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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 03-14-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00212
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Community leaders from throughout Franklin County congregated in Eastpoint on Monday to talk about what it will take to diversify the local economy while preserving whats best about it now. Billed as a Long-term Economic Diversi cation Summit, the all-day affair at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve featured a broad swath of viewpoints, from both east and west, from the schools to businesses to elected of cials, topped off with a keynote speech by Jesse Panuccio, executive director of the states Department of Economic Opportunity. The future of this region, and the state as a whole, lies in fostering diversi ed economic growth and ensuring we have the workforce pipeline to meet employer Museum preserves camps history By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com While tangible remnants of World War II become ever scarcer, Linda Minichiello, director of the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, vows that The people who trained here will not be forgotten. Minichiello, whose mission is to keep alive the memory of those who served in the Armys largest amphibious landing training facility during the war, said she believes Camp Gordon Johnston Days will continue even when the last veteran who trained there is gone. She hopes even as the last veterans grow too in rm to make the trip to Carrabelle, others will come forward to honor their memory, and she appears to be right. Although Saturdays parade was more abbreviated than in the past and some planned attractions failed to appear, a strong turnout took in the parade, with veterans of more recent Dog Island home a total loss in re By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A re on Dog Island destroyed a vacation home last week, but hard work by re ghters saved an adjacent dwelling. The house, at 802 Gulf Shore Drive, was the property of Frank Foley of Georgia. Deborah Jameson, a spokesman for the state re marshal, said investigation of the re is ongoing. She said the house, valued at about $250,000, was a total loss, and the cause of the blaze still unknown. Vinyl siding on an adjacent home received minor heat damage. No one was injured during the re ght. On the afternoon of March 6, travelers on U.S. 98 became aware of a large re on Dog Island. At Carrabelle Beach and along U.S. 98, curious onlookers watched as a thick column of black smoke rose above the barrier island. Lee Pravitz, a vacationing re ghter from Dover, Del., said ames were visible with the naked eye from the Ho Hum Trailer Park four miles east. Dick Foss, chief of the Dog Island Volunteer Fire Department, said the two-story vacation home on pilings at 802 Gulfshore Drive was the source of the ames and smoke. The house was located in what residents call the mountainous zone of Dog Island, where dunes rise up to 100 feet above sea level. Foss said he received a call at about 3:15 p.m. and went to the rehouse to retrieve a 400gallon tank truck. Dog Island re ghters also have a 1,000-gallon truck on hand. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County School District of cials have invalidated the writing exams of ve 10th-graders after allegations surfaced of possible teacher involvement in the annual standardized testing. After the parent of one of the ve students shared her concerns on Facebook and with of cials of the Florida Department of Education, the school district issued a formal statement March 6 on its Facebook page. In it, the district con rmed a problem had occurred with the sophomores who took the Feb. 27 Florida Writes exam. As with any standard assessment the role of security is imperative during PHOTOS BY JERRICA GRAY | Special to the Times This house at 802 Gulf Shore Drive was completely engulfed in ames 40 minutes after the rst smoke was noticed. A Forestry Service helicopter nally extinguished the ames. Summit stresses economic diversity Summit stresses economic diversity Apalachicola oysters are not just a menu item, they are a way of life for generations. I get that. And it should be celebrated. Jesse Panuccio executive director, Department of Economic Opportunity District investigates writing test allegations VACATION HOME DESTROYED IN FIRE Thursday, March 14, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 46 Opinion . . . A4 Society . . . A6 Faith . . . A7 Outdoors . . A8 Tide Chart . . A8 Sports . . . A9 Classi eds . A12-A13 Rib cook-off Saturday The 12th annual Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department Charity Rib Cook-off will be Saturday, March 16, at the Eastpoint rehouse. In addition to ribs, there will be a car show, silent auction, the Liars Contest, rides and face painting for the kids. Free admission. Gates open at 9 a.m. Barbecue dinners served from 11 a.m. till its all gone. A silent auction preview and open mic entertainment will be 5-7 p.m. Friday. For more information, contact George Pruett at 670-9000 or pru911@gtcom.net. Music at Dixie Theatre On Friday, experience house band the Sarah Mac Band from 8-10 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre. On Saturday, The Ned Devines will celebrate St. Patricks Day from 8-10 p.m. with the best Irish music on the Forgotten Coast. Tickets for each show is $25. For information, call 653-3200. Apalachicola Art Walk On March 23, artists will show, sell and demonstrate their talents from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown Apalachicola. A progressive wine tasting and hors doeuvres will be 3-5 p.m., and that evening, local chefs will prepare special dishes at their restaurants highlighting fresh local ingredients. At 8 p.m., the Dixie Theatre presents The Dixie Does Nashville, Apalachicolas annual singer-songwriter festival. For more information, call 653-9419 or visit www. apalachicolabay.org. Wanna go fast? On March 23, time trials will take place on an open runway at Carrabelles Thompson Field Airport, giving competitors a full half-mile of open-throttle acceleration. There will also be a live DJ spinning tracks as well as food vendors. Sixty cars will participate. Driver registration is closed. Admission for observers is $10. For information, call 585-5168 or visit www. wannagofast.com. See WRITING A2 See ECONOMIC A3 See CAMP A14 See FIRE A3 Seahawks in action, A9

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care? Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A local caf was badly damaged by an SUV last week. Carrabelle Junction remains open for business, but owner Ron Gembe would like to know who abandoned a white sport utility vehicle in his store on Wednesday night, March 6. Gembe said he was home in bed when he received a call from police at about 1 a.m. Thursday, informing him of the crash. He arrived at his business to nd the SUV lodged in his storefront. I have insurance, but that doesnt pay for the inconvenience, he said. Sweeping up glass at 2:30 in the morning is not my idea of fun. It was everywhere. I found it way back behind the counter. Police determined the SUV had been reported stolen. The driver abandoned it at the scene and apparently walked away from the collision. Gembe said investigating of cers discovered a fresh six-pack of beer in the car and hope it was purchased at one of the two convenience stores just south of the caf along U.S. 98. If so, they might be able to get a look at the culprit on a security tape, but some people speculate the SUV was headed south, rather than north, at the time of the accident because a metal pole north of the caf was also knocked askew. The good news is nobody was hurt, Gembe said. Im glad it happened at midnight instead of noon. He has made the best of a bad situation by decorating the temporary plywood wall of his shop with brightly colored signs bearing comic book style captions. But a quarter of Carrabelle Junctions dining room is still off limits until the wall and window can be replaced. A spokesman for the Carrabelle Police Department said no further information was available because the accident is still under investigation. Carrabelle Junction is on Tallahassee Street less than a block north of U.S. 98, across from the Carrabelle re station. Police would like to speak to anyone who saw the accident or who saw someone leaving the area on foot around midnight on Wednesday. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The left-hand window of Carrabelle Junction awaits repair. Police: Stolen car crashes into Carrabelle caf the testing periods. Unfortunately, a breach of security was reported, leading to invalidation of a few tests, the statement reads. The invalidation is the result of documented, unauthorized help or suggestions made during the test by the administrator of the test. The district takes this matter very seriously and is con dent that the issue has been appropriately resolved. On Thursday at the regular school board meeting, Superintendent Nina Marks said little, mostly con rming the matter was part of an open investigation. School board attorney Barbara Sanders told the board the superintendent is constrained whenever there are personnel issues. After the meeting, Marks conrmed the tests of ve sophomore students had been invalidated and that she believed those were all the students affected. She declined comment on the names of the teacher or teachers under investigation. According to the parent who has been public in discussing the matter on Facebook, the teacher walked up to my son and asked to see what he had written, then instructed him to correct misspelled words. To add an additional sentence and actually made a mark on his exam. (My son) wasnt aware that any wrong had been done until he was questioned by the of ce. Cheryl Etters, a spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Education, said the state is aware of the situation in Franklin County and our understanding is that theyre looking into it. Etters said, in general, if a students test has been compromised in any way, there is a potential for invalidation. The students test would not be scored. If they (school employees and/or students) were not a party to anything like that, there wouldnt be any reason to invalidate. The writing is given only to fourth-, eighthand 10th-graders during the spring testing window and does not carry the same weight as the math and reading tests that can in uence a teachers evaluation or a schools grade. The school districts statement on Facebook said the invalidated tests would not be scored or recorded and that the students will have the opportunity to take the writing test again next spring. Etters differed in part with that, noting that retakes are given in the fall for high school students who havent met the grade requirement by passing the reading and writing portions of the test. She said because the writing test is given only to sophomores, she did not believe retakes would be administered next spring to these particular students. We try to look at those things individually for each student. We want students to show us what they know, said Etters, noting that though the district and the state each have the authority to invalidate a test, the decision in this case was done by the district. The rules surrounding the administration of standardized tests are rigorous and explicitly warn against any possible compromising of test security. We provide teachers with a script to use, and theyre supposed to go through training, Etters said. According to state rules surrounding standardized assessment tests, it is a rst-degree misdemeanor for anyone to coach examinees during testing or alter or interfere with examinees responses in any way or to participate in, direct, aid, counsel, assist in, or encourage any of the acts prohibited in this section. In addition, the rules note that a violation can result in loss of teaching certi cation. The rules cite examples of prohibited activities, which include explaining or reading passages or test items for students as well as changing or otherwise interfering with student responses to test items and copying or reading student responses. According to these rules, the personally identi able information of any personnel of any school district or postsecondary educational institution, or any speci c allegations of misconduct obtained or reported pursuant to an investigation conducted by the Department of Education of a testing impropriety are con dential (until) the conclusion of the investigation or until such time as the investigation ceases to be active. The rules specify that an investigation is concluded upon a nding that no impropriety has occurred, upon the completion of any resulting investigation by a law enforcement agency or upon the referral of the matter to an employer who has the authority to take disciplinary action against an individual who is suspected of a testing impropriety. WRITING from page A1

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, March 14, 2013 needs, Panuccio said. It will not be easy. The people of this county are rightfully proud of their history as oystermen and shermen. Its a trade they know well and they do well. For years, Franklin County served Florida and the nation as a prime source of seafood. Apalachicola oysters are not just a menu item, they are a way of life for generations, he said. I get that. And it should be celebrated. Indeed, the rest of the nation could take a lesson from the families of Franklin County their pride, hard work and self-reliance. But my sense is that the families and communities of Franklin County are also ready to consider new ideas. You are eager to celebrate your past traditions and nd ways to sustain them, but you are also ready to invite new trades to town, to train for those trades, and to nd new traditions to pass down from generation to generation. Economic diversi cation doesnt happen overnight. Its a long process that can take many years. But by developing a countywide strategy, partners can begin to work with one another towards long-term goals that match the priorities of all the communities involved. I look forward to the day when we will gather here for a celebratory event, with a thriving Apalachicola Bay and Franklin County in a strong and diversi ed economic position, Panuccio said. The three-pronged objectives of the summit to develop ideas on how to keep and enhance existing industries, target new ones and develop the workforce began with a welcome from County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders, Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook and Carrabelle Commissioner Charlotte Schneider. Then, lead facilitator Heidi Stiller, who works with NOAAs Coastal Services Center, had all 80 or so people around the room introduce themselves and say what they most loved about the county. For some, it was the rural nature of the community and its independent people, and their multi-generational connectiveness. For others, it was the authentic sense of place and character, the wildlife or the environment. The room was lled with representatives of almost all the countys governmental bodies or organizations, as well as business people. The morning was spent hearing an overview of what has so far been done by DEO, rst by Kim Bodine, who leads the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, and later underscored by Panuccio in his keynote address. After praising Gov. Rick Scotts strategy for tackling economic problems statewide, Panuccio recounted the successes DEO has had in addressing the countys short-term needs in the wake of the troubles facing the oyster industry. A few regions of the state face special problems and are still hurting economically, he said. Franklin County is one of them. Franklin County has not only been hurt by the general economic downturn, but speci cally has seen an environmental disaster cause the collapse of its main industry. Panuccio said DEO staff has been, over the last few months, helping to respond to immediate hardships and needs through three resource fairs held in coordination with more than 20 partner agencies. He said these fairs had more than 1,200 people attending and more than 650 receiving emergency assistance including food, workforce programs and the processing of SNAP applications. Panuccio said, in conjunction with the local workforce board and the governors of ce, DEO had obtained a National Emergency Grant funding to support recovery efforts, including the hiring of up to 215 out-of-work oystermen in clean-up and restoration efforts. Currently there are 164 individuals working in temporary jobs, shelling the bay and assisting with debris removal, he said, also pointing out DEO had coordinated a food drive that resulted in thousands of pounds of food being delivered to Franklins Promise Coalition in October and November 2012. Panuccio said 138 families received help with heating and cooling costs through the states Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. He said the Franklin Works Program, coordinated by Bodine and the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, has helped more than 700 residents with temporary job placements, skills assessments and training for welding, law enforcement and commercial driving. They will also soon start a certi ed nursing program. Bodine said 11 individuals had completed classroom training in corrections, 17 had earned welding certi cations and eight were soon to enroll in training to earn a commercial drivers license. In a panel discussion on local perspectives, Alan Pierce, the countys director of administrative services, provided background on development projects during his more than two decades with the county. We realize as government leaders that we cant rely on housing to bring us out of the economic slump were in, because housing is at everywhere, he said. Were looking at small businesses. Ecotourism is clearly an opportunity. The other thing we see as an opportunity is the airport. The state of Florida promotes aerospace, and we have to two airports that are both underutilized. And we have an undeveloped industrial park, Pierce said. Carrabelle has hangars that are also vacant. But, he continued, aerospace is something that requires a trained labor force. We have an economic time warp on the skills needed to compete in todays marketplace. Its a different world than when I came here 25 years ago. If they are born and raised here, they may be missing some of those job skills. The labor force is a challenge. Apalachicola City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, lling in for Franklin County Seafood Workers Association President Shannon Harts eld, outlined areas of focus on preserving the seafood industry. They are so appreciative of the help they have been given so far, she said. The bay is not what is used to be; theyre very concerned. Shannon mentioned that they know the seafood industry is dwindling, they know its going away, she said. It could be a dying industry. We hope everyone joins them to get them over the hump. Theyre not always going to have grants coming in. She said opportunities for entrepreneurship have been discussed, but seafood workers are not the typical business person. It has to be something they enjoy, that theyre interested in. Theyre not interested in working a 9-to-5 job. FRIDAY MARCH 15TH SILENT AUCTION PREVIEW 5PM 7PM SATURDAY MARCH 16TH RIB COOKOFF GATES OPEN @ 9AM C EE B C C E EASTPOINT FIRE HOUSE L S L ARE YOU BEING SEEN? 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The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM Foss went straight to the scene, where he was joined by ve other island residents. Using the tank truck and a garden hose from a nearby house, they set to work to contain the ames. Foss said in the high wind, he knew there was little chance of saving the house. Four visitors to Dog Island helped with the reght. Jerrica Gray, Kery Wilson, Chase Green and Caitlin Manners, all of Blue Ridge, Ga., were visiting full-time island residents Hazel and Harley Bell when the re broke out. Gray said she and her friends ran to the re after the Bells received a telephone call warning them of the danger. She said when they rst arrived, two men were already on scene, and a little white smoke was visible leaking from a window on the top oor, but within 40 minutes, the entire structure was engulfed in ames despite Wilson and Green mounting the lower porch to wet down the exterior of the house. Strong winds accelerated combustion, but Gray said, The wind was really in our favor because it was blowing towards the Gulf, and so it blew the re away from the island and the other houses. If it had blown in the other direction, things might have been much worse. One time the wind shifted and whipped in from the west, and thats when the plants on the dunes all caught re. I thought we were in trouble then. At about the same time volunteers were rushing to the Dog Island re, Carrabelle Fire Chief Carl Whaley and a group of volunteers were responding to a wild re on Timber Island. Whaley said when the remen noticed the column of smoke on Dog Island, they thought they had been dispatched to the wrong location until they found a quarter-acre of grass burning near the Timber Island marina. Whaley said that re was started by sparks from a welding torch and rapidly spread because of windy conditions. After extinguishing the Timber Island blaze, Whaley and several Carrabelle re ghters got a ride to Dog Island with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cers and joined in ghting the house re, which by then involved about a tenth of an acre of woods. Whaley said the house had collapsed by the time he arrived. He complimented the Dog Island re ghters on containing the blaze in the high wind. FWC brought re ghting equipment to the Timber Island boat ramp, but it was not used. Working together, the volunteers from Dog Island and Carrabelle managed to contain the ames. Foss said after the rest of the house collapsed, the pilings remained standing, engulfed in an inferno. The re ghters poured water on them, but the extreme heat made work at close quarters dif cult. Eventually, re ghters were able to approach the pilings and cut them down with a chainsaw. About 4:30 p.m., a helicopter belonging to the Florida Forestry Service arrived on the scene carrying a re llable bucket and dumped 15 to 20 loads of water from the Gulf onto the blaze, nally extinguishing it. Foss said his crew continued to mop up smoldering remnants of the re until after 6:30 p.m. He said a representative of the state re marshals of ce visited the remains of the house at about 7 p.m. ECONOMIC from page A1 FIRE from page A1

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Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR Special to the Times Floridas charter school students continue to outperform traditional public school students, according to a report from the Florida Department of Education. The report shows students who attend charter schools exceed their traditional public school counterparts in math, science, and reading on state assessments. Required by state law, the report, Student Achievement in Floridas Charter Schools: A Comparison of the Performance of Charter School Students with Traditional Public School Students, is a statewide analysis of student achievement in charter schools versus comparable students in traditional public schools. We can all agree that great schools are the key to strong communities, said Florida Commissioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. Thats why its so encouraging to see Floridas commitment to highquality charter schools paying off. Thank you to our educators for their hard work to better prepare Floridas students. The data contained in the report is derived from student performance on the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test and Algebra end-of-course exams from the 2011-12 school year, based on more than three million test scores. The report makes 177 comparisons covering three measurements: pro ciency, achievement gaps, and learning gains. Each of these measurement areas are broken down further to offer a more detailed view of student achievement. The FCAT pro ciency section of the report contains 63 separate comparisons of student achievement using both overall rates of pro ciency by grade groupings and comparisons of subgroup performance. In 55 of the 63 comparisons, charter school students outperformed traditional public school students, with one tie. The achievement gap section contains data to analyze the gap between white students and African-American students, and white students and Hispanic students, in reading, math, and science. The achievement gap was smaller for charter school students in all 18 comparisons. The learning gains section of the report includes 96 comparisons of learning gains made by charter school students and traditional public school students. Charter school students had higher average learning gains in 83 of the 96 comparisons. Charter schools are independent public schools with the autonomy and exibility to provide expanded-learning opportunities to meet students individual educational needs. Charter schools are overseen by a governing board while being held accountable to state standards for academic performance and nancial solvency. During the 2011-12 school year, 518 charter schools operated throughout the state in 43 school districts and at two state universities. Charter schools served more than 183,000 students during the year, more than 7 percent of Floridas total public school population. For more information about Floridas charter schools and other educational options, visit www. oridaschoolchoice.org USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 14, 2013 A Page 4 Section State report: Charter schools performing better than traditional Special to the Times Apalachicola Riverkeeper, in coordination with the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR), is developing a management plan for the new Franklin County Public Library site in Eastpoint. The project is funded in part by the Northwest Florida Water Management District. The Riverkeeper and ANERR are working closely with the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library to establish the optimum management plan for the site. The project includes developing onsite environmental educational opportunities, including a trail. In December 2012, Apalachicola Riverkeeper worked with Ian Barlow, a contract restoration specialist in low impact land management, to evaluate the sites long-term vegetation management plan and initiate the rst phase of site preparation to reduce underbrush and thin trees. Work on the site by Apalachicola Riverkeeper and ANERR is slated to resume in mid-March. We plan to continue fuel reduction of underbrush and thinning of some trees in order to enhance the wetland and optimize the natural communitys habitat function, said Dan Tonsmeire, the Riverkeepers executive director. We also plan to clear a 15-foot buffer along the property boundaries adjacent to the library site to allow management of vegetation and for re prevention purposes. Bene ts of fuel reduction and thinning include prevention of wildres and reduction of re hazards to homeowners. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection issued an exemption permit for this activity in April 2012 to the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library. Thurman Roddenberry & Associates Surveyors completed the site survey and marked the property boundaries. When the library is nished, it will offer the community not only an expanded, modern space for collections and programs, but educational nature walks over the protected wetlands. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is a 1200-plus member non-pro t organization dedicated to the protection and stewardship of the Apalachicola River and Bay. For more information call 653-8936. Library planning continues By GRANT SMITH Special to the Times The makeup of the electric grid of the future is at stake as the fossil fuel industry continues to falsely lessen the impact of renewable energy. So its no wonder that the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) and the Solar Energy Industries Associations have recently rescinded their membership in the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC has mounted a relentless attack on renewable energy standards in states across the country in an effort to repeal or weaken them to the point of being irrelevant. ALECs mechanism is essentially a boilerplate report that uses bogus analysis to question the cost and economic impact of renewable energy standards. Indeed, its ndings have nothing whatsoever to do with reality and should be rejected. These aws are highlighted in a recent report prepared by Synapse Energy Economics (a Cambridge, Mass.-based consulting rm) for the Civil Society Institute (a Newton, Mass.-based non-partisan think tank) called NotSo-Smart ALEC: Inside the Attacks on Renewable Energy. ALEC uses wind energy costs two to four times higher than actual wind power contract prices. It also makes inaccurate claims that wind and solar resources (variable resources) are so unpredictable they cant be relied upon. Yet renewable sources of power accounted for 55 percent of generation capacity additions in 2012 and grid operators are honing skills and technology in integrating renewables into the grid. This January, all capacity additions were renewable. There were no coal, natural gas or nuclear power plants coming on line in the last month. ALEC also predicts excessively high electric demand growth in the future, in an effort to tie high electric rates to renewables, while the Department Of Energys Energy Information Administration predicts less than 1 percent growth in electric demand. As far as market manipulation goes, coal and nuclear advocates are the pros. No new coal or nuclear plant can be contemplated without shifting a large portion of construction risk to ratepayers and taxpayers. This is typically accomplished by getting construction work in progress passed by state legislators. For example, Kansas does not have such a mechanism for long-term construction projects, but one can only imagine that construction work in progress (CWIP) will rear its ugly head to force construction of an 895-megawatt supercritical coal plant. Wind and solar developers do not have that luxury. But for soon-to-bedefunct stimulus package grants, these developers have to build their projects prior to any tax subsidies kicking in. Construction work in progress allows utility companies with captive ratepayers to recover the nancing costs plus return on those costs during construction. They need this mechanism to leverage private loans (debt) despite having captive ratepayers. Typically, electric utilities are regulated state franchised monopolies. They are wards of the state. Regulators are a substitute for the market and directed by statute to re ect market conditions and ensure ratepayers are receiving least cost service. Surely, a mix of energy ef ciency and renewable investments would be much less nancially risky than building a super-critical coal plant. For example, the last attempt in Illinois to build a super-critical coal plant resulted in $2 billion in cost overruns. Something you will never experience with energy ef ciency, onshore wind or solar PV (photovoltaic) investments. Moreover, AWEA announced a few months ago that its members could forego the production tax credit in six years with a gradual reduction in the credit over that time. Some analysts predict solar PV reaching grid parity (the retail rate of electricity) in California in 2015 and most of the rest of the country in 2017. On the contrary, new coal and nuclear plants will always need to be heavily subsidized by ratepayers and taxpayers to have a chance at being built, mostly due to rising costs. Meanwhile storage technologies are coming on line and, in conjunction with primarily existing exible natural gas plants, will be able to accommodate much greater penetration of renewable resources. In fact, the National Renewable Energy Lab conducted a study last year where it concluded that the grid could reach 80 percent renewables by 2050 while maintaining grid reliability. Renewable power is being attacked not because it has failed or is too expensive, but because it works and has become a threat nancially to fossil fuel and nuclear interests. Grant Smith is a senior energy policy analyst to the Civil Society Institute and former executive director of the Citizens Action Coalition of Indiana, where he worked for 29 years. Why fossil fuel, nuclear interests trash renewable energy impact GRANT SMITH THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK @A palachTimes FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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ADVERTISING DEADLINE RESERVE SPACE THURSDAYS AD COPY FRIDAY Local The Times | A5 Thursday, March 14, 2013 Arrest REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. MARCH 6 Louise Huffman, 55, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) MARCH 8 Rashed O. Brown, 30, Port St. Joe, Bay County violation of probation (FCSO) MARCH 9 Charles R. Dean, 47, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) MARCH 10 Charles L. Fasbenner, 43, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Cathrine V. Thompson, 28, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Ben Turrell III, 35, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) MARCH 11 Michael R. Holland, 53, Apalachicola, resisting of cer without violence (FWC) Rhine W. Abas, 31, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Brandis E. Paul, 32, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) News BRIEFS Enjoy FCAT Family Night Tuesday The Franklin County School will host a FCAT Family Night for grades 3-12 at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, including family activities, dinner, and prize giveaways. Learn basics of photography Learn the secret of taking photos of moving objects, using tripods, manual modes, apertures, shutter speeds, night photography and more. The XCE0063 course, taught by professional photographer Bonnie Jones, an adjunct instructor at Gulf Coast State College, will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 25 in Room C-103 at the GulfFranklin Center. Fee is $21. For more info, call 227-9670. Child Find pre-K screenings April 11 Franklin County Schools and the Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resources System/Panhandle Area Educational Consortium will co-sponsor a free Child Find Pre-K Screening on April 11. Each child will be screened in learning, speech, social, vision and hearing for the purpose of identifying children with disabilities. Children ages 3-4 who are suspected to have a disability and are not enrolled in Headstart or public school are eligible to participate. Parent or guardians must call 866-277-6616 to schedule an appointment. Gulf Coast holds scholarship auditions The Visual & Performing Arts Division of Gulf Coast State College will hold theater scholarship auditions for the 2013-14 academic year on April 3. Anyone is welcome to audition, but students need to have a minimum GPA of 2.5. Applicants should come prepared with the following materials, depending on the performing arts track in which they have an interest: For acting: Two contrasting monologues not to exceed three minutes. For musical theater: One monologue and 16 bars of a song, along with sheet music or an accompaniment track without vocals. For directing/stage management/design: Their portfolio, resume and a sample of work if available. Applicants will sit for a technical interview as well. Auditions will be 4-6 p.m. April 3 in the Theatre Lab, room 152 of the Amelia G. Tapper Center for the Arts. To help prepare for the auditions, students may also attend a workshop from 2-4 p.m. Monday, March 18, in the Theatre Lab. For more information, contact Jason Hedden at jhedden@gulfcoast.edu or 769-1551 ext. 2889. See BRIEFS A10

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 OF THE WEEK PET Franklin County Humane Society DESPINA! Darling DESPINA! Despina is a 6 month old long haired Calico. She is an absolutely beautiful kitten with a sweet, playful disposition. She is being show-cased at the Funky Fiddler in Apalachicola so the next time youre in town, drop in to see this little beauty. You may be lucky enough to adopt her for yourself this St Patricks Day! VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Apalachicola Bay Charter School Open Enrollment For the 2013-2014 School Year March 18-29, 2013 Kindergarten Round-up (March 22, 2013 Call for a scheduled time) ABC Elementary School for Grades Pre K 5 ABC Middle School for Grades 6 8 Florida High Performing School of Choice A Grade Status Low student/teacher ratio Family environment with caring teachers Highly qualied certied teachers Dierentiated instruction used to meet the needs of all students Free breakfast and lunch program Challenging curriculum Intensive remediation for reading and math Elementary and middle school computer labs Free after school programs Permanent remodeled facility with separate middle school LIMITED ENROLLMENT Enrollment packet: Call, come by or visit our website Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone) www.abceagles.org 653-1857 (fax) abcschool@abceagles.org A Call To All Vendors: Exposure for Your Business Become a main ingredient for local consumers as a featured sponsor of the Taste of Home Cooking School: $ Buy your tickets now at The News Herald and at newsherald.com Buffkin completes Army basic training Special to the Times Army Pvt. Chance D. Buffkin has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, ri e marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches and eld training exercises. Buffkin is the son of Sonja Braswell, of S.E. Third St., Carrabelle. He is also the son of Glenn Buffkin and nephew of Elaine Laszlo, both of Carrabelle. He is a 2012 graduate of Franklin County High School. Lily Massey born Big sister Madison would like to announce the birth of her sister, Lily Ann Massey, born Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Lily Ann, daughter of CJ and Preston Massey of Crawfordville, weighed 8 pounds, 2 ounces. Grandparents are Angel Page and Bevin Miller of Eastpoint and Rod and Nita Massey of Carrabelle. Joshua Allen born Joshua Luke Allen was born on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. At birth, he weighed 8 pounds, 5 ounces. This happy little boy was 20 inches long. He is the son of Michael and Lena Allen and the brother of Bailey Nicole Allen of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Bob and Edda Allen of Eastpoint, and maternal grandparents are Nick and Maggie Hutchison of Carrabelle. Joshua is the great-grandson of Lena and Charlie Ellis of Carrabelle. He is the nephew of Michelle Huber and the cousin of Skye and Bianca Huber. Aubrey Davis born Aubrey Zoann Davis was born Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at 9:14 a.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 8 pounds, 11 ounces. She is the daughter of Ellis and Crystal Davis of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Betsy Gandy of West Palm Beach and Martin Gandy of Albany, Ala. Paternal grandparents are Hope Davis of Apalachicola and Martin Davis of Apalachicola. Happy birthday, Auntie Mrs. Pearlie Bunyon Perry celebrated her big day on Wednesday, March 13. Happy B-day. Auntie, Love always, Donate and Kyera and family Society PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Segree family lled the Eastpoint rehouse Saturday with their annual reunion, organized by Inez Segree and a host of helpers. Topping off the lavish buffet was music, both country and gospel. Above, clockwise from left, Willard Vinson, George Creamer, Gad Segree and Alonna Segree, seated in front. At left from left are Pastor Ronald Luke, from the Eastpoint Church of God, Miles Creamer and Ronnie Segree. Not pictured is Billy Granger. SEGREES PLAY AT ANNUAL REUNION Births Birthday Congratulations

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The Times | A7 Thursday, March 14, 2013 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 DAVI D AD LERSTEIN | The Times More than 300 Auburn University students, shown above serving food at Monday afternoons picnic at Sylvester Williams Park in Apalachicola, arrived Saturday for a weeklong mission trip to Gulf and Franklin counties on their spring break. Trace Hamiter, who ministers to the students at the First Baptist Church of Opelika, Ala., said after coming to Port St. Joe for the past six years, the students were making their rst trip to Apalachicola. They are staying on Cape San Blas. We are showing the love of Jesus in practical ways, by serving people with their houses, mowing lawns, walking around ministering to the kids, Hamiter said. We have quite a few big projects: replacing roofs, a lot of painting, a lot of yard work, wheelchair ramps. Holy smoke, what a great time we had at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion last Friday! The place was SRO. There was everything on the buffet table but escargot. Yum, yum. Tony and the Not Quite Ready Band provided the music. Thanks to those who came and enjoyed, and to those who provided the buffet. Looking forward to next year. I am sure the breakfast at Curfew Lodge, the parade and the dinner-dance was also well-supported. You can enjoy your monthly sugar fix at the Lanark Village Boat Club, this Saturday, March 16, from 9 until 11 a.m. Hope to see you there. Sunday, March 17, is our monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to share, a donation and green is the color of the day, St. Patricks Day. Be watching for you! Friday, March 22, will nd us at Chillas Hall for a spaghetti dinner. You can get your plates loaded for a $6 donation. Serving is from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Come and get it! Saturday, March 23, is our annual village clean-up day. Well meet at Gene Sewell Park between 8 and 8:30 a.m. Please join us. I just know we will have a great buffet and a real good time tonight, March 14, at the annual Lanark Village Golf Club banquet. We will meet at the Crooked River Grill for social hour at 5:30 p.m., and we will enjoy the food and the program at 6:30 p.m. Mark your calendars for Saturday, March 30. Thats the day we will have Spring Fling Dance. Greg K. and Krew will be on hand to play for your dancing and listening pleasure. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. More on this later. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and remember, to get a grip, tie a knot and hold on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry.Sheriffs Ofce, IGA Easter egg hunt March 30 The Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce and the Gulfside IGA announce the annual Easter Egg Hunt will be at noon March 30 on the eld adjacent to the sheriffs ofce on U.S. 65 in Eastpoint. All kids are invited to come out and participate in a wonderful day of egg hunting, with lots of prizes to be given away. The sheriffs ofce will be grilling hot dogs for the occasion free of charge. Come out and enjoy the fun. Fellowship Churchs revival runs through Friday The members of Fellowship Church of Praise will continue their 2013 Prophetic Revival nightly to Friday, March 15. Services start at 7 p.m. at 177 Ave. G in Apalachicola. Evangelist for the revival will be Prophetess Vernette Rosier of Fellowship Church of Praise in Panama City, an anointed woman and gifted in the spiritual prophetic realm. Please come out and help us lift up the name of Jesus and hear the Word of the Lord through the Prophetess. We hope to see you there. God bless you.Live Easter production on Good Friday Please come and join us, for one night only, for a live Easter production. With the theme This is the night something happened, the production will be staged on Good Friday, March 29, at 6 p.m. at New Life Church, on 16th Street in Apalachicola. Celebrate the life of the risen Christ and experience the love, peace and joy knowing Him brings. Sponsored by Hillside Dancers for Christ, and community wide of Apalachicola. For more information call Teresa Ann Martin and Barbara McNair.Relay for Life rescheduled to June 1 Because of conicts with the high school prom and JBG Rockfest, the annual Relay for Life has been moved to Saturday, June 1, beginning at noon, and running until Sunday, June 2 at 6 a.m. This years theme is carnival for a cure. The relay, to raise funds for the American Cancer Society, will be at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola. Merissa Beasley is this years honorary chair. There will be games, food, free samples and more. Make sure you mark it in your calendar and come out and walk to support those who are ghting cancer and those who have lost their battle with cancer. There is still time to register a new team, sponsorship or help with committee. For more info, call Chala at 370-0832 or Kyla at 348-6268.Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recovery Under the leadership of Ms. Rose Grifn, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Flowers family The kind generosity of good friends like you has been a great help to us during this very difcult time. Our family would like to offer our most sincere thanks for the owers, food, cards and gifts that everyone has sent in memory of Annie Mae Flowers. Thank you so much for your love and support. May God bless each and every one of you. Thank you, Bruford Flowers and family Bobbie Jean Watson was born in Madison to Idel Piercy and Gerald Rodgers. Jean passed away at the age of 73 on Saturday, March 9, 2013, surrounded by her family. Jean was a longtime resident of Apalachicola for 50 years. She owned Apalachee River Garden and Nursery in Apalachicola for 15 years. She then was known to many children in the community as Nanny for many more years. She is survived by her husband, William Curtis Watson Sr.; daughter Glenda Jean Martina; grandchildren, Mitchell Martina, Jennifer Brown, Wayne Watson, and Glenda Jean Martina; greatgrandchildren Alyssa and Clayton Martina, Brayden and Bryson Brown, Caden Haynes, Conner Martina, and Lucas Watson; brother Thomas Rodgers and Danny Talbert; and sister Peggy Garrett. She was preceded in death by her mother Idel Piercy; father Gerald Rodgers; son William Curtis Buddy Watson Jr.; brothers Richard and Robert Rodgers. Memorial service was held at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13 at the First Baptist Church in Eastpoint. T.J. Beggs Funeral Home handled all arrangements. Bobbie Jean Watson Terrell Danner Adamick was born June 14, 1949, and passed away in his home on St. George Island on Saturday, March 9, 2013. He was a peace-loving artist and musician/ songwriter, a Viking sort of guy with a love of nature and a giving heart. He will be missed by his brother John (Beth) Adamick; nieces Hillarey (Joe) Breedlove, Monica (Will) McKinney, and Star Squires; nephew Aaron (Beth) Adamick; his partner-in-life Lori Craig; and hundreds of great friends scattered over many states. Terry was raised in Atlanta and Germany. He attended the Atlanta Art Institute and went to work in the art department of Ted Turner Network upon graduating. He also spent years as a carpenter and was instrumental in helping to restore Atlantas Oakland Cemetery following a tornado. Terrys artwork ran the gamut from serious portraits to whimsical pet dreams. On St. George Island, he will be remembered for painting the Yacht Clubs luau cut-outs, his participation in Mr. Easter Bunny pageants, his Animals A to Z childrens book and St. George Island Coloring Book, the new librarys rst sign, his St. George Island map, original Christmas cards and nature photography. His Atlanta friends will treasure the many years he lived at The Farm. Terry, also known as Captain Banana, loved many things including old Westerns, playing guitar and singing in several notquite-prime-time bands, dressing up in costume, tie-dye and The Who. A memorial with music is planned for later this spring. A fundraiser to cover funeral home, medical and associated expenses will be held on Sunday, March 17, from 3 to 6 p.m. at Eddy Teachs Raw Bar on St. George Island. Other donations can be dropped off at The Garden Shop in Apalachicola, or dropped off or mailed to Lori Craig at 1000 W. Pine St. on St. George Island.T erry Adamick TERRY ADAMICK Obituaries Enjoy St. Patricks Day at covered dish lunch LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS TIGERS ON SPRING BREAK MISSION TRIP Card of THANKS Faith

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Special to The Times The most popular happening on St. Vincent Island is being held this month. The annual Open House on St. Vincent Island will take place from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Friday, March 22. This is your chance to experience the beauty of St. Vincent Island and learn more about what goes on at the wildlife refuge and other nearby natural areas. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided by the refuge barge. Visitors may only sign up for themselves. The barge will pick up visitors at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service barge dock located a short distance northeast of the Indian Pass boat ramp. This year there will be a limit of 250 visitors on the island for this event. There will be guided walks and tours, educational presentations, and guided wagon tours. Visitors can sign up for the wagon tour and other guided events when they reach the island (visitors may only sign up for themselves) or they can explore the island on their own. Some of the guided activities include birding walks, beach walks, photography safaris, and hiking tours. In the outdoor amphitheater created by placing folding chairs under one of the islands huge live oaks there will be several educational presentations, on the history of St. Vincent Island, whooping cranes, and more. The Supporters of St. Vincent Island will be providing hot dogs and drinks at a booth right beside an all-day live musical performance by John Miick and Cletus Heaps. There will be informational booths set up by the St. Marks Refuge, St. Marks Photo Club, Panama City Fish and Wildlife, Riverkeepers, St. George Lighthouse Association, UF Marine Turtle Research Group, and the St. Vincent Supporters. Suzanne Marshall and Brooks Jones will be our visiting on-site artists. Come prepared to enjoy the day on St. Vincent Island wear your walking shoes and a smile. Volunteers will be at the boat ramp to guide you to the barge that will take you to the island. Turtle nesting season will be here soon and you can help support the turtle program on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) by participating in the Adopt-a-Nest program. For a small fee of $25 you will be able to name the turtle whose nest you adopt and you will receive an adoption certificate, photo of adopted nest, activity/hatchling report and recognition in Supporters newsletter. Proceeds from nest adoptions help offset refuge costs for the turtle monitoring program. These costs include fuel for the survey vehicles and materials to construct cages to protect nests from predators. Turtle adoptions make a wonderful gift for people of any age who care about turtles and wildlife preservation. With so many turtles choosing to nest on St. Vincent Island last year we are hoping for another active year. That means we will certainly need an increase in turtle adoptions. To adopt a nest or learn more about the program, email us at supportstvin@hotmail. com or leave a message at 850-229-7635 and thank you for your support! There are only two more monthly island tours before the summer heat and bugs arrive. All tours are on the second Wednesday of each month April 10 and May 8. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web @ www. stvincentfriends.com Seats are filled on a firstcome, first-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive bring everything you need, including drinking water and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit www. stvincentfriends.com for more information and volunteer opportunities. YOUR SPRING BREAK HEADQUARTER S LIVE BAIT FISHING S UPP L IES BEACH S UPP L IES Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) Monday Sunday: 7:00 AM 6:00 PM EST By FRANK SARGEANT C ontributing writer Cliff Pace just brought home 500 grand from the Bassmaster Classic last month in Tulsa, Okla. The pros very often beat top local anglers in their travels to lakes across the nation; in fact, only one angler has ever won the Classic when it was held in his home state. The reason, said frequent winner Kevin Van Dam, is simple enough: In a threeor four-day tournament with a lot of good anglers on the water, the spots the local guys depend on to win for them get beaten up pretty bad. The spots that win are new spots found by the traveling anglers who rely on a lot of research to put them on the sh. Van Dams tactics are made to order for bass shing in areas such as the Apalachicola River and Lake Talquin, but theyre also right on target when it comes to nding reds, trout, ounder and other saltwater species in Panhandle waters. Because many prime inshore areas are both clear and shallow, Googles satellite view can give you an amazing amount of info that might be big news to local anglers who are not taking advantage of the technology. In a Google Earth yover you can see the bottom on much of St. Andrew Sound, East Bay, West Bay, North Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Sound, St. Joseph Sound and other areas, and also check out every tidal creek, oyster bar, grass bed, submerged channel and pothole even the occasional sunken boat, great secret spots for sheepshead. Print out a view of spots that look promising, then check out your Navionics app on PC, iPad or iPhone and you can get a marine chart view complete with GPS numbers, mark your spots and then transfer them to the GPS on your bay boat. Pay particular attention to areas where there are deep holes at the mouths of creeks, cuts through oyster bars, points created by grass ats, shallow humps created by channel dredge spoil anything that might create a feeding, resting or traveling area for game sh. Its far easier to locate these potential spots while sitting at your computer screen than it is out there on the water. Now youre ready to head for the ramp and ground-truth all those likely looking spots youve located via digital research. Of course, time and tide have much to do with success on coastal waters. Flats edges, grass ats, oyster bars and docks are likely to be most productive on rising water. Cuts through the outside bar, potholes, sloughs and creek mouths are likely to be better on falling water. Tactics from the world championship of bass angling CLASSIC TIPS St. Vincent Island annual open house March 22 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Mar. 14 62 45 0 % Fri, Mar. 15 66 52 0 % Sat, Mar. 16 70 57 0 % Sun, Mar. 17 72 60 10 % Mon, Mar. 18 71 59 10 % Tues, Mar. 19 73 55 20 % Wed, Mar. 20 71 58 0 % 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 21 Th 203pm 1.2 1130pm 1.2 703am 0.1 650pm 0.9 22 Fr 239pm 1.2 757am 0.1 756pm 0.8 23 Sa 1253am 1.2 306pm 1.2 842am 0.1 846pm 0.7 24 Su 205am 1.3 328pm 1.3 920am 0.2 928pm 0.5 25 Mo 307am 1.3 347pm 1.3 954am 0.3 1006pm 0.3 26 Tu 403am 1.4 405pm 1.4 1025am 0.4 1042pm 0.2 27 We 457am 1.4 425pm 1.4 1054am 0.5 1118pm 0.0 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 21 Th 203pm 1.2 1130pm 1.2 703am 0.1 650pm 0.9 22 Fr 239pm 1.2 757am 0.1 756pm 0.8 23 Sa 1253am 1.2 306pm 1.2 842am 0.1 846pm 0.7 24 Su 205am 1.3 328pm 1.3 920am 0.2 928pm 0.5 25 Mo 307am 1.3 347pm 1.3 954am 0.3 1006pm 0.3 26 Tu 403am 1.4 405pm 1.4 1025am 0.4 1042pm 0.2 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, March 14, 2013 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore As a result of the flooding, most inshore species such as trout, redfish and flounder have been washed out of the I.C.W. in our area and have returned to the bay. Great redfish and trout reports from the basin of the George Tapper Bridge and near the old mill site have been the talk of the town this week. Most of the flood waters have moved on out in our areas, leaving us with muddy water and displaced fish. Good catfish and bream reports are starting to come back in Howard Creek and Depot Creek. No reports from Lake Wimico yet this week. BIRDS-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FOR THE OPEN HOUSE 9 a.m. Music John Miick & Cletus Heaps 9:30 a.m. Wagon Tour David Francisco & Denise Williams Coastal Photo Walk Debbie Hooper 9:45 a.m. Hiking Tour Jeff Strickland Beach Walk Brad Smith 10 a.m. Talk Whooping Cranes & St. Marks 10:15 a.m. Birds of St. Vincent Walk Barry Kinzie 10:30 a.m. Music John Miick & Cletus Heaps 11 a.m. Photographic Safari St. Marks Photo Club Wagon Tour John Inzetta & Gloria Austin History Talk Jan Pietrzyk 11:45 a.m. Hiking Tour Jeff Strickland Noon Music John Miick & Cletus Heaps Nature Talk Kim Wren ANERR Beach Walk Trish Petrie 12:15 p.m. Wagon Tour Dave Francisco & Shelley Stiaes 1 p.m. Photographic Safari St. Marks Photo Club 1:15 p.m. Hiking Tour Jeff Strickland Birds of St. Vincent Walk Barry Kinzie 1:30 p.m. Wagon Tour Landy Luther & Pete Burgher Beach Walk Brad Smith LAWRENCE TAYLOR | Special to The News Herald Gold spinners equipped with soft plastic shad tails are a favorite for exploring waters where redfish prowl.

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Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Lady Seahawks senior shortstop Morgan Mock has been hitting at a .350 clip of late for the team. She managed to break up a no-hitter March 1 against Liberty County, and on Tuesday got a hit and scored against Godby. She hit the ball hard and played good defense, said coach Lisa Sweatt. Shes my leado batter, and shes always a leader on the eld and in the classroom. Shes always positive. Congratulations, Morgan! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly Sta Times of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At: 106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-4121 Renee Parrish, D.M.D ACCEP T ING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICE S FOR CHILDREN: E arly H ead Start / H ead Start All services for our children are free with no cost to the parent. **Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).** Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions Dixie Youth hosts baseball camp this weekend The Apalachicola Dixie Youth League will host a Lanier Baseball Camp this Saturday and Sunday, March 16 and 17. All Franklin County players, ages 5-13, are invited to take part. Cost is $25 for the two-day camp, with lunch included. The camp will also feature a free coaches clinic. The camp will begin Saturday, with coaches on the elds at 9 a.m., and the Kids Camp from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Sunday, coaches and kids will participate from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The camp will teach the latest techniques in baseball to better prepare youths for high school baseball and college scholarships. We look forward to a fantastic weekend of learning & fun! For more information check out the Apalachicola Dixie Baseball Softball Facebook page. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High Schools baseball and softball teams have hit a rough patch, with each sustaining a series of losses as they head into the closing stretch of the regular season. The Seahawk baseball team, under the direction of coach Mike Emerson, endured three away losses this month, beginning with a 16-8 loss to the John Paul II Panthers in a March 4 game. On March 5 at Wewahitchka, the team fell 12-7 to the Gators. While the Seahawks had 12 hits to Wewas 13, and one error to Wewas three, the Gators scored four in the bottom of the rst, and never relinquished their lead. Franklin County scored four in the top of the fth, to trail 8-4. The Seahawks notched three in the top of the sixth, to trail 10-7, but two Gator runs in the bottom of that inning sealed the game. On March 8, the Seahawks fell 10-0 to South Walton, managing only a single hit. The Lady Seahawks, under coach Lisa Sweatt, have also had a dif cult month, opening with a March 1 loss 16-0 to Liberty County. Six errors doomed the Lady Seahawks, who managed only a single hit by senior Morgan Mock. On March 5, the team fell 20-6 at Port St. Joe, with Maddie Newell knocking two of the teams six hits. On March 8 at South Walton, the Lady Seahawks fell 2-0, despite the fact senior Chena Segree hurled a one-hitter and struck out seven. Franklin County had ve hits, but committed four errors. Summer Medley went two-for-three at the plate, with Anna Lee, Ally Millender and Segree also getting hits. On Tuesday night, the team committed seven errors and fell 12-2, at home to Godby, with Morgan Mock and Medley managing the teams two hits. We hit the ball well but we hit it straight to people, said Sweatt. And they hit the ball where we werent standing. The coach praised Sophia and Allie Kirvin for their stepping up to play varsity, especially since injuries and illness have plagued the team. Sophia Kirvin started the teams lone rally in the bottom of the sixth by running out an in eld single. Mock and Medley then singled, and two runs came in that inning. Pitcher Krista Martina took the mound Tuesday, despite recovering from an appendectomy, and Segree has been recuperating from a sprained wrist. Segree pitched ve innings and struck out four to take the loss. March comes in like lion for Seahawk teams CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 14, 2013 A Page 9 Section Seahawks fell 10-0 to South standing. Photos by PHIL COALE | Special to the Times Senior Chase Golden in action against Godby. A Godby runner slides into Maddie Newell at second. Seahawk second baseman Logan McLeod prepares to eld. A Godby runner slides into Maddie Newell at second. Seahawk second baseman Logan McLeod prepares to eld. Morgan Mock takes a swing against Godby.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 Flood insurance discount received At their Feb. 19 meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce provided the board with copy of FEMA letter verifying Franklin County property owners are receiving a 15 percent discount on ood insurance premiums. This discount already has been applied to current premiums by the National Flood Insurance Program. Five DOT landscape grants approved The Department of Transportation has notied the county that it has reserved funds for ve landscaping grants, each at $10,000, if the county wants to participate. The sites must be within the U.S. 98 right of way and should have access to irrigation. The county commission rst discussed these projects more than six months ago, and now funds have become available: The sites chosen are U.S. 98 and Heffernan Drive in Lanark Village; Carrabelle Beach Wayside Park; U.S. 98 and Patton Drive in Eastpoint; the base of the bridge in Apalachicola; and Lombardi Park at Two Mile west of Apalachicola. The county will be required to maintain whatever is planted. County Planner Alan Pierce said the county doesnt need to seek bids for the landscape installation and materials. He said because the funds are limited, commissioners may wish to seek volunteer help with site design. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said she would begin planning for the Patton Drive site immediately. Final SHIP funds to be distributed On March 5, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners $60,000 in reserve State Housing Initiatives Partnership funds must be encumbered by June 30 or they will revert to the state. He said County SHIP Director Lori Switzer had a waiting list for emergency repairs, but she needed board authorization to spend the money. By the SHIP guidelines, the money must be spent on houses, not mobile homes. Commissioners voted unanimously to instruct Switzer to spend equal portions of the money in each county district. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said, I dont want to pick (the recipients), but I would like to see it equally distributed. Pierce said this is the last SHIP funding unless the legislature votes to dedicate more funding to the program. Pamphlets to be added at P.C. Airport On Tuesday, March 5, county commissioners voted unanimously to increase payment to the Panama City Airport from $580 to $700 monthly, to create enough space to allowing promotional pamphlets to be included in a display promoting county tourism. The display is maintained by the Tourist Development Council. The change amends the remaining seven years and three months of a 10-year contract. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the TDC discontinued a similar display at the Tallahassee airport but maintains display at welcome centers around the state. Commissioner Pinki Jackel, who represents the county commission on the TDC, said the cost of the display was modest compared to larger regional airports. 2 county leases approved At their regular March 5 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve two leases for county buildings. One was the proposed aircraft hanger lease with TP Transport. TP Transport initially asked the county to construct a new hangar but will now occupy the existing aircraft maintenance hangar southeast of the xed-base operator instead of a new hangar. Because the existing hanger has no ofce area, the county may construct an ofce, subject to the availability of grant funds. The second is a renewed lease for the current Supervisor of Elections ofce on Avenue F. Under a recommendation from the county attorney, the county reserves the right to terminate the lease upon six months notice to the landlord and will only be responsible for minor repairs, such as the plumbing and HVAC, dened as any repair less than $250 for parts and labor. NOTICE OF ZO N I N G C HA N GE The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt the following by ordinance: An Ordinance Rezoning the following parcel of land in Franklin County: A N OR DIN A N C E R EZ O NING A 20 FOOT P ARC EL B E T WEEN L OT S 12 & 13, B L OC K Z, UNI T 1, L A N AR K B E AC H A ND A LL OF L OT 13, B L OC K Z, UNI T 1, L A N AR K B E AC H, L A N AR K, FRA NKLIN CO UN T Y, F L OR ID A FRO M C -4 CO M ME RC I A L MIXED USE TO C -3 CO MME RC I A L R E CR E AT I O N. A public hearing on the proposed changes to the Z oning M aps series will be held on Tuesday, M arch 19, 2013 at 10:15 a.m., in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. M ore information can be obtained and the proposed change may be inspected at the Franklin County P lanning D epartment, 34 Forbes S treet, S uite 1, Apalachicola, Florida, Telephone (850) 653-9783. P ersons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 M arket S treet, S uite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. P ersons who wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evi dence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based. 2089830 3031166 MARCH 15-17, 2013 | PANAMA CITY MARINA Admission $8.00 BUY ONLINE SAVE $1.00 KIDS 12 AND UNDER AND PARKING FREE BOATS! BEER! ENTERTAINMENT! -Over 50 Vendor Booths including electronics, art and accessories 12-60 Vessels on Display SHOW FEATURES TO INCLUDE: Paul Bedard from Animal Planets Gator Boys Seminars: Cruising the Gulfcoast, Florida Keys and the Bahamas by Capt Chris Caldwell Hourly Prize Giveaways BRIEFS from page A5 THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK @A palachTimesFO LL OW US ON T WI TT E R

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, March 14, 2013 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services CALL TODAY! 653-8868 Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center Apalachicola Bay Charter School KINDERG A RTEN R OUNDUP M A R C H 22, 2013 P lease bring your child along with their Birth Certificate, Social Security Card, and I mmunization R ecords Call or come by for a registration form and to schedule an appointment for Friday, March 22 to meet teachers, visit classrooms and have your child screened. Open Enrollment continues through March 29th. After this date (if classes are full) students will be placed on a waiting list. PLEASE CONTACT OUR SCHOOL EVEN IF YOU HAVE MISSED THESE DEADLINES. The ABC School is a family learning community working as a team to provide a brighter future for our children. Florida High Performing School of Choice A Grade Status Low Student to Teacher ratio Well designed and functional campus Individualized educational program 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone) www.abceagles.org 653-1857 (fax) abcschool@abceagles.org Accountant We are pleased to announce an association of our oces to expand tax, accounting, auditing, and consulting services in Carrabelle and eastern Franklin County. With oce locations in Carrabelle, Apalachicola and Port St. Joe, this association is strategically positioned to oer convenient services to individual, business, non-prot and governmental clients along the Forgotten Coast. Tax, Business Accounting and Consulting, QuickBooks Support, Auditing Non-Prot accounting, Governmental Services Apalachicola Oce 219 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 850-653-1090 Carrabelle Oce 108 SE Avenue B Carrabelle, FL 850-697-2542 CALL: 850-670-3500 -or850-933-2171 Heavy Construction Site Work Excavation Asphalt Paving Brick Pavers Concrete Fill Dirt Gravel & Sand Mulch Sod Landscape Stone Patio Stone JASON WHITE CONSTRU C TION BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Linda Heavner Gerald had a picture in her mind she could not shake. The Cape San Blas resident had a recurring vision of a woman, walking down a street among older houses in Beaufort, South Carolina. There was a man on a balcony waving to her and the vision in Geralds head was gone. Only to reappear again and again. So, the retired nurse decided to sit down and map out the details surrounding her vision and that became her rst published book, Beaufort Betrayal. That was roughly 18 months ago and since then Gerald has found a calling cranking out two more mysteries and a childrens book, all published and being sold throughout the world, she said. I am the most unlikely person to write a book, Gerald said with a laugh last week. I feel my faith just set me up for this at this time. And here I am; I have my next book in my mind. I have had four books in a year and they are doing well. It is really amazing, this whole thing. Gerald has been published by Public America. The company assumes all expenses, pays no upfront costs and makes their books available to all booksellers. Gerald is among featured authors on Amazon.com. The publishing company, Gerald said, serves a launching pad for authors and is excellent at marketing its authors and their works. Gerald said that once she sat down with pen and pad a traditionalist, she also types with a typewriter the words, the sentences seem to take care of themselves. She does not plot or outline her books before beginning the task of writing, she said. The books, and the plots, just spill out. I feel like I am vessel in this, Gerald said. I have so many books in my mind, it is dif cult sorting them out. I am going to write what I feel. I feel like I work by divine intervention. The book just writes itself. It is different at the end that it was at the beginning. I love it. I sit and do it. Gerald said she writes pretty much every day, almost nonstop until the current work she is slaving over is nished. She has had such periods of artistic inspiration before. While living in the Bahamas she took up painting, though she knew little about brushwork or canvas before picking up a brush and paint. Painting was the same thing as the writing, Gerald said. I started painting and it was day and night; I must have painted 200 paintings and some those paintings sold well. A stint as president of the Friends of the St. Joseph Peninsula State Park provided added spark. That gave me a little condence, getting out and meeting people and being part of that organization, Gerald said. That really helped. So, with four books behind her, including a mystery set in Rosemary Beach in Walton County, Gerald is moving on the next tome which will surely come as easy as the rst four. Everything that has happened has been good, Gerald said. And then she was off, to her home and her pen and pad. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Among her rst four books, Port St. Joe resident Linda Gerald penned a childrens book. Linda Heavner Gerald has penned three mysteries and one childrens book published in the past year. Words spilling out for local author BOOK SIGNINGS Linda Heavner Gerald will have two upcoming book signings. The rst will be 1-3 p.m. Saturday, March 16 at Downtown Books in Apalachicola; the second will be 1-3 p.m. ET March 30 at No Name Books on Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe. $500 REWARD TO FIND TOBY A small dog is missing in Carrabelle. Toby has a great home and is loved by his owner and friends who visit. He is a therapy dog and visits a nursing home where he goes and sits on laps. He was lost near the recycling bins at the municipal center on Gray Avenue. He was seen Friday evening running near U.S. 98 close to Millenders. Saturday morning he was seen in the parking lot of the Carrabelle Dollar General. Toby is 3 years old, very cute and loving. He weighs 9 pounds, is all white except for a gray streak down the back over the shoulders. He was lost with a black collar and a name plate. Due to a medical condition, he may try to avoid being picked up because it is painful to him. Any information will be appreciated. There is a $500 reward for his return. Call (850) 294-9664 if you can help. LINDA HEAVNER GERALD

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 90404T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-000037-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking Corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance corporation, as Receiver for Apalachicola State Bank, a division of Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. CAROL J. WILSON and THE BANK OF JACKSON COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on April 25, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: A parcel of land 100 feet by 142 feet, in the NW of fractional Section 11, Township 9 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida, and further described as follows: from an iron pipe stake marking the intersection of the South boundary of the 50 foot State Highway No. 10, with the West boundary (air port fence offset 10 feet West) of the E of said NW run due South 700 feet, then East along the North boundary of a 66 foot street, 900 feet to a point for beginning; run thence North 142 feet; thence East 100 feet; thence South 142 feet; thence West, along said street, 100 feet to the point of beginning. This Notice dated this 27th day of February, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 14, 21, 2013 90382T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-11-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF CYNTHIA ANN GREEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CYNTHIA ANN GREEN, deceased, whose date of death was December 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 7, 2013. APRIL JOANN LOUDERMILK Personal Representative 3501 W. Orange, Lot 20, Tallahassee, FL 32310 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 7, 14, 2013 90406T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2012-CA-000184 ONEWEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. DAVID POTEETE; KATHY POTEETE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated February 25, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.: 19-2012-CA-000184, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and DAVID POTEETE; KATHY POTEETE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. MARCIA M. JOHNSON, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, on the 25th day of April, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment to wit: LOT 14, DEER RUN ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 40, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 134 CRAIG ST, CARRABELLE, FL 32322. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 26, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Phone: (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 14, 21, 2013 92545T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000488 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. UTA HARDY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 29, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000488 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and UTA HARDY; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF UTA HARDY N/K/A KEITH HARDY; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, and TENANT #4 are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at inside FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 8 AND 9, BLOCK 68, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-OF, RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 127 9TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 30, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850577-4401 Fax: 850487-7947. F10066366 March 7, 14, 2013 92547T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000462 RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000462 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, is Plaintiff, and MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, 2nd Floor Lobby of THE COURTHOUSE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of MAY, 2013, the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 41 OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF TRACT 41, A DISTANCE OF 107.73 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 136.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO, 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES, 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 449.20 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 102.87 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 439.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21st day of February, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days, if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 7, 14, 2013 92613T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-161-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER A/K/A WILLIAM P. KINSER, U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage dated February 25, 2013, in Case No. 12-161-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER A/K/A WILLIAM P. KINSER and U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on April 3, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage and more particularly described as follows: Lot 19, Block C of ST. JAMES ISLAND PARK UNIT NO. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: February 27, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 14, 21, 2013 92695T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ Emergency Management Contractual Services The Franklin County Emergency Management will receive sealed qualification documents at the Emergency Management Office at 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 until Friday, March 22, 2013 at 2:00 PM. Qualifications received will be publicly opened on Tuesday, April 02, 2013 at Franklin County Board of County Commissioner meeting for the following: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Any qualifications received after Friday, March 22, 2013 at 2:00 PM, will be retained at the Emergency Management Office. Emergency Management reserves the right to reject any and all documents received, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the RFQ in the best interest of Franklin County. The Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate because of race. creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact Emergency Management at 850-653-8977. Any questions concerning the RFQ specifications should be directed to Pamela Brownell. Five sets of qualification documents must be submitted and labeled on the outside of the envelope as “SEALED RFQ EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES” March 14, 21, 2013 92681T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000273 SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MAUREEN C. PROCTOR, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000273 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 3rd day of April, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 22, BLOCK 86 OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 16 & 17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk March 14, 21, 2013 OtherFranklin County S.H.I.P. ProgramThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on March 11, 2013 for the Down Payment Assistance, Owner Occupied Rehabilitation and Emergency Repair programs. The deadline for submitting applications will be April 10, 2013. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. At this time there are limited funds available for these programs. *Adopt*:Athletic, Creative, Loving Lawyer & Doctor yearn to be doting Dad & At Home Mom. Expenses Paid *Ben & Amy* FLBar42311 1800-522-0045 Lost Small White DogLong hair male maltese mix about 10 pounds, a family member.lost in Carrabelle $500 Reward 850-294-9664 Text FL43940 to 56654 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl Mar 16th & 17th 8a-5p. Concealed Weapons Classes. (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission: $6Text FL40762 to 56654 Apalachicola Used Book Storeis looking to buy limited number, good condition Apalachicola Cook Books For more information Call 850-570-4204

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 14, 2013 The Times | A13 13 Gulf Coast Residential & Commercial Lots RowellAuctions.comA MarkNet Alliance Member € GAL AU-C002594 € 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Complete Details Visit RowellAuctions.com Tuesday, March 26th at 2:00 p.m. Online Bidding Available2884 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Waterfront 3 BR/2 BA Home w/Dock 3149 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Gulf View 3 BR/2 BA Home 3153 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Nice Gulf View Lot 2390 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 0.8 Acres Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 1 Acre Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL 9,576 SF Comm. Bldg. U.S. Hwy. 98 E Nice Gulf View Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL (2) Comm. Bldgs. 202 NE 7th St., Carrabelle 6,400 SF Metal Bldg. NE 7th Street, Carrabelle Commercial Lot 3157 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 2 BR/2 BA Home & 1BR/1 BA Cottage 57 Seventh St, Apalachicola, FL Triplex, (3) 1 BR/1 BA Units Auction Site: St. James Bay Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Ln, Carrabelle, FLOpen House: Sunday, March 17th 2-5 p.m. RENTALS2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED ................$550 3 BR / 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDOW/ POOL .....................................$8503 BR / 2 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL AND 10X15 STORAGE UNIT.....$9503 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOLNIGHTLY / $150 | WEEKLY / $8503 BR / 2 UNFURNISHED TRAILOR ......$500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT. / 2 LOTS, HWY 98 FRONTAGE.........$650 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516UPWARD BOUND GRANT PROJECT COORDINATOR(Federally funded) To manage all aspects of the Upward Bound project & supervise and lead Upward Bound Grant sta & resources. Requires MS in guidance & counseling or related eld + 3 yrs. exp. as a teacher, counselor or administrator; and supervisor exp. & experience working with educationally/ economically disadvantaged youth. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Apply by 3/20/13. Only those who provide GCSC Application (must be completed); transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr.Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com.Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY:Digital Sales Manager ABOUT THE JOBThis Digital Sales Manager candidate will work with a group of 5-6 reps as a digital asset. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Assist the current Account Executive team grow, maintain and solicit account revenue.  Develop a book of business.  Ability to go on four legged calls  Develop, present and implement interactive marketing proposals for advertisers that include market research, website data and long term online advertising solutions.  Recommend new and enhanced products and marketing strategies.  Cultivate and maintain a mutually bene cial working rapport with an account base.  Find solutions to account challenges, including marketing needs, site location, and product development and promotion implementations.  Provide key information to senior management including sales recaps, customer feedback, and industry trends.  Negotiate, implement and monitor interactive revenue contracts.REQUIREMENTS/QUALIFICATIONS:Strong understanding of internet advertising and website functionality. Candidate should have proven track record in growing revenue with accounts. Strong leadership capabilities. Excellent negotiating and problem solving skills. Excellent written, oral and presentation skills. Must have strong knowledge of appropriate computer software including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Great benefits for full time employees. Weekend work requiredFT Maintenance TechnicianGeneral maintenance experience, good driving historyFT Inspectors & PT InspectorsMust have reliable transportation. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route DriverAverage 10 stops. Home base -Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID# 34244687Text FL44687 to 56654 Medical/HealthCNABrightStar Care of Bay County (#299993930) is seeking a CNA to work in the Gulf and Franklin County areas, PRN part-time 6-12 hours per week. Must have CNA certificate, TB test, Level 2, safe driving record, and be drug free. Non smoker. Call 850 238 3270 to get instructions for applying. Web ID#: 34242876 Text FL42876 to 56654 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 1/1 Carrabelle, private 1 acre1 bdrm, 1 bath, older home, closed in porch could be used for child/teen bdrm. Newly painted. Fenced yard Non-smokers only, 1st, last & security. $500 mo., 850-697-8790 C-30 near I-Pass1 br 1 ba, w/encl patio. Nice views. $515 unfurn. w/W&D, furn upon req., Bkgr/credit check, Avail. 3/31/13. 850-899-0261 for appt.Text FL44852 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $795‘02 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $1375‘02 Ford F-150 4 Door Crew Cab T otal Price $8,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! That’s where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! 747-5020 Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 wars both marching and waving from the sidelines. Camp Gordon Johnston Museum President Tony Minichiello said he thought this years celebration was a success. Carrabelle sponsored the Silver Wings Band from Fort Rucker, Ala. There was a scattering of county constitutional of cers and elected of cials, as well as the Shriners. The pageant included Nazi re-enactors, Sons of the Confederacy and a scale model of the battleship Wisconsin. The Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion Post 82 and the Marine Corps League of Tallahassee all turned out in force. The Lone Star Quilters looked toasty in a oat covered with red, white and blue coverlets. Carrabelle Beach RV Resort made a strong showing. Military vehicles, classic cars and horses added to the spectacle, and once again, the Warriors Watch honor guard bikers from Panama City stood at attention along the parades nal block. This year, eight World War II veterans, all designated as grand marshals, were able to make the trip to Camp Gordon Johnston Days. The oldest, Glenn Jeffries, 99, of Knoxville, Tenn., was attending his rst camp reunion. He was one of the four surviving alumni of the camp who attended. Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer is another; he drove with Grand Marshall Don MacLean, himself a veteran and a volunteer and contributor to the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. World War II veterans Mary Britz, Ken Tucker, Jim Moore, Buddy Scala, Bob Dietz and Arthur Minichiello also were honored. Britz of Lanark Village said her memories of military service a lifetime ago are still fresh. She served as an Army nurse caring for soldiers recently returned from the Paci c theatre. Sitting in the bright sunshine along the parade route, she said, I just cant get by it. When somebody dies in your arms and you make them all these promises you never keep, you cant forget it. I still cant talk about it. There will be changes in the reunions agenda in years to come. The city did not provide a free luncheon this year, although a benefit fish fry at the citys pavilion for medical expenses for Merissa Beasley provided plenty of tasty eats. Tony Minichiello said this will be the last year for the Saturday evening dinner dance because of reduced attendance. The kinds of things in the parade may change, Linda Minichiello said. Its already been changing. Its getting harder to get people to bring vintage equipment to Carrabelle for 45 minutes, but Camp Gordon Johnston will be remembered. Because she spends as much time thinking about the countys past as its future, her perspective is a little different. People come to the museum and ask me, Where was the camp? and I tell them it was the whole county, she said. Because it was a camp and not a fort, it existed just for the duration of the war, but Camp Gordon Johnston will not go the way of other installations across the state. The camp itself and the people who trained there will not be forgotten, whether theyre there or they are not there. Because of the museum, people will remember there was a military installation during the war that covered almost the whole county. The whole county paid a signi cant part in the outcome of World War II. Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast MLS 246105 $375,000 Eastpoint Gorgeous, custom home in a private setting surrounded by the National Forest. Country estate living at its best in this large, 5 bedroom home with every bell & whistle. There is a graceful front porch and the screened back porch is overlooking the in-ground, salt water pool, privacy fence & outside shower. Kathy Frink 850-899-5104 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248832 $329,000 St. George Island GULF VIEW HOME Well maintained 3rd tier home with Gulf views and convenient beach access, professionally remodeled and renovated in 2005, 3 BR, 2 BA, furnished, screened porch, plans available for an elevator, circular driveway, listed by Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248831 $159,000 Eastpoint COMM./RES. (ZONED C-4) DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times ABOVE: The Silver Wings Band from Fort Rucker, Ala. RIGHT: Gary Hunnings rides his horse Jacky in the parade. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Don MacLean, a grand marshal of the parade, left, rode with Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer, who trained at Camp Gordon Johnston in 1942. See more photos at www.apalachtimes.com LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Vietnam veteran Tom Tittle was part of the Warriors Watch honor guard from Panama City that stood attention along the parade route. CAMP from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Elden Durand of Port St. Joe brought his customized 1975 Sears and Roebuck garden tractor to Camp Gordon Johnston Days. Twelve years ago, he rigged the tractor with an oil eld engine circa 1954. Buzzing along at about 4 miles per hour, the hybrid uses about a gallon of gas a day. BELOW: The parade featured classic vehicles of all types, including some that predated World War II. CONNIE HUNNINGS | Special to The Times



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Community leaders from throughout Franklin County congregated in Eastpoint on Monday to talk about what it will take to diversify the local economy while preserving whats best about it now. Billed as a Long-term Economic Diversi cation Summit, the all-day affair at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve featured a broad swath of viewpoints, from both east and west, from the schools to businesses to elected of cials, topped off with a keynote speech by Jesse Panuccio, executive director of the states Department of Economic Opportunity. The future of this region, and the state as a whole, lies in fostering diversi ed economic growth and ensuring we have the workforce pipeline to meet employer Museum preserves camps historyBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com While tangible remnants of World War II become ever scarcer, Linda Minichiello, director of the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum, vows that The people who trained here will not be forgotten. Minichiello, whose mission is to keep alive the memory of those who served in the Armys largest amphibious landing training facility during the war, said she believes Camp Gordon Johnston Days will continue even when the last veteran who trained there is gone. She hopes even as the last veterans grow too in rm to make the trip to Carrabelle, others will come forward to honor their memory, and she appears to be right. Although Saturdays parade was more abbreviated than in the past and some planned attractions failed to appear, a strong turnout took in the parade, with veterans of more recent Dog Island home a total loss in reBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A re on Dog Island destroyed a vacation home last week, but hard work by re ghters saved an adjacent dwelling. The house, at 802 Gulf Shore Drive, was the property of Frank Foley of Georgia. Deborah Jameson, a spokesman for the state re marshal, said investigation of the re is ongoing. She said the house, valued at about $250,000, was a total loss, and the cause of the blaze still unknown. Vinyl siding on an adjacent home received minor heat damage. No one was injured during the re ght. On the afternoon of March 6, travelers on U.S. 98 became aware of a large re on Dog Island. At Carrabelle Beach and along U.S. 98, curious onlookers watched as a thick column of black smoke rose above the barrier island. Lee Pravitz, a vacationing re ghter from Dover, Del., said ames were visible with the naked eye from the Ho Hum Trailer Park four miles east. Dick Foss, chief of the Dog Island Volunteer Fire Department, said the two-story vacation home on pilings at 802 Gulfshore Drive was the source of the ames and smoke. The house was located in what residents call the mountainous zone of Dog Island, where dunes rise up to 100 feet above sea level. Foss said he received a call at about 3:15 p.m. and went to the rehouse to retrieve a 400gallon tank truck. Dog Island re ghters also have a 1,000-gallon truck on hand.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County School District of cials have invalidated the writing exams of ve 10th-graders after allegations surfaced of possible teacher involvement in the annual standardized testing. After the parent of one of the ve students shared her concerns on Facebook and with of cials of the Florida Department of Education, the school district issued a formal statement March 6 on its Facebook page. In it, the district con rmed a problem had occurred with the sophomores who took the Feb. 27 Florida Writes exam. As with any standard assessment the role of security is imperative during PHOTOS BY JERRICA GRAY | Special to the TimesThis house at 802 Gulf Shore Drive was completely engulfed in ames 40 minutes after the rst smoke was noticed. A Forestry Service helicopter nally extinguished the ames.Summit stresses economic diversity Summit stresses economic diversity Apalachicola oysters are not just a menu item, they are a way of life for generations. I get that. And it should be celebrated. Jesse Panuccio executive director, Department of Economic Opportunity District investigates writing test allegationsVACATION HOME DESTROYED IN FIREThursday, March 14, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 46Opinion . . . A4 Society . . . A6 Faith . . . A7 Outdoors . . A8 Tide Chart . . A8 Sports . . . A9 Classi eds . A12-A13Rib cook-off SaturdayThe 12th annual Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department Charity Rib Cook-off will be Saturday, March 16, at the Eastpoint rehouse. In addition to ribs, there will be a car show, silent auction, the Liars Contest, rides and face painting for the kids. Free admission. Gates open at 9 a.m. Barbecue dinners served from 11 a.m. till its all gone. A silent auction preview and open mic entertainment will be 5-7 p.m. Friday. For more information, contact George Pruett at 670-9000 or pru911@gtcom.net.Music at Dixie TheatreOn Friday, experience house band the Sarah Mac Band from 8-10 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre. On Saturday, The Ned Devines will celebrate St. Patricks Day from 8-10 p.m. with the best Irish music on the Forgotten Coast. Tickets for each show is $25. For information, call 653-3200.Apalachicola Art WalkOn March 23, artists will show, sell and demonstrate their talents from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown Apalachicola. A progressive wine tasting and hors doeuvres will be 3-5 p.m., and that evening, local chefs will prepare special dishes at their restaurants highlighting fresh local ingredients. At 8 p.m., the Dixie Theatre presents The Dixie Does Nashville, Apalachicolas annual singer-songwriter festival. For more information, call 653-9419 or visit www. apalachicolabay.org.Wanna go fast?On March 23, time trials will take place on an open runway at Carrabelles Thompson Field Airport, giving competitors a full half-mile of open-throttle acceleration. There will also be a live DJ spinning tracks as well as food vendors. Sixty cars will participate. Driver registration is closed. Admission for observers is $10. For information, call 585-5168 or visit www. wannagofast.com.See WRITING A2 See ECONOMIC A3 See CAMP A14 See FIRE A3 Seahawks in action, A9

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care?Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A local caf was badly damaged by an SUV last week. Carrabelle Junction remains open for business, but owner Ron Gembe would like to know who abandoned a white sport utility vehicle in his store on Wednesday night, March 6. Gembe said he was home in bed when he received a call from police at about 1 a.m. Thursday, informing him of the crash. He arrived at his business to nd the SUV lodged in his storefront. I have insurance, but that doesnt pay for the inconvenience, he said. Sweeping up glass at 2:30 in the morning is not my idea of fun. It was everywhere. I found it way back behind the counter. Police determined the SUV had been reported stolen. The driver abandoned it at the scene and apparently walked away from the collision. Gembe said investigating of cers discovered a fresh six-pack of beer in the car and hope it was purchased at one of the two convenience stores just south of the caf along U.S. 98. If so, they might be able to get a look at the culprit on a security tape, but some people speculate the SUV was headed south, rather than north, at the time of the accident because a metal pole north of the caf was also knocked askew. The good news is nobody was hurt, Gembe said. Im glad it happened at midnight instead of noon. He has made the best of a bad situation by decorating the temporary plywood wall of his shop with brightly colored signs bearing comic book style captions. But a quarter of Carrabelle Junctions dining room is still off limits until the wall and window can be replaced. A spokesman for the Carrabelle Police Department said no further information was available because the accident is still under investigation. Carrabelle Junction is on Tallahassee Street less than a block north of U.S. 98, across from the Carrabelle re station. Police would like to speak to anyone who saw the accident or who saw someone leaving the area on foot around midnight on Wednesday. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe left-hand window of Carrabelle Junction awaits repair.Police: Stolen car crashes into Carrabelle caf the testing periods. Unfortunately, a breach of security was reported, leading to invalidation of a few tests, the statement reads. The invalidation is the result of documented, unauthorized help or suggestions made during the test by the administrator of the test. The district takes this matter very seriously and is con dent that the issue has been appropriately resolved. On Thursday at the regular school board meeting, Superintendent Nina Marks said little, mostly con rming the matter was part of an open investigation. School board attorney Barbara Sanders told the board the superintendent is constrained whenever there are personnel issues. After the meeting, Marks conrmed the tests of ve sophomore students had been invalidated and that she believed those were all the students affected. She declined comment on the names of the teacher or teachers under investigation. According to the parent who has been public in discussing the matter on Facebook, the teacher walked up to my son and asked to see what he had written, then instructed him to correct misspelled words. To add an additional sentence and actually made a mark on his exam. (My son) wasnt aware that any wrong had been done until he was questioned by the of ce. Cheryl Etters, a spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Education, said the state is aware of the situation in Franklin County and our understanding is that theyre looking into it. Etters said, in general, if a students test has been compromised in any way, there is a potential for invalidation. The students test would not be scored. If they (school employees and/or students) were not a party to anything like that, there wouldnt be any reason to invalidate. The writing is given only to fourth-, eighthand 10th-graders during the spring testing window and does not carry the same weight as the math and reading tests that can in uence a teachers evaluation or a schools grade. The school districts statement on Facebook said the invalidated tests would not be scored or recorded and that the students will have the opportunity to take the writing test again next spring. Etters differed in part with that, noting that retakes are given in the fall for high school students who havent met the grade requirement by passing the reading and writing portions of the test. She said because the writing test is given only to sophomores, she did not believe retakes would be administered next spring to these particular students. We try to look at those things individually for each student. We want students to show us what they know, said Etters, noting that though the district and the state each have the authority to invalidate a test, the decision in this case was done by the district. The rules surrounding the administration of standardized tests are rigorous and explicitly warn against any possible compromising of test security. We provide teachers with a script to use, and theyre supposed to go through training, Etters said. According to state rules surrounding standardized assessment tests, it is a rst-degree misdemeanor for anyone to coach examinees during testing or alter or interfere with examinees responses in any way or to participate in, direct, aid, counsel, assist in, or encourage any of the acts prohibited in this section. In addition, the rules note that a violation can result in loss of teaching certi cation. The rules cite examples of prohibited activities, which include explaining or reading passages or test items for students as well as changing or otherwise interfering with student responses to test items and copying or reading student responses. According to these rules, the personally identi able information of any personnel of any school district or postsecondary educational institution, or any speci c allegations of misconduct obtained or reported pursuant to an investigation conducted by the Department of Education of a testing impropriety are con dential (until) the conclusion of the investigation or until such time as the investigation ceases to be active. The rules specify that an investigation is concluded upon a nding that no impropriety has occurred, upon the completion of any resulting investigation by a law enforcement agency or upon the referral of the matter to an employer who has the authority to take disciplinary action against an individual who is suspected of a testing impropriety. WRITING from page A1

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, March 14, 2013 needs, Panuccio said. It will not be easy. The people of this county are rightfully proud of their history as oystermen and shermen. Its a trade they know well and they do well. For years, Franklin County served Florida and the nation as a prime source of seafood. Apalachicola oysters are not just a menu item, they are a way of life for generations, he said. I get that. And it should be celebrated. Indeed, the rest of the nation could take a lesson from the families of Franklin County their pride, hard work and self-reliance. But my sense is that the families and communities of Franklin County are also ready to consider new ideas. You are eager to celebrate your past traditions and nd ways to sustain them, but you are also ready to invite new trades to town, to train for those trades, and to nd new traditions to pass down from generation to generation. Economic diversi cation doesnt happen overnight. Its a long process that can take many years. But by developing a countywide strategy, partners can begin to work with one another towards long-term goals that match the priorities of all the communities involved. I look forward to the day when we will gather here for a celebratory event, with a thriving Apalachicola Bay and Franklin County in a strong and diversi ed economic position, Panuccio said. The three-pronged objectives of the summit to develop ideas on how to keep and enhance existing industries, target new ones and develop the workforce began with a welcome from County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders, Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook and Carrabelle Commissioner Charlotte Schneider. Then, lead facilitator Heidi Stiller, who works with NOAAs Coastal Services Center, had all 80 or so people around the room introduce themselves and say what they most loved about the county. For some, it was the rural nature of the community and its independent people, and their multi-generational connectiveness. For others, it was the authentic sense of place and character, the wildlife or the environment. The room was lled with representatives of almost all the countys governmental bodies or organizations, as well as business people. The morning was spent hearing an overview of what has so far been done by DEO, rst by Kim Bodine, who leads the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, and later underscored by Panuccio in his keynote address. After praising Gov. Rick Scotts strategy for tackling economic problems statewide, Panuccio recounted the successes DEO has had in addressing the countys short-term needs in the wake of the troubles facing the oyster industry. A few regions of the state face special problems and are still hurting economically, he said. Franklin County is one of them. Franklin County has not only been hurt by the general economic downturn, but speci cally has seen an environmental disaster cause the collapse of its main industry. Panuccio said DEO staff has been, over the last few months, helping to respond to immediate hardships and needs through three resource fairs held in coordination with more than 20 partner agencies. He said these fairs had more than 1,200 people attending and more than 650 receiving emergency assistance including food, workforce programs and the processing of SNAP applications. Panuccio said, in conjunction with the local workforce board and the governors of ce, DEO had obtained a National Emergency Grant funding to support recovery efforts, including the hiring of up to 215 out-of-work oystermen in clean-up and restoration efforts. Currently there are 164 individuals working in temporary jobs, shelling the bay and assisting with debris removal, he said, also pointing out DEO had coordinated a food drive that resulted in thousands of pounds of food being delivered to Franklins Promise Coalition in October and November 2012. Panuccio said 138 families received help with heating and cooling costs through the states Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. He said the Franklin Works Program, coordinated by Bodine and the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, has helped more than 700 residents with temporary job placements, skills assessments and training for welding, law enforcement and commercial driving. They will also soon start a certi ed nursing program. Bodine said 11 individuals had completed classroom training in corrections, 17 had earned welding certi cations and eight were soon to enroll in training to earn a commercial drivers license. In a panel discussion on local perspectives, Alan Pierce, the countys director of administrative services, provided background on development projects during his more than two decades with the county. We realize as government leaders that we cant rely on housing to bring us out of the economic slump were in, because housing is at everywhere, he said. Were looking at small businesses. Ecotourism is clearly an opportunity. The other thing we see as an opportunity is the airport. The state of Florida promotes aerospace, and we have to two airports that are both underutilized. And we have an undeveloped industrial park, Pierce said. Carrabelle has hangars that are also vacant. But, he continued, aerospace is something that requires a trained labor force. We have an economic time warp on the skills needed to compete in todays marketplace. Its a different world than when I came here 25 years ago. If they are born and raised here, they may be missing some of those job skills. The labor force is a challenge. Apalachicola City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, lling in for Franklin County Seafood Workers Association President Shannon Harts eld, outlined areas of focus on preserving the seafood industry. They are so appreciative of the help they have been given so far, she said. The bay is not what is used to be; theyre very concerned. Shannon mentioned that they know the seafood industry is dwindling, they know its going away, she said. It could be a dying industry. We hope everyone joins them to get them over the hump. Theyre not always going to have grants coming in. She said opportunities for entrepreneurship have been discussed, but seafood workers are not the typical business person. It has to be something they enjoy, that theyre interested in. Theyre not interested in working a 9-to-5 job. FRIDAY MARCH 15TH SILENT AUCTION PREVIEW 5PM 7PM SATURDAY MARCH 16TH RIB COOKOFF GATES OPEN @ 9AM CEE BCC EEASTPOINT FIRE HOUSELSL ARE YOU BEING SEEN? 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Coupon Expires: 3-31-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM Foss went straight to the scene, where he was joined by ve other island residents. Using the tank truck and a garden hose from a nearby house, they set to work to contain the ames. Foss said in the high wind, he knew there was little chance of saving the house. Four visitors to Dog Island helped with the reght. Jerrica Gray, Kery Wilson, Chase Green and Caitlin Manners, all of Blue Ridge, Ga., were visiting full-time island residents Hazel and Harley Bell when the re broke out. Gray said she and her friends ran to the re after the Bells received a telephone call warning them of the danger. She said when they rst arrived, two men were already on scene, and a little white smoke was visible leaking from a window on the top oor, but within 40 minutes, the entire structure was engulfed in ames despite Wilson and Green mounting the lower porch to wet down the exterior of the house. Strong winds accelerated combustion, but Gray said, The wind was really in our favor because it was blowing towards the Gulf, and so it blew the re away from the island and the other houses. If it had blown in the other direction, things might have been much worse. One time the wind shifted and whipped in from the west, and thats when the plants on the dunes all caught re. I thought we were in trouble then. At about the same time volunteers were rushing to the Dog Island re, Carrabelle Fire Chief Carl Whaley and a group of volunteers were responding to a wild re on Timber Island. Whaley said when the remen noticed the column of smoke on Dog Island, they thought they had been dispatched to the wrong location until they found a quarter-acre of grass burning near the Timber Island marina. Whaley said that re was started by sparks from a welding torch and rapidly spread because of windy conditions. After extinguishing the Timber Island blaze, Whaley and several Carrabelle re ghters got a ride to Dog Island with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cers and joined in ghting the house re, which by then involved about a tenth of an acre of woods. Whaley said the house had collapsed by the time he arrived. He complimented the Dog Island re ghters on containing the blaze in the high wind. FWC brought re ghting equipment to the Timber Island boat ramp, but it was not used. Working together, the volunteers from Dog Island and Carrabelle managed to contain the ames. Foss said after the rest of the house collapsed, the pilings remained standing, engulfed in an inferno. The re ghters poured water on them, but the extreme heat made work at close quarters dif cult. Eventually, re ghters were able to approach the pilings and cut them down with a chainsaw. About 4:30 p.m., a helicopter belonging to the Florida Forestry Service arrived on the scene carrying a re llable bucket and dumped 15 to 20 loads of water from the Gulf onto the blaze, nally extinguishing it. Foss said his crew continued to mop up smoldering remnants of the re until after 6:30 p.m. He said a representative of the state re marshals of ce visited the remains of the house at about 7 p.m. ECONOMIC from page A1 FIRE from page A1

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Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR Special to the TimesFloridas charter school students continue to outperform traditional public school students, according to a report from the Florida Department of Education. The report shows students who attend charter schools exceed their traditional public school counterparts in math, science, and reading on state assessments. Required by state law, the report, Student Achievement in Floridas Charter Schools: A Comparison of the Performance of Charter School Students with Traditional Public School Students, is a statewide analysis of student achievement in charter schools versus comparable students in traditional public schools. We can all agree that great schools are the key to strong communities, said Florida Commissioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. Thats why its so encouraging to see Floridas commitment to highquality charter schools paying off. Thank you to our educators for their hard work to better prepare Floridas students. The data contained in the report is derived from student performance on the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test and Algebra end-of-course exams from the 2011-12 school year, based on more than three million test scores. The report makes 177 comparisons covering three measurements: pro ciency, achievement gaps, and learning gains. Each of these measurement areas are broken down further to offer a more detailed view of student achievement. The FCAT pro ciency section of the report contains 63 separate comparisons of student achievement using both overall rates of pro ciency by grade groupings and comparisons of subgroup performance. In 55 of the 63 comparisons, charter school students outperformed traditional public school students, with one tie. The achievement gap section contains data to analyze the gap between white students and African-American students, and white students and Hispanic students, in reading, math, and science. The achievement gap was smaller for charter school students in all 18 comparisons. The learning gains section of the report includes 96 comparisons of learning gains made by charter school students and traditional public school students. Charter school students had higher average learning gains in 83 of the 96 comparisons. Charter schools are independent public schools with the autonomy and exibility to provide expanded-learning opportunities to meet students individual educational needs. Charter schools are overseen by a governing board while being held accountable to state standards for academic performance and nancial solvency. During the 2011-12 school year, 518 charter schools operated throughout the state in 43 school districts and at two state universities. Charter schools served more than 183,000 students during the year, more than 7 percent of Floridas total public school population. For more information about Floridas charter schools and other educational options, visit www. oridaschoolchoice.org USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 14, 2013 APage 4SectionState report: Charter schools performing better than traditionalSpecial to the TimesApalachicola Riverkeeper, in coordination with the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR), is developing a management plan for the new Franklin County Public Library site in Eastpoint. The project is funded in part by the Northwest Florida Water Management District. The Riverkeeper and ANERR are working closely with the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library to establish the optimum management plan for the site. The project includes developing onsite environmental educational opportunities, including a trail. In December 2012, Apalachicola Riverkeeper worked with Ian Barlow, a contract restoration specialist in low impact land management, to evaluate the sites long-term vegetation management plan and initiate the rst phase of site preparation to reduce underbrush and thin trees. Work on the site by Apalachicola Riverkeeper and ANERR is slated to resume in mid-March. We plan to continue fuel reduction of underbrush and thinning of some trees in order to enhance the wetland and optimize the natural communitys habitat function, said Dan Tonsmeire, the Riverkeepers executive director. We also plan to clear a 15-foot buffer along the property boundaries adjacent to the library site to allow management of vegetation and for re prevention purposes. Bene ts of fuel reduction and thinning include prevention of wildres and reduction of re hazards to homeowners. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection issued an exemption permit for this activity in April 2012 to the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library. Thurman Roddenberry & Associates Surveyors completed the site survey and marked the property boundaries. When the library is nished, it will offer the community not only an expanded, modern space for collections and programs, but educational nature walks over the protected wetlands. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is a 1200-plus member non-pro t organization dedicated to the protection and stewardship of the Apalachicola River and Bay. For more information call 653-8936. Library planning continues By GRANT SMITHSpecial to the Times The makeup of the electric grid of the future is at stake as the fossil fuel industry continues to falsely lessen the impact of renewable energy. So its no wonder that the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) and the Solar Energy Industries Associations have recently rescinded their membership in the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). ALEC has mounted a relentless attack on renewable energy standards in states across the country in an effort to repeal or weaken them to the point of being irrelevant. ALECs mechanism is essentially a boilerplate report that uses bogus analysis to question the cost and economic impact of renewable energy standards. Indeed, its ndings have nothing whatsoever to do with reality and should be rejected. These aws are highlighted in a recent report prepared by Synapse Energy Economics (a Cambridge, Mass.-based consulting rm) for the Civil Society Institute (a Newton, Mass.-based non-partisan think tank) called NotSo-Smart ALEC: Inside the Attacks on Renewable Energy. ALEC uses wind energy costs two to four times higher than actual wind power contract prices. It also makes inaccurate claims that wind and solar resources (variable resources) are so unpredictable they cant be relied upon. Yet renewable sources of power accounted for 55 percent of generation capacity additions in 2012 and grid operators are honing skills and technology in integrating renewables into the grid. This January, all capacity additions were renewable. There were no coal, natural gas or nuclear power plants coming on line in the last month. ALEC also predicts excessively high electric demand growth in the future, in an effort to tie high electric rates to renewables, while the Department Of Energys Energy Information Administration predicts less than 1 percent growth in electric demand. As far as market manipulation goes, coal and nuclear advocates are the pros. No new coal or nuclear plant can be contemplated without shifting a large portion of construction risk to ratepayers and taxpayers. This is typically accomplished by getting construction work in progress passed by state legislators. For example, Kansas does not have such a mechanism for long-term construction projects, but one can only imagine that construction work in progress (CWIP) will rear its ugly head to force construction of an 895-megawatt supercritical coal plant. Wind and solar developers do not have that luxury. But for soon-to-bedefunct stimulus package grants, these developers have to build their projects prior to any tax subsidies kicking in. Construction work in progress allows utility companies with captive ratepayers to recover the nancing costs plus return on those costs during construction. They need this mechanism to leverage private loans (debt) despite having captive ratepayers. Typically, electric utilities are regulated state franchised monopolies. They are wards of the state. Regulators are a substitute for the market and directed by statute to re ect market conditions and ensure ratepayers are receiving least cost service. Surely, a mix of energy ef ciency and renewable investments would be much less nancially risky than building a super-critical coal plant. For example, the last attempt in Illinois to build a super-critical coal plant resulted in $2 billion in cost overruns. Something you will never experience with energy ef ciency, onshore wind or solar PV (photovoltaic) investments. Moreover, AWEA announced a few months ago that its members could forego the production tax credit in six years with a gradual reduction in the credit over that time. Some analysts predict solar PV reaching grid parity (the retail rate of electricity) in California in 2015 and most of the rest of the country in 2017. On the contrary, new coal and nuclear plants will always need to be heavily subsidized by ratepayers and taxpayers to have a chance at being built, mostly due to rising costs. Meanwhile storage technologies are coming on line and, in conjunction with primarily existing exible natural gas plants, will be able to accommodate much greater penetration of renewable resources. In fact, the National Renewable Energy Lab conducted a study last year where it concluded that the grid could reach 80 percent renewables by 2050 while maintaining grid reliability. Renewable power is being attacked not because it has failed or is too expensive, but because it works and has become a threat nancially to fossil fuel and nuclear interests. Grant Smith is a senior energy policy analyst to the Civil Society Institute and former executive director of the Citizens Action Coalition of Indiana, where he worked for 29 years.Why fossil fuel, nuclear interests trash renewable energy impact GRANT SMITH THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK @ApalachTimesFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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ADVERTISING DEADLINE RESERVE SPACE THURSDAYS AD COPY FRIDAY LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, March 14, 2013 Arrest REPORTThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. MARCH 6 Louise Huffman, 55, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) MARCH 8 Rashed O. Brown, 30, Port St. Joe, Bay County violation of probation (FCSO) MARCH 9 Charles R. Dean, 47, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) MARCH 10 Charles L. Fasbenner, 43, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Cathrine V. Thompson, 28, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Ben Turrell III, 35, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) MARCH 11 Michael R. Holland, 53, Apalachicola, resisting of cer without violence (FWC) Rhine W. Abas, 31, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Brandis E. Paul, 32, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) News BRIEFSEnjoy FCAT Family Night TuesdayThe Franklin County School will host a FCAT Family Night for grades 3-12 at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, including family activities, dinner, and prize giveaways.Learn basics of photographyLearn the secret of taking photos of moving objects, using tripods, manual modes, apertures, shutter speeds, night photography and more. The XCE0063 course, taught by professional photographer Bonnie Jones, an adjunct instructor at Gulf Coast State College, will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 25 in Room C-103 at the GulfFranklin Center. Fee is $21. For more info, call 227-9670.Child Find pre-K screenings April 11Franklin County Schools and the Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resources System/Panhandle Area Educational Consortium will co-sponsor a free Child Find Pre-K Screening on April 11. Each child will be screened in learning, speech, social, vision and hearing for the purpose of identifying children with disabilities. Children ages 3-4 who are suspected to have a disability and are not enrolled in Headstart or public school are eligible to participate. Parent or guardians must call 866-277-6616 to schedule an appointment.Gulf Coast holds scholarship auditionsThe Visual & Performing Arts Division of Gulf Coast State College will hold theater scholarship auditions for the 2013-14 academic year on April 3. Anyone is welcome to audition, but students need to have a minimum GPA of 2.5. Applicants should come prepared with the following materials, depending on the performing arts track in which they have an interest: For acting: Two contrasting monologues not to exceed three minutes. For musical theater: One monologue and 16 bars of a song, along with sheet music or an accompaniment track without vocals. For directing/stage management/design: Their portfolio, resume and a sample of work if available. Applicants will sit for a technical interview as well. Auditions will be 4-6 p.m. April 3 in the Theatre Lab, room 152 of the Amelia G. Tapper Center for the Arts. To help prepare for the auditions, students may also attend a workshop from 2-4 p.m. Monday, March 18, in the Theatre Lab. For more information, contact Jason Hedden at jhedden@gulfcoast.edu or 769-1551 ext. 2889. See BRIEFS A10

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 OFTHEWEEKPET Franklin County Humane SocietyDESPINA!Darling DESPINA! Despina is a 6 month old long haired Calico. She is an absolutely beautiful kitten with a sweet, playful disposition. She is being show-cased at the Funky Fiddler in Apalachicola so the next time youre in town, drop in to see this little beauty. You may be lucky enough to adopt her for yourself this St Patricks Day!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Apalachicola Bay Charter SchoolOpen Enrollment For the 2013-2014 School Year March 18-29, 2013 Kindergarten Round-up (March 22, 2013 Call for a scheduled time) ABC Elementary School for Grades Pre K 5 ABC Middle School for Grades 6 8Florida High Performing School of Choice A Grade Status Low student/teacher ratio Family environment with caring teachers Highly qualied certied teachers Dierentiated instruction used to meet the needs of all students Free breakfast and lunch program Challenging curriculum Intensive remediation for reading and math Elementary and middle school computer labs Free after school programs Permanent remodeled facility with separate middle schoolLIMITED ENROLLMENT -Enrollment packet: Call, come by or visit our website Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL653-1222 (phone) www.abceagles.org 653-1857 (fax) abcschool@abceagles.org A Call To All Vendors: Exposure for Your BusinessBecome a main ingredient for local consumers as a featured sponsor of the Taste of Home Cooking School: $Buy your tickets now at The News Herald and at newsherald.com Buffkin completes Army basic trainingSpecial to the TimesArmy Pvt. Chance D. Buffkin has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, ri e marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches and eld training exercises. Buffkin is the son of Sonja Braswell, of S.E. Third St., Carrabelle. He is also the son of Glenn Buffkin and nephew of Elaine Laszlo, both of Carrabelle. He is a 2012 graduate of Franklin County High School.Lily Massey bornBig sister Madison would like to announce the birth of her sister, Lily Ann Massey, born Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Lily Ann, daughter of CJ and Preston Massey of Crawfordville, weighed 8 pounds, 2 ounces. Grandparents are Angel Page and Bevin Miller of Eastpoint and Rod and Nita Massey of Carrabelle.Joshua Allen bornJoshua Luke Allen was born on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. At birth, he weighed 8 pounds, 5 ounces. This happy little boy was 20 inches long. He is the son of Michael and Lena Allen and the brother of Bailey Nicole Allen of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Bob and Edda Allen of Eastpoint, and maternal grandparents are Nick and Maggie Hutchison of Carrabelle. Joshua is the great-grandson of Lena and Charlie Ellis of Carrabelle. He is the nephew of Michelle Huber and the cousin of Skye and Bianca Huber.Aubrey Davis bornAubrey Zoann Davis was born Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013, at 9:14 a.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 8 pounds, 11 ounces. She is the daughter of Ellis and Crystal Davis of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Betsy Gandy of West Palm Beach and Martin Gandy of Albany, Ala. Paternal grandparents are Hope Davis of Apalachicola and Martin Davis of Apalachicola.Happy birthday, AuntieMrs. Pearlie Bunyon Perry celebrated her big day on Wednesday, March 13. Happy B-day. Auntie, Love always,Donate and Kyera and family SocietyPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe Segree family lled the Eastpoint rehouse Saturday with their annual reunion, organized by Inez Segree and a host of helpers. Topping off the lavish buffet was music, both country and gospel. Above, clockwise from left, Willard Vinson, George Creamer, Gad Segree and Alonna Segree, seated in front. At left, from left are Pastor Ronald Luke, from the Eastpoint Church of God, Miles Creamer and Ronnie Segree. Not pictured is Billy Granger. SEGREES PLAY AT ANNUAL REUNION Births Birthday Congratulations

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The Times | A7Thursday, March 14, 2013 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The TimesMore than 300 Auburn University students, shown above serving food at Monday afternoons picnic at Sylvester Williams Park in Apalachicola, arrived Saturday for a weeklong mission trip to Gulf and Franklin counties on their spring break. Trace Hamiter, who ministers to the students at the First Baptist Church of Opelika, Ala., said after coming to Port St. Joe for the past six years, the students were making their rst trip to Apalachicola. They are staying on Cape San Blas. We are showing the love of Jesus in practical ways, by serving people with their houses, mowing lawns, walking around ministering to the kids, Hamiter said. We have quite a few big projects: replacing roofs, a lot of painting, a lot of yard work, wheelchair ramps. Holy smoke, what a great time we had at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion last Friday! The place was SRO. There was everything on the buffet table but escargot. Yum, yum. Tony and the Not Quite Ready Band provided the music. Thanks to those who came and enjoyed, and to those who provided the buffet. Looking forward to next year. I am sure the breakfast at Curfew Lodge, the parade and the dinner-dance was also well-supported. You can enjoy your monthly sugar fix at the Lanark Village Boat Club, this Saturday, March 16, from 9 until 11 a.m. Hope to see you there. Sunday, March 17, is our monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to share, a donation and green is the color of the day, St. Patricks Day. Be watching for you! Friday, March 22, will nd us at Chillas Hall for a spaghetti dinner. You can get your plates loaded for a $6 donation. Serving is from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Come and get it! Saturday, March 23, is our annual village clean-up day. Well meet at Gene Sewell Park between 8 and 8:30 a.m. Please join us. I just know we will have a great buffet and a real good time tonight, March 14, at the annual Lanark Village Golf Club banquet. We will meet at the Crooked River Grill for social hour at 5:30 p.m., and we will enjoy the food and the program at 6:30 p.m. Mark your calendars for Saturday, March 30. Thats the day we will have Spring Fling Dance. Greg K. and Krew will be on hand to play for your dancing and listening pleasure. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. More on this later. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and remember, to get a grip, tie a knot and hold on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry.SSheriffs Ofce, IIGAA E E aster egg hunt March 30The Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce and the Gulfside IGA announce the annual Easter Egg Hunt will be at noon March 30 on the eld adjacent to the sheriffs ofce on U.S. 65 in Eastpoint. All kids are invited to come out and participate in a wonderful day of egg hunting, with lots of prizes to be given away. The sheriffs ofce will be grilling hot dogs for the occasion free of charge. Come out and enjoy the fun.Fellowship Churchs revival runs through FridayThe members of Fellowship Church of Praise will continue their 2013 Prophetic Revival nightly to Friday, March 15. Services start at 7 p.m. at 177 Ave. G in Apalachicola. Evangelist for the revival will be Prophetess Vernette Rosier of Fellowship Church of Praise in Panama City, an anointed woman and gifted in the spiritual prophetic realm. Please come out and help us lift up the name of Jesus and hear the Word of the Lord through the Prophetess. We hope to see you there. God bless you.LLive EEaster production on Good FridayPlease come and join us, for one night only, for a live Easter production. With the theme This is the night something happened, the production will be staged on Good Friday, March 29, at 6 p.m. at New Life Church, on 16th Street in Apalachicola. Celebrate the life of the risen Christ and experience the love, peace and joy knowing Him brings. Sponsored by Hillside Dancers for Christ, and community wide of Apalachicola. For more information call Teresa Ann Martin and Barbara McNair.RRelay for LLife rescheduled to June 1Because of conicts with the high school prom and JBG Rockfest, the annual Relay for Life has been moved to Saturday, June 1, beginning at noon, and running until Sunday, June 2 at 6 a.m. This years theme is carnival for a cure. The relay, to raise funds for the American Cancer Society, will be at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola. Merissa Beasley is this years honorary chair. There will be games, food, free samples and more. Make sure you mark it in your calendar and come out and walk to support those who are ghting cancer and those who have lost their battle with cancer. There is still time to register a new team, sponsorship or help with committee. For more info, call Chala at 370-0832 or Kyla at 348-6268.EEastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recoveryUnder the leadership of Ms. Rose Grifn, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Flowers family The kind generosity of good friends like you has been a great help to us during this very difcult time. Our family would like to offer our most sincere thanks for the owers, food, cards and gifts that everyone has sent in memory of Annie Mae Flowers. Thank you so much for your love and support. May God bless each and every one of you. Thank you,Bruford Flowers and familyBobbie Jean Watson was born in Madison to Idel Piercy and Gerald Rodgers. Jean passed away at the age of 73 on Saturday, March 9, 2013, surrounded by her family. Jean was a longtime resident of Apalachicola for 50 years. She owned Apalachee River Garden and Nursery in Apalachicola for 15 years. She then was known to many children in the community as Nanny for many more years. She is survived by her husband, William Curtis Watson Sr.; daughter Glenda Jean Martina; grandchildren, Mitchell Martina, Jennifer Brown, Wayne Watson, and Glenda Jean Martina; greatgrandchildren Alyssa and Clayton Martina, Brayden and Bryson Brown, Caden Haynes, Conner Martina, and Lucas Watson; brother Thomas Rodgers and Danny Talbert; and sister Peggy Garrett. She was preceded in death by her mother Idel Piercy; father Gerald Rodgers; son William Curtis Buddy Watson Jr.; brothers Richard and Robert Rodgers. Memorial service was held at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13 at the First Baptist Church in Eastpoint. T.J. Beggs Funeral Home handled all arrangements. Bobbie Jean WatsonTerrell Danner Adamick was born June 14, 1949, and passed away in his home on St. George Island on Saturday, March 9, 2013. He was a peace-loving artist and musician/ songwriter, a Viking sort of guy with a love of nature and a giving heart. He will be missed by his brother John (Beth) Adamick; nieces Hillarey (Joe) Breedlove, Monica (Will) McKinney, and Star Squires; nephew Aaron (Beth) Adamick; his partner-in-life Lori Craig; and hundreds of great friends scattered over many states. Terry was raised in Atlanta and Germany. He attended the Atlanta Art Institute and went to work in the art department of Ted Turner Network upon graduating. He also spent years as a carpenter and was instrumental in helping to restore Atlantas Oakland Cemetery following a tornado. Terrys artwork ran the gamut from serious portraits to whimsical pet dreams. On St. George Island, he will be remembered for painting the Yacht Clubs luau cut-outs, his participation in Mr. Easter Bunny pageants, his Animals A to Z childrens book and St. George Island Coloring Book, the new librarys rst sign, his St. George Island map, original Christmas cards and nature photography. His Atlanta friends will treasure the many years he lived at The Farm. Terry, also known as Captain Banana, loved many things including old Westerns, playing guitar and singing in several notquite-prime-time bands, dressing up in costume, tie-dye and The Who. A memorial with music is planned for later this spring. A fundraiser to cover funeral home, medical and associated expenses will be held on Sunday, March 17, from 3 to 6 p.m. at Eddy Teachs Raw Bar on St. George Island. Other donations can be dropped off at The Garden Shop in Apalachicola, or dropped off or mailed to Lori Craig at 1000 W. Pine St. on St. George Island.TT erry AAdamick TTERRY Ad ADAmMIcCK ObituariesEnjoy St. Patricks Day at covered dish lunch LLANARK NEwWSJim Welsh Faith bBRIEfFS TTIgGERS oON SPRINgG bBREAK mMISSIoON TRIP Card of TTHANKSANKS Faith

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Special to The TimesThe most popular happening on St. Vincent Island is being held this month. The annual Open House on St. Vincent Island will take place from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Friday, March 22. This is your chance to experience the beauty of St. Vincent Island and learn more about what goes on at the wildlife refuge and other nearby natural areas. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided by the refuge barge. Visitors may only sign up for themselves. The barge will pick up visitors at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service barge dock located a short distance northeast of the Indian Pass boat ramp. This year there will be a limit of 250 visitors on the island for this event. There will be guided walks and tours, educational presentations, and guided wagon tours. Visitors can sign up for the wagon tour and other guided events when they reach the island (visitors may only sign up for themselves) or they can explore the island on their own. Some of the guided activities include birding walks, beach walks, photography safaris, and hiking tours. In the outdoor amphitheater created by placing folding chairs under one of the islands huge live oaks there will be several educational presentations, on the history of St. Vincent Island, whooping cranes, and more. The Supporters of St. Vincent Island will be providing hot dogs and drinks at a booth right beside an all-day live musical performance by John Miick and Cletus Heaps. There will be informational booths set up by the St. Marks Refuge, St. Marks Photo Club, Panama City Fish and Wildlife, Riverkeepers, St. George Lighthouse Association, UF Marine Turtle Research Group, and the St. Vincent Supporters. Suzanne Marshall and Brooks Jones will be our visiting on-site artists. Come prepared to enjoy the day on St. Vincent Island wear your walking shoes and a smile. Volunteers will be at the boat ramp to guide you to the barge that will take you to the island. Turtle nesting season will be here soon and you can help support the turtle program on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) by participating in the Adopt-a-Nest program. For a small fee of $25 you will be able to name the turtle whose nest you adopt and you will receive an adoption certificate, photo of adopted nest, activity/hatchling report and recognition in Supporters newsletter. Proceeds from nest adoptions help offset refuge costs for the turtle monitoring program. These costs include fuel for the survey vehicles and materials to construct cages to protect nests from predators. Turtle adoptions make a wonderful gift for people of any age who care about turtles and wildlife preservation. With so many turtles choosing to nest on St. Vincent Island last year we are hoping for another active year. That means we will certainly need an increase in turtle adoptions. To adopt a nest or learn more about the program, email us at supportstvin@hotmail. com or leave a message at 850-229-7635 and thank you for your support! There are only two more monthly island tours before the summer heat and bugs arrive. All tours are on the second Wednesday of each month April 10 and May 8. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web @ www. stvincentfriends.com Seats are filled on a firstcome, first-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive bring everything you need, including drinking water and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit www. stvincentfriends.com for more information and volunteer opportunities. YOUR SPRING BREAK HEADQUARTERS! LIVE BAIT FISHING SUPPLIES BEACH SUPPLIES Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) Monday Sunday: 7:00 AM 6:00 PM EST By FRANK SARGEANTContributing writer Cliff Pace just brought home 500 grand from the Bassmaster Classic last month in Tulsa, Okla. The pros very often beat top local anglers in their travels to lakes across the nation; in fact, only one angler has ever won the Classic when it was held in his home state. The reason, said frequent winner Kevin Van Dam, is simple enough: In a threeor four-day tournament with a lot of good anglers on the water, the spots the local guys depend on to win for them get beaten up pretty bad. The spots that win are new spots found by the traveling anglers who rely on a lot of research to put them on the sh. Van Dams tactics are made to order for bass shing in areas such as the Apalachicola River and Lake Talquin, but theyre also right on target when it comes to nding reds, trout, ounder and other saltwater species in Panhandle waters. Because many prime inshore areas are both clear and shallow, Googles satellite view can give you an amazing amount of info that might be big news to local anglers who are not taking advantage of the technology. In a Google Earth yover you can see the bottom on much of St. Andrew Sound, East Bay, West Bay, North Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Sound, St. Joseph Sound and other areas, and also check out every tidal creek, oyster bar, grass bed, submerged channel and pothole even the occasional sunken boat, great secret spots for sheepshead. Print out a view of spots that look promising, then check out your Navionics app on PC, iPad or iPhone and you can get a marine chart view complete with GPS numbers, mark your spots and then transfer them to the GPS on your bay boat. Pay particular attention to areas where there are deep holes at the mouths of creeks, cuts through oyster bars, points created by grass ats, shallow humps created by channel dredge spoil anything that might create a feeding, resting or traveling area for game sh. Its far easier to locate these potential spots while sitting at your computer screen than it is out there on the water. Now youre ready to head for the ramp and ground-truth all those likely looking spots youve located via digital research. Of course, time and tide have much to do with success on coastal waters. Flats edges, grass ats, oyster bars and docks are likely to be most productive on rising water. Cuts through the outside bar, potholes, sloughs and creek mouths are likely to be better on falling water. Tactics from the world championship of bass angling CLASSIC TIPSSt. Vincent Island annual open house March 22 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Mar. 1462 45 0% Fri, Mar. 1566 52 0% Sat, Mar. 1670 57 0% Sun, Mar. 1772 6010% Mon, Mar. 1871 5910% Tues, Mar. 1973 5520% Wed, Mar. 2071 58 0% 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 21 Th 203pm 1.2 1130pm 1.2 703am 0.1 650pm 0.9 22 Fr 239pm 1.2 757am 0.1 756pm 0.8 23 Sa 1253am 1.2 306pm 1.2 842am 0.1 846pm 0.7 24 Su 205am 1.3 328pm 1.3 920am 0.2 928pm 0.5 25 Mo 307am 1.3 347pm 1.3 954am 0.3 1006pm 0.3 26 Tu 403am 1.4 405pm 1.4 1025am 0.4 1042pm 0.2 27 We 457am 1.4 425pm 1.4 1054am 0.5 1118pm 0.0 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 21 Th 203pm 1.2 1130pm 1.2 703am 0.1 650pm 0.9 22 Fr 239pm 1.2 757am 0.1 756pm 0.8 23 Sa 1253am 1.2 306pm 1.2 842am 0.1 846pm 0.7 24 Su 205am 1.3 328pm 1.3 920am 0.2 928pm 0.5 25 Mo 307am 1.3 347pm 1.3 954am 0.3 1006pm 0.3 26 Tu 403am 1.4 405pm 1.4 1025am 0.4 1042pm 0.2 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, March 14, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreAs a result of the flooding, most inshore species such as trout, redfish and flounder have been washed out of the I.C.W. in our area and have returned to the bay. Great redfish and trout reports from the basin of the George Tapper Bridge and near the old mill site have been the talk of the town this week. Most of the flood waters have moved on out in our areas, leaving us with muddy water and displaced fish. Good catfish and bream reports are starting to come back in Howard Creek and Depot Creek. No reports from Lake Wimico yet this week. BIRDS-EYE VIEWFROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FOR THE OPEN HOUSE9 a.m. Music John Miick & Cletus Heaps 9:30 a.m. Wagon Tour David Francisco & Denise W illiams Coastal Photo W alk Debbie Hooper 9:45 a.m. Hiking Tour Jeff Strickland Beach W alk Brad Smith 10 a.m. Talk Whooping Cranes & St. Marks 10:15 a.m. Birds of St. Vincent Walk Barry Kinzie 10:30 a.m. Music John Miick & Cletus Heaps 11 a.m. Photographic Safari St. Marks Photo Club W agon Tour John Inzetta & Gloria Austin Histor y Talk Jan Pietrzyk 11:45 a.m. Hiking Tour Jeff Strickland Noon Music John Miick & Cletus Heaps Nature T alk Kim Wren ANERR Beach W alk Trish Petrie 12:15 p.m. Wagon Tour Dave Francisco & Shelley Stiaes 1 p.m. Photographic Safari St. Marks Photo Club 1:15 p.m. Hiking Tour Jeff Strickland Birds of St. V incent Walk Barry Kinzie 1:30 p.m. Wagon Tour Landy Luther & Pete Burgher Beach W alk Brad SmithLAWRENCE TAYLOR | Special to The News HeraldGold spinners equipped with soft plastic shad tails are a favorite for exploring waters where redfish prowl.

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Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORLady Seahawks senior shortstop Morgan Mock has been hitting at a .350 clip of late for the team. She managed to break up a no-hitter March 1 against Liberty County, and on Tuesday got a hit and scored against Godby. She hit the ball hard and played good defense, said coach Lisa Sweatt. Shes my leado batter, and shes always a leader on the eld and in the classroom. Shes always positive.Congratulations, Morgan! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly StaTimes of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At:106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322850-697-4121Renee Parrish, D.M.DACCEPTING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN: Early Head Start / Head StartAll services for our children are free with no cost to the parent.**Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).**Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions Dixie Youth hosts baseball camp this weekendThe Apalachicola Dixie Youth League will host a Lanier Baseball Camp this Saturday and Sunday, March 16 and 17. All Franklin County players, ages 5-13, are invited to take part. Cost is $25 for the two-day camp, with lunch included. The camp will also feature a free coaches clinic. The camp will begin Saturday, with coaches on the elds at 9 a.m., and the Kids Camp from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Sunday, coaches and kids will participate from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The camp will teach the latest techniques in baseball to better prepare youths for high school baseball and college scholarships. We look forward to a fantastic weekend of learning & fun! For more information check out the Apalachicola Dixie Baseball Softball Facebook page. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High Schools baseball and softball teams have hit a rough patch, with each sustaining a series of losses as they head into the closing stretch of the regular season. The Seahawk baseball team, under the direction of coach Mike Emerson, endured three away losses this month, beginning with a 16-8 loss to the John Paul II Panthers in a March 4 game. On March 5 at Wewahitchka, the team fell 12-7 to the Gators. While the Seahawks had 12 hits to Wewas 13, and one error to Wewas three, the Gators scored four in the bottom of the rst, and never relinquished their lead. Franklin County scored four in the top of the fth, to trail 8-4. The Seahawks notched three in the top of the sixth, to trail 10-7, but two Gator runs in the bottom of that inning sealed the game. On March 8, the Seahawks fell 10-0 to South Walton, managing only a single hit. The Lady Seahawks, under coach Lisa Sweatt, have also had a dif cult month, opening with a March 1 loss 16-0 to Liberty County. Six errors doomed the Lady Seahawks, who managed only a single hit by senior Morgan Mock. On March 5, the team fell 20-6 at Port St. Joe, with Maddie Newell knocking two of the teams six hits. On March 8 at South Walton, the Lady Seahawks fell 2-0, despite the fact senior Chena Segree hurled a one-hitter and struck out seven. Franklin County had ve hits, but committed four errors. Summer Medley went two-for-three at the plate, with Anna Lee, Ally Millender and Segree also getting hits. On Tuesday night, the team committed seven errors and fell 12-2, at home to Godby, with Morgan Mock and Medley managing the teams two hits. We hit the ball well but we hit it straight to people, said Sweatt. And they hit the ball where we werent standing. The coach praised Sophia and Allie Kirvin for their stepping up to play varsity, especially since injuries and illness have plagued the team. Sophia Kirvin started the teams lone rally in the bottom of the sixth by running out an in eld single. Mock and Medley then singled, and two runs came in that inning. Pitcher Krista Martina took the mound Tuesday, despite recovering from an appendectomy, and Segree has been recuperating from a sprained wrist. Segree pitched ve innings and struck out four to take the loss. March comes in like lion for Seahawk teams CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 14, 2013 APage 9Section Seahawks fell 10-0 to South standing. Photos by PHIL COALE | Special to the TimesSenior Chase Golden in action against Godby. A Godby runner slides into Maddie Newell at second. Seahawk second baseman Logan McLeod prepares to eld. A Godby runner slides into Maddie Newell at second. Seahawk second baseman Logan McLeod prepares to eld. Morgan Mock takes a swing against Godby.

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 Flood insurance discount receivedAt their Feb. 19 meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce provided the board with copy of FEMA letter verifying Franklin County property owners are receiving a 15 percent discount on ood insurance premiums. This discount already has been applied to current premiums by the National Flood Insurance Program.Five DOT landscape grants approved The Department of Transportation has notied the county that it has reserved funds for ve landscaping grants, each at $10,000, if the county wants to participate. The sites must be within the U.S. 98 right of way and should have access to irrigation. The county commission rst discussed these projects more than six months ago, and now funds have become available: The sites chosen are U.S. 98 and Heffernan Drive in Lanark Village; Carrabelle Beach Wayside Park; U.S. 98 and Patton Drive in Eastpoint; the base of the bridge in Apalachicola; and Lombardi Park at Two Mile west of Apalachicola. The county will be required to maintain whatever is planted. County Planner Alan Pierce said the county doesnt need to seek bids for the landscape installation and materials. He said because the funds are limited, commissioners may wish to seek volunteer help with site design. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said she would begin planning for the Patton Drive site immediately.Final SHIP funds to be distributedOn March 5, County Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners $60,000 in reserve State Housing Initiatives Partnership funds must be encumbered by June 30 or they will revert to the state. He said County SHIP Director Lori Switzer had a waiting list for emergency repairs, but she needed board authorization to spend the money. By the SHIP guidelines, the money must be spent on houses, not mobile homes. Commissioners voted unanimously to instruct Switzer to spend equal portions of the money in each county district. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said, I dont want to pick (the recipients), but I would like to see it equally distributed. Pierce said this is the last SHIP funding unless the legislature votes to dedicate more funding to the program.Pamphlets to be added at P.C. AirportOn Tuesday, March 5, county commissioners voted unanimously to increase payment to the Panama City Airport from $580 to $700 monthly, to create enough space to allowing promotional pamphlets to be included in a display promoting county tourism. The display is maintained by the Tourist Development Council. The change amends the remaining seven years and three months of a 10-year contract. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the TDC discontinued a similar display at the Tallahassee airport but maintains display at welcome centers around the state. Commissioner Pinki Jackel, who represents the county commission on the TDC, said the cost of the display was modest compared to larger regional airports.2 county leases approvedAt their regular March 5 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve two leases for county buildings. One was the proposed aircraft hanger lease with TP Transport. TP Transport initially asked the county to construct a new hangar but will now occupy the existing aircraft maintenance hangar southeast of the xed-base operator instead of a new hangar. Because the existing hanger has no ofce area, the county may construct an ofce, subject to the availability of grant funds. The second is a renewed lease for the current Supervisor of Elections ofce on Avenue F. Under a recommendation from the county attorney, the county reserves the right to terminate the lease upon six months notice to the landlord and will only be responsible for minor repairs, such as the plumbing and HVAC, dened as any repair less than $250 for parts and labor. NOTICE OF ZONINGCHANGEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt the following by ordinance: An Ordinance Rezoningthe following parcel of land in Franklin County: ANORDINANCEREZONINGA 20 FOOT PARCEL BETWEEN LOTS 12 & 13, BLOCK Z, UNIT 1, LANARKBEACHANDALL OF LOT 13, BLOCK Z, UNIT 1, LANARKBEACH, LANARK,FRANKLINCOUNTY, FLORIDAFROMC-4COMMERCIAL MIXED USE TOC-3COMMERCIAL RECREATION. A public hearing on the proposed changes to the ZoningMaps series will be held on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 10:15 a.m., in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. More information can be obtained and the proposed change may be inspected at the Franklin CountyPlanningDepartment, 34 Forbes Street,Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida, Telephone (850) 653-9783. Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at thepublic hearing or in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 MarketStreet, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. Persons who wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based. 2089830 3031166 MARCH 15-17, 2013 | PANAMA CITY MARINA Admission $8.00 BUY ONLINE SAVE $1.00 KIDS 12 AND UNDER AND PARKING FREEBOATS! BEER! ENTERTAINMENT!-Over 50 Vendor Booths including electronics, art and accessories 12-60 Vessels on DisplaySHOW FEATURES TO INCLUDE:Paul Bedard from Animal Planets Gator Boys Seminars: Cruising the Gulfcoast, Florida Keys and the Bahamas by Capt Chris Caldwell Hourly Prize Giveaways BRIEFS from page A5 THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK @ApalachTimesFOll LL OW US O N TWI WI TTE E R

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LocalThe Times | A11Thursday, March 14, 2013 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN Trades & ServicesCALL TODAY!653-8868 Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center Apalachicola Bay Charter School KINDERGARTEN ROUNDUPMARCH 22, 2013Please bring your child along with their Birth Certificate, Social Security Card, and Immunization RecordsCall or come by for a registration form and to schedule an appointment for Friday, March 22 to meet teachers, visit classrooms and have your child screened. Open Enrollment continues through March 29th. After this date (if classes are full) students will be placed on a waiting list. PLEASE CONTACT OUR SCHOOL EVEN IF YOU HAVE MISSED THESE DEADLINES. The ABC School is a family learning community working as a team to provide a brighter future for our children.Florida High Performing School of Choice A Grade Status Low Student to Teacher ratio Well designed and functional campus Individualized educational program 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone)www.abceagles.org653-1857 (fax)abcschool@abceagles.org Accountant We are pleased to announce an association of our oces to expand tax, accounting, auditing, and consulting services in Carrabelle and eastern Franklin County. With oce locations in Carrabelle, Apalachicolaand Port St. Joe, this association is strategically positioned to oer convenient services to individual, business, non-prot and governmentalclients along the Forgotten Coast.Tax, Business Accounting and Consulting, QuickBooks Support, AuditingNon-Prot accounting, Governmental Services Apalachicola Oce 219 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 850-653-1090 Carrabelle Oce 108 SE Avenue B Carrabelle, FL 850-697-2542 CALL:850-670-3500 -or850-933-2171Heavy Construction Site Work Excavation Asphalt Paving Brick Pavers Concrete Fill Dirt Gravel & Sand Mulch Sod Landscape Stone Patio Stone JASON WHITE CONSTRUCTION BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Linda Heavner Gerald had a picture in her mind she could not shake. The Cape San Blas resident had a recurring vision of a woman, walking down a street among older houses in Beaufort, South Carolina. There was a man on a balcony waving to her and the vision in Geralds head was gone. Only to reappear again and again. So, the retired nurse decided to sit down and map out the details surrounding her vision and that became her rst published book, Beaufort Betrayal. That was roughly 18 months ago and since then Gerald has found a calling cranking out two more mysteries and a childrens book, all published and being sold throughout the world, she said. I am the most unlikely person to write a book, Gerald said with a laugh last week. I feel my faith just set me up for this at this time. And here I am; I have my next book in my mind. I have had four books in a year and they are doing well. It is really amazing, this whole thing. Gerald has been published by Public America. The company assumes all expenses, pays no upfront costs and makes their books available to all booksellers. Gerald is among featured authors on Amazon.com. The publishing company, Gerald said, serves a launching pad for authors and is excellent at marketing its authors and their works. Gerald said that once she sat down with pen and pad a traditionalist, she also types with a typewriter the words, the sentences seem to take care of themselves. She does not plot or outline her books before beginning the task of writing, she said. The books, and the plots, just spill out. I feel like I am vessel in this, Gerald said. I have so many books in my mind, it is dif cult sorting them out. I am going to write what I feel. I feel like I work by divine intervention. The book just writes itself. It is different at the end that it was at the beginning. I love it. I sit and do it. Gerald said she writes pretty much every day, almost nonstop until the current work she is slaving over is nished. She has had such periods of artistic inspiration before. While living in the Bahamas she took up painting, though she knew little about brushwork or canvas before picking up a brush and paint. Painting was the same thing as the writing, Gerald said. I started painting and it was day and night; I must have painted 200 paintings and some those paintings sold well. A stint as president of the Friends of the St. Joseph Peninsula State Park provided added spark. That gave me a little condence, getting out and meeting people and being part of that organization, Gerald said. That really helped. So, with four books behind her, including a mystery set in Rosemary Beach in Walton County, Gerald is moving on the next tome which will surely come as easy as the rst four. Everything that has happened has been good, Gerald said. And then she was off, to her home and her pen and pad.SPECIAL TO THE TIMESAmong her rst four books, Port St. Joe resident Linda Gerald penned a childrens book. Linda Heavner Gerald has penned three mysteries and one childrens book published in the past year.Words spilling out for local author BOOK SIGNINGSLinda Heavner Gerald will have two upcoming book signings. The rst will be 1-3 p.m. Saturday, March 16 at Downtown Books in Apalachicola; the second will be 1-3 p.m. ET March 30 at No Name Books on Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe. $500 REWARD TO FIND TOBYA small dog is missing in Carrabelle. Toby has a great home and is loved by his owner and friends who visit. He is a therapy dog and visits a nursing home where he goes and sits on laps. He was lost near the recycling bins at the municipal center on Gray Avenue. He was seen Friday evening running near U.S. 98 close to Millenders. Saturday morning he was seen in the parking lot of the Carrabelle Dollar General. Toby is 3 years old, very cute and loving. He weighs 9 pounds, is all white except for a gray streak down the back over the shoulders. He was lost with a black collar and a name plate. Due to a medical condition, he may try to avoid being picked up because it is painful to him. Any information will be appreciated. There is a $500 reward for his return. Call (850) 294-9664 if you can help. LINDA HEAVNER GERALD

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 90404T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-000037-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking Corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance corporation, as Receiver for Apalachicola State Bank, a division of Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. CAROL J. WILSON and THE BANK OF JACKSON COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on April 25, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: A parcel of land 100 feet by 142 feet, in the NW of fractional Section 11, Township 9 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida, and further described as follows: from an iron pipe stake marking the intersection of the South boundary of the 50 foot State Highway No. 10, with the West boundary (air port fence offset 10 feet West) of the E of said NW run due South 700 feet, then East along the North boundary of a 66 foot street, 900 feet to a point for beginning; run thence North 142 feet; thence East 100 feet; thence South 142 feet; thence West, along said street, 100 feet to the point of beginning. This Notice dated this 27th day of February, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 14, 21, 2013 90382T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-11-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF CYNTHIA ANN GREEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CYNTHIA ANN GREEN, deceased, whose date of death was December 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 7, 2013. APRIL JOANN LOUDERMILK Personal Representative 3501 W. Orange, Lot 20, Tallahassee, FL 32310 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 7, 14, 2013 90406T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 19-2012-CA-000184 ONEWEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. DAVID POTEETE; KATHY POTEETE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated February 25, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.: 19-2012-CA-000184, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and DAVID POTEETE; KATHY POTEETE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. MARCIA M. JOHNSON, the Clerk of Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, on the 25th day of April, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment to wit: LOT 14, DEER RUN ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 40, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 134 CRAIG ST, CARRABELLE, FL 32322. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 26, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd. Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Phone: (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 14, 21, 2013 92545T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000488 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. UTA HARDY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 29, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000488 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and UTA HARDY; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF UTA HARDY N/K/A KEITH HARDY; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, and TENANT #4 are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at inside FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 8 AND 9, BLOCK 68, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-OF, RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 127 9TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 30, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850577-4401 Fax: 850487-7947. F10066366 March 7, 14, 2013 92547T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000462 RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000462 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, is Plaintiff, and MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, 2nd Floor Lobby of THE COURTHOUSE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of MAY, 2013, the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 41 OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF TRACT 41, A DISTANCE OF 107.73 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 136.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO, 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES, 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 449.20 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 102.87 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 439.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21st day of February, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days, if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 7, 14, 2013 92613T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-161-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER A/K/A WILLIAM P. KINSER, U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage dated February 25, 2013, in Case No. 12-161-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM PATRICK KINSER A/K/A WILLIAM P. KINSER and U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on April 3, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage and more particularly described as follows: Lot 19, Block C of ST. JAMES ISLAND PARK UNIT NO. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: February 27, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 March 14, 21, 2013 92695T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ Emergency Management Contractual Services The Franklin County Emergency Management will receive sealed qualification documents at the Emergency Management Office at 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 until Friday, March 22, 2013 at 2:00 PM. Qualifications received will be publicly opened on Tuesday, April 02, 2013 at Franklin County Board of County Commissioner meeting for the following: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Any qualifications received after Friday, March 22, 2013 at 2:00 PM, will be retained at the Emergency Management Office. Emergency Management reserves the right to reject any and all documents received, waive formalities and re-advertise and award the RFQ in the best interest of Franklin County. The Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate because of race. creed, color, national origin or handicap status. Anyone wishing to obtain RFQ documents may contact Emergency Management at 850-653-8977. Any questions concerning the RFQ specifications should be directed to Pamela Brownell. Five sets of qualification documents must be submitted and labeled on the outside of the envelope as SEALED RFQ EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES March 14, 21, 2013 92681T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000273 SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MAUREEN C. PROCTOR, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000273 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 3rd day of April, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 22, BLOCK 86 OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. FIVE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 16 & 17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk March 14, 21, 2013 OtherFranklin County S.H.I.P. ProgramThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners through the Franklin County S.H.I.P. Program will be accepting applications starting on March 11, 2013 for the Down Payment Assistance, Owner Occupied Rehabilitation and Emergency Repair programs. The deadline for submitting applications will be April 10, 2013. For an application or more information please call Lori Switzer at 653-8199 or come by the office at 192-14th Street, Apalachicola. At this time there are limited funds available for these programs. *Adopt*:Athletic, Creative, Loving Lawyer & Doctor yearn to be doting Dad & At Home Mom. Expenses Paid *Ben & Amy* FLBar42311 1800-522-0045 Lost Small White DogLong hair male maltese mix about 10 pounds, a family member.lost in Carrabelle $500 Reward 850-294-9664 Text FL43940 to 56654 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl Mar 16th & 17th 8a-5p. Concealed Weapons Classes. (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission: $6Text FL40762 to 56654 Apalachicola Used Book Storeis looking to buy limited number, good condition Apalachicola Cook Books For more information Call 850-570-4204

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 14, 2013 The Times | A13 13 Gulf Coast Residential & Commercial Lots RowellAuctions.comA MarkNet Alliance Member GAL AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Complete Details Visit RowellAuctions.com Tuesday, March 26th at 2:00 p.m. Online Bidding Available2884 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Waterfront 3 BR/2 BA Home w/Dock 3149 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Gulf View 3 BR/2 BA Home 3153 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Nice Gulf View Lot 2390 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 0.8 Acres Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 1 Acre Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL 9,576 SF Comm. Bldg. U.S. Hwy. 98 E Nice Gulf View Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL (2) Comm. Bldgs. 202 NE 7th St., Carrabelle 6,400 SF Metal Bldg. NE 7th Street, Carrabelle Commercial Lot 3157 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 2 BR/2 BA Home & 1BR/1 BA Cottage 57 Seventh St, Apalachicola, FL Triplex, (3) 1 BR/1 BA Units Auction Site: St. James Bay Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Ln, Carrabelle, FLOpen House: Sunday, March 17th 2-5 p.m. RENTALS2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED ................$550 3 BR / 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDOW/ POOL .....................................$8503 BR / 2 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL AND 10X15 STORAGE UNIT.....$9503 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOLNIGHTLY / $150 | WEEKLY / $8503 BR / 2 UNFURNISHED TRAILOR ......$500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT. / 2 LOTS, HWY 98 FRONTAGE.........$650 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516UPWARD BOUND GRANT PROJECT COORDINATOR(Federally funded) To manage all aspects of the Upward Bound project & supervise and lead Upward Bound Grant sta & resources. Requires MS in guidance & counseling or related eld + 3 yrs. exp. as a teacher, counselor or administrator; and supervisor exp. & experience working with educationally/ economically disadvantaged youth. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Apply by 3/20/13. Only those who provide GCSC Application (must be completed); transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr.Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com.Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY:Digital Sales ManagerABOUT THE JOBThis Digital Sales Manager candidate will work with a group of 5-6 reps as a digital asset. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Assist the current Account Executive team grow, maintain and solicit account revenue. Develop a book of business. Ability to go on four legged calls Develop, present and implement interactive marketing proposals for advertisers that include market research, website data and long term online advertising solutions. Recommend new and enhanced products and marketing strategies. Cultivate and maintain a mutually bene cial working rapport with an account base. Find solutions to account challenges, including marketing needs, site location, and product development and promotion implementations. Provide key information to senior management including sales recaps, customer feedback, and industry trends. Negotiate, implement and monitor interactive revenue contracts.REQUIREMENTS/QUALIFICATIONS:Strong understanding of internet advertising and website functionality. Candidate should have proven track record in growing revenue with accounts. Strong leadership capabilities. Excellent negotiating and problem solving skills. Excellent written, oral and presentation skills. Must have strong knowledge of appropriate computer software including Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Great benefits for full time employees. Weekend work requiredFT Maintenance TechnicianGeneral maintenance experience, good driving historyFT Inspectors & PT InspectorsMust have reliable transportation. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route DriverAverage 10 stops. Home base -Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID# 34244687Text FL44687 to 56654 Medical/HealthCNABrightStar Care of Bay County (#299993930) is seeking a CNA to work in the Gulf and Franklin County areas, PRN part-time 6-12 hours per week. Must have CNA certificate, TB test, Level 2, safe driving record, and be drug free. Non smoker. Call 850 238 3270 to get instructions for applying. 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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, March 14, 2013wars both marching and waving from the sidelines. Camp Gordon Johnston Museum President Tony Minichiello said he thought this years celebration was a success. Carrabelle sponsored the Silver Wings Band from Fort Rucker, Ala. There was a scattering of county constitutional of cers and elected of cials, as well as the Shriners. The pageant included Nazi re-enactors, Sons of the Confederacy and a scale model of the battleship Wisconsin. The Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion Post 82 and the Marine Corps League of Tallahassee all turned out in force. The Lone Star Quilters looked toasty in a oat covered with red, white and blue coverlets. Carrabelle Beach RV Resort made a strong showing. Military vehicles, classic cars and horses added to the spectacle, and once again, the Warriors Watch honor guard bikers from Panama City stood at attention along the parades nal block. This year, eight World War II veterans, all designated as grand marshals, were able to make the trip to Camp Gordon Johnston Days. The oldest, Glenn Jeffries, 99, of Knoxville, Tenn., was attending his rst camp reunion. He was one of the four surviving alumni of the camp who attended. Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer is another; he drove with Grand Marshall Don MacLean, himself a veteran and a volunteer and contributor to the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum. World War II veterans Mary Britz, Ken Tucker, Jim Moore, Buddy Scala, Bob Dietz and Arthur Minichiello also were honored. Britz of Lanark Village said her memories of military service a lifetime ago are still fresh. She served as an Army nurse caring for soldiers recently returned from the Paci c theatre. Sitting in the bright sunshine along the parade route, she said, I just cant get by it. When somebody dies in your arms and you make them all these promises you never keep, you cant forget it. I still cant talk about it. There will be changes in the reunions agenda in years to come. The city did not provide a free luncheon this year, although a benefit fish fry at the citys pavilion for medical expenses for Merissa Beasley provided plenty of tasty eats. Tony Minichiello said this will be the last year for the Saturday evening dinner dance because of reduced attendance. The kinds of things in the parade may change, Linda Minichiello said. Its already been changing. Its getting harder to get people to bring vintage equipment to Carrabelle for 45 minutes, but Camp Gordon Johnston will be remembered. Because she spends as much time thinking about the countys past as its future, her perspective is a little different. People come to the museum and ask me, Where was the camp? and I tell them it was the whole county, she said. Because it was a camp and not a fort, it existed just for the duration of the war, but Camp Gordon Johnston will not go the way of other installations across the state. The camp itself and the people who trained there will not be forgotten, whether theyre there or they are not there. Because of the museum, people will remember there was a military installation during the war that covered almost the whole county. The whole county paid a signi cant part in the outcome of World War II. Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast MLS 246105 $375,000 EastpointGorgeous, custom home in a private setting surrounded by the National Forest. Country estate living at its best in this large, 5 bedroom home with every bell & whistle. There is a graceful front porch and the screened back porch is overlooking the in-ground, salt water pool, privacy fence & outside shower. Kathy Frink850-899-5104 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248832$329,000St. George IslandGULF VIEW HOMEWell maintained 3rd tier home with Gulf views and convenient beach access, professionally remodeled and renovated in 2005, 3 BR, 2 BA, furnished, screened porch, plans available for an elevator, circular driveway, listed by Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248831$159,000EastpointCOMM./RES. (ZONED C-4) DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesABOVE: The Silver Wings Band from Fort Rucker, Ala. RIGHT: Gary Hunnings rides his horse Jacky in the parade. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesDon MacLean, a grand marshal of the parade, left, rode with Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer, who trained at Camp Gordon Johnston in 1942. See more photos at www.apalachtimes.com.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesVietnam veteran Tom Tittle was part of the Warriors Watch honor guard from Panama City that stood attention along the parade route. CAMP from page A1LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesElden Durand of Port St. Joe brought his customized 1975 Sears and Roebuck garden tractor to Camp Gordon Johnston Days. Twelve years ago, he rigged the tractor with an oil eld engine circa 1954. Buzzing along at about 4 miles per hour, the hybrid uses about a gallon of gas a day. BELOW: The parade featured classic vehicles of all types, including some that predated World War II.CONNIE HUNNINGS | Special to The Times