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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 03-07-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00211
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Chili cook-off draws crowd on blustery day By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Its dif cult to imagine its been going strong for 31 years, but Saturdays Annual Chili Cook-off and Charity Auction on St. George Island gave some indication as to why. Despite the windy weather and the cold morning, the event drew another robust crowd all day long and a hefty fundraising total for the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department. Grayson Shepard, who oversees the cooking competition that has made the cook-off one of the Southeasts premier qualifying events for the International Chili Society world championships, said unof cial word is the event raised about $90,000, short of the record, but an excellent effort by all accounts. It was down from previous years by a little bit, but with the cold weather and the wind, everybody did great, he said. He said about 3,000 people paid $5 each to enter the gate, up a little from last year, with another $60,000 in food and beverage sales the day of the event. Add in the auction results and sponsorships, and event organizers were all pleased at how well the cook-off went this year. Shepard said this was the second year the organizers limited the chili booths to selling only chili, with each ticket buyer receiving ve tickets they could use to select their peoples choice. Blue Water Chili, with well more than 200 tickets received, was the runaway choice for the Peoples Choice Award. After a brisk morning 5K Red Pepper Run that featured 145 registered runners, up from 126 last year, the sun began to peek through the clouds and the temperature warmed while the wind stayed strong. The zaniness got started with the By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Morale at the Franklin County School District saw a huge learning gain last month, with the selection of its top teacher and school employee of the year. At a banquet Feb. 22 in the high school cafeteria, elementary teacher Laura King and the principals secretary Sharon Browning shared the honor of their colleagues choice as the best during what has been by all accounts a challenging year. King was chosen as district Teacher of the Year from a crew that include three other teachers: language arts teacher Lydia Countryman, representing the middle school; high school social studies teacher Jaime Duhart; and elementary school teacher turned high school credit recovery instructor Elinor MountSimmons, representing the Learning Center at the former campus of Brown Elementary. Browning was chosen as district School Related Employee of the Year after sharing in a tie with the Learning Centers Joy Towns Opinion . A4 Society . A6 Faith . A7 Outdoors . A8 Tide Chart . A8 Sports . A9 Classi eds A12-A13 xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxx xxxxx Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Camp Gordon Johnston parade Saturday The Camp Gordon Johnston Days parade will begin at 10:45 a.m. Saturday, featuring World War II vehicles, tanks, modern military equipment, marching bands, active-duty soldiers, civic groups and re-enactors. The museum will be open from noon to 4 p.m. today, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Dixie to present world music, songwriters Back for their second season at the Dixie, the Maharajah Flamenco musicians bring highenergy Argentine tango, Brazilian samba and Latin/ Caribbean rhythm. Tickets for the 8 p.m. Friday show are $25. At 8 p.m. Saturday, the Dixie presents An evening of New Orleans songwriters, featuring Jon Roniger and Kristen Diable. Tickets are $25. For more info, call 653-3200. Dont miss Saturday dinner-dance Tickets, $17, are on sale for the 2013 Camp Gordon Johnston Days Dinner/ Dance at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex on Saturday, March 9. World War II veterans and activeduty soldiers eat for free. Hog Wild Bar B Q will cater, with live dance music. Tickets are at the CGJ World War I Museum, at www.campgordonjohnston. com or from any Camp Gordon Johnston Association member. FCSWA to meet Monday The new meeting date for the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will be 6 p.m. Monday, March 11, at the Eastpoint Firehouse on Sixth Street. The group will announce new board members and will be looking for a new secretary and new second vice president. For more information, call Shannon Harts eld, FCSWA president, at 653-5190. Thursday, March 7, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 45 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM SPRING FORWARD 2 a.m. Sunday Shuler remains county attorney By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Michael Shuler will remain Franklin Countys attorney and will not receive a pay raise. After three months of debate, Commissioner William Massey on Tuesday moved to refuse all bids for the position of county attorney and leave it as it is. The motion passed 3-2 with Commissioners Pinki Jackel and Cheryl Sanders opposed. This action means Shuler continues in his role, at his original rate of reimbursement. The search for a new attorney began at the Dec. 4, 2012, meeting when Massey asked Shuler if he was under contract and how much he was paid. Shuler said he had been under contract since 2001 and received $80 per hour. This led to a motion by Commissioner Pinki Jackel, seconded by Massey, to advertise for the bids for the position of county attorney. Jackel said it would give the commission an opportunity to evaluate who we do business with. Under her motion, the attorney contract would be re-evaluated every two years. On Jan. 15, the commissioners opened bids from ve attorneys, including Shuler. Under his new proposal, Shulers fee would increase to $90 hourly. Kristy Banks of Eastpoint offered the lowest bid at $90 an hour for legal duties and $70 for non-legal matters. At the Feb. 5 meeting, the commissioners interviewed Shuler; Banks; Ethan Way, of Tallahassee; Shalene Grover, of Marianna; and Daniel Cox, of Carrabelle. At that meeting, Massey and Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders said they had received telephone threats to in uence their votes on the matter in favor of Shuler. The commission voted to table the choice of attorney, at that meeting and again at the Feb. 19 meeting. But on Tuesday, the matter was decided without further discussion. The only job candidates present were Shuler and, in the audience, Banks. When the topic was raised, Jackel immediately moved that Way be named county attorney. The motion died for lack of a second. Jackel then moved that Banks be awarded the position. This motion also died without a second. A little more spice PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times TOP LEFT: The Oompa Loompas, representing the FART (Fire ghters Annual Recompense Team) consisted of, from left, Chris Stegall, Atlanta; Rina Pearson, Panama City; Capt. Toby Banks and brother Tony Banks, seated, both from Atlanta. TOP RIGHT: Gordon and Sandra Adkins do volunteer duty. BOTTOM LEFT: Paul Nunn from Nunn Better Chili won top prize. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wanda Gangswich of Panama City Beach samples the chili that took third place for her Three Sheets to the Wind team. County picks years top teacher, staffer After youve done something for as long as I have, its not as stressful, and you can enjoy it more. You kind of nd a niche, and things seem to fall into place easier. Laura King Its an honor they selected me over everyone else. I share it with all our co-workers. Sharon Browning MICHAEL SHULER See SPICE A5 See TEACHER A14

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care? Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. PUBLIC NOTICE Please be advised that starting March 1, 2013, Fees will be as follows: Large Truck Tires ..................... $5.00 each For more information, contact 850-670-8167 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM FSU students study countys future trends By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Two Florida State University graduate students are seeking input on the economic future of the county. On Monday, March 4, Aaron Henderson and Kristi Malone, both FSU masters candidates, met with Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson and Franklins Promise Director Joe Taylor to discuss the future economics and demographics of the county. Henderson said the pair accessed census records from 2010 in an attempt to get a snapshot of conditions in the county and are in the process of interviewing county residents to get a boots on the ground feel for social and economic conditions. Johnson gave them in-depth information on the countys economic woes and problems with the bay. He was quick to point out that although the county received no oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, its reputation was blackened by negative reporting of environmental effects further west. He painted a picture of the problems caused by lack of freshwater in the bay and the multigenerational ties of many families to the seafood industry. Henderson and Malone said they were anxious to speak to Johnson because he is a lifelong resident of the county in addition to holding public of ce. Taylor outlined some of the programs under way to provide education for underemployed seafood workers. Johnson said one traditional problem with economic diversication schemes here is the tendency for seafood workers to return to life on the bay when shing rebounds. He pointed out that many oystermen prefer the freedom and potential for substantial pro t to a steady job, especially since few jobs here provide bene ts as an incentive. Taylor said interviews with local workers indicate that most require about $16 per hour just to make ends meet but most jobs only pay about $8 per hour. Johnson told the students that based on building permits issued; development is rebounding by baby steps from the recent low point. He said he considers it important to view the county as a cohesive community working together. Even though Apalachicola is an attraction in its own right, we rely on visitors to St. George Island to come over here and shop and dine, said the mayor. The students said a population pyramid created to envision the age structure of the county indicates the bulk of the population is aged 25 to 50 years. We are an aging population, said Johnson, pointing out that while young families are leaving, there is an in ux of early retirees and people seeking to set up new businesses downtown. Henderson and Malone said the working title of their thesis is Future and current trends in Franklin County. Working under Dr. Timothy Chapin, chairman of the FSU Department of Urban and Regional Planning, their ultimate goal is to predict trends through 2030. The students said they are seeking to interview members of local government and the business community but have had limited response to their introductory emails. If you would like to speak to them, call the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at 850-645-9232. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, left, and Franklins Promise Director Joe Taylor, center, met Monday with Aaron Henderson and Kristi Malone from the Florida State University Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Camp Gordon Johnston Days marches on Special to the Times Camp Gordon Johnston Days this weekend promises to be another exciting homage to the countys World War II legacy, when thousands of American troops trained for amphibious warfare at the Carrabelle site. Beginning on Thursday, March 7, veterans and their families can register throughout the day at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex at 1001 Grey Ave. At noon, there will be a formal dedication of the new addition to the museum. Finger foods, beverages and treats will be provided. On Friday, March 8, registration will continue throughout the day. Boat excursions to Dog Island, where many practice beach landings were held during the World War II training, will be provided by Towboats U.S. Passage for each participant will cost $25; there must be a minimum of three persons before the boat will leave. This is a sightseeing trip; passengers will not disembark to Dog Island. For reservations, call 6978909 or 697-3360. At 6 p.m., Friday, the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, in Lanark Village, will host a Southern seafood buffet. World War II veterans and active duty troops are especially invited to attend this event where they will be served rst. Live music will add to the evening festivities. Cash bar. On Saturday, March 9, all participants are invited to begin the day with breakfast at the Masonic Lodge, 108 NE First St., in Carrabelle. Breakfast is at 7:30 a.m. at a cost of $6. Breakfast is free to activeduty troops and World War II veterans. At approximately 10:45 a.m., on U.S. 98 in Carrabelle, the parade will begin, featuring World War II vehicles, tanks, and modern military equipment. Marching bands, active duty soldiers, civic groups and reenactors will participate in the parade festivities. The public is invited to attend Saturday evening beginning at 5 p.m. there will be a dinner and dance at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex auditorium, where prizes and awards will be given out. Live dance music will be provided. The meal will be your choice of either seafood or chicken at $17 per person. The public is invited to attend this event and sponsor dinner for a soldier. All active duty and World War II veterans eat free. The CGJ Museum will be open for visitors on Thursday from noon to 4 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The museum is closed Sundays. Some earlier press releases promised a tour of an army landing craft that has participated in the event in past years. American Legion Post 82 Commander Sid Winchester said he has been noti ed the craft is being repaired and not available for Camp Gordon Johnston Days this year. New in this years parade are a model of the battleship Wisconsin and a mock-up of the conning tower of a submarine. Also expect to see an entry from the dark side when Carrabelle is visited by a group of SS re-enactors.

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The Times | A3 Thursday, March 7, 2013 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. FEB. 26 Selina V. Tucker, 40, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Reginald D. Giddens, 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) FEB. 28 Luke Gruver, 33, Tallahassee, Marion County violation of probation (FCSO) Amber J. Nowling, 20, Sopchoppy, driving while license suspended or revoked, and violation of restrictions on drivers license (FHP) Steve A. Johns, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) MARCH 1 Luke Gruver, 33, Tallahassee, corruption by threats against a public servant (FCSO) Richard J. Elhard, 31, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked, and possession of a controlled substance (CPD) MARCH 2 Richard L. Brantly, Jr., 29, Tallahassee, possession of paraphernalia and four counts of possession of a controlled substance (FHP) Johnny L. Williams III, 37, Crawfordville, eeing or eluding law enforcement of cer, and driving while license suspended (FCSO) Ryan E. Todd, 29, Havana, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and indecent exposure (CPD) Thomas M. Conners, 59, St. Clair Shores, Mich., possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) Jonathan C. Davis, 30, Tallahassee, resisting of cer without violence (CPD) Joseph R. Chittenden, 18, Tallahassee, DUI (FHP) MARCH 3 Dustin C. Shahan, Jr., 23, Carrabelle, no valid drivers license, and possession of a legend drug without a prescription (CPD) Sabrina Carter, 44, Havana, two counts of battery (FCSO) Brian J. Jordan, 21, Tallahassee, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Lanark Village, DUI and violation of probation (FHP) Cody F. Harrell, 21, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance, possession of paraphernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis, and violation of probation (FCSO) Jacinto Negron, 47, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, leaving the scene of a crash with damages, and false report of traf c accident (FHP) MARCH 4 Johnny L. Williams III, 37, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) Harvey S. Barrack, 31, Carrabelle, sexual battery victim mentally defective/physically helpless, and withholding child support (FCSO) Juan J. Pavon, 25, Eastpoint, discharging a firearm in public (FCSO) TOBACCO C ESSA T ION C LASS S CHEDULE LOCATION: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital A ll classes begin at 5:30 P.M. Free nicotine patches and gum will be provided to participants who complete each class Each class is a 2 hour (one time) session. Please visit the following websites to view a current schedule of tobacco cessation classes that are being held in Franklin County at www.bigbendahec.org/quit-now and www.ahectobacco.com T o register for a class, please call Big Bend A HE C at 850-224-1177. THERE IS NO COS T T O A TT END! Accountant We are pleased to announce an association of our oces to expand tax, accounting, auditing, and consulting services in Carrabelle and eastern Franklin County. With oce locations in Carrabelle, Apalachicola and Port St. Joe, this association is strategically positioned to oer convenient services to individual, business, non-prot and governmental clients along the Forgotten Coast. Tax, Business Accounting and Consulting, QuickBooks Support, Auditing Non-Prot accounting, Governmental Services Apalachicola Oce 219 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 850-653-1090 Carrabelle Oce 108 SE Avenue B Carrabelle, FL 850-697-2542 ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND D IGITAL PACKAGES Starting at $ 234 per month Starting at $ 199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA C ON S UL T A T ION T O FI T YOUR BU S INE SS C ALL TODA Y Arrest REPORT FCI serves breakfast to community leaders Special to the Times On Wednesday, Feb. 27, Warden Russell Hosford, his leadership team and members of the Franklin Correctional Institution family hosted more than 60 people for a Community Leaders Breakfast at FCIs Training Building. The purpose of the event was to allow Franklin CI the opportunity to inform community leaders about the institution, to share information regarding current and future plans to help accomplish departmental and institutional goals, and to make them aware of the important role the community can play in assisting Franklin CI to reach those goals, particularly as it relates to community projects and reducing recidivism. The event began with welcome and prayer, formal introductions, and recognition of 8-year-old Chase Crum who recently discovered contraband at the Will Kendrick Park that had been left for inmate work crews at the park. Hosford presented young Chase with a commendation letter and appreciation for discovery of the contraband left for inmates. The warden indicated the discovery by Chase kept the contraband from entering Franklin C.I. which in turn provided for the overall safety and security of the institution. A PowerPoint presentation was presented by Assistant Wardens Willie Brown and Dwayne Watson and Col. Perez Bellelis, which included important statistical facts and figures relating to staffing and budget, daily operations at the institution, programming and reentry activities that assist in reduction of recidivism rates, as well as information on the helpful role that Franklin CI inmates play in community work related projects. The presentation included photographs depicting Franklin CI inmates working on clean-up and other construction related projects, which helped the community save money and ultimately resulted in taxpayer savings. Hosford spoke about the importance of partnering with leaders and members of the community to produce an outcome that benefits everyone when inmates successfully re-enter into society and the rate of recidivism is reduced. He further thanked the community leaders and the state delegation for their support of Franklin C.I. and the department. One of the highlights took place during the opening portion of the event when County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders and Commissioner Smokey Parrish both praised the efforts of the institution and the impact in the Community. Another noteworthy moment was when Will Kendrick, the DOCs legislative affairs director, personally thanked Hosford for providing inmate labor for construction, cleaning and other related Franklin County projects, which resulted in a tremendous savings to the taxpayers. He further indicated that the newly constructed Franklin Work Camp was constructed using bond money from the state which would be paid back over time by the department. The Franklin CI leadership team is looking forward to working with community attendees who indicated they are eager to see future partnership initiatives come to fruition. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Franklin Correctional Institution Warden Russell Hosford, left, presents a letter of recommendation to Chase Crum, standing with his grandfather, Danny Millender. Law Enforcement

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In my never-ending pursuit to discover historical events, intertwined with my love of historical fiction, I finally got around to reading The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America (2004) by Eric Larson. It tells the story of the 1893 Worlds Fair in Chicago. Officially known as the Worlds Columbian Exposition, it celebrated the 400th anniversary of Columbus discovery of America. At this pre-dawn of the 20th century, it is a fascinating period in our nations history. Innovation and scientific discovery were broadening our world daily. This is not historical fiction because its catalogued as non-fiction (Dewey 364.15). Some call it novelistic history, which is certainly appropriate. Amazon also lists it under true crime since one of the characters, known as H. H. Holmes, was a real person, and did murder between 20 and 100 people. With this host of characters including the serial killer, just five years after Jack the Ripper became famous on the streets of London, the inception and ultimate realization of the fair is described in colorful detail. While Chicago was dark and dirty, a central hub of smoke-gushing steam engines and dirt streets, the White City built on a local swampland, with all the buildings painted white, was lit at night by millions of electric light bulbs. Alternating current electricity was pioneered by the fair, what we call AC. Many new foods, like Cracker Jack, were introduced, but by far my favorite feature of the fair was the marvelous engineering creation of George Ferris, known as the Ferris wheel. The exposition was looking to create a centerpiece, grand in size, in order to eclipse the Frances Eiffel Tower, erected in 1888 for the Paris International Exposition. The organizers in Chicago sent out a challenge to American engineers, but when Ferris came forward, the committee was skeptical. Larson follows the progress as the Ferris wheel is first somewhat hesitantly approved, through the construction of its 254-foot structure, using thousands of pounds of bolts, to the wary observation of fair officials as it made its first revolution. To people of the time it seemed impossibly fragile, and immense. The 36 cars could hold as many as 60 people each. Thousandhorsepower engines fueled by steam boilers from underground mains drove the giant wheels. The rotation took 30 minutes with a maximum of more than 2,000 people on board. It was a marvel. The wheel was operated throughout the exposition and was then moved to a nearby location when it was again dismantled. It was sold for $8,000, and transported by rail to St. Louis for the 1904 Worlds Fair, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of the Lewis and Clark expedition. When you ride the Ferris wheel at next years Florida Seafood Festival, maybe you will think of the grand history of this form of attraction. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Special to the Times The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida Geological Survey has compiled the following information to provide a single point source for general knowledge about the nature of sinkholes in the state of Florida and additional information about proper protocol should you ever encounter a sinkhole in an urban area. Facts about sinkholes in Florida: The entire state of Florida sits on top of several thousand feet of limestone. Limestone is a rock that can form with natural void spaces called porosity. In limestone where the void spaces are connected, the rock is permeable. Porous and permeable limestone makes great aquifers and provides millions of gallons of fresh drinking water for residents and agriculture. The most signi cant factor in the development of sinkholes is the dissolution of the limestone underlying Florida by naturally acidic groundwater. Sinkholes are a natural and common feature of Floridas landscape. They are only one of many kinds of karst landforms, which include depressions, caves (both air and water lled), disappearing streams, springs and underground aquifer systems, all of which occur in Florida. Thousands of naturally occurring sinkholes can be seen throughout the state of Florida including many that connect underground to springs, rivers and lakes. -Sinkholes form in karst terrain from the collapse of surface sediments into underground voids. In Florida one may see solution sinkholes, cover-subsidence sinkholes or cover-collapse sinkholes. The rst two types will show very little topographical disturbance to the naked eye, while the third is the type which shows a abrupt change in topography and is most associated with the thought of sinkholes. Questions about sinkholes in urban and suburban environments: My yard is settling... Do I have a sinkhole? Maybe. But a number of other factors can cause holes, depressions or subsidence of the ground surface. Expansive clay layers in the earth may shrink upon drying, buried organic material, poorly-compacted soil after excavation work, buried trash or logs and broken pipes all may cause depressions to form at the ground surface. These settling events, when not veri ed as true sinkholes by professionals, are collectively called subsidence incidents. If the settling is affecting a dwelling, further testing by a licensed engineer with a licensed geologist on staff or a licensed geology rm may be in order. Property insurance may pay for testing, but in many cases insurance may not cover damage from settling due to causes other than sinkholes. A sinkhole opened in my neighborhood... should I be concerned? Although sinkholes in Florida sometimes occur in sets, most are isolated events. The bedrock underlying the state is honeycombed with cavities of varying size, most of which will not collapse in our lifetimes. A quick inspection of your property for any sinking or soft areas might be prudent. Unless the sinkhole is very large, and extends to your property, theres likely to be little reason for concern. Should a sinkhole open in an area near you the hole should be immediately cordoned off and clearly marked to protect traf c. Contact local law enforcement to report the hazard and call your city or county road department to initiate repair work. If the road is private, repair of the hole is usually the responsibility of the landowner or property owners association. Is there a safe area of Florida where there is no chance of sinkholes? Technically, no. Since the entire state is underlain by carbonate rocks, sinkholes could theoretically form anywhere. However, there are de nite regions where sinkhole risk is considerably higher. In general, areas of the state where limestone is close to surface, or areas with deeper limestone but with a conducive con guration of water table elevation, stratigraphy, and aquifer characteristics have increased sinkhole activity. In an effort to assist the state residents are encouraged to report sinkhole information by lling out a subsidence incident report form on the departments website and submit the completed copy to the FGS. This website also contains information on sinkholes and how they form. To access this form go to http://www.dep.state. .us/ geology/forms/Subsidence/SIRquick-form5.htm or contact FGS at 850-488-9380. More information about sinkholes can be found on the Florida Department of Environmental Protections website: http://www.dep.state. .us/geology/ USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 7, 2013 A Page 4 Section Special to the Times U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, RFlorida, and senators from Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and North Carolina on Feb. 28 sent a letter to the U.S. Government Accountability Of ce requesting a review of how the Department of Commerce conducts stock assessments in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic. The stock assessments conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service are critical in maintaining the vitality of the sheries, the shing communities, and related industries in the region. Stock assessments are the foundation of sound shery management, Rubio said. It is vital that, as we work to preserve the waters and resources surrounding Florida and other states, we base our management decisions on sound science. The report weve requested today will shed light on the decisionmaking process within the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and will help us to determine the best path forward so that we can ensure the economic livelihood of the shermen in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic and the industries that depend on them. Rubio is ranking member of the subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guard. The letter is signed by Sens. Roger Wicker (R-Mississippi), Thad Cochran (R-Mississippi), Richard Shelby (R-Alabama), Jeff Sessions (R-Alabama), David Vitter (RLouisiana), Mary Landrieu (DLouisiana) and Kay Hagan (DNorth Carolina). Fishing organizations in the southeast, both commercial and recreational, salute Sen. Marco Rubio for leading the effort to require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations to provide the basic science needed for honest stock assessments, said Bob Jones, executive director of Southeastern Fisheries Association. The numbers of sh calculated in the federal waters through stock assessments are critical in determining quotas, seasons, allowable gear, by catch and all aspects pertaining to the commercial and recreational harvest of seafood. The shing and tourism industry dependent on fresh local seafood thanks all the Senators who are working to improve the management of our sustainable marine resources. Harlon Pearce, chairman of the data collection committee at the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council, said, I see rst-hand how our lack of updated sheries data strikes at the heart of our ability to make sound management decisions that protect both our natural resources and our shermen. We need to get to the bottom of where our data collection resources are being spent and this full GAO investigation is a great step in the right direction. Gordon Robertson, vice president of the American Sport shing Association said, Robust biological and socioeconomic data are critical to the management of our nations sheries. Unfortunately this information has been lacking for many important sheries, particularly those in the southeast. ASA is grateful that Senator Rubio understands the need for improved science to drive management and is working towards that end. Sound science matters. Sen. Rubios leadership brings focus to the critical need for sciencebased management of Americas marine shery resources, said Jeff Angers, president of the Center for Coastal Conservation. Rubio seeks review of stock assessments MARCO RUBIO R-FL Should you be concerned about sinkholes? Discover the worlds fair that changed America Journey through lush gardens of art What de nes good art? Perhaps one de nition is when you stand before an art piece and cant walk away, dumfounded by how boundless human imagination can be. Such are Beth Appletons cut paper assemblages now on exhibit at the Apalachicola Museum of Art. Each and every one of her exhibits, 30-some pieces, with their blasts of Technicolor squid, serpents, gyrating palms and even human dance-hall denizens, pulse with an energy that one wonders how the frames stay straight on the walls. Forget the $1,500 cruise youve saved for; rather head over to the museum (its free!) and journey through the lush gardens of a true artists mind, and an artist of international caliber who happens to be one of our own. (The exhibit is on display, Wed. Sun., 1-4 p.m. through March 15). Richard Bickel LETTER TO THE EDITOR FISHING INDUSTRY According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, almost 40 million licensed anglers generate more than $46 billion in retail sales with a $115 billion impact on the nations economy, creating employment for 828,000 people. In the Gulf of Mexico region, an average of 23 million shing trips were taken annually from 2000 to 2009.

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, March 7, 2013 selection of the Mr. Hot Sauce and Miss Chili Pepper, with the mens machismo tested through a variety of means, such as hula hoop competition, ngernail painting, dancing and answering questions based on the lm Hall Pass. After he and the Hot Lips teams Chuck Mintor outlasted the competition, Jon Grauer, from the Blue Water team, took home the Mr. Hot Sauce honors, repeating his 2010 win. In 2011, his wife, Marcy, was pregnant with their second daughter, Callen, who this year joined older sister Kaitlyn at the cook-off. The Miss Chili Pepper contest was chosen from a smaller but equally enthusiastic eld of young women by an entrant from Destins Burnin at Both Ends team. The amateur chili crockpot competition, once again overseen by volunteer Dayle Flint, drew a robust eld, with Pam Addison of St. George Island taking home the top prize. Finishing in second place was Keith OMay of Fort Gaines, Ga., with Steve Bashore of Orlando nishing third. The 41 entrants in the professional competition labored at their concoctions, readying for a chance to have the volunteer judges decide who was tops. The Yellow Creek Swamp Sauce team of Bristol has been competing since 2007 and made its chili out of venison. Assisting in the effort were Chad and Travis West, Marjorie Boone, and Andrea, Addyson and Corey Clark. Bob H. Alexander of White sh, Mont., joined his son Bob C. Alexander of Niceville in competing for the Roadkill Hovering Harrier Chili team. Dad has cooked in two dozen world championships after winning in such places as British ADVERTISING DEADLINE RESERVE SPACE THURSDAYS AD COPY FRIDAY CALL: 850-670-3500 -or850-933-2171 Heavy Construction Site Work Excavation Asphalt Paving Brick Pavers Concrete Fill Dirt Gravel & Sand Mulch Sod Landscape Stone Patio Stone JASON WHITE CONSTRU C TION NOTICE OF ZO N I N G C HA N GE The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt the following by ordinance: An Ordinance Rezoning the following parcel of land in Franklin County: A N OR DIN A N C E R EZ O NING A 20 FOOT P ARC EL B E T WEEN L OT S 12 & 13, B L OC K Z, UNI T 1, L A N AR K B E AC H A ND A LL OF L OT 13, B L OC K Z, UNI T 1, L A N AR K B E AC H, L A N AR K, FRA NKLIN CO UN T Y, F L OR ID A FRO M C -4 CO M ME RC I A L MIXED USE TO C -3 CO MME RC I A L R E CR E AT I O N. A public hearing on the proposed changes to the Z oning M aps series will be held on Tuesday, M arch 19, 2013 at 10:15 a.m., in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. M ore information can be obtained and the proposed change may be inspected at the Franklin County P lanning D epartment, 34 Forbes S treet, S uite 1, Apalachicola, Florida, Telephone (850) 653-9783. P ersons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 M arket S treet, S uite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. P ersons who wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evi dence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based. SPICE from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEFT: Jon Grauer from the Blue Water team out of Tallahassee was wild in the Mr. Hot Sauce competition but settled down to pose with wife, Marcy, and daughters Callen, left, and Kaitlyn. RIGHT: Bob H. Alexander, left, and son Bob C. Alexander took second place for their Roadkill Hovering Harrier Chili. See SPICE A11 COOK-OFF CLEANUP ADA LONG | Special to the Times On Sunday morning, members of the St. George Island Trash Patrol gathered at Lighthouse Park for the annual post-chili cook-off cleanup. JoEllen Pearman, pictured, Pete Ritch, Ron Bush, Sharon Bush, Ann Giknis, John Olander, Barbara Sanders and grandson, Terry and Skip Kemp and Deborah Lang joined Ada Long and Dail Mullins and braved the cold March wind to collect 30 bags of trash, not counting grills, lawn chairs, etc. Long said the trash patrol is actively seeking new volunteers. For information, call 927-3776. ABOVE: Christina Grif n shows off her Deliciosa costume in the Miss Chili Pepper competition. RIGHT: Zach Beegle, left, and Ben Caruthers were part of Destins Burning at Both Ends team, which won for Best Booth. See more photos from the cook-off at www.apalachtimes.com

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 OF THE WEEK PET Franklin County Humane Society PAUL! Precious PAUL! Paul is a 3 year old Jack Russell. He is bright, well mannered and social. Jack Russells have a reputation of being hyper and yappy....not our Paul! He is a wonderful little dog with a lot of personality and a lot of love to give. Come meet this exceptional boy! VO LU NTEERS A RE DESPER A TE L Y NEEDED TO SOCI AL IZE WITH ALL OF O U R DOGS A ND C A TS. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR Society DON MCLEOD | Special to the Times On Friday, March 1, Voncile McLeod, the Reigning Queen of Apalachicola, celebrated her 95th birthday at her table at the Gibson Inn surrounded by more than 50 of her friends, family and admirers. Her sons, James and Don, were both on hand. A large cake was served to the party, and there were many toasts to Miss Vonciles health and happiness. Michelle Albert, Robert Whetzel engaged Les and Toni Albert of Carrabelle are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Michelle Lynn Albert, to Robert Whetzel of West Jefferson, N.C. Michelle, a 1992 graduate of Carrabelle High School, currently works as deli manager of the Corner Market in west Jefferson. Robert works for the Closet Design Center in West Jefferson. The wedding will take place in February 2014. Colton Butler born Ladonna and Rhett Butler of Apalachicola would like to announce the birth of their son Colton Ryan Butler. He was born at 12:54 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013, at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. Colton weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and was 20 inches long. Along with big brother Benjamin Butler, 7, Colton was welcomed home by older sisters Ashley and Cheyenne and brother Hunter. Maternal grandparents are Diane Cardenas of Apalachicola and Joey Creamer of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandmothers are Emma Taunton of Apalachicola and Shirley Creamer of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are George Butler of Apalachicola and the late Ginger Honey Butler. Coltons aunts include Ashley Zingarelli, Amanda Creamer, Valerie Creamer and Darlene Ray, and uncles Shane Butler and Austin Taunton. ZyMarion Williams turns 4 ZyMarion JhKel Williams will celebrate his 4th birthday with family and friends in Tallahassee on Monday, March 11, 2013. He is the son of James and Keneidra Williams and the brother of Zyon and Heaven Williams of Tallahassee. His maternal grandparents are Patricia Lane and the late William Bill Lane, and Alvin and Felicia Cummings, all of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are James Williams Sr. and the late Sheila Williams of Fort Lauderdale. His Godmother is Ashley Johnson of Marianna. Happy birthday. We love you, Kel. Joyce Durham has created a quilt to raise funds for re safety equipment. Durham, of ce manager of the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, is an avid quilter who decided to do her part to help purchase wild re gear suits for county volunteer remen. The machine-quilted coverlet, constructed of cotton marble batiks, measures 82 by 82 inches and is suitable for a full-sized or queen-sized bed. The theme of the quilt is re ghting equipment. It features trucks, helmets, a Dalmatian dog and at its center, The Firemans Prayer in a photo print on fabric. When I saw the re trucks on an embroidery site that I frequent, I knew I needed to make this quilt, Durham wrote. The bright colors represent a raging wild re in reds, oranges and blues, all marbled by the dark of the smoke. Around the quilt are the re trucks woven through the ribbons of time. The inner pictures are the reman as he says his prayer, the tools that he uses to combat the raging forces of nature, his famous re hat and, last but not least, his trusted re dog. The black border represents the charred remains of the res aftermath. On the back of the quilt, the emerging orals represent new beginnings that are part of the raging wild re. The drawing will be at 2 p.m. April 18 at the Carrabelle Riverfront Festival. Tickets are $1 or six for $5. Send your check or money order to The Fire Quilt, c/o Volunteer Franklin, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola FL 32320. You need not be present to win. By LOIS SWOBODA MANY HAPPY RETURNS, VONCILE! FSU TRIO PERFORMS A HOUSE CONCERT FOR HOMES DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times In a concert that ranged from a 17th-century sonata to the unusual work of a contemporary Czech composer, Sunday afternoons Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert offered a varied menu. The trio consisted of three Florida State University faculty members on piano, viola and clarinet in the afternoon concert at Trinity Episcopal Church. David Kalhous, born in Praague and now on the FSU faculty, accompanied on piano, with Pamela Ryan, professor of viola, at left, and Deborah Bish, associate professor of clarinet, right. The next concert, Do You Hear the People Sing!, will be March 24 and features the Bay Area Choral Society, led by Canadian conductor William Crane. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times A trio of talented musicians helped raise money for the not-for-pro t Franklin County Community Development and Land Trust Corporation Feb. 23 at special house concert show on St. George Island. The fundraiser featured Depot Creek, with Jon Copps, center, on guitar, Neal Jones, left, on bass, and Randall Big Daddy Webster on guitar. This semi-unplugged event offered an intimate concert with the artists and the best in blues peppered with soul, jazz and life. Birth Happy BIRTHDAY Engagement Happy BIRTHDAY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Wild re quilt to bene t volunteers THE FIREMANS PRAYER When duty calls me, oh Lord, Wherever Flames may rage, Give me the strength to save some life Whatever Be its age. Help me embrace a little child Before it is too late Or save an older person from The horror of that fate Enable me to be alert, and oh Lord, guide my every move, for life is so precious, please dont let us loose. I want to ll my calling and To give the best in me To guard my every neighbor And protect their property And if according to thy will, That I must give my life, Then with thy protecting hand my Lord, I pray thee, protect my children and my wife.

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Knights host bingo tonight against cancer The Knights of Columbus Council 1648 Relay for Life team will sponsor a Bingo Night on Thursday, March 7, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Parish Hall at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Sixth St. and Ave. C in Apalachicola. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society and be used towards the teams nancial goal to assist in the effort to ght cancer. The donation is $20 per person which includes eight games of Bingo. Prizes will be awarded and there will also be a nal jackpot game. Refreshments will be for sale at the event. Auburn students plan Monday block party A group of Auburn University college students from First Baptist Church of Opelika, Ala. will be in Apalachicola next week, from March 9-14, for their annual spring break mission trip. They have been going to Port St. Joe for the past ve years, building relationships with people in the community, sharing the good news of Jesus Christ, and doing construction work on houses. This will be the rst year that they are expanding to Apalachicola, sending around 40 students from their group to tell people about how good Jesus is! They plan on sharing the Good News that Jesus Christ has died on the cross and is alive, and frees people from having to live for themselves. They are sharing the message of Romans 5:8, But God demonstrates his love for us in this, that while we were still sinners Christ died for us. Their goal is to be a bridge to connect people with local churches in Apalachicola that will love them, serve them, and show them how good Jesus is. So come join them for a block party on Monday, March 11 from 4-6 p.m. at Sylvester Williams Memorial Recreation Park (at the dead end of both 9th and 10th Street in Apalachicola) for inatables, face paint, games, and free BBQ. They would absolutely love to meet and know you personally, and to tell you in person more about why they are here. Segree family reunion Saturday The Segree family reunion will be Saturday, March 9 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Come bring a covered dish, old pictures and have a good time. For more information, call Inez at 670-1115. Fellowship Church Prophetic Revival The members of Fellowship Church of Praise will start their 2013 Prophetic Revival on Wednesday, March 13 to Friday, March 15. Service starts nightly at 7 p.m. at 177 Ave G in Apalachicola. Evangelist for the revival will be Prophetess Vernette Rosier of Fellowship Church of Praise in Panama City. She is an anointed woman and gifted in the spiritual prophetic realm. Please come out and help us lift up the name of Jesus and hear the Word of the Lord through the Prophetess. We hope to see you there. God bless you. Live Easter production on Good Friday Please come and join us, for one night only, for a live Easter production. With the theme This is the night something happened, the production will be staged on Good Friday, March 29 at 6 p.m. at New Life Church, on 16th Street, in Apalachicola. Celebrate the life of the risen Christ and experience the love, peace and joy that knowing Him brings! Sponsored by Hillside Dancers for Christ, and community wide of Apalachicola. For more information call Teresa Ann Martin and Barbara McNair. Relay for Life April 6 in Apalach Relay for Life is fast approaching. This years theme is carnival for a cure. The American Cancer Societys Franklin County Relay for Life will be on Saturday, April 6, beginning at noon and continuing until 6 a.m. on Sunday morning at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola. There will be games, food, free samples, and much, much more. Make sure you mark it in your calendar and come out and walk to support those who are ghting cancer and those who have lost their battle with cancer. Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back. Fellowship Baptist studying Book of John Fellowship Baptist Church, 706 Ryan Drive, Carrabelle has begun a Bible Study. The Book of John will be the rst book studied and the group will meet each Sunday evening at 5 p.m. until the study of John is complete. All you will need is a Bible; you might want to bring a notebook. There has been and will be much prayer behind this Bible Study as we know that without the anointing of the Holy Spirit, little can be accomplished. Pray with us and come and join us. We will have some time for snacks, fellowship, and sharing. Your active involvement and participation is asked for. Sponsored by the Jerusalem Sisters of F.B.C. For more information call Babs or Bill Bailey at 697-3660. Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recovery Under the leadership of Ms. Rose Grifn, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups, and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Avenue A in Eastpoint. Nominate an outstanding senior volunteer The search is on for Floridas outstanding senior volunteer. The Salute to Senior Service program, sponsored by Home Instead, Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, honors the contributions of adults 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes. Nominations for outstanding senior volunteers will be accepted between Feb. 1 and March 31, 2013. State winners then will be selected by popular vote at SalutetoSeniorService. com. Online voting will take place from April 15 to 30, 2013. From those state winners, a panel of senior care experts will pick the national Salute to Senior Service honoree. Home Instead, Inc. will donate $500 to each of the state winners favorite nonprot organizations and their stories will be posted on the Salute to Senior Service Wall of Fame. In addition, $5,000 will be donated to the national winners nonprot charity of choice. We all know seniors who do so much for our community, said Lee Harrell, co-owner of the Home Instead Senior Care ofce serving Bay, Gulf, Jackson, Holmes, Washington, Calhoun, Franklin and Liberty counties. These silent heroes give selessly, expecting nothing in return. And yet, their contributions often make a difference not only to the organizations they serve, but in changing how the public views growing older. Senior care professionals and those who work at hospitals, senior care facilities and other places where seniors volunteer are encouraged to nominate older adults. So, too, are family caregivers and the adult children of aging parents. Older adults also may self-nominate. To complete and submit a nomination form online for a senior age 65 or older who volunteers at least 15 hours a month, and to view the contests ofcial rules, visit SalutetoSeniorService. com. Completed nomination forms also can be mailed to Salute to Senior Service, P.O. Box 285, Bellevue, NE 68005. For more information about Salute to Senior Service or the Home Instead Senior Care networks services, call 850-522-1919. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, March 7, 2013 Well folks, its time to spring forward again. So when you get home Saturday night from the dinner dance, or just out on the town, set the clock ahead one hour. And while youre at it, check the batteries in the smoke alarms. The members of the Lanark Golf Club prepared and served up a great breakfast last Saturday, March 2. There was a nice crowd. Thanks to all who came and supported the effort, and thanks to the volunteers who made it happen. Hope well see you at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, Friday. We will have the welcoming party for our veterans from World War II. Party starts at 6 p.m.; fun starts when you come in the door. A great evening with your friends, neighbors, and those who fought for our freedom. You can also enjoy the low country boil and other dishes. See you there! Saturday will nd us at the Curfew Lodge. Serving begins at 7:30 a.m. and goes until 10 a.m. Then its off to the big parade. You can watch boats, vans, vehicles from the war and much more. Saturday night is the dinner dance at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex. Enjoy the ne meal and music provided by the Not Quite Ready Band. Be watching for us in our yellow aprons, some of us members of Bishop OSullivan Knights of Columbus Council 1648 will have our annual tootsie roll drive for the handicapped and mentally challenged. Just in time for the Easter Basket. Please support this worthy cause. On Wednesday, March 13, come on over to Chillas Hall and join us for bingo. Doors open at 6 p.m. Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m. Hope you can make it! Members of the Lanark Golf Club will have their annual banquet at the Crooked River Grill on Thursday, March 21. Social hour is at 5:30 p.m.; dinner at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $23, and there will be a 50/50 drawing. Good luck! Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and ASAP also stands for Always Say a Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. Remember, God is watching us, from a distance. Andy and Rene Williams Pastor Andy and Elder Rene Williams will like to give a Big Thank You to all for their support, love, contributions and prayers during the time of our Appreciation. May the Lord richly bless you all. Thanks again. Andy and Rene Big Bend Hospice We would like to take a moment to express our appreciation for the generosity of Big Bend Hospice in support to us during this difcult time in our life. I want to thank the ladies very much for the help they done. We want to bless the ladies for a great job. Bless these ladies every day for their work. Thanks for all the help that they gave us during through the difcult time of our life for Billy Eugene Shiver. Thank you, The family of Billy, now never forgot Shiver Family We would like to take a moment to express our appreciation for your generosity in support to us during this difcult time in our life. Your personal commitment, donation and contribution were incredibly helpful. Words cannot describe how blessed we are. Special thanks to the United Baptist Church family for all their support. The many touching stories that were shared about Billy are a special memory that will not be forgotten. May God bless each and every one of you. Thank you so very much. Mrs. Audrey Shiver and Family Mother Katherine Bennett Robinson March 9, 1930 Dec. 2, 2008 A beautiful garden now stands alone, missing the one who nurtured it But now she is gone. Her owers still bloom, and the sun it still shines, But the rain is like teardrops, for the ones left behind. The beautiful memories of its keeper are in our hearts to stay, But just like her owers she was part of Gods plan, So when it was her time he reached out his hand. So when you start missing Mother Katherine, Remember if you just wait, When God has a spot in his garden, She will meet you at the gate. Callie Lil Ma Lewis March 8, 1913 Nov. 25, 2007 The Legend of Cottage Hill, but the Legacy still lives on in our minds and hearts forever. We love you! William J. and Marie Lane, Patrick Lane, Johnny Lane, Monica Lane-Moron Saturday opens with breakfast, ends with dance LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS Cards of THANKS In Loving MEMOR Y

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WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Mar. 07 59 44 0 % Fri, Mar. 08 64 51 0 % Sat, Mar. 09 67 55 0 % Sun, Mar. 10 70 60 0 % Mon, Mar. 11 71 59 10 % Tues, Mar. 12 72 56 60 % Wed, Mar. 13 73 59 10 % 6 We 213pm 1.1 1001pm 1.4 609am -0.2 500pm 1.0 7 Th 236pm 1.1 1137pm 1.3 715am -0.2 640pm 0.9 8 Fr 259pm 1.1 808am -0.2 746pm 0.8 9 Sa 103am 1.3 320pm 1.2 853am -0.1 838pm 0.6 10 Su 313am 1.4 437pm 1.2 1031am 0.0 1023pm 0.4 11 Mo 412am 1.4 453pm 1.2 1103am 0.1 1104pm 0.3 12 Tu 503am 1.3 507pm 1.3 1130am 0.3 1143pm 0.1 13 We 552am 1.3 524pm 1.3 1153am 0.4 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 7 Th 236pm 1.1 1137pm 1.3 715am -0.2 640pm 0.9 8 Fr 259pm 1.1 808am -0.2 746pm 0.8 9 Sa 103am 1.3 320pm 1.2 853am -0.1 838pm 0.6 10 Su 313am 1.4 437pm 1.2 1031am 0.0 1023pm 0.4 11 Mo 412am 1.4 453pm 1.2 1103am 0.1 1104pm 0.3 12 Tu 503am 1.3 507pm 1.3 1130am 0.3 1143pm 0.1 13 We 552am 1.3 524pm 1.3 1153am 0.4 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 YOUR SPRING BREAK HEADQUARTER S LIVE BAIT FISHING S UPP L IES BEACH S UPP L IES Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) Monday Sunday: 7:00 AM 6:00 PM EST By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The poisonous spider most commonly encountered in Franklin County is now the brown widow, Latrodectus geometricus. They are an invasive species from Asia that appeared here only a few years ago, but are now common everywhere. I have written about this spider before, but, I want to remind people to be careful. Because of the extremely mild winter, brown widows are already active and laying eggs. Cars, trucks, and RVs have probably helped to distribute this spider far and wide. Rod Gasche of Carrabelle disassembled the brake drums on his RV for servicing last week and found them full of active spiders and eggs. Adult brown widows vary from light tan to dark brown or almost black, with variable markings of black, white, yellow, orange or brown. Brown widows are not as easy to recognize as black widows. The underside of the abdomen, if you can see it, often contains the characteristic hourglass marking which is white, yelloworange or red. The legs are thickened at each joint. The brown widow is also slightly smaller than the black widow. The spiders are reclusive and may hide in tiny crevices but the egg sack is visible and very different from those of the other spiders. Instead of the smooth white to tan surface, the outside of the egg sac is covered with pointed projections giving it the appearance of a globe with many pointed protuberances on its surface. It has also been described as tufted or uffy looking or resembling a medieval mace. Bites usually occur when a spider becomes accidentally pressed against the skin of a person when putting on clothes or sticking their hands in recessed areas or dark corners. The symptoms of a bite can include pain, rigidity in the muscles of the abdomen and legs, swelling, nausea, vomiting and in severe cases a sharp rise in blood pressure. If you believe you have been bitten, seek medical attention. These spiders nest inside and outside in architectural features, mailboxes, vehicles, plants and furniture. Be very careful when doing spring clean-up. When in doubt, wear gloves and cover up. My friend Glynda Ratliff found a huge cluster of eggs in an ornamental shell hanging on the wall of her home last year. I have discovered them under pet dishes. They are frequently found in outdoor showers, empty owerpots, breezeways, stacked wood and the handles of plastic garbage cans. Sanitation is the most important strategy in reducing widow spider infestations around the home. Routine cleaning is the best way to eliminate spiders and discourage their return. Reducing clutter makes an area less attractive to spiders. Inside a home or garage, a thorough cleaning with a vacuum cleaner is an effective way to remove spiders, egg sacs, and webbing. The vacuum bag should be removed when you are nished and placed in a sealed plastic bag for disposal. Any cracks, holes, or spaces around windows and doors should be sealed or tted with weather stripping. Live spiders can be sprayed with almost any over-the-counter pesticide. Insecticidal dusts provide some residual control. When eggs are located, spraying them will usually ush an adult female from a nearby harborage. Be careful. The female can remain active for some minutes after contact with the pesticide. Educate yourself and family about the appearance of this dangerous invasive species and be careful. Supporters of St. Vincent choose Austin of Indian Pass to head group At the Supporters of St. Vincent annual meeting held Sunday, Feb 17, at the Buffer Preserve, Gloria Austin of Indian Pass was elected president. The new vice president is Jan Pietrzyk, of Tallahassee. Landy Luther, of Port St. Joe, is secretary and Audrey Schmidt, of Apalachicola, is treasurer. Supporters of St. Vincent was established in 2007 to provide support for the St Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge and to support environmental activities that include education, recreation and increased understanding of the history and natural environment of the refuge. The supporters are currently preparing for their annual island open house to be held Friday, March 22, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event provides a day of easy access to St. Vincent. Visitors enjoy a free full day of nature-related activities. Free transport to/from the island will be provided departing from the Indian Pass public boat ramp. Guided tours and exhibits inform participants about the islands protected wildlife, diverse ecosystems, and history as well as enjoy the unspoiled beauty of this unique, pristine, uninhabited refuge. Educational talks and discussions will be provided by numerous volunteers from the supporters and various community organizations. Guided tours will be both walking and vehicular. Light snacks and bottled water will be available. For more information call 653-8808. Outdoor BRIEF Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, March 7, 2013 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Flounder continue to be moving back closer to shore this week. Good reports from the Mexico beach canal, pier, and under the George Tapper bridge in St. Joe are still coming in. Trout and red fish will be on the run from all the freshwater coming down stream this week and holding in deeper holes and ledges in the bay. As the flood waters start to drain this week, most area streams and lakes are still full to the brim. Trot lines and bush hooks are a great way to take advantage of the catfish in the swift water. Beware of invasive brown widows BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net Early spring is sort of the of cial kickoff of what might be called Trap Time in Floridas Panhandle, the time when lipless crankbaits become the go-to lure for most guides, pros and expert anglers anywhere spring comes a month early. The trigger is the budding growth of hydrilla and other underwater weeds on many lakes. In summer the plants often grow in vast, solid mats all the way to the surface, making it impossible to sh with anything but a weedless-rig soft plastic slow and tedious. But winter causes these big mats to die back, and the dead vegetation then washes away with wind and waves. They never disappear in Florida lakes, but theyre considerably reduced. Though the weeds are decimated, the bass they harbored never go far away, and as soon as the rst new shoots start out of the bottom in late winter and early spring, the sh are back in these locations. But now, the ideal lure for rapidly nding and catching the sh is a fast-moving lipless crankbait. Its quick, its easy and its fun. Lipless crankbaits basically are slabs of hard plastic, apparently originated by Bill Lewis in the 1960s and the name of his invention, the Rat-LTrap, has become almost generic for this type of lure though there now are dozens of imitations. (Lewis reportedly named the lure for the clattery old station wagon he used to drive the roads of the South delivering his lures to tackle dealers.) When the lure is cranked steadily, the attened head causes it to vibrate rapidly. And rattles inside the lure set up a racket that actually can be heard above the surface as well as below. Fish apparently are attracted by both the sight and sound; the lures have caught millions of bass over the past 40 years. No-brainers The great thing about lipless crankers is that they are truly no-brainer lures; throw them out on points and creek bends, reel them back fast enough to feel the vibration and youll catch sh, especially if shed around shad schools or breaking bass. (If you need to get deeper, choose the larger, heavier models the retrieve speed can be maintained while the lure stays deep because of the extra weight.) The compact shape and high density make it possible to throw them great distances, reaching way out to schoolers you see at the surface. But there are ways to make them even more effective. One is ripping the lure, allowing it to sink just enough to tick the sprouting weeds, then snatching it forward hard enough to shake the weeds from the hooks each time you feel a snag, then letting it fall again. The dart and ash of the lures often triggers strikes from sh that could pass up a steady retrieve, with the strikes typically coming on the fall or just after you start cranking again. Bumping stumps, rocks and logs is similarly effective. Crank until you hit something, hesitate just a second, then crank some more, often the strike comes just after the movement starts again. And because of the shape of the lures, they are good for skipping under low-hanging docks. The lower and wider the dock the better, and the farther underneath you can scoot them, the more often youll get bit. Most anglers use a 6:1 or faster reel to work trap-style baits; slower ratios make it too tough to keep up the speed that works best. TRAP TIME Fast moving and lipless crankbaits

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Gulfside IGA PL A YERS OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR A pair of Allies shone for the Lady Seahawk softball teams last week. Junior catcher Ally Millender had a hit against Liberty County, where she played a great game behind the plate, and a hit against Port St. Joe, where she covered rst base. She is a leader on the eld and in the classroom, said coach Lisa Sweatt. Eighth grader Allie Kirvin went 3-for-4 in the JV game Tuesday night against Port St. Joe, and played awesome ball at third and rst against Liberty and Port St. Joe. Congratulations! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly Sta Times of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At: 106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-4121 Renee Parrish, D.M.D ACCEP T ING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICE S FOR CHILDREN: E arly H ead Start / H ead Start All services for our children are free with no cost to the parent. **Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).** Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 7, 2013 A Page 9 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A robust eld of runners braved strong wind and cool temperatures Saturday morning to make the 5K Red Pepper Run on St. George Island a memorable event. It was a refreshingly brisk morning for the 5K but we had an excellent turnout, with 145 registered runners, up from 126 in 2012, said race organizer Susan Bassett. Winning overall among the 140 runners who nished the race was Franklin County High School grad Michael D. Turner, 20, of Eastpoint, who topped the eld with a time of 21:59. The top female overall was Sam Fortunas, 22, of Tallahassee, who nished a half-minute behind Turner with a time of 22:30. Among St. George Island residents, the top nisher was Hobson Fulmer, 57, with a time of 22:58. The top female from the island was Alane Kadel, 43, with a time of 27:51. Bassett said participants hailed from Florida, South Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, Tennessee, and Ontario, Canada. Everything went off without a hitch, she said. Much thanks to our sponsors and to our hard-working volunteers Bob Landis, Davie Lloyd, and Shelley Shepard, our crossing guards Sandy Mitchem and John Schulz, and turn marker Steve Reilly. Reilly has been marking the turn at the 5K Red Pepper for as long as the race has been in existence! said Bassett. Our volunteers make this event what it is a very fun morning for all the runners, and a nice part of the fundraising effort for the St. George Island Fire Department. RED PEPPER 5K RESULTS Place Name Age Sex Time Award 1 Michael D. Turner 20 m 21:59 1st M Overall 2 Dan Fortunas 52 m 22:06 1st M 50-54 3 Sam Fortunas 22 f 22:30 1st F Overall 4 Chuck Pierson 41 m 22:49 1st M 40-44 5 Hobson Fulmer 57 m 22:58 1st M SGI 6 Stephen Taul 26 m 23:03 1st M 25-29 7 Scott Ruthstrom 43 m 23:12 2nd M 40-44 8 Joe Miller 33 m 23:29 1st M 30-34 9 Aw Haddock 43 m 23:41 3rd M 40-44 10 Bo Spring 36 m 1st M 35-39 11 Steve Wich 42 m 24:03 12 Jamie Nichols 25 f 24:07 1st F 25-29 13 Newt Houston 32 m 24:25 2nd M 30-34 14 Daniel Gidano 29 m 24:30 2nd M 25-29 15 Steve Newman 47 m 25:08 1st M 45-49 16 Larry Wagner 57 m 25:48 1st M 55-59 17 John M, Thompson 29 m 25:51 3rd M 25-29 18 Marena Benoit 14 f 25:55 1st F 9-14 19 Clint Kadel 44 m 26:06 20 Shaun Stott 24 f 26:20 21 Reid Hanway 29 m 26:20 22 Zach Childs 24 m 26:32 23 Ed Eastwood 51 m 26:33 2nd M 50-54 24 Dwayne Maddron 52 m 27:07 3rd M 50-54 25 Tanner Akos 28 m 27:14 26 Chris Emerson 38 m 27:20 2nd M 35-39 27 Nick Emerson 15 m 27:20 1st M 15-19 28 Danny Jones 27 m 27:32 29 Alane Kadel 43 f 27:51 1st F SGI 30 Susan Fox 62 f 27:54 1st F 60-64 31 Jill Owens 56 f 27:54 1st F 55-60 32 Lisa Kamal 42 f 28:02 1st F 40-44 33 Josh Sharp 31 m 28:12 3rd M 30-34 34 Rob Powis 59 m 28:38 2nd M 55-59 35 J. Gordon Shuler 51 m 29:20 36 Molly McKinstry 46 f 28:35 1st F 45-49 37 Angie Coglann 45 f 28:53 2nd F 45-49 38 Sean Ladson 36 m 29:25 3rd M 35-39 39 Sophia Kirvin 12 f 29:17 2nd F 9-14 40 Janelle Wagner 44 f 29:24 2nd F 40-44 41 Kaitlyn Akos 25 f 29:35 2nd F 25-29 42 Kim Braasch 44 f 29:41 3rd F 40-44 43 Dag Sohlberg 70 m 29:41 1st M 70+ By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Seahawks baseball team shutout Wewahitchka Feb. 28, and then were themselves shut out by Bozeman the following night. At Wewa, the Seahawks won 10-0, with senior pitcher Skyler Hutchinson pitching a one-hit shutout over six innings. Senior Chase Golden went 2-for-4, with four runs batted in, while junior Alex Causey went 2-for-4 with a pair of RBIs. Hutchinson helped his cause by going 1-for3, with an RBI. We hit the ball well, said coach Mike Emerson. We didnt make any errors. We did what we had to do, we put the ball in play. On Friday, the team lost 7-0 at Bozeman, as they produced just two hits, by seniors Billy Harris and Hutchinson, and committed four errors, including a pair of dropped fly balls. Junior pitcher James Newell got the loss, giving up six runs over the course of five innings, Junior Bobby John Curry hurled two innings in relief, giving up a run. It just goes to show you, if you dont put the ball in play you dont score, said Emerson. Last weeks rain and winds wreaked havoc on the ballfield, as a gust picked up the stands and plopped them down on the backstop, making the home field unplayable. Its making it hard for us and inconvenient for fans, said Emerson. The team played away games this week against John Paul. Wewa and South Walton, and return home next week. Runners brave brisk winds at Red Pepper Run Seahawks down Wewa, fall to Bozeman SHELLY SHEPARD | Special to the Times Top: Runners are off to a good start. Right: Top nishers Michael Turner, right, and Sam Fortunas, left. JAMES NEWELL BOBBY JOHN CURRY BILLY HARRIS ALEX CAUSEY SKYLER HUTCHINSON See full results on our website: apalachtimes.com

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The following is the honor roll for the second nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Chart School. All As First Grade: A. Carlton: Peyton Blackburn, CJ Conway, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Jostyn Tipton, Kiana Weeks, Isabella Price L. Allen: Cody Abercrombie, Caelyn Constantine, Trinity Creamer, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Esteban Bernabe, Malic ONeal, Taylor Pendleton, Jolie Mallon Second Grade J. Mallon: Ashton Amison, Jayden Nichols, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, Colin Weng S. Herrington: Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Lucy Neill, Arav Patel, Jabara Pearson, Owen Poloronis, Gabbi Register, Kylah Ross, Jackson Segree, Mark Willis Third Grade W. Martina: Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Andrew Monod, Genevieve Montgomery, Sophia Salman, Nico Valenzuela T. Moses: Meredith Alford, Weston Bockelman Fourth Grade M. Lee: Kaylee Hicks, Livia Monod L. Bockelman: Alex Joanos, Abby Johnson Sixth Grade Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Kevin Flores, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, JanMichael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer, Adria Valenzuela, Rebecca Willis Seventh Grade Michaela Cassidy, Savannah Montgomery, Ethan Moses, Faith Sapp Eighth Grade T. Ward: Jayla Alley, Corie Cates, Holly Chambers, Mikayla Lloyd, Alexis ONeal, Astrid Ramirez, Alexis Segree, Mallorie Shiver, Katy Spann A/B First Grade A. Carlton: Hannah Grace Abel, Alexicia McNair, Jentzen Odom, Aubrie Thompson, Jayla White, Taylor Pendleton L. Allen: Amontaye Austin, Conner Lolley, Weston Taranto Second Grade J. Mallon: Laithan Kent, Eric Lau, Trenton McLain, Rainey Smith, John Michael Thompson, Leah Wren S. Herrington: Wyatt Abercrombie, Caleb Cassidy, Miranda Diaz, Faline Everitt, Emily Hooten, Mason Moses, Mahaley Shuler, Brianna Stephens Third Grade W. Martina: Caleb Abel, Sevryn Everritt T. Moses: Lanie Allen, Lauren Conway, Carson Davis, Brooklyn ONeal, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith Fourth Grade M. Lee: Arryonna Cargill, Cody Cassidy, Devin Daniels, Leslie Escobar, Bradley Lee, Lamarius Martin, Ava Neill, Kiersten Prince, Austin Shiver L. Bockelman: Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Skye Huber, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clint Rester, Leslie Stiefel, Caden Turrell, Gregory Wilson Fifth Grade B. Linane: Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Cade Juno, Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Jake Norred, Allison Register, Alyssa Robinson, Camille Williams Sixth Grade Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Steven Hicks, Karolynn Myers, Christopher Newell, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott, Brandon Taranto, Cameron Wynn Seventh Grade Christian Amison, Mia Cummings, Nicholas Joanos, Brooke Martina, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Andrew Nguyen, Audriana Penamon, Lucas Sasnett, Alyssia Shirah, Madison Smith, Allie Zingarelli Eighth Grade Eve Bond, Cash Creamer, Logan Crosby, Jaylon Gainer, Bianca Huber, Emily Crosby, Tia Cummings, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bobby Kilgore, Allie Kirvin, Zachery May, Alyssa Shiver, Xuripha Tiller, Ali Valenzuela A Call To All Vendors: Exposure for Your Business Become a main ingredient for local consumers as a featured sponsor of the Taste of Home Cooking School: $ Buy your tickets now at The News Herald and at newsherald.com PUBLIC NOTICE The Franklin County Construction Industry Licensing Board will be holding a public workshop to review and discuss changes to the National Flood Insurance Program, for Franklin County. These new requirements will affect most areas in Franklin County, Apalachicola and Carrabelle which are located This workshop will be held March 13, 2013, at 6:30 p.m., in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For more information please contact Rachel Ward at the Franklin County Planning and Building Department at (850) 653-9783, ext 156. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information 2089830 ABC School announces Honor Roll Special to the Times Floridas top perform ing STEM students were recently recognized as Sunshine State Scholars and given the opportunity to attend a two-day event in Orlando, Feb. 21 22. Franklin Countys Flori daLearns STEM Scholars participant Jathan Martin said afterwards that To day we have joined other students from around Flor ida to experience and ex plore different options for future endeavors. We plan on using these experiences to better our futures. Martin said his favorite STEM Scholar activity so far had been the Summer Challenge when we did ro botics at FSU. Each school district throughout Florida se lected their top 11th grade student based on their academic achievement in Science, Technology, Engi neering and Mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher chosen by the student, were invited to participate in the annual Sunshine State Scholars program, sponsored by the Florida Education Founda tion, in collaboration with the State University Sys tem of Florida, the Florida College System, and the Florida Department of Education. Among those being hon ored this year were 17 stu dents from the small and rural school districts par ticipating in the FloridaLe arns Stem Scholars Initia tive for Gifted and Talented Students. The project is funded through the Florida Department of Educations Race to the Top award and involves a partnership among Floridas three edu cational consortia, which provide critical educational support services to Flori das small and rural school districts. The consortia in clude the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium in northwest Florida. The project is focused on affording increased ac cess to rigorous STEM courses, providing collab orative problem-solving experiences, and ensuring students are well-informed about STEM career op tions. In addition to rec ognizing their academic success, the Sunshine State Scholars program gave these STEM students the opportunity to meet directly with highly suc cessful professionals from STEM-related industries in Florida, and with recruit ers from Floridas nest colleges and universities. During the event, the students heard about spe cial programs of study and industry internship op portunities, learned about some of the latest innova tions and discoveries in STEM-related research, were inspired by personal success stories from lead ers in Floridas STEM in dustry, and were actively recruited to become part of Floridas future talented workforce. The scholars also enjoyed meeting with students from around the state who have similar interests in science, tech nology, engineering and mathematics. Martin recognized as Sunshine State ScholarSP E CI A L T O TH E TIM ES Franklin Countys Jathan Martin meets with Florida Commissioner of Education Tony Bennett. School A10 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013County to honor volunteers At their Tuesday meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to recognize April 21-27 as National Volunteer Week. This week is recognized nation-wide in honor of the many citizens who volunteer time and talents helping those in need. John Solomon is spearheading a local movement to recognize those who give of themselves. He is currently compiling a list of active volunteers and working with businesses and organizations across the county.Carrabelle to charge county for water At the Feb. 19 meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce told commissioners that Carrabelle had informed him they would charge 32 cents per 1,000 gallons for wastewater to irrigate Kendrick Sports Park. In the past, the city has provided water for free. Commissioners instructed Pierce to write the city a letter asking them to forgo the fee because the eld is of economic importance to the east end of the county. At Tuesdays meeting, Pierce told commissioners he had not written the letter, but was informed by Carrabelle employees the city could not provide water for free. He said they may raise the rates further to 46 cents per 1,000 gallons. There appears to be little opportunity for the city to provide water for free, considering the nancial straits the city is in, said Pierce. He said he had asked county Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender to calculate the cost of operating irrigation wells as an alternative to purchasing water from Carrabelle. News BRIEFS

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, March 7, 2013 Columbia, Montana and ve times in Oklahoma. He is the current Mississippi state champion. Its about the meat, tri tip, he said. His son, who ew Harrier jets for 20 years in the Marine Corps, said the team name came after he had won a chili cook-off in South Texas, and they asked what kind of meat he used. Roadkill was his answer. Dad said he has found that chilies are milder in Idaho and Montana, but in Mississippi, where his chili was hotter than he intended, he just put more tomatoes in it, and I won. After submitting their entries from among the four quarts each had to prepare, the competitors waited as the judges assessed their chilies for avor, texture, consistency, blend of spices, aroma and color. In the end, veteran competitor Paul Nunn of Nunn Better Chili, out of Fort Pierce, took home the win and $500, with Roadkill Hovering Harriers second, receiving $300. Wanda Gangswich of Three Sheets to the Wind, of Panama City Beach, took third and $200. Rounding out the winners were fourth place J. G. Carvers Team Spice Boys, from Vestavia, Ala., and fth place, Kim Pooles Hot Lips Chili team out of Tallahassee. Nunn, who won the cook-off in 2008 and has been competing here regularly for the past two decades, cooked alongside son Tim Nunn and, for the rst time, granddaughter Alyssa Jones. Weve been coming here for 20 years, Nunn said. Its got to be a family thing. We come up and spend a week. Nunn said he is looking forward to his third trip to the world championships in October in Palm Springs, Calif. A retired building contractor, for wastewater treatment facilities, Nunn said the weather proved to be a challenge. Most of use basically the same recipe, but you adjust it a little bit here or there, he said. You put in a little more spice, or I found from past experience that you wind up if youre not careful, you cook it too long, and if you cook it too long, you boil a lot of the avor out of it. I think today I cooked it a total of about an hour and 15 minutes and shut it off with 45 minutes left. Today was a good day to cool it, Nunn said. Today was especially hard because half the time the red blow out, and you had to restart it. When the winds blowing like this, if you turn it up too high it boils, turn it down too low and it blows out. Nunn said he enhanced his tri tail beef with a little bit of Jimmy Dean sausage and found the right mix of chili powders, cumin and Aunt Cora seasoning. Winning for Best Booth was the Burnin at Both Ends team, with the Showmanship award won by Team Toilet Bowl Chili out of Valdosta, Ga., The Just Because award went to the FART (Fire ghters Annual Recompense Team) out of Atlanta, which this year dressed as Oompa Loompas after last year coming dressed as Elvis. The High Yield award went to the Hot Lips Team, which raised more than $800 for the re ghters. Highlighting the auction was the sale of $4,000 in premium tickets to the Talladega 500, supplied courtesy of a high-level Talladega Superspeedway exec with a home on the island. Shepard said plans are to next year introduce salsa competition to further broaden the event. PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DE P ARTMENT OF ECONOMIC O PP ORTUNITY WILL HOST A FRANKLIN COUNTY LONG-TERM ECONOMIC D IVERSIFICATION SUMMIT ON MON D AY, MARCH 11, 2013 FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 3:00 P .M. AT THE A P ALACHICOLA NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE LOCATE D AT 108 ISLAN D D RIVE IN EAST P OINT, FLORI D A THE P UBLIC IS INVITE D TO ATTEN D AN D P ARTICI P ATE THE OBJECTIVES OF THE MEETING WILL BE: TO INTRODUCE KEY ISSUES TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY AND TO DEVELOP IDEAS FOR LONG-TERM ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION IN FRANKLIN COUNTY Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 SPICE from page A5 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEFT: An Oompa Loompa dances in the Mr. Hot Sauce competition. CENTER: The Big Belly team consisted of Dale Bodziony of Jacksonville, left, and Tallahassees Larry Hines. Not pictured is John Harris of Atlantic Beach. RIGHT: Victor Mitchell of Kelleys Foods, out of Alabama, cooks up the smoked sausages that make for a great tastin sensation. Most of use basically the same recipe, but you adjust it a little bit here or there. You put in a little more spice. Paul Nunn, Nunn Better Chili

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 90258T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit for a Breakwater installation, file number 19-0313745-001-E1, to Mr. William Kdd, P.O. Box 70847, Albany, Georgia 31708-0847. C/o Garlick Environ mental Assoc. Inc. P.O. Box 385 Apalachicola, FL 32329 The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of 63 linear feet of breakwater with two 5’ fishery corridors on either end. Breakwater is to be installed no more than 10’ waterward of Mean High Water. Wax Myrtle is to be planted on 6 foot centers within 5 feet landward of the existing rip-rap revetment. The project will be at 1457 Cutty Shark Way, St. George Island, Florida 32328, in Section 29, Township 9-South, Range 6-West in Franklin County, at Latitude 29.678958 North, Longitude 84.819078 West, in St. George Sound, a Class II Outstanding Florida Waterbody. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) `of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(x).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the fling of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days fiom the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District Tallahasse office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd. Tallahassee, Florida. March 7, 2013 90280T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192009CA000094CAXXXX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTE FOR BANK OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, Series 2006-5, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES R. PAYTON A/K/A ROBBY PAYTON, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated January 29, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000094CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, Series 2006-5, is Plaintiff, and JAMES R. PAYTON A/K/A ROBBY PAYTON, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 A.M. at FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 13th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at an old terra cotta monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 21, Township B South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 182.91 feet to the Northeasterly right-ofway boundary of Bluff Road, thence run North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 612.99 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 143.57 feet, thence run North 1029.20 feet to the Southerly edge of the Apalachicola River, thence run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 14 seconds East along said rivers edge 70.17 feet, thence run North 80 degrees 20 minutes 25 seconds East along said rivers edge 62.11 feet, thence run South 1067.04 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT the following described parcel: Commence at an old terra cotta monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 21, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 182.91 feet to the Northeasterly right-ofway boundary of Bluff Road, thence run North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 612.99 feet to a re-rod for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said rightof-way boundary 143.57 feet to a re-rod, thence run North 340.02 feet to a re-rod, thence run South 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds East 143.57 feet to a re-rod, thence run South 340.02 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendends must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachiacola, FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, this 30th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, Series 2006-5 c/o Phelan Hallinan, PLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-7000 PH# 20847 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Feb 28, March 7, 2013 90288T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA File No.: 13-000002-CP Division: Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF CORA MAXINE SANBORN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Cora Maxine Sanborn, deceased, who died testate on December 18, 2012, File Number 13-000002-CP, Probate Division, is pending in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, Clerk of the Circuit Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The estate is testate. The name and address of the personal representative and of the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THE NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 28, 2013. Executed this 7th day of February, 2013. Personal Representative: Gary Wayne Beebe P.O. Box 365 Carrabelle, FL 32322 David J. Hull, Esq. Mary M. Calcote, Esq. Florida Bar No. 278343 Florida Bar No. 25469 Smith Hulsey & Busey 225 Water Street, Suite 1800 Jacksonville, FL 32202 Phone: (904)359-7700 Email: mcalcote@smith hulsey.com Attorneys for Personal Representative Feb 28, March 7, 2013 90334T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 12000364CA Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Unknown Spouse of John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Phyllis Bleiseis; Unknown Spouse of Phyllis Bleiweis; Carrabelle Landings Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Unknown Spouse of John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Phyllis Bleiweis; Unknown Spouse of Phyllis Bleiweis; Carrabelle Landings Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, inside front steps of the courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 21st day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, CARRABELLE LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON AS CLERK OF THE COURT By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Feb 28, March 7, 2013 90364T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Gulf Coast Workforce Board announces the availability of a Request for Proposal (RFP) titled “Workforce Center Sign”. The purpose of the RFP is to seek proposals from qualified vendors to provide signage replacing the existing Workforce Center sign and accompanying tenant signs located at the corner of Highway 231 and 19th Street in Panama City, Florida. The intent is to enter into a contract with a single prime contractor. Bidder will submit proposals for two scenarios as outlined in the RFP. Proposals will be due by 4 pm, Wednesday March 15, 2013. To obtain an RFP, or for further information, contact: Workforce Center Amanda Bawn, Communications Coordinator 625 Highway 231 Panama City, FL 32405 850-872-4340 x180 abawn@gcwb.org Minority businesses are encouraged to apply. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. March 7, 2013 90336T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, March 8, 2013. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #49 William T. Harris Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #56 Kimberly Bennett Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #61 Mary James Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #70 Candice Lewicki Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #94 Martha Montgomery Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #110 Barbara Bloodworth Contents-Household Feb 28, March 7, 2013 92545T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000488 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. UTA HARDY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 29, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000488 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and UTA HARDY; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF UTA HARDY N/K/A KEITH HARDY; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, and TENANT #4 are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at inside FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 8 AND 9, BLOCK 68, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-OF, RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 127 9TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 30, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850577-4401 Fax: 850487-7947. F10066366 March 7, 14, 2013 90382T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-11-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF CYNTHIA ANN GREEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CYNTHIA

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 7, 2013 The Times | A13 13 Gulf Coast Residential & Commercial Lots RowellAuctions.comA MarkNet Alliance Member € GAL AU-C002594 € 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Complete Details Visit RowellAuctions.com Tuesday, March 26th at 2:00 p.m. Online Bidding Available2884 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Waterfront 3 BR/2 BA Home w/Dock 3149 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Gulf View 3 BR/2 BA Home 3153 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Nice Gulf View Lot 2390 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 0.8 Acres Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 1 Acre Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL 9,576 SF Comm. Bldg. U.S. Hwy. 98 E Nice Gulf View Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL (2) Comm. Bldgs. 202 NE 7th St., Carrabelle 6,400 SF Metal Bldg. NE 7th Street, Carrabelle Commercial Lot 3157 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 2 BR/2 BA Home & 1BR/1 BA Cottage 57 Seventh St, Apalachicola, FL Triplex, (3) 1 BR/1 BA Units Auction Site: St. James Bay Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Ln, Carrabelle, FLOpen House: Sunday, March 17th 2-5 p.m. RENTALS2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED ................$550 3 BR / 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDOW/ POOL .....................................$8503 BR / 2 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL AND 10X15 STORAGE UNIT.....$9503 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOLNIGHTLY / $150 | WEEKLY / $8503 BR / 2 UNFURNISHED TRAILOR ......$500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT. / 2 LOTS, HWY 98 FRONTAGE.........$650 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS  PIPE WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS  PAINTERS/SANDBLASTERS INDUSTRIAL MARINE ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516DENTAL ASSISTING FACULTYTeach in assigned didactic, clinical (direct patient care), lab and/or simulated labs. Design & implement curriculum plan, provide academic and/or career advising, and serve as inventory/supplies manager in on-campus clinic. Requires BS in related eld from an accredited institution, DANB Certi ed + registered Dental Hygienist both in good standing, 3 yrs. relevant experience, willing to complete coursework in Educational Methodology and current working knowledge/exp. in Dental Assisting & Dental Hygiene (within 6 mths. of application), and be willing to pursue/complete graduate degree in discipline, education or related eld within 3 yrs. of hire. MS degree in eld preferred. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Open Until Filled with a review starting 3/25/13. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED The MainStay Suites and Port Inn are now accepting applications for housekeepers. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about bene ts package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 NOW HIRING PARTTIME EVENING COOKThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time evening cook. The ideal candidate will have kitchen experience, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 BARTENDER / THERAPIST NEEDED The Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWPPort Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 NOW HIRINGPART-TIME INSPECTOR Weekends Required $12/hourApply at: 112 Franklin Blvd. St George Island NAIL PERSON NO ACRYLICS NEEDED FOR VERY BUSY SALON.Flexible Schedule Apply in Person @147 W. Hwy 98, Port St. Joe For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $165,000; Call 864-356-5949 3Br/2Ba, Dbl Wide Large Living Room, Dinning Room, on 1 acre of land, Heat & Air, All Appliances, 595 Wilderness Rd, Eastpoint, $75K; Call 850-370-0939 Total Down Pmt $795‘02 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $1375‘02 Ford F-150 4 Door Crew Cab T otal Price $8,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 1/1 Carrabelle, private 1 acre1 bdrm, 1 bath, older home, closed in porch could be used for child/teen bdrm. Newly painted. Fenced yard Non-smokers only, 1st, last & security. $500 mo., 850-697-8790 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow Taking ApplicationsAll Positions!!! Apply in person only HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/HealthCNABrightStar Care of Bay County (#299993930) is seeking a CNA to work in the Gulf and Franklin County areas, PRN part-time 6-12 hours per week. Must have CNA certificate, TB test, Level 2, safe driving record, and be drug free. Non smoker. Call 850 238 3270 to get instructions for applying. Web ID#: 34242876 Text FL42876 to 56654 Medical/HealthFULL TIMEFull time position available with Buy Rite Drugs in Apalachicola. Apply in person at 117 Ave E. NO PHONE CALLS. Web ID# 34243652 Text FL43652 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Great benefits for full time employees. Weekend work requiredFT Maintenance TechnicianGeneral maintenance experience, good driving historyFT Inspectors & PT InspectorsMust have reliable transportation. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time/ Full time Housekeeper Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Drama Free, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Carrabelle: 2171 Kentucky Ave. Friday, March 8th & Saturday, March 9th 8am -? Tools, household decor, fishing equip, clothing, lots of nice items.Text FL43908 to 56654 Port St. Joe 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Saturday 9th 8am-?Multi Family Yard SaleFurniture, Home Decor, Clothing for all ages, Jewlery and much more! GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl Mar 16th & 17th 8a-5p. Concealed Weapons Classes. (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission: $6Text FL40762 to 56654 Apalachicola Used Book Storeis looking to buy limited number, good condition Apalachicola Cook Books For more information Call 850-570-4204 92547T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000462 RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000462 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, is Plaintiff, and MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, 2nd Floor Lobby of THE COURTHOUSE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of MAY, 2013, the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 41 OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF TRACT 41, A DISTANCE OF 107.73 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 136.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO, 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES, 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 449.20 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 102.87 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 439.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21st day of February, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days, if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 7, 14, 2013 *Adopt*:Athletic, Creative, Loving Lawyer & Doctor yearn to be doting Dad & At Home Mom. Expenses Paid *Ben & Amy* FLBar42311 1800-522-0045 Lost Small White DogLong hair male maltese mix about 10 pounds, a family member.lost in Carrabelle reward 850-294-9664 Text FL43940 to 56654 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 ANN GREEN, deceased, whose date of death was December 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 7, 2013. APRIL JOANN LOUDERMILK Personal Representative 3501 W. Orange, Lot 20, Tallahassee, FL 32310 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 7, 14, 2013

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast MLS 247917 $132,500 Carrabelle A 3 BD / 2 BA historic home zoned mix use commercial district. Home has lots of character with historical value plus a large fenced yard and an unobstructed view of the Carrabelle River. Wanda Rose 850-545-5852 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248790 $99,900 St. George Island GULF BEACHES LOT High duney lot on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive. Bike path across the street. 3rd lot from the corner of 6th Street East puts you close to the beach for under $100,000. No clearing necessary, 1/3 acre, High (dry) elevation. Buy to build or keep as investment. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248838 $635,000 St. George Island CLIPPER BAY HOME Beautifully decorated, Fully furnished, 5 br/5ba, spectacular Gulf view, Elevator, open LR with wet Dock, Pool & bathhouse, Boat Slip, park like setting. as top secretary. Also in consideration for the district employee of the year honors were pre-K paraprofessional Jeanine Wood, bus driver Maxine Taylor, custodian Bobby Langley and food service manager April Dalton. It was a big honor, said King, a 1991 Apalachicola High School graduate now in 17th year of teaching. I know there are a lot of teachers who work weekends and evenings. Im not the only one who gives a lot of their personal time. Browning, a retired rural mail carrier from Thomasville, Ga., who has worked as a secretary for the last nine years, said her honor came as a result of group effort. One person cant do the job, she said. It takes all of them. I couldnt do my job if not for my coworkers. Its an honor they selected me over everyone else, she said. I share it with all our co-workers. King, who attended Gulf Coast Community College and then Florida State, graduated in 1996 with a bachelors degree in elementary education. She has been married to David King for 20 years, and the couple has two sons, Jordan, who attends Gulf Franklin, and Jared, a Franklin County High School freshman. She has taught in the district since 1996 in grades two through ve and has a fourth-grade classroom this year. The students having just nished taking the Florida Writes exam. King has shared writing instruction techniques with teachers throughout the district, some based on the ideas of Melissa Forney. We share ideas, and Ive shared with them what I do, said King, who said she thinks her teaching at this stage of her career is more effective than it ever has been. After youve done something for as long as I have, its not as stressful, and you can enjoy it more, she said. You kind of nd a niche, and things seem to fall into place easier and kids enjoy the learning easier. Browning has worked for the school system for 12 years, and after nishing a rst career as a rural mail carrier in Thomasville decided to retire to Franklin County. I wanted some place warmer, and it was too crowded in South Florida, she said. I came here for the week of Thanksgiving, stayed at the island and decided this was where I wanted to retire. Browning bought a house in Lanark Village in 2002, not long after she started as a substitute teacher. In 2004 she was moved to a secretary position and became principals secretary when the new school opened in August 2008. Her son, Bert, is married to the former Jennifer Ashley, and the couple has a 16-year-old granddaughter, a 2-year-old son and is expecting twins in the next three weeks. Duhart, who earned an economics degree from Marshall University and worked as a paralegal and nancial analyst before entering the teaching profession, is on the other end of her career. After nishing her education at Gulf Coast, she started in 2008 in the county as a business teacher and then moved to social studies. She now teaches American history and government, economics and global studies and is married to Michael Duhart. They have twin sons, Thomas and Jackson Subbarao-Copley, in the eighth grade. I was honored that my fellow teachers nominated me for this, she said. I love my students; theyre the reason I keep coming back. A native of Normal, Ill., Countryman is in her 23rd year of teaching, 15 of them in the Franklin County Schools. She holds bachelors degrees in graphic communications from Illinois State University and elementary education from University of West Florida, as well as a masters degree in varying exceptionalities from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La, and a specialist degree in curriculum instruction from Piedmont College in Athens, Ga. She started teaching in 1990 in Franklin County, rst elementary school and then special education, and stayed until 2002 when, she moved to Georgia. Countryman returned in 2010 to teach middle school ESE and now teaches eighth-grade language arts. I am honored to represent such a great group of colleagues, said Countryman, mother of two Franklin County students, daughter Ursula and son Rory. Mount-Simmons, who was the districts teacher of the year in 2009, has taught in the district for 33 years, mostly in elementary school. But this year, she took over coordination of the Franklin County Academy, which together with the pre-kindergarten classes and the alternative school, form the offerings at the Learning Center. Its for kids who have gotten behind. They get to do that here, she said. Students can complete two years of work in one and stay on to receive their diplomas. We nd most of the kids are behind academically because they missed too much school. Mount-Simmons said. Theyre committed now to getting their education. It was social time for them, she said. But theyre sharp kids, now theyre back on track and need to do what they chose not to. These kids can do; its just life got in their way. Mount-Simmons said she sees her role as a teacher as more of a calling than a job. I always said I dont like kids, she said. You have to have a calling to be in this profession. I honestly believed I was called here, it was a choice made for me. And because its a calling, the compassion for what I do comes out. The senior member among those honored was Taylor, who has been driving a bus for the district since 1971. She had been driving to and from Carrabelle, but later moved to the route to Sumatra, which takes her to Brickyard, Bloody Bluff, Jeffy Tucker Road and CC Land Road. I love it. Thats why Ive been here so long. I love the young uns, she said. I am driving grandkids. They tell me, My daddy used to ride your bus, and my grandma used to ride your bus. Taylor, who lives in Blood Bluff with husband, AJ, has three daughters, Karen, Lucretia and Carlene, and a son Jay; nine grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Every year I say Im going to retire and I dont do it, she said. Towns, who shared top secretary honors with Browning, started in May 2001 at Apalachicola High School and then went to Carrabelle before eventually nding her role at the Learning Center. Towns also was chosen last year as the districts top secretary and said she was very proud and honored to be chosen again. She has lived in Apalachicola since 1991 and has raised three children, all AHS graduates: April, Holly and Charles Justice. Towns has two grandchildren, Jayden and Gianna. Wood, a native of Eastpoint, graduated in 1987 from Carrabelle High School, then took courses at Gulf Coast Community College before starting to work for the school district in 2001. She rst began as an assistant to Deene Cook and later was hired as a paraprofessional, mostly for kindergarten and prekindergartners in Carrabelle and later the Learning Center. She now works with instructor Lisa Murray. I was very honored and very humbled and appreciative, she said. Married to husband Charlie Wood, she is mom to daughters Haley Wood-Hobbs, a CHS graduate who lives in Crawfordville with stepchildren Molly and Braddock; and Katie Wood, a FCHS senior. Langley graduated from AHS in 2000, and after a stint working for Barbers Seafood, started in October 2005 working as a custodian. In Feb. 2011 he married wife Jennifer. I felt very, very honored, he said. Seeing the kids, thats one of the rewards of my job. I get to see the kids in the cafeteria. They come up and hug me and are happy to see us. I enjoy talking to them, asking them how their day went and make sure theyre doing good. Me and my wife love children; we just dont have any at the moment, he said. Dalton started as a paraprofessional in 2007 but in 2009 shifted over to food service, where she now manages food for the three schools in the district. I love my job, she said. Because I get to see the children and come in contact with every child. Most I know by name. Married to husband Frank, the couple lives in Eastpoint and has two sons, Marcus, 19, and William, 17. Dolores Hayward-Croom coordinated the School Related Employee of the Year program, while Harolyn Walker handled the Teacher of the Year selection process. Both King and Browning will receive an all-expense paid trip to the Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta. The four teachers honored each received $100, with King presented with a $150 check for her district selection. When she attends the state event in Orlando later this year, she will receive a $750 check from Macys, and the school will receive one for $250. King also received a gift certi cate from Mainstay Suites for one-night stay, a $25 gift certi cate from the Honey Hole and a $50 gift from Delta Kappa Gamma, a fraternal organization for women educators. In addition to a $100 prize and gift basket from her fellow employees, Browning received a $25 gift certi cate from Gulfside IGA, a $50 gift certi cate from Ace Hardware and a two-night stay at Sportsmans Lodge. JEANINE WOOD JOY TOWNS BOBBY LANGLEY APRIL DALTON MAXINE TAYLOR ELINOR MOUNT-SIMMONS JAIME DUHART LYDIA COUNTRYMAN TEACHER from page A1



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Chili cook-off draws crowd on blustery dayBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Its dif cult to imagine its been going strong for 31 years, but Saturdays Annual Chili Cook-off and Charity Auction on St. George Island gave some indication as to why. Despite the windy weather and the cold morning, the event drew another robust crowd all day long and a hefty fundraising total for the St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department. Grayson Shepard, who oversees the cooking competition that has made the cook-off one of the Southeasts premier qualifying events for the International Chili Society world championships, said unof cial word is the event raised about $90,000, short of the record, but an excellent effort by all accounts. It was down from previous years by a little bit, but with the cold weather and the wind, everybody did great, he said. He said about 3,000 people paid $5 each to enter the gate, up a little from last year, with another $60,000 in food and beverage sales the day of the event. Add in the auction results and sponsorships, and event organizers were all pleased at how well the cook-off went this year. Shepard said this was the second year the organizers limited the chili booths to selling only chili, with each ticket buyer receiving ve tickets they could use to select their peoples choice. Blue Water Chili, with well more than 200 tickets received, was the runaway choice for the Peoples Choice Award. After a brisk morning 5K Red Pepper Run that featured 145 registered runners, up from 126 last year, the sun began to peek through the clouds and the temperature warmed while the wind stayed strong. The zaniness got started with the By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Morale at the Franklin County School District saw a huge learning gain last month, with the selection of its top teacher and school employee of the year. At a banquet Feb. 22 in the high school cafeteria, elementary teacher Laura King and the principals secretary Sharon Browning shared the honor of their colleagues choice as the best during what has been by all accounts a challenging year. King was chosen as district Teacher of the Year from a crew that include three other teachers: language arts teacher Lydia Countryman, representing the middle school; high school social studies teacher Jaime Duhart; and elementary school teacher turned high school credit recovery instructor Elinor MountSimmons, representing the Learning Center at the former campus of Brown Elementary. Browning was chosen as district School Related Employee of the Year after sharing in a tie with the Learning Centers Joy Towns Opinion . A4 Society . A6 Faith . A7 Outdoors . A8 Tide Chart . A8 Sports . A9 Classi eds A12-A13 xxxxx Opinion A4 xxxxx xxxxxPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Camp Gordon Johnston parade SaturdayThe Camp Gordon Johnston Days parade will begin at 10:45 a.m. Saturday, featuring World War II vehicles, tanks, modern military equipment, marching bands, active-duty soldiers, civic groups and re-enactors. The museum will be open from noon to 4 p.m. today, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Dixie to present world music, songwritersBack for their second season at the Dixie, the Maharajah Flamenco musicians bring highenergy Argentine tango, Brazilian samba and Latin/ Caribbean rhythm. Tickets for the 8 p.m. Friday show are $25. At 8 p.m. Saturday, the Dixie presents An evening of New Orleans songwriters, featuring Jon Roniger and Kristen Diable. Tickets are $25. For more info, call 653-3200.Dont miss Saturday dinner-danceTickets, $17, are on sale for the 2013 Camp Gordon Johnston Days Dinner/ Dance at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex on Saturday, March 9. World War II veterans and activeduty soldiers eat for free. Hog Wild Bar B Q will cater, with live dance music. Tickets are at the CGJ World War I Museum, at www.campgordonjohnston. com or from any Camp Gordon Johnston Association member. FCSWA to meet MondayThe new meeting date for the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will be 6 p.m. Monday, March 11, at the Eastpoint Firehouse on Sixth Street. The group will announce new board members and will be looking for a new secretary and new second vice president. For more information, call Shannon Harts eld, FCSWA president, at 653-5190. Thursday, March 7, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 45 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM SPRING FORWARD2 a.m. Sunday Shuler remains county attorneyBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Michael Shuler will remain Franklin Countys attorney and will not receive a pay raise. After three months of debate, Commissioner William Massey on Tuesday moved to refuse all bids for the position of county attorney and leave it as it is. The motion passed 3-2 with Commissioners Pinki Jackel and Cheryl Sanders opposed. This action means Shuler continues in his role, at his original rate of reimbursement. The search for a new attorney began at the Dec. 4, 2012, meeting when Massey asked Shuler if he was under contract and how much he was paid. Shuler said he had been under contract since 2001 and received $80 per hour. This led to a motion by Commissioner Pinki Jackel, seconded by Massey, to advertise for the bids for the position of county attorney. Jackel said it would give the commission an opportunity to evaluate who we do business with. Under her motion, the attorney contract would be re-evaluated every two years. On Jan. 15, the commissioners opened bids from ve attorneys, including Shuler. Under his new proposal, Shulers fee would increase to $90 hourly. Kristy Banks of Eastpoint offered the lowest bid at $90 an hour for legal duties and $70 for non-legal matters. At the Feb. 5 meeting, the commissioners interviewed Shuler; Banks; Ethan Way, of Tallahassee; Shalene Grover, of Marianna; and Daniel Cox, of Carrabelle. At that meeting, Massey and Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders said they had received telephone threats to in uence their votes on the matter in favor of Shuler. The commission voted to table the choice of attorney, at that meeting and again at the Feb. 19 meeting. But on Tuesday, the matter was decided without further discussion. The only job candidates present were Shuler and, in the audience, Banks. When the topic was raised, Jackel immediately moved that Way be named county attorney. The motion died for lack of a second. Jackel then moved that Banks be awarded the position. This motion also died without a second.A little more spicePHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesTOP LEFT: The Oompa Loompas, representing the FART (Fire ghters Annual Recompense Team) consisted of, from left, Chris Stegall, Atlanta; Rina Pearson, Panama City; Capt. Toby Banks and brother Tony Banks, seated, both from Atlanta. TOP RIGHT: Gordon and Sandra Adkins do volunteer duty. BOTTOM LEFT: Paul Nunn from Nunn Better Chili won top prize. BOTTOM RIGHT: Wanda Gangswich of Panama City Beach samples the chili that took third place for her Three Sheets to the Wind team.County picks years top teacher, staffer After youve done something for as long as I have, its not as stressful, and you can enjoy it more. You kind of nd a niche, and things seem to fall into place easier.Laura KingIts an honor they selected me over everyone else. I share it with all our co-workers.Sharon Browning MICHAEL SHULERSee SPICE A5 See TEACHER A14

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care?Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. PUBLIC NOTICEPlease be advised that starting March 1, 2013, Fees will be as follows: Large Truck Tires ..................... $5.00 each For more information, contact 850-670-8167 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM FSU students study countys future trendsBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Two Florida State University graduate students are seeking input on the economic future of the county. On Monday, March 4, Aaron Henderson and Kristi Malone, both FSU masters candidates, met with Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson and Franklins Promise Director Joe Taylor to discuss the future economics and demographics of the county. Henderson said the pair accessed census records from 2010 in an attempt to get a snapshot of conditions in the county and are in the process of interviewing county residents to get a boots on the ground feel for social and economic conditions. Johnson gave them in-depth information on the countys economic woes and problems with the bay. He was quick to point out that although the county received no oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, its reputation was blackened by negative reporting of environmental effects further west. He painted a picture of the problems caused by lack of freshwater in the bay and the multigenerational ties of many families to the seafood industry. Henderson and Malone said they were anxious to speak to Johnson because he is a lifelong resident of the county in addition to holding public of ce. Taylor outlined some of the programs under way to provide education for underemployed seafood workers. Johnson said one traditional problem with economic diversication schemes here is the tendency for seafood workers to return to life on the bay when shing rebounds. He pointed out that many oystermen prefer the freedom and potential for substantial pro t to a steady job, especially since few jobs here provide bene ts as an incentive. Taylor said interviews with local workers indicate that most require about $16 per hour just to make ends meet but most jobs only pay about $8 per hour. Johnson told the students that based on building permits issued; development is rebounding by baby steps from the recent low point. He said he considers it important to view the county as a cohesive community working together. Even though Apalachicola is an attraction in its own right, we rely on visitors to St. George Island to come over here and shop and dine, said the mayor. The students said a population pyramid created to envision the age structure of the county indicates the bulk of the population is aged 25 to 50 years. We are an aging population, said Johnson, pointing out that while young families are leaving, there is an in ux of early retirees and people seeking to set up new businesses downtown. Henderson and Malone said the working title of their thesis is Future and current trends in Franklin County. Working under Dr. Timothy Chapin, chairman of the FSU Department of Urban and Regional Planning, their ultimate goal is to predict trends through 2030. The students said they are seeking to interview members of local government and the business community but have had limited response to their introductory emails. If you would like to speak to them, call the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at 850-645-9232. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesApalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, left, and Franklins Promise Director Joe Taylor, center, met Monday with Aaron Henderson and Kristi Malone from the Florida State University Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Camp Gordon Johnston Days marches onSpecial to the TimesCamp Gordon Johnston Days this weekend promises to be another exciting homage to the countys World War II legacy, when thousands of American troops trained for amphibious warfare at the Carrabelle site. Beginning on Thursday, March 7, veterans and their families can register throughout the day at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex at 1001 Grey Ave. At noon, there will be a formal dedication of the new addition to the museum. Finger foods, beverages and treats will be provided. On Friday, March 8, registration will continue throughout the day. Boat excursions to Dog Island, where many practice beach landings were held during the World War II training, will be provided by Towboats U.S. Passage for each participant will cost $25; there must be a minimum of three persons before the boat will leave. This is a sightseeing trip; passengers will not disembark to Dog Island. For reservations, call 6978909 or 697-3360. At 6 p.m., Friday, the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, in Lanark Village, will host a Southern seafood buffet. World War II veterans and active duty troops are especially invited to attend this event where they will be served rst. Live music will add to the evening festivities. Cash bar. On Saturday, March 9, all participants are invited to begin the day with breakfast at the Masonic Lodge, 108 NE First St., in Carrabelle. Breakfast is at 7:30 a.m. at a cost of $6. Breakfast is free to activeduty troops and World War II veterans. At approximately 10:45 a.m., on U.S. 98 in Carrabelle, the parade will begin, featuring World War II vehicles, tanks, and modern military equipment. Marching bands, active duty soldiers, civic groups and reenactors will participate in the parade festivities. The public is invited to attend Saturday evening beginning at 5 p.m. there will be a dinner and dance at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex auditorium, where prizes and awards will be given out. Live dance music will be provided. The meal will be your choice of either seafood or chicken at $17 per person. The public is invited to attend this event and sponsor dinner for a soldier. All active duty and World War II veterans eat free. The CGJ Museum will be open for visitors on Thursday from noon to 4 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The museum is closed Sundays. Some earlier press releases promised a tour of an army landing craft that has participated in the event in past years. American Legion Post 82 Commander Sid Winchester said he has been noti ed the craft is being repaired and not available for Camp Gordon Johnston Days this year. New in this years parade are a model of the battleship Wisconsin and a mock-up of the conning tower of a submarine. Also expect to see an entry from the dark side when Carrabelle is visited by a group of SS re-enactors.

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The Times | A3Thursday, March 7, 2013The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.FEB. 26Selina V. Tucker, 40, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Reginald D. Giddens, 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)FEB. 28Luke Gruver, 33, Tallahassee, Marion County violation of probation (FCSO) Amber J. Nowling, 20, Sopchoppy, driving while license suspended or revoked, and violation of restrictions on drivers license (FHP) Steve A. Johns, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)MARCH 1Luke Gruver, 33, Tallahassee, corruption by threats against a public servant (FCSO) Richard J. Elhard, 31, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked, and possession of a controlled substance (CPD)MARCH 2Richard L. Brantly, Jr., 29, Tallahassee, possession of paraphernalia and four counts of possession of a controlled substance (FHP) Johnny L. Williams III, 37, Crawfordville, eeing or eluding law enforcement of cer, and driving while license suspended (FCSO) Ryan E. Todd, 29, Havana, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and indecent exposure (CPD) Thomas M. Conners, 59, St. Clair Shores, Mich., possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) Jonathan C. Davis, 30, Tallahassee, resisting of cer without violence (CPD) Joseph R. Chittenden, 18, Tallahassee, DUI (FHP)MARCH 3Dustin C. Shahan, Jr., 23, Carrabelle, no valid drivers license, and possession of a legend drug without a prescription (CPD) Sabrina Carter, 44, Havana, two counts of battery (FCSO) Brian J. Jordan, 21, Tallahassee, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Lanark Village, DUI and violation of probation (FHP) Cody F. Harrell, 21, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance, possession of paraphernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis, and violation of probation (FCSO) Jacinto Negron, 47, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked, leaving the scene of a crash with damages, and false report of traf c accident (FHP)MARCH 4Johnny L. Williams III, 37, Crawfordville, violation of probation (FCSO) Harvey S. Barrack, 31, Carrabelle, sexual battery victim mentally defective/physically helpless, and withholding child support (FCSO) Juan J. Pavon, 25, Eastpoint, discharging a firearm in public (FCSO) TOBACCO CESSATIONCLASSSCHEDULELOCATION: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital All classes begin at 5:30 P.M. Free nicotine patches and gum will be provided to participants who complete each class Each class is a 2 hour (one time) session. Please visit the following websites to view a current schedule of tobacco cessation classes that are being held in Franklin County at www.bigbendahec.org/quit-now and www.ahectobacco.com To register for a class, please call Big Bend AHEC at 850-224-1177.THERE IS NO COSTTO ATTEND! Accountant We are pleased to announce an association of our oces to expand tax, accounting, auditing, and consulting services in Carrabelle and eastern Franklin County. With oce locations in Carrabelle, Apalachicolaand Port St. Joe, this association is strategically positioned to oer convenient services to individual, business, non-prot and governmentalclients along the Forgotten Coast.Tax, Business Accounting and Consulting, QuickBooks Support, AuditingNon-Prot accounting, Governmental Services Apalachicola Oce 219 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 850-653-1090 Carrabelle Oce 108 SE Avenue B Carrabelle, FL 850-697-2542 ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND DIGITAL PACKAGESStarting at $234 per month -Starting at $199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA CONSULTATION TO FIT YOUR BUSINESS, CALL TODAY! Arrest REPORT FCI serves breakfast to community leadersSpecial to the TimesOn Wednesday, Feb. 27, Warden Russell Hosford, his leadership team and members of the Franklin Correctional Institution family hosted more than 60 people for a Community Leaders Breakfast at FCIs Training Building. The purpose of the event was to allow Franklin CI the opportunity to inform community leaders about the institution, to share information regarding current and future plans to help accomplish departmental and institutional goals, and to make them aware of the important role the community can play in assisting Franklin CI to reach those goals, particularly as it relates to community projects and reducing recidivism. The event began with welcome and prayer, formal introductions, and recognition of 8-year-old Chase Crum who recently discovered contraband at the Will Kendrick Park that had been left for inmate work crews at the park. Hosford presented young Chase with a commendation letter and appreciation for discovery of the contraband left for inmates. The warden indicated the discovery by Chase kept the contraband from entering Franklin C.I. which in turn provided for the overall safety and security of the institution. A PowerPoint presentation was presented by Assistant Wardens Willie Brown and Dwayne Watson and Col. Perez Bellelis, which included important statistical facts and figures relating to staffing and budget, daily operations at the institution, programming and reentry activities that assist in reduction of recidivism rates, as well as information on the helpful role that Franklin CI inmates play in community work related projects. The presentation included photographs depicting Franklin CI inmates working on clean-up and other construction related projects, which helped the community save money and ultimately resulted in taxpayer savings. Hosford spoke about the importance of partnering with leaders and members of the community to produce an outcome that benefits everyone when inmates successfully re-enter into society and the rate of recidivism is reduced. He further thanked the community leaders and the state delegation for their support of Franklin C.I. and the department. One of the highlights took place during the opening portion of the event when County Commission Chairman Cheryl Sanders and Commissioner Smokey Parrish both praised the efforts of the institution and the impact in the Community. Another noteworthy moment was when Will Kendrick, the DOCs legislative affairs director, personally thanked Hosford for providing inmate labor for construction, cleaning and other related Franklin County projects, which resulted in a tremendous savings to the taxpayers. He further indicated that the newly constructed Franklin Work Camp was constructed using bond money from the state which would be paid back over time by the department. The Franklin CI leadership team is looking forward to working with community attendees who indicated they are eager to see future partnership initiatives come to fruition. SPECIAL TO THE TIMESFranklin Correctional Institution Warden Russell Hosford, left, presents a letter of recommendation to Chase Crum, standing with his grandfather, Danny Millender. Law Enforcement

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In my never-ending pursuit to discover historical events, intertwined with my love of historical fiction, I finally got around to reading The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America (2004) by Eric Larson. It tells the story of the 1893 Worlds Fair in Chicago. Officially known as the Worlds Columbian Exposition, it celebrated the 400th anniversary of Columbus discovery of America. At this pre-dawn of the 20th century, it is a fascinating period in our nations history. Innovation and scientific discovery were broadening our world daily. This is not historical fiction because its catalogued as non-fiction (Dewey 364.15). Some call it novelistic history, which is certainly appropriate. Amazon also lists it under true crime since one of the characters, known as H. H. Holmes, was a real person, and did murder between 20 and 100 people. With this host of characters including the serial killer, just five years after Jack the Ripper became famous on the streets of London, the inception and ultimate realization of the fair is described in colorful detail. While Chicago was dark and dirty, a central hub of smoke-gushing steam engines and dirt streets, the White City built on a local swampland, with all the buildings painted white, was lit at night by millions of electric light bulbs. Alternating current electricity was pioneered by the fair, what we call AC. Many new foods, like Cracker Jack, were introduced, but by far my favorite feature of the fair was the marvelous engineering creation of George Ferris, known as the Ferris wheel. The exposition was looking to create a centerpiece, grand in size, in order to eclipse the Frances Eiffel Tower, erected in 1888 for the Paris International Exposition. The organizers in Chicago sent out a challenge to American engineers, but when Ferris came forward, the committee was skeptical. Larson follows the progress as the Ferris wheel is first somewhat hesitantly approved, through the construction of its 254-foot structure, using thousands of pounds of bolts, to the wary observation of fair officials as it made its first revolution. To people of the time it seemed impossibly fragile, and immense. The 36 cars could hold as many as 60 people each. Thousandhorsepower engines fueled by steam boilers from underground mains drove the giant wheels. The rotation took 30 minutes with a maximum of more than 2,000 people on board. It was a marvel. The wheel was operated throughout the exposition and was then moved to a nearby location when it was again dismantled. It was sold for $8,000, and transported by rail to St. Louis for the 1904 Worlds Fair, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of the Lewis and Clark expedition. When you ride the Ferris wheel at next years Florida Seafood Festival, maybe you will think of the grand history of this form of attraction. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. @THE LIBRARY Caty GreeneSpecial to the TimesThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida Geological Survey has compiled the following information to provide a single point source for general knowledge about the nature of sinkholes in the state of Florida and additional information about proper protocol should you ever encounter a sinkhole in an urban area. Facts about sinkholes in Florida: The entire state of Florida sits on top of several thousand feet of limestone. Limestone is a rock that can form with natural void spaces called porosity. In limestone where the void spaces are connected, the rock is permeable. Porous and permeable limestone makes great aquifers and provides millions of gallons of fresh drinking water for residents and agriculture. The most signi cant factor in the development of sinkholes is the dissolution of the limestone underlying Florida by naturally acidic groundwater. Sinkholes are a natural and common feature of Floridas landscape. They are only one of many kinds of karst landforms, which include depressions, caves (both air and water lled), disappearing streams, springs and underground aquifer systems, all of which occur in Florida. Thousands of naturally occurring sinkholes can be seen throughout the state of Florida including many that connect underground to springs, rivers and lakes. -Sinkholes form in karst terrain from the collapse of surface sediments into underground voids. In Florida one may see solution sinkholes, cover-subsidence sinkholes or cover-collapse sinkholes. The rst two types will show very little topographical disturbance to the naked eye, while the third is the type which shows a abrupt change in topography and is most associated with the thought of sinkholes. Questions about sinkholes in urban and suburban environments: My yard is settling... Do I have a sinkhole? Maybe. But a number of other factors can cause holes, depressions or subsidence of the ground surface. Expansive clay layers in the earth may shrink upon drying, buried organic material, poorly-compacted soil after excavation work, buried trash or logs and broken pipes all may cause depressions to form at the ground surface. These settling events, when not veri ed as true sinkholes by professionals, are collectively called subsidence incidents. If the settling is affecting a dwelling, further testing by a licensed engineer with a licensed geologist on staff or a licensed geology rm may be in order. Property insurance may pay for testing, but in many cases insurance may not cover damage from settling due to causes other than sinkholes. A sinkhole opened in my neighborhood... should I be concerned? Although sinkholes in Florida sometimes occur in sets, most are isolated events. The bedrock underlying the state is honeycombed with cavities of varying size, most of which will not collapse in our lifetimes. A quick inspection of your property for any sinking or soft areas might be prudent. Unless the sinkhole is very large, and extends to your property, theres likely to be little reason for concern. Should a sinkhole open in an area near you the hole should be immediately cordoned off and clearly marked to protect traf c. Contact local law enforcement to report the hazard and call your city or county road department to initiate repair work. If the road is private, repair of the hole is usually the responsibility of the landowner or property owners association. Is there a safe area of Florida where there is no chance of sinkholes? Technically, no. Since the entire state is underlain by carbonate rocks, sinkholes could theoretically form anywhere. However, there are de nite regions where sinkhole risk is considerably higher. In general, areas of the state where limestone is close to surface, or areas with deeper limestone but with a conducive con guration of water table elevation, stratigraphy, and aquifer characteristics have increased sinkhole activity. In an effort to assist the state residents are encouraged to report sinkhole information by lling out a subsidence incident report form on the departments website and submit the completed copy to the FGS. This website also contains information on sinkholes and how they form. To access this form go to http://www.dep.state. .us/ geology/forms/Subsidence/SIRquick-form5.htm or contact FGS at 850-488-9380. More information about sinkholes can be found on the Florida Department of Environmental Protections website: http://www.dep.state. .us/geology/ USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 7, 2013 APage 4SectionSpecial to the TimesU.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, RFlorida, and senators from Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and North Carolina on Feb. 28 sent a letter to the U.S. Government Accountability Of ce requesting a review of how the Department of Commerce conducts stock assessments in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic. The stock assessments conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service are critical in maintaining the vitality of the sheries, the shing communities, and related industries in the region. Stock assessments are the foundation of sound shery management, Rubio said. It is vital that, as we work to preserve the waters and resources surrounding Florida and other states, we base our management decisions on sound science. The report weve requested today will shed light on the decisionmaking process within the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and will help us to determine the best path forward so that we can ensure the economic livelihood of the shermen in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic and the industries that depend on them. Rubio is ranking member of the subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guard. The letter is signed by Sens. Roger Wicker (R-Mississippi), Thad Cochran (R-Mississippi), Richard Shelby (R-Alabama), Jeff Sessions (R-Alabama), David Vitter (RLouisiana), Mary Landrieu (DLouisiana) and Kay Hagan (DNorth Carolina). Fishing organizations in the southeast, both commercial and recreational, salute Sen. Marco Rubio for leading the effort to require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations to provide the basic science needed for honest stock assessments, said Bob Jones, executive director of Southeastern Fisheries Association. The numbers of sh calculated in the federal waters through stock assessments are critical in determining quotas, seasons, allowable gear, by catch and all aspects pertaining to the commercial and recreational harvest of seafood. The shing and tourism industry dependent on fresh local seafood thanks all the Senators who are working to improve the management of our sustainable marine resources. Harlon Pearce, chairman of the data collection committee at the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council, said, I see rst-hand how our lack of updated sheries data strikes at the heart of our ability to make sound management decisions that protect both our natural resources and our shermen. We need to get to the bottom of where our data collection resources are being spent and this full GAO investigation is a great step in the right direction. Gordon Robertson, vice president of the American Sport shing Association said, Robust biological and socioeconomic data are critical to the management of our nations sheries. Unfortunately this information has been lacking for many important sheries, particularly those in the southeast. ASA is grateful that Senator Rubio understands the need for improved science to drive management and is working towards that end. Sound science matters. Sen. Rubios leadership brings focus to the critical need for sciencebased management of Americas marine shery resources, said Jeff Angers, president of the Center for Coastal Conservation.Rubio seeks review of stock assessments MARCO RUBIOR-FL Should you be concerned about sinkholes?Discover the worlds fair that changed America Journey through lush gardens of artWhat de nes good art? Perhaps one de nition is when you stand before an art piece and cant walk away, dumfounded by how boundless human imagination can be. Such are Beth Appletons cut paper assemblages now on exhibit at the Apalachicola Museum of Art. Each and every one of her exhibits, 30-some pieces, with their blasts of Technicolor squid, serpents, gyrating palms and even human dance-hall denizens, pulse with an energy that one wonders how the frames stay straight on the walls. Forget the $1,500 cruise youve saved for; rather head over to the museum (its free!) and journey through the lush gardens of a true artists mind, and an artist of international caliber who happens to be one of our own. (The exhibit is on display, Wed. Sun., 1-4 p.m. through March 15).Richard Bickel LETTER TO THE EDITOR FISHING INDUSTRYAccording to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, almost 40 million licensed anglers generate more than $46 billion in retail sales with a $115 billion impact on the nations economy, creating employment for 828,000 people. In the Gulf of Mexico region, an average of 23 million shing trips were taken annually from 2000 to 2009.

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, March 7, 2013selection of the Mr. Hot Sauce and Miss Chili Pepper, with the mens machismo tested through a variety of means, such as hula hoop competition, ngernail painting, dancing and answering questions based on the lm Hall Pass. After he and the Hot Lips teams Chuck Mintor outlasted the competition, Jon Grauer, from the Blue Water team, took home the Mr. Hot Sauce honors, repeating his 2010 win. In 2011, his wife, Marcy, was pregnant with their second daughter, Callen, who this year joined older sister Kaitlyn at the cook-off. The Miss Chili Pepper contest was chosen from a smaller but equally enthusiastic eld of young women by an entrant from Destins Burnin at Both Ends team. The amateur chili crockpot competition, once again overseen by volunteer Dayle Flint, drew a robust eld, with Pam Addison of St. George Island taking home the top prize. Finishing in second place was Keith OMay of Fort Gaines, Ga., with Steve Bashore of Orlando nishing third. The 41 entrants in the professional competition labored at their concoctions, readying for a chance to have the volunteer judges decide who was tops. The Yellow Creek Swamp Sauce team of Bristol has been competing since 2007 and made its chili out of venison. Assisting in the effort were Chad and Travis West, Marjorie Boone, and Andrea, Addyson and Corey Clark. Bob H. Alexander of White sh, Mont., joined his son Bob C. Alexander of Niceville in competing for the Roadkill Hovering Harrier Chili team. Dad has cooked in two dozen world championships after winning in such places as British ADVERTISING DEADLINE RESERVE SPACE THURSDAYS AD COPY FRIDAY CALL:850-670-3500 -or850-933-2171Heavy Construction Site Work Excavation Asphalt Paving Brick Pavers Concrete Fill Dirt Gravel & Sand Mulch Sod Landscape Stone Patio Stone JASON WHITE CONSTRUCTION NOTICE OF ZONINGCHANGEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners proposes to adopt the following by ordinance: An Ordinance Rezoningthe following parcel of land in Franklin County: ANORDINANCEREZONINGA 20 FOOT PARCEL BETWEEN LOTS 12 & 13, BLOCK Z, UNIT 1, LANARKBEACHANDALL OF LOT 13, BLOCK Z, UNIT 1, LANARKBEACH, LANARK,FRANKLINCOUNTY, FLORIDAFROMC-4COMMERCIAL MIXED USE TOC-3COMMERCIAL RECREATION. A public hearing on the proposed changes to the ZoningMaps series will be held on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 10:15 a.m., in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. More information can be obtained and the proposed change may be inspected at the Franklin CountyPlanningDepartment, 34 Forbes Street,Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida, Telephone (850) 653-9783. Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at thepublic hearing or in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 MarketStreet, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. Persons who wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based. SPICE from page A1PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLEFT: Jon Grauer from the Blue Water team out of Tallahassee was wild in the Mr. Hot Sauce competition but settled down to pose with wife, Marcy, and daughters Callen, left, and Kaitlyn. RIGHT: Bob H. Alexander, left, and son Bob C. Alexander took second place for their Roadkill Hovering Harrier Chili. See SPICE A11 COOK-OFF CLEANUP ADA LONG | Special to the Times On Sunday morning, members of the St. George Island Trash Patrol gathered at Lighthouse Park for the annual post-chili cook-off cleanup. JoEllen Pearman, pictured, Pete Ritch, Ron Bush, Sharon Bush, Ann Giknis, John Olander, Barbara Sanders and grandson, Terry and Skip Kemp and Deborah Lang joined Ada Long and Dail Mullins and braved the cold March wind to collect 30 bags of trash, not counting grills, lawn chairs, etc. Long said the trash patrol is actively seeking new volunteers. For information, call 927-3776.ABOVE: Christina Grif n shows off her Deliciosa costume in the Miss Chili Pepper competition. RIGHT: Zach Beegle, left, and Ben Caruthers were part of Destins Burning at Both Ends team, which won for Best Booth. See more photos from the cook-off at www.apalachtimes.com.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 OFTHEWEEKPET Franklin County Humane SocietyPAUL!Precious PAUL! Paul is a 3 year old Jack Russell. He is bright, well mannered and social. Jack Russells have a reputation of being hyper and yappy....not our Paul! He is a wonderful little dog with a lot of personality and a lot of love to give. Come meet this exceptional boy!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELYNEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR SocietyDON MCLEOD | Special to the TimesOn Friday, March 1, Voncile McLeod, the Reigning Queen of Apalachicola, celebrated her 95th birthday at her table at the Gibson Inn surrounded by more than 50 of her friends, family and admirers. Her sons, James and Don, were both on hand. A large cake was served to the party, and there were many toasts to Miss Vonciles health and happiness. Michelle Albert, Robert Whetzel engagedLes and Toni Albert of Carrabelle are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Michelle Lynn Albert, to Robert Whetzel of West Jefferson, N.C. Michelle, a 1992 graduate of Carrabelle High School, currently works as deli manager of the Corner Market in west Jefferson. Robert works for the Closet Design Center in West Jefferson. The wedding will take place in February 2014.Colton Butler bornLadonna and Rhett Butler of Apalachicola would like to announce the birth of their son Colton Ryan Butler. He was born at 12:54 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013, at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. Colton weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and was 20 inches long. Along with big brother Benjamin Butler, 7, Colton was welcomed home by older sisters Ashley and Cheyenne and brother Hunter. Maternal grandparents are Diane Cardenas of Apalachicola and Joey Creamer of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandmothers are Emma Taunton of Apalachicola and Shirley Creamer of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are George Butler of Apalachicola and the late Ginger Honey Butler. Coltons aunts include Ashley Zingarelli, Amanda Creamer, Valerie Creamer and Darlene Ray, and uncles Shane Butler and Austin Taunton.ZyMarion Williams turns 4ZyMarion JhKel Williams will celebrate his 4th birthday with family and friends in Tallahassee on Monday, March 11, 2013. He is the son of James and Keneidra Williams and the brother of Zyon and Heaven Williams of Tallahassee. His maternal grandparents are Patricia Lane and the late William Bill Lane, and Alvin and Felicia Cummings, all of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are James Williams Sr. and the late Sheila Williams of Fort Lauderdale. His Godmother is Ashley Johnson of Marianna. Happy birthday. We love you, Kel. Joyce Durham has created a quilt to raise funds for re safety equipment. Durham, of ce manager of the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, is an avid quilter who decided to do her part to help purchase wild re gear suits for county volunteer remen. The machine-quilted coverlet, constructed of cotton marble batiks, measures 82 by 82 inches and is suitable for a full-sized or queen-sized bed. The theme of the quilt is re ghting equipment. It features trucks, helmets, a Dalmatian dog and at its center, The Firemans Prayer in a photo print on fabric. When I saw the re trucks on an embroidery site that I frequent, I knew I needed to make this quilt, Durham wrote. The bright colors represent a raging wild re in reds, oranges and blues, all marbled by the dark of the smoke. Around the quilt are the re trucks woven through the ribbons of time. The inner pictures are the reman as he says his prayer, the tools that he uses to combat the raging forces of nature, his famous re hat and, last but not least, his trusted re dog. The black border represents the charred remains of the res aftermath. On the back of the quilt, the emerging orals represent new beginnings that are part of the raging wild re. The drawing will be at 2 p.m. April 18 at the Carrabelle Riverfront Festival. Tickets are $1 or six for $5. Send your check or money order to The Fire Quilt, c/o Volunteer Franklin, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola FL 32320. You need not be present to win. By LOIS SWOBODA MANY HAPPY RETURNS, VONCILE! FSU TRIO PERFORMS A HOUSE CONCERT FOR HOMES DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesIn a concert that ranged from a 17th-century sonata to the unusual work of a contemporary Czech composer, Sunday afternoons Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert offered a varied menu. The trio consisted of three Florida State University faculty members on piano, viola and clarinet in the afternoon concert at Trinity Episcopal Church. David Kalhous, born in Praague and now on the FSU faculty, accompanied on piano, with Pamela Ryan, professor of viola, at left, and Deborah Bish, associate professor of clarinet, right. The next concert, Do You Hear the People Sing!, will be March 24 and features the Bay Area Choral Society, led by Canadian conductor William Crane. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesA trio of talented musicians helped raise money for the not-for-pro t Franklin County Community Development and Land Trust Corporation Feb. 23 at special house concert show on St. George Island. The fundraiser featured Depot Creek, with Jon Copps, center, on guitar, Neal Jones, left, on bass, and Randall Big Daddy Webster on guitar. This semi-unplugged event offered an intimate concert with the artists and the best in blues peppered with soul, jazz and life. Birth Happy BIRTHDAY Engagement Happy BIRTHDAYLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesWild re quilt to bene t volunteers THE FIREMANS PRAYERWhen duty calls me, oh Lord, Wherever Flames may rage, Give me the strength to save some life Whatever Be its age. Help me embrace a little child Before it is too late Or save an older person from The horror of that fate Enable me to be alert, and oh Lord, guide my every move, for life is so precious, please dont let us loose. I want to ll my calling and To give the best in me To guard my every neighbor And protect their property And if according to thy will, That I must give my life, Then with thy protecting hand my Lord, I pray thee, protect my children and my wife.

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Knights host bingo tonight against cancerThe Knights of Columbus Council 1648 Relay for Life team will sponsor a Bingo Night on Thursday, March 7, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Parish Hall at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Sixth St. and Ave. C in Apalachicola. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society and be used towards the teams nancial goal to assist in the effort to ght cancer. The donation is $20 per person which includes eight games of Bingo. Prizes will be awarded and there will also be a nal jackpot game. Refreshments will be for sale at the event.Auburn students plan Monday block partyA group of Auburn University college students from First Baptist Church of Opelika, Ala. will be in Apalachicola next week, from March 9-14, for their annual spring break mission trip. They have been going to Port St. Joe for the past ve years, building relationships with people in the community, sharing the good news of Jesus Christ, and doing construction work on houses. This will be the rst year that they are expanding to Apalachicola, sending around 40 students from their group to tell people about how good Jesus is! They plan on sharing the Good News that Jesus Christ has died on the cross and is alive, and frees people from having to live for themselves. They are sharing the message of Romans 5:8, But God demonstrates his love for us in this, that while we were still sinners Christ died for us. Their goal is to be a bridge to connect people with local churches in Apalachicola that will love them, serve them, and show them how good Jesus is. So come join them for a block party on Monday, March 11 from 4-6 p.m. at Sylvester Williams Memorial Recreation Park (at the dead end of both 9th and 10th Street in Apalachicola) for inatables, face paint, games, and free BBQ. They would absolutely love to meet and know you personally, and to tell you in person more about why they are here.Segree family reunion SaturdayThe Segree family reunion will be Saturday, March 9 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Come bring a covered dish, old pictures and have a good time. For more information, call Inez at 670-1115.Fellowship Church Prophetic RevivalThe members of Fellowship Church of Praise will start their 2013 Prophetic Revival on Wednesday, March 13 to Friday, March 15. Service starts nightly at 7 p.m. at 177 Ave G in Apalachicola. Evangelist for the revival will be Prophetess Vernette Rosier of Fellowship Church of Praise in Panama City. She is an anointed woman and gifted in the spiritual prophetic realm. Please come out and help us lift up the name of Jesus and hear the Word of the Lord through the Prophetess. We hope to see you there. God bless you.Live Easter production on Good FridayPlease come and join us, for one night only, for a live Easter production. With the theme This is the night something happened, the production will be staged on Good Friday, March 29 at 6 p.m. at New Life Church, on 16th Street, in Apalachicola. Celebrate the life of the risen Christ and experience the love, peace and joy that knowing Him brings! Sponsored by Hillside Dancers for Christ, and community wide of Apalachicola. For more information call Teresa Ann Martin and Barbara McNair.Relay for Life April 6 in ApalachRelay for Life is fast approaching. This years theme is carnival for a cure. The American Cancer Societys Franklin County Relay for Life will be on Saturday, April 6, beginning at noon and continuing until 6 a.m. on Sunday morning at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola. There will be games, food, free samples, and much, much more. Make sure you mark it in your calendar and come out and walk to support those who are ghting cancer and those who have lost their battle with cancer. Celebrate. Remember. Fight Back.Fellowship Baptist studying Book of JohnFellowship Baptist Church, 706 Ryan Drive, Carrabelle has begun a Bible Study. The Book of John will be the rst book studied and the group will meet each Sunday evening at 5 p.m. until the study of John is complete. All you will need is a Bible; you might want to bring a notebook. There has been and will be much prayer behind this Bible Study as we know that without the anointing of the Holy Spirit, little can be accomplished. Pray with us and come and join us. We will have some time for snacks, fellowship, and sharing. Your active involvement and participation is asked for. Sponsored by the Jerusalem Sisters of F.B.C. For more information call Babs or Bill Bailey at 697-3660.Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recoveryUnder the leadership of Ms. Rose Grifn, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups, and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Avenue A in Eastpoint. Nominate an outstanding senior volunteerThe search is on for Floridas outstanding senior volunteer. The Salute to Senior Service program, sponsored by Home Instead, Inc., the franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, honors the contributions of adults 65 and older who give at least 15 hours a month of volunteer service to their favorite causes. Nominations for outstanding senior volunteers will be accepted between Feb. 1 and March 31, 2013. State winners then will be selected by popular vote at SalutetoSeniorService. com. Online voting will take place from April 15 to 30, 2013. From those state winners, a panel of senior care experts will pick the national Salute to Senior Service honoree. Home Instead, Inc. will donate $500 to each of the state winners favorite nonprot organizations and their stories will be posted on the Salute to Senior Service Wall of Fame. In addition, $5,000 will be donated to the national winners nonprot charity of choice. We all know seniors who do so much for our community, said Lee Harrell, co-owner of the Home Instead Senior Care ofce serving Bay, Gulf, Jackson, Holmes, Washington, Calhoun, Franklin and Liberty counties. These silent heroes give selessly, expecting nothing in return. And yet, their contributions often make a difference not only to the organizations they serve, but in changing how the public views growing older. Senior care professionals and those who work at hospitals, senior care facilities and other places where seniors volunteer are encouraged to nominate older adults. So, too, are family caregivers and the adult children of aging parents. Older adults also may self-nominate. To complete and submit a nomination form online for a senior age 65 or older who volunteers at least 15 hours a month, and to view the contests ofcial rules, visit SalutetoSeniorService. com. Completed nomination forms also can be mailed to Salute to Senior Service, P.O. Box 285, Bellevue, NE 68005. For more information about Salute to Senior Service or the Home Instead Senior Care networks services, call 850-522-1919. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 FaithThe Times | A7Thursday, March 7, 2013Well folks, its time to spring forward again. So when you get home Saturday night from the dinner dance, or just out on the town, set the clock ahead one hour. And while youre at it, check the batteries in the smoke alarms. The members of the Lanark Golf Club prepared and served up a great breakfast last Saturday, March 2. There was a nice crowd. Thanks to all who came and supported the effort, and thanks to the volunteers who made it happen. Hope well see you at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, Friday. We will have the welcoming party for our veterans from World War II. Party starts at 6 p.m.; fun starts when you come in the door. A great evening with your friends, neighbors, and those who fought for our freedom. You can also enjoy the low country boil and other dishes. See you there! Saturday will nd us at the Curfew Lodge. Serving begins at 7:30 a.m. and goes until 10 a.m. Then its off to the big parade. You can watch boats, vans, vehicles from the war and much more. Saturday night is the dinner dance at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex. Enjoy the ne meal and music provided by the Not Quite Ready Band. Be watching for us in our yellow aprons, some of us members of Bishop OSullivan Knights of Columbus Council 1648 will have our annual tootsie roll drive for the handicapped and mentally challenged. Just in time for the Easter Basket. Please support this worthy cause. On Wednesday, March 13, come on over to Chillas Hall and join us for bingo. Doors open at 6 p.m. Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m. Hope you can make it! Members of the Lanark Golf Club will have their annual banquet at the Crooked River Grill on Thursday, March 21. Social hour is at 5:30 p.m.; dinner at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $23, and there will be a 50/50 drawing. Good luck! Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and ASAP also stands for Always Say a Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. Remember, God is watching us, from a distance.Andy and Rene WilliamsPastor Andy and Elder Rene Williams will like to give a Big Thank You to all for their support, love, contributions and prayers during the time of our Appreciation. May the Lord richly bless you all. Thanks again.Andy and ReneBig Bend HospiceWe would like to take a moment to express our appreciation for the generosity of Big Bend Hospice in support to us during this difcult time in our life. I want to thank the ladies very much for the help they done. We want to bless the ladies for a great job. Bless these ladies every day for their work. Thanks for all the help that they gave us during through the difcult time of our life for Billy Eugene Shiver.Thank you, The family of Billy, now never forgotShiver FamilyWe would like to take a moment to express our appreciation for your generosity in support to us during this difcult time in our life. Your personal commitment, donation and contribution were incredibly helpful. Words cannot describe how blessed we are. Special thanks to the United Baptist Church family for all their support. The many touching stories that were shared about Billy are a special memory that will not be forgotten. May God bless each and every one of you. Thank you so very much.Mrs. Audrey Shiver and FamilyMother Katherine Bennett RobinsonMarch 9, 1930 Dec. 2, 2008 A beautiful garden now stands alone, missing the one who nurtured it But now she is gone. Her owers still bloom, and the sun it still shines, But the rain is like teardrops, for the ones left behind. The beautiful memories of its keeper are in our hearts to stay, But just like her owers she was part of Gods plan, So when it was her time he reached out his hand. So when you start missing Mother Katherine, Remember if you just wait, When God has a spot in his garden, She will meet you at the gate.Callie Lil Ma LewisMarch 8, 1913 Nov. 25, 2007 The Legend of Cottage Hill, but the Legacy still lives on in our minds and hearts forever. We love you!William J. and Marie Lane, Patrick Lane, Johnny Lane, Monica Lane-MoronSaturday opens with breakfast, ends with dance LanarkANARK newsNEWSJim Welsh Faith brBRIefsEFS Cards of ThanksHANKS In Loving memMEMOrR Y

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WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Mar. 0759 44 0% Fri, Mar. 0864 51 0% Sat, Mar. 0967 55 0% Sun, Mar. 1070 60 0% Mon, Mar. 1171 5910% Tues, Mar. 1272 5660% Wed, Mar. 1373 5910% 6 We 213pm 1.1 1001pm 1.4 609am -0.2 500pm 1.0 7 Th 236pm 1.1 1137pm 1.3 715am -0.2 640pm 0.9 8 Fr 259pm 1.1 808am -0.2 746pm 0.8 9 Sa 103am 1.3 320pm 1.2 853am -0.1 838pm 0.6 10 Su 313am 1.4 437pm 1.2 1031am 0.0 1023pm 0.4 11 Mo 412am 1.4 453pm 1.2 1103am 0.1 1104pm 0.3 12 Tu 503am 1.3 507pm 1.3 1130am 0.3 1143pm 0.1 13 We 552am 1.3 524pm 1.3 1153am 0.4 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 7 Th 236pm 1.1 1137pm 1.3 715am -0.2 640pm 0.9 8 Fr 259pm 1.1 808am -0.2 746pm 0.8 9 Sa 103am 1.3 320pm 1.2 853am -0.1 838pm 0.6 10 Su 313am 1.4 437pm 1.2 1031am 0.0 1023pm 0.4 11 Mo 412am 1.4 453pm 1.2 1103am 0.1 1104pm 0.3 12 Tu 503am 1.3 507pm 1.3 1130am 0.3 1143pm 0.1 13 We 552am 1.3 524pm 1.3 1153am 0.4 14 Th 640am 1.2 544pm 1.4 1221am 0.1 1213pm 0.6 15 Fr 730am 1.2 608pm 1.4 1259am 0.0 1236pm 0.7 16 Sa 824am 1.1 638pm 1.5 139am 0.0 102pm 0.8 17 Su 926am 1.1 715pm 1.4 226am 0.0 135pm 0.9 18 Mo 1040am 1.1 759pm 1.4 326am 0.1 221pm 0.9 19 Tu 1202pm 1.1 855pm 1.3 440am 0.1 334pm 1.0 20 We 113pm 1.1 1006pm 1.3 557am 0.1 519pm 1.0 YOUR SPRING BREAK HEADQUARTERS! LIVE BAIT FISHING SUPPLIES BEACH SUPPLIES Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) Monday Sunday: 7:00 AM 6:00 PM EST By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The poisonous spider most commonly encountered in Franklin County is now the brown widow, Latrodectus geometricus. They are an invasive species from Asia that appeared here only a few years ago, but are now common everywhere. I have written about this spider before, but, I want to remind people to be careful. Because of the extremely mild winter, brown widows are already active and laying eggs. Cars, trucks, and RVs have probably helped to distribute this spider far and wide. Rod Gasche of Carrabelle disassembled the brake drums on his RV for servicing last week and found them full of active spiders and eggs. Adult brown widows vary from light tan to dark brown or almost black, with variable markings of black, white, yellow, orange or brown. Brown widows are not as easy to recognize as black widows. The underside of the abdomen, if you can see it, often contains the characteristic hourglass marking which is white, yelloworange or red. The legs are thickened at each joint. The brown widow is also slightly smaller than the black widow. The spiders are reclusive and may hide in tiny crevices but the egg sack is visible and very different from those of the other spiders. Instead of the smooth white to tan surface, the outside of the egg sac is covered with pointed projections giving it the appearance of a globe with many pointed protuberances on its surface. It has also been described as tufted or uffy looking or resembling a medieval mace. Bites usually occur when a spider becomes accidentally pressed against the skin of a person when putting on clothes or sticking their hands in recessed areas or dark corners. The symptoms of a bite can include pain, rigidity in the muscles of the abdomen and legs, swelling, nausea, vomiting and in severe cases a sharp rise in blood pressure. If you believe you have been bitten, seek medical attention. These spiders nest inside and outside in architectural features, mailboxes, vehicles, plants and furniture. Be very careful when doing spring clean-up. When in doubt, wear gloves and cover up. My friend Glynda Ratliff found a huge cluster of eggs in an ornamental shell hanging on the wall of her home last year. I have discovered them under pet dishes. They are frequently found in outdoor showers, empty owerpots, breezeways, stacked wood and the handles of plastic garbage cans. Sanitation is the most important strategy in reducing widow spider infestations around the home. Routine cleaning is the best way to eliminate spiders and discourage their return. Reducing clutter makes an area less attractive to spiders. Inside a home or garage, a thorough cleaning with a vacuum cleaner is an effective way to remove spiders, egg sacs, and webbing. The vacuum bag should be removed when you are nished and placed in a sealed plastic bag for disposal. Any cracks, holes, or spaces around windows and doors should be sealed or tted with weather stripping. Live spiders can be sprayed with almost any over-the-counter pesticide. Insecticidal dusts provide some residual control. When eggs are located, spraying them will usually ush an adult female from a nearby harborage. Be careful. The female can remain active for some minutes after contact with the pesticide. Educate yourself and family about the appearance of this dangerous invasive species and be careful.Supporters of St. Vincent choose Austin of Indian Pass to head groupAt the Supporters of St. Vincent annual meeting held Sunday, Feb 17, at the Buffer Preserve, Gloria Austin of Indian Pass was elected president. The new vice president is Jan Pietrzyk, of Tallahassee. Landy Luther, of Port St. Joe, is secretary and Audrey Schmidt, of Apalachicola, is treasurer. Supporters of St. Vincent was established in 2007 to provide support for the St Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge and to support environmental activities that include education, recreation and increased understanding of the history and natural environment of the refuge. The supporters are currently preparing for their annual island open house to be held Friday, March 22, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event provides a day of easy access to St. Vincent. Visitors enjoy a free full day of nature-related activities. Free transport to/from the island will be provided departing from the Indian Pass public boat ramp. Guided tours and exhibits inform participants about the islands protected wildlife, diverse ecosystems, and history as well as enjoy the unspoiled beauty of this unique, pristine, uninhabited refuge. Educational talks and discussions will be provided by numerous volunteers from the supporters and various community organizations. Guided tours will be both walking and vehicular. Light snacks and bottled water will be available. For more information call 653-8808. Outdoor BRIEFEmail outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 8 Thursday, March 7, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreFlounder continue to be moving back closer to shore this week. Good reports from the Mexico beach canal, pier, and under the George Tapper bridge in St. Joe are still coming in. Trout and red fish will be on the run from all the freshwater coming down stream this week and holding in deeper holes and ledges in the bay. As the flood waters start to drain this week, most area streams and lakes are still full to the brim. Trot lines and bush hooks are a great way to take advantage of the catfish in the swift water. Beware of invasive brown widows BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net Early spring is sort of the of cial kickoff of what might be called Trap Time in Floridas Panhandle, the time when lipless crankbaits become the go-to lure for most guides, pros and expert anglers anywhere spring comes a month early. The trigger is the budding growth of hydrilla and other underwater weeds on many lakes. In summer the plants often grow in vast, solid mats all the way to the surface, making it impossible to sh with anything but a weedless-rig soft plastic slow and tedious. But winter causes these big mats to die back, and the dead vegetation then washes away with wind and waves. They never disappear in Florida lakes, but theyre considerably reduced. Though the weeds are decimated, the bass they harbored never go far away, and as soon as the rst new shoots start out of the bottom in late winter and early spring, the sh are back in these locations. But now, the ideal lure for rapidly nding and catching the sh is a fast-moving lipless crankbait. Its quick, its easy and its fun. Lipless crankbaits basically are slabs of hard plastic, apparently originated by Bill Lewis in the 1960s and the name of his invention, the Rat-LTrap, has become almost generic for this type of lure though there now are dozens of imitations. (Lewis reportedly named the lure for the clattery old station wagon he used to drive the roads of the South delivering his lures to tackle dealers.) When the lure is cranked steadily, the attened head causes it to vibrate rapidly. And rattles inside the lure set up a racket that actually can be heard above the surface as well as below. Fish apparently are attracted by both the sight and sound; the lures have caught millions of bass over the past 40 years.No-brainersThe great thing about lipless crankers is that they are truly no-brainer lures; throw them out on points and creek bends, reel them back fast enough to feel the vibration and youll catch sh, especially if shed around shad schools or breaking bass. (If you need to get deeper, choose the larger, heavier models the retrieve speed can be maintained while the lure stays deep because of the extra weight.) The compact shape and high density make it possible to throw them great distances, reaching way out to schoolers you see at the surface. But there are ways to make them even more effective. One is ripping the lure, allowing it to sink just enough to tick the sprouting weeds, then snatching it forward hard enough to shake the weeds from the hooks each time you feel a snag, then letting it fall again. The dart and ash of the lures often triggers strikes from sh that could pass up a steady retrieve, with the strikes typically coming on the fall or just after you start cranking again. Bumping stumps, rocks and logs is similarly effective. Crank until you hit something, hesitate just a second, then crank some more, often the strike comes just after the movement starts again. And because of the shape of the lures, they are good for skipping under low-hanging docks. The lower and wider the dock the better, and the farther underneath you can scoot them, the more often youll get bit. Most anglers use a 6:1 or faster reel to work trap-style baits; slower ratios make it too tough to keep up the speed that works best. TRAP TIME Fast moving and lipless crankbaits

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Gulfside IGA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK SPONSOR A pair of Allies shone for the Lady Seahawk softball teams last week. Junior catcher Ally Millender had a hit against Liberty County, where she played a great game behindthe plate, and a hit against Port St. Joe, where she covered rst base. She is a leader on the eld and in the classroom, said coach Lisa Sweatt. Eighth grader Allie Kirvin went 3-for-4 in the JV game Tuesday night against Port St. Joe, and played awesome ball at third and rst against Liberty and Port St. Joe.Congratulations! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly StaTimes of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At:106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322850-697-4121Renee Parrish, D.M.DACCEPTING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN: Early Head Start / Head StartAll services for our children are free with no cost to the parent.**Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).**Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 7, 2013 APage 9SectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A robust eld of runners braved strong wind and cool temperatures Saturday morning to make the 5K Red Pepper Run on St. George Island a memorable event. It was a refreshingly brisk morning for the 5K but we had an excellent turnout, with 145 registered runners, up from 126 in 2012, said race organizer Susan Bassett. Winning overall among the 140 runners who nished the race was Franklin County High School grad Michael D. Turner, 20, of Eastpoint, who topped the eld with a time of 21:59. The top female overall was Sam Fortunas, 22, of Tallahassee, who nished a half-minute behind Turner with a time of 22:30. Among St. George Island residents, the top nisher was Hobson Fulmer, 57, with a time of 22:58. The top female from the island was Alane Kadel, 43, with a time of 27:51. Bassett said participants hailed from Florida, South Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, Tennessee, and Ontario, Canada. Everything went off without a hitch, she said. Much thanks to our sponsors and to our hard-working volunteers Bob Landis, Davie Lloyd, and Shelley Shepard, our crossing guards Sandy Mitchem and John Schulz, and turn marker Steve Reilly. Reilly has been marking the turn at the 5K Red Pepper for as long as the race has been in existence! said Bassett. Our volunteers make this event what it is a very fun morning for all the runners, and a nice part of the fundraising effort for the St. George Island Fire Department. RED PEPPER 5K RESULTSPlace Name Age Sex Time Award1 Michael D. Turner 20 m 21:59 1st M Overall 2 Dan Fortunas 52 m 22:06 1st M 50-54 3 Sam Fortunas 22 f 22:30 1st F Overall 4 Chuck Pierson 41 m 22:49 1st M 40-44 5 Hobson Fulmer 57 m 22:58 1st M SGI 6 Stephen Taul 26 m 23:03 1st M 25-29 7 Scott Ruthstrom 43 m 23:12 2nd M 40-44 8 Joe Miller 33 m 23:29 1st M 30-34 9 Aw Haddock 43 m 23:41 3rd M 40-44 10 Bo Spring 36 m 1st M 35-39 11 Steve Wich 42 m 24:03 12 Jamie Nichols 25 f 24:07 1st F 25-29 13 Newt Houston 32 m 24:25 2nd M 30-34 14 Daniel Gidano 29 m 24:30 2nd M 25-29 15 Steve Newman 47 m 25:08 1st M 45-49 16 Larry Wagner 57 m 25:48 1st M 55-59 17 John M, Thompson 29 m 25:51 3rd M 25-29 18 Marena Benoit 14 f 25:55 1st F 9-14 19 Clint Kadel 44 m 26:06 20 Shaun Stott 24 f 26:20 21 Reid Hanway 29 m 26:20 22 Zach Childs 24 m 26:32 23 Ed Eastwood 51 m 26:33 2nd M 50-54 24 Dwayne Maddron 52 m 27:07 3rd M 50-54 25 Tanner Akos 28 m 27:14 26 Chris Emerson 38 m 27:20 2nd M 35-39 27 Nick Emerson 15 m 27:20 1st M 15-19 28 Danny Jones 27 m 27:32 29 Alane Kadel 43 f 27:51 1st F SGI 30 Susan Fox 62 f 27:54 1st F 60-64 31 Jill Owens 56 f 27:54 1st F 55-60 32 Lisa Kamal 42 f 28:02 1st F 40-44 33 Josh Sharp 31 m 28:12 3rd M 30-34 34 Rob Powis 59 m 28:38 2nd M 55-59 35 J. Gordon Shuler 51 m 29:20 36 Molly McKinstry 46 f 28:35 1st F 45-49 37 Angie Coglann 45 f 28:53 2nd F 45-49 38 Sean Ladson 36 m 29:25 3rd M 35-39 39 Sophia Kirvin 12 f 29:17 2nd F 9-14 40 Janelle Wagner 44 f 29:24 2nd F 40-44 41 Kaitlyn Akos 25 f 29:35 2nd F 25-29 42 Kim Braasch 44 f 29:41 3rd F 40-44 43 Dag Sohlberg 70 m 29:41 1st M 70+By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Seahawks baseball team shutout Wewahitchka Feb. 28, and then were themselves shut out by Bozeman the following night. At Wewa, the Seahawks won 10-0, with senior pitcher Skyler Hutchinson pitching a one-hit shutout over six innings. Senior Chase Golden went 2-for-4, with four runs batted in, while junior Alex Causey went 2-for-4 with a pair of RBIs. Hutchinson helped his cause by going 1-for3, with an RBI. We hit the ball well, said coach Mike Emerson. We didnt make any errors. We did what we had to do, we put the ball in play. On Friday, the team lost 7-0 at Bozeman, as they produced just two hits, by seniors Billy Harris and Hutchinson, and committed four errors, including a pair of dropped fly balls. Junior pitcher James Newell got the loss, giving up six runs over the course of five innings, Junior Bobby John Curry hurled two innings in relief, giving up a run. It just goes to show you, if you dont put the ball in play you dont score, said Emerson. Last weeks rain and winds wreaked havoc on the ballfield, as a gust picked up the stands and plopped them down on the backstop, making the home field unplayable. Its making it hard for us and inconvenient for fans, said Emerson. The team played away games this week against John Paul. Wewa and South Walton, and return home next week. Runners brave brisk winds at Red Pepper Run Seahawks down Wewa, fall to BozemanSHELLY SHEPARD | Special to the TimesTop: Runners are off to a good start. Right: Top nishers Michael Turner, right, and Sam Fortunas, left. JAMES NEWELL BOBBY JOHN CURRY BILLY HARRIS ALEX CAUSEY SKYLER HUTCHINSON See full results on our website: apalachtimes.com

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The following is the honor roll for the second nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Chart School.All AsFirst Grade: A. Carlton: Peyton Blackburn, CJ Conway, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Jostyn Tipton, Kiana Weeks, Isabella Price L. Allen: Cody Abercrombie, Caelyn Constantine, Trinity Creamer, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Esteban Bernabe, Malic ONeal, Taylor Pendleton, Jolie Mallon Second Grade J. Mallon: Ashton Amison, Jayden Nichols, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, Colin Weng S. Herrington: Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Lucy Neill, Arav Patel, Jabara Pearson, Owen Poloronis, Gabbi Register, Kylah Ross, Jackson Segree, Mark Willis Third Grade W. Martina: Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Gavin Lashley, Andrew Monod, Genevieve Montgomery, Sophia Salman, Nico Valenzuela T. Moses: Meredith Alford, Weston Bockelman Fourth Grade M. Lee: Kaylee Hicks, Livia Monod L. Bockelman: Alex Joanos, Abby Johnson Sixth Grade Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Kevin Flores, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, JanMichael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Conner Messer, Adria Valenzuela, Rebecca Willis Seventh Grade Michaela Cassidy, Savannah Montgomery, Ethan Moses, Faith Sapp Eighth Grade T. Ward: Jayla Alley, Corie Cates, Holly Chambers, Mikayla Lloyd, Alexis ONeal, Astrid Ramirez, Alexis Segree, Mallorie Shiver, Katy SpannA/BFirst Grade A. Carlton: Hannah Grace Abel, Alexicia McNair, Jentzen Odom, Aubrie Thompson, Jayla White, Taylor Pendleton L. Allen: Amontaye Austin, Conner Lolley, Weston Taranto Second Grade J. Mallon: Laithan Kent, Eric Lau, Trenton McLain, Rainey Smith, John Michael Thompson, Leah Wren S. Herrington: Wyatt Abercrombie, Caleb Cassidy, Miranda Diaz, Faline Everitt, Emily Hooten, Mason Moses, Mahaley Shuler, Brianna Stephens Third Grade W. Martina: Caleb Abel, Sevryn Everritt T. Moses: Lanie Allen, Lauren Conway, Carson Davis, Brooklyn ONeal, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith Fourth Grade M. Lee: Arryonna Cargill, Cody Cassidy, Devin Daniels, Leslie Escobar, Bradley Lee, Lamarius Martin, Ava Neill, Kiersten Prince, Austin Shiver L. Bockelman: Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Skye Huber, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clint Rester, Leslie Stiefel, Caden Turrell, Gregory Wilson Fifth Grade B. Linane: Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Cade Juno, Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Jake Norred, Allison Register, Alyssa Robinson, Camille Williams Sixth Grade Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Steven Hicks, Karolynn Myers, Christopher Newell, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott, Brandon Taranto, Cameron Wynn Seventh Grade Christian Amison, Mia Cummings, Nicholas Joanos, Brooke Martina, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Andrew Nguyen, Audriana Penamon, Lucas Sasnett, Alyssia Shirah, Madison Smith, Allie Zingarelli Eighth Grade Eve Bond, Cash Creamer, Logan Crosby, Jaylon Gainer, Bianca Huber, Emily Crosby, Tia Cummings, Emily Gay, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bobby Kilgore, Allie Kirvin, Zachery May, Alyssa Shiver, Xuripha Tiller, Ali Valenzuela A Call To All Vendors: Exposure for Your BusinessBecome a main ingredient for local consumers as a featured sponsor of the Taste of Home Cooking School: $Buy your tickets now at The News Herald and at newsherald.com PUBLIC NOTICEThe Franklin County Construction Industry Licensing Board will be holding a public workshop to review and discuss changes to the National Flood Insurance Program,for Franklin County.These new requirements will affect most areas in FranklinCounty, Apalachicola and Carrabelle which are located This workshop will be held March 13, 2013, at 6:30 p.m., in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For more informationplease contact Rachel Ward at the Franklin County Planningand Building Department at (850) 653-9783, ext 156. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information 2089830 ABC School announces Honor Roll Special to the TimesFloridas top performing STEM students were recently recognized as Sunshine State Scholars and given the opportunity to attend a two-day event in Orlando, Feb. 21 22. Franklin Countys FloridaLearns STEM Scholars participant Jathan Martin said afterwards that Today we have joined other students from around Florida to experience and explore different options for future endeavors. We plan on using these experiences to better our futures. Martin said his favorite STEM Scholar activity so far had been the Summer Challenge when we did robotics at FSU. Each school district throughout Florida selected their top 11th grade student based on their academic achievement in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher chosen by the student, were invited to participate in the annual Sunshine State Scholars program, sponsored by the Florida Education Foundation, in collaboration with the State University System of Florida, the Florida College System, and the Florida Department of Education. Among those being honored this year were 17 students from the small and rural school districts participating in the FloridaLearns Stem Scholars Initiative for Gifted and Talented Students. The project is funded through the Florida Department of Educations Race to the Top award and involves a partnership among Floridas three educational consortia, which provide critical educational support services to Floridas small and rural school districts. The consortia include the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium in northwest Florida. The project is focused on affording increased access to rigorous STEM courses, providing collaborative problem-solving experiences, and ensuring students are well-informed about STEM career options. In addition to recognizing their academic success, the Sunshine State Scholars program gave these STEM students the opportunity to meet directly with highly successful professionals from STEM-related industries in Florida, and with recruiters from Floridas nest colleges and universities. During the event, the students heard about special programs of study and industry internship opportunities, learned about some of the latest innovations and discoveries in STEM-related research, were inspired by personal success stories from leaders in Floridas STEM industry, and were actively recruited to become part of Floridas future talented workforce. The scholars also enjoyed meeting with students from around the state who have similar interests in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Martin recognized as Sunshine State ScholarSPe E CIa A L tT O THe E TIMes ESFranklin Countys Jathan Martin meets with Florida Commissioner of Education Tony Bennett. SchoolA10 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013CCounty to honor volunteersAt their Tuesday meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to recognize April 21-27 as National Volunteer Week. This week is recognized nation-wide in honor of the many citizens who volunteer time and talents helping those in need. John Solomon is spearheading a local movement to recognize those who give of themselves. He is currently compiling a list of active volunteers and working with businesses and organizations across the county.CCarrabelle to charge county for waterAt the Feb. 19 meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce told commissioners that Carrabelle had informed him they would charge 32 cents per 1,000 gallons for wastewater to irrigate Kendrick Sports Park. In the past, the city has provided water for free. Commissioners instructed Pierce to write the city a letter asking them to forgo the fee because the eld is of economic importance to the east end of the county. At Tuesdays meeting, Pierce told commissioners he had not written the letter, but was informed by Carrabelle employees the city could not provide water for free. He said they may raise the rates further to 46 cents per 1,000 gallons. There appears to be little opportunity for the city to provide water for free, considering the nancial straits the city is in, said Pierce. He said he had asked county Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender to calculate the cost of operating irrigation wells as an alternative to purchasing water from Carrabelle. News bBRIefsEFS

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LocalThe Times | A11Thursday, March 7, 2013Columbia, Montana and ve times in Oklahoma. He is the current Mississippi state champion. Its about the meat, tri tip, he said. His son, who ew Harrier jets for 20 years in the Marine Corps, said the team name came after he had won a chili cook-off in South Texas, and they asked what kind of meat he used. Roadkill was his answer. Dad said he has found that chilies are milder in Idaho and Montana, but in Mississippi, where his chili was hotter than he intended, he just put more tomatoes in it, and I won. After submitting their entries from among the four quarts each had to prepare, the competitors waited as the judges assessed their chilies for avor, texture, consistency, blend of spices, aroma and color. In the end, veteran competitor Paul Nunn of Nunn Better Chili, out of Fort Pierce, took home the win and $500, with Roadkill Hovering Harriers second, receiving $300. Wanda Gangswich of Three Sheets to the Wind, of Panama City Beach, took third and $200. Rounding out the winners were fourth place J. G. Carvers Team Spice Boys, from Vestavia, Ala., and fth place, Kim Pooles Hot Lips Chili team out of Tallahassee. Nunn, who won the cook-off in 2008 and has been competing here regularly for the past two decades, cooked alongside son Tim Nunn and, for the rst time, granddaughter Alyssa Jones. Weve been coming here for 20 years, Nunn said. Its got to be a family thing. We come up and spend a week. Nunn said he is looking forward to his third trip to the world championships in October in Palm Springs, Calif. A retired building contractor, for wastewater treatment facilities, Nunn said the weather proved to be a challenge. Most of use basically the same recipe, but you adjust it a little bit here or there, he said. You put in a little more spice, or I found from past experience that you wind up if youre not careful, you cook it too long, and if you cook it too long, you boil a lot of the avor out of it. I think today I cooked it a total of about an hour and 15 minutes and shut it off with 45 minutes left. Today was a good day to cool it, Nunn said. Today was especially hard because half the time the red blow out, and you had to restart it. When the winds blowing like this, if you turn it up too high it boils, turn it down too low and it blows out. Nunn said he enhanced his tri tail beef with a little bit of Jimmy Dean sausage and found the right mix of chili powders, cumin and Aunt Cora seasoning. Winning for Best Booth was the Burnin at Both Ends team, with the Showmanship award won by Team Toilet Bowl Chili out of Valdosta, Ga., The Just Because award went to the FART (Fire ghters Annual Recompense Team) out of Atlanta, which this year dressed as Oompa Loompas after last year coming dressed as Elvis. The High Yield award went to the Hot Lips Team, which raised more than $800 for the re ghters. Highlighting the auction was the sale of $4,000 in premium tickets to the Talladega 500, supplied courtesy of a high-level Talladega Superspeedway exec with a home on the island. Shepard said plans are to next year introduce salsa competition to further broaden the event. PUBLIC NOTICEFRANKLIN COUNTY IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY WILL HOSTA FRANKLIN COUNTY LONG-TERM ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION SUMMITON MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 FROM 10:00 A.M. TO 3:00 P.M. AT THE APALACHICOLA NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE LOCATED AT 108 ISLANDDRIVE IN EASTPOINT, FLORIDA THEPUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND ANDPARTICIPATE THE OBJECTIVES OF THE MEETING WILL BE: TO INTRODUCE KEY ISSUES TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY AND TO DEVELOP IDEAS FOR LONG-TERM ECONOMIC DIVERSIFICATION IN FRANKLIN COUNTY Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 SPICE from page A5 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLEFT: An Oompa Loompa dances in the Mr. Hot Sauce competition. CENTER: The Big Belly team consisted of Dale Bodziony of Jacksonville, left, and Tallahassees Larry Hines. Not pictured is John Harris of Atlantic Beach. RIGHT: Victor Mitchell of Kelleys Foods, out of Alabama, cooks up the smoked sausages that make for a great tastin sensation.Most of use basically the same recipe, but you adjust it a little bit here or there. You put in a little more spice.Paul Nunn, Nunn Better Chili

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 90258T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit for a Breakwater installation, file number 19-0313745-001-E1, to Mr. William Kdd, P.O. Box 70847, Albany, Georgia 31708-0847. C/o Garlick Environ mental Assoc. Inc. P.O. Box 385 Apalachicola, FL 32329 The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of 63 linear feet of breakwater with two 5 fishery corridors on either end. Breakwater is to be installed no more than 10 waterward of Mean High Water. Wax Myrtle is to be planted on 6 foot centers within 5 feet landward of the existing rip-rap revetment. The project will be at 1457 Cutty Shark Way, St. George Island, Florida 32328, in Section 29, Township 9-South, Range 6-West in Franklin County, at Latitude 29.678958 North, Longitude 84.819078 West, in St. George Sound, a Class II Outstanding Florida Waterbody. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) `of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(x).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the fling of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days fiom the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District Tallahasse office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd. Tallahassee, Florida. March 7, 2013 90280T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192009CA000094CAXXXX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTE FOR BANK OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, Series 2006-5, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES R. PAYTON A/K/A ROBBY PAYTON, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated January 29, 2013, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000094CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, Series 2006-5, is Plaintiff, and JAMES R. PAYTON A/K/A ROBBY PAYTON, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 A.M. at FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 13th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at an old terra cotta monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 21, Township B South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 182.91 feet to the Northeasterly right-ofway boundary of Bluff Road, thence run North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 612.99 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 143.57 feet, thence run North 1029.20 feet to the Southerly edge of the Apalachicola River, thence run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 14 seconds East along said rivers edge 70.17 feet, thence run North 80 degrees 20 minutes 25 seconds East along said rivers edge 62.11 feet, thence run South 1067.04 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT the following described parcel: Commence at an old terra cotta monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 21, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida and thence run South 182.91 feet to the Northeasterly right-ofway boundary of Bluff Road, thence run North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 612.99 feet to a re-rod for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds West along said rightof-way boundary 143.57 feet to a re-rod, thence run North 340.02 feet to a re-rod, thence run South 63 degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds East 143.57 feet to a re-rod, thence run South 340.02 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendends must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachiacola, FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, this 30th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for BANC OF AMERICA FUNDING CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, Series 2006-5 c/o Phelan Hallinan, PLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-7000 PH# 20847 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Feb 28, March 7, 2013 90288T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA File No.: 13-000002-CP Division: Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF CORA MAXINE SANBORN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Cora Maxine Sanborn, deceased, who died testate on December 18, 2012, File Number 13-000002-CP, Probate Division, is pending in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, Clerk of the Circuit Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The estate is testate. The name and address of the personal representative and of the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THE NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 28, 2013. Executed this 7th day of February, 2013. Personal Representative: Gary Wayne Beebe P.O. Box 365 Carrabelle, FL 32322 David J. Hull, Esq. Mary M. Calcote, Esq. Florida Bar No. 278343 Florida Bar No. 25469 Smith Hulsey & Busey 225 Water Street, Suite 1800 Jacksonville, FL 32202 Phone: (904)359-7700 Email: mcalcote@smith hulsey.com Attorneys for Personal Representative Feb 28, March 7, 2013 90334T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 12000364CA Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Unknown Spouse of John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Phyllis Bleiseis; Unknown Spouse of Phyllis Bleiweis; Carrabelle Landings Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Unknown Spouse of John E. Graham a/k/a John E. Grahamn; Phyllis Bleiweis; Unknown Spouse of Phyllis Bleiweis; Carrabelle Landings Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, inside front steps of the courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 21st day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, CARRABELLE LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON AS CLERK OF THE COURT By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Feb 28, March 7, 2013 90364T PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Gulf Coast Workforce Board announces the availability of a Request for Proposal (RFP) titled Workforce Center Sign. The purpose of the RFP is to seek proposals from qualified vendors to provide signage replacing the existing Workforce Center sign and accompanying tenant signs located at the corner of Highway 231 and 19th Street in Panama City, Florida. The intent is to enter into a contract with a single prime contractor. Bidder will submit proposals for two scenarios as outlined in the RFP. Proposals will be due by 4 pm, Wednesday March 15, 2013. To obtain an RFP, or for further information, contact: Workforce Center Amanda Bawn, Communications Coordinator 625 Highway 231 Panama City, FL 32405 850-872-4340 x180 abawn@gcwb.org Minority businesses are encouraged to apply. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Program and auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. March 7, 2013 90336T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes Self Service Storage Facility Act 83.80183.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, March 8, 2013. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT #49 William T. Harris Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #56 Kimberly Bennett Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #61 Mary James Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #70 Candice Lewicki Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #94 Martha Montgomery Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #110 Barbara Bloodworth Contents-Household Feb 28, March 7, 2013 92545T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000488 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. UTA HARDY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 29, 2013 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000488 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and UTA HARDY; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF UTA HARDY N/K/A KEITH HARDY; TENANT #1, TENANT #2, TENANT #3, and TENANT #4 are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at inside FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 8 AND 9, BLOCK 68, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-OF, RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 127 9TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 30, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850577-4401 Fax: 850487-7947. F10066366 March 7, 14, 2013 90382T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 13-11-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF CYNTHIA ANN GREEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CYNTHIA

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 7, 2013 The Times | A13 13 Gulf Coast Residential & Commercial Lots RowellAuctions.comA MarkNet Alliance Member GAL AU-C002594 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Complete Details Visit RowellAuctions.com Tuesday, March 26th at 2:00 p.m. Online Bidding Available2884 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Waterfront 3 BR/2 BA Home w/Dock 3149 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Gulf View 3 BR/2 BA Home 3153 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Nice Gulf View Lot 2390 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 0.8 Acres Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 1 Acre Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL 9,576 SF Comm. Bldg. U.S. Hwy. 98 E Nice Gulf View Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL (2) Comm. Bldgs. 202 NE 7th St., Carrabelle 6,400 SF Metal Bldg. NE 7th Street, Carrabelle Commercial Lot 3157 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 2 BR/2 BA Home & 1BR/1 BA Cottage 57 Seventh St, Apalachicola, FL Triplex, (3) 1 BR/1 BA Units Auction Site: St. James Bay Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Ln, Carrabelle, FLOpen House: Sunday, March 17th 2-5 p.m. RENTALS2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED ................$550 3 BR / 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDOW/ POOL .....................................$8503 BR / 2 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL AND 10X15 STORAGE UNIT.....$9503 BR / 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOLNIGHTLY / $150 | WEEKLY / $8503 BR / 2 UNFURNISHED TRAILOR ......$500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ. FT. / 2 LOTS, HWY 98 FRONTAGE.........$650 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS PIPE WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS PAINTERS/SANDBLASTERS INDUSTRIAL MARINE ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516DENTAL ASSISTING FACULTYTeach in assigned didactic, clinical (direct patient care), lab and/or simulated labs. Design & implement curriculum plan, provide academic and/or career advising, and serve as inventory/supplies manager in on-campus clinic. Requires BS in related eld from an accredited institution, DANB Certi ed + registered Dental Hygienist both in good standing, 3 yrs. relevant experience, willing to complete coursework in Educational Methodology and current working knowledge/exp. in Dental Assisting & Dental Hygiene (within 6 mths. of application), and be willing to pursue/complete graduate degree in discipline, education or related eld within 3 yrs. of hire. MS degree in eld preferred. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Open Until Filled with a review starting 3/25/13. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. HOUSEKEEPER NEEDEDThe MainStay Suites and Port Inn are now accepting applications for housekeepers. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about bene ts package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 NOW HIRINGPARTTIME EVENING COOKThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time evening cook. The ideal candidate will have kitchen experience, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 BARTENDER / THERAPIST NEEDEDThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWPPort Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 NOW HIRINGPART-TIME INSPECTOR Weekends Required $12/hourApply at: 112 Franklin Blvd. St George Island NAIL PERSON NO ACRYLICS NEEDED FOR VERY BUSY SALON.Flexible Schedule Apply in Person @147 W. Hwy 98, Port St. Joe For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $165,000; Call 864-356-5949 3Br/2Ba, Dbl Wide Large Living Room, Dinning Room, on 1 acre of land, Heat & Air, All Appliances, 595 Wilderness Rd, Eastpoint, $75K; Call 850-370-0939 Total Down Pmt $795 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $1375 Ford F-150 4 Door Crew Cab T otal Price $8,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 1/1 Carrabelle, private 1 acre1 bdrm, 1 bath, older home, closed in porch could be used for child/teen bdrm. Newly painted. Fenced yard Non-smokers only, 1st, last & security. $500 mo., 850-697-8790 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow Taking ApplicationsAll Positions!!! Apply in person only HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/HealthCNABrightStar Care of Bay County (#299993930) is seeking a CNA to work in the Gulf and Franklin County areas, PRN part-time 6-12 hours per week. Must have CNA certificate, TB test, Level 2, safe driving record, and be drug free. Non smoker. Call 850 238 3270 to get instructions for applying. Web ID#: 34242876 Text FL42876 to 56654 Medical/HealthFULL TIMEFull time position available with Buy Rite Drugs in Apalachicola. Apply in person at 117 Ave E. NO PHONE CALLS. Web ID# 34243652 Text FL43652 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Great benefits for full time employees. Weekend work requiredFT Maintenance TechnicianGeneral maintenance experience, good driving historyFT Inspectors & PT InspectorsMust have reliable transportation. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time/ Full time Housekeeper Must be trustworthy, Dependable, Drama Free, Ref. Required, Come join the Gibson Inn team. Apply in person 51 Ave. C $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Carrabelle: 2171 Kentucky Ave. Friday, March 8th & Saturday, March 9th 8am -? Tools, household decor, fishing equip, clothing, lots of nice items.Text FL43908 to 56654 Port St. Joe 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Saturday 9th 8am-?Multi Family Yard SaleFurniture, Home Decor, Clothing for all ages, Jewlery and much more! GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton Fl Mar 16th & 17th 8a-5p. Concealed Weapons Classes. (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission: $6Text FL40762 to 56654 Apalachicola Used Book Storeis looking to buy limited number, good condition Apalachicola Cook Books For more information Call 850-570-4204 92547T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000462 RBC CENTURA BANK Plaintiff, vs. MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000462 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, is Plaintiff, and MUNSON, PHILIP J., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, 2nd Floor Lobby of THE COURTHOUSE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 30th day of MAY, 2013, the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT 41 OF THE CITY OF ST. GEORGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF TRACT 41, A DISTANCE OF 107.73 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 136.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO, 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 66 DEGREES 43 MINUTES, 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.17 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 449.20 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 102.87 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 439.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21st day of February, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days, if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 7, 14, 2013 *Adopt*:Athletic, Creative, Loving Lawyer & Doctor yearn to be doting Dad & At Home Mom. Expenses Paid *Ben & Amy* FLBar42311 1800-522-0045 Lost Small White DogLong hair male maltese mix about 10 pounds, a family member.lost in Carrabelle reward 850-294-9664 Text FL43940 to 56654 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 ANN GREEN, deceased, whose date of death was December 12, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file theirs claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREEVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 7, 2013. APRIL JOANN LOUDERMILK Personal Representative 3501 W. Orange, Lot 20, Tallahassee, FL 32310 Steve M. Watkins, III Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 March 7, 14, 2013

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, March 7, 2013 Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast MLS 247917 $132,500 CarrabelleA 3 BD / 2 BA historic home zoned mix use commercial district. Home has lots of character with historical value plus a large fenced yard and an unobstructed view of the Carrabelle River. Wanda Rose850-545-5852 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248790$99,900St. George IslandGULF BEACHES LOTHigh duney lot on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive. Bike path across the street. 3rd lot from the corner of 6th Street East puts you close to the beach for under $100,000. No clearing necessary, 1/3 acre, High (dry) elevation. Buy to build or keep as investment. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248838$635,000St. George IslandCLIPPER BAY HOME Beautifully decorated, Fully furnished, 5 br/5ba, spectacular Gulf view, Elevator, open LR with wet Dock, Pool & bathhouse, Boat Slip, park like setting. as top secretary. Also in consideration for the district employee of the year honors were pre-K paraprofessional Jeanine Wood, bus driver Maxine Taylor, custodian Bobby Langley and food service manager April Dalton. It was a big honor, said King, a 1991 Apalachicola High School graduate now in 17th year of teaching. I know there are a lot of teachers who work weekends and evenings. Im not the only one who gives a lot of their personal time. Browning, a retired rural mail carrier from Thomasville, Ga., who has worked as a secretary for the last nine years, said her honor came as a result of group effort. One person cant do the job, she said. It takes all of them. I couldnt do my job if not for my coworkers. Its an honor they selected me over everyone else, she said. I share it with all our co-workers. King, who attended Gulf Coast Community College and then Florida State, graduated in 1996 with a bachelors degree in elementary education. She has been married to David King for 20 years, and the couple has two sons, Jordan, who attends Gulf Franklin, and Jared, a Franklin County High School freshman. She has taught in the district since 1996 in grades two through ve and has a fourth-grade classroom this year. The students having just nished taking the Florida Writes exam. King has shared writing instruction techniques with teachers throughout the district, some based on the ideas of Melissa Forney. We share ideas, and Ive shared with them what I do, said King, who said she thinks her teaching at this stage of her career is more effective than it ever has been. After youve done something for as long as I have, its not as stressful, and you can enjoy it more, she said. You kind of nd a niche, and things seem to fall into place easier and kids enjoy the learning easier. Browning has worked for the school system for 12 years, and after nishing a rst career as a rural mail carrier in Thomasville decided to retire to Franklin County. I wanted some place warmer, and it was too crowded in South Florida, she said. I came here for the week of Thanksgiving, stayed at the island and decided this was where I wanted to retire. Browning bought a house in Lanark Village in 2002, not long after she started as a substitute teacher. In 2004 she was moved to a secretary position and became principals secretary when the new school opened in August 2008. Her son, Bert, is married to the former Jennifer Ashley, and the couple has a 16-year-old granddaughter, a 2-year-old son and is expecting twins in the next three weeks. Duhart, who earned an economics degree from Marshall University and worked as a paralegal and nancial analyst before entering the teaching profession, is on the other end of her career. After nishing her education at Gulf Coast, she started in 2008 in the county as a business teacher and then moved to social studies. She now teaches American history and government, economics and global studies and is married to Michael Duhart. They have twin sons, Thomas and Jackson Subbarao-Copley, in the eighth grade. I was honored that my fellow teachers nominated me for this, she said. I love my students; theyre the reason I keep coming back. A native of Normal, Ill., Countryman is in her 23rd year of teaching, 15 of them in the Franklin County Schools. She holds bachelors degrees in graphic communications from Illinois State University and elementary education from University of West Florida, as well as a masters degree in varying exceptionalities from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La, and a specialist degree in curriculum instruction from Piedmont College in Athens, Ga. She started teaching in 1990 in Franklin County, rst elementary school and then special education, and stayed until 2002 when, she moved to Georgia. Countryman returned in 2010 to teach middle school ESE and now teaches eighth-grade language arts. I am honored to represent such a great group of colleagues, said Countryman, mother of two Franklin County students, daughter Ursula and son Rory. Mount-Simmons, who was the districts teacher of the year in 2009, has taught in the district for 33 years, mostly in elementary school. But this year, she took over coordination of the Franklin County Academy, which together with the pre-kindergarten classes and the alternative school, form the offerings at the Learning Center. Its for kids who have gotten behind. They get to do that here, she said. Students can complete two years of work in one and stay on to receive their diplomas. We nd most of the kids are behind academically because they missed too much school. Mount-Simmons said. Theyre committed now to getting their education. It was social time for them, she said. But theyre sharp kids, now theyre back on track and need to do what they chose not to. These kids can do; its just life got in their way. Mount-Simmons said she sees her role as a teacher as more of a calling than a job. I always said I dont like kids, she said. You have to have a calling to be in this profession. I honestly believed I was called here, it was a choice made for me. And because its a calling, the compassion for what I do comes out. The senior member among those honored was Taylor, who has been driving a bus for the district since 1971. She had been driving to and from Carrabelle, but later moved to the route to Sumatra, which takes her to Brickyard, Bloody Bluff, Jeffy Tucker Road and CC Land Road. I love it. Thats why Ive been here so long. I love the young uns, she said. I am driving grandkids. They tell me, My daddy used to ride your bus, and my grandma used to ride your bus. Taylor, who lives in Blood Bluff with husband, AJ, has three daughters, Karen, Lucretia and Carlene, and a son Jay; nine grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Every year I say Im going to retire and I dont do it, she said. Towns, who shared top secretary honors with Browning, started in May 2001 at Apalachicola High School and then went to Carrabelle before eventually nding her role at the Learning Center. Towns also was chosen last year as the districts top secretary and said she was very proud and honored to be chosen again. She has lived in Apalachicola since 1991 and has raised three children, all AHS graduates: April, Holly and Charles Justice. Towns has two grandchildren, Jayden and Gianna. Wood, a native of Eastpoint, graduated in 1987 from Carrabelle High School, then took courses at Gulf Coast Community College before starting to work for the school district in 2001. She rst began as an assistant to Deene Cook and later was hired as a paraprofessional, mostly for kindergarten and prekindergartners in Carrabelle and later the Learning Center. She now works with instructor Lisa Murray. I was very honored and very humbled and appreciative, she said. Married to husband Charlie Wood, she is mom to daughters Haley Wood-Hobbs, a CHS graduate who lives in Crawfordville with stepchildren Molly and Braddock; and Katie Wood, a FCHS senior. Langley graduated from AHS in 2000, and after a stint working for Barbers Seafood, started in October 2005 working as a custodian. In Feb. 2011 he married wife Jennifer. I felt very, very honored, he said. Seeing the kids, thats one of the rewards of my job. I get to see the kids in the cafeteria. They come up and hug me and are happy to see us. I enjoy talking to them, asking them how their day went and make sure theyre doing good. Me and my wife love children; we just dont have any at the moment, he said. Dalton started as a paraprofessional in 2007 but in 2009 shifted over to food service, where she now manages food for the three schools in the district. I love my job, she said. Because I get to see the children and come in contact with every child. Most I know by name. Married to husband Frank, the couple lives in Eastpoint and has two sons, Marcus, 19, and William, 17. Dolores Hayward-Croom coordinated the School Related Employee of the Year program, while Harolyn Walker handled the Teacher of the Year selection process. Both King and Browning will receive an all-expense paid trip to the Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta. The four teachers honored each received $100, with King presented with a $150 check for her district selection. When she attends the state event in Orlando later this year, she will receive a $750 check from Macys, and the school will receive one for $250. King also received a gift certi cate from Mainstay Suites for one-night stay, a $25 gift certi cate from the Honey Hole and a $50 gift from Delta Kappa Gamma, a fraternal organization for women educators. In addition to a $100 prize and gift basket from her fellow employees, Browning received a $25 gift certi cate from Gulfside IGA, a $50 gift certi cate from Ace Hardware and a two-night stay at Sportsmans Lodge. JEANINE WOOD JOY TOWNS BOBBY LANGLEY APRIL DALTON MAXINE TAYLOR ELINOR MOUNT-SIMMONS JAIME DUHART LYDIA COUNTRYMAN TEACHER from page A1