled for 2018 at a cost of $306,000. Crooms Transportation Inc. will receive $92,000 for operations and administrative assistance during the 2014 scal year.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesApalachicola Regional Airport is slated to receive more than $2 million in funding for improvements for the next four years.FDOT earmarks $4.6 million for Franklin County County mulls new work rules Nineteen students from the Franklin County High School Class of 2017 traveled last month to Washington D.C., where they visited the White House, among their many stops. For the complete story, see Page A9.SPe E Cial IAL tT O tT He E Ti I Mes ES GOneNE tTO Was ASHingtINGTOnN

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The Times | A3Thursday, June 6, 2013 502WoodwardAvenue,PortSaintJoe,Ph:(850)227-1156 101EastRiverRoad,Wewahitchka,Ph:(850)639-5024 248USHighway98,Eastpoint,Ph:(850)670-1199 Toll-Free:1-877-874-0007Email: emeraldcoast@fairpoint.net www.emeraldcoastfcu.com CouponExpires:6-30-13 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by ofcers from Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.May 28Jana R. Walker, 35, Jacksonville, failure to appear (FCSO)May 29Hunter R. Shiver, 19, Eastpoint, possession of paraphernalia and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) John Michael Davis, 48, Carrabelle, shing with saltwater product license revoked permanently, and failure to allow inspection (FWC)May 31Linda J. Tucker, 53, Eastpoint, sale of a prescription drug (FCSO) Michael S. Langley, 27, Bristol, sale or possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Autumn B. Beebe, 32, Carrabelle, petit theft (CPD)June 1Kimberly J. Wheeler, 41, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Jennifer M. Monroe, 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)June 2Christopher D. Rose, 30, Carrabelle, reckless driving (FCSO)Special to The TimesIn the early morning of May 31, the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce, with the assistance of the Apalachicola and Carrabelle police departments, served numerous drug offense warrants in the Franklin County area. Sheriff Mike Mock said this was the culmination of an extensive ve-month investigation led by the Franklin County Drug Unit. Charges range from the trafcking of narcotics to the sale or possession of narcotics, with numerous types of controlled substances being seized. The following people were arrested, transported and booked on their charge or charges at the Franklin County Jail: Brandy Davis, 22, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, and sale of a prescription drug Courtney Brownell, 24, Eastpoint, trafcking in a controlled substance Victoria Estes, 26, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance, and sale of a prescription drug Brittney Shiver, 26, Bristol, sale of a controlled substance within 1000 feet of a church, and sale of a substance in lieu of cocaine Jenny Nowling, 27, Eastpoint, two counts of sale of a controlled substance, and intent to sell a controlled substance within a 1000 feet of a church Sharon Garrett, 52, Carrabelle, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell Robert Thompson, 54, Eastpoint, sale of a controlled substance Angela Law, 29, Eastpoint, sale of a substance in lieu of cocaine Brittany Davis, 23, Apalachicola, sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of public housing, and possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell Kayla R. Langley, 29, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled s ubstance with intent to sell Amber Vinson, 26, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell Andrea D. McCoy, 29, Panacea, two counts possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, and sale of a prescription drug Theus J. Yowell, 34, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance and trafcking four grams or more illegal drugs James L. Corley, 35, Eastpoint, sale of a substance within a 1000 ft. of public housing, and contributing to the delinquency or dependency of a minor Leon Irvin, 49, Eastpoint, sale of controlled substance Jesse Gordon Smith, 47, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell, and delivery of a controlled substance Lance Flowers, 33, Apalachicola, trafcking in a controlled substance Arrest REPORTDrug sweep completes 5-month investigation BrRANDY D DAVIS CoOUrtRTNeEY BroROWNeELL VVIctorCTORIA ESteTES BrRIttTTNeEY S SHIVerER JeENNY No NOWLING SSHAroRON G GArrettRRETT RobertOBERT THompOMPSoON AANGeELA L L AW BrRIttTT ANY D DAVIS KAYLA R. L LANGLeEY AmberAMBER V VINSoON AANDreREA DD. McCo OY THeEUS J. Yo YOWeELL JAmeMES LL. CorORLeEY LeoLEON Ir IR VIN JeESSeE Sm SM ItTH LLANceCE FLoOWerERS Law Enforcement

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASectionPage 4 Thursday, June 6, 2013A Jewish man re ects on HolocaustStudents of the Franklin County eighth grade wrote the following re ections after listening to Mr. Chuck Itzkovitz speak about the Holocaust on May 28. Teacher Lydia Countryman said students and staff were deeply grateful and honored to hear Mr. Itzkovitz bear witness to history, and the grace he showed while sharing his perspective will play a part in ensuring that such horri c tragedies will not reoccur. Our students do not often hear from cultures different from their own, and this experience will be indelible. Thank you, Mr. Itzkovitz. Mr. Itzkovitz is a positive person. He spoke about the Holocaust and said it was a blessing to survive the Holocaust. He said it affected the Jewish community deeply and sincerely. RonaldI thought the way Mr. Itzkovitz explained the Holocaust was interesting. HE ANSWERED ONE OF MY QUESTIONS! He was very informative about his experience even though he wasnt a victim of the Holocaust. I feel sad that he experienced prejudice for being Jewish when he was growing up. DylanMr. Itzkovitz knows a lot about the Holocaust. He also knows a lot about the Jewish heritage. He has a nice accent. He added more knowledge about the Holocaust to me. LeviMr. Itzkovitz talked about the Holocaust and what it meant to him. What bothers me the most is that people lived in their homes thinking it would go away but it didnt. I dont know how those people lived their lives knowing that they knew people were getting killed. It is sad to me. MyrandaThe Holocaust was just brutal and plain ugly. People died for no good reason. Being Jewish is not a race but a way of life. Being Jewish is not bad. No one should have died for being different. JonathanThe Holocaust breaks my heart. It makes me feel like this world is chaotic. Its full of hatred and evil. But it makes me grateful to live in a free country. MelodyMr. Itzkovitz is a nice man who if he was in the Holocaust, I would feel bad. The Holocaust was a terrible thing orchestrated by an abused child who failed art school. Do I need to go into more detail? Hitler was a jerk; the kind of jerk that kills 6,000,000 plus people. PrestonI think Mr. Itzkovitz is very strong, emotionally. It took a lot of bravery, courageousness and guts to go to an eighth grade class and tell about his heritage. To me, I think the Holocaust was horrible. It makes me mad. It makes me sad. If this is the way I think about it, then I wonder how Mr. Itzkovitz feels? DylanMr. Itzkovitz is very nice and very smart. The Holocaust makes me sick. I hate hearing about it. Many of my people were killed. I hate what the Nazis did. Just hearing about them makes me want to puke. AbbyMr. Itzkovitz is a Jewish man who was born in America and did not personally go through the Holocaust but knew people who did and is still affected by it. The Holocaust was a cruel and harsh, mass killing of the Jewish people. It was horrible and very cruel and I feel sympathetic toward the people who had to go through it. We should not hate others. AnnThe Holocaust was a catastrophic injustice to the Jewish people. Hitler blamed the Jewish people for the loss of the Great War. Mr. Chuck Itzkovitz was kind enough to let us know how horrible the Holocaust was from his perspective. Mr. Chuck told us of good and bad, good as being expected to this day and bad as all the troubles, and sorrows, the Jewish people and others went through. QuantaviusI didnt really know that much about the Holocaust before this year but now I know a lot. It makes me feel very sad and mad at the same time. I went to Washington, D.C. and went to the Holocaust Memorial Museum. Seeing how the Jewish people were treated made me cry. Going through Daniels house made me cry. I am glad people dont have to go through that anymore. SabrinaThe Holocaust. Ghettos, concentration camps that turned into death camps. Some Jewish people went into hiding in German homes for a while until the Holocaust ended. Makenzie When I think about the Holocaust it makes me think about a sad time for Jewish people and how diabolical Hitler and other people were. When Mr. Itzkovitz was talking about the Holocaust I felt sad for him. I also thought that he was a strong man for being able to talk about a sensitive subject. MartyMr. Itzkovitz is a very good speaker. He told us details of what happened in the Holocaust such as dates, people, and locations. To me, the Holocaust was a vile, sick and heartbreaking event. BryanNow when I hear the word Holocaust it makes me think of all the bad things Jewish people have been through. Like how the Nazis would make the people dig trenches and then shoot them so they would fall in the trench. Also, how people would get shots from the camps doctor. Jewish people have been through a lot. MistyThe Holocaust was cruel. So many people died and so many people suffered from torture, starvation, and diseases. I hate the Holocaust, and prejudices, but we must remember it to prevent it from happening again. Clay Mr. Itzkovitz is a really great speaker. He gave us information on the Holocaust and the way life was during that time. Hearing what he had to say made me feel really sad about the way Jewish people were treated. LettI thought the meeting with Mr. Itzkovitz was great. He gave us information that changed my perspective. The Holocaust was a brutal killing of Jewish people. I felt that Hitler was not right for what he did. The Holocaust should be taught in EVERY school so students will know what happened and the knowledge of this will probably prevent this from happening again. TyannaThe Holocaust was genocide. The Nazis were human poachers. The Holocaust upsets me. It also makes me scared. Adolf Hitler was an extremely horrible man. The people who agreed with Hitler were horrible. MercedesIt was an honor to have Mr. Itzkovitz tell us about what he knew about the Holocaust. The Holocaust was horrible, just horrible. I am glad Mr. Itzkovitz came to our school to talk to us about the Holocaust and anti-Semitism. NatasiaMr. Itzkovitz shed light on the topic of the Holocaust by sharing his personal insights on it. The term Holocaust is a word that represents a horri c event that can never be forgotten. CharlesMr. Itzkovitz is a very intelligent man. I already knew facts about the Holocaust but its always nice to know more. It was a very intriguing lecture. It was quite informing. I am glad he came to speak with us. ReeseMr. Itzkovitz is a great speaker. He really caught my attention. He taught me about the horrible events that took place in the Holocaust. The Holocaust was so terrible. What happened can never be forgotten. It was horrid. AmandaMy vote on the Water Resources Development ActBy MARCO RUBIOSpecial to the Times The Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) that passed the Senate May 15 could have had a positive effect on Floridas natural resources, industries and residents. Every Floridian is impacted by the work conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers in our state. Unfortunately, politics were chosen over sound public policy, and the states best interests were left out of the nal bill. When this legislation was rst passed by the Environment and Public Works Committee, it contained a provision that would have worked to resolve a multi-decade water dispute between our state, the state of Alabama and the state of Georgia. Floridians in Apalachicola Bay have known all too well how this dispute has created economic havoc for our once vibrant oyster industry, as well as all the other industries that are so dependent on the harvesting and sale of that great resource. To address this issue, I worked with several other senators to make restoring ows out of Atlanta and towards the Apalachicola Bay my top priority as we began debate on the WRDA. Unfortunately, the language addressing this dispute was taken out of the bill after the committee approved it, and my amendment to reinstate this important policy was not included in the nal bill. Despite this setback, I will not give up on restoring ows towards the Apalachicola Bay. Ive requested a eld hearing in the Apalachicola Bay area so that my colleagues in the Senate can better understand why this issue simply cannot continue to be held hostage to the broken politics of Washington. Another top priority for me on this legislation was to make sure that funds paid into the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund are used for harbor maintenance, not ransacked by Washington appropriators for other pet projects around the country. But once again, the Democrat majority in the Senate chose politics over policy by removing a provision in the bill that would prohibit funds for harbor maintenance from being used elsewhere. This does not serve Floridas interests, nor the American taxpayers interest. And, while this legislation authorized several projects important to the Everglades, it did not authorize the Central Everglades Planning Project, the next major step towards complete restoration. This legislation could have done much more for the natural resources and industries of Florida, but it is clear that Washington has a long way to go when it comes to choosing good policy over politics. I share in the frustration of many Floridians, but will remain committed to achieving the best policy for my state of Florida. Marco Rubio is the Republican junior senator from Florida. MARCO RUBIOMr. Itzkovitzs visit SPECIAL TO THE TIMESChuck Itzkovitz talks to Franklin County eighth graders about the Holocaust.

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, June 6, 2013 Wearepleasedtopresenttoyouthisyear'sAnnualWaterQualityReport.isreportisdesignedtoinformyouaboutthequalitywaterandserviceswedelivertoyouevery day.Ourconstantgoalistoprovideyouwithasafeanddependablesupplyofdrinkingwater.Wewantyoutounderstandtheeortswemaketocontinuallyimprovethewater treatmentprocessandprotectourwaterresources.Wearecommittedtoensuringthequalityofyourdrinkingwater.Ourwatersourceisgroundwaterfromsixwellsdrawnfrom theFloridanAquifer.Becauseoftheexcellentqualityofourwater,theonlytreatmentsrequiredarechlorinefordisinfectionpurposesandAquaGold,whichisapolyphosphate compoundinjectedasasequesteringagentthatneutralizesscaleandcorrosion. In2012theDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtectionperformedaSourceWaterAssessmentonoursystemandasearchofthedatasourcesindicatednopotentialsourcesof contaminationnearourwells.eassessmentresultsareavailableontheFDEPSourceWaterAssessmentandProtectionProgramwebsiteatwww.dep.state..us/swapp. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsaboutthisreportorconcerningyourwaterutility,pleasecontactAlligatorPointWaterResourceDistrict(APWRD),SaraTurnerat(850)349-2274.We encourageourvaluedcustomerstobeinformedabouttheirwaterutility.Ifyouwanttolearnmore,pleaseattendanyofourregularlyscheduledmeetings.eyareheldmonthly onthethirdSaturdayofeachmonthat9:00a.m.,attheAPWRDOce,1378AlligatorDrive. AlligatorPointroutinelymonitorsforcontaminantsinyourdrinkingwateraccordingtoFederalandStatelaws,rules,andregulations.Exceptwhereindicatedotherwise,this reportisbasedontheresultsofourmonitoringfortheperiodofJanuary1toDecember31,2012.DataobtainedbeforeJanuary1,2012,andpresentedinthisreportarefromthe mostrecenttestingdoneinaccordancewiththelaws,rules,andregulations. Inthetablebelow,youmayndunfamiliartermsandabbreviations.Tohelpyoubetterunderstandthesetermswehaveprovidedthefollowingdenitions: ActionLevel(AL):econcentrationofacontaminantwhich,ifexceeded,triggerstreatmentorotherrequirementsthatawatersystemmustfollow. InitialDistributionSystemEvaluation(IDSE):AnimportantpartoftheStage2DisinfectionBy-ProductsRule(DBPR).eIDSEisaone-timestudyconductedby watersystemstoidentifydistributionsystemlocationswithhighconcentrationsoftrihalomethanes(THMs)andhaloaceticacids(HAAs).Watersystemswilluse resultsfromtheIDSE,inconjunctionwiththeirStage1DBPRcompliancemonitoringdata,toselectcompliancemonitoringlocationsfortheStage2DBPR. LocationalRunningAnnualAverage(LRAA):theaverageofsampleanalyticalresultsforsamplestakenataparticularmonitoringlocationduringthepreviousfour calendarquarters. MaximumContaminantLevelorMCL:ehighestlevelofacontaminantthatisallowedindrinkingwater.MCLsaresetasclosetotheMCLGsasfeasibleusingthe bestavailabletreatmenttechnology. MaximumContaminantLevelGoalorMCLG:elevelofacontaminantindrinkingwaterbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MCLGsallowfor amarginofsafety. MaximumResidualDisinfectantLevelorMRDL:ehighestlevelofadisinfectantallowedindrinkingwater.ereisconvincingevidencethatadditionofa disinfectantisnecessaryforcontrolofmicrobialcontaminants. MaximumResidualDisinfectantLevelGoalorMRDLG:elevelofadrinkingwaterdisinfectantbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MRDLGs donotreectthebenetsoftheuseofdisinfectantstocontrolmicrobialcontaminants. Non-Applicable(N/A):Doesnotapply Non-Detect(ND):meansnotdetectedandindicatesthatthesubstancewasnotfoundbylaboratoryanalysis. Partspermillion(ppm)orMilligramsperliter(mg/l):onepartbyweightofanalyteto1millionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Partsperbillion(ppb)orMicrogramsperliter(g/l):onepartbyweightofanalyteto1billionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Picocurieperliter(pCi/L):measureoftheradioactivityinwater. Ifpresent,elevatedlevelsofleadcancauseserioushealthproblems,especiallyforpregnantwomenandyoungchildren.Leadindrinkingwaterisprimarilyfrommaterials andcomponentsassociatedwithservicelinesandhomeplumbing.APWRDisresponsibleforprovidinghighqualitydrinkingwater,butcannotcontrolthevarietyof materialsusedinplumbingcomponents.Whenyourwaterhasbeensittingforseveralhours,youcanminimizethepotentialforleadexposurebyushingyourtapfor30 secondsto2minutesbeforeusingwaterfordrinkingorcooking.Ifyouareconcernedaboutleadinyourwater,youmaywishtohaveyourwatertested.Informationonlead indrinkingwater,testingmethods,andstepsyoucantaketominimizeexposureisavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineorat http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. eStateofFloridaDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtection(DEP)setsdrinkingwaterstandardforsecondarycontaminantsandhasdeterminedthatChlorideandTotal DissolvedSolidsareaestheticconcernsatcertainlevelsofexposure.ChlorideandTotalDissolvedSolidsweresampledinAugust2012andwerefoundinhigherlevelsthan areallowedbytheState(MCLviolations).ChlorideandTotalDissolvedSolids,assecondarydrinkingwatercontaminants,donotposeahealthrisk.Wewillcontinueto sampleasrequiredbyrule. esourcesofdrinkingwater(bothtapwaterandbottledwater)includerivers,lakes,streams,ponds,reservoirs,springs,andwells.Aswatertravelsoverthesurfaceofthe landorthroughtheground,itdissolvesnaturallyoccurringmineralsand,insomecases,radioactivematerial,andcanpickupsubstancesresultingfromthepresenceof animalsorfromhumanactivity. Contaminantsthatmaybepresentinsourcewaterinclude: (A)Microbialcontaminants,suchasvirusesandbacteria,whichmaycomefromsewagetreatmentplants,septicsystems,agriculturallivestockoperations,andwildlife. (B)Inorganiccontaminants,suchassaltsandmetals,whichcanbenaturally-occurringorresultfromurbanstormwaterruno,industrialordomesticwastewater discharges,oilandgasproduction,mining,orfarming. (C)Pesticidesandherbicides,whichmaycomefromavarietyofsourcessuchasagriculture,urbanstormwaterruno,andresidentialuses. (D)Organicchemicalcontaminants,includingsyntheticandvolatileorganicchemicals,whichareby-productsofindustrialprocessesandpetroleumproduction,andcan alsocomefromgasstations,urbanstormwaterruno,andsepticsystems. (E)Radioactivecontaminants,whichcanbenaturallyoccurringorbetheresultofoilandgasproductionandminingactivities. Inordertoensurethattapwaterissafetodrink,theEPAprescribesregulations,whichlimittheamountofcertaincontaminantsinwaterprovidedbypublicwatersystems. eFoodandDrugAdministration(FDA)regulationsestablishlimitsforcontaminantsinbottledwater,whichmustprovidethesameprotectionforpublichealth. Drinkingwater,includingbottledwater,mayreasonablybeexpectedtocontainatleastsmallamountsofsomecontaminants.epresenceofcontaminantsdoesnot necessarilyindicatethatthewaterposesahealthrisk.MoreinformationaboutcontaminantsandpotentialhealtheectscanbeobtainedbycallingtheEnvironmental ProtectionAgencysSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineat1-800-426-4791. ankyouforallowingustocontinueprovidingyourfamilywithclean,qualitywaterthisyear.Inordertomaintainasafeanddependablewatersupply,wesometimesneed tomakeimprovementsthatwillbenetallofourcustomers.eseimprovementsaresometimesreectedasratestructureadjustments.ankyouforunderstanding.Somepeoplemaybemorevulnerabletocontaminantsindrinkingwaterthanthegeneralpopulation.Immunocompromisedpersonssuchaspersonswithcancerundergoingchemotherapy,personswhohaveundergoneorgan transplants,peoplewithHIV/AIDSorotherimmunesystemdisorders,someelderly,andinfantscanbeparticularly atriskfrominfections.esepeopleshouldseekadviceaboutdrinkingwaterfromtheirhealthcareproviders.EPA/ CDCguidelinesonappropriatemeanstolessentheriskofinfectionbyCryptosporidiumandothermicrobiological contaminantsareavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotline(800-426-4791).Weworktoprovidetopqualitywatertoeverytap.Weaskthatallourcustomershelpusprotectourwatersources,whicharetheheartofour community,ourwayoflifeandourchildrensfuture.Ifyouhaveanyquestionsorconcernsabouttheinformationprovided,pleasefeelfreeto callanyofthenumberslisted.

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Local6 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 Congratulation'stoAlltheSENIORS!! Congratulation's &GoodLuck Classof2013!! Congratulations Love,AnitaGrove ChristinaCollins! Congratulation's&BestWishes toAllthe 2013Graduates!! fromthe 's & Best W Congratulation ishes 's & Best W Congratulation ishes The Franklin County High School Class of 2013 harvested more than $150,000 in academic and athletic scholarships Friday night. After Katie Wood, vice president of the class, led the Pledge of Allegiance, Shamekia Lake, a member of the Class of 2015, offered a stirring rendition of the National Anthem. Zach Howze, class second vice president, led the invocation, followed by a welcome from Morgan Kelley, the class president. Superintendent Nina Marks offered greetings, followed by special recognition of Cathy Creamer and Missy Cumbie, both of whom are retiring this year after long teaching careers. A poem put together by members of the class was read by Carli Hunt, who had assembled her classmates memories. Principal George Oehlert then announced the class valedictorian, Stephanie Marxsen, and salutatorian, Morgan Walker, and both were given medals. Several scholarships were then presented, followed by a passing of the torch through a candle lighting ceremony between class ofcers of 2013 and 2014. The evening closed with an appreciative sharing by class sponsors Delores Croom and Stephanie Howze Jones. CLASS OF 2013 SCHOLARSHIPSThe following is a list of the scholarships, the name of the presenter and the recipients: Apalachicola Bay Charter School (Chimene Johnson): two $250 scholarships to Emily Cash and Zach Howze A palachicola Bay Rotary (Alan Pierce): $1,000 scholarship to Morgan Walker Barbara Massey Memorial (Laura Baney): scholarship to Miranda Pilger Butler Family Memorial (Denise Butler): two $1,200 scholarships to Gulf Coast State College, in the names of Emily Burnett Butler and Jose Miguel Dosal, to David Butler and Kerri Williams Centennial Bank (Brenda Ash): two $500 scholarships to Emily Cash and Katie Wood College for Every Student (Eric Bidwell): two $3,000 scholarships to Morgan Kelley and Katie Wood Donnie Wilson Memorial (Roderick Robinson): two $500 scholarships to Christina Collins and Zach Howze DAR Good Citizens Award (Elinor Mount Simmons): scholarship to Christina Collins FairPoint Communications (Kerry Anthony): scholarship to Katie Wood Florida Seafood Festival (Carl Whaley): four $500 scholarships to Savannah Boone, Cheyenne Martin, Chena Segree and Karli Tucker Forgotten Coast Builders Association: Katie Wood Franklin County Education Foundation (Lois Catlin): scholarships to Direek Farmer and Yvonne Mitchell Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council (Carol Bareld): scholarship to Savannah Boone Franklin County Teachers Association (Laura Baney): scholarships to Zach Howze and, Whitney Vause F ranklin Educational Support Personnel (Roderick Robinson): scholarships to Kerri Williams, Lanae Wilson and Katie Wood Franklin County School Board (Pam Shiver and Teresa Ann Martin): scholarships to David Butler, Skyler Hutchinson, Stephanie Marxsen and Annalyse Wharrie Franklin County School Trust: $1,200 scholarships to David Butler and Cheyenne Martin HCOLA (Elinor Mount Simmons): two $250 scholarships to Skyler Hutchinson and Cheyenne Martin Loretta Taylor Memorial: one $500 scholarship to Zach Howze Love & Worship Center School of Arts (Jathan Martin): scholarships to Cheyenne Martin and LaDarius Rhodes Montgomery Foundation: three $500 scholarships to Shelby Myers, Skyler Hutchinson and Direek Farmer; two $700 scholarships to Savannah Boone and Whitney Vause; and four $900 scholarships to Emily Cash, Zach Howze, Morgan Kelley, and Elisha Patriotis, Phoenix Family (Lois Catlin): a $200 book scholarship to Hannah Oxedine Philaco Womens Club (Ginny Griner): one $1,000 scholarship to Morgan Walker Project HOPE: scholarships to Direek Farmer, Tevin Jones, Cheyenne Martin, Rahkeim Pierce, LaDarius Rhodes, TaShay Sewell and William Collins Seahawk Boosters: four $1,000 scholarships to David Butler, Christina Collins, Zach Howze and Chena Segree SWAT: scholarships to Cheyenne Martin, Rahkeim Pierce, LaDarius Rhodes, TaShay Sewell Take Stock in Children (Lois Catlin): twoand four-year scholarships to Cheyenne Martin, Yvonne Mitchell, Karlie Tucker Willie Speed Memorial (Orion Speed): scholarship to Cheyenne Martin Yent Family Memorial: $1,000 scholarship to Stephanie Marxsen Gulf Coast State College: two-year full scholarship to Katie Wood Enterprise State Community College: softball scholarship to Anna Lee Lurleen B. Wallace Community College: softball scholarship to Chena Segree Troy University: scholarship to Zach Howze Class of 2013 reaps academic rewardsPho HO Tos OS BY DAVID ADLERST T EIN | The Times Ofcers from the class of 2013 are, from left, Historian Emily Cash, Treasurer Christina Collins, Secretary Chena Segree, Second Vice President Zach Howze, and First Vice President Katie Wood. Not pictured is President Morgan Kelley. Recepients of the HCOLA scholarship are Skyler Hutchinson and Cheyenne Martin. Students from the Class of 2013. The Class of 2013 listens to a speaker.Elayne Williams, Chena Breanne Segree, David Wade Butler, Morgan Aylse Kelley and Austin Seth Ward. Receiving standard high school diplomas will be Mirian Roxana Barahona, Thomas Anthony Benitez, Savannah Danielle Boone, Brittney Marie Carr, Daniel Robert Carrino, William Nathaniel Collins, Codee Shianne Crum, Darrell Dewayne Dart, Alissia Dempsey, Cheyenne Nicole Diorio, Direek Antwoin Farmer, Christopher Chase Golden, Michael William Harris, Carli Danielle Hunt, Tevin Juan Jones, David Leon Langston, Anna Rose Lee, Haley Nicole Mathes, Yvonne Marie Mitchell, Jeffery James Murray, Hannah Elizabeth Oxendine, Rahkeim Leeshon Pierce, Julio Caesar Ramirez, Kevin Joshua Reeder Marjorie Chantel Rhine, Ladarius DWayne Rhodes, Seth Hanson Rogers, Katelyn Marie Rowland, Kayla Lynn Sanford, Casey Shae Sapp, TaShay Shamir Sewell, Jacob Peyton Shuler, Whitney Ann Vause, Shaquana Altrice Weaver, Tyler Wayne Webb, Dianne Lanae Wilson and Ellis William Wilson. On Friday, at senior recognition night, more than $150,000 in scholarships was awarded to the class (See A6) as they celebrated their commitment to learning. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit, a quote by Aristotle, is the class motto. The class colors are silver and pink, and the class ower yellow poppy, a symbol of wealth and success. Parents traditionally receive a ower from their son or daughter after each has received their diploma in the high school gymnasium Friday. The audience can also expect to hear a version of the instrumental class song We Are Young. FCHS from page A1

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The Times | A7Thursday, June 6, 2013 Graduation 2013Franklin County High School Mirian Roxana Barahona Thomas Anthony Benitez Savannah Danielle Boone Brittany Nicole Bryant David Wade ButlerBrittney Marie Carr Daniel Robert Carrino Karl Ray SanfordKayla Lynn Sanford Casey Shae SappChena Breanne Segree TaShay Shamir Sewell Jacob Peyton Shuler Karlie Ann Tucker Miranda Alexis Pilger Julio Caesar Ramirez Kevin Joshua Reeder Marjorie Chantel Rhine Ladarius DWayne Rhodes Seth Hanson Rogers Katelyn Marie Rowland Yvonne Marie Mitchell Jeffery James Murray Shelby Melody Myers Elton Ivan Olvera Hannah Elizabeth Oxendine Elisha Aaron Patriotis Rahkeim Leeshon Pierce Tevin Juan JonesMorgan Aylse Kelley David Leon Langston Anna Rose LeeCheyenne Elizabeth Martin Stephanie Frances Marxsen Haley Nicole Mathes Direek Antwoin Farmer Ryne Seth Fisher Christopher Chase Golden Michael William Harris Zachary Lyle Howze Carli Danielle HuntSkyler Eli Hutchinson Emily Brooke Cash Christina Michelle Collins William Nathaniel Collins Codee Shianne Crum Darrell Dewayne Dart Alissia DempseyCheyenne Nicole Diorio Morgan Anderson Walker Austin Seth WardShaquana Altrice Weaver Tyler Wayne WebbAnnalyse Elisabeth Wharrie Kerri Elayne Williams Whitney Ann Vause Dianne Lanae Wilson Ellis William Wilson Katie Danielle WoodCLASS OF 2013 Congratulations,GRADUATES!

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A8 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013Braden Wes Grifn will celebrate his sixth birthday on Friday, June 7. This occasion comes one week after Braden graduated from kindergarten May 29 at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. He is the son of Kayla and Eli Grifn, of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Arlene and Bobby Shiver, and Barry Thompson, all of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Delores and Larry Grifn, of Eastpoint. Braden will celebrate his birthday with family and friends at a pool party on Sunday, June 9 at 3:30 p.m. at the family home. Love, Mom, Dad and Kelsey. Bay Community School raised $2,500 with its fourth annual student art sale. Dozens of patrons of education and the arts gathered on May 31 to support Apalachicolas littlest students and share some fun. Bay School Director Tonya King said 95 pieces of art created by the kindergarten and preschool classes were sold. A group project titled You Are My Sunshine, netted the highest bid, $40. This year, dinner was provided by Tamaras Caf Floridita. King said this was the rst year the event had private sponsors. The sponsors were a huge, huge help this year, she said. They pretty much paid to put it on. We made the most money ever because of their help. The art auction was the brainchild of Marissa Getter whose children attended the Bay School. King, who has worked at the school since 2004, will be leaving next week to become a stay-athome mom. She will be replaced by Ashley Allen of Apalachicola who holds an associates degree in child development from Gulf Coast State College. Allen, a Franklin County native, teaches the toddler class and has worked at the school since 2007. King and Allen wished to thank Tamaras Caf, Cathy and Michael Bailey, Artemis Gallery, Charlie and Carrie Kienzle, Charming Comforts, Erin Rodriguez Construction, June Dosik, Paulette Moss, Jim and Susan Bachrach, Piggly Wiggly, Bayside Weddings and Events, House of Tartts and Water Street Seafood for their help in staging this years student art auction. BY LOIS S S WOb B ODA STELLA!SweetSTELLA!Lookatthatface!Wedont thinkshecouldbeanycuter!Stellasmomis aBoxer.ThatswhereStellagetsthatcute expressionandexpressiveeyes.Daddymust havebeenaLabbecausesheadoresthewater almostasmuchassheloveschasingaball. Thislittlegirlis6monthsold,spayedand heartwormnegative.Sheisgentle,playful andfunloving.Ifyouhavebeenwaitingto adoptadogforyourchildrenuntilschoolis outforthesummer,comebyandmeetStella.Shemaybethemostperfect familypetever!VOLUNTEERSAREDESPERATELYNEEDED TOSOCIALIZEALLOFOURDOGSANDCATS.Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofouranimalsintotheir hometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatly appreciated. CallKarenat 670-8417 formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCountyHumane Societyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogontothewebsiteat www.forgottenpets.org toseemoreofouradoptablepets. 4515011SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthCallTodayJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 GARLICKCLEANINGSERVICEEXTERIORHOUSE CLEANINGMildewRemoval Experts!Since1995850-653-5564 JerryGarlick|Owner 31AveE.Apalachicola,FL32320 ggarlick@fairpoint.net 850-653-3550(S)850-653-5564(C) www.apalachspongecompany.com 2091939 SocietyOn June 1, 1957, Major Ellis Camp and Barbara Ann Marchant, both of Ty Ty, Ga., were married in a civil ceremony when Ellis returned home following basic training for the U.S. Coast Guard in Cape May, N.J. Ellis had received his orders and was on his way to Miami where he would serve on board the USS Gentian. Later, he was stationed at Mayport, Fla., and after his tour of duty returned to Georgia where he and Barbara raised their family. On Saturday, June 1, 2013, Ellis and Barbara Camp, now of Carrabelle, were honored by their six children in celebration of 56 years of marriage. The daylong celebration included a barbecue cookout, cake and champagne toast. Those in attendance included hosts Danny and Lynn Camp Palmer, of Elmodel, Ga.; Bryant and Amber Palmer Jensen, Newton, Ga.; Scott and Diane Camp Wolcott, Buford, Ga.; Donnie Camp, Camilla, Ga.; Tonya Camp Bradshaw, Gracie Bradshaw and Macie Bradshaw, Kaleb Palmer and Will Palmer, Camilla, Ga.; Tony and Tricia Edwards Camp, Gerald Camp, Tiffany Camp and Caleb Cromer, Albany, Ga.; Cindy Camp Duke, Kiln, Miss.; Sherry Camp Thompson, Carrabelle; and Brandy Herndon, Brandon Polous and Jackson Polous, Eastpoint. Couple celebrates 56 years of marriage Anniversary The ravages of global warming on the planet, and stress on the human body, highlighted the topics shared by the winners of the 20th annual countywide 4-H Tropicana Public Speaking Competition May 24 at the Franklin County School. In the fourth and fth grade division, Katie Newman, a student in Ms. Kings class at the Franklin County School, won with a speech on Global Warming in which she made vivid the threat that rising temperatures pose to the planet. In the sixth grade division, Steven Hicks, a student in Ms. Joanoss class at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, won with a speech on Stress. People stress all the time, they just dont do anything about it, he said. Stop, take a deep breath and relax. Livia Monod, a student in Ms. Lees class at the ABC School, was runner-up among fourth graders with a speech on Phones, while Adrian Pruett, a student in Ms. Linanes class at ABC, was third with a speech on Kittens. Cale Barber, a student in Ms. Parrishs class at Franklin, was fourth, with a moving speech on his positive relationship with a family member who is incarcerated. Robyn Suiter, a sixth grader in Ms. Keuchels class at Franklin, was runner-up with a speech on bullying, while Grayson Constantine, a student in Ms. Joanos class at ABC, was third with The Secret Agent. Hunter Kelly, a student in Ms. Keuchels class at Franklin, was fourth with a speech on The Presents A Gift. Each of the students did an excellent job presenting their speech so our panel of judges had their work cut out for them, said Extension Agent Bill Mahan, who oversaw the completion, with his secretary, Christy Murphy serving as scorekeeper. Serving as judges were Anita Grove, director of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce; Marcia Mathis, area representative for State Sen. Bill Montford; Sue Cronkite, a former newspaper reporter and editor who now works at the Apalachicola Library. Teresa Ann Martin, school board member; and the Rev. John Sink, a retired Methodist minister, retired Navy captain and retired college professor. By DA DA VIDID ADADLERSSTEIINBay Community art sale a successSpecial to The TimesOn May 23, 2013, United States Army Pvt. Kristopher Woodrow Duncan graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He was assigned to the 165th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, Echo Company, 1st Platoon Bonecrushers. During the nine weeks of training, Duncan studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rie marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map-reading eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches, and eld training exercise. Duncan will continue his advanced individualized training at Fort Lee, Virginia. Duncan is the son of Donna Duncan and stepson of Joseph W. Gander, grandson of Carl Pap Duncan and Dianne Duncan, and great-grandson of Ollie Ruth Houseman, Milton and Joan Houseman and the late Woodrow and Lorene Duncan of Apalachicola. He is a 2012 graduate of Franklin County High School.KrRIS DDUnNCAnNDuncan graduates basic combat trainingLOIS OIS SWOSWO BODA ODA | The TimesJune Dosik, left, and Mel Remy were two of the art lovers in attendance Friday night. For more photos of student art, visit www.apalachtimes.com. Tropicana speakers project their thoughtsDADA VID ID ADAD LERS S TEI I N | The TimesLeft: Fourth/fth grade district winners were, from left, Katie Newman, rst; Livia Monod, second; Cale Barber, fourth; and Adrian Pruett, third. Right: Sixth grade district winners are, from left, Hunter Kelly, fourth; Grayson Constantine, third; Robyn Suiter, second; and Steven Hicks, rst.Braden Grifn turns 6 Birthday

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The Times | A9Thursday, June 6, 2013Dorcas Elizabeth Bledsoe Bodenheimer of Wake Forest, North Carolina, died May 22, 2013, under the care of Hospice of Wake County and the staff at Carolina House of Wake Forest. Dorcas was born in Winston-Salem, NC, Oct. 1, 1914, one of 11 children of Laurens Hinton and Susan Libes Bledsoe. Her parents and siblings predeceased her. She graduated from RJ Reynolds High School and completed a three-year nurses training at City Hospital in Winston-Salem in 1938. She began her nursing career with R.J Reynolds Tobacco Company in the medical department and later worked as a private duty nurse in Winston-Salem, retiring in 1976. She served in the US Army as a nurse during the early days of World War II at Station Hospital, Ft. Bragg, NC. She married Ted Eugene Bodenheimer also of Winston-Salem, in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1944, where he was serving in the US Army Air Corps. After the war, Dorcas and Ted returned to Winston-Salem where they lived and raised their two children, Susan and Ted, Jr. Dorcas continued her nursing career until retirement at age 62. She and Ted moved to Raleigh, NC in 1987. Dorcas was a member of St. Pauls Episcopal Church in Winston-Salem for many years, and later St Michaels in Raleigh. She joyously recalled throughout her life accepting Jesus Christ as her Lord and Savior at the age of three. Dorcas was a proud member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Daughters of the American Colonies. She was an accomplished bridge player, loved reading and studying religion and theology, and reading and writing poetry. There was not an antique store anywhere that she did not seek out and enjoy browsing in for hours. Dorcas always said the loves of her life were her family and Jesus. She is survived by her daughter Susan Thomas Antekeier (Andy) of Eastpoint; son Ted E. Bodenheimer, Jr. of Raleigh, NC, a loving and special grandson John Clayton Bart (Shelley) Norcross, Ga., and adored great grandchildren Ainsley and John Clayton, also of Norcross. She was also a loving grandmother to three stepgrandchildren, Grant R. Jones (Heather), of Greenvile, NC, Todd Behre, of Raleigh, NC, and Randy Behre of Portland, Ore. A graveside service was held Monday morning, May 27 at Forsyth Memorial Park. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions suggested to Hospice of Wake County 250 Hospice Circle, Raleigh, NC 27607. Online condolences may be made through www.Dorcas Bodenheimer DORCAS BOd D ENHEIMER Rev.StacyHilliardSPRINGREVIVAL REVIVAL Rev.StacyHilliardservesastheInternational PentecostalHolinessChurchMultiplication Director,inOklahomaCity,OK. HilliardalsoservesastheAfricanAmerican MinistriesDirector. Heisananointedspeakerandyouwillloveto hearhimministertheGospelofChrist. EveryoneisWelcome!! 4514857 NurserynowprovidedforSundayChurchService First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget 4515030 JesusChristthesame yesterday,andtoday,and forever.Heb.13:8Lookand Live!FaithTabernacle 2540FairlandAve. PanamaCity,FL Ph:(850)785-8679 PastorHoraceSlay(VisitlinktohearmessageLook. http://branham.org/messageplayer/63-0428) 101NEFirstStreet CarrabelleSUNDAY 10:00AM WELCOMESYOU THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850)545-2578 Faith ObOBITUARY CCARdDS OF THANKSJulia FFisherJulia Fisher, also known as Jewel, and family would like to thank everyone for the prayers, ramp, benet, time, visits, cards and the list goes on and on. Words cannot express our sincere appreciation. We are forever grateful. Please continue to keep her in your prayers and may each and every one of you be blessed! NNash FFamilyThanks to all our friends and loved ones for your prayers and good food during the loss of our husband, father and grandfather. To Michelle Sizemore, Ginger Coulter and Michael Cassidy for the ministry of music during the funeral service. Also, big thanks to our pastor Gwennell Wilson, Comforter Funeral Home, pallbearers and the Franklin County Sheriffs Department. God Bless Everyone,The Nash Family FFish fry SSaturday for Gary SShiverOn Saturday June 8, starting at 11 a.m., there will be a benet sh fry for Gary Shiver, who is currently receiving treatments for cancer. The benet will be at Apalachicolas Riverfront Park and will feature mullet dinners. The cost is $7 and includes mullet, Cole slaw, baked beans and hush puppies.Project ONEONE: 27 to restore homesVolunteers are needed for a faith-based home improvement outreach known as Project ONE: 27. At the June 4 county meeting, Pastor Aaron Batey of the Carrabelle United Methodist Church told commissioners local churches are working with a group of visitor volunteers next week to restore the homes of people in need. The visitors will stay at the Carrabelle Christian Center June 8 through 15. The group will work on ve houses in Carrabelle at a cost of $2,500 per home, and are seeking donations of building supplies. Batey said another group of volunteers will work on the west end of the county, mainly in Eastpoint. Batey said volunteers who want to help with the work are also welcome. This wont be the only time we do this, he told commissioners, Too often we depend on our government ofcials. The commission voted unanimously to waive building license fees for the project but asked Batey to ll in the paper work on projects. That way, in the future, we will know how the work got done, said County Planner Alan Pierce, noting that the sites will be visited by the county building inspector. If you want to help, contact Batey at 322-1058 or dtaaronb@gmail.com. FAITHFAITH BRIEFSRIEFS Special to the TimesOn Tuesday May 21, at 1:45 am, 19 students from the Franklin County High School Class of 2017 met their class sponsors in front of Franklin County School to begin an exciting trip to our nations capital, Washington DC! The group ew out of Tallahassee and landed in DC around noon, where they stayed for a total of four days and three nights. The students who participated in the trip were Kimmie Boone, Bryan Boyd, Adriana Butler, Jill Diestelhorst, Luke Hames, Abigail Harris, Melody Hateld, Dylan Lance, Myranda McLeod, Sabrina McQueen, Ann Reeder, Chelsea Register, Mercedes Rice, Marty Sawesky, Scout Segree, Connor Smith, Jackson Subbarao, Thomas Subbarao and Ellie Weldon. Jaime Duhart and Hilary Stanton attended as school chaperones as well as Roger Smith as a parent chaperone. The group toured nonstop, visiting the many sites and attractions the capital has to offer. They paid tribute to our veterans while visiting various war memorials including the World War Two Memorial, Korean War Memorial and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall. In total, the group visited more than 10 memorials that recognized veterans, past presidents, and American heroes like Martin Luther King, Jr. They attended the wreath laying ceremony and the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. They also had the opportunity to see the Constitution up close at The National Archives as well as visiting two Smithsonian Museums, The Library of Congress, Mount Vernon, Fords Theatre, The Holocaust Museum, The Capitol, The White House, and the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial. This is the rst time a group of students from Franklin County School have visited DC and the beginning of an amazing tradition for our eighth grade students. For many students that participated, it was the rst time they have ever own or even been to an airport! It gave them opportunity for a wonderful experience they wont forget! The students of the Class of 2017 would like to thank everyone that helped make this trip possible. They would like to send out a special THANK YOU to the local businesses that sent in a $100 donation toward the trip: Taylors Building Supply, Jimmys Auto, Aqua Magic Pool and Spa, Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union, Hometown BP and Deli of Carrabelle and Marks Insurance Agency Inc.Eighth-graders renew Washington trip traditionFirst of all, I want to apologize to the family of Vera Snider. Last week, in my column, I put a y instead of an i in her last name, Please, forgive me. Coffee hour at Chillas Hall is closed for the summer. See you in the fall. Have a safe and great summer, and thank you for your support. The thrift shop in the Lanark Village Plaza will still be open Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m. to noon. Thank you for your support. Of course we still have hamburgers and chips on Friday nights at Camp Gordon American Johnston Legion Post 82 here in the village. Orders are taken from 5 to 7 p.m. Donation of $6 is required. Eat in or to go. Sunday night is always pizza night at Post 82, 5 to 7 p.m. Pizza by the slice is $1 each Whole pizza, eat in is $8 and pizza to go is $10. Your donation will be collected in the lounge. To place your order call 697-9998. Coming attractions, with the public invited to all the following meals and parties. There will be a golf tournament on our golf course Saturday, June 8. Tee time is 1 p.m. A donation of $5 each will be required. Fore! Friday, June 14 through Sunday June 16 will be the 25th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic. You can come and watch the contestants weigh in their catch in Carrabelle, St. Marks and Port St. Joe. You can register online at www. saltwaterclassic.com. Our monthly covered dish luncheon follows on Fathers Day, Sunday, June 16. The doors to Chillas Hall will open at 12:30 p.m. Serving begins at 1 p.m. All you need to bring is your growling stomach, a dish to share and a donation. Enjoy the afternoon with your friends and neighbors. See you there. Like mothers, God gave us each one father to love and cherish. You fathers have a great day. On Saturday, June 15, you can get your sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club. The members will prepare and serve pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, orange juice and coffee and still only a $5 donation. In the evening on Saturday, June 15, you can have a fun lled evening at the June Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon American Johnston Legion Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you come throu8gh the door. Okie dokie! The memorial service for our friend and neighbor Michael Maloche was held Monday, June 3 at our Legion Post 82. We gathered at 2 p.m. to celebrate Mikes life. We will miss him very much. Pray for his eternal peace and for strength for his wife, Debbie and his family. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and the housebound and smile, Jesus loves you! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry.Coffee hour closed until fall, thrift shop open LANARK NEWSJim Welsh

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net Its been a long time coming, but the 2013 red snapper season opened June 1 in the Gulf of Mexico in both state and federal waters. The seasons begin in unison but end in what some observers call chaos. Because Floridas Game & Freshwater Fish Commission refused to go along with federal regulations, Florida, like several other Gulf states, is being penalized by the National Marine Fisheries Service with a shortened season in federal waters, those more than 9 nautical miles from shore. Unfortunately for anglers, though theres fair snapper shing inside the 9NM line, the great shing is mostly beyond it in deeper water. The season will be just 26 days long in federal waters, closing June 27, at 12:01 a.m., local time. Florida state waters are open June 1 to July 14. Federal regulators say the rules are for the good of the sh and ultimately of the shermen. But most experienced reef anglers say red snapper shing is now better than it has been in 40 years thanks to an extended period of tight harvest regulations, and perhaps in some measure because of the success of sh excluder devices on shrimp nets, allowing millions of juvenile snapper to escape when in the past they would have wound up as by-catch. So why dont the feds want to pony up longer seasons and more generous bag limits? Because of a bizarre twist in the way they calculate the harvest they measure in pounds, and when their best estimate of a conservationsmart harvest is achieved, they call for closure. But snapper grow fast and live a long time, and consequently anglers are now catching tons of whoppers, which means they can catch a lot fewer before they reach those limits set by the feds, even though everybody agrees there are more and bigger snapper than there have been in decades. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will review the 2013 red snapper population assessment during their June meeting in Pensacola. The council may request an emergency rule to increase the quota again based on the new scienti c information and request NOAA Fisheries to reopen the recreational season for red snapper later in the year. But NOAA seems in a combative mood when it comes to releasing their sh. Capt. Bob Zales of Panama City Beach, past president of the National Association of Charterboat Operators and one of the leaders in seeking reasonable regulation in offshore waters, is among many pushing for pure state management of federal waters and these days, its really starting to make sense. The checks and balances of recreational anglers and conservationists weigh in for keeping the maximum number of quality-sized sh in the water and even the saltiest old commercial harvesters have nally come to realize that it just simply makes sense to guard the resource, so that they can not only make money shing today, but also tomorrow, next month and next year. It should be noted that thanks goes to not only state agencies but also federal biologists for much of the research on offshore species that has made this awakening happen. In any event, there are some tactics that consistently produce results on red snapper.HOW TO GET EMAnglers who regularly target red snapper say they are bottom-relating sh, but not bottom sh. Theyre usually found over structure, but not as often in the structure like grouper. Experts seek out what they call a Christmas tree show on their sh nder screens before dropping a line. The pyramid or tree is the shape made by a school of snapper, with most deep, fewer at the top. In 200 feet of water, the stack may extend as much as 50 feet off bottom. Red snapper are typically found in 60 foot depths and more, on out to the edge of the continental shelf at around 250 to 280 feet. The Panhandle has a unique shery in that there are hundreds and perhaps thousands of private reefs junk skippers have dropped on otherwise barren sand bottom to attract snapper. Its not legal, but there are still many of these reefs around, and smart skippers have dozens of them in their GPS machines. There are also numerous legally placed arti cial reefs, including tugboats, barges and ships as well as demolition rubble, that attract lots of sh; these can be found on any good offshore chart, or visit www.myfwc.com and type arti cial reefs in the search box. A much easier way to get on the sh, however, is simply to join a charterboat trip; the Panhandle area has one of the largest and most active reef shing eets in the nation, and any angler interested in a trip can readily nd just the right boat for his buddies or his family. Prices range from around $350 for a halfday to $800 for a full day, and that fee can be split by up to six anglers on most boats. Party boats or head boats are also numerous in Panhandle ports, and these big boats can handle up to 40 anglers, at prices typically around $45 each for four hours, $65 each for six hours. Kids under 5 are not accepted on some offshore boats check in advance. Red snapper these days typically average 5 to 8 pounds, though 20pounders are not unheard of. The limit is two per angler per day, minimum size 16 inches. Red snapper are among the tastiest of all sh and are great broiled, fried or baked. Monday-Saturday:7:00AM-7:00PMEST Sunday:7:00AM-5:00PMEST FishingHeadquarters: WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,June0684 7430% Fri,June0786 7640% Sat,June0886 7730% Sun,June0987 7640% Mon,June1086 7640% Tues,June1186 7630% Wed,June1286 7630% SPONSORED BY Inshore OffshoreRed snapper season kicked off this past weekend with a bang. Huge sh were caught in the car bodies, but as the season gets hotter, the sh will move deeper. Better sh are in 100-150 feet of water, and live bait will help you land a big one. Pin sh, grunts, and larger bait sh are easy to nd right now around docks and in the grass. Great trout catches are being reported from Towns Beach and Fire Tower areas using top water baits this week. Early morning and late afternoon will prove to be the best times for the action. Flounder are just about everywhere in the bay as well. Try using a live bull minnow on a Carolina rig.Page 10 Thursday, June 6, 2013 RED SNAPPER NEW DAY, NEW WAYFloridas favorite snapper legal as of June 1 but season will be shortDAVID RAINER, ADCNR | Special to The TimesAnglers all along the northern Gulf of Mexico caught snapper like these on almost every trip last season, and many are wondering why more liberal federal regulations have not been forthcoming. If you want to bring color and activity to your garden, consider recracker plant (Russelia equisetiformis). Firecracker plant is a large perennial with slender, rushlike stems and leaves that are reduced to little more than small scales. The wiry branches cascade down in lengths as long as 4 feet and bloom here any time of year. A member of the Plantaginaceae, it is related to the coarse lawn weeds plantains. Also known as fountain plant, coral plant or coral blow, this native of tropical America and Mexico produces masses of tubular scarlet owers that are attractive to butter ies, hummingbirds and bees. It does best in rich welldrained soil but will tolerate sandier conditions if water is available. It is mildly drought tolerant and requires a minimum of four hours of direct sun to thrive. Firecracker plant does well in containers and hanging baskets, where it makes an attractive display, but potted specimens must be protected in the winter. This plant can be is propagated by division or by stem cuttings in spring. Traditionally used as a cure for snakebite, modern researchers have identi ed it as a powerful antioxidant and anti-in ammatory. BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda CRIMSON TIDE LANDS TARPONCHRIS ROBINSON | Special to the TimesParker Barrineau, a walk-on wide receiver for the University of Alabama, landed this tarpon on a three-day offshore shing weekend with Capt. Chris Robinson. Sophomore Barrineau wears number 87. Firecracker plant attractive and healingLOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At a soccer banquet last month at the high school, members of the 2012-13 Franklin County High School boys varsity soccer team were honored. The team nished as district runners-up for the second year in a row and lost to Lafayette Mayo in the regional quarter nal. Named Most Valuable Player was senior mid elder Zach Howze. He scored 12 goals for the year and was nominated to the alldistrict team. Selected by the coaches as Best Offensive Player was junior forward Graham Kirvin. He had 17 goals on the year, and also received an all-district team nod. The teams Best Defensive Player honors went to senior defenseman Julio Ramirez, who was also all district. Rounding out the all-district choices was junior mid elder James Harris, who received an honorable mention. Im very happy for our goals leader, Graham Kirvin, who showed his great spirit and passion for soccer, said coach Ramon Valenzuela. He is a great leader and a great player that will help us a lot next year. The head coach also praised the play of MVP Howze. He showed his skill and passion for soccer, and I wish him a good luck in college, same as the other six seniors that will be missed, Valenzuela said. Julio The Wall Ramirez will be irreplaceable this coming year and we are looking for someone like him, I know as a coach we can train someone like him but it takes time to develop his system and stronger kicking. Also graduating this week are goalie Casey Sapp, who scored two goals on the year, Josh Reeder, who had two goals on the year, goalie Daniel Carrino, who missed his senior year due to injury, and Elisha Patriotis, who scored one goal this season. Patriotis won the scholastic award for having the teams best grade point average. Receiving the honor of Most Improved Player was junior Alex Causey. I am very con dent that he will continue to work on his soccer skills during this summer and looking forward to work with him next year, said Valenzuela. Also receiving varsity letters this season was Joshua Patriotis, James Newell, James Bailey, Jacob Montgomery, Walker DeVaughn, Dalyn Parrish, Austin Carter, Stefan DeVaughn (who had two goals on the year), Christian Jones (who had one goal) Logan Allen, Billy Harris (who had one goal), and Tyler Pendelton. As far as the year went, I am very happy how the boys developed their improvement throughout the season, said Valenzuela, who was assisted this season by Stacy Kirvin. It was a new endeavor for me since I only coached girls for 10 years during my previous coaching experience back in Ohio. This past season was the rst high school boys soccer team that I have coached and hopefully not the last. I will miss some of the boys next year but I am very happy will all of those that would return and the new ones, said the coach. We are looking a little rough in the coming season, now with the new district teams, but I am con dent that we can go out, play and win. Next year the Region 1, District 1 Class 1A district is set to include Franklin County, Lafayette Mayo, Maclay, John Paul II, Port St. Joe, Rocky Bayou Christian and West Gadsden. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my assistant coach, Stacy Kirvin, for his support and commitment to the soccer program, said Valenzuela. I know that I couldnt have done too much without him. BILLMILLERREALTY850697375133105700658400+COMM.U.S.98&GULFADJ.TOLANARKMARINA850K$29,500$2,500DOWN BUYS2BEDAPT.26 ORRENT$500/MTH U.S.98COMMLOTS BELOWCITY.APP.PRICE C/BHOME3112COR.LOTS CITY$49,500COMM.BLDG.ON98&GULF FORRENT$500/MTH.MIH2CRNRLOTSBLK.$ STOREREDUCED$49,500 2ACATRIVER UTIL.IN$39,500 NOTICEOFCHANGEOFRE-ZONINGeFranklinCountyBoardofCountyCommissionerswillholdapublichearing,pursuantto Section163.3184,FloridaStatutes,toconsideradoptingproposedchangestotheFranklinCounty ZoningMapsseriesfor: Lots49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63andLot64,BlockA,andLots1,2,3,4, 5,6,7,8,19andLot20,BlockF,LanarkBeach,Unit1,Lanark,FranklinCounty,FloridatoberezonedfromR-1SingleFamilyResidentialtoR-2SingleFamilyMobileHome. ApublichearingontheproposedchangestotheZoningMapserieswillbeheldonTuesday,June 18,2013,at10:00a.m.,attheFranklinCountyCourthouseAnnexinApalachicola,Florida.More informationmaybeinspectedattheFranklinCountyPlanningDepartment,34ForbesStreet,Suite 1,Apalachicola,Florida,Telephone(850)653-9783. PersonswishingtocommentmaydosoinpersonatthepublichearingorinwritingtotheFranklin CountyBoardofCountyCommissioners,33MarketStreet,Suite203,Apalachicola,Florida32320. Transactionsofthispublichearingshouldmakethenecessaryarrangementstoassurethataverbatimrecordismade,includingtestimonyandevidence,ifany,uponwhichtheappealistobebased. Thursday, June 6, 2013 Page 11Boys soccer team honored at banquet CORRECTIONIn last weeks Times, there was an error in the cutline for the photo of the winning team in the recent Golf Gone Wild golf tournament. The four team members included Nola Tolbert, Robbie Johnson, Rob Olin and Brett Johnson. CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the TimesGraduating Seahawk seniors include, from left, Julio Ramirez, Zach Howze, Billy Harris, Josh Reeder, Elisha Patriotis and Casey Sapp.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 Trades&Services GETYOURADINTrades&Services GETYOURADINTrades&ServicesCALLTODAY!653-8868 StumpGrinder StumpGrinder 4514617 ROBERTSAPPLIANCE REPAIR -ALLMAJORBRANDS18ShadowLane Apalachicola,FL32320 Phone:(850)653-8122 Cell:(850)653-7654 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter LICENSEDANDINSURED 20YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O.Box439 Carrabelle,FL32322 697-2783orMobile566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES,TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVALALSOCLEANGUTTERSANDIRRIGATIONINSTILLATION,PLANTINGANDBEDDINGAVAILABLECALLJOE8503230741OREMAILJOES_LAWNYAHOO.COM StartingJune3rdofficehourswillbechanging forbothWeemsMedicalCenterEastClinicand WeemsMedicalCenterWestClinic WeemsMedicalCenterEastMonday(extendedhours)8:00am-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-4:30pm Wednesday8:00-4:30pm Thursday8:00-4:30pm Friday(extendedhours)8:00-6:00pm Saturday8:00-4:00pm Note:appointmentswillbescheduledupto30min.priorto close(walk-insstillwelcomeupuntilclose) WeemsMedicalCenterWestMonday8:00-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-6:00pm Wednesday8:00-6:00pm Thursday8:00-6:00pm FAMILYANDSPECIALTYCARE850-653-8853,ext.118 Apalachicola 850-697-2345 Carrabelle Museum to feature WWII songsThe Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum in Carrabelle will have Jennifer Duncan from Columbus, Ga., as a special guest on Saturday. Jennifer will be singing and entertaining with some of the great songs from the 1930s and 1940s; the program is from 1111:45 a.m. Jennifer has entertained many historical, military and veterans groups including the Military Ofcers Association of America, World War II Heritage Days, The National Infantry Museum and the West Georgia Honor Flights for WWII veterans. Admission is by donation.County to re-advertise for roads chiefThe search for a new head of the county roads department will start from scratch. At Tuesdays county meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to refuse all applications already received and advertise for an additional two weeks in house for the job. The decision came after Commissioner Noah Lockley said he had been approached by a senior employee who said he was told not to apply for the position because he was not qualified. Lockley said the person did not want to be identified. Chair Cheryl Sanders, who also knew about the situation, said the employee refused to name the person who told them not to apply. If the position cannot be filled in house, the county will advertise in the local newspaper.BP Funds earmarked for NFWFAt Tuesdays county meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce reported to commissioners on the status of some BP funding at the request of Commissioner Smokey Parrish. Parrish asked for the report because of reports of available money for various projects. BP has made a $2.4 billion settlement with the federal government of which $335 million will go to Florida, Pierce said. However, all of these funds will go to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) who in turn will distribute the money. Theyve never had this much money before and they are just trying to deal with it. Parrish noted people in Florida could submit projects. Pierce said the SMARRT Council is trying to put together a proposal package for the funding. He said the SMARRT proposals for environmental and economic restoration will probably be funded in different parts from several different sources. Its clear now that the community resiliency portion of their package will not be funded out of environmental restoration money, he said. Pierce said the NFWF has not yet developed an application process for distributing the funds. From going to the meetings around the state, I can tell you Franklin County is going to have more bang from our buck if we go in with Gulf or Wakulla, Chair Cheryl Sanders said. We need to look at the regional approach. Its going to be a pretty good while before we see anything. We need to wait for the rules to come down. We could be in meetings every day and we dont know yet what were meeting about.Collection donated to St. George LightLighthouse lover Derith Bennett of Valrico (near Tampa) has donated her collection of 169 Harbour Lights miniatures and 49 Harbour Lights and Barlow Christmas ornaments to the St. George Lighthouse Association. Derith collected the lighthouses from states she visited, including Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, California, Oregon and Washington. The collection includes miniature lighthouses from various special editions and the Harbour Lights series, as well as historical buildings, accessories, Fresnel lens miniatures, and Little Lights of Mine. The current plan is to display as much of the collection as possible in the lighthouse museum. Museum docents needed The St. George Island Lighthouse Association needs volunteers to work as docents in the museum during the summer months. Docents receive training about the museum displays and potential problem spots and can sign up for shifts of several hours or ll in when needed. Its a fun way to meet visitors, share your knowledge about the lighthouse and feel good about helping out. If you can help, call the gift shop at 927-7745 and your name will be given to Docent Coordinator Pam Vest.New Lighthouse ofcers chosenThe St. George Island Lighthouse Association annual meeting took place on May 11. Lighthouse Keeper Stanley Colvin reported that 73,560 lighthouse enthusiasts have climbed to the top of the historic structure since reconstruction was completed in December of 2008. The association now has about 400 members, according to Secretary Terry Kemp. She welcomed new Lifetime Patrons Susan and Mark Baldino, Dawn and Richard Radford, Sherri and Eric Roberts, and Mary and Tom Slocum. Director Vito Bell highlighted by-law changes which include term limits for ofcers and directors, creation of standing board committees, and a reduction in the maximum number of board members from 12 to nine. Ofcers elected for the coming year are Dennis Barnell, president; Jim Kemp, vice president; Terry Kemp, secretary; and Phyllis Vitale-Lewis, treasurer. In addition to the ofcers, members of the board of directors are Vito Bell, Kristy Branch Banks, Bud Hayes, Richard Saucer, and Fred Stanley. The board welcomed new member Kristy Branch Banks, and extended best wishes and appreciation to retiring board members Joe Bacher and Doug Brandt. How to save money on your insuranceOn Wednesday, June 12 from 5-7 p.m., the Florida Foundation and Florida Division of Emergency Management will host a workshop on How to save money on your insurance cost at the courthouse annex in Apalachicola For more information, call 653-6748. News bBRiIEfsFS THE E APALACHICOLA T IME E SFIn N D US On N FACEBOOK

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 6, 2013 The Times | A13 2090209 FLORIDA PROPERTIES10% BUYER'S PREMIUM Broker Compensation Available!55Tue., June 25, 1:00 P.M. EDT Sale Site: Hotel Duval 415 N. Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 All Properties Sell Absolute Live & Online BiddingProperesinTheseCounes:Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden,Gulf,Jeerson, Leon, Liberty, Wakulla, Walton&WashingtonCounes,FLProperesInclude:Homes, Condos, Gulf Front, Bay Front and OtherResidenalLots; Commercial Buildings, Land and Acreage Tracts. ForDetailed Informaonjohndixon.com 800.479.1763FLAL# AB-0001488 JOHN DIXONAUCTIONS MARKETING & ASSOCIATES 1112349 AUCTIONBANK ORDERED Member FDIC 1109885 INSTRUCTIONAL BIOLOGY LAB COORDINATORResponsible for daily operations of the Biology Lab. Ensures all safety regulations are met, orders and maintains supplies while overseeing budget. Hires, trains, & supervises student lab assistants. Manages adjunct faculty, is responsible for course development and coordinates STEM activities with area middle & high schools. Requires Bachelors degree in Biological Sciences/Masters degree and Lab experience preferred. SALARY STARTS AT $40,800. APPLY BY 7/8/13. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 93803T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000020 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN E. SEGER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 13, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 19-2012-CA-000020 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and STEVEN E. SEGER; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEVEN E. SEGER; MERRIE J. SEGER; ONE CHARLESTON PLACE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 27th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 2 BLOCK 2 EAST, ST GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT 1 A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. A/K/A 159 GUNN STREET, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 323282879 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 14, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F11039170 June 6, 13, 2013 91308T REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Gulf Coast Workforce Board announces the availability of a Request for Proposal (RFP) titled Workforce Center Telephone System. The purpose of the RFP is to seek proposals from qualified vendors to install new telephone system located at the Workforce Center, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida. The intent is to enter into a contract with a single prime contractor. Bidder will submit proposals by 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 11, 2013. For a copy of the proposal and further information, contact: Gulf Coast Workforce Board Lucy Cantley 5230 W. Highway 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-913-3285 lcantley@gcwb.org Minority businesses are encouraged to apply. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. June 6, 2013 93819T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-281-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 28th day of May, 2013, in Case Number 11-281 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and S. WILLIAM FULLER, JR., is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 10th day of July, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 6, Block C, Range 3, McKissack Beach Subdivision, as per map or Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 29th day of May, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court, Franklin County By:/s/ Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 6, 13, 2013 93837T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 11-000148-CA JOHN EARLE PERKINS, III, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR FRANCIS PERKINS, JR., and HERBERT DAIGRE PERKINS, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Partition Sale in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: The West 17 feet of Lot 2 and the East 55 feet of Lot 3 of Block C of Perkins Beach according to map or plat thereof in Plat Book 1, Page 7 on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit a/k/a 4322 Highway 98, St. Teresa Beach, Franklin County, FL 32358 at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. EDT on June 25, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 31st day of May, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 June 6, 13, 2013 ADOPT' :At-Home-Mom & Prof Dad yearn to share everything with baby. Expenses Paid. 800-552-0045. Chris & Carolyn' Port Saint Joe, 674 Jones Homestead Rd, Friday, Saturday and Sunday June 7th, 8th and 9th, 8am to 5pm.2 Family Yard SaleLots of Items! Text FL54213 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl June 15th & 16th 8:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407Text FL53032 to 56654 Flood Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk ReceptionistWeekends Required Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34252703 Text FL52703 to 56654 Admin/ClericalOffice CoordinatorSt. George Plantation Owners Assoc (SGPOA) This position reports to the Manager of SGPOA. The individual should be a team player and be able to work toward common goals. The position is customer service orientated, interfacing with owners, staff, board members and committee members answering questions and performing requested tasks. This will require an individual that is detailed oriented and has strong multi-tasking skills. Strong computer skills are a must for this position, specifically Word, Outlook, Excel and PowerPoint. The position is the first point of contact for the SGPOA for Architectural Review, attending monthly Architectural Review Committee meetings, taking minutes and processing applications. This is a front office position with duties that include but are not limited to phones, emails, and answering questions from owners and guests. Wages are competitive and based on skills. Must be able to provide references upon request. Full-time position with excellent benefits. Please remit resume to Manager Karen Rudder, SGPOA, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, Fl 32328. Fax 850-927-3039; email: gmanager@sgpoa.com Web ID#: 34254454 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringAll Positions Apply in person only HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part Time Front Desk and Part Time Bartender Experience preferred. Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C. Web ID#: 34254465 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Licensed Medical Technologist Paramedic EMT RN Dietary Registration Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34253531 Text FL253531to 56654 Quality AssuranceCollins Vacation Rentals, IncSt George Island Full and Part Time PositionsCollins Vacation Rentals, Inc is now interviewing for Full and Part Time positions in Administration, Front Desk, Reservations, Housekeeping and Maintenance departments. Applicants must have excellent communication and computer skills. Prior experience in Customer Service and Vacation Rentals helpful. If you enjoy greeting and assisting visitors on St. George Island, we want to talk to you! Applications available at our main office at 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. LOW INTEREST FINANCINGBorrow up to $20K, pay $386/month. 8 % interest 6 year term. Personal and Small Business loans, debt consolodiation, bad credit ok. Call 888-994-0029 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12X 65deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1200 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL53929 to 56654 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $79,000. Call (850) 524-1257 Total Down Pmt $675 Chevy Impala T ot al Price $4,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $77502 Chevy Trailblazer T ot al Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $11752002 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T ot al Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Look No Further Than The ClassifiedsWhat you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday NewspapersFor fast results, call747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 4515026 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $400 2BR / 1BA FURNISHED APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 3BR / 2BA UNFURNISHED HOME ON THE BAY W/ DOCK ....................................................... $1000 3BR / 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE, FENCED YARD .................................................. $600 1BR / 2BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ............................................... $7501BR / 1BA FURNISHED APT/LANARK .............................. $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT/ 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY 98 FRONTAGE ...........................................$650

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Local14 | The Times Thursday, June 6, 2013 Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaround andareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),Discoverthebestrealestatevaluesin MexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. oundalues ar e the best v eel art they fed wha tie idenvts haxpere eteal estaal rur locO RealEstatePicks BestValueson theForgottenCoast JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#249406$235,000ApalachicolaIMMACULATELYMAINTAINED3BR,2BA,tastefullyfurnished&decorated,recently renovated,renishedhardwoodoors&newupscale kitchenappliances,replace,Floridaroom,patio, spaciousbackyard,coveredparking,storagebuilding, propertyoccupiessixlots.FredMeyerStreet.4514871 Large5BR/2BAhomelocatedinThree RiversSubdivision.Thishomefeatures woodandtileflooringthroughoutthe home,afireplace,thekitchenhasplenty ofcounterandcabinetspace,onjustover halfanacreandcompletelyfenced. 850-545-5852l850-697-1010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD 4514872 St.GeorgeIslandPlantation -Comfortable,laidbackquality-builtWillSolberghomeinexclusive CasadelMarsubdivisionwithinwalkingdistanceto"FishingatTheCut"featureslargelivingarea,ocenook, andmastersuiteonmainlevelopeningontospaciousGulfSideporchwithboardwalktotheBeach,Fantastic GulfofMexicoviewsfromthelivingarea,MBR,andporch!MBAhasbidet,jettedtub,separateshower,and large2-sinkvanityandwalk-inclosetbetweenMasterBR/BA.Upperoorhas2extralargebedroomseach withlargeprivatebaths.Elevatorfromgroundleveltotopoor!Thishomewascustomdesignedbyarchitect LarryBurkeandfeaturescustomcypressinteriortrim. ShimmeringSandsRealty STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.stevesisland.com www.2224SailshDrive.com UNDERCONTRACT! JohnShelby,Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#248790$99,900St.GeorgeIsland4515037 GULFBEACHESLOTHighduneylotonthenorthsideofGulfBeachDrive. Bikepathacrossthestreet.3rdlotfromthecornerof 6thStreetEastputsyouclosetothebeachforunder $100,000.Noclearingnecessary,1/3acre,High(dry) elevation.Buytobuildorkeepasinvestment. ThiscustomdesignedhomeintheprestigiousMagnoliaBaygated community.Sunroom,screened&openporches,hottuboMBR suite,largemastertiledbathw/openshowerandgardentub, detachedgarage,gasreplace,granitecountertops,stainless kitchen,winecooler,built-incornercabinets.Amenitiesincludecommunity dock,pool,tenniscourts.Mainlivingarea&masteron1stoorw/guestrooms upstairsforprivacyw/privateporch. ShimmeringSandsRealty 4514873STEVEHARRISCell:850-890-1971 steve@stevesisland.com www.288magnoliabaydr.com www.stevesisland.com REDUCED termites and cause more damage, more quickly. While subterranean termites must normally maintain contact with the ground for a constant water supply, drywood termites can build a nest that has no contact with the ground. Subterranean termites are most often treated by injecting pesticides into the ground around the infested structure. Drywood termites are treated by tenting the structure with tarps and pumping in poison gas. Two pest control operators who evaluated the infestation at the Armory estimated the cost of treating the drywood termites between $60,000 to $100,000. An inspector working for the county noticed additional wings in the front entry of the Armory and, on examination; these proved to be from subterranean termites indicating the Armory also has an infestation of those insects. Also, there is visible damage from subterranean termites in a door frame in the storage area at the rear of the building. The estimated cost of treatment for subterranean termites is $6,000 or more. Since the Armory is constructed primarily of brick, the damage is believed to be restricted to the wooden inner walls, stairway and second story oors. County Planner Alan Pierce said he will examine the area behind the wall where the drywood swarm emerged. He said it is unlikely the county will pay to have the Armory tented to treat the drywood infestation due to the high cost. We will investigate the extent of the damage and probably simply replace the damaged wood, said Pierce. Both Mahan and Nikki Millender, the county parks and recreation director who also has an ofce in the building, said this was the rst time either had seen termites emerge. Anthony Taranto, who was a longtime caretaker of the structure, said that, to his knowledge, there was never a termite infestation during his tenure. He said that, in addition to foot-thick brick walls, massive pine beams were used in the construction of the fort. Pierce said he was not surprised to nd termites in the building given its advanced age. Restoration of the Armory and its conversion to a convention center has been under way for a year, using funds provided by the Tourist Development Council (TDC). To date, most of the money was spent on repairing the roof of an addition to the right side of the building and replacing wood damaged by water from a leak. On April 16, commissioners unanimously approved the nal payment on the rst phase of the Armory restoration project. The budget from the TDC for repairs was $248,000 and the construction costs, including a change order, were $186,771, Pierce said. There were architectural fees in addition to the construction fees so the total cost of the current renovations was about $230,000. Therefore, there is still some $18,000 in funds available for other repairs. He said Millender, who also manages the Armory, requested the remaining money be used to hire an electrician to x the outside light that shines over the entrance door, and to clean up the kitchen area. Commissioners approved the request and instructed Millender to get three bids for work on the kitchen. She said a contractor has yet to be selected for those tasks. In a telephone interview, Millender said a contractor has not been chosen for either task. At the same meeting, Chairman Cheryl Sanders instructed Pierce to send a letter to the TDC asking when the next allocation of funds for the Armory project will be available. A historical marker erected near the armory in 2004 reads, The Franklin Guards, a company of Infantry organized in Apalachicola in 1884 by J.H. Coombs and Fred Bettereld, erected the rst building in the city to be used solely as an armory in 1898. Made of simulated brick, it was located at the corner of High Street and Center Avenue. On May 25, 1900, re destroyed it and much of the downtown. On July 3, 1900, a committee was formed to build a new armory. The facility was designed by Frank and Thomas Lockwood of Columbus, Georgia and constructed by John H. Hecker. It was completed in 1901 at a cost of $12,000. The replacement armory features real brick walls and a gable roof with a gable parapet. Solid massing of the walls, slit windows, and a corner tower that resembles a medieval watchtower make this an imposing military structure. Fort Coombs is a unique example of fortress architecture in Florida, and has served as the military and social nexus of Apalachicola for more than a century. Units stationed here have been mobilized for service in World Wars I and II, the Gulf War and the War with Iraq. Bronze plaques located on the exterior front wall memorialize the names of generations of Apalachicola and Franklin County citizens who have served their State and Nation. TERMITES from page A1 Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) Besides Louisiana which of these also has land below sea level? Florida, S. Carolina, Alaska, California 2) In 1967 who voted 12,138 to 44 to remain British? Northern Ireland, Bangladesh, Gibraltar, Madagascar 3) What was the main color of Abraham Lincolns eyes? Blue, Gray, Green, Brown 4) In 1908 who became the rst airplane fatality? Selfridge, Tobin, Gallagher, Cooper 5) Who was the rst U.S. president to resign? Van Buren, Taft, Mondale, Nixon 6) Whats a silver drinking-cup? Zibeline, Zoarium, Zegedine, Zona 7) In 1913 Pittsburgh who opened the U.S. rst drive-in service station? Shell, Esso, Pure, Gulf 8) What are the nger cymbals used in belly dancing called? Zinke, Ziti, Zebu, Zill 9) Nitrous oxide is also known as what gas? Laughing, Natural, Tear, Unleaded 10) What former president retired to Gettysburg? Wilson, Truman, Eisenhower, LBJ 11) A galactic year is how many million Earthyears? 1, 100, 250, 500 12) Whats the shaddock closely related to? Crawsh, Grapefruit, Sparrow, Banana 13) For what construction project were hard hats rst invented and used? Interstates, Empire State Bldg, Lincoln Memorial, Hoover Dam 14) What Louisiana city is called the Most Cajun Place on Earth? Jennings, Bogalusa, Kaplan, Walker ANSWERS 1) California. 2) Gibraltar. 3) Gray. 4) Selfridge. 5) Nixon. 6) Zegedine. 7) Gulf. 8) Zill. 9) Laughing. 10) Eisenhower. 11) 250. 12) Grapefruit. 13) Hoover Dam. 14) Kaplan.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com