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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 03-28-2013
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00214
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald


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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Live Easter production on Good Friday A live Easter production with the theme This is the night something happened will be at 6 p.m. Good Friday, March 29, at New Life Church, on 16th Street in Apalachicola. For more information, call Teresa Ann Martin or Barbara McNair. RedTrout Shootout The 2013 RedTrout Shootout will begin Friday, March 29, with a banquet at Cross Creek Driving Range and Par 3 Golf Course in Tallahassee. The pre-registration deadline for the shootout is 10 a.m. April 3. The Shootout will be April 13 in Carrabelle, with shing, weigh-ins and awards. For more information, visit www. redtroutshootout.com or call 528-0553. Elvis at the Dixie Experience tribute artist Todd Alan Herendeen and his Follow That Dream Band, one of the Dixie Theatres most popular shows, at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 29-30. Tickets are $25. For more information, call 653-3200 or visit www. dixietheatre.com. Carrabelle Speed Festival The Carrabelle Speed Festival will be 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 6 at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport. It will take place on an open runway, giving competitors a half-mile of open throttle acceleration. Driver registration is closed. Admission for observers is $10. For more information, call 5855168. Jury Room by Panhandle Players For an evening of suspense and mystery, see The Jury Room by the Panhandle Players. Performances are April 19-21 at the Dixie Theatre. Tickets are $15. For tickets, call John Inzetta at 734-2060. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com To many he was known as Pop, and by his players he was called Coach, and when the community mourned the passing of William Wagoner on Saturday morning, he was known both for his dedication to athletics and for his decency as a man. Wagoner, enshrined in the states high school hall of fame for his stellar coaching career at Apalachicola High School, passed away at age 91 in Ocala on March 19. The pews at First Baptist Church of Apalachicola were lined with former players and those throughout the community who had come to appreciate the impact Wagoner had on the blossoming of AHS athletics and the nurturing of so many young people into successful adulthoods. Brother Charles Scott led the service, with several former players stepping forward to recount the impact Wagoner had dating back to 1948, when he came looking for a teaching position on the advice of a friend. Abe Johnson, a black star of Wagoners 1968 undefeated state championship football team that still holds records for defensive game performance, stepped forward to voice the feelings of so many of Wagoners players, both white and black. Johnson rose slowly, joking that, I might have been the fastest then, but not now. He then spoke in serious terms about how the Alabamaborn Wagoner had made sure his players were shielded from any racism that might have lingered in the tumultuous 1960s. A lot of us remember him as a coach, but I remember him as a By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On April 4, the Dixie Theatre will celebrate the centennial anniversary of its grand opening. In 1905, Alex Fortunas, a sponge sherman, immigrated to the U.S. from Trikkeri, Greece, through Ellis Island in New York. The enterprising young man rst moved to Tarpon Springs, where he entered the theater business with capital earned by sponge diving, and founded the Southern Amusement Company. About 1912, when Tarpon Springs economy faltered because of sponge over shing, Fortunas moved to Apalachicola, where the sponge industry reached its peak in the rst decade of the 20th century. He opened a successful seafood house, and with capital from it, Fortunas ordered the construction of a new theater on property adjacent to the By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Louis Van Vleet received a mullet special delivery last week. Van Vleet, a well known Apalachicola resident often seen riding his bicycle through town or driving his classic Mustang, was in his kitchen preparing tuna salad for lunch when he heard a loud noise on the tin roof of his house. After a few moments, he heard something clattering on his porch roof. Thinking someone wanted in, he exited through the front door but found nobody in sight. I ran around the house, but I didnt see anybody, Van Vleet said. Then I noticed something on the ground by my back door steps. Van Vleet found a mullet, weighing about one pound, still ipping on the ground outside his kitchen. Presumably, the sh was dropped by a large bird and landed on the roof before sliding to the ground. Van Vleet said his initial reaction was to toss the sh out of the yard, but then it occurred to him this was wasteful. He retrieved the gift from above and cleaned it for supper. The sh, he said, was plump, tasty and extremely fresh. Van Vleet said he has, on other occasions, observed an eagle feeding on mullet in a sycamore tree adjacent to the home of his next-door neighbor, City Commissioner Mitchell Bartley. Though Van Vleets experience is unusual, it is far from unique. Some years ago, this author barely missed colliding with a dinner plate-sized ounder when exiting a business near the Port St. Joe waterfront. The late Danny Segree of Eastpoint also reported a similar experience with a large mullet in the late 1990s. Van Vleet, a deeply religious man, asked that the following piece of Scripture accompany this story. It is from 1 Kings 17:4 in the King James Version of the Bible: And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there. Missing man last seen near Franklin County By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On March 25, Gloria McDonald was 83 years old. She waited by the phone all day for her son James to call, but for the rst time ever, he failed to wish her happy birthday. His family is desperate to know what happened to him. James Francis McDonald, missing since October 2012, last was seen just east of Franklin County. On the morning of Oct. 14, 2012, Park Manager Robert Steele was making his rounds in Ochlocknee River State Park when he noticed a large yellow kayak pulled up onto the bank near the bathhouse provided for campers. He felt sure the kayak didnt belong to a registered camper and took a closer look. A man approached Steele from the surrounding woods and identied himself as the owner of the craft without giving a name. He appeared to be someone on a long kayak trip, Steele said. We get a lot of those here. I had no reason to believe he was in trouble or distress or in need of help. He seemed to be doing exactly what he wanted to. The man seemed well supplied with camping gear. The ranger noticed the kayak had interior storage and a dry pack lashed to the bow. The Players honor legendary coach LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Louis Van Vleet said a mullet that fell onto his roof was about this big. Man accepts ying sh as gift from above DIXIE THEATRE CENTENNIAL JAMES M c DONALD FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT The Dixie Theatre is shown circa 1952. Joyce Proctor Counts was the ticket agent; Voncile McLeod stands next to the booth; and Evelyn Bobb is the waitress seen in the window of the Louis Cafe. At left is theater founder Alex Fortunas with Leo the MGM lion during a business trip to Hollywood, from the collection of Jody Fortunas-Wilson. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 First 50 years of beloved landmark remembered See COACH A7 See MISSING A5 See DIXIE A5 Thursday, March 28, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 48 Artwalk 2013, A8 SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Bill Wagoner, who coached sports in Apalachicola for decades, died March 19.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 WEEMS M EMORIAL R EHAB CARE Are you recovering from a surgery, stroke or trauma and need rehabilitative therapy before going home? With todays shorter hospital stays, your need for skilled rehabilitation care is an important part of the healing process. Weems Memorial Rehab Care is here to guide you through your healing process and best of all, it is local with loved ones nearby to help and encourage you. WEEMS M EMORIAL R EHAB CARE HAS JUST EXPANDED ITS R EHAB P ROGRAM! AS P A RT OF THIS EXP A NSION S T A TE OF THE ART EQUIPMENT H A S BEEN A DDED TO A NEW A ND L A RGER A RE A Additionally, we are proud to welcome Apalachicola Therapy, Inc. to our REHAB CARE program providing Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapies. Their sta comes to us highly trained with innovative techniques proven to accomplish improved function and capacity. Y OU HA V E A C HOI C E T ell your doctor you want to come to Weems M emorial for your R ehab Care. FOR MORE IN F OR M AT I ON, PLEASE CONTA C T US AT: Phone: 850-653-8853 | Cell: 903-724-0983 Fax: 850-653-2474 | E -mail: bklein@weemsmemorial.com ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND D IGITAL PACKAGES Starting at $ 234 per month Starting at $ 199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA C ON S UL T A T ION T O FI T YOUR BU S INE SS C ALL TODA Y PUBLIC NOTICE The Franklin County TDC will be conducting a workshop on Thursday March 28, 2013 at 5:00 P.M. at the Eastpoint Firehouse. The purpose of the meeting is to receive public input regarding policies and procedures governing the operation of the Franklin County Visitor Centers. Included in the discussion will be issues relating to distribution of information to the public including referrals and the Visitor Center operations in general. More than one member of the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners and Franklin County TDC may be in attendance at this meeting. For more information, please contact the FC TDC at 653-8678. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Commissioner Brenda LaPaz has clari ed her stance on Carrabelles sewer debt and offered suggestions for city commission protocol. In February, LaPaz read a seven-page report on Carrabelles sewer-related debt and circulated emails suggesting city employees and elected of cials had been responsible for incompetence. In her report as the commissioner charged with supervising water and sewer for the city she wrote, City staff appeared to have no understanding of the nancial complexity or meaning. I explained to DEP (Florida Department of Environmental Protection) administrators that city administrative transactions/functions were not reported to the city commission. Explained that city administration has made no preparations in recent years to secure or plan for additional sewer revenues to supplement payment of upcoming loan. At the March 7 meeting, LaPaz asked Mayor Curley Messer to accept my sincere apologies for any embarrassment I brought to you or your family. She told the audience she did not suspect misappropriation of funds or malfeasance related to $11 million in debt incurred during the construction of the sewer treatment system. I didnt mean any disrespect to you or your of ce, she told Messer. LaPaz also said she had been mistaken about references to the debt in a 2011 rate study and had incorrectly written that the DEP would re city employees to pay for the sewer debt. I want to thank you for being lady enough to say that, Messer said. Im 90 years old but, Ive got a good mind. I had a lot more to say to you but Im glad you apologized. LaPaz noted two reasons for the heavy debt load: capitalized interest and the sewer project funding stretched out over a 16-year period. Its like the gift of a baby elephant; so cute, but it grows up and you need to buy the hay to feed it, she said. LaPaz said the DEP now recognizes the loans were awed and that several communities accumulated large debts by participating in the funding. The new rules no longer allow these kinds of loans, she said. LaPaz suggested the city hire a certi ed public accountant to help nd the best resolution to sewer debt. At Messers urging, City Attorney Dan Hartman said the city had an obligation to upgrade the sewer system after accepting tap fees from prospective developers. (The unpaid debt) was a repercussion of the real estate meltdown, Hartman said. Former City Commissioner Gathana Parmenas laid a large portion of the blame for the debt on former city engineering consultant Baskerville Donovan. Our sewer plant has the capacity to handle a city of 25,000 people. At no time was there ever a possibility that Carrabelle would reach that size, she said. The real estate debacle is bad, but its unforgivable that the consulting engineer did such poor work. Im really angry with Baskerville Donovan. I dont know if theres legal recourse after all this time, but I wish there was. Hartman said the city might get some relief in the short term while a rate study is in progress. He also said Baskerville Donovan should not take all the blame for advising the city to build the oversized plant. It wasnt just our consultant; it was DEP that came in here, Hartman said. Jim Waddell, liaison for the citys current engineering consultant, Inovia, said there are ongoing negotiations with several communities to the east to hook into the Carrabelle water treatment system, which would help relieve the debt load on current customers. The ball is really in their court now, he said. He discussed the possibility of servicing the Lighthouse Estates community. Their water is not unsafe to drink, but has to be treated, he said. Waddell said he believed residents of Lighthouse Estates pay, on average, $125 to $150 monthly to operate household water treatment systems. He said the development could add 250 residences to the city system but added that funding would be needed to tie the community into the grid. Commissioner Cal Allen said the oversized sewage treatment plant could eventually prove an asset. The Northwest Florida Water Management District recommended regionalization for water treatment. In the future, we might be able to help the county in taking care of septic tank problems up and down the coast. Carrabelle would be in a prime position because of our system, Allen said. LaPaz offered four recommendations to help the board make better informed decisions in the future. She moved that the city clerk attach a memo to commissioners information packets which would list all bills paid in the previous month After some discussion of the information already available to commissioners, the motion died for lack of a second. LaPaz also suggested a detailed list of pending bills be provided commissioners one week in advance of the meeting. That is done at the county level, and I dont see why it cant be done at the city level, considering what straits we are in, Parmenas said. City Clerk Keisha Smith said such reports were provided when John McInnis was city manager but the practice had more recently zzled out. City staffers agreed the practice could be reinstated without a formal motion. LaPaz then moved the city administrator present a complete written report of all ongoing city projects at each meeting, to be read aloud if possible. Allen said it would be simpler and less time consuming if the administrator placed the report in commissioners information packets. He pointed out that each commissioner is assigned to oversee a department and could report on signi cant work under their purview. The commission voted unanimously to accept Allens proposal. LaPaz then asked if the city had a purchasing policy and procedures manual, and offered a copy of the manual in use by Apalachicola. But Smith said Carrabelle was in possession of a sample manual provided by auditors in 2011, and that the procedures would have to be adapted to Carrabelles particular circumstances. LaPaz asked that a copy be made available to her before the next city commission meeting. She also requested a detailed breakdown of the attorneys billable hours be made available to commissioners at each monthly meeting. The commission voted unanimously in support of that suggestion. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson; City Administrator Betty Webb; contractor William Poloronis; Apalachicola commissioners Jimmy Elliott, Mitchell Bartley, Frank Cook and Brenda Ash; City Clerk Lee Mathes; City Grant Manager Cindy Summerhill and city workers Wilber Bellew and Robert Osburn broke ground March 11 for the new downtown public restrooms. Local contractor Poloronis Construction won the bid on the long anticipated public restroom facility to be constructed in downtown Apalachicola directly behind the City of Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Arts building. As the lowest bidder, Poloronis was awarded a $300,000 contract to build the restrooms by the Apalachicola city commission at the regular scheduled Jan. 8 meeting. The project is funded though the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant Program and is part of the citys overall redevelopment strategy. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times BRENDA LAPAZ LaPaz says no water and sewer debt malfeasance WORK BEGINS ON PUBLIC RESTROOM

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, March 28, 2013

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Special to The Times During a recent meeting of the Florida Cabinet, Gov. Rick Scott showed his appreciation for Floridas teachers and applauded their commitment to improving Floridas education system by presenting special commendations to several North Florida 2013 Teachers of the Year. The commendation was created to honor Floridas valued educators and their efforts to foster greater student achievement. The winners invited to attend the meeting come from Franklin, Gadsden, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla counties. Every day, you help Floridas students realize their potential, ful ll their dreams and embark on challenging journeys toward college and successful careers, Scott said. Floridas strong, effective teachers give students an advantage in todays competitive environment, and that is why I am proud to award this special commendation to teachers who go above and beyond to make a difference in education. This special recognition took place a few weeks after Scott announced his Florida Families First Budget proposal to increase Florida teachers salaries and education funding. The participating 2013 Teachers of the Year are as follows: Laura King, Franklin County: King teaches social studies and language arts at Franklin County K12 School. With more than 16 years of classroom instruction under her belt, Kings classroom management is an example to her peers and her use of technology in the classroom captures students attention right away. Zola Akins, Gadsden County: In addition to being the reading coach at George W. Munroe Elementary School, Akins also teaches language arts, reading and writing. She has been teaching in Gadsden schools for 11 years. This is her second year as Gadsdens Teacher of the Year. Rebecca Kirchharr, Leon County: Kirchharr is a reading and English teacher at Leon High School. She also serves as a gifted coordinator, reading coach and coach of the junior varsity tennis team. Samantha Newsome, Liberty County: Newsome is a sixthgrade math teacher at W.R. Tolar K-8 School. Before beginning her teaching career, she helped Florida children as a child-abuse investigator. Jodie Martin, Wakulla County: A fth-grade teacher at Medart Elementary School, Martin is committed to teaching students, not teaching subjects. She is a member of Delta Kappa Gamma, the Medart Reading Leadership Team, the science curriculum team and math curriculum team. Each of Floridas 67 school districts selects a Teacher of the Year who is then considered for statewide recognition. The Florida Teacher of the Year is chosen from more than 180,000 public school teachers throughout the state by a selection committee representing teachers, principals, parents and the business community. Floridas top educator is selected on the basis of the superior ability to teach and communicate knowledge of the subject taught, professional development, philosophy of teaching and outstanding school and community service. The most important quali cation is the teachers ability to inspire a love of learning in students of all backgrounds and abilities. Chaining a dog is cruel and dangerous both for the dog and the people around it. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a dog that has been chained for a prolonged period of time is almost three times as likely to bite as one who has freedom to move around. A study of fatal dog attacks from 1965 to 2001 found that 25 percent were in icted by chained dogs. Unaltered male dogs were the most likely to attack. The American Veterinary Medical Association has issued a public statement that chaining a dog can contribute to aggressive behavior. Chaining or tethering a dog refers to the practice of fastening a dog to a stationary object or stake as a means of keeping the animal under control. Walking a dog on a leash is not a form of tethering. The Humane Society of the United States says most chained dogs live their lives away from the prying eyes of neighbors, but most of us know of a dog in this situation. Dogs are social animals genetically designed to live in family groups and interact with each other and human beings. A dog kept con ned for days, weeks or a lifetime can suffer irreparable psychological damage. A docile, friendly animal may become fearful and aggressive. The physical results of chaining include sores and raw spots on the neck from struggling and illtted collars, heat exhaustion and injury or even death brought about by prolonged exposure to the cold. Tethered dogs can become entangled in their chain or rope and be unable to access food and water or even accidently hang themselves. An Apalachicola landlord cleaning a newly purchased rental property found a large section of pipe in the back yard with a chain and collar attached and the skeleton of the dog that was left there to starve. The U. S. Department of Agriculture issued a statement in the July 2, 1996, Federal Register declaring tethering dogs to be inhumane. In 1997, the USDA ruled that people and organizations regulated by the Animal Welfare Act cannot keep dogs continuously chained. Throughout Florida, there are now movements to ban chained dogs or limit the time a dog can be chained and the conditions under which chaining is acceptable. Collier and Escambia counties, as well as Miami, Okaloosa, and Seminole, all prohibit chaining. Dania, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Oakland Park, West Palm Beach, Wilton Manors, Pembroke Park, Tarpon Springs and Orange County limit the time a dog can be chained to the period it takes to complete a brief task during which the dog must be temporarily restrained. The courts have set a precedent of about three hours. Many ordinances also include a stipulation that the owner may not leave a chained dog alone. If you have neighbors with a chained dog, consider talking to them about the animals welfare. If you are interested in helping chained dogs, there are several useful websites. Visit www. unchainyourdog.org/, www. dogsdeservebetter.org/ or www.humanesociety.org/ issues/chaining_tethering/ facts/chaining_tethering_ facts.html for suggestions on helping to unchain mans best friend. Hats off to Pat Bott, Jamie Schaffer and those who brought desserts for the spaghetti dinner. It was great! Pat and her crew served up 54 plates. Thanks to you who came and enjoyed the dinner. Have a blessed Holy Week, and a very happy Easter. Well, folks, it wont be long now! The cannon is ready for shipment It will grace the front lawn of the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Thanks for the efforts of Bill Miller and for those who made donations. Dont forget the Farewell Dance at Chillas Hall. Come on over to the hall Saturday, March 30. Bring a snack or dish to share, your dancing shoes, your main squeeze and enjoy the evening. Greg K and the Crew will provide the music for your dancing and listening pleasure. A donation of $5 is required. Dance starts at 7 p.m.; fun starts when you walk in the door. Easter Mass will be at 11:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 2653 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. Havent heard about any sunrise services in the area. I can remember when wed have sunrise service at the Lanark Village Boat Club. The Rev. Rappljay of ciated. What a crowd we would have. After the service, we would go inside for coffee and donuts. We lost three longtime close friends, Jennie Mae Melton, Ruthie Martin and Mercedes Henderson. Jennie Maes Celebration of Life was held Friday, March 23, at the Assembly of God Church in Carrabelle. Ruthie Martins service was held at Carrabelle Christian Center. The Celebration of Life for Mercedes Henderson, Mercy as she was called, will be at Sacred Heart Church, Saturday, April 5, at 9:30 a.m. We will have our monthly covered dish following the mass. Mercy was a faithful lady of the church. She would pick me up for daily and Sunday Mass. I will miss all three ladies very much. Jennie Mae, Little Ruthie and Mercy were friends of mine for many years. Pray for their eternal rest, and strength for their families. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember a double in nitive is a no-no! Until next time, God bless America, our troops the homeless and the hungry. Chained dogs a danger to animals, humans WWW.UNCHAINYOURDOG.ORG/ BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda Page 4 Citizens of Franklin County continue to use the library for basic needs. Staff members help those who ll in applications for food stamps and unemployment. Many use our faxing service to send information to Children and Family Services. Job searches and resume writing are ongoing by the public. College exam proctoring is another service that is used regularly as many people are training to learn a new skill or profession in Franklin County. Many do not have access to computers or the Internet and must rely upon the local library to apply for their bene ts. More and more companies require or encourage people to complete their business online, and once again, those who do not have Internet capabilities at home are relying upon their public library. Public libraries are a necessity in the ever changing way of our daily life. Irish eyes were smiling as the children of Mommy and Me Story time enjoyed watching and learning the Dublin Jig as performed by Debbie Ruffner. She performed various dances using both hard and soft shoes and invited the children to learn some steps. This activity was just one of many learning and fun opportunities for children ages birth to 9 to experience different cultures at the library. Franklin County Public Library is committed to offering learning opportunities through reading, crafts and guest speakers. Both branches in Eastpoint and Carrabelle offer programs that will be sure to please, including adult book chats, Cinema at the Library, Writers Workshops, individual computer instruction, Kids Wii and story time. These types of programs endear patrons to the importance of the library to their lives. Each time a child visits the library, he or she is offered a chance to explore and learn the value of the lending library process. The new e-books are being praised by our patrons, and the collection through the Wilderness Coast Website www. wildernesscoast.org is growing. As we look forward to the month of April, the Carrabelle branch will be offering a free Smoking Cessation Workshop from 2-4 p.m. April 11 sponsored by Big Bend AHEC. Also, National Library Week will be celebrated April 15-20, when Franklin County Public Library will recognize the valued patrons who come to both the Eastpoint and Carrabelle branches. Each day, there will be a small surprise for patrons at the front desk when they check out materials. April 22 is Earth Day, and the library will be recognizing the importance of ecology to the children in Eastpoint who attend the Mommy and Me Storytime. Books about Florida plants and owers can be checked out from our Florida collection. There are also additions in the new materials collections at both branches. For more information about programs and services, call 670-8151 or 697-2366. Scott presents commendations to 5 teachers Easter activities coming up Thursday, March 28, 2013 LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh YOUR COUNTY LIBRARY Library continues to play a vital role The FCS Band scored a Superior rating on March 7 at the District 2 Concert Music Performance Assessment in Chipley. In addition to their superior performance, their behavior was outstanding (to the point of strangers coming up to our chaperones, asking who we were, where we were from and recognizing how well our students represented our school). We quali ed to participate in the State Concert Festival in Niceville at the New Performing Arts Center! We will start raising money for the $325 entry fee when we return from spring break. Please congratulate our band students & spread the word! Karl Lester FCS band director Congratulations

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, March 28, 2013 8:00am to 4:00pm 8:00am to 4:00pm NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM traveler didnt want to talk, which Steele said is unusual. Steele continued his park inspection. When he returned to the bathhouse later in the day, the kayak was gone. That night, Steele glanced at the television and saw a familiar face on the evening news. The Coast Guard was searching for a missing kayaker named James Francis McDonald. I talked to that guy this morning, Steele told his wife. The ranger called the authorities and reported what he had seen. He also sent an alert to coastal parks west of the Ochlocknee River, but nobody else reported seeing the missing kayaker. McDonald still is listed as a missing person in Dixie County. Family and friends said he was a consummate outdoorsman and could still be alive in the wilderness. Dayle Flint, manager of Journeys of St. George Island, speculated McDonald could have traveled from Ochlocknee River State Park down the river to Ochlocknee Bay. From there, he might have returned to Suwannee or followed the Intercoastal Waterway to Apalachicola Bay and continued west as far a New Orleans. He could have stopped over in Apalachicola or on St. George Island, or traveled north on the Apalachicola River as far as Atlanta. If he turned north and headed inland on the Ochlocknee River, he could have followed the Crooked River to Carrabelle or continued up into the swamp on the Ochlocknee. McDonald was traveling in a bright yellow, Solstice touring kayak, probably a 17-foot, 7-inch Solstice GT Titan. Flint said he could easily carry enough food and water for a week in the kayak, along with gear, especially if he supplemented his diet by shing. Because McDonald had been traveling for ve days when he reached the Ochlocknee, he might have stopped for supplies somewhere in Franklin County. McDonald is described as frugal and reserved with strangers, especially men. McDonalds last encounters The circumstances that led McDonald to Ochlocknee are complicated. After splitting up with his longterm girlfriend, Heather Barrett, he visited his parents on or around Oct. 6. He was highly distraught. I had never seen him cry before, said Kirk McDonald, James father. On Monday, Oct. 8, having retrieved his kayak and gear from his cabin in High Springs, McDonald traveled to the home of his friend and former teacher Yvonne Streetman on the Suwannee River and spent the night. McDonald frequently visited her and launched his kayak from her property. Streetman was traveling at that time, but McDonald spoke to neighbors, and one of them saw him launch his kayak on Tuesday morning, Oct. 9. While in Suwannee, McDonald called his mother pretending to be in Gainesville. This is his last known call to a friend or relative. McDonald took his cell phone and drivers license with him as well as a Discover card. The phone last was used Oct. 9 and the credit card has not been used. How much cash he was carrying is unknown. He did not take his passport. When Streetman returned home on Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 9, she found McDonalds 1995 Chevrolet pickup truck in her driveway and his keys on her kitchen table. Initially, she didnt worry about his absence. He was in the habit of making long, solitary paddle trips. Barrett also was out of town when McDonald set off on his paddle. When she returned to their shared home, she assumed he had traveled to Miami, where he was employed part-time refurbishing a yacht, or had embarked on an impromptu journey. McDonald was able to support himself without a regular full-time job. On Saturday, Oct. 13, knowing McDonald was distraught over the breakup with Barrett, Streetman decided to contact another friend, Travis Cooper, a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cer. Cooper and another man came to Suwannee on their own time and searched in the area for the missing kayaker. This was the same day Steele believes he saw McDonald at Ochlocknee River State Park. On Monday, Oct. 15, the FWC started an of cial search from Suwannee south to Tampa, which was McDonalds regular haunt for solitary trips. Together, the FWC and Coast Guard covered 500 square miles of territory by boat and helicopter. They found nothing, and the search was called off on Wednesday, Oct. 17. Jeff Summer, a public information of cer for FWC, said because there was nothing to indicate an accident or foul play, it was believed McDonald simply decided to leave. Since then, there have been no reported sightings of James McDonald. Both Streetman and McDonalds parents, Kirk and Gloria, wonder what has happened to James. Although he is quite t, they fear he may be suffering from a recurrence of Hodgkins disease, a cancer of the lymph tissue. Friends and relatives have made trips to Ochlocknee River State Park and the surrounding area searching for McDonald and found no trace. No formal search has ever been made in the Panhandle, and though posters have been circulated at local marinas and some other businesses, most Franklin County residents seem unaware a kayaker disappeared here. McDonald and Barrett once resided in New Orleans. Friends there have been informed he is missing, but nobody has seen him. James Francis McDonald is 6-foot-2 and weighs about 200 pounds. He has brown hair and brown eyes and might have a beard. He is athletic and enjoys bicycling and kayaking. He is now 46 years old but appears younger. He has worked as a photographer, mechanic, carpenter, bartender and art teacher. He is skilled in boat repair and maintenance. If you have seen McDonald or his 17-foot yellow Solstice kayak, call Kirk McDonald at 352-3727444 or local law enforcement. MISSING from page A1 PHOTOS FROM THE MCDONALD FAMILY COLLECTION James McDonald has been missing since October. He was last seen in his Solstice GT Titan kayak. DIXIE from page A1 Flatauer-Wake eld Hardware Company on Avenue E, then called Chestnut Street. The Dixie Theatre, described by the Apalachicola Times as one of the prettiest in the state, was a modern marvel with an aluminum and silver curtain to act as a movie screen and a proscenium stage for live performances. A projection booth at the front of the balcony was furnished with a Powers Cameragraph, an early 35 mm projector. There was an orchestra pit in front of the stage. There were two 16-by-16foot shops anking the ticket of ce. To the left was a barbershop leased by Jenkins and ORourke, and to the right was a cigar and candy stand owned by W.G. Sharit that provided snacks for theatergoers. The theater had electric lights. The front of the building displayed 15 large white lights and 100 colored light bulbs. Inside, strings of lights served the seating area and the stage had adjustable lighting. Three stairways, two for white patrons and one for blacks, provided access to the audience. Employees of Fortunas seafood business were treated to free admission. The main entrance to the theater was through the ticket of ce, but blacks sat on the left-hand side of the balcony. They took their tickets to Uncle Stathis Sardellis, standing at the top of their stairwell. At the age of 80, Sardellis could read without glasses. In the beginning, he also changed theater posters around town when the movie changed and kept the theater clean and sparkling. Later, the Fortunas children took up some of these tasks, and Aunt Sadie Ford became the See DIXIE A6

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 ticket taker for black theatergoers and held the job for many years. The right hand side of the balcony was reserved for smokers, who sometimes scattered ashes on the audience below. The street entrance was tall glass doors that could be shrouded with thick curtains to exclude the light while the show was in progress. The auditorium seated more than 500 with 380 seats on the ground oor, 140 in the horseshoe shaped balcony and four private boxes located to the right and left of the stage. The theater oors were covered with noiseless rubber-backed carpets. The main oor was on an incline to allow a good view for all patrons. Seating was in folding opera chairs. There were four cozy dressing rooms for performers behind the stage. The stage was furnished with velvet curtains that could be raised into the ceiling. Fortunas ordered eight sets of scenery painted by the Kansas City Scenic Company as a backdrop for shows. These were lifting ats that could be pulled up into the 42-foot ceiling above the stage and concealed when not in use. At the grand opening, a theater company booked to perform failed to appear, and Fortunas wound up showing a six-reel moving picture. The theater was packed to over owing, and the street in front was crowded with people seeking admission. A four-piece orchestra performed consisting of Miss Hollister, a pianist: Mr. Albert Shine from Tallahassee on the coronet; Dr. Rosenbaum, a violinist; and Mr. L. Forsyth, a trap drummer from Tarpon Springs. Professor Joseph H. Becsey was soon employed as the regular musical accompanist. He played multiple instruments but normally performed on violin at the Dixie. He was also the choirmaster at St. Patricks Church for many years. Becsey was a native of Kalozsvar, Transylvania, but immigrated to Tarpon Springs in 1903, where he met Fortunas. Willoughby Marshall remembers his mother Estelle Marshall accompanying Becksey on keyboard. In 1926, Fortunas bought a pipe organ for the theater. The next year, Becksey died after a brief illness. Young and old The Dixie was a magic place for children. Joe Barber said around the time of Beckseys death, Fortunas installed a player piano to the delight and fascination of local children. Barber and his friends sat in the very front of the house as much to watch the piano keys move on their own as to watch the movie. Toto McCluskey remembers attending shows at the Dixie during the 1930s. She, too, favored the front row. She and her friends went to the corner bakery and bought a loaf of warm bread for a dime. They ate it during the show and sometimes mashed bits into pellets for an impromptu battle. She also remembers a donut eating contest staged at the Dixie. A long rope was strung across the stage, and lots of donuts were attached to it by strings, she said. You had to put your hands behind your back and grab the donut with your mouth. I got mine all the way in my mouth and then I pulled it. When I did that, it pulled the donuts out of everybody elses mouth, so I won. I didnt mean to do it. In the early years, the Dixie hosted a variety of entertainments. The attractions for the rst winter season of the Dixie were announced in the Sept. 13 Times. They included The Little Millionaire, a musical comedy; the traditional opera Barber of Seville; a comic opera called The Divorce Question; and a drama titled Sheppard of the Hills. When Barber was growing up in the 1920s, the Dixie was still a Vaudeville house. There was always music and a comic skit before the picture show. Alice Jean Gibbs was a teenager working in Vaudeville around this time. She traveled by train with a theatrical company. The players performed the same stage act at each stop for six months, but the movies that preceded or followed their performances varied from theater to theater. Her company carried their own costumes, sets and musicians. Traveling acts at the Dixie were usually less elaborate. Performers in Apalachicola might have arrived by car or aboard a steamboat. Traveling tent shows also came to town setting up in a vacant eld in competition with the Dixie. Part of the community The Dixie was an integral part of the community. It provided entertainment and a venue for community meetings. Memorial Day services, war bond rallies and church conventions were held there. During the rst Mardi Gras in 1915, a huge clock was leased and displayed in front of the theater for a week. Locals also made their own entertainment. During World War I, the Times carried an account of a talent show at the Dixie highlighted by cartoons depicting town characters drawn by Mrs. De Bauvier and projected onto the movie screen. Caricatures included Paul Ploger and his Million Dollar Dog, George Plaza who cooka da nica meal, Professor Becksey, Fishing with the Sun and Elgin We ng Pushing Business at the Garage. On the same evening, the Misses Floyd Rice and Loretta Long sang Until We Meet Again. They were called back to sing again before the audience would release them. Miss Floyd Rice later sang Hawaiian Butter y. She was followed by The Smiles, 20 girls in white who sang their way into the heart of the audience. Later, Miss Patricia Long sang Dear Old Pal of Mine and Goodbye to France. The whole program was accompanied by music performed by Becksey on violin; Estelle Marshall, then Estelle Marks, on piano and a clarinetist named Castorina. The show raised $28.50 for charity, which was divided between Descendents of Confederate Veterans and the old soldiers home in Jacksonville. In 1927, a theatrical troop out of Atlanta used a clever scheme to ensure a robust audience. They produced a traveling play called Cupid Up to Date. It played at the Dixie on Valentines Day 1927. The company arrived in town about two weeks before the production date. The actors were professionals, but the chorus was recruited from local school children. At the Dixie, Cupid, a golf caddy in satin diapers, was played by 7-year-old Voncile McLeod. The show featured dances ranging from the Black Bottom to the minuet. Not surprisingly, it played to a packed house and got rave reviews. According to the Times, Mothers attending rehearsals are entranced by the snap and rhythm displayed by their little tots. Nationally known lecturers also appeared at the theater. William Jennings Bryan is said to have spoken there. In 1922, Winifred Kimball, daughter of a Franklin County timber tycoon, won a national competition to create a scenario for a moving picture with her story The Newness of Life, which was lmed under the title Broken Chains. It was a tale of domestic abuse and triumphant love. Kimball prevailed over 30,000 other entrants. The judges included D.W. Grif n, Charlie Chaplin and Norma Talmadge. Broken Chains debuted at the Dixie on Jan. 1, 1923, with much fanfare and a gala opening celebration at the Gibson Inn, but it fell rather at in theaters. Kimball went on to direct a number of stage plays at the Dixie. A 1927 production, The Path Across the Hills, received rave reviews in the Times with special praise for W.D. Buzzett in his role as Grandpa and Grandma Mrs. Charles Marks. Bill and Raymond Loftin, Paul Ploeger Jr., Little Betty Ploeger and Ada Clair Theobald also performed. Kathleen Nease played Zuzu the cook. The Times wrote, The dramatic talent was well represented under the skillful training of Miss Winifrid Kimball, authoress and dramatic trainer who has been responsible for many brilliant successes. The Times never appears to have published a bad review of any lm or stage production at the Dixie, possibly because, from the 1920s through the 1940s, the Dixie was a proli c and faithful advertiser. Lengthy reviews of upcoming features appeared on the front page and large box ads were scattered throughout the paper. From time to time, local businesses sponsored shows at the Dixie. In 1919, Hinckley Hardware presented contralto Ida Gardener accompanied by utist Harold Lyman in a recital. Tickets were available at Hinckley Hardware. Changes Over the years, there were changes at the theatre. In 1918, Fortunas purchased Sharits sweet and cigar shop and put Josephine Porter in charge. In 1920, she married Alex Nicholas Fortunas, son of the theaters founder. Still later, George Louis opened a diner in the Sharit building. At some point, Nick Fortunas opened a concession stand where sodas, candy and crackers were available in the lobby of the theater. Patrons still were free to pick up a burger at the Louis diner and carry it into the theater if they were peckish. In September 1929, talkies came to the Dixie. The rst picture with sound displayed was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayers Broadway Melody. According to the Times, The theatre was packed to over owing with standing room at a premium. In preparation for the metamorphosis to all-talkers, Fortunas had the projection booth soundproofed and installed the very latest equipment, including DeFoerest phono lm and phonodisc talking equipment. The Dixie was one of the rst Florida theaters to display talkies. Alexander Keys brother Robert published a newspaper article about the Dixies modern equipment in the Florida Times Union. In the 1933, Fortunas added Sunday matinees. After World War II, Carol McLeod became the projectionist, a job he held for 24 years. Voncile McLeod said she spent most evenings with him in the projection booth. Frances Louis Cook, whose parents ran the Louis Diner, said she grew up in the Dixie. Fortunas son Georgie was about her age, and he had taken on the task of changing posters. Frances would help him and then stand at the back of the theater and watch the show. Sometimes Georgie ran the projector and she would sit with him in the booth, where two projectors sat side by side to minimize the pause between reels. She remembers Mrs. Fortunas was an animal lover and always kept a Pekingese dog. Sometimes she would accompany her husband to the theater, and while he took care of business, she would sit in the car with her dog or a spider monkey and socialize with passersby. Georgies daughter Jody Fortunas-Wilson remembers begging to clean the theater during summer vacation. She and her brothers and sisters had to take a nap in the afternoon to be allowed to stay up late, but the reward was change spilled from the pockets of theatergoers. Over time, the theater became strictly a movie house, and the private booths were removed. The Nichols brothers opened The Number 1 Drive-in Theatre on U.S. 98 west of Apalachicola during the late 1950s, and television came to the county at about the same time. It was the beginning of the end for the Dixie. By 1962, the Dixie no longer advertised in the Times, although the drive-in ran weekly ads for B movies. Fortunas bought a piece of land in Eastpoint, where he planned to build a drivein of his own, but he never did. By the time the Dixie nally shut her doors in 1967, her demise was not even covered by the local paper. The shabby old lady sat shuttered for three decades until she was rediscovered by the Partington family, but thats another story. Who is 50 now? C an you remember nineteen sixty three? U nusually long hair, sex and drugs were all free. R eturn to it now for just a moment of pause, E ngage your friends to help with this cause. N ow think who in town should have missed that whole scene? T hat he would have preferred the Old South to any electronic machine. O r if you fail with that clue then hes a great chef who never drinks wines. And, N otice his name spelled in these lines. FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NOTICE OF SOLICITATION REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS Franklin County Clerk of Court Alligator Drive Multi-Use Path Franklin County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. DIXIE from page A5 W.D. Buzzett in his role as Grandpa and Grandma Mrs. Charles Marks. mond Loftin, Paul Ploeger Jr., Little Betty Ploeger and Ada Clair Theobald also performed. Kathleen Nease played Zuzu the cook. wrote, The dramatic talent was well represented under the skillful training of Miss Winifrid Kimball, authoress and dramatic trainer who SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Broken Chains premiered at the Dixie in1923. At right is a Times ad for the Dixie circa 1927.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, March 28, 2013 man, and probably a genius in his own time, Johnson said. Not only was he a decent man, but with a lot of the crazy stuff that was going on culturally, he kept that from his players. I didnt have to experience that, Johnson said. He was a many of integrity. He gave me an awareness of people (who I didnt know). I thought to myself, If he is this decent and honest, then perhaps this is a standard of what others feel. I dont know them, but I know him, Johnson said. That made a difference to me. I want you to know he was a decent human being, and I appreciated the impact that he made on my life. Later, Johnny Browne, who played for Wagoner in the 1970s, rose to speak and told a story of how, in 1966, when he was 9, Wagoner had showed up early on a Saturday morning with a paper sack full of a baseball uniform, shoes and gloves, pushed it into Brownes stomach and told the boy, Cmon you can change in the car. Browne said Wagoner stood by his side and encouraged him to get into the game. Son, go out there and show them what you can do, he told Browne. Dont worry; Im going to be here. Years later, Browne would be a part of overpowering football teams that won the Apalachicola Valley Conference and would play in hundreds of baseball games for Wagoner, but that what he remembered most is a man standing in that living room, talking to a 9-year-old boy. Scott recounted the early life of a boy who played in the cotton elds where his mother worked around Clanton, Ala., where he was born March 11, 1922. Wagoner used to say the family was so poor, he could stand on a dime with his shoes on and tell you whether it was heads or tails. He never knew his father, and his mom died when he was 12, so Wagoner went to live with his older sister in Birmingham, Ala., who was protective of her little brother. He did play for Phillips High School, and the rst time he got in, playing in Legion Field in Birmingham, the coach called to the wing man, and Wagoner did as instructed, cutting through the line, out into the at and scored a 70-yard touchdown, Thats a pretty good start, right? Thats a pretty good indicator of how successful he was going to be, in the schools and in football, said Pat Floyd, a former player of Wagoners who went on to a spot on the University of Florida football team and who the coach had asked to share facts about Wagoners life and career when the time came to be eulogized. Wagoner went over the items and then called Floyd back a week later and asked to go over them again so that you get it right. It made me remember how much time in his life that he spent making plans, for his teams for the players, for class, Floyd said. How he prepared us to make sure that we never failed those tasks and do the best we could to succeed and carry them out. In 1942, Scott said in his remarks, Wagoner went off to World War II, training with the Coast Guard in California before eventually becoming senior leader of a team of 110 men that shipped off to the South Pacic from San Francisco. Wagoner came home with a Bronze Star and plenty of tales of his adventures, including a boat ride with Admiral William Bull Halsey. He had told Floyd practically to the minute that he had spent three years, six months, 18 days and he got discharged at 11 a.m. Wagoner then enrolled through the GI Bill in Livingston State Teachers College in Alabama, where he became the schools rst three-time letter winner, in football, basketball and baseball, where he played catcher, second base and outeld. Because he was older than his teammates, having gone off to war at age 20, he became known as Pop, and the nickname stuck. It was also there that he met his wife, the former Blanche Henderson, and in 1948 they moved to Apalachicola to teach and coach. For more than 32 years he taught and coached at both Chapman High School and Apalachicola High School. Floyd shared a list of memorable players and memorable seasons that Wagoner had gone over with his former player, now a successful local attorney. He really enjoyed seeing his players be successful off the eld, Floyd said. Boy, werent we blessed with that? He had a plan, and he prepared us for it, and we won with it, he said. When you look back at what he did and you see he was extraordinary man, and he generated some pretty good successes. Wagoner had impressive success as a coach, with a nal football record of 188 wins, 111 losses and 9 ties. His career included being honored as Florida High School Coach of the Year, for all high schools in the state, and a nomination for National High School Coach of the Year, which took him to events in San Francisco. He was inducted into the Florida High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame in 1990 and is in the University of West Alabama Athletic Hall of Fame. The football elds at the former Apalachicola High School were named in his honor. He is survived by his son, Wally Wagoner, and his daughter-in-law Julie of Ocala, and their children Phillip and Abbey. He was preceded in death by his wife, Blanche, and his sister Paula Binion. The service was followed by a graveside service at Magnolia Cemetery. All services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Those who wish may make donations to hospice in his memory. PUBLIC NOTICE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle will meet in regular session on Thursday April 4, 2013, at approximately 6:00 p.m. or as soon as can be heard in the City of Carrabelle Commission Chambers located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL (850)697-2727 to consider the following in accordance with Ordinance No.443, Consent of Use for the Consumption and Sale of Alcohol: 1. Allowing a temporary beer and wine permit for the Big Bend Salt Water Classic on June 14th thru 16th. All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing on this matter. Further information concerning the proposed amendment can be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by calling (850) 697-2727, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly Sta Times of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At: 106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-4121 Renee Parrish, D.M.D ACCEP T ING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICE S FOR CHILDREN: E arly H ead Start / H ead Start All services for our children are free with no cost to the parent. **Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).** Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY RESTORE COUNCIL Notice is given that on March 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. (ET), at the Carrabelle City Hall, 106 SE Avenue B, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, the Franklin County Restore Council shall hold a public organizational meeting. For additional information contact Alan Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, at 850-653-9783, Ext. 161. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard. Any party who may wish to appeal the decisions made at this public meeting is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the meeting. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. COACH from page A1SPECIAL TO T HE T IME S Coach Bill Wagoner stands nexts to his trophy case.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 OF THE WEEK PET Franklin County Humane Society LOVABLE LOLLY! Lolly is a 3 month old Terrier mix with a stubby little tail that never stops wagging. She is playful and energetic so needs plenty of attention and exercise. A home with a yard and a couple kids would be just what this little girl needs. If you fit the bill, come meet this cutie! V OLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 Society By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A drizzly day dampened attendance at this years Artwalk. A number of artists bowed out to protect delicate artwork or because they were hesitant to travel to what might be a rained out event. Several dozen artists did attend. Some moved inside. Others braved the elements. Most artists on site reported good sales. Painter Mershell Sherman said, although there were fewer shoppers, his sales had matched last years by early afternoon. Phillip Campbell of The Fifth Digit pottery and copper said, Just before it seems like its going to storm, People seem to go into a frenzy and start buying things as if they want to be sure they get what they want. Local creative icon Kristin Anderson displayed a stunning, new creation in the Grady Mart courtyard. Her massive necklace and four accompanying earrings in silver, enamel and precious stones, pays tribute to the four seasons and the changing aspects of day and night. Some other Franklin County artists created lots of interest at the affair. Katie McFarland worked on one of her whimsical ceramic murals throughout the afternoon. The Bowery Gallery had a bevy of artists on hand. LG Duniston of Lanark Village brought a gorgeous display of Gyotaku to Artwalk. This is the ancient Japanese art of sh printing. Each print is taken from a dead sh that has been thoroughly washed with mild dish soap. Absorbent material is packed behind gills and inside the mouth. Then dry, high quality acrylic paint is applied directly to the surface of the sh. Special interest is devoted to preserving the personality of the specimen, and creating an image that will serve as an artifact. Finally, veil-thin rice paper or cotton canvas is laid across the sh, and the surface is delicately rubbed by hand. The result is wonderfully lifelike and stylized at the same time. Joe Kotzman of Carrabelle displayed his fantastic watercolors, a rare treat. Kotzman has painted in both the United States and abroad. He said folk tales learned from his mother are the basis of much of his work. He is an active member and past president of the Carrabelle Artists Club. Barbara Rosen of Alligator Point brought both visual and literary creations to the show. She presented an assortment of pine needle baskets, many with ceramic or wooden bases and inserts but Rosen also brought along a half dozen short works of poetry on all manner of subjects. She distributed her wise little books to passersby asking only that they make a contribution to the Humane Society if they enjoyed her verse. Another creative duo that has become a xture of local art viewings is The Fifth Digit, Patti and Phillip Campbell. The couple displayed new works in ceramics, metal and found materials like seashells. Phillip Campbell said, Its nice to have somebody to collaborate with. I engineer the stuff and she does the pottery. An interesting face that is new on the local horizon was Jennifer Odom of Live Oak Island near Crawfordville. Odoms work consists of quirky animals with large eyes reminiscent of religious icons. Odom said she left 20 years of residence in Santa Fe to experience the lifestyle of rural Florida and has found the change inspiring. Rylie Wilson turns 1 Rylie Jack Wilson celebrated his rst birthday on Sunday, March 10, with friends and family. He is the son of David and Erica Wilson of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Dale and Montez Davis of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Shellie Wilson of Apalachicola and Chris and Carolyn Hill of Sumatra. Birthday Special to the Times Chairperson Carrie Kienzle has announced plans are under way for the 21st annual Historic Apalachicola Home and Garden Tour, sponsored by Trinity Episcopal Church. The tour is expected to attract hundreds of visitors to Apalachicola on May 3 and 4. This years theme, At Home in Apalach runs the gamut from spacious and graceful century-old houses and charming bungalows to contemporary ones with new energy sources. The tours featured house is the home of Ed and Candace Springer. Built by Dave Maddox for Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Flowers, it celebrates its 100th birthday this year. Constructed of heart pine, situated behind a white picket fence and shaded by towering Magnolia trees, it portrays a gracious vision of life in Apalach in the past century. An example of Gulf Coast two-story Greek Revival architecture, the large central halls on each oor are anked by equal-sized, spacious rooms. Modern updates in the past several decades have made the residence more comfortable, but the house remains true to its original plan. Of special interest are a collection of Weller pottery and a restored 1962 Corvette. Pastel and oil paintings done by one of the current owners adorn the walls; and examples of pique assiette (a type of mosaic) abound both indoors and out. On Friday, May 3, a second annual preservation symposium precedes the tour day. This years focus will be on outdoor spaces and is titled Public Places, Private Spaces: A Garden Symposium. Tickets are available at $75, which includes lecture, eld trip, luncheon and cocktail party Evensong service at Trinity Episcopal Church on Friday, May 3, 5:30 p.m., provides the traditional opening for the home tour. It will be followed by a reception open to all, and a free lecture, Gardening in Apalach at 6:30 p.m., which will round out the days events. Homes will be open on Saturday, May 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pre-sale tickets will be available at $20 until the day of the event. On May 4, ticket sales will begin at 9:30 a.m. at $25 per ticket. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Trinitys parish hall at a cost of $12. In addition, a sealed-bid auction, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. will be a part of the tour days festivities. Guests to Apalachicola can enhance their weekend experience by allowing time to visit the many historical buildings and churches, museums, inns and parks that mark this historic town. For more information or ticket sales please contact Trinity Episcopal Church at 653-9550 or the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Please visit the tour website at www.apalachicolahistorichometour.org. Springer home highlights May tour of homes Artwalk damp but dazzling THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK @A palachTimes FOLLOW US ON TWITTER Barbara Rosen displays a partly completed basket. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above: Pine needle baskets created by Barbara Rosen of alligator Point. Below: Fanciful ceramics by Marti Campbell of Apalachicola. Above: Jennifer Odoms work has striking vitality. Left: A water color by Joe Kotzman of Carrabelle.

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The Times | A9 Thursday, March 28, 2013 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Palm Sunday, March 24 8:00 AM Holy Eucharist, Rite I; 10:30 AM Holy Eucharist, Rite II Lenten Seder Wednesday, 6:00 PM, March 27 ( Call for reservations ) Maundy Thursday, 6:00 PM, March 28 Good Friday, March 29 Noon, Good Friday Service; 6:00PM, Stations of the Cross Holy Saturday, 10:00 AM, March 30 Easter Sunday, March 31 6:30 AM, Sunrise Service at Lafayette Park 10:30 AM, Holy Eucharist, Rite II; Coffee and Easter Egg Hunt to follow WELCOMES YOU Trinity est. 1836 Welcomes You Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Hwy 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Local Rudolph Buzier, born Aug. 25, 1934, in Apalachicola, died at age 76 on Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 4:05 a.m. at Bridges by the Bay in Port St. Joe, with family members Adolph Buzier Jr. and Violet Buzier Garrity at his side. He was the son of the late Costa and Esther Buzier of Apalachicola. He was preceded in death by brother Costa Buzier Jr., sister Gloria Houseman and brother Jackie Buzier. He is survived by twin brother Adolph Buzier Sr., sisters Loretta Ost of Panama City, and Ollie Houseman of Apalachicola, and his beloved bird GiGi. He graduated from Chapman High School in 1955, and joined the U.S. Navy in 1956, serving on the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Essex, stationed in San Diego, Calif. He traveled around the world four times, seeking out his fathers family in Greece and his mothers family in Italy, mailing many treasures from around the world to his mother and nieces. He ended his career in the Navy as an honorably discharged petty ofcer third class. He lived in California a short time, then returned home to Apalachicola where he crewed and cooked on many a shrimp boat, a valued member of the shing community. He oystered when necessary. Rudolphs passion was antique collecting and history. He managed the rst community store and restaurant on St. George Island in the 60s and went on to work on the St. George Island toll bridge for many years. He then became a selfmade chef and opened the Seafood Shack in Eastpoint. He developed many recipes that are still enjoyed in the community. His last venture before retiring was the Owl Cafe. After the Owl he retired and moved to Lanark Village, then on to Gulfport, Miss. to live near his sister, Gloria Houseman. After being displaced by Hurricane Katrina he came back to Florida, where he lived for several years until his health began to decline. Rudolph Buzier was a remarkable man and it would take a novel to cover his wonderful life. He was a much loved son of Apalachicola. Family and friends will celebrate his life by coming together at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 13 at niece Diane Duncans house at 1416 Bluff Rd. Apalachicola. Rudolph Buzier RUDOLPH BUZIER Sharon (Jenkins) Hall, daughter to the late Daniel Jenkins of Moss Point, Mississippi and the late Ernestine (Bunyon) Pittman of Apalachicola, was born Nov. 24, 1958. She graduated from Apalachicola High School. She was an employee of Franklin County Courthouse where she served faithfully for 30 years. She was a faithful member of Saint Paul AME Church under the shepherding of the Rev. Garry B. Reed. Sharon gave her life to Christ at an early age, living her last years as a trailblazer for Christ. She was known for always willing and giving a helping hand. She operated under the gifting of exaltation and hospitality. She was an encourager to all those around her no matter how sick she felt. She never allowed the pain of her life to stop her from being a servant of the Most High. Although, she was not tired of running for Jesus, He saw t to call her home to rest. On Sunday, March 17, 2013, God called His angel home. She is survived by her beloved husband Harry J. Hall Jr. of Apalachicola. Her children are Marcus Jenkins (Rachel) of Valrico; Felicia Williams (John) of Memphis, Tenn.; Allen ONeal of Apalachicola; Harry Hall III, of Carrabelle; and Helen J. Hall of Lancaster, Calif. Her siblings are Shirley Byrd (Harold), of Apalachicola, Daniel Jenkins Jr. of Lake Wales and James Jenkins (deceased); and Jeff Pearson of West Virginia; Godmother Elder Mary Ann Hayward of Apalachicola. Bobbie Clark (Sylvester )Fort Myers, Andrew Davis (Dorothy) Bonifay, Ann Fields and Mike A. Hall, Port St Joe, Arma J. Mitchell (Stanley), Wilmington North Carolina; Charles Hall, Portland, Ore.; Charlie Freeman (Mary) Augusta Ga.; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, in-laws and other relatives and friends. The wake was held Friday evening, March 22 at Kelly Funeral Home, 149 Ave H, Apalachicola. Funeral services were held Saturday, March 23 at Saint Paul A.M.E. Church, 81 Avenue I.Sharon Jenkins Hall SHARON JENKINS HALL Marjorie Wiggins Thompson passed away in Panama City on Tuesday, March 19, 2013. She was born on Feb. 7, 1921, in Goldsboro, N.C., the daughter of the late Lonnie Lee Wiggins of Goldsboro and Mary Frances Davis Wiggins from Cove City, N.C. She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years, Raymond Morris Thompson in Goldsboro, and her great-greatgranddaughter, Hayley Grace Lane, of Hiram, Ga.; and brothers Lonnie Lee Wiggins Jr., Charles Miller Wiggins and Frances Earl Wiggins. She is survived by her son, Jerry Morris Thompson (Karen) of St George Island; granddaughters Holli Lea Thompson, Dallas, Ga. and Stevie Lyn, Panama City Beach; greatgrandsons Alexander Lane (Lyndsie), Hiram, Ga., Mathew Lane, Dallas, Ga. and greatgreat-granddaughter, Alexis Callie Lane; stepgranddaughter, Jennifer Heusing (Jeff) and stepgreat-grandson, Cannon Heusing of Alpharetta, Ga. Survivors also include her sister-in-law, Mary Fowler Ward in Raleigh, NC and numerous nieces and nephews. Affectionately called Mamie by her grandchildren; Mrs. Thompson was a longtime member of St. Luke United Methodist Church in Goldsboro. She moved to Panama City in 2003 and resided at her beloved Mathison Retirement Home where she enjoyed playing bridge, bingo, Bunco and bowling on the Wii machine with many of her good friends. Her good humor, laughter and character will long be remembered. A visitation was held Saturday afternoon, March 23 at Seymour Funeral Home, 1300 Wayne Memorial Drive, in Goldsboro, N.C., followed by the service at 3 p.m. in the chapel. An entombment followed the service in Wayne Memorial Park. Another memorial service will be at 3 p.m. CDT this Friday, March 29 for her friends at Mathison Retirement Home, at 3167 W. Highway 390, Panama City. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in her memory to Mathison Retirement Center, 3636 Highway 390 West, Panama City, FL 32405, or to Covenant Hospice, 107 West 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405. The family would like to express their deepest appreciation for the care these two organizations have provided to our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and great-great-grandmother over the past years and months. Marjorie Wiggins Thompson MARJORIE W. THOMPSON I would like to share a few thoughts regarding Houston Miller. Houston Miller was a Franklin County resident for well over 60 years. He and his wife, Xuripha, settled in Eastpoint and started a seafood business. Houston was a good man. He never turned anyone away that needed help. People came to Franklin County to look for work on the water so they could feed their family. This was during the Depression. There was no work. People with little schooling could not nd work. When they would come to the oyster house looking for work, they would be asked if they could tong oysters or shuck oysters. Of course, that was completely foreign to them, as most of them, used to farm. So Houston would get the men to get the wood and all they needed and Houston would show them how to build an oyster boat. Then, he would take them out on the water and teach them how to oyster. The women would be taught how to shuck the oyster, thus, they could make money and feed their families. Houston was big on bartering. If Houston had something you needed and you had something he wanted, you had a deal!!! Houston was the rst ofcer of the law in Eastpoint. He was never far from Millers Quarters, where most of the newcomers lived. Any trouble that came along, i.e. drunk ghting, he would take you home. Houston had a big heart. For years, he would go mullet shing, then come home and smoke all the mullet and give them away. He helped anyone who asked for help. We buried Houston Miller on March 19, 2013. By Peggy Miller Sister-in-law Colley Houston Miller was born May 28, 1917, in Chipley. He passed away Sunday, March 17, 2013, at the age of 95 in Port St Joe. He was a dedicated member of the First Baptist Church in Eastpoint. He is survived by his wife, Xuripha Miller; children, Sharon Cumbie and Jimmy Miller, Sr. (Jeanette); brothers, JR Miller (Peggy) and Burdette Miller; ve grandchildren, four greatgrandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday, March 19 at First Baptist Church with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Bro. Garry Kent and Bro. Bobby Shiver ofciated. Kelley Funeral Home handled all arrangements. Houston Miller HOUSTON MILLER Eulice Troy Kelley died Sunday, March 3, 2013, in Columbus, Ga., at the age of 44. He is survived by wife, Anna Day Kelley; daughters Melinda Kelley Gates, Courtney Kelley Liske, Hailey Keann Pate, and Alexis Brooke Boutwell; sons Brandon Troy Kelley and Clayton Parnell Boutwell; parents Sharon and James Kelley; siblings James Matthew Kelley, Robert Dewayne Kelley, Aleatha Rose Thrush, Tana Lee Stillwagon, and Ross Lee; grandchildren James Carter Liske, Jordan Tyler Liske, and Alex Troy Kelley; ve nieces and ve nephews. He was preceded in death by Henryella Williams Millender, Otis Odeal Millender, Edith May Kelley, and Ernest Turner Kelley. Funeral services were held Monday, March 11 at Assembly of God in Carrabelle with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handled all local arrangements.Eulice Troy Kelley Gene Roy Surber was born Jan. 28, 1944, in St. Petersburg. He died Monday, March 11, 2013, in Apalachicola. He is survived by his wife Julie Surber of Carrabelle. Private memorial services were held. Kelley Funeral Home handled all arrangements. Gene Roy Surber Patricia Dianne (Patty) Fleeman, 56, of Clarksville, passed away Saturday, March 23, 2013, in Clarksville. She was a 1975 graduate of Apalachicola High School and was a registered surgical nurse at Jackson County Hospital in Marianna. She was preceded in death by her dad, Hollis J. Fleeman Survivors include her mother, Katherine W. Fleeman; sisters, Karen Bryant and her husband Belvin, and Rebecca Shuler, all of Clarksville, and Donna Golden and her husband Jerry of Bremen, Georgia. The family would like to thank everyone for their prayers and support. In lieu of owers, please make contributions to Emerald Coast Hospice, 4374 Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL 32446. Memorialization will be by cremation. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.Patricia Fleeman ObituariesLive Easter production on Good Friday Please come and join us, for one night only, for a live Easter production. With the theme This is the night something happened, the production will be staged on Good Friday, March 29 at 6 p.m. at New Life Church, on 16th Street, in Apalachicola. Celebrate the life of the risen Christ and experience the love, peace and joy that knowing Him brings! Sponsored by Hillside Dancers for Christ, and community wide of Apalachicola. For more information call Teresa Ann Martin and Barbara McNair.Trinity plans Holy Week services Trinity Episcopal Church, 76 5th Street, in Apalachicola, will hold Faith BRIEFS See F AITH A14

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A EV E RYTHING FOR Y OUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com 6 t h A n n u a l EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR E RYTHING FOR E Y OUR Y OUR Y O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 6 6 A A n A n A O ur BIGGEST S ALE of the Y ear! HUGE SAVINGS ON T H OUSANDS OF I TEMS APRIL 12 & 13 FRIDAY 7AM6PM ET & S ATURDAY 7AM 5PM ET WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Mar. 28 65 48 0 % Fri, Mar. 29 67 52 10 % Sat, Mar. 30 69 57 0 % Sun, Mar. 31 71 61 20 % Mon, Apr. 01 73 60 30 % Tues, Apr. 02 74 62 0 % Wed, Apr. 03 73 61 60 % 28 Th 551am 1.4 447pm 1.5 1122am 0.7 1158pm -0.1 29 Fr 648am 1.4 514pm 1.6 1151am 0.8 30 Sa 749am 1.3 547pm 1.6 1242am -0.2 1221pm 0.9 31 Su 858am 1.3 625pm 1.6 134am -0.2 1255pm 1.0 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 28 Th 551am 1.4 447pm 1.5 1122am 0.7 1158pm -0.1 29 Fr 648am 1.4 514pm 1.6 1151am 0.8 30 Sa 749am 1.3 547pm 1.6 1242am -0.2 1221pm 0.9 31 Su 858am 1.3 625pm 1.6 134am -0.2 1255pm 1.0 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Springtime fishing was on a high note until the cold snap this week. Most area waters are seeing good numbers of fish such as trout and redfish with the occasional flounder in the mix. Most beach fishing is producing good-sized whiting in our area, with pompano catches on the rise! Hand painted bream by the coolerful are coming to the docks at Howard and Berman creeks this week. Good catfish are also being reported here as well. With the cold weather setting back in this week, crappie should be on the minds of many local anglers. Page 10 Thursday, March 28, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Almost 300 people attended the annual open house on St. Vincent Island hosted by the Supporters of St. Vincent. In spite of cold weather, forbidding skies and whitecaps on the bay, the passenger barge made seven trips to St. Vincent Island on Friday, March 22. This year, parkas and hoodies were more in evidence than shorts and sandals. Visitors were treated to walking tours including a coastal photo walk with Debbie Hooper; bird walks guided by Barry Kinzle; a beach walk with Brad Smith; and a photo safari led by the St. Marks Photo Club. Wagon tours of the island were a bracing experience, but they were still booked solid throughout the day. Historian Jan Pietryzk regaled the crowd with curious tales of life on the island. The Apalachicola Estuarine Research Reserve, Apalachicola Riverkeepers, the University of Florida Marine Turtle Research Group, Friends of the St. Joseph Preserves and the St. George Island Lighthouse Association were among the booths with displays at the event. Some exhibitors canceled in the face of poor weather conditions. John Miick and Cletus Heaps were on hand once more to provide their own special brand of beachy blues. The open house was scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., but around noon, the wind picked up and Refuge Manager Shelly Stiaes decided to cut the day short because of rough conditions on the water. Better safe than sorry, Stiaes said. At least 260 people had already made the trip across the pass, but on the nal crossing, some of the passengers were soaked by whitecaps splashing onto the deck, and the pilot had dif culty landing the barge. In spite of chilly winds and glowering skies, St. Vincent was, as always, an amazing and beautiful place to visit. Attendees bundled up, but they didnt complain. The St. Vincent Supporters group once again provided hot dogs to visitors, and this year, the warm snack was especially popular. Special to The Times Gov. Rick Scott proclaimed March 2013 Seagrass Awareness Month, the 12th annual statewide recognition. Awareness of seagrass and its integral role in the marine ecosystem will help to create an understanding of the way seagrass damage can affect both the economic and ecological value of our marine resources. Recreational divers, snorkelers and shing enthusiasts from around the world visit Floridas coastal areas to experience the states world-class marine resources, and more than 90 percent of Floridas recreational and commercial sheries depend on seagrasses for part of their lifespan. Considered to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, seagrasses are owering underwater grasses found in estuaries, lagoons and shallow, open shelves along Floridas coastline. Seagrass habitat provides a variety of functions that contribute to a healthy and viable marine ecosystem, said Kevin Claridge, the Department of Environmental Protections Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas director. These valuable underwater grasses are one of the many natural resources that Floridians and visitors can work together to protect and preserve now and for future generations. For more information on Floridas seagrasses, visit www.dep.state. .us/coastal/habitats/seagrass/. Special to The Times In 2010, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission directed staff to review the status of all state-listed species that had not undergone review in the past decade. Staff conducted a literature review and solicited information from the public on the status of the alligator snapping turtle. A Biological Review Group of experts on the species was subsequently convened. The draft of the alligator snapping turtle report was released March 13. The study determined that within Florida, the turtles area of occupancy was less than 800 square miles but not severely fragmented and, in the event of a catastrophic event eliminating much of a Florida population, population rescue could be achieved by importing turtles from Georgia and Alabama. FWC recommended the alligator snapping turtles not be listed as a threatened species. The principal past threat to alligator snapping turtles historically was harvest for food by humans. In 2009, FWC prohibited all take and possession of the species. Pet owners who possessed alligator snapping turtles before July 2009 were required to obtain a Class III Personal Pet Permit to keep those turtles, and possession is limited to one. In Florida, alligator snapping turtles are restricted to rivers, streams and associated permanent freshwater habitats. Food items include sh, turtles, snakes, birds, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms, with some vegetation. Females lay a single clutch of 17 to 52 eggs per year; nesting typically occurs from late April to mid-May. Young emerge from nests in August and September. Students against Plastic Pollution has two new projects in the works. At the March 18 county commission meeting, Brooke Pittman, president of the student conservation group, requested permission to install kiosks at county boat ramps to educate tourists and the public about pollution problems. Pollution is not good for the industry or the bay or the economy, Pittman said. SAPP also has obtained permission from Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender to install recycle bins on each kiosk. Pittman said the bins will be emptied by county workers. Commissioners voted unanimously to allow the kiosks contingent on review of the educational material by County Attorney Michael Shuler. SAPP has a new fundraising initiative to help support their efforts to keep the coast clean. The students are recycling old T-shirts as reusable shopping bags. The bags sell for $5 each and make great gifts. Organizer Heidi Montgomery said the group also has reusable plastic bags available for $1 each. If you want to buy a bag, contribute to SAPP or to suggest a project or fundraiser, call Montgomery at 653-5679 or visit montgomeryscience.org. In addition to helping the environment, membership in SAPP helps a student qualify for academic recognition. (SAPP) helps with college admissions and scholarship applications, said senior Stephan DeVaugn. He said membership in the National Honor Society requires a minimum of 18 hours of community service per semester. Lois Swoboda Biologists seek help with horseshoe crab study Spring marks horseshoe crabs mating season, and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologists are requesting the publics help identifying spawning sites. Beachgoers likely will have the best luck spotting mating horseshoe crabs around high tide, just before, during or after a new or full moon. The conditions around the next full moons on April 25 and May 5 will create ideal opportunities to view the spawning behavior of horseshoe crabs. Beachgoers lucky enough to spot horseshoe crabs are asked to note how many they see and whether the horseshoe crabs are mating. If possible, the observer should also count how many horseshoe crabs are mating adults and how many are juveniles (4 inches wide or smaller). In addition, biologists ask observers to provide the date, time, location, habitat type and environmental conditions such as tides and moon phase when a sighting occurs. To report your sighting, go to MyFWC.com/Contact and click on the Submit a Horseshoe Crab Survey link, then Florida Horseshoe Crab Spawning Beach Survey. You can also report ndings via email at horseshoe@ MyFWC.com or by phone at 866-252-9326. Alligator snapping turtles holding on LOIS SWOBODA | The Times SAPP battles pollution with shopping bags, recycle stations Outdoor BRIEFS LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above, Jan Pietryzk shares stories of St. Vincent with visitors bundled against the east wind. St. Vincent Island was still breathtaking on a cold and blustery day. Hundreds visit St. Vincent Island Florida pays tribute to seagrasses

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www.apalachtimes.com A Section Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Lady Seahawk eighth grade softball player Scout Segree was top hitter against Port St. Joe. A great utility player, she starts at rst, behind the plate and even played shortstop against Godby, said coach Lisa Sweatt. She is such a good role model for the younger kids, all As in the classroom, and always the loudest in the dugout. Congratulations, Scout! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 456 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 389, PERTAINING TO CODE ENFORCEMENT POWERS, PROCEDURES, AND NOTICES IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing the Carrabelle City Hall located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 11 ADULT SOFTBALL PLAYERS SOUGHT Granville Croom and Carol Bar eld are spearheading a community adult softball team and are looking for anyone interested in playing. A meet and greet will be at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 3, at Crooms Snack Shack, on the corner of Avenue I and 10th Street. For more information, call Carol at 653-2784. www.apalachtimes.com SPORTS CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPRING FEVER PHIL COALE | Special to The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times TOP LEFT: Seahawk rst baseman Chase Golden covers the base. TOP RIGHT: Trey Jones swings for the AAA Stars team at the Day of Baseball. LEFT: Seahawk hurler Skyler Hutchinson shows his stuff. BELOW LEFT: Seahawk junior varsity pitcher Jayden Liston prepares to throw. BELOW RIGHT: Charlie Winchester hurls for the AAA Angry Birds team at the Day of Baseball on Saturday. SPRING FEVER PHIL COALE | Special to The Times TOP LEFT: Seahawk rst baseman Chase Golden covers the base. TOP RIGHT: Trey Jones swings for the AAA Stars team at the Day of Baseball. LEFT: Seahawk hurler Skyler Hutchinson shows his stuff. prepares to throw. BELOW RIGHT: Charlie Winchester hurls for the AAA Angry Birds team at the Day of Baseball on Saturday. PHIL COALE | Special to The Times BASEBALL HEATS UP To see or purchase baseball photos, contact Phil Coale at tigersports1@ live.com or 379-8049.

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 90470T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2012-CA000297 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. BRADLEY R. BLACKBURN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2012-CA000297 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, and, BRADLEY R. BLACKBURN, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor, Apalachicola, Florida, at the hour of 11:00 am on the 2nd day of May, 2013, the following described property: LOT 4, BLOCK 1 OF ADDITION TO MAGNOLIA BLUFFS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 17, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 4th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provisoin of certain assistance. Please contact teh Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401 or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding: If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County if Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon county courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. March 21, 28, 2013 90484T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010CA-000194 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 11, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000194 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC*, is the Plaintiff and MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH; DANIELLE MCCULLOUGH; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY; TENANT #1 N/K/A DONALD DEMPSEY are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at INSIDE FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 3rd day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 4 BLOCK 187, KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 908 NE 6TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 *Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 12, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa FL 33622-5018 File #: F10016145 **See Americans with Disabilites Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse 301 S Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 March 21, 28, 2013 90508T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012CA-000292 ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B. Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF LOUISE H. HOBBS, DECEASED; BLAIR M. HOBBS A/K/A BLAIR M. PUGH; CINDY MARIE BRISBIN A/K/A CINDY MARIE BAILEY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC F/K/A CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING CORP.; MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TERRY NEWELL; LINDA BACKMAN; MARY BRISBAN; ENA BUCY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF LOUISE H. HOBBS, DECEASED. whose residence is unknown Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein TO: BLAIR M. HOBBS A/K/A BLAIR M. PUGH Last Known Address: 77 Gilbert Street Eastpoint, FL 32328 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: Unknown TO: LINDA BACKMAN Last Known Address: 539 N. Franklin Street La Grange, TX 78945 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: Unknown TO: MARY BRISBAN Last Known Address: 163 Kirkland Drive Crawfordville, FL 32327 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: 77 Gilbert Street Eastpoint, FL 32328 Previous Address: 407 SE 7th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 TO: ENA BUCY Last Known Address: 539 N. Franklin Street La Grange, TX 78945 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: Unknown TO: ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 4 OF INGRAM ACRES (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COMER OF SECTION 25 (ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36), TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH. RANGE 7 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 25 (AS MONUMENTED) 50.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY GRADED ROAD (GILBERT ROAD). THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 159.82 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 107.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261). THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 407.1 0 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 106.79 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 407.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME VIN # CV02AL0258375A AND VIN # CV02AL0258375B WITH TITLE # 0084695571 AND TITLE # 0084695470 This property is located at the Streed address of: 77 Gilbert Street, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiff’s Attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s Attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 7, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Randolph Clement, Esq. Jacquelyn C. Herrman, Esq. Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Phone: (954)354-3544 Fax: (954)354-3545 Primary email: rclemente@erwlaw.com Secondary email: servicecomplete@erwlaw. com **IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN’S WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 21, 28, 2013 90510T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013CA-000035CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., 2006-AR6, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR6, Plaintiff, vs. CLIFFORD K. BRODY, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLIFFORD K. BRODY Last Known Address Unknown also Attempted At: 127 SPOONBILL DRIVE, PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL 32456; 180 HARBOR DRIVE, APT. 52, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149; 249 LEAVENSWORTH ROAD, HINESBURG, VT 05461; 260 CRANDON BLVD., SUITE 32, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149 AND 2746 HWY 98 W, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Current Residence Unknown SALLY H BRODY A/K/A SALLY A. BRODY Last Known Address Unknown Also Attempted At: 127 SPOONBILL DRIVE, PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL 32456; 180 HARBOR DRIVE, APT. 52, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149; 249 LEAVENSWORTH ROAD, HINESBURG, VT 05461; 260 CRANDON BLVD., SUITE 32, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149 AND 2746 HWY 98 W, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: ALL OF LOT 5, AND THE EAST HALF OF LOT 4, AND WEST HALF OF LOT 15, AND THE EAST 86 FT. OF LOT 16, SAVE AND EXCEPT THAT PART OF LOTS 15 & 16, LYING NORTH OF HIGHWAY 98, ALL IN WATERFRONT BLOCK “F” OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, A SUBDIVISION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. ALSO: THAT PARCEL OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5, OF WATERFRONT BLOCK “F” OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, AND RUN SOUTH 18 FT. TO A CONCRETE POST; THENCE WESTERLY 150 FT. TO A CONCRETE POST, THENCE NORTHERLY 19.7 FT. TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF LOT 4 OF SAID BLOCK “F”, THENCE EAST 150 FT. TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING has been filed against you and you are required to serve a coy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 5th day of March, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk March 21, 28, 2013 92633T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2007-195-CA NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. ELLIS R. GOLDEN, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY given pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 27, 2013 and entered in Case No. 2007-195-CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK, is the Plaintiff and Ellis R. Golden; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ELLIS R. GOLDEN, DECEASED and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), are the Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash inside the Front Doors of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on April 25, 2013, the following described property set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: Begin at the intersection of the West boundary of the 25 foot County Road and the Southeasterly boundary of the 60 foot State paved secondary road (S.-65) at a point 481.5 feet South (true meridian) and 1125 feet West of the N.E. corner of fractional Section 31, T8S, R6W. Run thence South 190.5 feet. Thence S.54 degrees W.30.9 feet. Thence North 190.5 feet. Thence N. 54 degrees E. 30.9 feet to the point of beginning. Thus forming a parcel in the N. E. 1/4 of said Section 31. ALSO: From a point on the Southern boundary of a 45 foot public right-ofway projected from a platted tract for Sawyer and Shuler 1,000 feet West and 382.7 feet South from the N.E. corner of Section 31, T8S, R6W, run S. 54 degrees West along road 185.4 feet to a point for beginning. From this point of beginning continue thence along road 61.8 feet, thence South 200 feet, thence N. 54 degrees East 61.8 feet, thence North (true meridian) 200 feet to the point of beginning. Thus forming a tract in the N.E. 1/4 of said Section 31, fronting 61.8 feet on road and running South 200 feet. LESS AND EXCEPT: From the intersection of the 25 foot “Moore Street” West boundary and the Southeasterly boundary of the 60 foot State paved road (S-65) at a point 481.5 feet South and 1125 feet West of the NE corner of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, run due South along said street 130.5 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING of the property to be described; thence Run S 54 degrees West 92.7 feet, thence North 30 feet, thence in an Easterly direction 90 feet more or less to POINT OF BEGINNING. Being a parcel of land in a triangle shape, in the NE 1/4 of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West. ALSO: The Most Southerly 60 foot strip of land running across the back of Lots 6 and 6 1/2, Block “116” (revised), according to an unrecorded 1956 map of the N.E. 1/4 of Fractional Section 31, T8S, R6W, as recorded in Vol. “41’’ at pages 148-149 and Vol. “66” at pages 18-19, respectively, of the “Official Records” of Franklin County, Florida. and further described as follows: From the intersection of the 25 foot “Moore Street” West boundary and the Southeasterly boundary of the 60 foot State paved Road (S65) at a point 481.5 feet South and 1125 feet West of the N.E. corner of said Section 31, run due South along said Street 130.5 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING; run thence continuing South, 60 feet; thence S. 54 degrees W. 92.7 feet; thence North 60 feet; thence N. 54 degrees E. 92.7 feet to the point of beginning. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator at (850) 577-4401 at 301 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Franklin County, Florida, this 28th day of February, 2013. Marcia Johnson, Clerk Franklin County, FL By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Weltman, Weinberg & Reis Co., L.P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff 550 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 550 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 740-5200 Fax: (954) 740-5290 Mar 28, Apr 4, 2013 92749T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 13-000012CP IN RE: ESTATE OF SARAH MAXWELL BABBIT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Sarah Maxwell Babbit, deceased, File 13000012CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is March 21, 2013. Co-Personal Representatives: Harry L. Babbit, Jr. 505 Russet Valley Cir. Hoover, AL 35244 David Babbit 3198 Normandy Cir NE Marietta, GA 30062 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. FL Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. 3042 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-8245 March 21, 28, 2013 92791T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000247-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, SIDNEY E. GRAY, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Lot 3 and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Lot 3A Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2013, in Case No. 12-000247CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Sid Gray Rentals, LLC, Sidney E. Gray, Unknown Tenant (s) Lot 3 and Unknown Tenant (s) Lot 3A, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on April 17, 2013, the property, set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 3 AND LOT 3A, DOC’S SEA SHORES AS PER MAP OR PLAT IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: March 12,

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 28, 2013 The Times | A13 RENTALS2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED ................$550 3 BR / 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDOW/ POOL .....................................$8503 BR / 2 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL AND 10X15 STORAGE UNIT.....$9503 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOLNIGHTLY / $150 | WEEKLY / $8503 BR / 2 UNFURNISHED TRAILOR ......$500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT. / 2 LOTS, HWY 98 FRONTAGE.........$650 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW This position includes developing, presenting and closing sales for new and existing customers. Advertising solutions which include print and digital are related to business customer needs that span all categories of small to medium local businesses. Presentations are made via in-person sales calls.We are seeking strong sales minded individuals who are able to manage multiple tasks, prospect for new business & offer excellent customer service.Certi cation: Valid driver’s license Find out why our team loves their job. Is it the exciting environment, the revenue rewards, the great bene ts, or all of the above? The Halifax Media Group is adding talented and motivated multi-media sales professionals to our advertising team.Please submit resume & cover letter to:lgrimes@pcnh.com or contact Lorraine Grimes at 850.747.5002 for more informationHalifax Media Group encourages applications from those with diverse backgrounds. Halifax Media Group is a DRUG-FREE environment. SalesCALLCENTER Inside SalesThe News Herald is looking for highly motivated Inside Sales Representatives who are customer service champions for inbound and outbound calls. Required Skills: Excellent computer skills to include use of internet and microsoft office. *Type 40 wpm. *Ability to handle heavy flow of inbound calls *Time management & organization skills *Excellent verbal/written communication skills *Must be detail oriented and work as a team player to ensure customer service excellence. *Strong work ethic & capacity to thrive in a professional team environment. *Outbound sales experience preferred The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package, including medical, dental, vision, life and long-term disability insurance, 401(k) options, vacation and sick leave and select paid holidays. Please send resumes to: lgrimes@pcnh.com Web ID#: 34244751 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Michael P. Bist, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 21, 28, 2013 92819T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHHSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on April 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer the sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property EXHIBIT “A” A CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND COMPRISING PART OF LOTS 1, 2 AND 3, BLOCK E-2 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E-2 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED ON FILE AT THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT OFFICE IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF AVENUE D WITH THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF COMMERCE STREET, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 40.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 50 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 78.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 40.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COMMERCE STREET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 78.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and Personal Property: Alcoholic Beverage License Number 29-00021 8COP (the “Beverage License”) pursuant to the Order Setting Foreclosure Sale and the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK Plaintiff, vs. RIVERSIDE OASIS PARTNERS, LLC a Florida limited liability company; RIVER OASIS, INC., a Florida corporation, JAMES R. (ROBBY) PAYTON; DARRELL STANTON WARD, JR. a/k/a DARRELL STANTON WARD a/k/a DARRELL S. WARD a/k/a STANTON WARD; DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TABACCO; DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; et al., Defendants, and the docket number of which is 2010-CA000123. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 13th day of March, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk March 28, April 4, 2013 92895T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000491 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LAURA JOANN MAHAR A/K/A LAURA J. MAHAR, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 26, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000491 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LAURA JOANN MAHAR A/K/A LAURA J. MAHAR; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 17th day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 7, BLOCK 60, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 16 AND 17, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 327 PATTON STREET, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 27, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By:Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947. F11022058 March 28, April 4, 2013 Harbor Medical Center is closed. Dr Miniat will be working part time at Calhoun Liberty Hospital Clinic. Request for copy of the records to be sent/transferred to another office can be sent to 20370 NE Burns Ave Box 419 -Attention Calhoun Liberty Hospital Clinic-Blountstown Fl. 32424. Lost Small White DogLong hair male maltese mix about 10 pounds, a family member.lost in Carrabelle $500 Reward 850-294-9664 Text FL43940 to 56654 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time/ Full time Housekeeper Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C. HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESIs looking for Inspectors who are dependable employees with good customer service and teamwork skills. Must have reliable transportation. Great benefits for full time employees. Weekend work required Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 Carrabelle, 1 1/2 bedroom, Smaller home on 1+ acre. Huge double carport, 3 storage buildings. Fenced yard. Has one big room, smaller room for child or office/computer and sunken living room. Home could be configured several ways, Non smokers only, First, last and security. $475. 850-697-8790Text FL46033 to 56654 I-Pass, C-301 br 1 ba, w/encl patio. Nice views. $515 unfurn. w/W&D, furn upon req., Bkgr/credit check, Avail. 3/31/13. 850-358-8634 for appt.Text FL44852 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $675‘02 Ford Taurus T otal Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775‘04 Chevy Blazer T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752002 Dodge Ram -X/Cab T otal Price $5,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $20002004 Ford F-150 4 Door -Crew Cab T otal Price $8,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Chevy Silverado 2003, 4WD, 33K miles w/ topper. $10K OBO. 850-227-4650 Text FL45579 to 56654 Pontiac Montana 2001, 6 passenger mini-van, one owner, well below market $2500 firm. 770-335-2754. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it!

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD MLS 248540 $335,000 Carrabelle Located on the pristine New River, this 3 BR / 2.5 BA 2,400 sqft riverfront paradise offers a private boat ramp, dock, lift, cleaning station. Has a private master suite, custom kitchen with lighted glass front cabinets and a large family room with Beth Barber 850.528.4141 | 850.697.1010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248941 $589,000 St. George Island BAYFRONT WITH DOCK Directly on the Apalachicola Bay, panoramic bay views, 5 BR, 4 BA, meticulously cared for, furnished, covered decks on all levels, elevator shaft as 3 owners closets, DEEP WATER dock with 2 boat slips, rock revetment, bayside POOL, storm shutters, Buck Str. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248156 $110,000 St. George Island PLANTATION BAYFRONT LOT Sunset Views from this one acre bay front lot are spectacular! a cleared building site, at the end of Avocet Lane for privacy tennis, and air strip. MLS 248461 $414,000 This lovely custom designed country home in the prestigious Magnolia Bay gated community has many extras! Sunroom, screened & open porches, hot tub o MBR suite, large master tiled bath w/ open shower and garden tub, detached garage, gas replace, granite countertops, stainless kitchen, wine cooler, built-in corner cabinets, and lovely casual landscaping make this the perfect home for both entertaining and escaping from it all! Amenities include community dock, pool, tennis courts. Beautifully maintained by original owner on corner lot. Main living area & master on 1st oor w/guestrooms upstairs for privacy w/ private porch. Open concept living room. Shimmering Sands Realty STEV E HARRIS 866-927-4654 | Home: 850-927-4654 Cell: 850-890-1971 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes-County TimesAdvertiser. 1) Around one-third of all asthma cases in the U.S. are related to an allergy to what? Cigarette smoke, Perfume, Cats, Sulfa drugs 2) What John Wayne movie co-star was the 1st woman to run a U.S. airline? Maureen OHara, Vera Miles, Patricia Neal, Kim Darby 3) Sandra Bullock, Chevy Chase, and Bruce Willis are all former what? Pizza deliverers, Bartenders, Cigar smokers, Accountants 4) To whom did Helen Keller dedicate her autobiography? Alexander Graham Bell, Gandhi, Teddy Roosevelt, Jesus 5) Around the kitchen about half of us reuse what after the rst use? Paper towel, Aluminum foil, Zip lock bags, Wax paper 6) What was the name of the rst daily comic strip published in the U.S.? Mr. Mutt, Scruples, Katzenjammer Kids, Hobo 7) As paid in gold dust how much did Levi Strauss get for his rst pair of jeans in 1850? $6, $32, $65, $290 8) The U.S. Marines rst recruiting station was in a what? Church, Station wagon, Bar, Grocery store 9) On Wall Street whats a quarter-point change in a stocks price? Quirk, Quire, Quirt, Quack 10) Valentine was one of Shakespeares Two Gentlemen of Verona; who was the other? Leonato, Macduff, Tybalt, Proteus 11) What was Lindberghs average m.p.h. speed on his historic nonstop Atlantic ight in 1927? 45, 74, 89, 108 12) A premature infant is ve times more likely to be what? Blind, Mentally challenged, Left-handed, Blue-eyed 13) In an average lifetime a woman will consume how many pounds of lipstick? 6, 8, 10, 12 14) What does a labeorphilist ordinarily collect? Parking tickets, Cigar bands, Beer bottles, Car tags ANSWERS 1) Cats. 2) Maureen OHara. 3) Bartenders. 4) Alexander Graham Bell. 5) Aluminum foil. 6) Mr. Mutt. 7) $6. 8) Bar. 9) Quack. 10) Proteus. 11) 108. 12) Left-handed. 13) 6. 14) Beer bottles. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com FAITH from page A9 Maundy Thursday services on Thursday, March 28 at 6 p.m. in the church. Reserve sacrament in of ce oratorio (prayer room), Thursday evening until noon Friday sign up in of ce The Good Friday Liturgy on March 29 will be at noon at Trinity, with Evening Prayer at 5:30 p.m. followed by Stations of the Cross at 6 p.m. Holy Saturday services on March 30 will include a work day on grounds beginning at 9 a.m., with prayers in the garden at 10 a.m. Easter Sunday on March 31 will begin with an Easter Sunrise Service at Lafayette Park at 6:30 a.m., with an Easter Service at the church at 10:30 a.m., followed by reception and Easter Egg hunt. Sheriffs Easter egg hunt Saturday The Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce and the Gulfside IGA will host the annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, March 30 at noon. The egg hunt will take place on the eld adjacent to the sheriffs of ce on US Highway 65 in Eastpoint. All kids are invited to come out and participate in a wonderful day of egg hunting, with lots of prizes to be given away. The sheriffs of ce will be grilling hotdogs for the occasion free of charge. Come out and enjoy the fun! Fellowship Baptist holds Easter sunrise service The Fellowship Baptist Church will hold a Easter sunrise service on Sunday, March 31 at 7:30 a.m. at Riverside Park in downtown Apalachicola. It will be led by the Rev. Charles Scott. All are welcome to join us. Easter sunrise service in Eastpoint Franklin Countys annual Easter sunrise service on March 31 will begin at 7:30 a.m. at Marion Millender Park on Patton Drive in Eastpoint. Guest speaker will be Bro. Ronnie Like, from the Eastpoint Church of God. Everyone is invited. Bring your chair and enjoy the service. For more information, call Sheila Chambers at 850-899-3740.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Live Easter production on Good FridayA live Easter production with the theme This is the night something happened will be at 6 p.m. Good Friday, March 29, at New Life Church, on 16th Street in Apalachicola. For more information, call Teresa Ann Martin or Barbara McNair.RedTrout ShootoutThe 2013 RedTrout Shootout will begin Friday, March 29, with a banquet at Cross Creek Driving Range and Par 3 Golf Course in Tallahassee. The pre-registration deadline for the shootout is 10 a.m. April 3. The Shootout will be April 13 in Carrabelle, with shing, weigh-ins and awards. For more information, visit www. redtroutshootout.com or call 528-0553.Elvis at the DixieExperience tribute artist Todd Alan Herendeen and his Follow That Dream Band, one of the Dixie Theatres most popular shows, at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 29-30. Tickets are $25. For more information, call 653-3200 or visit www. dixietheatre.com. Carrabelle Speed FestivalThe Carrabelle Speed Festival will be 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 6 at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport. It will take place on an open runway, giving competitors a half-mile of open throttle acceleration. Driver registration is closed. Admission for observers is $10. For more information, call 5855168.Jury Room by Panhandle PlayersFor an evening of suspense and mystery, see The Jury Room by the Panhandle Players. Performances are April 19-21 at the Dixie Theatre. Tickets are $15. For tickets, call John Inzetta at 734-2060.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com To many he was known as Pop, and by his players he was called Coach, and when the community mourned the passing of William Wagoner on Saturday morning, he was known both for his dedication to athletics and for his decency as a man. Wagoner, enshrined in the states high school hall of fame for his stellar coaching career at Apalachicola High School, passed away at age 91 in Ocala on March 19. The pews at First Baptist Church of Apalachicola were lined with former players and those throughout the community who had come to appreciate the impact Wagoner had on the blossoming of AHS athletics and the nurturing of so many young people into successful adulthoods. Brother Charles Scott led the service, with several former players stepping forward to recount the impact Wagoner had dating back to 1948, when he came looking for a teaching position on the advice of a friend. Abe Johnson, a black star of Wagoners 1968 undefeated state championship football team that still holds records for defensive game performance, stepped forward to voice the feelings of so many of Wagoners players, both white and black. Johnson rose slowly, joking that, I might have been the fastest then, but not now. He then spoke in serious terms about how the Alabamaborn Wagoner had made sure his players were shielded from any racism that might have lingered in the tumultuous 1960s. A lot of us remember him as a coach, but I remember him as a By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On April 4, the Dixie Theatre will celebrate the centennial anniversary of its grand opening. In 1905, Alex Fortunas, a sponge sherman, immigrated to the U.S. from Trikkeri, Greece, through Ellis Island in New York. The enterprising young man rst moved to Tarpon Springs, where he entered the theater business with capital earned by sponge diving, and founded the Southern Amusement Company. About 1912, when Tarpon Springs economy faltered because of sponge over shing, Fortunas moved to Apalachicola, where the sponge industry reached its peak in the rst decade of the 20th century. He opened a successful seafood house, and with capital from it, Fortunas ordered the construction of a new theater on property adjacent to the By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Louis Van Vleet received a mullet special delivery last week. Van Vleet, a well known Apalachicola resident often seen riding his bicycle through town or driving his classic Mustang, was in his kitchen preparing tuna salad for lunch when he heard a loud noise on the tin roof of his house. After a few moments, he heard something clattering on his porch roof. Thinking someone wanted in, he exited through the front door but found nobody in sight. I ran around the house, but I didnt see anybody, Van Vleet said. Then I noticed something on the ground by my back door steps. Van Vleet found a mullet, weighing about one pound, still ipping on the ground outside his kitchen. Presumably, the sh was dropped by a large bird and landed on the roof before sliding to the ground. Van Vleet said his initial reaction was to toss the sh out of the yard, but then it occurred to him this was wasteful. He retrieved the gift from above and cleaned it for supper. The sh, he said, was plump, tasty and extremely fresh. Van Vleet said he has, on other occasions, observed an eagle feeding on mullet in a sycamore tree adjacent to the home of his next-door neighbor, City Commissioner Mitchell Bartley. Though Van Vleets experience is unusual, it is far from unique. Some years ago, this author barely missed colliding with a dinner plate-sized ounder when exiting a business near the Port St. Joe waterfront. The late Danny Segree of Eastpoint also reported a similar experience with a large mullet in the late 1990s. Van Vleet, a deeply religious man, asked that the following piece of Scripture accompany this story. It is from 1 Kings 17:4 in the King James Version of the Bible: And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there.Missing man last seen near Franklin CountyBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On March 25, Gloria McDonald was 83 years old. She waited by the phone all day for her son James to call, but for the rst time ever, he failed to wish her happy birthday. His family is desperate to know what happened to him. James Francis McDonald, missing since October 2012, last was seen just east of Franklin County. On the morning of Oct. 14, 2012, Park Manager Robert Steele was making his rounds in Ochlocknee River State Park when he noticed a large yellow kayak pulled up onto the bank near the bathhouse provided for campers. He felt sure the kayak didnt belong to a registered camper and took a closer look. A man approached Steele from the surrounding woods and identied himself as the owner of the craft without giving a name. He appeared to be someone on a long kayak trip, Steele said. We get a lot of those here. I had no reason to believe he was in trouble or distress or in need of help. He seemed to be doing exactly what he wanted to. The man seemed well supplied with camping gear. The ranger noticed the kayak had interior storage and a dry pack lashed to the bow. The Players honor legendary coach LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesLouis Van Vleet said a mullet that fell onto his roof was about this big.Man accepts ying sh as gift from above DIXIE THEATRE CENTENNIAL JAMES McDONALDFLORIDA MEMORY PROJECTThe Dixie Theatre is shown circa 1952. Joyce Proctor Counts was the ticket agent; Voncile McLeod stands next to the booth; and Evelyn Bobb is the waitress seen in the window of the Louis Cafe. At left is theater founder Alex Fortunas with Leo the MGM lion during a business trip to Hollywood, from the collection of Jody Fortunas-Wilson. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 First 50 years of beloved landmark remembered See COACH A7 See MISSING A5 See DIXIE A5Thursday, March 28, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 48Artwalk 2013, A8SPECIAL TO THE TIMESBill Wagoner, who coached sports in Apalachicola for decades, died March 19.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 WEEMS MEMORIAL REHAB CARE Are you recovering from a surgery, stroke or trauma and need rehabilitative therapy before going home? With todays shorter hospital stays, your need for skilled rehabilitation care is an important part of the healing process. Weems Memorial Rehab Care is here to guide you through your healing process and best of all, it is local with loved ones nearby to help and encourage you.WEEMS MEMORIAL REHAB CARE HAS JUST EXPANDED ITS REHAB PROGRAM!AS PART OF THIS EXPANSION STATE OF THE ART EQUIPMENT HAS BEEN ADDED TO A NEW AND LARGER AREA.Additionally, we are proud to welcome Apalachicola Therapy, Inc. to our REHAB CARE program providing Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapies. Their sta comes to us highly trained with innovative techniques proven to accomplish improved function and capacity.YOUHAVEA CHOICE!Tell your doctor you want to come to Weems Memorial for your Rehab Care. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT US AT:Phone: 850-653-8853 | Cell: 903-724-0983 Fax: 850-653-2474 | E-mail: bklein@weemsmemorial.com ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND DIGITAL PACKAGESStarting at $234 per month -Starting at $199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA CONSULTATION TO FIT YOUR BUSINESS, CALL TODAY! PUBLIC NOTICEThe Franklin County TDC will be conducting a workshop on Thursday March 28, 2013 at 5:00 P.M. at the Eastpoint Firehouse. The purpose of the meeting is to receive public input regarding policies and procedures governing the operation of the Franklin County Visitor Centers. Included in the discussion will be issues relating to distribution of information to the public including referrals and the Visitor Center operations in general. More than one member of the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners and Franklin County TDC may be in attendance at this meeting. For more information, please contact the FC TDC at 653-8678. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Commissioner Brenda LaPaz has clari ed her stance on Carrabelles sewer debt and offered suggestions for city commission protocol. In February, LaPaz read a seven-page report on Carrabelles sewer-related debt and circulated emails suggesting city employees and elected of cials had been responsible for incompetence. In her report as the commissioner charged with supervising water and sewer for the city she wrote, City staff appeared to have no understanding of the nancial complexity or meaning. I explained to DEP (Florida Department of Environmental Protection) administrators that city administrative transactions/functions were not reported to the city commission. Explained that city administration has made no preparations in recent years to secure or plan for additional sewer revenues to supplement payment of upcoming loan. At the March 7 meeting, LaPaz asked Mayor Curley Messer to accept my sincere apologies for any embarrassment I brought to you or your family. She told the audience she did not suspect misappropriation of funds or malfeasance related to $11 million in debt incurred during the construction of the sewer treatment system. I didnt mean any disrespect to you or your of ce, she told Messer. LaPaz also said she had been mistaken about references to the debt in a 2011 rate study and had incorrectly written that the DEP would re city employees to pay for the sewer debt. I want to thank you for being lady enough to say that, Messer said. Im 90 years old but, Ive got a good mind. I had a lot more to say to you but Im glad you apologized. LaPaz noted two reasons for the heavy debt load: capitalized interest and the sewer project funding stretched out over a 16-year period. Its like the gift of a baby elephant; so cute, but it grows up and you need to buy the hay to feed it, she said. LaPaz said the DEP now recognizes the loans were awed and that several communities accumulated large debts by participating in the funding. The new rules no longer allow these kinds of loans, she said. LaPaz suggested the city hire a certi ed public accountant to help nd the best resolution to sewer debt. At Messers urging, City Attorney Dan Hartman said the city had an obligation to upgrade the sewer system after accepting tap fees from prospective developers. (The unpaid debt) was a repercussion of the real estate meltdown, Hartman said. Former City Commissioner Gathana Parmenas laid a large portion of the blame for the debt on former city engineering consultant Baskerville Donovan. Our sewer plant has the capacity to handle a city of 25,000 people. At no time was there ever a possibility that Carrabelle would reach that size, she said. The real estate debacle is bad, but its unforgivable that the consulting engineer did such poor work. Im really angry with Baskerville Donovan. I dont know if theres legal recourse after all this time, but I wish there was. Hartman said the city might get some relief in the short term while a rate study is in progress. He also said Baskerville Donovan should not take all the blame for advising the city to build the oversized plant. It wasnt just our consultant; it was DEP that came in here, Hartman said. Jim Waddell, liaison for the citys current engineering consultant, Inovia, said there are ongoing negotiations with several communities to the east to hook into the Carrabelle water treatment system, which would help relieve the debt load on current customers. The ball is really in their court now, he said. He discussed the possibility of servicing the Lighthouse Estates community. Their water is not unsafe to drink, but has to be treated, he said. Waddell said he believed residents of Lighthouse Estates pay, on average, $125 to $150 monthly to operate household water treatment systems. He said the development could add 250 residences to the city system but added that funding would be needed to tie the community into the grid. Commissioner Cal Allen said the oversized sewage treatment plant could eventually prove an asset. The Northwest Florida Water Management District recommended regionalization for water treatment. In the future, we might be able to help the county in taking care of septic tank problems up and down the coast. Carrabelle would be in a prime position because of our system, Allen said. LaPaz offered four recommendations to help the board make better informed decisions in the future. She moved that the city clerk attach a memo to commissioners information packets which would list all bills paid in the previous month After some discussion of the information already available to commissioners, the motion died for lack of a second. LaPaz also suggested a detailed list of pending bills be provided commissioners one week in advance of the meeting. That is done at the county level, and I dont see why it cant be done at the city level, considering what straits we are in, Parmenas said. City Clerk Keisha Smith said such reports were provided when John McInnis was city manager but the practice had more recently zzled out. City staffers agreed the practice could be reinstated without a formal motion. LaPaz then moved the city administrator present a complete written report of all ongoing city projects at each meeting, to be read aloud if possible. Allen said it would be simpler and less time consuming if the administrator placed the report in commissioners information packets. He pointed out that each commissioner is assigned to oversee a department and could report on signi cant work under their purview. The commission voted unanimously to accept Allens proposal. LaPaz then asked if the city had a purchasing policy and procedures manual, and offered a copy of the manual in use by Apalachicola. But Smith said Carrabelle was in possession of a sample manual provided by auditors in 2011, and that the procedures would have to be adapted to Carrabelles particular circumstances. LaPaz asked that a copy be made available to her before the next city commission meeting. She also requested a detailed breakdown of the attorneys billable hours be made available to commissioners at each monthly meeting. The commission voted unanimously in support of that suggestion. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson; City Administrator Betty Webb; contractor William Poloronis; Apalachicola commissioners Jimmy Elliott, Mitchell Bartley, Frank Cook and Brenda Ash; City Clerk Lee Mathes; City Grant Manager Cindy Summerhill and city workers Wilber Bellew and Robert Osburn broke ground March 11 for the new downtown public restrooms. Local contractor Poloronis Construction won the bid on the long anticipated public restroom facility to be constructed in downtown Apalachicola directly behind the City of Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Arts building. As the lowest bidder, Poloronis was awarded a $300,000 contract to build the restrooms by the Apalachicola city commission at the regular scheduled Jan. 8 meeting. The project is funded though the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant Program and is part of the citys overall redevelopment strategy.LOIS SWOBODA | The Times BRENDA LAPAZLaPaz says no water and sewer debt malfeasance WORK BEGINS ON PUBLIC RESTROOM

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, March 28, 2013

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASectionSpecial to The TimesDuring a recent meeting of the Florida Cabinet, Gov. Rick Scott showed his appreciation for Floridas teachers and applauded their commitment to improving Floridas education system by presenting special commendations to several North Florida 2013 Teachers of the Year. The commendation was created to honor Floridas valued educators and their efforts to foster greater student achievement. The winners invited to attend the meeting come from Franklin, Gadsden, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla counties. Every day, you help Floridas students realize their potential, ful ll their dreams and embark on challenging journeys toward college and successful careers, Scott said. Floridas strong, effective teachers give students an advantage in todays competitive environment, and that is why I am proud to award this special commendation to teachers who go above and beyond to make a difference in education. This special recognition took place a few weeks after Scott announced his Florida Families First Budget proposal to increase Florida teachers salaries and education funding. The participating 2013 Teachers of the Year are as follows: Laura King, Franklin County: King teaches social studies and language arts at Franklin County K12 School. With more than 16 years of classroom instruction under her belt, Kings classroom management is an example to her peers and her use of technology in the classroom captures students attention right away. Zola Akins, Gadsden County: In addition to being the reading coach at George W. Munroe Elementary School, Akins also teaches language arts, reading and writing. She has been teaching in Gadsden schools for 11 years. This is her second year as Gadsdens Teacher of the Year. Rebecca Kirchharr, Leon County: Kirchharr is a reading and English teacher at Leon High School. She also serves as a gifted coordinator, reading coach and coach of the junior varsity tennis team. Samantha Newsome, Liberty County: Newsome is a sixthgrade math teacher at W.R. Tolar K-8 School. Before beginning her teaching career, she helped Florida children as a child-abuse investigator. Jodie Martin, Wakulla County: A fth-grade teacher at Medart Elementary School, Martin is committed to teaching students, not teaching subjects. She is a member of Delta Kappa Gamma, the Medart Reading Leadership Team, the science curriculum team and math curriculum team. Each of Floridas 67 school districts selects a Teacher of the Year who is then considered for statewide recognition. The Florida Teacher of the Year is chosen from more than 180,000 public school teachers throughout the state by a selection committee representing teachers, principals, parents and the business community. Floridas top educator is selected on the basis of the superior ability to teach and communicate knowledge of the subject taught, professional development, philosophy of teaching and outstanding school and community service. The most important quali cation is the teachers ability to inspire a love of learning in students of all backgrounds and abilities. Chaining a dog is cruel and dangerous both for the dog and the people around it. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a dog that has been chained for a prolonged period of time is almost three times as likely to bite as one who has freedom to move around. A study of fatal dog attacks from 1965 to 2001 found that 25 percent were in icted by chained dogs. Unaltered male dogs were the most likely to attack. The American Veterinary Medical Association has issued a public statement that chaining a dog can contribute to aggressive behavior. Chaining or tethering a dog refers to the practice of fastening a dog to a stationary object or stake as a means of keeping the animal under control. Walking a dog on a leash is not a form of tethering. The Humane Society of the United States says most chained dogs live their lives away from the prying eyes of neighbors, but most of us know of a dog in this situation. Dogs are social animals genetically designed to live in family groups and interact with each other and human beings. A dog kept con ned for days, weeks or a lifetime can suffer irreparable psychological damage. A docile, friendly animal may become fearful and aggressive. The physical results of chaining include sores and raw spots on the neck from struggling and illtted collars, heat exhaustion and injury or even death brought about by prolonged exposure to the cold. Tethered dogs can become entangled in their chain or rope and be unable to access food and water or even accidently hang themselves. An Apalachicola landlord cleaning a newly purchased rental property found a large section of pipe in the back yard with a chain and collar attached and the skeleton of the dog that was left there to starve. The U. S. Department of Agriculture issued a statement in the July 2, 1996, Federal Register declaring tethering dogs to be inhumane. In 1997, the USDA ruled that people and organizations regulated by the Animal Welfare Act cannot keep dogs continuously chained. Throughout Florida, there are now movements to ban chained dogs or limit the time a dog can be chained and the conditions under which chaining is acceptable. Collier and Escambia counties, as well as Miami, Okaloosa, and Seminole, all prohibit chaining. Dania, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Oakland Park, West Palm Beach, Wilton Manors, Pembroke Park, Tarpon Springs and Orange County limit the time a dog can be chained to the period it takes to complete a brief task during which the dog must be temporarily restrained. The courts have set a precedent of about three hours. Many ordinances also include a stipulation that the owner may not leave a chained dog alone. If you have neighbors with a chained dog, consider talking to them about the animals welfare. If you are interested in helping chained dogs, there are several useful websites. Visit www. unchainyourdog.org/, www. dogsdeservebetter.org/ or www.humanesociety.org/ issues/chaining_tethering/ facts/chaining_tethering_ facts.html for suggestions on helping to unchain mans best friend. Hats off to Pat Bott, Jamie Schaffer and those who brought desserts for the spaghetti dinner. It was great! Pat and her crew served up 54 plates. Thanks to you who came and enjoyed the dinner. Have a blessed Holy Week, and a very happy Easter. Well, folks, it wont be long now! The cannon is ready for shipment It will grace the front lawn of the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Thanks for the efforts of Bill Miller and for those who made donations. Dont forget the Farewell Dance at Chillas Hall. Come on over to the hall Saturday, March 30. Bring a snack or dish to share, your dancing shoes, your main squeeze and enjoy the evening. Greg K and the Crew will provide the music for your dancing and listening pleasure. A donation of $5 is required. Dance starts at 7 p.m.; fun starts when you walk in the door. Easter Mass will be at 11:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 2653 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. Havent heard about any sunrise services in the area. I can remember when wed have sunrise service at the Lanark Village Boat Club. The Rev. Rappljay of ciated. What a crowd we would have. After the service, we would go inside for coffee and donuts. We lost three longtime close friends, Jennie Mae Melton, Ruthie Martin and Mercedes Henderson. Jennie Maes Celebration of Life was held Friday, March 23, at the Assembly of God Church in Carrabelle. Ruthie Martins service was held at Carrabelle Christian Center. The Celebration of Life for Mercedes Henderson, Mercy as she was called, will be at Sacred Heart Church, Saturday, April 5, at 9:30 a.m. We will have our monthly covered dish following the mass. Mercy was a faithful lady of the church. She would pick me up for daily and Sunday Mass. I will miss all three ladies very much. Jennie Mae, Little Ruthie and Mercy were friends of mine for many years. Pray for their eternal rest, and strength for their families. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember a double in nitive is a no-no! Until next time, God bless America, our troops the homeless and the hungry. Chained dogs a danger to animals, humansWWW.UNCHAINYOURDOG.ORG/ BUDS N BUGSLois SwobodaPage 4 Citizens of Franklin County continue to use the library for basic needs. Staff members help those who ll in applications for food stamps and unemployment. Many use our faxing service to send information to Children and Family Services. Job searches and resume writing are ongoing by the public. College exam proctoring is another service that is used regularly as many people are training to learn a new skill or profession in Franklin County. Many do not have access to computers or the Internet and must rely upon the local library to apply for their bene ts. More and more companies require or encourage people to complete their business online, and once again, those who do not have Internet capabilities at home are relying upon their public library. Public libraries are a necessity in the ever changing way of our daily life. Irish eyes were smiling as the children of Mommy and Me Story time enjoyed watching and learning the Dublin Jig as performed by Debbie Ruffner. She performed various dances using both hard and soft shoes and invited the children to learn some steps. This activity was just one of many learning and fun opportunities for children ages birth to 9 to experience different cultures at the library. Franklin County Public Library is committed to offering learning opportunities through reading, crafts and guest speakers. Both branches in Eastpoint and Carrabelle offer programs that will be sure to please, including adult book chats, Cinema at the Library, Writers Workshops, individual computer instruction, Kids Wii and story time. These types of programs endear patrons to the importance of the library to their lives. Each time a child visits the library, he or she is offered a chance to explore and learn the value of the lending library process. The new e-books are being praised by our patrons, and the collection through the Wilderness Coast Website www. wildernesscoast.org is growing. As we look forward to the month of April, the Carrabelle branch will be offering a free Smoking Cessation Workshop from 2-4 p.m. April 11 sponsored by Big Bend AHEC. Also, National Library Week will be celebrated April 15-20, when Franklin County Public Library will recognize the valued patrons who come to both the Eastpoint and Carrabelle branches. Each day, there will be a small surprise for patrons at the front desk when they check out materials. April 22 is Earth Day, and the library will be recognizing the importance of ecology to the children in Eastpoint who attend the Mommy and Me Storytime. Books about Florida plants and owers can be checked out from our Florida collection. There are also additions in the new materials collections at both branches. For more information about programs and services, call 670-8151 or 697-2366.Scott presents commendations to 5 teachersEaster activities coming upThursday, March 28, 2013 LANARK NEWSJim Welsh YOUR COUNTY LIBRARYLibrary continues to play a vital role The FCS Band scored a Superior rating on March 7 at the District 2 Concert Music Performance Assessment in Chipley. In addition to their superior performance, their behavior was outstanding (to the point of strangers coming up to our chaperones, asking who we were, where we were from and recognizing how well our students represented our school). We quali ed to participate in the State Concert Festival in Niceville at the New Performing Arts Center! We will start raising money for the $325 entry fee when we return from spring break. Please congratulate our band students & spread the word! Karl Lester FCS band director Congratulations

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, March 28, 2013 8:00am to 4:00pm 8:00am to 4:00pm NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM traveler didnt want to talk, which Steele said is unusual. Steele continued his park inspection. When he returned to the bathhouse later in the day, the kayak was gone. That night, Steele glanced at the television and saw a familiar face on the evening news. The Coast Guard was searching for a missing kayaker named James Francis McDonald. I talked to that guy this morning, Steele told his wife. The ranger called the authorities and reported what he had seen. He also sent an alert to coastal parks west of the Ochlocknee River, but nobody else reported seeing the missing kayaker. McDonald still is listed as a missing person in Dixie County. Family and friends said he was a consummate outdoorsman and could still be alive in the wilderness. Dayle Flint, manager of Journeys of St. George Island, speculated McDonald could have traveled from Ochlocknee River State Park down the river to Ochlocknee Bay. From there, he might have returned to Suwannee or followed the Intercoastal Waterway to Apalachicola Bay and continued west as far a New Orleans. He could have stopped over in Apalachicola or on St. George Island, or traveled north on the Apalachicola River as far as Atlanta. If he turned north and headed inland on the Ochlocknee River, he could have followed the Crooked River to Carrabelle or continued up into the swamp on the Ochlocknee. McDonald was traveling in a bright yellow, Solstice touring kayak, probably a 17-foot, 7-inch Solstice GT Titan. Flint said he could easily carry enough food and water for a week in the kayak, along with gear, especially if he supplemented his diet by shing. Because McDonald had been traveling for ve days when he reached the Ochlocknee, he might have stopped for supplies somewhere in Franklin County. McDonald is described as frugal and reserved with strangers, especially men.McDonalds last encountersThe circumstances that led McDonald to Ochlocknee are complicated. After splitting up with his longterm girlfriend, Heather Barrett, he visited his parents on or around Oct. 6. He was highly distraught. I had never seen him cry before, said Kirk McDonald, James father. On Monday, Oct. 8, having retrieved his kayak and gear from his cabin in High Springs, McDonald traveled to the home of his friend and former teacher Yvonne Streetman on the Suwannee River and spent the night. McDonald frequently visited her and launched his kayak from her property. Streetman was traveling at that time, but McDonald spoke to neighbors, and one of them saw him launch his kayak on Tuesday morning, Oct. 9. While in Suwannee, McDonald called his mother pretending to be in Gainesville. This is his last known call to a friend or relative. McDonald took his cell phone and drivers license with him as well as a Discover card. The phone last was used Oct. 9 and the credit card has not been used. How much cash he was carrying is unknown. He did not take his passport. When Streetman returned home on Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 9, she found McDonalds 1995 Chevrolet pickup truck in her driveway and his keys on her kitchen table. Initially, she didnt worry about his absence. He was in the habit of making long, solitary paddle trips. Barrett also was out of town when McDonald set off on his paddle. When she returned to their shared home, she assumed he had traveled to Miami, where he was employed part-time refurbishing a yacht, or had embarked on an impromptu journey. McDonald was able to support himself without a regular full-time job. On Saturday, Oct. 13, knowing McDonald was distraught over the breakup with Barrett, Streetman decided to contact another friend, Travis Cooper, a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cer. Cooper and another man came to Suwannee on their own time and searched in the area for the missing kayaker. This was the same day Steele believes he saw McDonald at Ochlocknee River State Park. On Monday, Oct. 15, the FWC started an of cial search from Suwannee south to Tampa, which was McDonalds regular haunt for solitary trips. Together, the FWC and Coast Guard covered 500 square miles of territory by boat and helicopter. They found nothing, and the search was called off on Wednesday, Oct. 17. Jeff Summer, a public information of cer for FWC, said because there was nothing to indicate an accident or foul play, it was believed McDonald simply decided to leave. Since then, there have been no reported sightings of James McDonald. Both Streetman and McDonalds parents, Kirk and Gloria, wonder what has happened to James. Although he is quite t, they fear he may be suffering from a recurrence of Hodgkins disease, a cancer of the lymph tissue. Friends and relatives have made trips to Ochlocknee River State Park and the surrounding area searching for McDonald and found no trace. No formal search has ever been made in the Panhandle, and though posters have been circulated at local marinas and some other businesses, most Franklin County residents seem unaware a kayaker disappeared here. McDonald and Barrett once resided in New Orleans. Friends there have been informed he is missing, but nobody has seen him. James Francis McDonald is 6-foot-2 and weighs about 200 pounds. He has brown hair and brown eyes and might have a beard. He is athletic and enjoys bicycling and kayaking. He is now 46 years old but appears younger. He has worked as a photographer, mechanic, carpenter, bartender and art teacher. He is skilled in boat repair and maintenance. If you have seen McDonald or his 17-foot yellow Solstice kayak, call Kirk McDonald at 352-3727444 or local law enforcement. MISSING from page A1PHOTOS FROM THE MCDONALD FAMILY COLLECTIONJames McDonald has been missing since October. He was last seen in his Solstice GT Titan kayak. DIXIE from page A1Flatauer-Wake eld Hardware Company on Avenue E, then called Chestnut Street. The Dixie Theatre, described by the Apalachicola Times as one of the prettiest in the state, was a modern marvel with an aluminum and silver curtain to act as a movie screen and a proscenium stage for live performances. A projection booth at the front of the balcony was furnished with a Powers Cameragraph, an early 35 mm projector. There was an orchestra pit in front of the stage. There were two 16-by-16foot shops anking the ticket of ce. To the left was a barbershop leased by Jenkins and ORourke, and to the right was a cigar and candy stand owned by W.G. Sharit that provided snacks for theatergoers. The theater had electric lights. The front of the building displayed 15 large white lights and 100 colored light bulbs. Inside, strings of lights served the seating area and the stage had adjustable lighting. Three stairways, two for white patrons and one for blacks, provided access to the audience. Employees of Fortunas seafood business were treated to free admission. The main entrance to the theater was through the ticket of ce, but blacks sat on the left-hand side of the balcony. They took their tickets to Uncle Stathis Sardellis, standing at the top of their stairwell. At the age of 80, Sardellis could read without glasses. In the beginning, he also changed theater posters around town when the movie changed and kept the theater clean and sparkling. Later, the Fortunas children took up some of these tasks, and Aunt Sadie Ford became the See DIXIE A6

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 ticket taker for black theatergoers and held the job for many years. The right hand side of the balcony was reserved for smokers, who sometimes scattered ashes on the audience below. The street entrance was tall glass doors that could be shrouded with thick curtains to exclude the light while the show was in progress. The auditorium seated more than 500 with 380 seats on the ground oor, 140 in the horseshoe shaped balcony and four private boxes located to the right and left of the stage. The theater oors were covered with noiseless rubber-backed carpets. The main oor was on an incline to allow a good view for all patrons. Seating was in folding opera chairs. There were four cozy dressing rooms for performers behind the stage. The stage was furnished with velvet curtains that could be raised into the ceiling. Fortunas ordered eight sets of scenery painted by the Kansas City Scenic Company as a backdrop for shows. These were lifting ats that could be pulled up into the 42-foot ceiling above the stage and concealed when not in use. At the grand opening, a theater company booked to perform failed to appear, and Fortunas wound up showing a six-reel moving picture. The theater was packed to over owing, and the street in front was crowded with people seeking admission. A four-piece orchestra performed consisting of Miss Hollister, a pianist: Mr. Albert Shine from Tallahassee on the coronet; Dr. Rosenbaum, a violinist; and Mr. L. Forsyth, a trap drummer from Tarpon Springs. Professor Joseph H. Becsey was soon employed as the regular musical accompanist. He played multiple instruments but normally performed on violin at the Dixie. He was also the choirmaster at St. Patricks Church for many years. Becsey was a native of Kalozsvar, Transylvania, but immigrated to Tarpon Springs in 1903, where he met Fortunas. Willoughby Marshall remembers his mother Estelle Marshall accompanying Becksey on keyboard. In 1926, Fortunas bought a pipe organ for the theater. The next year, Becksey died after a brief illness. Young and oldThe Dixie was a magic place for children. Joe Barber said around the time of Beckseys death, Fortunas installed a player piano to the delight and fascination of local children. Barber and his friends sat in the very front of the house as much to watch the piano keys move on their own as to watch the movie. Toto McCluskey remembers attending shows at the Dixie during the 1930s. She, too, favored the front row. She and her friends went to the corner bakery and bought a loaf of warm bread for a dime. They ate it during the show and sometimes mashed bits into pellets for an impromptu battle. She also remembers a donut eating contest staged at the Dixie. A long rope was strung across the stage, and lots of donuts were attached to it by strings, she said. You had to put your hands behind your back and grab the donut with your mouth. I got mine all the way in my mouth and then I pulled it. When I did that, it pulled the donuts out of everybody elses mouth, so I won. I didnt mean to do it. In the early years, the Dixie hosted a variety of entertainments. The attractions for the rst winter season of the Dixie were announced in the Sept. 13 Times. They included The Little Millionaire, a musical comedy; the traditional opera Barber of Seville; a comic opera called The Divorce Question; and a drama titled Sheppard of the Hills. When Barber was growing up in the 1920s, the Dixie was still a Vaudeville house. There was always music and a comic skit before the picture show. Alice Jean Gibbs was a teenager working in Vaudeville around this time. She traveled by train with a theatrical company. The players performed the same stage act at each stop for six months, but the movies that preceded or followed their performances varied from theater to theater. Her company carried their own costumes, sets and musicians. Traveling acts at the Dixie were usually less elaborate. Performers in Apalachicola might have arrived by car or aboard a steamboat. Traveling tent shows also came to town setting up in a vacant eld in competition with the Dixie.Part of the communityThe Dixie was an integral part of the community. It provided entertainment and a venue for community meetings. Memorial Day services, war bond rallies and church conventions were held there. During the rst Mardi Gras in 1915, a huge clock was leased and displayed in front of the theater for a week. Locals also made their own entertainment. During World War I, the Times carried an account of a talent show at the Dixie highlighted by cartoons depicting town characters drawn by Mrs. De Bauvier and projected onto the movie screen. Caricatures included Paul Ploger and his Million Dollar Dog, George Plaza who cooka da nica meal, Professor Becksey, Fishing with the Sun and Elgin We ng Pushing Business at the Garage. On the same evening, the Misses Floyd Rice and Loretta Long sang Until We Meet Again. They were called back to sing again before the audience would release them. Miss Floyd Rice later sang Hawaiian Butter y. She was followed by The Smiles, 20 girls in white who sang their way into the heart of the audience. Later, Miss Patricia Long sang Dear Old Pal of Mine and Goodbye to France. The whole program was accompanied by music performed by Becksey on violin; Estelle Marshall, then Estelle Marks, on piano and a clarinetist named Castorina. The show raised $28.50 for charity, which was divided between Descendents of Confederate Veterans and the old soldiers home in Jacksonville. In 1927, a theatrical troop out of Atlanta used a clever scheme to ensure a robust audience. They produced a traveling play called Cupid Up to Date. It played at the Dixie on Valentines Day 1927. The company arrived in town about two weeks before the production date. The actors were professionals, but the chorus was recruited from local school children. At the Dixie, Cupid, a golf caddy in satin diapers, was played by 7-year-old Voncile McLeod. The show featured dances ranging from the Black Bottom to the minuet. Not surprisingly, it played to a packed house and got rave reviews. According to the Times, Mothers attending rehearsals are entranced by the snap and rhythm displayed by their little tots. Nationally known lecturers also appeared at the theater. William Jennings Bryan is said to have spoken there. In 1922, Winifred Kimball, daughter of a Franklin County timber tycoon, won a national competition to create a scenario for a moving picture with her story The Newness of Life, which was lmed under the title Broken Chains. It was a tale of domestic abuse and triumphant love. Kimball prevailed over 30,000 other entrants. The judges included D.W. Grif n, Charlie Chaplin and Norma Talmadge. Broken Chains debuted at the Dixie on Jan. 1, 1923, with much fanfare and a gala opening celebration at the Gibson Inn, but it fell rather at in theaters. Kimball went on to direct a number of stage plays at the Dixie. A 1927 production, The Path Across the Hills, received rave reviews in the Times with special praise for W.D. Buzzett in his role as Grandpa and Grandma Mrs. Charles Marks. Bill and Raymond Loftin, Paul Ploeger Jr., Little Betty Ploeger and Ada Clair Theobald also performed. Kathleen Nease played Zuzu the cook. The Times wrote, The dramatic talent was well represented under the skillful training of Miss Winifrid Kimball, authoress and dramatic trainer who has been responsible for many brilliant successes. The Times never appears to have published a bad review of any lm or stage production at the Dixie, possibly because, from the 1920s through the 1940s, the Dixie was a proli c and faithful advertiser. Lengthy reviews of upcoming features appeared on the front page and large box ads were scattered throughout the paper. From time to time, local businesses sponsored shows at the Dixie. In 1919, Hinckley Hardware presented contralto Ida Gardener accompanied by utist Harold Lyman in a recital. Tickets were available at Hinckley Hardware.ChangesOver the years, there were changes at the theatre. In 1918, Fortunas purchased Sharits sweet and cigar shop and put Josephine Porter in charge. In 1920, she married Alex Nicholas Fortunas, son of the theaters founder. Still later, George Louis opened a diner in the Sharit building. At some point, Nick Fortunas opened a concession stand where sodas, candy and crackers were available in the lobby of the theater. Patrons still were free to pick up a burger at the Louis diner and carry it into the theater if they were peckish. In September 1929, talkies came to the Dixie. The rst picture with sound displayed was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayers Broadway Melody. According to the Times, The theatre was packed to over owing with standing room at a premium. In preparation for the metamorphosis to all-talkers, Fortunas had the projection booth soundproofed and installed the very latest equipment, including DeFoerest phono lm and phonodisc talking equipment. The Dixie was one of the rst Florida theaters to display talkies. Alexander Keys brother Robert published a newspaper article about the Dixies modern equipment in the Florida Times Union. In the 1933, Fortunas added Sunday matinees. After World War II, Carol McLeod became the projectionist, a job he held for 24 years. Voncile McLeod said she spent most evenings with him in the projection booth. Frances Louis Cook, whose parents ran the Louis Diner, said she grew up in the Dixie. Fortunas son Georgie was about her age, and he had taken on the task of changing posters. Frances would help him and then stand at the back of the theater and watch the show. Sometimes Georgie ran the projector and she would sit with him in the booth, where two projectors sat side by side to minimize the pause between reels. She remembers Mrs. Fortunas was an animal lover and always kept a Pekingese dog. Sometimes she would accompany her husband to the theater, and while he took care of business, she would sit in the car with her dog or a spider monkey and socialize with passersby. Georgies daughter Jody Fortunas-Wilson remembers begging to clean the theater during summer vacation. She and her brothers and sisters had to take a nap in the afternoon to be allowed to stay up late, but the reward was change spilled from the pockets of theatergoers. Over time, the theater became strictly a movie house, and the private booths were removed. The Nichols brothers opened The Number 1 Drive-in Theatre on U.S. 98 west of Apalachicola during the late 1950s, and television came to the county at about the same time. It was the beginning of the end for the Dixie. By 1962, the Dixie no longer advertised in the Times, although the drive-in ran weekly ads for B movies. Fortunas bought a piece of land in Eastpoint, where he planned to build a drivein of his own, but he never did. By the time the Dixie nally shut her doors in 1967, her demise was not even covered by the local paper. The shabby old lady sat shuttered for three decades until she was rediscovered by the Partington family, but thats another story. Who is 50 now?Can you remember nineteen sixty three?Unusually long hair, sex and drugs were all free.Return to it now for just a moment of pause,Engage your friends to help with this cause.Now think who in town should have missed that whole scene?That he would have preferred the Old South to any electronic machine.Or if you fail with that clue then hes a great chef who never drinks wines. And,Notice his name spelled in these lines. FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERSNOTICE OF SOLICITATION REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS Franklin County Clerk of Court Alligator Drive Multi-Use Path Franklin County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. DIXIE from page A5 W.D. Buzzett in his role as Grandpa and Grandma Mrs. Charles Marks. mond Loftin, Paul Ploeger Jr., Little Betty Ploeger and Ada Clair Theobald also performed. Kathleen Nease played Zuzu the cook. wrote, The dramatic talent was well represented under the skillful training of Miss Winifrid Kimball, authoress and dramatic trainer who SPECIAL TO THE TIMESBroken Chains premiered at the Dixie in1923. At right is a Times ad for the Dixie circa 1927.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, March 28, 2013 man, and probably a genius in his own time, Johnson said. Not only was he a decent man, but with a lot of the crazy stuff that was going on culturally, he kept that from his players. I didnt have to experience that, Johnson said. He was a many of integrity. He gave me an awareness of people (who I didnt know). I thought to myself, If he is this decent and honest, then perhaps this is a standard of what others feel. I dont know them, but I know him, Johnson said. That made a difference to me. I want you to know he was a decent human being, and I appreciated the impact that he made on my life. Later, Johnny Browne, who played for Wagoner in the 1970s, rose to speak and told a story of how, in 1966, when he was 9, Wagoner had showed up early on a Saturday morning with a paper sack full of a baseball uniform, shoes and gloves, pushed it into Brownes stomach and told the boy, Cmon you can change in the car. Browne said Wagoner stood by his side and encouraged him to get into the game. Son, go out there and show them what you can do, he told Browne. Dont worry; Im going to be here. Years later, Browne would be a part of overpowering football teams that won the Apalachicola Valley Conference and would play in hundreds of baseball games for Wagoner, but that what he remembered most is a man standing in that living room, talking to a 9-year-old boy. Scott recounted the early life of a boy who played in the cotton elds where his mother worked around Clanton, Ala., where he was born March 11, 1922. Wagoner used to say the family was so poor, he could stand on a dime with his shoes on and tell you whether it was heads or tails. He never knew his father, and his mom died when he was 12, so Wagoner went to live with his older sister in Birmingham, Ala., who was protective of her little brother. He did play for Phillips High School, and the rst time he got in, playing in Legion Field in Birmingham, the coach called to the wing man, and Wagoner did as instructed, cutting through the line, out into the at and scored a 70-yard touchdown, Thats a pretty good start, right? Thats a pretty good indicator of how successful he was going to be, in the schools and in football, said Pat Floyd, a former player of Wagoners who went on to a spot on the University of Florida football team and who the coach had asked to share facts about Wagoners life and career when the time came to be eulogized. Wagoner went over the items and then called Floyd back a week later and asked to go over them again so that you get it right. It made me remember how much time in his life that he spent making plans, for his teams for the players, for class, Floyd said. How he prepared us to make sure that we never failed those tasks and do the best we could to succeed and carry them out. In 1942, Scott said in his remarks, Wagoner went off to World War II, training with the Coast Guard in California before eventually becoming senior leader of a team of 110 men that shipped off to the South Pacic from San Francisco. Wagoner came home with a Bronze Star and plenty of tales of his adventures, including a boat ride with Admiral William Bull Halsey. He had told Floyd practically to the minute that he had spent three years, six months, 18 days and he got discharged at 11 a.m. Wagoner then enrolled through the GI Bill in Livingston State Teachers College in Alabama, where he became the schools rst three-time letter winner, in football, basketball and baseball, where he played catcher, second base and outeld. Because he was older than his teammates, having gone off to war at age 20, he became known as Pop, and the nickname stuck. It was also there that he met his wife, the former Blanche Henderson, and in 1948 they moved to Apalachicola to teach and coach. For more than 32 years he taught and coached at both Chapman High School and Apalachicola High School. Floyd shared a list of memorable players and memorable seasons that Wagoner had gone over with his former player, now a successful local attorney. He really enjoyed seeing his players be successful off the eld, Floyd said. Boy, werent we blessed with that? He had a plan, and he prepared us for it, and we won with it, he said. When you look back at what he did and you see he was extraordinary man, and he generated some pretty good successes. Wagoner had impressive success as a coach, with a nal football record of 188 wins, 111 losses and 9 ties. His career included being honored as Florida High School Coach of the Year, for all high schools in the state, and a nomination for National High School Coach of the Year, which took him to events in San Francisco. He was inducted into the Florida High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame in 1990 and is in the University of West Alabama Athletic Hall of Fame. The football elds at the former Apalachicola High School were named in his honor. He is survived by his son, Wally Wagoner, and his daughter-in-law Julie of Ocala, and their children Phillip and Abbey. He was preceded in death by his wife, Blanche, and his sister Paula Binion. The service was followed by a graveside service at Magnolia Cemetery. All services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Those who wish may make donations to hospice in his memory. PUBLIC NOTICEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle will meet in regular session on Thursday April 4, 2013, at approximately 6:00 p.m. or as soon as can be heard in the City of Carrabelle Commission Chambers located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL (850)697-2727 to consider the following in accordancewith Ordinance No.443, Consent of Use for the Consumption and Sale of Alcohol: 1. Allowing a temporary beer and wine permit for the Big Bend Salt Water Classic on June 14th thru 16th. All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing on this matter. Further information concerning the proposed amendment can be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by calling (850) 697-2727, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participatein this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly StaTimes of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At:106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322850-697-4121Renee Parrish, D.M.DACCEPTING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN: Early Head Start / Head StartAll services for our children are free with no cost to the parent.**Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).**Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY RESTORE COUNCILNotice is given that on March 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. (ET), at the CarrabelleCity Hall, 106 SE Avenue B, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, the Franklin CountyRestore Council shall hold a public organizational meeting. For additional information contact Alan Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, at 850-653-9783, Ext. 161. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard. Any party who may wish to appeal the decisions made at this public meeting is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the meeting.Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days beforethe meeting to make arrangements. COACH from page A1SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs SCoach Bill Wagoner stands nexts to his trophy case.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 OFTHEWEEKPET Franklin County Humane SocietyLOVABLE LOLLY!Lolly is a 3 month old Terrier mix with a stubby little tail that never stops wagging. She is playful and energetic so needs plenty of attention and exercise. A home with a yard and a couple kids would be just what this little girl needs. If you fit the bill, come meet this cutie!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 SocietyBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A drizzly day dampened attendance at this years Artwalk. A number of artists bowed out to protect delicate artwork or because they were hesitant to travel to what might be a rained out event. Several dozen artists did attend. Some moved inside. Others braved the elements. Most artists on site reported good sales. Painter Mershell Sherman said, although there were fewer shoppers, his sales had matched last years by early afternoon. Phillip Campbell of The Fifth Digit pottery and copper said, Just before it seems like its going to storm, People seem to go into a frenzy and start buying things as if they want to be sure they get what they want. Local creative icon Kristin Anderson displayed a stunning, new creation in the Grady Mart courtyard. Her massive necklace and four accompanying earrings in silver, enamel and precious stones, pays tribute to the four seasons and the changing aspects of day and night. Some other Franklin County artists created lots of interest at the affair. Katie McFarland worked on one of her whimsical ceramic murals throughout the afternoon. The Bowery Gallery had a bevy of artists on hand. LG Duniston of Lanark Village brought a gorgeous display of Gyotaku to Artwalk. This is the ancient Japanese art of sh printing. Each print is taken from a dead sh that has been thoroughly washed with mild dish soap. Absorbent material is packed behind gills and inside the mouth. Then dry, high quality acrylic paint is applied directly to the surface of the sh. Special interest is devoted to preserving the personality of the specimen, and creating an image that will serve as an artifact. Finally, veil-thin rice paper or cotton canvas is laid across the sh, and the surface is delicately rubbed by hand. The result is wonderfully lifelike and stylized at the same time. Joe Kotzman of Carrabelle displayed his fantastic watercolors, a rare treat. Kotzman has painted in both the United States and abroad. He said folk tales learned from his mother are the basis of much of his work. He is an active member and past president of the Carrabelle Artists Club. Barbara Rosen of Alligator Point brought both visual and literary creations to the show. She presented an assortment of pine needle baskets, many with ceramic or wooden bases and inserts but Rosen also brought along a half dozen short works of poetry on all manner of subjects. She distributed her wise little books to passersby asking only that they make a contribution to the Humane Society if they enjoyed her verse. Another creative duo that has become a xture of local art viewings is The Fifth Digit, Patti and Phillip Campbell. The couple displayed new works in ceramics, metal and found materials like seashells. Phillip Campbell said, Its nice to have somebody to collaborate with. I engineer the stuff and she does the pottery. An interesting face that is new on the local horizon was Jennifer Odom of Live Oak Island near Crawfordville. Odoms work consists of quirky animals with large eyes reminiscent of religious icons. Odom said she left 20 years of residence in Santa Fe to experience the lifestyle of rural Florida and has found the change inspiring. Rylie Wilson turns 1Rylie Jack Wilson celebrated his rst birthday on Sunday, March 10, with friends and family. He is the son of David and Erica Wilson of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Dale and Montez Davis of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Shellie Wilson of Apalachicola and Chris and Carolyn Hill of Sumatra. BirthdaySpecial to the TimesChairperson Carrie Kienzle has announced plans are under way for the 21st annual Historic Apalachicola Home and Garden Tour, sponsored by Trinity Episcopal Church. The tour is expected to attract hundreds of visitors to Apalachicola on May 3 and 4. This years theme, At Home in Apalach runs the gamut from spacious and graceful century-old houses and charming bungalows to contemporary ones with new energy sources. The tours featured house is the home of Ed and Candace Springer. Built by Dave Maddox for Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Flowers, it celebrates its 100th birthday this year. Constructed of heart pine, situated behind a white picket fence and shaded by towering Magnolia trees, it portrays a gracious vision of life in Apalach in the past century. An example of Gulf Coast two-story Greek Revival architecture, the large central halls on each oor are anked by equal-sized, spacious rooms. Modern updates in the past several decades have made the residence more comfortable, but the house remains true to its original plan. Of special interest are a collection of Weller pottery and a restored 1962 Corvette. Pastel and oil paintings done by one of the current owners adorn the walls; and examples of pique assiette (a type of mosaic) abound both indoors and out. On Friday, May 3, a second annual preservation symposium precedes the tour day. This years focus will be on outdoor spaces and is titled Public Places, Private Spaces: A Garden Symposium. Tickets are available at $75, which includes lecture, eld trip, luncheon and cocktail party Evensong service at Trinity Episcopal Church on Friday, May 3, 5:30 p.m., provides the traditional opening for the home tour. It will be followed by a reception open to all, and a free lecture, Gardening in Apalach at 6:30 p.m., which will round out the days events. Homes will be open on Saturday, May 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pre-sale tickets will be available at $20 until the day of the event. On May 4, ticket sales will begin at 9:30 a.m. at $25 per ticket. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Trinitys parish hall at a cost of $12. In addition, a sealed-bid auction, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. will be a part of the tour days festivities. Guests to Apalachicola can enhance their weekend experience by allowing time to visit the many historical buildings and churches, museums, inns and parks that mark this historic town. For more information or ticket sales please contact Trinity Episcopal Church at 653-9550 or the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Please visit the tour website at www.apalachicolahistorichometour.org.Springer home highlights May tour of homesArtwalk damp but dazzling THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK @ApalachTimesFOLLOW US ON TWITTER Barbara Rosen displays a partly completed basket.PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove: Pine needle baskets created by Barbara Rosen of alligator Point. Below: Fanciful ceramics by Marti Campbell of Apalachicola.Above: Jennifer Odoms work has striking vitality. Left: A water color by Joe Kotzman of Carrabelle.

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The Times | A9Thursday, March 28, 2013 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Palm Sunday, March 24 8:00 AM Holy Eucharist, Rite I; 10:30 AM Holy Eucharist, Rite IILenten SederWednesday, 6:00 PM, March 27 (Call for reservations)Maundy Thursday, 6:00 PM, March 28 Good Friday, March 29Noon, Good Friday Service; 6:00PM, Stations of the CrossHoly Saturday, 10:00 AM, March 30 Easter Sunday, March 316:30 AM, Sunrise Service at Lafayette Park 10:30 AM, Holy Eucharist, Rite II; Coffee and Easter Egg Hunt to follow WELCOMES YOU Trinity est. 1836Welcomes You Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836Hwy 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 LocalRudolph Buzier, born Aug. 25, 1934, in Apalachicola, d ied at  age 76 on Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 4:05 a.m. at Bridges by the Bay in Port St. Joe, with family members Adolph Buzier Jr. and Violet Buzier Garrity at his side. He was the son of the late Costa and Esther Buzier of Apalachicola. He was preceded in death by brother Costa Buzier Jr., sister Gloria Houseman and brother Jackie Buzier. He is survived by twin brother Adolph Buzier Sr., sisters Loretta Ost of Panama City, and Ollie Houseman of Apalachicola, and his beloved bird GiGi. He graduated from Chapman High School in 1955, and joined the U.S. Navy in 1956, serving on the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Essex, stationed in San Diego, Calif. He traveled around the world four times, seeking out his fathers family in Greece and his mothers family in Italy, mailing many treasures from around the world to his mother and nieces. He ended his career in the Navy as an honorably discharged petty ofcer third class. He lived in California a short time, then returned home to Apalachicola where he crewed and cooked on many a shrimp boat, a valued member of the shing community. He oystered when necessary. Rudolphs passion was antique collecting and history. He managed the rst community store and restaurant on St. George Island in the 60s and went on to work on the St. George Island toll bridge for many years. He then became a selfmade chef and opened the Seafood Shack in Eastpoint. He developed many recipes that are still enjoyed in the community. His last venture before retiring was the Owl Cafe. After the Owl he retired and moved to Lanark Village, then on to Gulfport, Miss. to live near his sister, Gloria Houseman. After being displaced by Hurricane Katrina he came back to Florida, where he lived f or several years  until his health began to  decline. Rudolph Buzier was a remarkable man and it would take a novel to cover his wonderful life. He was a much loved son of Apalachicola. Family and friends will celebrate his life by coming together at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 13 at niece Diane Duncans h ouse at  1416 Bluff Rd. Apalachicola.Rudolph Buzier RUDOLPH BUZIErRSharon (Jenkins) Hall, daughter to the late Daniel Jenkins of Moss Point, Mississippi and the late Ernestine (Bunyon) Pittman of Apalachicola, was born Nov. 24, 1958. She graduated from Apalachicola High School. She was an employee of Franklin County Courthouse where she served faithfully for 30 years. She was a faithful member of Saint Paul AME Church under the shepherding of the Rev. Garry B. Reed. Sharon gave her life to Christ at an early age, living her last years as a trailblazer for Christ. She was known for always willing and giving a helping hand. She operated under the gifting of exaltation and hospitality. She was an encourager to all those around her no matter how sick she felt. She never allowed the pain of her life to stop her from being a servant of the Most High. Although, she was not tired of running for Jesus, He saw t to call her home to rest. On Sunday, March 17, 2013, God called His angel home. She is survived by her beloved husband Harry J. Hall Jr. of Apalachicola. Her children are Marcus Jenkins (Rachel) of Valrico; Felicia Williams (John) of Memphis, Tenn.; Allen ONeal of Apalachicola; Harry Hall III, of Carrabelle; and Helen J. Hall of Lancaster, Calif. Her siblings are Shirley Byrd (Harold), of Apalachicola, Daniel Jenkins Jr. of Lake Wales and James Jenkins (deceased); and Jeff Pearson of West Virginia; Godmother Elder Mary Ann Hayward of Apalachicola. Bobbie Clark (Sylvester )Fort Myers, Andrew Davis (Dorothy) Bonifay, Ann Fields and Mike A. Hall, Port St Joe, Arma J. Mitchell (Stanley), Wilmington North Carolina; Charles Hall, Portland, Ore.; Charlie Freeman (Mary) Augusta Ga.; a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, in-laws and other relatives and friends. The wake was held Friday evening, March 22 at Kelly Funeral Home, 149 Ave H, Apalachicola. Funeral services were held Saturday, March 23 at Saint Paul A.M.E. Church, 81 Avenue I.Sharon Jenkins HHall SHArRON JENKINsS HHALLMarjorie Wiggins Thompson passed away in Panama City on Tuesday, March 19, 2013. She was born on Feb. 7, 1921, in Goldsboro, N.C., the daughter of the late Lonnie Lee Wiggins of Goldsboro and Mary Frances Davis Wiggins from Cove City, N.C. She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years, Raymond Morris Thompson in Goldsboro, and her great-greatgranddaughter, Hayley Grace Lane, of Hiram, Ga.; and brothers Lonnie Lee Wiggins Jr., Charles Miller Wiggins and Frances Earl Wiggins. She is survived by her son, Jerry Morris Thompson (Karen) of St George Island; granddaughters Holli Lea Thompson, Dallas, Ga. and Stevie Lyn, Panama City Beach; greatgrandsons Alexander Lane (Lyndsie), Hiram, Ga., Mathew Lane, Dallas, Ga. and greatgreat-granddaughter, Alexis Callie Lane; stepgranddaughter, Jennifer Heusing (Jeff) and stepgreat-grandson, Cannon Heusing of Alpharetta, Ga. Survivors also include her sister-in-law, Mary Fowler Ward in Raleigh, NC and numerous nieces and nephews. Affectionately called Mamie by her grandchildren; Mrs. Thompson was a longtime member of St. Luke United Methodist Church in Goldsboro. She moved to Panama City in 2003 and resided at her beloved Mathison Retirement Home where she enjoyed playing bridge, bingo, Bunco and bowling on the Wii machine with many of her good friends. Her good humor, laughter and character will long be remembered. A visitation was held Saturday afternoon, March 23 at Seymour Funeral Home, 1300 Wayne Memorial Drive, in Goldsboro, N.C., followed by the service at 3 p.m. in the chapel. An entombment followed the service in Wayne Memorial Park. Another memorial service will be at 3 p.m. CDT this Friday, March 29 for her friends at Mathison Retirement Home, at 3167 W. Highway 390, Panama City. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in her memory to Mathison Retirement Center, 3636 Highway 390 West, Panama City, FL 32405, or to Covenant Hospice, 107 West 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405. The family would like to express their deepest appreciation for the care these two organizations have provided to our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and great-great-grandmother over the past years and months.Marjorie Wiggins Thompson MArjRJOrRIE W. THOmMPsSONI would like to share a few thoughts regarding Houston Miller. Houston Miller was a Franklin County resident for well over 60 years. He and his wife, Xuripha, settled in Eastpoint and started a seafood business. Houston was a good man. He never turned anyone away that needed help. People came to Franklin County to look for work on the water so they could feed their family. This was during the Depression. There was no work. People with little schooling could not nd work. When they would come to the oyster house looking for work, they would be asked if they could tong oysters or shuck oysters. Of course, that was completely foreign to them, as most of them, used to farm. So Houston would get the men to get the wood and all they needed and Houston would show them how to build an oyster boat. Then, he would take them out on the water and teach them how to oyster. The women would be taught how to shuck the oyster, thus, they could make money and feed their families. Houston was big on bartering. If Houston had something you needed and you had something he wanted, you had a deal!!! Houston was the rst ofcer of the law in Eastpoint. He was never far from Millers Quarters, where most of the newcomers lived. Any trouble that came along, i.e. drunk ghting, he would take you home. Houston had a big heart. For years, he would go mullet shing, then come home and smoke all the mullet and give them away. He helped anyone who asked for help. We buried Houston Miller on March 19, 2013. By Peggy Miller Sister-in-law Colley Houston Miller was born May 28, 1917, in Chipley. He passed away Sunday, March 17, 2013, at the age of 95 in Port St Joe. He was a dedicated member of the First Baptist Church in Eastpoint. He is survived by his wife, Xuripha Miller; children, Sharon Cumbie and Jimmy Miller, Sr. (Jeanette); brothers, JR Miller (Peggy) and Burdette Miller; ve grandchildren, four greatgrandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday, March 19 at First Baptist Church with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Bro. Garry Kent and Bro. Bobby Shiver ofciated. Kelley Funeral Home handled all arrangements. HHouston Miller HHOUstSTON MILLErREulice Troy Kelley died Sunday, March 3, 2013, in Columbus, Ga., at the age of 44. He is survived by wife, Anna Day Kelley; daughters Melinda Kelley Gates, Courtney Kelley Liske, Hailey Keann Pate, and Alexis Brooke Boutwell; sons Brandon Troy Kelley and Clayton Parnell Boutwell; parents Sharon and James Kelley; siblings James Matthew Kelley, Robert Dewayne Kelley, Aleatha Rose Thrush, Tana Lee Stillwagon, and Ross Lee; grandchildren James Carter Liske, Jordan Tyler Liske, and Alex Troy Kelley; ve nieces and ve nephews. He was preceded in death by Henryella Williams Millender, Otis Odeal Millender, Edith May Kelley, and Ernest Turner Kelley. Funeral services were held Monday, March 11 at Assembly of God in Carrabelle with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handled all local arrangements.EEulice Troy KKelleyGene Roy Surber was born Jan. 28, 1944, in St. P etersburg.  He died Monday, March 11, 2013, in Apalachicola. He is survived by his wife Julie Surber of Carrabelle. Private memorial services were held. Kelley Funeral Home handled all arrangements.Gene Roy SurberPatricia Dianne (Patty) Fleeman, 56, of Clarksville, passed away Saturday, March 23, 2013, in Clarksville. She was a 1975 graduate of Apalachicola High School and was a registered surgical nurse at Jackson County Hospital in Marianna. She was preceded in death by her dad, Hollis J. Fleeman Survivors include her mother, Katherine W. Fleeman; sisters, Karen Bryant and her husband Belvin, and Rebecca Shuler, all of Clarksville, and Donna Golden and her husband Jerry of Bremen, Georgia. The family would like to thank everyone for their prayers and support. In lieu of owers, please make contributions to Emerald Coast Hospice, 4374 Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL 32446. Memorialization will be by cremation. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.PPatricia Fleeman ObituariesLLive EEaster production on Good FridayPlease come and join us, for one night only, for a live Easter production. With the theme This is the night something happened, the production will be staged on Good Friday, March 29 at 6 p.m. at New Life Church, on 16th Street, in Apalachicola. Celebrate the life of the risen Christ and experience the love, peace and joy that knowing Him brings! Sponsored by Hillside Dancers for Christ, and community wide of Apalachicola. For more information call Teresa Ann Martin and Barbara McNair.Trinity plans HHoly Week servicesTrinity Episcopal Church, 76 5th Street, in Apalachicola, will hold Faith brBRIEfsFSSee FAI AI THH A14

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A EVERYTHING FOR YOUROUTDOOR ADVENTURECorner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com 6 th Annual EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR E RYTHING FOR E Y OUR Y OUR Y O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 6 6 A A n A n A Our BIGGEST SALEof the Year!HUGE SAVINGS ON THOUSANDS OF ITEMSAPRIL 12 & 13 FRIDAY 7AM6PMET&SATURDAY 7AM 5PMET WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Mar. 2865 48 0% Fri, Mar. 2967 5210% Sat, Mar. 3069 57 0% Sun, Mar. 3171 6120% Mon, Apr. 0173 6030% Tues, Apr. 0274 62 0% Wed, Apr. 0373 6160% 28 Th 551am 1.4 447pm 1.5 1122am 0.7 1158pm -0.1 29 Fr 648am 1.4 514pm 1.6 1151am 0.8 30 Sa 749am 1.3 547pm 1.6 1242am -0.2 1221pm 0.9 31 Su 858am 1.3 625pm 1.6 134am -0.2 1255pm 1.0 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 28 Th 551am 1.4 447pm 1.5 1122am 0.7 1158pm -0.1 29 Fr 648am 1.4 514pm 1.6 1151am 0.8 30 Sa 749am 1.3 547pm 1.6 1242am -0.2 1221pm 0.9 31 Su 858am 1.3 625pm 1.6 134am -0.2 1255pm 1.0 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreSpringtime fishing was on a high note until the cold snap this week. Most area waters are seeing good numbers of fish such as trout and redfish with the occasional flounder in the mix. Most beach fishing is producing good-sized whiting in our area, with pompano catches on the rise! Hand painted bream by the coolerful are coming to the docks at Howard and Berman creeks this week. Good catfish are also being reported here as well. With the cold weather setting back in this week, crappie should be on the minds of many local anglers.Page 10 Thursday, March 28, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Almost 300 people attended the annual open house on St. Vincent Island hosted by the Supporters of St. Vincent. In spite of cold weather, forbidding skies and whitecaps on the bay, the passenger barge made seven trips to St. Vincent Island on Friday, March 22. This year, parkas and hoodies were more in evidence than shorts and sandals. Visitors were treated to walking tours including a coastal photo walk with Debbie Hooper; bird walks guided by Barry Kinzle; a beach walk with Brad Smith; and a photo safari led by the St. Marks Photo Club. Wagon tours of the island were a bracing experience, but they were still booked solid throughout the day. Historian Jan Pietryzk regaled the crowd with curious tales of life on the island. The Apalachicola Estuarine Research Reserve, Apalachicola Riverkeepers, the University of Florida Marine Turtle Research Group, Friends of the St. Joseph Preserves and the St. George Island Lighthouse Association were among the booths with displays at the event. Some exhibitors canceled in the face of poor weather conditions. John Miick and Cletus Heaps were on hand once more to provide their own special brand of beachy blues. The open house was scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., but around noon, the wind picked up and Refuge Manager Shelly Stiaes decided to cut the day short because of rough conditions on the water. Better safe than sorry, Stiaes said. At least 260 people had already made the trip across the pass, but on the nal crossing, some of the passengers were soaked by whitecaps splashing onto the deck, and the pilot had dif culty landing the barge. In spite of chilly winds and glowering skies, St. Vincent was, as always, an amazing and beautiful place to visit. Attendees bundled up, but they didnt complain. The St. Vincent Supporters group once again provided hot dogs to visitors, and this year, the warm snack was especially popular. Special to The TimesGov. Rick Scott proclaimed March 2013 Seagrass Awareness Month, the 12th annual statewide recognition. Awareness of seagrass and its integral role in the marine ecosystem will help to create an understanding of the way seagrass damage can affect both the economic and ecological value of our marine resources. Recreational divers, snorkelers and shing enthusiasts from around the world visit Floridas coastal areas to experience the states world-class marine resources, and more than 90 percent of Floridas recreational and commercial sheries depend on seagrasses for part of their lifespan. Considered to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, seagrasses are owering underwater grasses found in estuaries, lagoons and shallow, open shelves along Floridas coastline. Seagrass habitat provides a variety of functions that contribute to a healthy and viable marine ecosystem, said Kevin Claridge, the Department of Environmental Protections Coastal and Aquatic Managed Areas director. These valuable underwater grasses are one of the many natural resources that Floridians and visitors can work together to protect and preserve now and for future generations. For more information on Floridas seagrasses, visit www.dep.state. .us/coastal/habitats/seagrass/. Special to The TimesIn 2010, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission directed staff to review the status of all state-listed species that had not undergone review in the past decade. Staff conducted a literature review and solicited information from the public on the status of the alligator snapping turtle. A Biological Review Group of experts on the species was subsequently convened. The draft of the alligator snapping turtle report was released March 13. The study determined that within Florida, the turtles area of occupancy was less than 800 square miles but not severely fragmented and, in the event of a catastrophic event eliminating much of a Florida population, population rescue could be achieved by importing turtles from Georgia and Alabama. FWC recommended the alligator snapping turtles not be listed as a threatened species. The principal past threat to alligator snapping turtles historically was harvest for food by humans. In 2009, FWC prohibited all take and possession of the species. Pet owners who possessed alligator snapping turtles before July 2009 were required to obtain a Class III Personal Pet Permit to keep those turtles, and possession is limited to one. In Florida, alligator snapping turtles are restricted to rivers, streams and associated permanent freshwater habitats. Food items include sh, turtles, snakes, birds, mollusks, and other aquatic organisms, with some vegetation. Females lay a single clutch of 17 to 52 eggs per year; nesting typically occurs from late April to mid-May. Young emerge from nests in August and September. Students against Plastic Pollution has two new projects in the works. At the March 18 county commission meeting, Brooke Pittman, president of the student conservation group, requested permission to install kiosks at county boat ramps to educate tourists and the public about pollution problems. Pollution is not good for the industry or the bay or the economy, Pittman said. SAPP also has obtained permission from Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender to install recycle bins on each kiosk. Pittman said the bins will be emptied by county workers. Commissioners voted unanimously to allow the kiosks contingent on review of the educational material by County Attorney Michael Shuler. SAPP has a new fundraising initiative to help support their efforts to keep the coast clean. The students are recycling old T-shirts as reusable shopping bags. The bags sell for $5 each and make great gifts. Organizer Heidi Montgomery said the group also has reusable plastic bags available for $1 each. If you want to buy a bag, contribute to SAPP or to suggest a project or fundraiser, call Montgomery at 653-5679 or visit montgomeryscience.org. In addition to helping the environment, membership in SAPP helps a student qualify for academic recognition. (SAPP) helps with college admissions and scholarship applications, said senior Stephan DeVaugn. He said membership in the National Honor Society requires a minimum of 18 hours of community service per semester. Lois Swoboda Biologists seek help with horseshoe crab studySpring marks horseshoe crabs mating season, and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologists are requesting the publics help identifying spawning sites. Beachgoers likely will have the best luck spotting mating horseshoe crabs around high tide, just before, during or after a new or full moon. The conditions around the next full moons on April 25 and May 5 will create ideal opportunities to view the spawning behavior of horseshoe crabs. Beachgoers lucky enough to spot horseshoe crabs are asked to note how many they see and whether the horseshoe crabs are mating. If possible, the observer should also count how many horseshoe crabs are mating adults and how many are juveniles (4 inches wide or smaller). In addition, biologists ask observers to provide the date, time, location, habitat type and environmental conditions such as tides and moon phase when a sighting occurs. To report your sighting, go to MyFWC.com/Contact and click on the Submit a Horseshoe Crab Survey link, then Florida Horseshoe Crab Spawning Beach Survey. You can also report ndings via email at horseshoe@ MyFWC.com or by phone at 866-252-9326.Alligator snapping turtles holding on LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesSAPP battles pollution with shopping bags, recycle stations Outdoor BRIEFS LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove, Jan Pietryzk shares stories of St. Vincent with visitors bundled against the east wind. St. Vincent Island was still breathtaking on a cold and blustery day.Hundreds visit St. Vincent Island Florida pays tribute to seagrasses

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www.apalachtimes.com ASection Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORLady Seahawk eighth grade softball player Scout Segree was top hitter against Port St. Joe. A great utility player, she starts at rst, behind the plate and even played shortstop against Godby, said coach Lisa Sweatt. She is such a good role model for the younger kids, all As in the classroom, and always the loudest in the dugout.Congratulations, Scout! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 456 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 389, PERTAINING TO CODE ENFORCEMENT POWERS, PROCEDURES, AND NOTICES IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at CarrabelleCity Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727.The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing the Carrabelle City Hall located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE:special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meetingby contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Thursday, March 28, 2013 Page 11ADULT SOFTBALL PLAYERS SOUGHTGranville Croom and Carol Bar eld are spearheading a community adult softball team and are looking for anyone interested in playing. A meet and greet will be at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 3, at Crooms Snack Shack, on the corner of Avenue I and 10th Street. For more information, call Carol at 653-2784. www.apalachtimes.com SPORTSCARRABELLE APALACHICOLASPRING FEVER PHIL COALE | Special to The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesTOP LEFT: Seahawk rst baseman Chase Golden covers the base. TOP RIGHT: Trey Jones swings for the AAA Stars team at the Day of Baseball. LEFT: Seahawk hurler Skyler Hutchinson shows his stuff. BELOW LEFT: Seahawk junior varsity pitcher Jayden Liston prepares to throw. BELOW RIGHT: Charlie Winchester hurls for the AAA Angry Birds team at the Day of Baseball on Saturday. SPRING FEVER PHIL COALE | Special to The Times TOP LEFT: Seahawk rst baseman Chase Golden covers the base. TOP RIGHT: Trey Jones swings for the AAA Stars team at the Day of Baseball. LEFT: Seahawk hurler Skyler Hutchinson shows his stuff. prepares to throw. BELOW RIGHT: Charlie Winchester hurls for the AAA Angry Birds team at the Day of Baseball on Saturday. PHIL COALE | Special to The TimesBASEBALL HEATS UP To see or purchase baseball photos, contact Phil Coale at tigersports1@ live.com or 379-8049.

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 90470T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2012-CA000297 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. BRADLEY R. BLACKBURN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2012-CA000297 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, and, BRADLEY R. BLACKBURN, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor, Apalachicola, Florida, at the hour of 11:00 am on the 2nd day of May, 2013, the following described property: LOT 4, BLOCK 1 OF ADDITION TO MAGNOLIA BLUFFS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 17, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 4th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provisoin of certain assistance. Please contact teh Office of Court Administration at (850)5774401 or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding: If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County if Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon county courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. March 21, 28, 2013 90484T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010CA-000194 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 11, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000194 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC*, is the Plaintiff and MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH; DANIELLE MCCULLOUGH; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY; TENANT #1 N/K/A DONALD DEMPSEY are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at INSIDE FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 3rd day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 4 BLOCK 187, KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 908 NE 6TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 *Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 12, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa FL 33622-5018 File #: F10016145 **See Americans with Disabilites Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse 301 S Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 March 21, 28, 2013 90508T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012CA-000292 ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B. Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF LOUISE H. HOBBS, DECEASED; BLAIR M. HOBBS A/K/A BLAIR M. PUGH; CINDY MARIE BRISBIN A/K/A CINDY MARIE BAILEY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC F/K/A CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING CORP.; MAGNOLIA RIDGE ESTATES PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TERRY NEWELL; LINDA BACKMAN; MARY BRISBAN; ENA BUCY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF LOUISE H. HOBBS, DECEASED. whose residence is unknown Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein TO: BLAIR M. HOBBS A/K/A BLAIR M. PUGH Last Known Address: 77 Gilbert Street Eastpoint, FL 32328 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: Unknown TO: LINDA BACKMAN Last Known Address: 539 N. Franklin Street La Grange, TX 78945 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: Unknown TO: MARY BRISBAN Last Known Address: 163 Kirkland Drive Crawfordville, FL 32327 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: 77 Gilbert Street Eastpoint, FL 32328 Previous Address: 407 SE 7th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 TO: ENA BUCY Last Known Address: 539 N. Franklin Street La Grange, TX 78945 Current Address: Unknown Previous Address: Unknown TO: ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 4 OF INGRAM ACRES (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COMER OF SECTION 25 (ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36), TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH. RANGE 7 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 25 (AS MONUMENTED) 50.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT WIDE COUNTY GRADED ROAD (GILBERT ROAD). THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 159.82 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 107.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261). THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 407.1 0 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 106.79 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 407.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME VIN # CV02AL0258375A AND VIN # CV02AL0258375B WITH TITLE # 0084695571 AND TITLE # 0084695470 This property is located at the Streed address of: 77 Gilbert Street, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiffs Attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs Attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 7, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Randolph Clement, Esq. Jacquelyn C. Herrman, Esq. Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Phone: (954)354-3544 Fax: (954)354-3545 Primary email: rclemente@erwlaw.com Secondary email: servicecomplete@erwlaw. com **IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 21, 28, 2013 90510T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2013CA-000035CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., 2006-AR6, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR6, Plaintiff, vs. CLIFFORD K. BRODY, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLIFFORD K. BRODY Last Known Address Unknown also Attempted At: 127 SPOONBILL DRIVE, PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL 32456; 180 HARBOR DRIVE, APT. 52, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149; 249 LEAVENSWORTH ROAD, HINESBURG, VT 05461; 260 CRANDON BLVD., SUITE 32, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149 AND 2746 HWY 98 W, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Current Residence Unknown SALLY H BRODY A/K/A SALLY A. BRODY Last Known Address Unknown Also Attempted At: 127 SPOONBILL DRIVE, PORT SAINT LUCIE, FL 32456; 180 HARBOR DRIVE, APT. 52, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149; 249 LEAVENSWORTH ROAD, HINESBURG, VT 05461; 260 CRANDON BLVD., SUITE 32, KEY BISCAYNE, FL 33149 AND 2746 HWY 98 W, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: ALL OF LOT 5, AND THE EAST HALF OF LOT 4, AND WEST HALF OF LOT 15, AND THE EAST 86 FT. OF LOT 16, SAVE AND EXCEPT THAT PART OF LOTS 15 & 16, LYING NORTH OF HIGHWAY 98, ALL IN WATERFRONT BLOCK F OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, A SUBDIVISION OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. ALSO: THAT PARCEL OF PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5, OF WATERFRONT BLOCK F OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, AND RUN SOUTH 18 FT. TO A CONCRETE POST; THENCE WESTERLY 150 FT. TO A CONCRETE POST, THENCE NORTHERLY 19.7 FT. TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF LOT 4 OF SAID BLOCK F, THENCE EAST 150 FT. TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING has been filed against you and you are required to serve a coy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or before within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 5th day of March, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk March 21, 28, 2013 92633T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2007-195-CA NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. ELLIS R. GOLDEN, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY given pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 27, 2013 and entered in Case No. 2007-195-CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK, is the Plaintiff and Ellis R. Golden; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ELLIS R. GOLDEN, DECEASED and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), are the Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash inside the Front Doors of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, on April 25, 2013, the following described property set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: Begin at the intersection of the West boundary of the 25 foot County Road and the Southeasterly boundary of the 60 foot State paved secondary road (S.-65) at a point 481.5 feet South (true meridian) and 1125 feet West of the N.E. corner of fractional Section 31, T8S, R6W. Run thence South 190.5 feet. Thence S.54 degrees W.30.9 feet. Thence North 190.5 feet. Thence N. 54 degrees E. 30.9 feet to the point of beginning. Thus forming a parcel in the N. E. 1/4 of said Section 31. ALSO: From a point on the Southern boundary of a 45 foot public right-ofway projected from a platted tract for Sawyer and Shuler 1,000 feet West and 382.7 feet South from the N.E. corner of Section 31, T8S, R6W, run S. 54 degrees West along road 185.4 feet to a point for beginning. From this point of beginning continue thence along road 61.8 feet, thence South 200 feet, thence N. 54 degrees East 61.8 feet, thence North (true meridian) 200 feet to the point of beginning. Thus forming a tract in the N.E. 1/4 of said Section 31, fronting 61.8 feet on road and running South 200 feet. LESS AND EXCEPT: From the intersection of the 25 foot Moore Street West boundary and the Southeasterly boundary of the 60 foot State paved road (S-65) at a point 481.5 feet South and 1125 feet West of the NE corner of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, run due South along said street 130.5 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING of the property to be described; thence Run S 54 degrees West 92.7 feet, thence North 30 feet, thence in an Easterly direction 90 feet more or less to POINT OF BEGINNING. Being a parcel of land in a triangle shape, in the NE 1/4 of Section 31, Township 8 South, Range 6 West. ALSO: The Most Southerly 60 foot strip of land running across the back of Lots 6 and 6 1/2, Block (revised), according to an unrecorded 1956 map of the N.E. 1/4 of Fractional Section 31, T8S, R6W, as recorded in Vol. at pages 148-149 and Vol. at pages 18-19, respectively, of the Official Records of Franklin County, Florida. and further described as follows: From the intersection of the 25 foot Moore Street West boundary and the Southeasterly boundary of the 60 foot State paved Road (S65) at a point 481.5 feet South and 1125 feet West of the N.E. corner of said Section 31, run due South along said Street 130.5 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING; run thence continuing South, 60 feet; thence S. 54 degrees W. 92.7 feet; thence North 60 feet; thence N. 54 degrees E. 92.7 feet to the point of beginning. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator at (850) 577-4401 at 301 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Franklin County, Florida, this 28th day of February, 2013. Marcia Johnson, Clerk Franklin County, FL By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Weltman, Weinberg & Reis Co., L.P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff 550 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 550 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 740-5200 Fax: (954) 740-5290 Mar 28, Apr 4, 2013 92749T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 13-000012CP IN RE: ESTATE OF SARAH MAXWELL BABBIT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Sarah Maxwell Babbit, deceased, File 13000012CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is March 21, 2013. Co-Personal Representatives: Harry L. Babbit, Jr. 505 Russet Valley Cir. Hoover, AL 35244 David Babbit 3198 Normandy Cir NE Marietta, GA 30062 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. FL Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. 3042 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-8245 March 21, 28, 2013 92791T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000247-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. SID GRAY RENTALS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, SIDNEY E. GRAY, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Lot 3 and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Lot 3A Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 25, 2013, in Case No. 12-000247CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Sid Gray Rentals, LLC, Sidney E. Gray, Unknown Tenant (s) Lot 3 and Unknown Tenant (s) Lot 3A, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on April 17, 2013, the property, set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 3 AND LOT 3A, DOCS SEA SHORES AS PER MAP OR PLAT IN SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 49 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: March 12,

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 28, 2013 The Times | A13 RENTALS2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED ................$550 3 BR / 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDOW/ POOL .....................................$8503 BR / 2 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL AND 10X15 STORAGE UNIT.....$9503 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOLNIGHTLY / $150 | WEEKLY / $8503 BR / 2 UNFURNISHED TRAILOR ......$500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT. / 2 LOTS, HWY 98 FRONTAGE.........$650 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW This position includes developing, presenting and closing sales for new and existing customers. Advertising solutions which include print and digital are related to business customer needs that span all categories of small to medium local businesses. Presentations are made via in-person sales calls.We are seeking strong sales minded individuals who are able to manage multiple tasks, prospect for new business & offer excellent customer service.Certi cation: Valid drivers licenseFind out why our team loves their job. Is it the exciting environment, the revenue rewards, the great bene ts, or all of the above? The Halifax Media Group is adding talented and motivated multi-media sales professionals to our advertising team.Please submit resume & cover letter to:lgrimes@pcnh.com or contact Lorraine Grimes at 850.747.5002 for more informationHalifax Media Group encourages applications from those with diverse backgrounds. Halifax Media Group is a DRUG-FREE environment. SalesCALLCENTER Inside SalesThe News Herald is looking for highly motivated Inside Sales Representatives who are customer service champions for inbound and outbound calls. Required Skills: Excellent computer skills to include use of internet and microsoft office. *Type 40 wpm. *Ability to handle heavy flow of inbound calls *Time management & organization skills *Excellent verbal/written communication skills *Must be detail oriented and work as a team player to ensure customer service excellence. *Strong work ethic & capacity to thrive in a professional team environment. *Outbound sales experience preferred The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package, including medical, dental, vision, life and long-term disability insurance, 401(k) options, vacation and sick leave and select paid holidays. Please send resumes to: lgrimes@pcnh.com Web ID#: 34244751 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Michael P. Bist, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 21, 28, 2013 92819T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHHSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on April 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer the sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property EXHIBIT A A CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND COMPRISING PART OF LOTS 1, 2 AND 3, BLOCK E-2 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK E-2 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED ON FILE AT THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT OFFICE IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF AVENUE D WITH THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF COMMERCE STREET, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 40.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 50 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 78.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 40.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), LYING ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COMMERCE STREET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 78.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and Personal Property: Alcoholic Beverage License Number 29-00021 8COP (the Beverage License) pursuant to the Order Setting Foreclosure Sale and the Stipulated Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK Plaintiff, vs. RIVERSIDE OASIS PARTNERS, LLC a Florida limited liability company; RIVER OASIS, INC., a Florida corporation, JAMES R. (ROBBY) PAYTON; DARRELL STANTON WARD, JR. a/k/a DARRELL STANTON WARD a/k/a DARRELL S. WARD a/k/a STANTON WARD; DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TABACCO; DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; et al., Defendants, and the docket number of which is 2010-CA000123. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 13th day of March, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Franklin County, FL By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk March 28, April 4, 2013 92895T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000491 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LAURA JOANN MAHAR A/K/A LAURA J. MAHAR, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 26, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000491 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LAURA JOANN MAHAR A/K/A LAURA J. MAHAR; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 17th day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 7, BLOCK 60, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 16 AND 17, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 327 PATTON STREET, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 27, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By:Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947. F11022058 March 28, April 4, 2013 Harbor Medical Center is closed. Dr Miniat will be working part time at Calhoun Liberty Hospital Clinic. Request for copy of the records to be sent/transferred to another office can be sent to 20370 NE Burns Ave Box 419 -Attention Calhoun Liberty Hospital Clinic-Blountstown Fl. 32424. Lost Small White DogLong hair male maltese mix about 10 pounds, a family member.lost in Carrabelle $500 Reward 850-294-9664 Text FL43940 to 56654 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time/ Full time Housekeeper Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C. HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESIs looking for Inspectors who are dependable employees with good customer service and teamwork skills. Must have reliable transportation. Great benefits for full time employees. Weekend work required Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 Carrabelle, 1 1/2 bedroom, Smaller home on 1+ acre. Huge double carport, 3 storage buildings. Fenced yard. Has one big room, smaller room for child or office/computer and sunken living room. Home could be configured several ways, Non smokers only, First, last and security. $475. 850-697-8790Text FL46033 to 56654 I-Pass, C-301 br 1 ba, w/encl patio. Nice views. $515 unfurn. w/W&D, furn upon req., Bkgr/credit check, Avail. 3/31/13. 850-358-8634 for appt.Text FL44852 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $675 Ford Taurus T otal Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $775 Chevy Blazer T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752002 Dodge Ram -X/Cab T otal Price $5,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $20002004 Ford F-150 4 Door -Crew Cab T otal Price $8,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Chevy Silverado 2003, 4WD, 33K miles w/ topper. $10K OBO. 850-227-4650 Text FL45579 to 56654 Pontiac Montana 2001, 6 passenger mini-van, one owner, well below market $2500 firm. 770-335-2754. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it!

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, March 28, 2013 Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD MLS 248540 $335,000 CarrabelleLocated on the pristine New River, this 3 BR / 2.5 BA 2,400 sqft riverfront paradise offers a private boat ramp, dock, lift, cleaning station. Has a private master suite, custom kitchen with lighted glass front cabinets and a large family room with Beth Barber850.528.4141 | 850.697.1010 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248941$589,000St. George IslandBAYFRONT WITH DOCKDirectly on the Apalachicola Bay, panoramic bay views, 5 BR, 4 BA, meticulously cared for, furnished, covered decks on all levels, elevator shaft as 3 owners closets, DEEP WATER dock with 2 boat slips, rock revetment, bayside POOL, storm shutters, Buck Str. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248156$110,000St. George IslandPLANTATION BAYFRONT LOT Sunset Views from this one acre bay front lot are spectacular! a cleared building site, at the end of Avocet Lane for privacy tennis, and air strip. MLS 248461 $414,000 This lovely custom designed country home in the prestigious Magnolia Bay gated community has many extras! Sunroom, screened & open porches, hot tub o MBR suite, large master tiled bath w/ open shower and garden tub, detached garage, gas replace, granite countertops, stainless kitchen, wine cooler, built-in corner cabinets, and lovely casual landscaping make this the perfect home for both entertaining and escaping from it all! Amenities include community dock, pool, tennis courts. Beautifully maintained by original owner on corner lot. Main living area & master on 1st oor w/guestrooms upstairs for privacy w/ private porch. Open concept living room. Shimmering Sands RealtySTEVE HARRIS866-927-4654 | Home: 850-927-4654 Cell: 850-890-1971 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guiness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is now a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes-County TimesAdvertiser. 1) Around one-third of all asthma cases in the U.S. are related to an allergy to what? Cigarette smoke, Perfume, Cats, Sulfa drugs 2) What John Wayne movie co-star was the 1st woman to run a U.S. airline? Maureen OHara, Vera Miles, Patricia Neal, Kim Darby 3) Sandra Bullock, Chevy Chase, and Bruce Willis are all former what? Pizza deliverers, Bartenders, Cigar smokers, Accountants 4) To whom did Helen Keller dedicate her autobiography? Alexander Graham Bell, Gandhi, Teddy Roosevelt, Jesus 5) Around the kitchen about half of us reuse what after the rst use? Paper towel, Aluminum foil, Zip lock bags, Wax paper 6) What was the name of the rst daily comic strip published in the U.S.? Mr. Mutt, Scruples, Katzenjammer Kids, Hobo 7) As paid in gold dust how much did Levi Strauss get for his rst pair of jeans in 1850? $6, $32, $65, $290 8) The U.S. Marines rst recruiting station was in a what? Church, Station wagon, Bar, Grocery store 9) On Wall Street whats a quarter-point change in a stocks price? Quirk, Quire, Quirt, Quack 10) Valentine was one of Shakespeares Two Gentlemen of Verona; who was the other? Leonato, Macduff, Tybalt, Proteus 11) What was Lindberghs average m.p.h. speed on his historic nonstop Atlantic ight in 1927? 45, 74, 89, 108 12) A premature infant is ve times more likely to be what? Blind, Mentally challenged, Left-handed, Blue-eyed 13) In an average lifetime a woman will consume how many pounds of lipstick? 6, 8, 10, 12 14) What does a labeorphilist ordinarily collect? Parking tickets, Cigar bands, Beer bottles, Car tags ANSWERS 1) Cats. 2) Maureen OHara. 3) Bartenders. 4) Alexander Graham Bell. 5) Aluminum foil. 6) Mr. Mutt. 7) $6. 8) Bar. 9) Quack. 10) Proteus. 11) 108. 12) Left-handed. 13) 6. 14) Beer bottles.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com FAITH from page A9Maundy Thursday services on Thursday, March 28 at 6 p.m. in the church. Reserve sacrament in of ce oratorio (prayer room), Thursday evening until noon Friday sign up in of ce The Good Friday Liturgy on March 29 will be at noon at Trinity, with Evening Prayer at 5:30 p.m. followed by Stations of the Cross at 6 p.m. Holy Saturday services on March 30 will include a work day on grounds beginning at 9 a.m., with prayers in the garden at 10 a.m. Easter Sunday on March 31 will begin with an Easter Sunrise Service at Lafayette Park at 6:30 a.m., with an Easter Service at the church at 10:30 a.m., followed by reception and Easter Egg hunt.Sheriffs Easter egg hunt SaturdayThe Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce and the Gulfside IGA will host the annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, March 30 at noon. The egg hunt will take place on the eld adjacent to the sheriffs of ce on US Highway 65 in Eastpoint. All kids are invited to come out and participate in a wonderful day of egg hunting, with lots of prizes to be given away. The sheriffs of ce will be grilling hotdogs for the occasion free of charge. Come out and enjoy the fun!Fellowship Baptist holds Easter sunrise serviceThe Fellowship Baptist Church will hold a Easter sunrise service on Sunday, March 31 at 7:30 a.m. at Riverside Park in downtown Apalachicola. It will be led by the Rev. Charles Scott. All are welcome to join us.Easter sunrise service in EastpointFranklin Countys annual Easter sunrise service on March 31 will begin at 7:30 a.m. at Marion Millender Park on Patton Drive in Eastpoint. Guest speaker will be Bro. Ronnie Like, from the Eastpoint Church of God. Everyone is invited. Bring your chair and enjoy the service. For more information, call Sheila Chambers at 850-899-3740.