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The Apalachicola times ( May 30, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 05-30-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00223

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200

Material Information

Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 05-30-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00223

Related Items

Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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Full Text

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, May 30, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 5 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . . A11 ABC, FCS results at odds, even after interventions By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The third-grade reading and math FCAT scores released last week showed a modest improvement over last year for both the county’s two public elementary schools; the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and the Franklin County Schools each showed gains in the percentage of their students scoring at grade level or better. What is of concern, though, is that the scores appear to reinforce a sharply contrasting pattern rst suggested in last year’s results. That just as the ABC School is inching closer to the goal of having three-quarters of its thirdgraders at grade level or better, Franklin is stalled at the point of having two-thirds of its thirdgraders testing at below grade level. For the second year in a row, fewer than one-third of Franklin third-graders taking the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, of which there were 75, scored at grade level or above in reading and math, in both cases short of the percentages reached in 2011. In the case of the ABC School, three-quarters of the 35 thirdgraders were at grade level or better in reading, more than 20 percentage points better than in 2011. About two-thirds of these students were at grade level or better in math, 10 percentage points better than two years ago. In reading, the percentage edged up from 72 to 74 percent, with the brightest spot the 12 percentage point jump in the number of Level 4s, from 28 to 40 percent of the third grade class. In math, By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The dedication of a longsought decommissioned howitzer was the highlight of an impressive Memorial Day celebration on the county’s east end. Despite a sense of triumph, the mood was somber as Camp Gordon Johnston American Returning soldier helps honor the fallen By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The old soldiers gathered Monday for Memorial Day at veterans plaza, remembering those who did not return home and a young one who just did. Members of American Legion Post 106 led services attended by an ample audience, who applauded the return this month of Sgt. Joseph Taranto to his wife and four sons. Taranto’s unit, the Florida National Guard’s 870th Engineer Company out of Crestview, was tasked with nding By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Monday, May 27, a cruise ship made an overnight stop in Carrabelle. The layover was part of the 11-day Southern Charms Cruise offered by Blount’s Small Ship Adventures of Warren, Rhode Island. The cruise ship Grande Caribe navigated the Mississippi River, Industrial Canal Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Bay to reach Carrabelle. In the course of her travels, she had already visited New Orleans; Biloxi, Miss.; Mobile, Ala.; Pensacola and Panama City. The travelers will nish their journey on Thursday in St. Petersburg. The ship can carry 96 passengers in her 48 cabins; this trip had 49 and a crew of 17. While in Carrabelle, the cruisers could walk the town on their own or travel by shuttle bus. David Butler gave a lecture on Carrabelle history on Monday night, and Lesley Cox, a certi ed Green Guide led an optional nature tour of Tate’s Hell. John and Carol Leinhard of Houston, Texas, said this was their rst visit to northern Florida. “Is it always this quiet?” he asked. “When was the last time you had a burglary?” The couple said their objective for the afternoon was to photograph the town. Elaine Tucker of Clarksville, Texas, said she wanted to visit the 2 die in plane crash By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Two South Carolina men died in a plane crash Monday evening after taking off from Apalachicola Regional Airport. According to the Federal Aviation Authority, Anthony Caveza, 58, and Julius “Gil” Gilreath, 71, both of Greenville, South Carolina, were headed for Greenville Downtown Airport. Apalachicola airport employee Arthur “Perky” White said Gilreath drove himself to Cleve Randolph Field in a borrowed blue Toyota, which was still parked there on Tuesday morning. He and Gilreath discussed shing while waiting for Gilreath’s ight to arrive. White believes Gilreath was in the area on a shing trip. White said the single-engine Piper 32 was number four of seven planes that refueled at the airport on Monday. He said the airport immediately ceased selling fuel after learning of the accident. “That’s just a precaution,” White said. “It’s the rst thing we do in case the crash is fuel-related.” White said the other six planes serviced arrived safely at their destinations. FAA records say the plane was registered to FLEBO Air LLC of Greenville, N.C. Caveza listed his occupation as commercial pilot on several internet networking sites. Joe Frasher, manager of the Greenville airport, where many corporate jets land and take off, told reporters Caveza had a 3rd-grade FCAT scores vary River cruise ship makes stop in Carrabelle MEMORIAL DAY 2013 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Joey Taranto’s wife, Gina, hands their baby son, Cooper, to grandmother Toni Taranto. The sergeant left for war when his youngest son was just 5 weeks old. Below, a decommissioned artillery cannon stands in front of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. ‘The f lag still ies’ LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Legion dedicates howitzer cannon See CRASH A5 See FCAT A5 See CRUISE A2 See SOLDIER A3 See CANNON A3 Buds ‘n’ Bugs looks at barn swallows, A8 Bay Community student art exhibit Friday Bay Community School, the community based not-for-pro t pre-school in Apalachicola, will have its annual Art Show and Auction at 6 p.m. Friday, May 31, at the History Culture and Arts Center in downtown Apalachicola on Water Street. Dinner will be prepared by Tamara’s Caf. Tickets, $25, will be sold at the door. Call 653-6523 for reservations. Proceeds cover the basic costs of running the school. For details, visit www. baycommunityschool.com. Relay for Life starts Saturday Relay for Life of Franklin County will be noon Saturday until 6 a.m. Sunday. Tents will sell food, drinks and more with live entertainment and games throughout the night. Highlights are opening ceremonies and survivor/ caregiver lap at noon and the luminaria ceremony at 9 p.m. For information, call 348-6268 or email Kyla.Pugh@cancer.org. Nobles dancers Saturday at Dixie Performers go “Dancing in Paradise” in two shows for Pam Nobles Studio’s 32nd recital at 1:01 and 6:06 p.m. Saturday at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Tickets are $10 advance or $15 at door. Call 653-8078. Doors open 45 minutes before each show. Headliners include the Hillside Dancers, Hot Flashes, singer Tamara Marsh, Holly Chambers in a solo, Three Little Fishes, and Sea Cruise. Arnett Peel will emcee. Special awards go to Georgia Page, dancer for three years; Myia Maxwell, six years; Holly Chambers, 12 years; Patricia Perryman, 13 years; Linda Grif n, 18 years; Bonnie Smith, 23 years; Linda Maloy, 24 years; Rita Theis, 26 years; Debby Ruffner 27; and June Gray, 30 years. WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 EV E R Y ON E IS CORDIALL Y INVIT E D to attend an O PE N H O U S E for the O FFIC E OF S T A T E REP R E S E NT A TIV E Halse y Beshears on Thursday May 30, 2013 fr om 3:00 5:00. T he ofce is located in the R ealtors A ssociation of F ranklin & Gulf C ounties b uilding at 78 11th S treet, S uite 5, A palachicola, F lorida. “W e are e xcited to open this ofce and ha v e a presence in F ranklin C ounty to serv e the citizens of this community and surrounding counties”, states R ep. Beshears. S top by and visit us and meet the staf f. W e look forw ard to seeing you. 78 11t h S t. S u i t e 5 A pa l a c h i c o l a, FL 32320 (850) 653-1213 A n n o u n ci ng a n e w na m e f o r P ro gre s s E n e r g y L oo k f o r o u r n e w n a m e a n d l o g o i n y o u r b i l l s a n d o t h e r p l a c e s N o o t h e r a s pe c t o f y o u r s e r v i c e o r a c c o u n t i s ch a ng i ng A l t h o u g h o u r n a m e h a s c h a n g e d o u r c o m m i t m e n t t o y o u a n d t h e c o m m u n i t i e s w e s e r v e r e m a i n s t h e s a m e S o y o u c a n c o u n t o n u s f o r r el i a b l e el e c t r i c i t y – e v e r y t i m e y o u i p t h e s w i t c h L e a r n m o r e a t d u k e e n er g y c om / n e w n a me “' B ‹  C’ƒ A”•”v‡”’ P r o g r e s s E ne r g y no w h a s a ne w n a m e : Du k e E n er g y PUB LI C N O TI CE THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y AD VISO R Y B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G O N WED NES D A Y JUNE 5, 2013, A T 10:00 A.M., IN THE C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O N MEE TIN G R O O M O F THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y C O UR TH O US E ANNEX T O C O NS ID ER THE FO LLO WIN G V ARI AN CES, AP P EALS AND S P ECI AL EX CEPTI O NS: 1. C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O THE S-4 D IS TRI CT S T AND ARDS O F L AN ARK VILL A GE T O C O NS TR UCT AN AD D ITI O N 12 FEE T FR O M THE O RI GIN AL W ALL F A CIN G A C O UR T O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 46, B L O CK 4, UNIT 1, 5-3 P ARKER A VENUE, L AN ARK VILL A GE, FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GENE S TRI CKL AND A GENT FO R ED W ARD P A T TILL O O WNER 2. C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O INS T ALL A CAR GO LIFT 4 FEE T INT O THE S ID E S E TB A CK LINE O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 4, B L O CK B UNIT O NE, GULF WYNN S UB D IVIS I O N, 2470 U .S. HI GHW A Y 98, L AN ARK VILL A GE, FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY WILLI AM S. AND E VEL YN C. B ARNES, O WNERS. 3. C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O INS T ALL A VINYL S EA W ALL WITHIN THE CRITI CAL H AB IT A T ZO NE O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 1, CR O O KED RIVER LI GHTH O US E RES ER V A TI O N, 1968 US HI GHW A Y 98 WES T CARR AB ELLE, FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GARLI CK ENVIR O NMENT AL A SSO CI A TES, IN C., A GENT FO R FIRS T CH O I CE GO V IN C., O WNER THE B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS A CTIN G A S THE B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL AD D RESS THES E REQ UES T S A T THEIR MEE T IN G O N JUNE 18, 2013. *P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g & Z o nin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, FL 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s h e a r in g w i l l n o t b e r e co r de d p er s o n s w i s hin g t o r e co r d t h e p r o ce e din gs m u s t t a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts f o r r e co r din g “World’s Smallest Police Station” at the request of her daughter, a law enforcement ofcer. “I’ve taken 10 or 12 of these river cruises,” she said. “I love them. You get a totally different perspective on things and see things you’d never see. Also, with only about 50 people on board, we get to know everybody.” She said the food on the cruise was excellent but that passengers can opt to dine ashore when in port. Blount’s Small Ship Adven tures, whose motto is “We go where the big ships cannot,” was founded by Luther Blount in the 1950s. His family owned E.B. Blount and Sons Oyster Company, but after the 1938 hurricane left the Maine oyster beds in a sham bles, college-educated Blount developed a system for steam ing clams that saved the family fortune By 1947, Blount had become vice president of E.B. Blount and Sons, but the fact his family hadn’t returned to the oyster busi ness weighed on him. He turned to boat building and, after having built numerous craft, decided to attempt a small pleasure cruiser. Blount’s Small Ship Adven tures now has two cruise ships, both built by Blount’s Boats. They sail under an American ag and employ mostly U.S. citizens. The Grande Caribe spends her time in the Americas, and her sister, the Grand Mariner, travels the water ways of Europe. The boats have a draft of less than 7 feet and retractable pilot houses that allow them to pass under low bridges. The Grande Caribe is 184 feet long with a beam of 41 feet and weighs 94 tons. She was built in 1997 and refurbished in 2009. Both boats carry kayaks and glass-bottomed boats for local touring. In addition to optional tours and programs ashore at most stops, on many evenings, lo cal entertainers come aboard to perform. Passengers on the cruise were offered a 2-for-1 special, so most paid about $2,000 for the cruise. CRUISE from page A1 Weems recognized for lab services Special to The Times Weems Memorial Hos pital’s laboratory has met all criteria for laboratory accreditation by COLA, a national health care ac creditation organization. Accreditation is given only to laboratories that apply rigid standards of quality in day-to-day op erations, demonstrate continued accuracy in the performance of prociency testing and pass a rigorous on-site laboratory survey. Weems has earned COLA accreditation as a result of a long-term commitment to provide quality service to its patients. In a letter to Charles McDearis, lab manager, COLA said, “the standards your laboratory maintain demonstrates your com mitment to quality. Your emphasis on quality leads to reliable test results which are essential in as suring excellence in pa tient care. We compliment your laboratory staff for its dedication.” Ray Brownsworth, Weems CEO, expressed his appreciation for the exceptional quality pro vided by McDearis and his staff, Donna Taratoot, Jean Roberts, and Meloney Chambers. COLA is approved by the federal government and sponsored by the Ameri can Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Passengers disembark from the Grande Caribe on the Carrabelle waterfront.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, May 30, 2013 and disposing of improvised explosive devices. “Business was real good over there,” he said. “Same things we we’re nding over there happened in Boston. “It’s a very bad business. Pray for those who made the ultimate sacri ce, and pray for those who never made it home.” The ceremony was led by Post Commander Larry Hale, who focused on the cost of war to families and loved ones back home. He spoke of the dying words of soldiers throughout the ages, “remember me to my wife, to my mother.” It is important that he and his fellow veterans live up to the mission outlined in the Legion’s preamble, “to do service to our communities,” he stressed. “I, and so many others like me, have done my best to live up to that,” Hale said. “They came back to make the community a better place.” His daughter, Brooke Pittman, stood alongside, gently ringing a bell, as Hale read off the names of the area’s casualties from Vietnam. Chaplain Charles Scott opened the service with a prayer, and did not leave unprayed concern for the direction of the country away from God. “Thank the Lord the ag still ies,” he said. “We honor those who paid the debt, and honor the many of those who will yet serve and who will yet pay the price. “We are fast losing that freedom that’s deserving of living one nation under God. God help us that we never have to try. Remind us of the cost of freedom, that it’s up to us to maintain that freedom, by being willing to sacri ce our lives if necessary.” With veterans standing crisply in salute, Angeline Stanley began the solemn occasion with a singing of “The Star Spangled Banner.” In her closing, she summoned the beauty of returning home safely in a contemporary rendition of “Amazing Grace.” In Scott’s closing, blessing the low country boil that followed at Chapman Botanical Gardens, he spoke of how “we are honoring those who paid the terri c price so we could be here today, only by God’s amazing grace. “We honor those who will never join in that fellowship around the table again.” He offered a blessing for our nation’s leaders and closed with a promise that expressions of the Christian faith would not be deterred by public policy. “You will not stop us from raising the name of Jesus,” Scott prayed. Guests then were treated to a low country boil beneath the shade of the gardens. w h en y o u give your heart there is only o n e c h o ice ba ymedical .or g | 7 6 9 1 5 1 1 One L if e One H e a r t One H os p i ta l T o p R a n k e d in N o r t h w es t Flo r id a A r e a ’ s On l y O p en H e a r t S ur g er y Fi v e C a r di ac C a t h L a bs A r e a ’ s On l y D e dic a t e d C a r dio va s c u l a r I n t en si v e C a r e U ni t 200 D o c t o r s a n d S t a D e dic a t e d t o H e a r t C a re A r e a ’ s B es t H e a r t A t t ac k a n d H e a r t F a i l ur e S ur v i va l R a t es N o H e a r t P a t ien t W a i ts in O ur ER 2092216 SOLDIER from page A1 Legion Post 82 celebrated Memorial Day 2013. About 40 members, friends and supporters of the post gathered to dedicate a decommissioned eld armament and welcome it to its new home on Oak Street. Former Post Commander Bill Miller received a plaque and an award for his efforts in obtaining the gun as a monument to all veterans. He also did the honors and cut a red, white and blue braided ribbon to of cially receive the gun. Miller said he has worked on obtaining a piece of military equipment for the post for 53 years. “When Dad founded this post in 1957, he started trying,” Miller said. “When I moved here permanently in 1960, I took up the cause. Congressman (Bob) Sikes had something in front of every Legion post from here to Pensacola, but we weren’t in his district. We nally got on the list, but it still took ve years until we were nally approved in 2012. If it hadn’t been for Greg Christopherson and his computer, we still wouldn’t have it. I am really grateful. This is de nitely at the top of my bucket list.” During the dedication, Miller told the audience, “If all the guns in the world were silent, we wouldn’t have to have this, but it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen. So this is to remind us of all of those who have fallen to protect our nation and to remind the world that the United States will defend itself against all enemies.” Miller raised $3,000 to bring the gun to Lanark. In addition to the moving dedication and ribbon cutting, the ag was raised and lowered to half mast, and Chaplin Barbara Cook read a devotional. “She prayed, ‘Dear Heavenly Father, oh, Holy One, oh, God Our Creator, we are gathered here today to honor and pay tribute to the veterans who sacri ced their lives so we could meet here today without fear of armed soldiers. “Bless the Lord who is my rock. He gives me strength for war and skill for battle. He is my loving ally and my fortress, my tower of safety, my deliverer. He stands before me as a shield and I take refuge in him. He subdues the nations under me. “In this turbulent world, we give our thanks and gratitude to the servicemen and women who are protecting our freedom that we so often take for granted. There will always be wars and rumors of war until our Lord returns to Earth again. Until his return, we should pray every day that he might protect and watch over our troops.” After the dedication, a ceremony was held in the picnic shelter behind the Legion Hall, where more than 200 retired ags were honorably disposed of by burning. The ags were full-sized ones collected over the last year and small ags exchanged for new ones placed on the graves of East End veterans on Sunday. Christopherson of ciated in the ceremony and, with help from Cook and David Butler, laid the ags to honorable rest. After the day’s duties, everyone was invited inside for a chicken dinner prepared by Thomas Lee, Becky Whaley and many, many helpers. World War II vet Mary Britz was on hand looking t and happy in red, white and blue. At the Lanark Village Boat Club, 50 people joined to celebrate the holiday and enjoy a potluck picnic with burgers, pulled pork and hot dogs prepared by Norm Gembel and Carol Daddona. The group rose and sang “God Bless America” before the feast. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Post Commander Greg Christopherson and Chaplin Barbara Cook commit retired ags to the ames. Below is World War II veteran Mary Britz. CANNON from page A1

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 4 Thursday, May 30, 2013 The Apalachicola Municipal Library has just received its shipment of books from the Libri Foundation of Eugene, Ore., which offers books to small rural public libraries at an affordable cost for excellent awardwinning books. The library has received several grants from them in the past, and this year’s selection is based on the Summer Reading Program theme “Dig Into Reading.” Matching funds for this grant were provided by PALS. Titles range from “I’m Dirty” by Kate and Jim McMullan, about a little dump truck, to “Bodies from the Ash” by James Deem, a middle school book about the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in Pompeii. The library has increased its collection of the Nic Bishop books which cover spiders, snakes, lizards and other creatures. These are fabulous books are lled with full page close-ups, with lots of information too. The Summer Reading Program which begins on June 10, and runs Mondays and Tuesdays for six weeks at the two Project Impact sites, will use many of these new Libri grant books. The weekly themes are Gardening (Week 1), Earthmovers and Trucks (Week 2), Underground and Underwater Animals (Week 3), Buried Treasure and Pirates (Week 4), Earth and Geology (Week 5), and nally Explorers, Archeology and History (Week 6). Age appropriate books and small crafts activities will be done with several groups each morning, followed by a “ eld trip” to the library in the afternoon to check out books. For some children the ability to take home books for free from the public library is a new concept, one which we hope will encourage them to return with their parents to take advantage of our resources. Reading, from a young age fosters inquisitive thinking, provides enjoyment and certainly promotes better educational achievement. Working together with Project Impact, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program (www.projectimpactfcs. org), weaves the library together with the school and afterschool community in Apalachicola. It is hard to select from the numerous beautiful books just received from the Libri Foundation, but adults and children alike should come by and see “Living Sunshine: How Plants Bring the Earth to Life” and “Down Down Down” which are works of art as well as great educational books. As usual, the Apalachicola Municipal Library is seeking volunteers to read to children from Pre-K up. Many loyal readers volunteer each year, but there is always a need for more. If crafting with kids is your thing, We Need You! If you just want to help children select books to check out, there are volunteer slots in the afternoon too. Come by and sign up and see this outstanding collection of new books. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. ‘Dig Into Reading’ this summer @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Carrabelle fortunate to have outstanding librarian I am a patron of both Carrabelle and Wakulla County libraries and was forced to learn how to use a computer. Since I live in Lanark, it made sense to seek instruction at the Carrabelle library. This is when I became aware of Tonia’s exceptional leadership and teaching abilities and the professional qualities of her staff, even the volunteers. She offered to give me individual instruction since I was a complete failure in the group instruction offered by both Carrabelle and Wakulla libraries. It should be noted that I could not get individual instruction at Wakulla. We arranged weekly classes that were convenient for me, not her. I had priority. Since I had fought against computers all my life, swearing that I would never have one, I was computer illiterate. When I say illiterate, I mean just that. I did not even know how to turn one on. They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Well, I am 80 and Tonia tossed me the right bones, for now I can scan, make attachments, send emails (this email proves it), put emails over to my copier and fax, send pictures, and the many other things one can do with a computer. I led to be led and I think that my ability to use a computer proves Tonia’s expertise in leadership and knowledge. Sometimes I have a problem. She is only a phone call away and seems to be able to solve my dif culty. Since Wakulla funnels much more money into their library than does Franklin, their computers are much more powerful than Franklin’s. It became necessary for me to use their computers in order to get a weekly sports magazine from Purdue University (incidentally Wakulla charges a nickel more per page than does Franklin). I had the opportunity to compare the staffs of each. Franklin’s is tops thanks to Tonia. And thanks to her teachings, I now have my own computer. Franklin County is fortunate to have such an outstanding librarian. Thank God for Tonia Chisholm. David Baker Lanark Village Library director has done a great job As longtime volunteers at the Eastpoint branch of the Franklin County Library, we were disturbed by the letters to the editor a week or so ago. While we know Tonia Chisolm to be helpful and competent, she is not the library director. Those “couple of letters after their name” represent an important achievement in education, emphasizing library science, budgeting, cataloguing, collection development and information sciences. In these changing times of public libraries, it is important to understand how quickly information technology is changing and keep abreast of it, and our director has done a great job. We have no doubt that Tonia is doing a ne job at the Carrabelle Library, as evidenced by her supporters. I hope this issue can be worked out so we can relocate into our new Library building and move forward in a positive manner. J. Bell and A. Colston Chisholm provides help in respectful, professional manner I have spent several days re ecting on an article made public to the press that was brought to my attention. The article being an email sent to my local librarian Tonia Chisholm from my local Franklin County Library Director Glenda Ondracek. In the said email Library Director Glenda Ondracek wrote: “Should someone not be happy about something we do, here is a something you might say to them depending upon the situation. I thought this was priceless. I’m sorry that you are disappointed with our ‘free’ service.” This email sent by our library director offended me on so many levels that I knew I would not be able to solidly sit by as our library staff are instructed to display such rude, unprofessional behavior by Ondracek. I do refer to Franklin County library as “my/our Library.” To set the point of fact straight with Library Director Glenda Ondracek, Franklin County Library is funded by the taxes, which is money paid out of the public’s hard working income. Therefore I believe Ondracek needs reminding that these “free services” are not free, as every paycheck we earn helps to pay for these “Free Services” which she refers in her distasteful email. May I also be allowed to bring to her attention that the check she cashes to pay her bills and living expenses also comes from me and every community member that uses our library. I am sure I will not be alone when questioning my money being spent to employ someone who has forgotten where her paycheck comes from. Therefore I want her to be aware that we the people not only deserve, but demand the utmost respect from the employees we pay and not be demeaned by badmannered employees who have forgotten their duties of customer respect. I visit often with my library and would be in shock if Tonia Chisholm or any library staff or volunteer were to approach me with such a poor, disrespectful behavior as our library director has instructed Tonia Chisholm to do. On all my visits I have received the help I needed in a respectful and professional manner, never being degraded or turned away with rude statements of “free services.” One of many examples of my experience at my library happened just recently. My husband who works 55 to 60 hours Monday through Friday came to be in need of a dentist but, could only see one on a Saturday in order to not miss any workdays. It was Tonia whom I called upon to ask for a referral to any dentist in or around our area that may take patients on Saturday. Tonia Chisholm being community involved directed me to a dentist that practices on Saturday here in Carrabelle giving my husband the muchneeded relief without him needing to seek help or spend our money outside of our community. Now, this is the type of person and employee I want and demand for the money my husband’s 55 to 60 hour week taxes pay. I praise her for the extra knowledge on our community affairs and sharing them with me in my time of need although it is not part of the “free services” she is paid to do. Thank you Tonia for being that person who goes the extra step in providing the caring and accommodating atmosphere in my library. Brief word to Glenda Ondracek, “You may want to follow Tonia Chisholm’s behavior and social skills or you may nd yourself no longer being the one we are paying for in the future.” Mrs. Chase Gray Letters to the EDITOR Color ectal Cancer is a Killer Y ou Can Help Pr event T allahassee Memorial HealthCare is teaming up with George E. W eems Memorial Hospital and the American Cancer Society to provide informa tion for preventing colon cancer – a disease tha t is expected to cause a pproxima tely 51,690 dea ths in 2013, according to the American Cancer Society F or further informa tion, call (850) 431-4226 option 7 Get Scr eened Regularly scheduled colorectal screening tests are recommended beginning a t a ge 50, ho wever if you ha ve kno wn risk factors such as family histor y of colon cancer or polyps, colon cancer syndromes, or are African-American, you may need to be screened earlier and more frequently T A K E A C T IO N

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, May 30, 2013 the percentage at grade level or better inched up from 61 to 63 percent. “Our biggest goal as far as our student growth and improvement is that we in crease our percentage of prociency every year. Our overall school goal is 75 per cent procient in reading, math and science,” ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said. “I’m extreme ly proud we are above the state average. Another clear goal is that we hit at least state average. “I’m very proud of the results, but it comes from a lot of those strategies on our teachers’ part that devote a lot of their time in school,” she said. “I’m very well pleased with the interven tional pieces that we put in place this year.” These interventions in cluded the spending of Title 1 monies, federal monies targeted at schools with sizeable numbers of eco nomically disadvantaged students. Johnson said these funds were used to pay teachers for an hour two days a week to work af ter school reinforcing stan dards from the school day, and challenging students to reach the Level 4 and 5. In addition, the hiring of a full-time teaching assistant in the computer lab freed up individual teachers to take three or four students back to their room for additional intervention, Johnson said. A third focus was on FCAT Chats with students, where educators at the schools could sit down and talk about preliminary test data throughout the year gleaned from FCAT-related assessments. This gives a projection on how a student will perform on FCAT, and teachers sit down with the student and give an assess ment on areas students may be weak in. “Signicant pieces we try to do on a regular ba sis to see how students are performing,” Johnson said. “It gives a teacher insight on what she needs to do in struction wise, and it’s very informative to students. They set their own goals, and it allows them to begin to take ownership.” Superintendent Nina Marks expressed exaspera tion because the district had put in place several new strategies to address the sharp fall-off last year in the third-grade scores at the Franklin School. Though this year’s math scores did see a 14 percentage point increase in the number of third-graders scoring at grade level or better, the total percentage remained at 29 percent, still below the 31 percent at grade level in 2011. “We’ve had people in place, academic coaches in place, to work with this group of students, and a lot of professional develop ment,” Marks said. “We put things in front of people. We have stepped up doing a lot of things to get people where we thought they needed to be for the benet of students. “I really hoped we were going to see improvement. There is something not working, and I’m not exactly sure what that is.” Marks said there were some bright spots with the results, including declines in the numbers of thirdgraders below grade level in reading and math, but the overall hope for strong improvement did not mate rialize. She said she plans to meet with Principal Eric Bidwell and his staff this week, and next week with third-grade teachers after they requested to meet with her. “I believe change is nec essary, and we are very concerned about the level of learning taking place with our students, and we’re go ing to be very proactive to see what we can do to turn this around,” Marks said. The superintendent said the third-grade scores cre ate a focus on a more urgent priority for the district amid the revised, state-assisted approach to its many educa tional needs. “This puts a different spin on the priorities,” she said. “We’ve got an opportunity now with the change in lead ership over there for a lot of things to change. They’re really being proactive. “We do have an oppor tunity for some changes to happen. They may be chang es people are not happy with, but we need to observe whether business has been taken care of as it should be. I think the public needs to look for many changes based on what we now be lieve. We just know we need to make some changes and they need to be based on the needs of our students.” e N e w s H e r a l d e N o r th w es t F l o ri d a D a i ly N e w s P o r t S t J o e S ta r A p a l achi c o l a T imes W as hin g t o n C o un t y N e w s H o lmes C o un t y T imes A dv e r t is e r e W a l t o n S un e D es t in L o g S a n ta R os a P r ess G az e t t e C r es t v i e w N e w s B u l l e t in b 9 f\ ]V GLa B 5 ] ¢› 5 \]V[ R › Ž•Ž ŽŽ t} }  t› u• Rt†‹ † • } •’ ‚‚ t {…{ Š t› £ • ‹{t‹ fVŠ‹t…Œt \›•Œ a†{›† Œ G† ‹† t›5 Coupon Expir es: 6-15-13 CODE: AP00 St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle reputation as a good pilot. “I don’t know what happened,” Fra sher said Tuesday, “But, it had to be catastrophic.” Gilreath was a Greenville-based de signer and builder, primarily of medical ofces and facilities. He was a well known philanthropist within his community and established the Gilreath Foundation with his wife, Parry. A posting on the website of the Avia tion Safety Network said the small plane, registration number N4489F, crashed in Warner Robins, Ga., around 6:40 p.m. af ter an in-ight emergency transmission. A post-crash re ensued. The two occupants onboard received fatal injuries. The crash site was near runways at Robins Air Force Base and Middle Geor gia Regional Airport. Bibb County Coroner Leon Jones said the crash site was a dense swamp area, and snakes, mosquitoes and other poten tial hazards were a hindrance to the re covery of the wreckage. Around 8:30 p.m., the Georgia Forest ry Commission brought in a bulldozer to help cut a path to the plane. The Air Force base dispatched a large crash truck, and a Houston County light truck was brought in to illuminate the woods after sunset. Houston County Fire Department, Ma con-Bibb Fire Department, Bibb County Sheriff’s Ofce, Macon Police Depart ment, Robins Air Force Base and Georgia State Patrol all responded at the scene. FCAT from page A1 CRASH from page A1 Allen ice machine approved At their May 7 meeting, county commissioners accepted the unanimous recommendation of the planning and zoning board and approved a commercial site plan to locate an ice vending machine at 95 U.S. 98, the northwest corner of U.S. 98 and North Bayshore Drive in Eastpoint. The request submitted by John Pritchard, agent/ applicant for Bob Allen, had been discussed at the April 16 meeting after P&Z recommended it be denied. Commissioners then directed that a changed version of the original proposal be reviewed at an emergency P&Z meeting. At the May 7 meeting, the ice machine was approved with the requirements that it have a one-way entrance and exit off of North Bayshore Drive, with permanent fencing or bollard system to keep trafc from entering off U.S. 98. There must also be a clearly dened driving surface of shell and lime rock. Airport aces inspection County Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the airport passed its annual Florida Department of Transportation inspection on April 26. “We have a few trees along the perimeter that need to be dealt with, but otherwise the inspector said the airport looked good,” said Pierce, who is also the airport manager. The board also voted unanimously to sign an amended joint participation agreement with FDOT for $70,000 worth of additional funds for improvements at the airport. The funds will be spent on security or drainage improvements News BRIEFS

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`= =G S=Y L E S T E R L O V A B L E L E S T E R L e s t e r i s a o n e y e a r o l d A u s t r a l ian S h e p h e r d m i x H e w a s l e f t i n t h e d r o p p e n i n b a d c o n d i t i o n b u t ha s r e sp o n d e d b e a u t i f u l l y t o t r e at m e n t an d h i s ha p p y e n g a g i n g p e r s o na l i t y ha s e m e r g e d H e s t i l l n e e d s t o b e t r e at e d f o r h e a r t w o r m s w h i c h t h e H u m an e S o c i e t y w i l l t a k e c a r e o f b e f o r e h i s r e l e a s e b u t h e c an b e a d o p t e d an d h e l d u n t i l h i s t r e at m e n t i s c o m p l e t e S o c o m e d o w n t o m e e t t h i s u n i q u e b l u e m e r l e b l u e e y e d b o y H e i s a v e r y sp e c ia l d o g V O L U N TE E R S A R E D E S P E R A TE L Y N E E D E D T O S O C IA L I Z E A L L O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f or go t t enpe t s or g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e pet s 451501 1 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 PUB LI C N O TI CE e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n o f t h e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le w i l l m e et in r egu l a r s es sio n o n ur s d a y J un e 6, 2013, a t a p p r o xim a t e l y 6:00 p .m. o r a s s o o n a s c a n b e h e a r d in t h e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le C o mmi s sio n C h a m b er s lo c a t e d a t 1001 G ra y A v e C a r ra b e l le FL (850)697-2727 t o co n sider t h e f o l lo w in g in acco r d a n ce w i t h Or din a n ce N o .443, C o n s en t o f U s e f o r t h e C o n s um p t io n a n d Sa le o f A lco h o l: 1.Al l o w in g S a nd Ba r t o s e l l p ack age l o c a t e d a t 710 A v e n u e B S E, S t e 10. A l l in t er es t e d p a r t ies a r e in v i t e d t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o n t hi s m a t t er F ur t h er inf o r m a t io n co n cer nin g t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t c a n b e o b t a in e d f r o m t h e Ci t y C ler k a t Ci t y H a l l a t 1001 G ra y A v en ue C a r ra b e l le Flo r id a, 32322, o r b y c a l lin g (850) 697-2727, b et w e en t h e h o ur s o f 8:00 A.M. a n d 4:30 P .M., M o n d a y t hr o ug h F r id a y ex c l udin g h o lid a ys. I f a n in di v id u a l de cides t o a p p e a l a n y de ci sio n m ade b y t h e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n w i t h r es p e c t t o t hi s m e et in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t m a y b e r e q uir e d I f s o t h e in di v id u a l s h o u ld m a k e p r o v i sio n f o r a t ra n s cr i p t t o b e m ade a t t h e m e et in g (RE: Flo r id a S t a t u t e 286.0105). Pur s u a n t t o t h e p r o v i sio n s o f t h e A m er ic a n s w i t h Di s a b i li t ies A c t, a n y p er s o n r e q uir in g s p e ci a l acco mm o d a t io n t o p a r t ici p a t e in t hi s m e et in g i s a s k e d t o ad v i s e t h e ci t y a t le a s t 48 h o ur s b ef o r e t h e m e et in g b y co n t ac t in g K ei s h a M es s er a t t h e a b o v e addr es s o r p h o n e n um b er W i l b urn M ess e r M a y o r A t t es t: K e is ha M ess e r C i t y C l e rk Society A6 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 Malen Lyree Henry turned 4 on May 14. She celebrated on Saturday, with a Lalaloopsy party and lots of family and friends. Malen is the daughter of Mark and Kandice Henry of Eastpoint. We love you baby girl, to the moon and back! JESSICA DEMPSEY | Special to the Times The Franklin County Schools’ kindergarten classes had a one-month contest to see which class could collect the most tabs off of cans. The winning class was Mrs. Cook’s class, who brought in 40.2 pounds of tabs. They won an ice cream party! Mrs. Williams’ class brought in 15.4 pounds, Mrs. Bloodworth’s 11.4 pounds, Mrs. Dempsey’s 4.3 pounds and Mrs. Miller’s class 3.2 pounds. The 75 pounds of tabs will be delivered to Shriners Hospital over the summer, where they will use them to help children around the world. Shriners Hospitals for Children is a pediatric health care system dedicated to improving the lives of children, often beyond what others thought possible, delivering its mission without charging patients or insurance companies. The hospital relies on the generosity of donors, past and present, to carry out its mission. The kindergarten expressed thanks to all the parents who helped their kids help other kids in need. M aA L eE N H eE NR y Y TURN sS 4 K idsIDS heHE L piPI NG kidsKIDS The ladies of the R Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy were delighted to participate in Apalachic ola’s rst Civil War History Weekend May 17-19. Ten members of the Crawfordville chapter sewed ags, made bandag es, spun cotton, and played music throughout the day in the Raney House and Or man homes. Found along Market Street, both the Raney and Orman Houses are beautiful antebellum homes listed on the Na tional Register of Historic Places. “We hope this will be one of many events in which our chapter may participate,” said Michelle Kirby, chapter member and UDC Florida ofcer. “Apalachicola is full of our rich Southern heritage and should be remembered.” For more informa tion on the UDC including membership, scholarships, and service opportunities, please contact the chapter via their website at www. rdonmcleod.org. Daughters of Confederacy explore history P h H OTOs S speciaSPECIA L TO The HE T imes IMES Michelle Kirby, district I director, Florida Division United Daughters of the Confederacy, shared thoughts of the UDC and the South. Kathy Frank plays for the crowd with a musical number. Kathy Frank and Mary Ann Owens work on their quilt while visiting in the sitting room. Arlene Vause mends the First National Flag. Linda Thompson spins cotton.

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The Times | A7 Thursday, May 30, 2013 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Richard Miller Family Many thanks for all the cards and expressions of sympathy I received after Richards death. I can only express gratitude to Jennifer, Cliff, Shawn, Marc, Rich and the staff from Carolines Spoonbill Lounge for the lovely tribute they put on for him. Many thanks to all who attended. Sandy Miller and Family Card of THANKS Christopher Anderson, of Port St. Joe, passed away May 21, 2013. He was born Jan. 8, 1972, in Port St. Joe, served in the U.S. Army and later worked for the Department of Corrections. He was preceded by his grandparents WT and Minister Irene Moses. Christopher is survived by his children Hunter and Morgan Anderson; mother Lola Lewis and husband Jake Lewis; father Lamar Anderson and wife Sheri Anderson; siblings sister Jennifer Smith and brotherin-law James Smith, brother Little Jake Lewis and sister-in-law Stephanie Lewis, brother Kevin Lewis and sister-in-law Brandi Lewis, sister Stacy Boring and brother-in-law Harland Boring; grandparents Richard Sonny and Lillian Anderson; and many nieces and nephews and lots of loving relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Saturday, May 25 at Highland View Church of God at 3 p.m. with the Rev. Vickie Summers ofciating. Interment followed in Pleasant Rest Cemetery at Overstreet All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Christopher Anderson John Wayne Page was born Aug. 15, 1950, in Wewahitchka. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1968-1972, then moved to Eastpoint, and resided there for many years. Wayne then married his sweetheart Melba Lominec on March 3, 1973. Wayne was a commercial sherman for most of his life and then worked with Florida Department of Corrections for 10 years. He was blessed with two beautiful sons, Jeffery Wayne Page and wife Angel, and son Jesse Ernest Page and wife Jennifer. Wayne has three grandchildren, Jesse Allen Page, Aden Bass, and C. J. Massey. He also had two greatgranddaughters, Madison Varnes and Lily Massey. Wayne is survived by two brothers, Andrew Page and wife Catherine, and Donald Page and wife Revina; and was predeceased by his brother, Ernest Page. Survivors also include his loving mother, Nettie Mae Page and deceased father Clyde Ernest Page. Wayne was blessed with many nieces and nephews including niece and number one daughter Katrina Strickland, Tammy Shiver, Rhonda Garrett, Shawna Emile, Tanya Walden, Brandy Banks, Leanna Nowling, Lisa Rowland, Christie Page, Little Lynn Page, Catherine Page, and Lindsey Page. Nephews include Donald Page, John Michael and Christopher Paul Polous, Johnny Davis, and the late Vince Allen Davis and Joshua Donovan. Wayne passed away at his home surrounded by his family and friends Sunday, May 26 at 4:07 p.m. He will be remembered as a loving and caring husband, father, grandfather, and friend to many including his D.O.C. family. Wayne will forever be missed, but always in our hearts. Wayne Page, We Love You! A celebration of his life was held Wednesday morning, May 29 at Eastpoint Church of God conducted by the Rev. Bobby Shiver and the Rev. Ronny Luke. Interment followed in Eastpoint Cemetery. He lay in state at the church Tuesday evening. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. John Wayne Page Charlie Billy Moses was born July 9, 1941, in Wewahitchka, to the now late Charlie and Frances Moses. He passed away Thursday, May 23, 2013, in Panama City at the age of 71. Billy worked maintenance for the Franklin County Courthouse; and was a F&AM Lodge #76, Scottish Rite, and Shaddai Shriner. He is survived by his wife, Sally Moses; children, Maranda Dooley (Josh), Shonda Segeren, and Dirk J. Segeren Jr.; and siblings, Joann Branch, Larry James, Edward James and Carolyn Butler. He was preceded in death by his sister, Helen Mintz. Funeral services will be held Saturday, June 1 at 11 a.m. at First Pentecostal Holiness Church in Apalachicola, with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Viewing will be held Friday, May 31 from 5 to 7 p.m. at First Pentecostal Holiness Church. Arrangements handled by Kelley Funeral Home. Billy Moses Thomas Hardin Knight, 85, passed away Saturday, May 18, 2013. After serving in the U. S. Navy on the USS Osage (LSV-3) during World War II, Tom completed a degree in electrical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. He had a distinguished career of 39 years with the Buckeye Corporation of Proctor and Gamble. Tom loved reading, sailing, music and sports; but most of all spending time with friends and family. He is survived by his loving wife Lorraine; son Kevin Knight (Alicia); stepsons Bill (Sherry) and Derek McGinn, all of Panama City; daughter-inlaw Elaine Mack Knight of Charlottesville, Virginia; brother Robert (Lavern), of Vernon, and sister-inlaw Elaine F. Knight, of Panama City; and sister Barbara (Ray) Stanyard of Tallahassee. Tom was the proud grandfather of 10 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. Tom was preceded in death by his parents Sadie Peggy Archibald and Thomas Ferguson Knight, his rst wife Lessie Swindle Knight, brother Richard Dick Knight and son Dr. James G. Knight. Donations in Toms honor and in gratitude for the wonderful care he received may be made to Shepherd Center 2020 Peachtree Rd NW Atlanta, GA 30309-9965 / shepherd. org/charitable-giving; or Big Bend Hospice, Gadsden County Special Needs, 105 N. Jackson St., Quincy, FL 32351 Thomas Hardin Knight Patricia Gayle Brown was born Sept. 5, 1951, in Port St. Joe to the now late Leroy and Jamie Butler. She passed away Thursday, May 23, 2013, in Panama City at the age of 61. She is survived by her husband, Charles Brown; children, Erica Tiller and Jermaine Fedd, both of Apalachicola; siblings, Delores Fedd, Lottie Yarrell, Marilyn Fedd, Carolyn Fedd, Paula Tiller, Earl Woods, Larry Butler, and Linda Woods; grandchildren, Xuripha Tiller, Micaela Fedd, Cassia Fedd, Jathan Proctor, Jymmarries Fedd, and NaiKycia Mitchell; and great-grandchild, Purity Myers. Funeral services will be held Sunday, June 2 at 2 p.m. at Kelley Funeral Home Chapel, Apalachicola. Patricia Gayle Brown Oliver Nash, 82, of Apalachicola, passed away early Monday morning, May 27, 2013, at his home. A lifelong resident of Apalachicola, Mr. Nash served three terms in the Florida House of Representatives, at that time the youngest person ever elected to that post. He also served as constable, also the youngest person to have served. He owned a seafood business and worked for St. Joe Paper Company, retiring from that job. Survivors include his wife Geraldine Nash, of Apalachicola; a son, Stephen Nash, of Apalachicola, and a son, Wayne Nash and wife, Casey, of Eastpoint; two daughters, Suzanne Osburn and husband Robert, and Debra Moses and husband Mark; seven grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren, all of Apalachicola; and his sister Ardelle Harper ,of White City. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, May 30, at Brownsville Assembly of God Church, conducted by the Rev. Geraldine Wilson. Interment will follow in the family plot in Magnolia Cemetery. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Oliver Nash OLIVER NASH Obituaries Faith BRIEF Miller honored at Memorial Day service Did you have a safe and somber Memorial Day? I went to our Legion post for the services and lunch. The service at the ag pole was at 11 a.m. Then we did an about face for the dedication of the cannon. Then we went out back for the retiring of the ags. Mr. Bill, Miller that is, was presented with a plaque and a citation; well deserved, I might add. We had a very good lunch. Thomas Lee and his helpers prepared the chicken and Becky Whaley and the other Auxiliary members prepared the sides and served. Along with the other desserts was Claudettes world famous chocolate clairs Yum! Yum! You bet your bippy Mary Britz was there! She looked great and happy to be back in Lanark. I had met a nice couple at the IGA on Sunday. They wanted to know about the activities on Memorial Day. I told them about the service at the Legion and the lunch and also about the lunch at the Lanark Village Boat Club. After our services, I went back into the lounge and there they were. I sat and had lunch with them and a nice visit. They are staying at the campground. Among many other friends and fellow members, I got to see Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. Hope you get to come to lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Serving begins at noon. Minimum donation of $3 will be collected at the desk. Be watching for you! The rst Saturday Over 50 Dance will be this Saturday, June 1, and will start at 8 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. for a while. Ro Vice will be on hand to provide the music. Bring your dancing shoes, your favorite snack to share, your beverage of choice and, oh yes, your main squeeze and dance the night away. One of the great ladies of Carrabelle was taken home over the weekend. Vera Snyder is with our Lord. A good, longtime friend of many of us. Pray for Veras eternal peace and for strength for her children. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, ASAP also stands for Always Say a Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh News BRIEFS FCHS plans graduation events Franklin County High Schools Senior Recognition Night will be at 6 p.m. Friday, May 31 in the school cafeteria. The commencement ceremony will be at 7 p.m. in the high school gymnasium on June 7. The public is invited to both events. Governor pens note to Sanders At the May 21 county commission meeting, Chairwoman Cheryl Sanders shared a handwritten note she received from Gov. Rick Scott with other board members. How can I help with job creation? Sanders said the note simply asked. We will work with him in any way we can, she said, and suggested the Greensteel Factory in Carrabelle was in need of a corporate tenant. She also said she plans to ask the governor about improving the industrial park at the Apalachicola Regional Airport. By this card, I think hes really interested in us, Sanders said. Commissioner Pinki Jackel agreed. Hes been down here when we invited him. I think hes really interested. We are facing long-term problems with the bay, and we really need to diversify our economy. People has realized there is a life off the water, but now, were going to have to have good paying jobs, Sanders said. Fellowship Baptist plans Saturday yard sale On Saturday June 1, Fellowship Baptist Church of Carrabelle will sponsor a yard sale in the parking lot of Compass Law in the triangle area behind the Carrabelle Library on U.S. 98. The sale will begin at 9 a.m. and will offer a wide variety of items including appliances, housewares, kitchen tools, and clothes. All proceeds will go to among 14 different missions; which include home and foreign missions, church planting, and prison ministries. So, come and shop for real deals and support outreach to missions the world over, as well as here at home.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M a y 30 85 75 10 % F ri, M a y 31 85 75 10 % S a t June 01 85 74 30 % Sun, June 02 84 74 10 % M on, June 03 85 73 40 % T ues June 04 85 74 10 % W ed June 05 85 74 20 % SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore This weekend we see the return of red snapper to our state and federal waters with much anticipation. We should see great catches coming to the dock, but don’t wait too long — the federal season is only 21 days, and the state runs 44 days this year. Weather will play a major part in this week’s offshore fishing, so check it before you go! Inshore fishing is at a peak in St. Joe waters right now. With water and air temps on the rise, the fishing will soon slow down as the water gets above the 85-degree mark. Right now trout, redfish and flounder can be found in all waters from 2 to 10 feet in St. Joe Bay. Live bait is abundant right now, so make the most of it! Page 8 Thursday, May 30, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Barn swallows are amazing yers and bene cial. Barn swallows are blue above with a peachy colored breast and darker orange on the throat and forehead. They have a long, slender, deeply forked tail. Females are slightly duller and shorter-tailed than males. Juveniles look similar to adults, but have much shorter tails. In late March, while walking my dogs on a mowed area near the airport, I found myself surrounded by about a half dozen barn swallows. They were swooping within a foot of the ground and so close to me I could almost have reached out and touched one. They were probably feeding on gnats or midges since it was dusk. They may have come so close to take advantage of insects my pack and I ushed while moving through the grass. They are known to follow agricultural equipment and cattle for that reason. Flies make up the majority of the barn swallow’s diet. Midges, mosquitoes and gnats are all ies. Barn swallows will eat any ying insect but prefer larger prey including beetles, bees, wasps, ants, butter ies and moths to midge swarms. However, larger insects are less abundant in early spring. The value of insectivorous swallows to farmers was recognized very early. It was illegal to kill them in ancient Rome. But they were driven to near extinction by hat-makers in the 19th century. The millinery trade’s impact on barn swallows prompted early conservationist George Bird Grinnell’s famous 1886 Forest & Stream editorial decrying slaughter of the little birds. That essay led to the founding of the rst Audubon Society. Happily, the barn swallow is once again among the commonest and most widely distributed bird species in the world and is found throughout the Northern Hemisphere in summer and over most of the Southern Hemisphere in winter. Barn swallows eat and drink on the wing. They forage in open areas including parks, ball elds, agricultural elds and beaches and over open water such as lakes, ponds and coastal waters. They range from sea level up to 10,000 feet. They are commonly seen over the grassy shoulders of the John Gorrie Bridge. According to Allaboutbirds.com, “Barn Swallows once nested in caves throughout North America, but now build their nests almost exclusively on humanmade structures. Today the only North American barn swallow population that still regularly uses caves as nest sites occurs in the Channel Islands off the California coast.” Master birder John Spohrer said they commonly nest under bridges and docks in our area, since barns are few and far between. That means last year was not kind to these beautiful birds because high water from tropical storms Debby and Ivan washed away most of the nestlings and destroyed nests. Swallows nest in mud cups lined with grass and feathers and will reuse existing cups after changing out the soft lining and patching them with fresh mud. Barn swallows don’t come to seed or suet feeders, but you might be able to attract them to your yard with ground-up eggshells or oyster shells placed on an open platform feeder. Swallows have lived in close association with humans for at least 2,000 years and, for this reason, they are the subject of much folklore. According to legend, a barn swallow consoled Christ on the cross. They represent freedom and hope. The swallow’s forked tail is said to have been struck by a lightning bolt when the swallow stole re from the gods to bring it to humankind. Another legend is that cows will give bloody milk if the swallows in the barn die or leave. Barn swallows also play an important role in maritime lore. English sailors had swallows tattooed on the chest or above the thumb on each hand. Each bird was said to represent 5,000 nautical miles traveled. It was also believed that, when a sailor drowned, the swallows carried his soul to heaven. DOT beauti cation funding approved On May 21, the county commission voted unanimously to accept funding for roadside beauti cation from the Florida Department of Transportation (DOT). At the March 5 county meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners $50,000 in DOT funding was available for roadside plantings to beautify the right of way along US 98. A $10,000 budget was earmarked for each county district. The DOT grant speci ed that money be limited to plants and “plant support materials,” like irrigation. Pierce speci ed that each site be furnished with irrigation to support the new plantings. The grant required that half the funding be used for large plant material, i.e. ve gallon containers or larger. Two of the sites chosen, US 98 and Hefernan Drive in Lanark Village and Island Drive in Eastpoint will be planted with large specimen palms. Three other sites, Carrabelle Beach Wayside Park, Seafood Workers County Park west of Apalachicola and the lawn of the county courthouse, designed by Nikki Millender, director of parks and recreation, will be planted with shrubs and perennials supporting migrating birds and butter ies. Pierce said the county has a year to complete the plantings and he anticipates planting will occur this fall. Oyster harvesting licenses now on sale The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is selling the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License. In order to harvest oysters from the Apalachicola Bay System beginning July 1, 2013, you must purchase this license before June 28. The cost of the license remains at $100 for Florida residents. (The cost for non-residents is $500 if purchased before June 28.) Please bring a check or money order for this amount made payable to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (F.D.A.C.S). No cash will be accepted. As a public service, we are also selling the FWC Saltwater Products License (SPL) in conjunction with the Apalachicola Bay oyster harvesting license. You will receive your SPL for free upon purchase of your oyster harvesting license. If you renew your license after Friday, June 28, you will have to pay an additional $500 late fee. Please note: The Shell sh Center in Apalachicola is currently undergoing renovation and no staff are on-site. To renew your license from now through June 14, please come to our temporary of ce in Eastpoint (350 Carroll Street), Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To accommodate the higher volume of harvesters seeking the license during the last two weeks of the sales period, June 17 through June 28, license sales will be held at the DEP ANERR building located at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries Street in Apalachicola, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have any questions regarding the purchase of your license you may call the FDACS of ce, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 670-1114. DAIL MULLINS | Special to the Times Participating in Hands Across the Sand this year on St. George Island on May 18 are, from left, Marty Beech, Lucia Delphinus, Marty Asrey, Ada Long, Barbara Sanders, W. K. Sanders, Stephenie Beene, and Sara Pankaskie. The crew was small but enthusiastic, said organizer Ada Long. HANDS ACROSS THE SAND By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A group of Franklin County students would like to clean up your land to raise money to ght pollution. Brook Pittman, president of Students Against Plastic Pollution, said her group wants to raise funds by doing monthly or quarterly trash pick-ups for businesses or individuals in return for a donation to support their outreach efforts. Last year, the group paid to display a billboard in Eastpoint reminding drivers not to litter and to take care of the bay. This year, SAPP, under sponsor Heidi Montgomery, has two projects. They want to erect educational kiosks at boat ramps around the county and display an anti pollution mural on the old NAPA building at 336 U.S. 98 in Eastpoint. Artist Lamar Mitchelle will donate his work, and the building’s owner, Rick Donahoe, is donating the canvas, but the students must raise money to buy paint and materials to construct the kiosks. To contribute to SAPP or hire the students, call Montgomery at 653-5679 or visit montgomeryscience.org. Outdoor BRIEFS Buds N Bugs: Barn swallows BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the Times Area residents can attract barn swallows to their yards with ground-up eggshells or oyster shells placed on an open platform feeder. Students offer work for the environment

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 9 Thursday, May 30, 2013 Golf Gone Wild, the Florida Wild Mammal Association’s annual golf tournament fundraiser, is well on its way to becoming a Panhandle tradition. With a score of 53, the foursome led by Nola Tolbert took the honors during the second annual Golf Gone Wild Tournament on May 18. Nine teams competed this year on a perfect afternoon for 18 holes. Two teams nished par 55 but the team headed by Gary Settle triumphed after a scorecard playoff. Tolbert’s team walked away with a purse of $400 and the second place team earned $250. The team earning the prize for being the “Dead Ass Last Team” Dan Harper, Brett Gormley, Gerald Bamberger and Jarrett Woolever won $100 for a score of 67. Closest to the pin on holes #2 and #6 was Dave Rheel. Mike Wheelus took that honor on hole #11 and Robbie Johnson on hole #17. All three men win free rounds of golf for their efforts. This year’s tournament featured a bevy of pink-capped hostesses who served up punch and sympathy along the fairway and acted as cheerleaders for the competing teams. Organizers Hollis Vail and John Spohrer said the fundraiser exceeded expectations. “Everybody had a great time. It went great,” Spohrer said. “I wouldn’t change a thing.” Vail said she wanted to thank the hostesses she recruited for making the tourney a smashing success. Chris Beatty, director of the Florida Wild Mammal Association said she was grateful for the help and everybody’s efforts. She said she especially wished to thank Spohrer, Vail, golf pro Rob Burlison and the St. James Bay Golf Resort for organizing and hosting the event. The Florida Wild Mammal Association is totally funded by grants and donations and serves a ve-county area including Franklin County. You can send a tax-deductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, or visit www.wakullawildlife. org. If you nd an injured animal, please bring it to their 198 Edgar Poole Road facility in Wakulla County. Visit the website for detailed directions. By LOIS SWOBODA Tolbert team triumphs in charity tourney The Franklin and Wakulla county sheriff’s of ces will host a golf tournament on Friday, June 7 to bene t the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches. The tourney is at St. James Bay. 151 Laughing Gull Lane, Carrabelle. The format is a 4 Person Scramble, with registration at 7 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Entry fee: is $100 per person, and $400 for a four-person team. Entry fee includes cart, refreshments and luncheon to all participants. Prizes awarded for longest drive, closest to pin (Par 3) and 50/50 Pay Out ($10/Entry). Mulligans are ve for $20. Cash payout for rst, second and third places. Payout determined by number of entries The mission of the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches is to help as many of Florida’s neglected and dependent children as possible. The Ranches operate ve facilities throughout Florida to meet the needs of boys and girls. Plans for the Project Impact Summer Camp are well under way at both the ABC Site and the city recreation site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program will be “Digging Into Reading,” and will be presented in collaboration with the Apalachicola Municipal Library. This program is developed by the 2013 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. Highlights for the summer include Kid’s College with the Gulf Coast State College, and a wooden boat building program presented in collaboration with the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. For a third year a special Sizzlin’ Summer Scholars program for teens and pre-teens is planned in collaboration with Gulf Coast through the Kids College outreach project. The program will include science, technology, health science, and the visual, performing, and culinary arts curriculum. GCCC has a new Advanced Technology Center where students will learn about the latest in the “green” sciences and engineering with many hands-on learning experiences. Students from both sites will participate in activities at Project Impact in Apalachicola and then attend special classes at the Panama City GCCC Campus during four eld trips where they will have an opportunity to see themselves in a campus setting and get a feel for life as college students. The Project Impact Summer Theater Program will host a dramatic arts program and performance, and a special guest pottery artist will provide wheel lesson at the city site. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 10 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week, with Project Impact collaborating with the City of Apalachicola for the July 3 parade and reworks program. Students must be between Pre-K (at least 4 years. old), and no older than the 12th grade for next school year to enroll in the camp. Other summer programs offered will include ne arts, crafts, sports, computer technology, and a eld trip each Thursday. The Project Impact Summer Program is provided free of charge. Families may enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city recreational sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 370-0145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola. Sheriff’s of ce plans golf tourney BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UY S 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y A PP P RICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 C RNR L O T S BLK $ S T ORE REDUCED $ 4 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Big plans for Project Impact Summer Camp Nola Tolbert, second from left, Robbie Johnson, far left, Rob Olin, second from right, and Brent Johnson bested the next team by two strokes.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office. Arrests in this week’s report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Franklin County Sheriff’s Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 22 Scotty C. Banks, 24, Eastpoint, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, burglary of a dwelling – person assaulted and domestic battery (FCSO) May 23 Sandi N. Dunlap, 23, Panacea, disorderly conduct (FCSO) Jason A. Scott, 39, St. George Island, failure to appear (FCSO) Robert F, Millender, 24, Carrabelle, battery (FCSO) Jamie R. Proctor, 31, Summerfield, violation of probation (FCSO) May 24 Jerry N. Kent, 37, Apalachicola, driving while licenses suspended or revoked (FWC) Tonya C. Seamon, 40, Carrabelle, domestic battery and violation of a pre-trial release injunction (CPD) Martin R. Raulerson, 53, Carrabelle, domestic battery and violation of a pre-trial release injunction (CPD) May 25 Brooklyn B. Page, 18, Eastpoint, no valid drivers license (APD) Marco A. Perez, 32, Apalachicola, providing alcohol to person under age 21 (APD) Christopher Bridges, 26, Lanark Village, felony battery – great bodily harm (FCSO) Paul E. Noblitt, 30, Columbia, Ala., boating under the influence (FWC) May 26 Michael R. Downing, 43, Eastpoint, DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked (FWC) Farah D. Frady, 43, Thomasville Ga., DUI (FHP) Buel C. Taylor, 26, Apalachicola, driving while license or revoked, and possession of paraphernalia (APD) James R. Ervin, 58, Tallahassee, boating under the influence (FWC) Howard N. Martin, 34, Carrabelle, boating under the influence (FWC) Daniel Stepp, 45, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) May 27 Patrick A. Harvey, 43, Sopchoppy, driving while license suspended or revoked (FHP) Megan H. Cummins, 22, Tallahassee, DUI, refusal to submit to breath test and resting officer without violence (FCSO) Arrest REPORT A10 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center Representative Panama City, FL Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: 21*+)*.#(-++%+0)*#')* *%1#'%%',*'.#*('&', 2#%#,1'+#*,(+%% 2,*('!(&&-'#,#('+$#%%+ 2*(3#'1/#,"%%#*(+(4))%#,#('+ 2,#%(*#',,&)%1*/#,")++#(' (*"%)#'!-+,(&*+ Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, # ('!,*&#+#%#,1#'+-*')%'')#,#&(5 In addition, we oer: 2* (*&''',#.+1% 2*#'%1&'.#*('&', 2-))(*,#.(,#.,#'!,5,("%)1(-+2(+#,#.*( ++#('%'),/(*$'.#*('&', 2*(&(, *(&/#,"#' Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1109042 # !! $ "!" ""!

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 30, 2013 The Times | A11 4514621 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE,FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www.rsttness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW2 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT .............................. $550 3 BR / 2 BAMOBILEHOME .......... $700 1 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT, INCLUDESUTILITIES .................. $650 2 BR/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME WITHPOOL ............................... $850 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY98 FRONTAGE ......... $650 4515019 Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking a seasonal part-time, entry-level Housekeeping Inspector / Laundry Assistant and Front Desk person. Some experience is preferred but not required. Must be energetic, detailed oriented and possess great customer service skills. Weekends are required and must be able to start immediately. $10 $12 per hour with paid training. Drug Screen & Background Check required. Please apply in person at 112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 1109847EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace Multi-Media Advertising Sales Executive Panama City, Florida Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida has an immediate opening for a motivated Multi-Media Advertising Sales Executive for our Automotive Team. In addition to powerful and result achieving print products, you will have the ability to oer local advertisers sought aer digital marketing tools such as: website design, mobile websites, behavioral targeting, search engine marketing, search engine optimization, social media daily deals and more.We are seeking a dynamic individual with the ability to grow revenue through new business development and existing customer relationships. Job responsibilities include: Developing and implementing strategies to increase account revenue Increasing marketshare through new business development Growing revenue through existing client product education Communicating marketing, circulation and readership data to advertisers in a call to actionŽ format With solid training, a great leadership team and a personal commitment, you will grow to become a respected local marketing consultant that is digitally sa vvy and knows how to help local businesses grow. Unlike other media in the marketplace, we dont sell advertising … we create MULTI-media solutions. Our most successful team members are successful be cause they ask customers and prospects about their business; they listen to their answers, and design long-term print and digital advertising solutions that will help our business-to-business customers to increase their sales. Qualications Include: € A friendly and outgoing personality € Comfortable making presentations € Desire to be a part of a fun and hardworking team € Vision and creativity € Excellent time management skills € Minimum 2 years successful sales experience € Ability to operate independently € Newspaper background a plus, but not required All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/Ad&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. Well oer you a competitive base salary plus a monthly incentive/commission plan. If you’re ready for a new challenge and to grow your career, submit a cover letter, resume and compensation expectations to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 91148T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000273 YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JUSTIN SAMUELLS, etc., at al., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Canceling and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 2, 2013, entered in the above captioned action, Case No. 2009-CA -000273, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 A.M. inside the front courthouse steps, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, on June 13, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said final judgment, to-wit: Lot 12 and 13, Block 82, St. George Island Gulf Beaches No. 5, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this May 7th, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Eric R. Schwartz, Esq. Attorney for Plaintiff Weitz & Schwartz, P.A. 900 S. E. 3rd Avenue, Suite 204 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316 eschwartz@weitzschwartz. com (954) 468-0016 May 23, 30, 2013 91260T REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Gulf Coast Workforce Board announces the availability of a Request for Proposal (RFP) titled “Workforce Center Carpeting”. The purpose of the RFP is to seek proposals from qualified vendors to remove old carpeting and install approximately 11,700 square feet of new carpeting at the Workforce Center located at 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida. The intent is to enter into a contract with a single prime contractor. Bidder will submit proposals by 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 4, 2013. For a copy of the proposal and further information, contact: Gulf Coast Workforce Board Jen Hiddleson 5230 W. Highway 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-913-3285 jhiddleson@gcwb.org Minority businesses are encouraged to apply. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. May 30, 2013 j j Adopt j j : Active, Energetic, Pro Couple Yearns for 1st Baby Joyce 00-552-0045 FLBar42311 Expenses Paid Larnard Village East Pine Street, Saturday June 1st 8am to 5pm Multi-Family!Furniture, home decor, dryer, Large Variety! GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl June 15th & 16th 8:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL53032 to 56654 7 ft. glass display case; $250; Electric cash register $125; Steel Ladder Rack for a truck $125; Tecky Cypress Wood, 100 linear feet $125. 850-832-1563 Administrative/Clerical Admin Asst. The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is seeking a part time Admin Asst. Candidates should possess High School diploma or GED, minimum of 5 years office experience, excellent interpersonal skills and computer skills, attn to detail & have the ability to multi-task. Responsibilities include handling incoming calls, scheduling appts, data entry, and special projects as assigned. Selected employee will be needed 24 hours per week and be able to work 6 hours per day Mon through Thurs from 9am-4pm. Email, drop off or mail resume to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Email: apalha@fairpoint.net. Web ID:34252798 Flood Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Receptionist Weekends Required Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34252703 Text FL52703 to 56654 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *Bussers BLUE PARROT Now HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityBartender / Therapist Needed The Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & Grill Now Hiring All Positions Apply in person only HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook Needed The Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Logistics/TransportDrivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/Health Weems Memorial Is now hiring for the following positions: Licensed Medical Technologist Paramedic EMT RN Dietary Registration Applications are available at: www weemsmemorial.com & may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34253531 Text FL253531to 56654 LOW INTEREST FINANCING Borrow up to $20K, pay $386/month. 8 % interest 6 year term. Personal and Small Business loans, debt consolodiation, bad credit ok. Call 888-994-0029 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL48155 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL50614 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/Ain Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 Appalachacola 4 Bedroom/ 1 Bath. Wood frame. Central heat and air, all appliances electrical. $950/ month, plus $950 deposit. Call (561) 312-7188 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1200 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $79,000. Call (850) 524-1257 North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 OBO. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers pro-tected (404) 218-0077 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition ABS brakes, Reinhart pipes, two seats, cover, two helmets, charger, extra chrome, two windshields and more. Always garage kept, less than 10,000 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $16,500 NADA suggestedretail is $16,000 850-723-4642 2003 Bounder 36S $18,800!!! VIN: 5B4MP67G233371432. EVERYTHING WORKS, 8.1 Chevy gas motor, Allison 5-speed auto tranny. Call or txt: 850-387-6500 to make offer.Text FL53262 to 56654 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper. For Fast Results,Call 747-5020 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper.For Fast Results, Call 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 Get in tune with Classified’s section of musical instruments in Class 3310. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 O ur local r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in R eal E sta t e P icks! (I n this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an Blas S t G eor ge Island C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty $$ STE VE HA RR IS C ell: 8508901971 st e v e@s t e v esisl and .com w w w .288 mag nolia ba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisl and .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248585 $1,199,000 St. Geor ge Island $$ PLANT A TION BEA CHFR ONT Go r ge ou s, 4B R, 3. 5 B A, Gr ea t ki tc he n, gr an it e co un te r to ps up sc al e ap pl ia nc es fu rn is he d, a t sc re en TV s, du mb w ai te r ti le o or s, Sp a T ub la r ge PO OL ou td oo r ki tc he n wi th po ol ta bl e & ba th IN CO ME PR OD UC ER Na ut il us Dr i v e. $$ MLS# 249088 $275,000 401 St. James A ve. #10, Carrabelle, FL F isher man 's Geta way Corn er unit 2 bedr oom / 2 ba th to wn hom e in Rive rside a t Carr abel le. Loca ted in the cent er of Carr abel le. F ea tures desig na ted boa t slip and 9,00 0 lb. boa t lift. Purc hase toda y and be read y for all the sum mer shin g tourn ame nts. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 ( (( !! % !! # !! # ! &# #& S O L D $ John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248778 $439,000 St. Geor ge Island EAST END BEA CHFR ONT L OT One acr e in the East End, str eet to beach lot, DEP Bldg per mit f or house & POOL in place plans can be r e vised & still use the same DEP per mit, b uy er sa v es almost $22,000 in soft b ldg costs plus the sa vings of a ppr o x. 6 months of per mitting time 1.02 acr es $$ $$ && &% $'$ B eautifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular B a y and B ridge views with man y new upda t es Remodeled k it chen (new c abinets c oun t er t ops sink disposal st o v e dish w asher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea t r e ec tiv e windo w lm; 3 lg BRs with new mast er BA; priv a t e o c e just o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2 w alk in closets T his house is per f ec t f or en t er taining with a huge fr on t por ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and w ood burning r eplac e L andsc ape has irriga tion w ell and na tiv e plan ts High e cienc y hea t pump new r oof 6 additional in. r oof insula tion. P r esen t o wners ha v e immac ula t ely main tained and impr o v ed this v er y c omf or table B a y V iew home! B uy er should v erify squar e f ootage S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HA RR IS C ell: 8508901971 st e v e@s t e v esisl and .com w w w .st e v esisl and .com w w w .332 C ookS tr eet .com / + *0 0 ,-+ ( ( ' % !# $..$ Ri ve rfr on t pa ra di se Lo ca t e d ju st a fe w m ile s ou t sid e Ca rra be lle on t h e pri st in e Ne w Ri ve r t h is 3 BR / 2 .5 BA 2 ,4 0 0 sq ft h o m e of fe rs so m e t h in g fo r e ve ryo n e $ ) # $ 850 -528 -414 1 l 850 -697 -101 0 ww w .co ast alre alt yin f o .co m $$ ML S# 249 344 $25 0,0 00 401 St. Jam es A ve. #11 C AR RA BEL LE, FL F isher man 's Drea m! V er y well main taine d 2 bedr oom /2 ba th to wn hom e in Rive rside a t Carr abel le. F ea tures desig na ted boa t slip and 9,00 0 lb. boa t lift. Conv enie ntly loca ted next to C-Qu arter s. Purc hase toda y and be read y for all the sum mer shin g tourn ame nts. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 $ “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) The main difference between a cafe latte and a cappuccino deals with the amount of? Skim milk, Sugar, Foam, Espresso 2) The pressure in a bottle of champagne is about how many times the pressure in an automobile tire? 2, 3, 4, 5 3) What’s the average number of grapes it takes to make a bottle of wine? 300, 600, 900, 1200 4) Which women’s sport banned the crowhop? Softball, Tennis, Basketball, Volleyball 5) What gaming activity may begin with a corking? Pool, Horseshoes, Marbles, Darts 6) To prove a point in 1903 whose company electrocuted an elephant at Coney Island? Ford, Edison, Morse, Houdini 7) What sports bureau does Major League Baseball rely upon for its ofcial records? Lazarus, Birdhouse, Elias, Bear 8) What’s the name of Willie Nelson’s main acoustic guitar? Hank, Lassie, Johnny, Trigger 9) Who is Jerry’s cousin of cartoon’s “Tom & Jerry”? Tiny, Muscles, Thorny, Bubbles 10) Of these which is not on the Gulf of Mexico? Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana 11) When “The Flintstones” aired on prime-time TV, what was its cigarette sponsor? Winston, Camel, Marlboro, Lucky Strike 12) What’s traditionally given as a 30th wedding anniversary gift? Silver, Crystal, Pearls, Paper 13) “Tweety Pie” who’s continually chased by Sylvester the cat is what type of bird? Parakeet, Cockatiel, Robin, Canary 14) What’s the main shape of the “Star Africa” diamond? Pear, Star, Rectangular, Marquise ANSWERS 1) Foam. 2) 3. 3) 600. 4) Softball. 5) Darts. 6) Edison. 7) Elias. 8) Trigger. 9) Muscles. 10) Georgia. 11) Winston. 12) Pearls. 13) Canary. 14) Pear. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Bay Community School hosts Friday art auction Bay Community School, our community based pre-school in Apalachicola, is hosting its annual Art Show and Auction on Friday, May 31 beginning at 6 p.m. at The Center for History, Culture and Art, on the corner of Water Street and Avenue E. Come and have dinner prepared by Tamara’s Caf and have fun while supporting a great cause. Tickets are $25/person. They are also looking for community sponsors to help supplement the cost for their event. Sponsorships are $100 and include a dinner ticket and personal thank you from the children. The Bay Community School, at 184 Fred Meyer St. in Apalachicola, is a not-for-prot center for education. Proceeds from this event cover the basic costs of running the school. Thank you for your support! For more information about the event or the school, please visit www.baycommunityschool.com Relay for Life begins at noon Saturday Join us in promoting and celebrating Relay for Life! As a way to promote ghting back, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson signed a proclamation to Paint the town Purple! Storefronts, yards, fences, any way you can! Decorate your place purple, from May 27 to June 2! Join the American Cancer Society as we Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back. The Relay for Life is Saturday, June 1 from noon until Sunday, June 2 at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. All survivors and caregivers are invited to join us we celebrate you and remember those we’ve lost. Survivor dinner will be served. Lumanaria ceremony. Local entertainment. Food and family fun! All proceeds go to American Cancer Society to help ght back against cancer! Dance Saturday at Carrabelle Senior Center A dance will be held at 8 p.m. on Saturday evening, June 1, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue. Admission is free, with music provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to dance ... or just to listen to the music! The Nobles dancers in paradise Saturday at Dixie Performers go “Dancing in Paradise” in two shows for Pam Nobles Studio’s 32nd recital Saturday, June 1, at 1:01 p.m. and 6:06 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Tickets are $10 advanced or $15 at door. Call 653-8078. Doors open 45 minutes before each show. News br BR IE fsFS



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50¢ Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, May 30, 2013 VOL. 128 ISSUE 5 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . . A11 ABC, FCS results at odds, even after interventions By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The third-grade reading and math FCAT scores released last week showed a modest improvement over last year for both the county’s two public elementary schools; the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and the Franklin County Schools each showed gains in the percentage of their students scoring at grade level or better. What is of concern, though, is that the scores appear to reinforce a sharply contrasting pattern rst suggested in last year’s results. That just as the ABC School is inching closer to the goal of having three-quarters of its thirdgraders at grade level or better, Franklin is stalled at the point of having two-thirds of its thirdgraders testing at below grade level. For the second year in a row, fewer than one-third of Franklin third-graders taking the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, of which there were 75, scored at grade level or above in reading and math, in both cases short of the percentages reached in 2011. In the case of the ABC School, three-quarters of the 35 thirdgraders were at grade level or better in reading, more than 20 percentage points better than in 2011. About two-thirds of these students were at grade level or better in math, 10 percentage points better than two years ago. In reading, the percentage edged up from 72 to 74 percent, with the brightest spot the 12 percentage point jump in the number of Level 4s, from 28 to 40 percent of the third grade class. In math, By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The dedication of a longsought decommissioned howitzer was the highlight of an impressive Memorial Day celebration on the county’s east end. Despite a sense of triumph, the mood was somber as Camp Gordon Johnston American Returning soldier helps honor the fallen By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The old soldiers gathered Monday for Memorial Day at veterans plaza, remembering those who did not return home and a young one who just did. Members of American Legion Post 106 led services attended by an ample audience, who applauded the return this month of Sgt. Joseph Taranto to his wife and four sons. Taranto’s unit, the Florida National Guard’s 870th Engineer Company out of Crestview, was tasked with nding By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Monday, May 27, a cruise ship made an overnight stop in Carrabelle. The layover was part of the 11-day Southern Charms Cruise offered by Blount’s Small Ship Adventures of Warren, Rhode Island. The cruise ship Grande Caribe navigated the Mississippi River, Industrial Canal Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Bay to reach Carrabelle. In the course of her travels, she had already visited New Orleans; Biloxi, Miss.; Mobile, Ala.; Pensacola and Panama City. The travelers will nish their journey on Thursday in St. Petersburg. The ship can carry 96 passengers in her 48 cabins; this trip had 49 and a crew of 17. While in Carrabelle, the cruisers could walk the town on their own or travel by shuttle bus. David Butler gave a lecture on Carrabelle history on Monday night, and Lesley Cox, a certi ed Green Guide led an optional nature tour of Tate’s Hell. John and Carol Leinhard of Houston, Texas, said this was their rst visit to northern Florida. “Is it always this quiet?” he asked. “When was the last time you had a burglary?” The couple said their objective for the afternoon was to photograph the town. Elaine Tucker of Clarksville, Texas, said she wanted to visit the 2 die in plane crash By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Two South Carolina men died in a plane crash Monday evening after taking off from Apalachicola Regional Airport. According to the Federal Aviation Authority, Anthony Caveza, 58, and Julius “Gil” Gilreath, 71, both of Greenville, South Carolina, were headed for Greenville Downtown Airport. Apalachicola airport employee Arthur “Perky” White said Gilreath drove himself to Cleve Randolph Field in a borrowed blue Toyota, which was still parked there on Tuesday morning. He and Gilreath discussed shing while waiting for Gilreath’s ight to arrive. White believes Gilreath was in the area on a shing trip. White said the single-engine Piper 32 was number four of seven planes that refueled at the airport on Monday. He said the airport immediately ceased selling fuel after learning of the accident. “That’s just a precaution,” White said. “It’s the rst thing we do in case the crash is fuel-related.” White said the other six planes serviced arrived safely at their destinations. FAA records say the plane was registered to FLEBO Air LLC of Greenville, N.C. Caveza listed his occupation as commercial pilot on several internet networking sites. Joe Frasher, manager of the Greenville airport, where many corporate jets land and take off, told reporters Caveza had a 3rd-grade FCAT scores vary River cruise ship makes stop in Carrabelle MEMORIAL DAY 2013 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Joey Taranto’s wife, Gina, hands their baby son, Cooper, to grandmother Toni Taranto. The sergeant left for war when his youngest son was just 5 weeks old. Below, a decommissioned artillery cannon stands in front of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. ‘The f lag still ies’ LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Legion dedicates howitzer cannon See CRASH A5 See FCAT A5 See CRUISE A2 See SOLDIER A3 See CANNON A3 Buds ‘n’ Bugs looks at barn swallows, A8 Bay Community student art exhibit Friday Bay Community School, the community based not-for-pro t pre-school in Apalachicola, will have its annual Art Show and Auction at 6 p.m. Friday, May 31, at the History Culture and Arts Center in downtown Apalachicola on Water Street. Dinner will be prepared by Tamara’s Caf. Tickets, $25, will be sold at the door. Call 653-6523 for reservations. Proceeds cover the basic costs of running the school. For details, visit www. baycommunityschool.com. Relay for Life starts Saturday Relay for Life of Franklin County will be noon Saturday until 6 a.m. Sunday. Tents will sell food, drinks and more with live entertainment and games throughout the night. Highlights are opening ceremonies and survivor/ caregiver lap at noon and the luminaria ceremony at 9 p.m. For information, call 348-6268 or email Kyla.Pugh@cancer.org. Nobles dancers Saturday at Dixie Performers go “Dancing in Paradise” in two shows for Pam Nobles Studio’s 32nd recital at 1:01 and 6:06 p.m. Saturday at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Tickets are $10 advance or $15 at door. Call 653-8078. Doors open 45 minutes before each show. Headliners include the Hillside Dancers, Hot Flashes, singer Tamara Marsh, Holly Chambers in a solo, Three Little Fishes, and Sea Cruise. Arnett Peel will emcee. Special awards go to Georgia Page, dancer for three years; Myia Maxwell, six years; Holly Chambers, 12 years; Patricia Perryman, 13 years; Linda Grif n, 18 years; Bonnie Smith, 23 years; Linda Maloy, 24 years; Rita Theis, 26 years; Debby Ruffner 27; and June Gray, 30 years. WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 EV E R Y ON E IS CORDIALL Y INVIT E D to attend an O PE N H O U S E for the O FFIC E OF S T A T E REP R E S E NT A TIV E Halse y Beshears on Thursday May 30, 2013 fr om 3:00 5:00. T he ofce is located in the R ealtors A ssociation of F ranklin & Gulf C ounties b uilding at 78 11th S treet, S uite 5, A palachicola, F lorida. “W e are e xcited to open this ofce and ha v e a presence in F ranklin C ounty to serv e the citizens of this community and surrounding counties”, states R ep. Beshears. S top by and visit us and meet the staf f. W e look forw ard to seeing you. 78 11t h S t. S u i t e 5 A pa l a c h i c o l a, FL 32320 (850) 653-1213 A n n o u n ci ng a n e w na m e f o r P ro gre s s E n e r g y L oo k f o r o u r n e w n a m e a n d l o g o i n y o u r b i l l s a n d o t h e r p l a c e s N o o t h e r a s pe c t o f y o u r s e r v i c e o r a c c o u n t i s ch a ng i ng A l t h o u g h o u r n a m e h a s c h a n g e d o u r c o m m i t m e n t t o y o u a n d t h e c o m m u n i t i e s w e s e r v e r e m a i n s t h e s a m e S o y o u c a n c o u n t o n u s f o r r el i a b l e el e c t r i c i t y – e v e r y t i m e y o u i p t h e s w i t c h L e a r n m o r e a t d u k e e n er g y c om / n e w n a me “' B ‹  C’ƒ A”•”v‡”’ P r o g r e s s E ne r g y no w h a s a ne w n a m e : Du k e E n er g y PUB LI C N O TI CE THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y AD VISO R Y B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL H O LD A PUB LI C HEARIN G O N WED NES D A Y JUNE 5, 2013, A T 10:00 A.M., IN THE C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O N MEE TIN G R O O M O F THE FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y C O UR TH O US E ANNEX T O C O NS ID ER THE FO LLO WIN G V ARI AN CES, AP P EALS AND S P ECI AL EX CEPTI O NS: 1. C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O THE S-4 D IS TRI CT S T AND ARDS O F L AN ARK VILL A GE T O C O NS TR UCT AN AD D ITI O N 12 FEE T FR O M THE O RI GIN AL W ALL F A CIN G A C O UR T O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 46, B L O CK 4, UNIT 1, 5-3 P ARKER A VENUE, L AN ARK VILL A GE, FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GENE S TRI CKL AND A GENT FO R ED W ARD P A T TILL O O WNER 2. C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O INS T ALL A CAR GO LIFT 4 FEE T INT O THE S ID E S E TB A CK LINE O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 4, B L O CK B UNIT O NE, GULF WYNN S UB D IVIS I O N, 2470 U .S. HI GHW A Y 98, L AN ARK VILL A GE, FR ANKLIN C O UNT Y FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY WILLI AM S. AND E VEL YN C. B ARNES, O WNERS. 3. C O NS ID ER A TI O N O F A REQ UES T FO R A V ARI AN CE T O INS T ALL A VINYL S EA W ALL WITHIN THE CRITI CAL H AB IT A T ZO NE O N P R O P ER T Y D ESCRIB ED A S L O T 1, CR O O KED RIVER LI GHTH O US E RES ER V A TI O N, 1968 US HI GHW A Y 98 WES T CARR AB ELLE, FL O RID A. REQ UES T S UBMIT TED BY GARLI CK ENVIR O NMENT AL A SSO CI A TES, IN C., A GENT FO R FIRS T CH O I CE GO V IN C., O WNER THE B O ARD O F C O UNT Y C O MMISS I O NERS A CTIN G A S THE B O ARD O F AD JUS T MENT WILL AD D RESS THES E REQ UES T S A T THEIR MEE T IN G O N JUNE 18, 2013. *P er s o n s w i s hin g t o co mm en t m a y do s o in p er s o n o r in w r i t in g t o t h e F ra n k lin C o un t y P l a nnin g & Z o nin g D ep a r t m en t, 34 F o rb es S t r e et, S ui t e 1, A p a l ac hico l a, FL 32320. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t hi s h e a r in g w i l l n o t b e r e co r de d p er s o n s w i s hin g t o r e co r d t h e p r o ce e din gs m u s t t a k e t h e n e ces s a r y a r ra n g em en ts f o r r e co r din g “World’s Smallest Police Station” at the request of her daughter, a law enforcement ofcer. “I’ve taken 10 or 12 of these river cruises,” she said. “I love them. You get a totally different perspective on things and see things you’d never see. Also, with only about 50 people on board, we get to know everybody.” She said the food on the cruise was excellent but that passengers can opt to dine ashore when in port. Blount’s Small Ship Adven tures, whose motto is “We go where the big ships cannot,” was founded by Luther Blount in the 1950s. His family owned E.B. Blount and Sons Oyster Company, but after the 1938 hurricane left the Maine oyster beds in a sham bles, college-educated Blount developed a system for steam ing clams that saved the family fortune By 1947, Blount had become vice president of E.B. Blount and Sons, but the fact his family hadn’t returned to the oyster busi ness weighed on him. He turned to boat building and, after having built numerous craft, decided to attempt a small pleasure cruiser. Blount’s Small Ship Adven tures now has two cruise ships, both built by Blount’s Boats. They sail under an American ag and employ mostly U.S. citizens. The Grande Caribe spends her time in the Americas, and her sister, the Grand Mariner, travels the water ways of Europe. The boats have a draft of less than 7 feet and retractable pilot houses that allow them to pass under low bridges. The Grande Caribe is 184 feet long with a beam of 41 feet and weighs 94 tons. She was built in 1997 and refurbished in 2009. Both boats carry kayaks and glass-bottomed boats for local touring. In addition to optional tours and programs ashore at most stops, on many evenings, lo cal entertainers come aboard to perform. Passengers on the cruise were offered a 2-for-1 special, so most paid about $2,000 for the cruise. CRUISE from page A1 Weems recognized for lab services Special to The Times Weems Memorial Hos pital’s laboratory has met all criteria for laboratory accreditation by COLA, a national health care ac creditation organization. Accreditation is given only to laboratories that apply rigid standards of quality in day-to-day op erations, demonstrate continued accuracy in the performance of prociency testing and pass a rigorous on-site laboratory survey. Weems has earned COLA accreditation as a result of a long-term commitment to provide quality service to its patients. In a letter to Charles McDearis, lab manager, COLA said, “the standards your laboratory maintain demonstrates your com mitment to quality. Your emphasis on quality leads to reliable test results which are essential in as suring excellence in pa tient care. We compliment your laboratory staff for its dedication.” Ray Brownsworth, Weems CEO, expressed his appreciation for the exceptional quality pro vided by McDearis and his staff, Donna Taratoot, Jean Roberts, and Meloney Chambers. COLA is approved by the federal government and sponsored by the Ameri can Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Passengers disembark from the Grande Caribe on the Carrabelle waterfront.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, May 30, 2013 and disposing of improvised explosive devices. “Business was real good over there,” he said. “Same things we we’re nding over there happened in Boston. “It’s a very bad business. Pray for those who made the ultimate sacri ce, and pray for those who never made it home.” The ceremony was led by Post Commander Larry Hale, who focused on the cost of war to families and loved ones back home. He spoke of the dying words of soldiers throughout the ages, “remember me to my wife, to my mother.” It is important that he and his fellow veterans live up to the mission outlined in the Legion’s preamble, “to do service to our communities,” he stressed. “I, and so many others like me, have done my best to live up to that,” Hale said. “They came back to make the community a better place.” His daughter, Brooke Pittman, stood alongside, gently ringing a bell, as Hale read off the names of the area’s casualties from Vietnam. Chaplain Charles Scott opened the service with a prayer, and did not leave unprayed concern for the direction of the country away from God. “Thank the Lord the ag still ies,” he said. “We honor those who paid the debt, and honor the many of those who will yet serve and who will yet pay the price. “We are fast losing that freedom that’s deserving of living one nation under God. God help us that we never have to try. Remind us of the cost of freedom, that it’s up to us to maintain that freedom, by being willing to sacri ce our lives if necessary.” With veterans standing crisply in salute, Angeline Stanley began the solemn occasion with a singing of “The Star Spangled Banner.” In her closing, she summoned the beauty of returning home safely in a contemporary rendition of “Amazing Grace.” In Scott’s closing, blessing the low country boil that followed at Chapman Botanical Gardens, he spoke of how “we are honoring those who paid the terri c price so we could be here today, only by God’s amazing grace. “We honor those who will never join in that fellowship around the table again.” He offered a blessing for our nation’s leaders and closed with a promise that expressions of the Christian faith would not be deterred by public policy. “You will not stop us from raising the name of Jesus,” Scott prayed. Guests then were treated to a low country boil beneath the shade of the gardens. w h en y o u give your heart there is only o n e c h o ice ba ymedical .or g | 7 6 9 1 5 1 1 One L if e One H e a r t One H os p i ta l T o p R a n k e d in N o r t h w es t Flo r id a A r e a ’ s On l y O p en H e a r t S ur g er y Fi v e C a r di ac C a t h L a bs A r e a ’ s On l y D e dic a t e d C a r dio va s c u l a r I n t en si v e C a r e U ni t 200 D o c t o r s a n d S t a D e dic a t e d t o H e a r t C a re A r e a ’ s B es t H e a r t A t t ac k a n d H e a r t F a i l ur e S ur v i va l R a t es N o H e a r t P a t ien t W a i ts in O ur ER 2092216 SOLDIER from page A1 Legion Post 82 celebrated Memorial Day 2013. About 40 members, friends and supporters of the post gathered to dedicate a decommissioned eld armament and welcome it to its new home on Oak Street. Former Post Commander Bill Miller received a plaque and an award for his efforts in obtaining the gun as a monument to all veterans. He also did the honors and cut a red, white and blue braided ribbon to of cially receive the gun. Miller said he has worked on obtaining a piece of military equipment for the post for 53 years. “When Dad founded this post in 1957, he started trying,” Miller said. “When I moved here permanently in 1960, I took up the cause. Congressman (Bob) Sikes had something in front of every Legion post from here to Pensacola, but we weren’t in his district. We nally got on the list, but it still took ve years until we were nally approved in 2012. If it hadn’t been for Greg Christopherson and his computer, we still wouldn’t have it. I am really grateful. This is de nitely at the top of my bucket list.” During the dedication, Miller told the audience, “If all the guns in the world were silent, we wouldn’t have to have this, but it doesn’t look like that’s going to happen. So this is to remind us of all of those who have fallen to protect our nation and to remind the world that the United States will defend itself against all enemies.” Miller raised $3,000 to bring the gun to Lanark. In addition to the moving dedication and ribbon cutting, the ag was raised and lowered to half mast, and Chaplin Barbara Cook read a devotional. “She prayed, ‘Dear Heavenly Father, oh, Holy One, oh, God Our Creator, we are gathered here today to honor and pay tribute to the veterans who sacri ced their lives so we could meet here today without fear of armed soldiers. “Bless the Lord who is my rock. He gives me strength for war and skill for battle. He is my loving ally and my fortress, my tower of safety, my deliverer. He stands before me as a shield and I take refuge in him. He subdues the nations under me. “In this turbulent world, we give our thanks and gratitude to the servicemen and women who are protecting our freedom that we so often take for granted. There will always be wars and rumors of war until our Lord returns to Earth again. Until his return, we should pray every day that he might protect and watch over our troops.” After the dedication, a ceremony was held in the picnic shelter behind the Legion Hall, where more than 200 retired ags were honorably disposed of by burning. The ags were full-sized ones collected over the last year and small ags exchanged for new ones placed on the graves of East End veterans on Sunday. Christopherson of ciated in the ceremony and, with help from Cook and David Butler, laid the ags to honorable rest. After the day’s duties, everyone was invited inside for a chicken dinner prepared by Thomas Lee, Becky Whaley and many, many helpers. World War II vet Mary Britz was on hand looking t and happy in red, white and blue. At the Lanark Village Boat Club, 50 people joined to celebrate the holiday and enjoy a potluck picnic with burgers, pulled pork and hot dogs prepared by Norm Gembel and Carol Daddona. The group rose and sang “God Bless America” before the feast. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Post Commander Greg Christopherson and Chaplin Barbara Cook commit retired ags to the ames. Below is World War II veteran Mary Britz. CANNON from page A1

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times O PINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 4 Thursday, May 30, 2013 The Apalachicola Municipal Library has just received its shipment of books from the Libri Foundation of Eugene, Ore., which offers books to small rural public libraries at an affordable cost for excellent awardwinning books. The library has received several grants from them in the past, and this year’s selection is based on the Summer Reading Program theme “Dig Into Reading.” Matching funds for this grant were provided by PALS. Titles range from “I’m Dirty” by Kate and Jim McMullan, about a little dump truck, to “Bodies from the Ash” by James Deem, a middle school book about the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in Pompeii. The library has increased its collection of the Nic Bishop books which cover spiders, snakes, lizards and other creatures. These are fabulous books are lled with full page close-ups, with lots of information too. The Summer Reading Program which begins on June 10, and runs Mondays and Tuesdays for six weeks at the two Project Impact sites, will use many of these new Libri grant books. The weekly themes are Gardening (Week 1), Earthmovers and Trucks (Week 2), Underground and Underwater Animals (Week 3), Buried Treasure and Pirates (Week 4), Earth and Geology (Week 5), and nally Explorers, Archeology and History (Week 6). Age appropriate books and small crafts activities will be done with several groups each morning, followed by a “ eld trip” to the library in the afternoon to check out books. For some children the ability to take home books for free from the public library is a new concept, one which we hope will encourage them to return with their parents to take advantage of our resources. Reading, from a young age fosters inquisitive thinking, provides enjoyment and certainly promotes better educational achievement. Working together with Project Impact, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program (www.projectimpactfcs. org), weaves the library together with the school and afterschool community in Apalachicola. It is hard to select from the numerous beautiful books just received from the Libri Foundation, but adults and children alike should come by and see “Living Sunshine: How Plants Bring the Earth to Life” and “Down Down Down” which are works of art as well as great educational books. As usual, the Apalachicola Municipal Library is seeking volunteers to read to children from Pre-K up. Many loyal readers volunteer each year, but there is always a need for more. If crafting with kids is your thing, We Need You! If you just want to help children select books to check out, there are volunteer slots in the afternoon too. Come by and sign up and see this outstanding collection of new books. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. ‘Dig Into Reading’ this summer @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Carrabelle fortunate to have outstanding librarian I am a patron of both Carrabelle and Wakulla County libraries and was forced to learn how to use a computer. Since I live in Lanark, it made sense to seek instruction at the Carrabelle library. This is when I became aware of Tonia’s exceptional leadership and teaching abilities and the professional qualities of her staff, even the volunteers. She offered to give me individual instruction since I was a complete failure in the group instruction offered by both Carrabelle and Wakulla libraries. It should be noted that I could not get individual instruction at Wakulla. We arranged weekly classes that were convenient for me, not her. I had priority. Since I had fought against computers all my life, swearing that I would never have one, I was computer illiterate. When I say illiterate, I mean just that. I did not even know how to turn one on. They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Well, I am 80 and Tonia tossed me the right bones, for now I can scan, make attachments, send emails (this email proves it), put emails over to my copier and fax, send pictures, and the many other things one can do with a computer. I led to be led and I think that my ability to use a computer proves Tonia’s expertise in leadership and knowledge. Sometimes I have a problem. She is only a phone call away and seems to be able to solve my dif culty. Since Wakulla funnels much more money into their library than does Franklin, their computers are much more powerful than Franklin’s. It became necessary for me to use their computers in order to get a weekly sports magazine from Purdue University (incidentally Wakulla charges a nickel more per page than does Franklin). I had the opportunity to compare the staffs of each. Franklin’s is tops thanks to Tonia. And thanks to her teachings, I now have my own computer. Franklin County is fortunate to have such an outstanding librarian. Thank God for Tonia Chisholm. David Baker Lanark Village Library director has done a great job As longtime volunteers at the Eastpoint branch of the Franklin County Library, we were disturbed by the letters to the editor a week or so ago. While we know Tonia Chisolm to be helpful and competent, she is not the library director. Those “couple of letters after their name” represent an important achievement in education, emphasizing library science, budgeting, cataloguing, collection development and information sciences. In these changing times of public libraries, it is important to understand how quickly information technology is changing and keep abreast of it, and our director has done a great job. We have no doubt that Tonia is doing a ne job at the Carrabelle Library, as evidenced by her supporters. I hope this issue can be worked out so we can relocate into our new Library building and move forward in a positive manner. J. Bell and A. Colston Chisholm provides help in respectful, professional manner I have spent several days re ecting on an article made public to the press that was brought to my attention. The article being an email sent to my local librarian Tonia Chisholm from my local Franklin County Library Director Glenda Ondracek. In the said email Library Director Glenda Ondracek wrote: “Should someone not be happy about something we do, here is a something you might say to them depending upon the situation. I thought this was priceless. I’m sorry that you are disappointed with our ‘free’ service.” This email sent by our library director offended me on so many levels that I knew I would not be able to solidly sit by as our library staff are instructed to display such rude, unprofessional behavior by Ondracek. I do refer to Franklin County library as “my/our Library.” To set the point of fact straight with Library Director Glenda Ondracek, Franklin County Library is funded by the taxes, which is money paid out of the public’s hard working income. Therefore I believe Ondracek needs reminding that these “free services” are not free, as every paycheck we earn helps to pay for these “Free Services” which she refers in her distasteful email. May I also be allowed to bring to her attention that the check she cashes to pay her bills and living expenses also comes from me and every community member that uses our library. I am sure I will not be alone when questioning my money being spent to employ someone who has forgotten where her paycheck comes from. Therefore I want her to be aware that we the people not only deserve, but demand the utmost respect from the employees we pay and not be demeaned by badmannered employees who have forgotten their duties of customer respect. I visit often with my library and would be in shock if Tonia Chisholm or any library staff or volunteer were to approach me with such a poor, disrespectful behavior as our library director has instructed Tonia Chisholm to do. On all my visits I have received the help I needed in a respectful and professional manner, never being degraded or turned away with rude statements of “free services.” One of many examples of my experience at my library happened just recently. My husband who works 55 to 60 hours Monday through Friday came to be in need of a dentist but, could only see one on a Saturday in order to not miss any workdays. It was Tonia whom I called upon to ask for a referral to any dentist in or around our area that may take patients on Saturday. Tonia Chisholm being community involved directed me to a dentist that practices on Saturday here in Carrabelle giving my husband the muchneeded relief without him needing to seek help or spend our money outside of our community. Now, this is the type of person and employee I want and demand for the money my husband’s 55 to 60 hour week taxes pay. I praise her for the extra knowledge on our community affairs and sharing them with me in my time of need although it is not part of the “free services” she is paid to do. Thank you Tonia for being that person who goes the extra step in providing the caring and accommodating atmosphere in my library. Brief word to Glenda Ondracek, “You may want to follow Tonia Chisholm’s behavior and social skills or you may nd yourself no longer being the one we are paying for in the future.” Mrs. Chase Gray Letters to the EDITOR Color ectal Cancer is a Killer Y ou Can Help Pr event T allahassee Memorial HealthCare is teaming up with George E. W eems Memorial Hospital and the American Cancer Society to provide informa tion for preventing colon cancer – a disease tha t is expected to cause a pproxima tely 51,690 dea ths in 2013, according to the American Cancer Society F or further informa tion, call (850) 431-4226 option 7 Get Scr eened Regularly scheduled colorectal screening tests are recommended beginning a t a ge 50, ho wever if you ha ve kno wn risk factors such as family histor y of colon cancer or polyps, colon cancer syndromes, or are African-American, you may need to be screened earlier and more frequently T A K E A C T IO N

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, May 30, 2013 the percentage at grade level or better inched up from 61 to 63 percent. “Our biggest goal as far as our student growth and improvement is that we in crease our percentage of prociency every year. Our overall school goal is 75 per cent procient in reading, math and science,” ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said. “I’m extreme ly proud we are above the state average. Another clear goal is that we hit at least state average. “I’m very proud of the results, but it comes from a lot of those strategies on our teachers’ part that devote a lot of their time in school,” she said. “I’m very well pleased with the interven tional pieces that we put in place this year.” These interventions in cluded the spending of Title 1 monies, federal monies targeted at schools with sizeable numbers of eco nomically disadvantaged students. Johnson said these funds were used to pay teachers for an hour two days a week to work af ter school reinforcing stan dards from the school day, and challenging students to reach the Level 4 and 5. In addition, the hiring of a full-time teaching assistant in the computer lab freed up individual teachers to take three or four students back to their room for additional intervention, Johnson said. A third focus was on FCAT Chats with students, where educators at the schools could sit down and talk about preliminary test data throughout the year gleaned from FCAT-related assessments. This gives a projection on how a student will perform on FCAT, and teachers sit down with the student and give an assess ment on areas students may be weak in. “Signicant pieces we try to do on a regular ba sis to see how students are performing,” Johnson said. “It gives a teacher insight on what she needs to do in struction wise, and it’s very informative to students. They set their own goals, and it allows them to begin to take ownership.” Superintendent Nina Marks expressed exaspera tion because the district had put in place several new strategies to address the sharp fall-off last year in the third-grade scores at the Franklin School. Though this year’s math scores did see a 14 percentage point increase in the number of third-graders scoring at grade level or better, the total percentage remained at 29 percent, still below the 31 percent at grade level in 2011. “We’ve had people in place, academic coaches in place, to work with this group of students, and a lot of professional develop ment,” Marks said. “We put things in front of people. We have stepped up doing a lot of things to get people where we thought they needed to be for the benet of students. “I really hoped we were going to see improvement. There is something not working, and I’m not exactly sure what that is.” Marks said there were some bright spots with the results, including declines in the numbers of thirdgraders below grade level in reading and math, but the overall hope for strong improvement did not mate rialize. She said she plans to meet with Principal Eric Bidwell and his staff this week, and next week with third-grade teachers after they requested to meet with her. “I believe change is nec essary, and we are very concerned about the level of learning taking place with our students, and we’re go ing to be very proactive to see what we can do to turn this around,” Marks said. The superintendent said the third-grade scores cre ate a focus on a more urgent priority for the district amid the revised, state-assisted approach to its many educa tional needs. “This puts a different spin on the priorities,” she said. “We’ve got an opportunity now with the change in lead ership over there for a lot of things to change. They’re really being proactive. “We do have an oppor tunity for some changes to happen. They may be chang es people are not happy with, but we need to observe whether business has been taken care of as it should be. I think the public needs to look for many changes based on what we now be lieve. We just know we need to make some changes and they need to be based on the needs of our students.” e N e w s H e r a l d e N o r th w es t F l o ri d a D a i ly N e w s P o r t S t J o e S ta r A p a l achi c o l a T imes W as hin g t o n C o un t y N e w s H o lmes C o un t y T imes A dv e r t is e r e W a l t o n S un e D es t in L o g S a n ta R os a P r ess G az e t t e C r es t v i e w N e w s B u l l e t in b 9 f\ ]V GLa B 5 ] ¢› 5 \]V[ R › Ž•Ž ŽŽ t} }  t› u• Rt†‹ † • } •’ ‚‚ t {…{ Š t› £ • ‹{t‹ fVŠ‹t…Œt \›•Œ a†{›† Œ G† ‹† t›5 Coupon Expir es: 6-15-13 CODE: AP00 St ar ting J une 3r d of f ice hour s will be changing f or both W eems Medical C ent er East Clinic and W eems Medical C ent er W est Clinic W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle reputation as a good pilot. “I don’t know what happened,” Fra sher said Tuesday, “But, it had to be catastrophic.” Gilreath was a Greenville-based de signer and builder, primarily of medical ofces and facilities. He was a well known philanthropist within his community and established the Gilreath Foundation with his wife, Parry. A posting on the website of the Avia tion Safety Network said the small plane, registration number N4489F, crashed in Warner Robins, Ga., around 6:40 p.m. af ter an in-ight emergency transmission. A post-crash re ensued. The two occupants onboard received fatal injuries. The crash site was near runways at Robins Air Force Base and Middle Geor gia Regional Airport. Bibb County Coroner Leon Jones said the crash site was a dense swamp area, and snakes, mosquitoes and other poten tial hazards were a hindrance to the re covery of the wreckage. Around 8:30 p.m., the Georgia Forest ry Commission brought in a bulldozer to help cut a path to the plane. The Air Force base dispatched a large crash truck, and a Houston County light truck was brought in to illuminate the woods after sunset. Houston County Fire Department, Ma con-Bibb Fire Department, Bibb County Sheriff’s Ofce, Macon Police Depart ment, Robins Air Force Base and Georgia State Patrol all responded at the scene. FCAT from page A1 CRASH from page A1 Allen ice machine approved At their May 7 meeting, county commissioners accepted the unanimous recommendation of the planning and zoning board and approved a commercial site plan to locate an ice vending machine at 95 U.S. 98, the northwest corner of U.S. 98 and North Bayshore Drive in Eastpoint. The request submitted by John Pritchard, agent/ applicant for Bob Allen, had been discussed at the April 16 meeting after P&Z recommended it be denied. Commissioners then directed that a changed version of the original proposal be reviewed at an emergency P&Z meeting. At the May 7 meeting, the ice machine was approved with the requirements that it have a one-way entrance and exit off of North Bayshore Drive, with permanent fencing or bollard system to keep trafc from entering off U.S. 98. There must also be a clearly dened driving surface of shell and lime rock. Airport aces inspection County Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the airport passed its annual Florida Department of Transportation inspection on April 26. “We have a few trees along the perimeter that need to be dealt with, but otherwise the inspector said the airport looked good,” said Pierce, who is also the airport manager. The board also voted unanimously to sign an amended joint participation agreement with FDOT for $70,000 worth of additional funds for improvements at the airport. The funds will be spent on security or drainage improvements News BRIEFS

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`= =G S=Y L E S T E R L O V A B L E L E S T E R L e s t e r i s a o n e y e a r o l d A u s t r a l ian S h e p h e r d m i x H e w a s l e f t i n t h e d r o p p e n i n b a d c o n d i t i o n b u t ha s r e sp o n d e d b e a u t i f u l l y t o t r e at m e n t an d h i s ha p p y e n g a g i n g p e r s o na l i t y ha s e m e r g e d H e s t i l l n e e d s t o b e t r e at e d f o r h e a r t w o r m s w h i c h t h e H u m an e S o c i e t y w i l l t a k e c a r e o f b e f o r e h i s r e l e a s e b u t h e c an b e a d o p t e d an d h e l d u n t i l h i s t r e at m e n t i s c o m p l e t e S o c o m e d o w n t o m e e t t h i s u n i q u e b l u e m e r l e b l u e e y e d b o y H e i s a v e r y sp e c ia l d o g V O L U N TE E R S A R E D E S P E R A TE L Y N E E D E D T O S O C IA L I Z E A L L O F O U R D O G S A N D C A T S W e a r e a l w a y s l o o k i n g f o r p e o p l e w i l l i n g t o b r i n g o n e o f o u r an i m a l s i n t o t h e i r h o m e t o b e f o s t e r e d f o r v a r i o u s n e e d s A n y t i m e y o u c an sp a r e w o u l d b e g r e at l y a p p r e c iat e d C a l l K a r e n at 6 7 0 8 4 17 f o r m o r e d e t ai l s o r v i si t t h e F r an k l i n C o u n t y H u m an e S o c i e t y at 2 4 4 S t at e R o a d 6 5 i n E a s t p o i n t Y o u m a y l o g o n t o t h e w e b si t e at w w w f or go t t enpe t s or g t o s e e m o r e o f o u r a d o p t a b l e pet s 451501 1 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 PUB LI C N O TI CE e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n o f t h e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le w i l l m e et in r egu l a r s es sio n o n ur s d a y J un e 6, 2013, a t a p p r o xim a t e l y 6:00 p .m. o r a s s o o n a s c a n b e h e a r d in t h e Ci t y o f C a r ra b e l le C o mmi s sio n C h a m b er s lo c a t e d a t 1001 G ra y A v e C a r ra b e l le FL (850)697-2727 t o co n sider t h e f o l lo w in g in acco r d a n ce w i t h Or din a n ce N o .443, C o n s en t o f U s e f o r t h e C o n s um p t io n a n d Sa le o f A lco h o l: 1.Al l o w in g S a nd Ba r t o s e l l p ack age l o c a t e d a t 710 A v e n u e B S E, S t e 10. A l l in t er es t e d p a r t ies a r e in v i t e d t o a t t en d t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o n t hi s m a t t er F ur t h er inf o r m a t io n co n cer nin g t h e p r o p os e d a m en dm en t c a n b e o b t a in e d f r o m t h e Ci t y C ler k a t Ci t y H a l l a t 1001 G ra y A v en ue C a r ra b e l le Flo r id a, 32322, o r b y c a l lin g (850) 697-2727, b et w e en t h e h o ur s o f 8:00 A.M. a n d 4:30 P .M., M o n d a y t hr o ug h F r id a y ex c l udin g h o lid a ys. I f a n in di v id u a l de cides t o a p p e a l a n y de ci sio n m ade b y t h e Ci t y C o mmi s sio n w i t h r es p e c t t o t hi s m e et in g a v erb a t im t ra n s cr i p t m a y b e r e q uir e d I f s o t h e in di v id u a l s h o u ld m a k e p r o v i sio n f o r a t ra n s cr i p t t o b e m ade a t t h e m e et in g (RE: Flo r id a S t a t u t e 286.0105). Pur s u a n t t o t h e p r o v i sio n s o f t h e A m er ic a n s w i t h Di s a b i li t ies A c t, a n y p er s o n r e q uir in g s p e ci a l acco mm o d a t io n t o p a r t ici p a t e in t hi s m e et in g i s a s k e d t o ad v i s e t h e ci t y a t le a s t 48 h o ur s b ef o r e t h e m e et in g b y co n t ac t in g K ei s h a M es s er a t t h e a b o v e addr es s o r p h o n e n um b er W i l b urn M ess e r M a y o r A t t es t: K e is ha M ess e r C i t y C l e rk Society A6 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 Malen Lyree Henry turned 4 on May 14. She celebrated on Saturday, with a Lalaloopsy party and lots of family and friends. Malen is the daughter of Mark and Kandice Henry of Eastpoint. We love you baby girl, to the moon and back! JESSICA DEMPSEY | Special to the Times The Franklin County Schools’ kindergarten classes had a one-month contest to see which class could collect the most tabs off of cans. The winning class was Mrs. Cook’s class, who brought in 40.2 pounds of tabs. They won an ice cream party! Mrs. Williams’ class brought in 15.4 pounds, Mrs. Bloodworth’s 11.4 pounds, Mrs. Dempsey’s 4.3 pounds and Mrs. Miller’s class 3.2 pounds. The 75 pounds of tabs will be delivered to Shriners Hospital over the summer, where they will use them to help children around the world. Shriners Hospitals for Children is a pediatric health care system dedicated to improving the lives of children, often beyond what others thought possible, delivering its mission without charging patients or insurance companies. The hospital relies on the generosity of donors, past and present, to carry out its mission. The kindergarten expressed thanks to all the parents who helped their kids help other kids in need. M aA L eE N H eE NR y Y TURN sS 4 K idsIDS heHE L piPI NG kidsKIDS The ladies of the R Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy were delighted to participate in Apalachic ola’s rst Civil War History Weekend May 17-19. Ten members of the Crawfordville chapter sewed ags, made bandag es, spun cotton, and played music throughout the day in the Raney House and Or man homes. Found along Market Street, both the Raney and Orman Houses are beautiful antebellum homes listed on the Na tional Register of Historic Places. “We hope this will be one of many events in which our chapter may participate,” said Michelle Kirby, chapter member and UDC Florida ofcer. “Apalachicola is full of our rich Southern heritage and should be remembered.” For more informa tion on the UDC including membership, scholarships, and service opportunities, please contact the chapter via their website at www. rdonmcleod.org. Daughters of Confederacy explore history P h H OTOs S speciaSPECIA L TO The HE T imes IMES Michelle Kirby, district I director, Florida Division United Daughters of the Confederacy, shared thoughts of the UDC and the South. Kathy Frank plays for the crowd with a musical number. Kathy Frank and Mary Ann Owens work on their quilt while visiting in the sitting room. Arlene Vause mends the First National Flag. Linda Thompson spins cotton.

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The Times | A7 Thursday, May 30, 2013 Nurs ery no w pro vide d for Sund ay Chur ch Serv ice First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et 101 NE F irst Street Carrabel le SUND A Y 10:00 AM WELCOMES Y OU THE EPISCOP AL CHURCH (850) 545-257 8 Faith Richard Miller Family Many thanks for all the cards and expressions of sympathy I received after Richards death. I can only express gratitude to Jennifer, Cliff, Shawn, Marc, Rich and the staff from Carolines Spoonbill Lounge for the lovely tribute they put on for him. Many thanks to all who attended. Sandy Miller and Family Card of THANKS Christopher Anderson, of Port St. Joe, passed away May 21, 2013. He was born Jan. 8, 1972, in Port St. Joe, served in the U.S. Army and later worked for the Department of Corrections. He was preceded by his grandparents WT and Minister Irene Moses. Christopher is survived by his children Hunter and Morgan Anderson; mother Lola Lewis and husband Jake Lewis; father Lamar Anderson and wife Sheri Anderson; siblings sister Jennifer Smith and brotherin-law James Smith, brother Little Jake Lewis and sister-in-law Stephanie Lewis, brother Kevin Lewis and sister-in-law Brandi Lewis, sister Stacy Boring and brother-in-law Harland Boring; grandparents Richard Sonny and Lillian Anderson; and many nieces and nephews and lots of loving relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Saturday, May 25 at Highland View Church of God at 3 p.m. with the Rev. Vickie Summers ofciating. Interment followed in Pleasant Rest Cemetery at Overstreet All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Christopher Anderson John Wayne Page was born Aug. 15, 1950, in Wewahitchka. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1968-1972, then moved to Eastpoint, and resided there for many years. Wayne then married his sweetheart Melba Lominec on March 3, 1973. Wayne was a commercial sherman for most of his life and then worked with Florida Department of Corrections for 10 years. He was blessed with two beautiful sons, Jeffery Wayne Page and wife Angel, and son Jesse Ernest Page and wife Jennifer. Wayne has three grandchildren, Jesse Allen Page, Aden Bass, and C. J. Massey. He also had two greatgranddaughters, Madison Varnes and Lily Massey. Wayne is survived by two brothers, Andrew Page and wife Catherine, and Donald Page and wife Revina; and was predeceased by his brother, Ernest Page. Survivors also include his loving mother, Nettie Mae Page and deceased father Clyde Ernest Page. Wayne was blessed with many nieces and nephews including niece and number one daughter Katrina Strickland, Tammy Shiver, Rhonda Garrett, Shawna Emile, Tanya Walden, Brandy Banks, Leanna Nowling, Lisa Rowland, Christie Page, Little Lynn Page, Catherine Page, and Lindsey Page. Nephews include Donald Page, John Michael and Christopher Paul Polous, Johnny Davis, and the late Vince Allen Davis and Joshua Donovan. Wayne passed away at his home surrounded by his family and friends Sunday, May 26 at 4:07 p.m. He will be remembered as a loving and caring husband, father, grandfather, and friend to many including his D.O.C. family. Wayne will forever be missed, but always in our hearts. Wayne Page, We Love You! A celebration of his life was held Wednesday morning, May 29 at Eastpoint Church of God conducted by the Rev. Bobby Shiver and the Rev. Ronny Luke. Interment followed in Eastpoint Cemetery. He lay in state at the church Tuesday evening. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. John Wayne Page Charlie Billy Moses was born July 9, 1941, in Wewahitchka, to the now late Charlie and Frances Moses. He passed away Thursday, May 23, 2013, in Panama City at the age of 71. Billy worked maintenance for the Franklin County Courthouse; and was a F&AM Lodge #76, Scottish Rite, and Shaddai Shriner. He is survived by his wife, Sally Moses; children, Maranda Dooley (Josh), Shonda Segeren, and Dirk J. Segeren Jr.; and siblings, Joann Branch, Larry James, Edward James and Carolyn Butler. He was preceded in death by his sister, Helen Mintz. Funeral services will be held Saturday, June 1 at 11 a.m. at First Pentecostal Holiness Church in Apalachicola, with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Viewing will be held Friday, May 31 from 5 to 7 p.m. at First Pentecostal Holiness Church. Arrangements handled by Kelley Funeral Home. Billy Moses Thomas Hardin Knight, 85, passed away Saturday, May 18, 2013. After serving in the U. S. Navy on the USS Osage (LSV-3) during World War II, Tom completed a degree in electrical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. He had a distinguished career of 39 years with the Buckeye Corporation of Proctor and Gamble. Tom loved reading, sailing, music and sports; but most of all spending time with friends and family. He is survived by his loving wife Lorraine; son Kevin Knight (Alicia); stepsons Bill (Sherry) and Derek McGinn, all of Panama City; daughter-inlaw Elaine Mack Knight of Charlottesville, Virginia; brother Robert (Lavern), of Vernon, and sister-inlaw Elaine F. Knight, of Panama City; and sister Barbara (Ray) Stanyard of Tallahassee. Tom was the proud grandfather of 10 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. Tom was preceded in death by his parents Sadie Peggy Archibald and Thomas Ferguson Knight, his rst wife Lessie Swindle Knight, brother Richard Dick Knight and son Dr. James G. Knight. Donations in Toms honor and in gratitude for the wonderful care he received may be made to Shepherd Center 2020 Peachtree Rd NW Atlanta, GA 30309-9965 / shepherd. org/charitable-giving; or Big Bend Hospice, Gadsden County Special Needs, 105 N. Jackson St., Quincy, FL 32351 Thomas Hardin Knight Patricia Gayle Brown was born Sept. 5, 1951, in Port St. Joe to the now late Leroy and Jamie Butler. She passed away Thursday, May 23, 2013, in Panama City at the age of 61. She is survived by her husband, Charles Brown; children, Erica Tiller and Jermaine Fedd, both of Apalachicola; siblings, Delores Fedd, Lottie Yarrell, Marilyn Fedd, Carolyn Fedd, Paula Tiller, Earl Woods, Larry Butler, and Linda Woods; grandchildren, Xuripha Tiller, Micaela Fedd, Cassia Fedd, Jathan Proctor, Jymmarries Fedd, and NaiKycia Mitchell; and great-grandchild, Purity Myers. Funeral services will be held Sunday, June 2 at 2 p.m. at Kelley Funeral Home Chapel, Apalachicola. Patricia Gayle Brown Oliver Nash, 82, of Apalachicola, passed away early Monday morning, May 27, 2013, at his home. A lifelong resident of Apalachicola, Mr. Nash served three terms in the Florida House of Representatives, at that time the youngest person ever elected to that post. He also served as constable, also the youngest person to have served. He owned a seafood business and worked for St. Joe Paper Company, retiring from that job. Survivors include his wife Geraldine Nash, of Apalachicola; a son, Stephen Nash, of Apalachicola, and a son, Wayne Nash and wife, Casey, of Eastpoint; two daughters, Suzanne Osburn and husband Robert, and Debra Moses and husband Mark; seven grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren, all of Apalachicola; and his sister Ardelle Harper ,of White City. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, May 30, at Brownsville Assembly of God Church, conducted by the Rev. Geraldine Wilson. Interment will follow in the family plot in Magnolia Cemetery. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Oliver Nash OLIVER NASH Obituaries Faith BRIEF Miller honored at Memorial Day service Did you have a safe and somber Memorial Day? I went to our Legion post for the services and lunch. The service at the ag pole was at 11 a.m. Then we did an about face for the dedication of the cannon. Then we went out back for the retiring of the ags. Mr. Bill, Miller that is, was presented with a plaque and a citation; well deserved, I might add. We had a very good lunch. Thomas Lee and his helpers prepared the chicken and Becky Whaley and the other Auxiliary members prepared the sides and served. Along with the other desserts was Claudettes world famous chocolate clairs Yum! Yum! You bet your bippy Mary Britz was there! She looked great and happy to be back in Lanark. I had met a nice couple at the IGA on Sunday. They wanted to know about the activities on Memorial Day. I told them about the service at the Legion and the lunch and also about the lunch at the Lanark Village Boat Club. After our services, I went back into the lounge and there they were. I sat and had lunch with them and a nice visit. They are staying at the campground. Among many other friends and fellow members, I got to see Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. Hope you get to come to lunch this afternoon at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Serving begins at noon. Minimum donation of $3 will be collected at the desk. Be watching for you! The rst Saturday Over 50 Dance will be this Saturday, June 1, and will start at 8 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. for a while. Ro Vice will be on hand to provide the music. Bring your dancing shoes, your favorite snack to share, your beverage of choice and, oh yes, your main squeeze and dance the night away. One of the great ladies of Carrabelle was taken home over the weekend. Vera Snyder is with our Lord. A good, longtime friend of many of us. Pray for Veras eternal peace and for strength for her children. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and the housebound and remember, ASAP also stands for Always Say a Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, and the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh News BRIEFS FCHS plans graduation events Franklin County High Schools Senior Recognition Night will be at 6 p.m. Friday, May 31 in the school cafeteria. The commencement ceremony will be at 7 p.m. in the high school gymnasium on June 7. The public is invited to both events. Governor pens note to Sanders At the May 21 county commission meeting, Chairwoman Cheryl Sanders shared a handwritten note she received from Gov. Rick Scott with other board members. How can I help with job creation? Sanders said the note simply asked. We will work with him in any way we can, she said, and suggested the Greensteel Factory in Carrabelle was in need of a corporate tenant. She also said she plans to ask the governor about improving the industrial park at the Apalachicola Regional Airport. By this card, I think hes really interested in us, Sanders said. Commissioner Pinki Jackel agreed. Hes been down here when we invited him. I think hes really interested. We are facing long-term problems with the bay, and we really need to diversify our economy. People has realized there is a life off the water, but now, were going to have to have good paying jobs, Sanders said. Fellowship Baptist plans Saturday yard sale On Saturday June 1, Fellowship Baptist Church of Carrabelle will sponsor a yard sale in the parking lot of Compass Law in the triangle area behind the Carrabelle Library on U.S. 98. The sale will begin at 9 a.m. and will offer a wide variety of items including appliances, housewares, kitchen tools, and clothes. All proceeds will go to among 14 different missions; which include home and foreign missions, church planting, and prison ministries. So, come and shop for real deals and support outreach to missions the world over, as well as here at home.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M a y 30 85 75 10 % F ri, M a y 31 85 75 10 % S a t June 01 85 74 30 % Sun, June 02 84 74 10 % M on, June 03 85 73 40 % T ues June 04 85 74 10 % W ed June 05 85 74 20 % SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore This weekend we see the return of red snapper to our state and federal waters with much anticipation. We should see great catches coming to the dock, but don’t wait too long — the federal season is only 21 days, and the state runs 44 days this year. Weather will play a major part in this week’s offshore fishing, so check it before you go! Inshore fishing is at a peak in St. Joe waters right now. With water and air temps on the rise, the fishing will soon slow down as the water gets above the 85-degree mark. Right now trout, redfish and flounder can be found in all waters from 2 to 10 feet in St. Joe Bay. Live bait is abundant right now, so make the most of it! Page 8 Thursday, May 30, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Barn swallows are amazing yers and bene cial. Barn swallows are blue above with a peachy colored breast and darker orange on the throat and forehead. They have a long, slender, deeply forked tail. Females are slightly duller and shorter-tailed than males. Juveniles look similar to adults, but have much shorter tails. In late March, while walking my dogs on a mowed area near the airport, I found myself surrounded by about a half dozen barn swallows. They were swooping within a foot of the ground and so close to me I could almost have reached out and touched one. They were probably feeding on gnats or midges since it was dusk. They may have come so close to take advantage of insects my pack and I ushed while moving through the grass. They are known to follow agricultural equipment and cattle for that reason. Flies make up the majority of the barn swallow’s diet. Midges, mosquitoes and gnats are all ies. Barn swallows will eat any ying insect but prefer larger prey including beetles, bees, wasps, ants, butter ies and moths to midge swarms. However, larger insects are less abundant in early spring. The value of insectivorous swallows to farmers was recognized very early. It was illegal to kill them in ancient Rome. But they were driven to near extinction by hat-makers in the 19th century. The millinery trade’s impact on barn swallows prompted early conservationist George Bird Grinnell’s famous 1886 Forest & Stream editorial decrying slaughter of the little birds. That essay led to the founding of the rst Audubon Society. Happily, the barn swallow is once again among the commonest and most widely distributed bird species in the world and is found throughout the Northern Hemisphere in summer and over most of the Southern Hemisphere in winter. Barn swallows eat and drink on the wing. They forage in open areas including parks, ball elds, agricultural elds and beaches and over open water such as lakes, ponds and coastal waters. They range from sea level up to 10,000 feet. They are commonly seen over the grassy shoulders of the John Gorrie Bridge. According to Allaboutbirds.com, “Barn Swallows once nested in caves throughout North America, but now build their nests almost exclusively on humanmade structures. Today the only North American barn swallow population that still regularly uses caves as nest sites occurs in the Channel Islands off the California coast.” Master birder John Spohrer said they commonly nest under bridges and docks in our area, since barns are few and far between. That means last year was not kind to these beautiful birds because high water from tropical storms Debby and Ivan washed away most of the nestlings and destroyed nests. Swallows nest in mud cups lined with grass and feathers and will reuse existing cups after changing out the soft lining and patching them with fresh mud. Barn swallows don’t come to seed or suet feeders, but you might be able to attract them to your yard with ground-up eggshells or oyster shells placed on an open platform feeder. Swallows have lived in close association with humans for at least 2,000 years and, for this reason, they are the subject of much folklore. According to legend, a barn swallow consoled Christ on the cross. They represent freedom and hope. The swallow’s forked tail is said to have been struck by a lightning bolt when the swallow stole re from the gods to bring it to humankind. Another legend is that cows will give bloody milk if the swallows in the barn die or leave. Barn swallows also play an important role in maritime lore. English sailors had swallows tattooed on the chest or above the thumb on each hand. Each bird was said to represent 5,000 nautical miles traveled. It was also believed that, when a sailor drowned, the swallows carried his soul to heaven. DOT beauti cation funding approved On May 21, the county commission voted unanimously to accept funding for roadside beauti cation from the Florida Department of Transportation (DOT). At the March 5 county meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners $50,000 in DOT funding was available for roadside plantings to beautify the right of way along US 98. A $10,000 budget was earmarked for each county district. The DOT grant speci ed that money be limited to plants and “plant support materials,” like irrigation. Pierce speci ed that each site be furnished with irrigation to support the new plantings. The grant required that half the funding be used for large plant material, i.e. ve gallon containers or larger. Two of the sites chosen, US 98 and Hefernan Drive in Lanark Village and Island Drive in Eastpoint will be planted with large specimen palms. Three other sites, Carrabelle Beach Wayside Park, Seafood Workers County Park west of Apalachicola and the lawn of the county courthouse, designed by Nikki Millender, director of parks and recreation, will be planted with shrubs and perennials supporting migrating birds and butter ies. Pierce said the county has a year to complete the plantings and he anticipates planting will occur this fall. Oyster harvesting licenses now on sale The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is selling the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License. In order to harvest oysters from the Apalachicola Bay System beginning July 1, 2013, you must purchase this license before June 28. The cost of the license remains at $100 for Florida residents. (The cost for non-residents is $500 if purchased before June 28.) Please bring a check or money order for this amount made payable to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (F.D.A.C.S). No cash will be accepted. As a public service, we are also selling the FWC Saltwater Products License (SPL) in conjunction with the Apalachicola Bay oyster harvesting license. You will receive your SPL for free upon purchase of your oyster harvesting license. If you renew your license after Friday, June 28, you will have to pay an additional $500 late fee. Please note: The Shell sh Center in Apalachicola is currently undergoing renovation and no staff are on-site. To renew your license from now through June 14, please come to our temporary of ce in Eastpoint (350 Carroll Street), Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To accommodate the higher volume of harvesters seeking the license during the last two weeks of the sales period, June 17 through June 28, license sales will be held at the DEP ANERR building located at 261 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries Street in Apalachicola, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have any questions regarding the purchase of your license you may call the FDACS of ce, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 670-1114. DAIL MULLINS | Special to the Times Participating in Hands Across the Sand this year on St. George Island on May 18 are, from left, Marty Beech, Lucia Delphinus, Marty Asrey, Ada Long, Barbara Sanders, W. K. Sanders, Stephenie Beene, and Sara Pankaskie. The crew was small but enthusiastic, said organizer Ada Long. HANDS ACROSS THE SAND By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A group of Franklin County students would like to clean up your land to raise money to ght pollution. Brook Pittman, president of Students Against Plastic Pollution, said her group wants to raise funds by doing monthly or quarterly trash pick-ups for businesses or individuals in return for a donation to support their outreach efforts. Last year, the group paid to display a billboard in Eastpoint reminding drivers not to litter and to take care of the bay. This year, SAPP, under sponsor Heidi Montgomery, has two projects. They want to erect educational kiosks at boat ramps around the county and display an anti pollution mural on the old NAPA building at 336 U.S. 98 in Eastpoint. Artist Lamar Mitchelle will donate his work, and the building’s owner, Rick Donahoe, is donating the canvas, but the students must raise money to buy paint and materials to construct the kiosks. To contribute to SAPP or hire the students, call Montgomery at 653-5679 or visit montgomeryscience.org. Outdoor BRIEFS Buds N Bugs: Barn swallows BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the Times Area residents can attract barn swallows to their yards with ground-up eggshells or oyster shells placed on an open platform feeder. Students offer work for the environment

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CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE • APALACHICOLA S PORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 9 Thursday, May 30, 2013 Golf Gone Wild, the Florida Wild Mammal Association’s annual golf tournament fundraiser, is well on its way to becoming a Panhandle tradition. With a score of 53, the foursome led by Nola Tolbert took the honors during the second annual Golf Gone Wild Tournament on May 18. Nine teams competed this year on a perfect afternoon for 18 holes. Two teams nished par 55 but the team headed by Gary Settle triumphed after a scorecard playoff. Tolbert’s team walked away with a purse of $400 and the second place team earned $250. The team earning the prize for being the “Dead Ass Last Team” Dan Harper, Brett Gormley, Gerald Bamberger and Jarrett Woolever won $100 for a score of 67. Closest to the pin on holes #2 and #6 was Dave Rheel. Mike Wheelus took that honor on hole #11 and Robbie Johnson on hole #17. All three men win free rounds of golf for their efforts. This year’s tournament featured a bevy of pink-capped hostesses who served up punch and sympathy along the fairway and acted as cheerleaders for the competing teams. Organizers Hollis Vail and John Spohrer said the fundraiser exceeded expectations. “Everybody had a great time. It went great,” Spohrer said. “I wouldn’t change a thing.” Vail said she wanted to thank the hostesses she recruited for making the tourney a smashing success. Chris Beatty, director of the Florida Wild Mammal Association said she was grateful for the help and everybody’s efforts. She said she especially wished to thank Spohrer, Vail, golf pro Rob Burlison and the St. James Bay Golf Resort for organizing and hosting the event. The Florida Wild Mammal Association is totally funded by grants and donations and serves a ve-county area including Franklin County. You can send a tax-deductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, or visit www.wakullawildlife. org. If you nd an injured animal, please bring it to their 198 Edgar Poole Road facility in Wakulla County. Visit the website for detailed directions. By LOIS SWOBODA Tolbert team triumphs in charity tourney The Franklin and Wakulla county sheriff’s of ces will host a golf tournament on Friday, June 7 to bene t the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches. The tourney is at St. James Bay. 151 Laughing Gull Lane, Carrabelle. The format is a 4 Person Scramble, with registration at 7 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 a.m. Entry fee: is $100 per person, and $400 for a four-person team. Entry fee includes cart, refreshments and luncheon to all participants. Prizes awarded for longest drive, closest to pin (Par 3) and 50/50 Pay Out ($10/Entry). Mulligans are ve for $20. Cash payout for rst, second and third places. Payout determined by number of entries The mission of the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches is to help as many of Florida’s neglected and dependent children as possible. The Ranches operate ve facilities throughout Florida to meet the needs of boys and girls. Plans for the Project Impact Summer Camp are well under way at both the ABC Site and the city recreation site. The theme of the Summer Reading Program will be “Digging Into Reading,” and will be presented in collaboration with the Apalachicola Municipal Library. This program is developed by the 2013 Summer Collaborative Reading Program and the state library system. Students can earn rewards for their reading time through the summer while helping to boost their skills for the next school year. Highlights for the summer include Kid’s College with the Gulf Coast State College, and a wooden boat building program presented in collaboration with the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. For a third year a special Sizzlin’ Summer Scholars program for teens and pre-teens is planned in collaboration with Gulf Coast through the Kids College outreach project. The program will include science, technology, health science, and the visual, performing, and culinary arts curriculum. GCCC has a new Advanced Technology Center where students will learn about the latest in the “green” sciences and engineering with many hands-on learning experiences. Students from both sites will participate in activities at Project Impact in Apalachicola and then attend special classes at the Panama City GCCC Campus during four eld trips where they will have an opportunity to see themselves in a campus setting and get a feel for life as college students. The Project Impact Summer Theater Program will host a dramatic arts program and performance, and a special guest pottery artist will provide wheel lesson at the city site. Program hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays through Thursdays beginning June 10 and running through July 25. The program will be closed for the Fourth of July week, with Project Impact collaborating with the City of Apalachicola for the July 3 parade and reworks program. Students must be between Pre-K (at least 4 years. old), and no older than the 12th grade for next school year to enroll in the camp. Other summer programs offered will include ne arts, crafts, sports, computer technology, and a eld trip each Thursday. The Project Impact Summer Program is provided free of charge. Families may enroll their child in Project Impact at either the ABC or city recreational sites or online at projectimpactfcs.org. For more information please call Faye Johnson, program director, at 370-0145. Project Impact is funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant program sponsored by the City of Apalachicola. Sheriff’s of ce plans golf tourney BILL MILLER REAL T Y 850 697 3751 3310 570 0658 400’ + C O M M U S 98 & G U L F ADJ T O L ANARK M ARINA 8 5 0 K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UY S 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH U S 98 C O M M L O T S BEL O W CIT Y A PP P RICE C/B H O M E 311 2 C O R L O T S C I T Y $49,500 C OMM BLDG ON 9 8 & GULF FOR RENT $ 5 0 0 / M TH MIH 2 C RNR L O T S BLK $ S T ORE REDUCED $ 4 9 5 0 0 2 A CA T RIVER U T I L I N $39,500 Big plans for Project Impact Summer Camp Nola Tolbert, second from left, Robbie Johnson, far left, Rob Olin, second from right, and Brent Johnson bested the next team by two strokes.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN 3  Ž Ž3 Ž T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN T rades & Ser v ices CALL T OD A Y! 653-8868 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 R OBER TS APPLIANCE REP AIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shado w Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Flori da 32321 TELEPHO NE (850) 643-5 41 7 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic ipat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % JOE’S LA WN CARE IF I T ’ S I N Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF I T FULL L A WN SER VICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL AL S O CLEAN GUT TER S AND IRRIG A TION IN S TILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL J OE S L A WN Y A H OO C OM The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office. Arrests in this week’s report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Franklin County Sheriff’s Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 22 Scotty C. Banks, 24, Eastpoint, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, burglary of a dwelling – person assaulted and domestic battery (FCSO) May 23 Sandi N. Dunlap, 23, Panacea, disorderly conduct (FCSO) Jason A. Scott, 39, St. George Island, failure to appear (FCSO) Robert F, Millender, 24, Carrabelle, battery (FCSO) Jamie R. Proctor, 31, Summerfield, violation of probation (FCSO) May 24 Jerry N. Kent, 37, Apalachicola, driving while licenses suspended or revoked (FWC) Tonya C. Seamon, 40, Carrabelle, domestic battery and violation of a pre-trial release injunction (CPD) Martin R. Raulerson, 53, Carrabelle, domestic battery and violation of a pre-trial release injunction (CPD) May 25 Brooklyn B. Page, 18, Eastpoint, no valid drivers license (APD) Marco A. Perez, 32, Apalachicola, providing alcohol to person under age 21 (APD) Christopher Bridges, 26, Lanark Village, felony battery – great bodily harm (FCSO) Paul E. Noblitt, 30, Columbia, Ala., boating under the influence (FWC) May 26 Michael R. Downing, 43, Eastpoint, DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked (FWC) Farah D. Frady, 43, Thomasville Ga., DUI (FHP) Buel C. Taylor, 26, Apalachicola, driving while license or revoked, and possession of paraphernalia (APD) James R. Ervin, 58, Tallahassee, boating under the influence (FWC) Howard N. Martin, 34, Carrabelle, boating under the influence (FWC) Daniel Stepp, 45, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) May 27 Patrick A. Harvey, 43, Sopchoppy, driving while license suspended or revoked (FHP) Megan H. Cummins, 22, Tallahassee, DUI, refusal to submit to breath test and resting officer without violence (FCSO) Arrest REPORT A10 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center Representative Panama City, FL Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: 21*+)*.#(-++%+0)*#')* *%1#'%%',*'.#*('&', 2#%#,1'+#*,(+%% 2,*('!(&&-'#,#('+$#%%+ 2*(3#'1/#,"%%#*(+(4))%#,#('+ 2,#%(*#',,&)%1*/#,")++#(' (*"%)#'!-+,(&*+ Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, # ('!,*&#+#%#,1#'+-*')%'')#,#&(5 In addition, we oer: 2* (*&''',#.+1% 2*#'%1&'.#*('&', 2-))(*,#.(,#.,#'!,5,("%)1(-+2(+#,#.*( ++#('%'),/(*$'.#*('&', 2*(&(, *(&/#,"#' Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1109042 # !! $ "!" ""!

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 30, 2013 The Times | A11 4514621 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE,FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www.rsttness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW2 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT .............................. $550 3 BR / 2 BAMOBILEHOME .......... $700 1 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT, INCLUDESUTILITIES .................. $650 2 BR/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME WITHPOOL ............................... $850 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY98 FRONTAGE ......... $650 4515019 Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking a seasonal part-time, entry-level Housekeeping Inspector / Laundry Assistant and Front Desk person. Some experience is preferred but not required. Must be energetic, detailed oriented and possess great customer service skills. Weekends are required and must be able to start immediately. $10 $12 per hour with paid training. Drug Screen & Background Check required. Please apply in person at 112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 1109847EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace Multi-Media Advertising Sales Executive Panama City, Florida Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida has an immediate opening for a motivated Multi-Media Advertising Sales Executive for our Automotive Team. In addition to powerful and result achieving print products, you will have the ability to oer local advertisers sought aer digital marketing tools such as: website design, mobile websites, behavioral targeting, search engine marketing, search engine optimization, social media daily deals and more.We are seeking a dynamic individual with the ability to grow revenue through new business development and existing customer relationships. Job responsibilities include: Developing and implementing strategies to increase account revenue Increasing marketshare through new business development Growing revenue through existing client product education Communicating marketing, circulation and readership data to advertisers in a call to actionŽ format With solid training, a great leadership team and a personal commitment, you will grow to become a respected local marketing consultant that is digitally sa vvy and knows how to help local businesses grow. Unlike other media in the marketplace, we dont sell advertising … we create MULTI-media solutions. Our most successful team members are successful be cause they ask customers and prospects about their business; they listen to their answers, and design long-term print and digital advertising solutions that will help our business-to-business customers to increase their sales. Qualications Include: € A friendly and outgoing personality € Comfortable making presentations € Desire to be a part of a fun and hardworking team € Vision and creativity € Excellent time management skills € Minimum 2 years successful sales experience € Ability to operate independently € Newspaper background a plus, but not required All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/Ad&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. Well oer you a competitive base salary plus a monthly incentive/commission plan. If you’re ready for a new challenge and to grow your career, submit a cover letter, resume and compensation expectations to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 91148T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000273 YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JUSTIN SAMUELLS, etc., at al., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Canceling and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 2, 2013, entered in the above captioned action, Case No. 2009-CA -000273, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 A.M. inside the front courthouse steps, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, on June 13, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said final judgment, to-wit: Lot 12 and 13, Block 82, St. George Island Gulf Beaches No. 5, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this May 7th, 2013. Marcia Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Eric R. Schwartz, Esq. Attorney for Plaintiff Weitz & Schwartz, P.A. 900 S. E. 3rd Avenue, Suite 204 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316 eschwartz@weitzschwartz. com (954) 468-0016 May 23, 30, 2013 91260T REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Gulf Coast Workforce Board announces the availability of a Request for Proposal (RFP) titled “Workforce Center Carpeting”. The purpose of the RFP is to seek proposals from qualified vendors to remove old carpeting and install approximately 11,700 square feet of new carpeting at the Workforce Center located at 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida. The intent is to enter into a contract with a single prime contractor. Bidder will submit proposals by 4:00 p.m., Tuesday, June 4, 2013. For a copy of the proposal and further information, contact: Gulf Coast Workforce Board Jen Hiddleson 5230 W. Highway 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-913-3285 jhiddleson@gcwb.org Minority businesses are encouraged to apply. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. May 30, 2013 j j Adopt j j : Active, Energetic, Pro Couple Yearns for 1st Baby Joyce 00-552-0045 FLBar42311 Expenses Paid Larnard Village East Pine Street, Saturday June 1st 8am to 5pm Multi-Family!Furniture, home decor, dryer, Large Variety! GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl June 15th & 16th 8:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL53032 to 56654 7 ft. glass display case; $250; Electric cash register $125; Steel Ladder Rack for a truck $125; Tecky Cypress Wood, 100 linear feet $125. 850-832-1563 Administrative/Clerical Admin Asst. The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is seeking a part time Admin Asst. Candidates should possess High School diploma or GED, minimum of 5 years office experience, excellent interpersonal skills and computer skills, attn to detail & have the ability to multi-task. Responsibilities include handling incoming calls, scheduling appts, data entry, and special projects as assigned. Selected employee will be needed 24 hours per week and be able to work 6 hours per day Mon through Thurs from 9am-4pm. Email, drop off or mail resume to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Email: apalha@fairpoint.net. Web ID:34252798 Flood Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk Receptionist Weekends Required Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34252703 Text FL52703 to 56654 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *Bussers BLUE PARROT Now HIRING Please apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityBartender / Therapist Needed The Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & Grill Now Hiring All Positions Apply in person only HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook Needed The Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Logistics/TransportDrivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-ACDLFlatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/Health Weems Memorial Is now hiring for the following positions: Licensed Medical Technologist Paramedic EMT RN Dietary Registration Applications are available at: www weemsmemorial.com & may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34253531 Text FL253531to 56654 LOW INTEREST FINANCING Borrow up to $20K, pay $386/month. 8 % interest 6 year term. Personal and Small Business loans, debt consolodiation, bad credit ok. Call 888-994-0029 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL48155 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove Apartments Taking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer Text FL50614 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’X 65’deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/Ain Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 Appalachacola 4 Bedroom/ 1 Bath. Wood frame. Central heat and air, all appliances electrical. $950/ month, plus $950 deposit. Call (561) 312-7188 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1 BR, 800sf, W/D, stone FP & central AC. $420/mo. $200/mo covers all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV & gas. Secluded, 1/2 mi. from beach. 1st & security (954) 0816-7004 St. George Island -2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1200 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Carrabelle Beach 2 & 1/2 acre property, incl. W/S/E with small mobile home. 24x24 carport, and 8x16 shed. Asking $79,000. Call (850) 524-1257 North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 OBO. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers pro-tected (404) 218-0077 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition ABS brakes, Reinhart pipes, two seats, cover, two helmets, charger, extra chrome, two windshields and more. Always garage kept, less than 10,000 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $16,500 NADA suggestedretail is $16,000 850-723-4642 2003 Bounder 36S $18,800!!! VIN: 5B4MP67G233371432. EVERYTHING WORKS, 8.1 Chevy gas motor, Allison 5-speed auto tranny. Call or txt: 850-387-6500 to make offer.Text FL53262 to 56654 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper. For Fast Results,Call 747-5020 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper.For Fast Results, Call 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 Get in tune with Classified’s section of musical instruments in Class 3310. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, May 30, 2013 O ur local r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t the y f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in R eal E sta t e P icks! (I n this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an Blas S t G eor ge Island C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast T his c ust om designed home in the pr estigious Magnolia B a y ga t ed c ommunit y S unr oom, scr eened & open por ches hot tub o MBR suit e lar ge mast er tiled ba th w/ open sho w er and gar den tub detached gar age gas r eplac e gr anit e c oun t er t ops stainless k it chen, wine c ooler built-in c orner c abinets A menities include c ommunit y dock pool t ennis c our ts Main living ar ea & mast er on 1st oor w/guestr ooms upstairs f or priv ac y w/ priv a t e por ch. S himmering S ands R ealty $$ STE VE HA RR IS C ell: 8508901971 st e v e@s t e v esisl and .com w w w .288 mag nolia ba y dr .com w w w .st e v esisl and .com REDUCED John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248585 $1,199,000 St. Geor ge Island $$ PLANT A TION BEA CHFR ONT Go r ge ou s, 4B R, 3. 5 B A, Gr ea t ki tc he n, gr an it e co un te r to ps up sc al e ap pl ia nc es fu rn is he d, a t sc re en TV s, du mb w ai te r ti le o or s, Sp a T ub la r ge PO OL ou td oo r ki tc he n wi th po ol ta bl e & ba th IN CO ME PR OD UC ER Na ut il us Dr i v e. $$ MLS# 249088 $275,000 401 St. James A ve. #10, Carrabelle, FL F isher man 's Geta way Corn er unit 2 bedr oom / 2 ba th to wn hom e in Rive rside a t Carr abel le. Loca ted in the cent er of Carr abel le. F ea tures desig na ted boa t slip and 9,00 0 lb. boa t lift. Purc hase toda y and be read y for all the sum mer shin g tourn ame nts. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 ( (( !! % !! # !! # ! &# #& S O L D $ John Shelby Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www .sgirealty .com MLS# 248778 $439,000 St. Geor ge Island EAST END BEA CHFR ONT L OT One acr e in the East End, str eet to beach lot, DEP Bldg per mit f or house & POOL in place plans can be r e vised & still use the same DEP per mit, b uy er sa v es almost $22,000 in soft b ldg costs plus the sa vings of a ppr o x. 6 months of per mitting time 1.02 acr es $$ $$ && &% $'$ B eautifully landsc aped home with spec tac ular B a y and B ridge views with man y new upda t es Remodeled k it chen (new c abinets c oun t er t ops sink disposal st o v e dish w asher tile oor), lg dining ar ea with hea t r e ec tiv e windo w lm; 3 lg BRs with new mast er BA; priv a t e o c e just o the lar ge mast er bedr oom; 2 w alk in closets T his house is per f ec t f or en t er taining with a huge fr on t por ch and living ar ea with har dw ood oors and w ood burning r eplac e L andsc ape has irriga tion w ell and na tiv e plan ts High e cienc y hea t pump new r oof 6 additional in. r oof insula tion. P r esen t o wners ha v e immac ula t ely main tained and impr o v ed this v er y c omf or table B a y V iew home! B uy er should v erify squar e f ootage S himmering S ands R ealt y STE VE HA RR IS C ell: 8508901971 st e v e@s t e v esisl and .com w w w .st e v esisl and .com w w w .332 C ookS tr eet .com / + *0 0 ,-+ ( ( ' % !# $..$ Ri ve rfr on t pa ra di se Lo ca t e d ju st a fe w m ile s ou t sid e Ca rra be lle on t h e pri st in e Ne w Ri ve r t h is 3 BR / 2 .5 BA 2 ,4 0 0 sq ft h o m e of fe rs so m e t h in g fo r e ve ryo n e $ ) # $ 850 -528 -414 1 l 850 -697 -101 0 ww w .co ast alre alt yin f o .co m $$ ML S# 249 344 $25 0,0 00 401 St. Jam es A ve. #11 C AR RA BEL LE, FL F isher man 's Drea m! V er y well main taine d 2 bedr oom /2 ba th to wn hom e in Rive rside a t Carr abel le. F ea tures desig na ted boa t slip and 9,00 0 lb. boa t lift. Conv enie ntly loca ted next to C-Qu arter s. Purc hase toda y and be read y for all the sum mer shin g tourn ame nts. Mary Seymour Jef f Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 $ “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Times. 1) The main difference between a cafe latte and a cappuccino deals with the amount of? Skim milk, Sugar, Foam, Espresso 2) The pressure in a bottle of champagne is about how many times the pressure in an automobile tire? 2, 3, 4, 5 3) What’s the average number of grapes it takes to make a bottle of wine? 300, 600, 900, 1200 4) Which women’s sport banned the crowhop? Softball, Tennis, Basketball, Volleyball 5) What gaming activity may begin with a corking? Pool, Horseshoes, Marbles, Darts 6) To prove a point in 1903 whose company electrocuted an elephant at Coney Island? Ford, Edison, Morse, Houdini 7) What sports bureau does Major League Baseball rely upon for its ofcial records? Lazarus, Birdhouse, Elias, Bear 8) What’s the name of Willie Nelson’s main acoustic guitar? Hank, Lassie, Johnny, Trigger 9) Who is Jerry’s cousin of cartoon’s “Tom & Jerry”? Tiny, Muscles, Thorny, Bubbles 10) Of these which is not on the Gulf of Mexico? Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana 11) When “The Flintstones” aired on prime-time TV, what was its cigarette sponsor? Winston, Camel, Marlboro, Lucky Strike 12) What’s traditionally given as a 30th wedding anniversary gift? Silver, Crystal, Pearls, Paper 13) “Tweety Pie” who’s continually chased by Sylvester the cat is what type of bird? Parakeet, Cockatiel, Robin, Canary 14) What’s the main shape of the “Star Africa” diamond? Pear, Star, Rectangular, Marquise ANSWERS 1) Foam. 2) 3. 3) 600. 4) Softball. 5) Darts. 6) Edison. 7) Elias. 8) Trigger. 9) Muscles. 10) Georgia. 11) Winston. 12) Pearls. 13) Canary. 14) Pear. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Bay Community School hosts Friday art auction Bay Community School, our community based pre-school in Apalachicola, is hosting its annual Art Show and Auction on Friday, May 31 beginning at 6 p.m. at The Center for History, Culture and Art, on the corner of Water Street and Avenue E. Come and have dinner prepared by Tamara’s Caf and have fun while supporting a great cause. Tickets are $25/person. They are also looking for community sponsors to help supplement the cost for their event. Sponsorships are $100 and include a dinner ticket and personal thank you from the children. The Bay Community School, at 184 Fred Meyer St. in Apalachicola, is a not-for-prot center for education. Proceeds from this event cover the basic costs of running the school. Thank you for your support! For more information about the event or the school, please visit www.baycommunityschool.com Relay for Life begins at noon Saturday Join us in promoting and celebrating Relay for Life! As a way to promote ghting back, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson signed a proclamation to Paint the town Purple! Storefronts, yards, fences, any way you can! Decorate your place purple, from May 27 to June 2! Join the American Cancer Society as we Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back. The Relay for Life is Saturday, June 1 from noon until Sunday, June 2 at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. All survivors and caregivers are invited to join us we celebrate you and remember those we’ve lost. Survivor dinner will be served. Lumanaria ceremony. Local entertainment. Food and family fun! All proceeds go to American Cancer Society to help ght back against cancer! Dance Saturday at Carrabelle Senior Center A dance will be held at 8 p.m. on Saturday evening, June 1, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue. Admission is free, with music provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to dance ... or just to listen to the music! The Nobles dancers in paradise Saturday at Dixie Performers go “Dancing in Paradise” in two shows for Pam Nobles Studio’s 32nd recital Saturday, June 1, at 1:01 p.m. and 6:06 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Tickets are $10 advanced or $15 at door. Call 653-8078. Doors open 45 minutes before each show. News br BR IE fsFS