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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 02-14-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00209
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A local club would like to see the county shooting range moved farther north on County Road 65. There is currently a public shooting range on county land just east of the Franklin County Humane Society on County Road 65. A group of local outdoorsmen, the Tates Hell Rod and Gun Club (THRGC), has taken on the task of facilitating the construction of a new public ri e range in the county. According to the THRGC website, plans include separate pistol, ri e, trap and skeet areas with covered shooting benches. Our rst goals are to facilitate the relocation and improvement of our countys ri e range to a more suitable location to make it safer for shooters and neighbors, the site reads. We hope in the future to arrange rearm training courses as well as competitive matches open to the public. A secondary goal will be to work with FWC on other regulatory agencies to voice our concerns with hunting and shing regulations. We intend to advocate, with elected of cials at all levels, School board will vote on agreement Feb. 21 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County School district employees voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to ratify a contract for the current school year designed to bring the districts fund balance into positive territory. But whether it will prevent the need for future cuts this school year remains a question. Rik McNeill, executive director of the Florida Education Associations Central Panhandle Service unit and a key negotiator on behalf of the county teachers and education support personnel, said the one-year contract, from July 1, 2012 until June 30, 2103, passed easily in secret balloting by both teachers and support personnel. All teachers, regardless of whether they are among the roughly two-thirds who are members of the Franklin County Teachers Association union, were entitled to vote on the contract. Of these, 93 percent voted yes. The same was true of the nonteaching staff, with all of them, not only members of the Franklin Education Support Professionals Association, able to vote. Of these, 78 percent voted yes. The contract remains to be approved by the district, with school board members expected to vote yes when they meet Feb. 21. Key to the contract is a provision that will enable the district to delay the June 2012 paychecks to teachers on 10-month contracts until July 2013, the rst month of the next scal year. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com For the past 17 years, the annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler has showcased the culinary creations of the areas growing number of ne establishments. This year, there were some new twists, including stylish mixed drinks, a celebrity chef and the cuisine of a retirement community all part of the evolving face of the areas food establishments. Once again, the annual fundraiser for the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce was a sell-out, attracting more than 210 people to the Armory on Sunday night. A huge array of volunteers helped to make the event a success, with their efforts State, city begin big Mill Pond investment By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Both the state and city are moving forward this month with major investments at Scipio Creek, with the state set to spend almost $1 million in renovating and modernizing the aging structure that houses aquaculture regulators. The city last week also awarded an almost $330,000 contract to Poloronis Construction to complete a haul-out facility at the marina, long known by locals as the Mill Pond, dating back to the days when a saw mill was located there. Though the two projects have separate funding sources, they are intertwined because they are two major pieces of what city of cials hope will be a revitalized area for preserving and enhancing the struggling seafood industry. At the Feb. 5 city commission meeting, City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb presented seven bids for constructing the haulout facility, work to be managed by Baskerville Donovans Richard Delp. She said because the industry has said a 60-ton lift is what is needed, the base bids for a 50-ton facility would be suf cient. These bids ranged from a high of $581,000 from H.G. Harders & Son Inc. to Poloronis low bid. The only other bid under a half-million dollars was $349,000 from Cathey Construction and Development. Drawing on millions in federal stimulus money to complete the overall Scipio Creek renovation, Taylor-Webb said $230,000 has been granted for the portion of the project covered by Poloronis bid. The additional $100,000 needed will come from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (DOACS), which has plans to modify its original plans for housing its barge at the marina. Taylor-Webb said DOACS noti ed the city in late 2010 that the state was Teachers OK budget deal INSIDE St. Joe settlement comes through, brings $61,000 to school district A2 See TEACHERS A2 Thursday, February 14, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 42 County aims to relocate gun range PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times At left, The Blue Parrots George Joanos stands behind his red pepper sauce over baked grouper. At right, members of the high schools culinary arts class offer up their selections. From left are David Butler, Daniel Carrino, Brittany Carr, Casey Sapp, Brittany Bryant, Chandler White and Karl Sanford. FORGOTTEN COAST CHEF SAMPLER 17th Chef Sampler displays varied offerings See GOURMET A3 See GUN RANGE A7 See MILL POND A7 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Classi eds . . . . A15 African-American History Festival this weekend HCOLAs 10th annual African-American History Festival will be Feb. 1517 at Franklin Square in Apalachicola. The two-day free festival will highlight African-American history, food, art and culture with a parade, entertainment featuring Un nished Business, exhibits, food, arts and crafts, speakers, music, dance, poetry and drama. The festival is in the North Historic District, The Hill off Sixth Street and Avenue L. For info, call 323-0544 or 653-7515. Dixie to present Vintage Hitchcock The Dixie Theatre presents the rst in its 2013 professional season with Vintage Hitchcock: A Live Radio Play over the next two weekends. Spies, murder, love and other trademarks of Alfred Hitchcock come to life in the style of a 1940s radio broadcast complete with vintage commercials, a train chase, a serial killer and a devastating explosion through live sound effects and music. Shows are 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 15-16, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17. There will be a matinee at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20, and then shows continue Feb. 22-24. All seats are $25. For tickets, call the box of ce at 653-3200. Souper Book and Bread sale Saturday Friends of the Franklin County Public Library will hold their annual Souper Book and Bread sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Sea Oats Gallery, 128 E. Pine Ave on St. George Island. Delicious homemade soups and breads plus great used books of all kinds! Enjoy a bowl while you browse, or buy a quart for lunch or dinner. All proceeds bene t the county libraries in Eastpoint and Carrabelle. Want to donate books, soups or breads? Questions? Call Anna Carmichael at 370-6763. Appletons estuary, A14

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 Shannon Venable, the districts nance director, said by delaying these last two paychecks until July, the district will save about $396,000, just slightly below the roughly $402,000 in property tax proceeds that disappeared during the July to October 2012 budget process. Venable said the state will allow for a prior period millage adjustment for the upcoming scal year, which will enable the district to assess additional millage in 2013-14 because of the declines between July and October 2012. Were going to see that on our tax revenues that come in next year, she said. In addition, the teachers agreed to two furlough days, June 10 and 11, two planning days after the last day of school on June 7. The furloughs will save the district about $56,000. Though the deal takes a huge step toward balancing the budget by the end of the scal year, it is not expected to bring the district to the minimum 2 percent of overall revenue the state requires a district have in its fund balance. Venable said with these changes, the unrestricted fund balance will be negative $110,976 at years end, and when the more than $200,000 in restricted funds are factored in, it will be a positive $131,000, still short of the 2 percent. The problem is not solved, she said. We will still be in nancial woes after these changes this week. I think both parties are aware this doesnt solve the problem. McNeill said it was the understanding of the two unions that nishing the year with a positive fund balance would satisfy the Florida Department of Education. We should nish the year in the black, not in the red, he said. Thats what we were told, that they (the administration) have been told by the DOE. That we needed to get to zero, or into the positive, but they werent going to be held to the 2 percent threshold this year. We need to get there in the future, McNeill said. I think we need to get to the end of this year and see the number of students we have at the end of the year, and what faculty has retired or moved away, and then make some determination of how were going to move ahead to meet the needs of students and the county and to get to a more positive fund balance. McNeill credited the districts receipt last week of money from a property tax settlement with The St. Joe Company (see sidebar) as being instrumental in making the deal possible. We were very fortunate that settlement of monies from St. Joe came through, he said. It absolutely helped out. Without it, (the deal) might not have happened as easily as it did. The employees were reluctant to bear the burden of the all of these other errors that have occurred. Employees speak out At last weeks regular school board meeting, the board heard from two employees who urged the district not to cut employee salaries and bene ts. Im not here to brag. Im not here to complain, said Paul Bankston, a 15-year paraprofessional. I just want my income, if it cant go up, to stay the same. I dont want no money taken away from me. He said his paycheck last year totaled a little more than $18,000, and he brought home a little more than $12,000, with about $3,000 spent on out-of-pocket costs for health insurance and other bene ts. I dont drink, I dont smoke, I dont play the lottery, he said. Its not like I spend this on bad habits. (But) Im not the healthy man I was years ago. I know its tough, I know what youre going through, Bankston said. Im not a number on the paper, Im one voice for the voice of hundreds. Cathy Wood, the teachers union representative, commended the work of athletic director Josh Wright, who was the unions chief negotiator. Wright left last week to take a job as football coach at Arnold High School in Panama City. She credited the district with the cuts it had made so far this scal year. Have we cut corners? Weve proven we can live on potatoes and beans, and I think its working, Wood said. I cant say its the morale thats the best. She also alluded to Richard Metcalf, a former middle school math teacher who was dismissed in January after an incident involving an altercation with a student that the district believed constituted professional misconduct. Wood said Metcalf had been cleared by the Florida Department of Educations Of ce of Professional Practices of all wrongdoing, although it is arguable whether a decision not to sanction a teacher constitutes a complete exoneration. If we rehired that person, we would save all expenses of attorney fees, Wood said. In her report, School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders asked the school board to refer Metcalfs appeal of its decision to the Florida Department of Administrative Hearings. She opted against recommending the ve-member school board hear the matter. That administrative law judge makes a decision, Was what the board did right or wrong? Thats the bottom line, and they refer it to back to you. Some options you can adopt or not adopt, she said. Sanders said attorney Bob Harris will represent the district in the appeal, with attorney fees covered by the districts insurance company. She said the district will be liable for several thousand dollars in administrative fees. WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Family Care and Rotating Specialty Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola Quick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-653-8853 ext. 118 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-28-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM St. Joe settlement comes through An infusion of almost $62,000 in additional tax proceeds as a result of a settlement with The St. Joe Company helped lead to school employees rati cation this week of a one-year contract deal. The schools received a check last week from Tax Collector Jimmy Harris for $61,891 as a result of the settlement. The county received $53,745 from the settlement, while the Northwest Florida Water Management District got $698, for a total of $116,133. Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper said the settlement with The St. Joe Company dates back to 2007, when the company rst went to court to protest the valuation of 147 lots in the SummerCamp development on the eastern end of the county. The company also sued over the appraisals for 2008 and 2009. Skipper said St. Joe argued that some of their values were in ated because though there were contracts in 2004 for deeds agreed upon during the height of real estate market, these werent recorded until 2006, when values had begun to fall. She said she and Doris Pendleton, the former property appraiser, met with St. Joe representatives in April 2010 to discuss these valuations. Skipper said the county offered St. Joe a $15 million reduction in value on the whole SummerCamp subdivision for three years. We met and made that offer and heard nothing from them up until Doris retired, she said. Skipper said the company contacted the property appraisers of ce in October and December 2012, but the countys offer remained the same. Both sides then entered mediation and agreed on a $20 million property tax reduction over the three years. The biggest reason for the agreement is now the state of Florida says that whenever were qualifying sales, we must recognize the notarized acknowledged date of the document as opposed the actual recorded date, Skipper said. It gives the judge (the ability) to rule on so many ifs in the situation. We just didnt feel it was a good gamble for the county. The judge could have waived the penalty and interest that St. Joe owed, and it was quite a sum. Now that the lawsuit has been resolved, the monies that had been frozen now can be disbursed. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN TEACHERS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The districts chief negotiator, Leonard Dietzen, left, speaks with school board attorney Barbara Sanders while board member George Thompson, center, talks with administrator Al London.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, February 14, 2013 Thursday, February 14, 2013 PHOTOS BY DAVI D AD LERSTEIN | The TimesLEFT : Kelli Boxberger created this sign, one of many she has at her Funky Fiddler furniture store. CENTER: The areas political muscle was represented, clockwise from left, by Gulf County Superintendent Jim Norton, Jane Montford, Liz Boyette, Cristin Beshears, State Rep. Halsey Beshears, Erika Norton, Aaron Boyette and State Sen. Bill Montford. RIGHT : Celebrity Chef Joe Rego chats with the Owl Cafes Susan Gary. matched once again by the students in the Franklin County High Schools culinary arts program. Debbie Fletcher, a former restaurateur who directs the program, said seven of her 66 students took part in preparing sweets for the event, including succulent chocolate clair cakes and white chocolate toffee cake. Taking part were Brittany Bryant, Karl Sanford, Casey Sapp, Daniel Carrino, Brittany Carr, Chandler White and David Butler. It was a great inspiration to them and left a lasting impression, Fletcher said. Though the young people did not take part, a new addition to the offerings this year were fancy mixed drinks, courtesy of the two newest beverage spots, The Tap Room and Tamaras Tapas Bar. Traditionally, beverage suppliers such as Southern Wine and Spirits, Lewis Bear Company and Republic National Distributing Company handle all the libations. The Tap Room offered up a selection of craft beers, Bees Knees martinis and Key Lime cocktails, while the Tapas Bar poured blueberry lemon drop martinis. Among the rst to sell out was the Blue Parrot Oceanfront Cafs baked grouper St. George with red pepper sauce. Owner George Joanos plated a hefty chunk of fresh grouper, lightly breaded and baked to seal in the moisture, then topped with a delicate sauce. Right alongside him was the Apalachicola Seafood Grill, which had owners Bev Hewitt and Jerry Hall serving up tropical rice with sweet and sour shrimp and Jerrys famous smoked sh dip. The Owl Caf saw owner Susan Gary presenting an alligator sausage Creole, with grits cake, made from sausage she gets from New Orleans. This was accompanied by brie with bread, and baklava made with local Tupelo honey and pecans. Up the Creek Raw Bar and chef Brett Gormley delighted patrons with Thai noodles with mung bean salad with ginger crisps, as well as crab cake with chipotle aioli. Carolines Dining of the River served up Panhandle grouper with sweet pepper, leeks and a light garlic sauce. The Crooked River Grill offered a seafood blend of grouper, shrimp and crab, served over jasmine rice with a remoulade sauce. This was accompanied by lo stuffed with pured peas with baked salmon and dill. Tamaras Caf offered home baked rosemary foccaccio bread, with mozzarella, heirloom tomatoes, spinach, basil aioli and prosciutto ham, tossed with balsamic vinegar. Iras at the Gibson Inn offered salmon on cucumber rounds, and a sweet potato soup, while Eddy Teachs Raw Bar served up what else? raw oysters, accompanied with a curried potato salad. Caf Con Leche offered a host of delicacies, including chocolate chip lavender cookies, bacon dipped with chocolate, kumquat liqueur, kumquats dipped in chocolate, amaretto cakes, mocha cake and monkey bread. Jonathan Brubaker, a graduate of Johnson and Wales who now works as chef and dietary director at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing home, showed the new face of a growing niche in the culinary industry, that of ne foods at longterm care communities. He offered a salmon mousse and she crab soup to delight the palate. Attracting a lot of attention was chef Joe Rego at the Front Porch restaurant in Tallahassee. A native of Portugal, Rego secured the title of Chopped Champion on the widely popular Food Network television show, gaining national recognition through the competition that challenges skill, speed and ingenuity. Rego served up a house specially, ceviche, with the restaurant featuring on its menu a make-your-own ceviche bar with a choice of fresh snapper, tuna, scallop, shrimp or salmon. For the Chefs Sampler, Rego made a spicy ceviche with watermelon, served on malanga chips. Each of the tables was designed by a volunteer with a different theme in mind. These designers included Andrea Duval, Kathy Andrews, Caty Greene, Judi Stokowski, Amy Price, Denise Butler, Kelli Boxberger, Butch Rowell, Jan Houser, Kayd Selden, Bonnie Fulmer, Katherine Neill, Elizabeth and Rich Wynn, Shelly James, Dixie Partington, Karen Brown, Beverly Coxwell and Anna Carmichael. GOURMET from page A1LEFT : Michaelin Watts tries a pastry from the Bridge at Bay St. Joe. RIGHT : Ira Mittleman, from The Gibson Inn, stands with Nola Tolbert from Crooked River Grille, center, and the Gibson Inns Emily Adams.

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 14, 2013 A Page 4 Section Southerland named to Coast Guard subcommittee Special to the Times House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster said last month he has appointed Rep. Steve Southerland II to serve as vice chairman of the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation for the 113th Congress. Southerlands new role will enhance his leadership for Florida on Coast Guard, ports and maritime issues in Congress. As a member of the House Transportation Committee hailing from a state with 20 ports, I understand the importance of bolstering Coast Guard readiness and strengthening our coastal economies, Southerland said. I appreciate Chairman Shusters friendship and look forward to expanding my role on these maritime issues so critical to our nations economic competiveness. Over the past two years, Rep. Southerland has consistently demonstrated a commitment to reforming Americas vital infrastructure systems without losing his focus on making Washington spend smartly, Shuster said. His knowledge and expertise in coastal issues will be a welcome addition to the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee. For more than a year, Sue Cronkite has been working on a database of names of people who are referenced in the indexes of books such as Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers, published by the University of Florida, The Magic of Cape San Blas and the Surrounding Area, published by Marlene Womack in 2011, and The Lovett Family of Apalachicola Florida and Allied Families self-published by Rose Gibbons Lovett in 1963. These are great resources, in hardcopy form at the library, but if nothing else Library School is teaching me that library holdings are only part of the wealth of information available, especially on the Internet. Yesterday I found, while looking for a particular portal for early Apalachicola Census Records, a Florida State University dissertation by Christopher Horrell on maritime history and archaeology focusing substantially on Apalachicola. In the appendixes are lists of ship captains, vessels and the master carpenters who built them. All of these names could potentially be added to the database, which the Apalachicola Municipal Library is willing to share with any other interested parties. The library is reaching out to the Gulf County Public Library, with their Alfred I. DuPont Florida History and Genealogy Center, which is almost the square footage of this library. Port St. Joe and Apalachicola, while certainly rivals historically, are linked together by history and families, back before the town, known then as St Joseph, was decimated by Yellow Fever and a hurricane in 1843. Some Apalachicola houses were even originally built in Port St. Joe and transported to Apalachicola. Another resource, more precious than the Internet, as it is more eeting, are the recollections of our local residents. The library has scant resources to put toward an oral history project, but the Florida Humanities Council did record some in 2003. The loss of our beloved Bobby Siprell last Sunday highlights the urgency of gathering information from lifelong resident. Bobby was not one we thought we would lose so soon. He was just going to be tapped by the University of Floridas Historic Preservation Program, to provide recollections on the evolution of the Chapman School buildings, at the recommendation of Susan Clementson. The list of Bobbys wonderful works, both personal and physical is long, but we especially appreciate his transformation of a discarded piece of furniture, which is now the librarys circulation desk. He was on our list to call for some other carpentry projects. We will miss him, as will many residents of Apalachicola. Let the call go out come help us compile an historical record of Apalachicola. Any suggestions or temporary offers of materials will be greatly appreciated. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. As you know, Apalachicola has led a lawsuit against the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners to compel them to meet jointly and in public with the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Boards of City Commissioners as required by the Governmental Con ict Resolution Act, Florida Statutes 164.1055. The intent of the lawsuit is very much contrary to the political spin that has most recently emanated the chambers where our esteemed county commission conducts the business affairs of the people of this great county. The complaint is solely about the Franklin County Commissions refusal to meet jointly and in public with the City of Apalachicola and the City of Carrabelle on Dec. 19, 2012, to discuss and attempt to resolve con icts regarding the local plan for allocation of Restore Act Fine Funds under the stated Governmental Dispute Resolution Act. The total focus of which is to require the Franklin County Commission to meet as required by the statute to discuss and attempt to resolve con icts between the county and the two cities. It is not to compel Franklin County to accept the fair distribution plan adopted by both cities in August and early September, which apparently to date has been rejected without cause or comment at a meeting of the county commission on Wednesday morning, Jan. 2, 2013, without being on the agenda and without any notice being given to the cities. The truth is that Franklin County has knowingly and repeatedly refused to meet with the cities to even discuss much less attempt to resolve the con icts and has in large part ignored the many cordial requests by Carrabelle and Apalachicola since August 2012 to meet with the cities to discuss a fair plan of allocation to our respective communities. The Franklin County Commission now comes to the court cloaked in indignation, with a de ant attitude where their actions have made it abundantly clear that they would rather ght than meet with the two cities to discuss the simple and uncomplicated matter of how the cities are to receive a fair share of the Fine Funds. We trust that the court will declare F.S. .1055 applicable and require Franklin County to meet jointly and in public with the cities such as the meeting called and noticed and attended by both Apalachicola and Carrabelle on Dec. 19, 2012. Again, I thank you for your time and attention to this matter. Van W. Johnson Sr. mayor of Apalachicola Threats to public servants against the law After carefully listening to the county commission meeting proceedings for the Feb. 5 meeting, and hearing District One Commissioner Massey report multiple threats to his person and property over the forthcoming vote for the county attorney position, I was truly saddened and very disappointed that neither the current county attorney, nor the administrator of services, nor the current or past board of commissioners chair took this opportunity to remind the public of the penalties and illegality of threatening a public of cial in the commission of their duties. What an ideal opportunity for public education and civility wasted! Florida Statutes 838.021 Corruption by threat against public servant Florida Statutes > Title XLVI > Chapter 838 > 838.021 Corruption by threat against public servant current as of: 2011 It is unlawful to harm or threaten to harm any public servant, his or her immediate family, or any other person with whose welfare the public servant is interested with the intent to: In uence the performance of any act or omission that the person believes to be, or that the public servant represents as being, within the of cial discretion of the public servant, in violation of a public duty, or in performance of a public duty. When this issue to choose a county attorney is again presented for a vote at the next meeting, I sincerely hope that such an important and cautionary statutory reminder will be made to the public at that time by one of the lead county of cials. It will at least be better late than never! Sincerely, Mel Kelly Mayor of Carrabelle 2005-2007 Dont let cuts affect salaries, curriculum Good Morning! I am writing concerning the dire nancial situation the Franklin County School board nds itself in. I fear the drastic methods under discussion to solve the problems may in the long term affect the curriculum offered and the students as well. As a graduate of the public schools (1941) of Franklin County, I was a student during the great depression of the 1930s and the school year was only eight months long. The elected superintendent during my senior year was Dr. Ham who had a full-time dental practice. Dr Ham had a fulltime secretary to help with his school job. I think school board members received $25 per meeting, but did not meet every month. The point that I would like to make is that because of the severe depression, school expenses were carefully monitored to keep within the schools austere budget. As a result the curriculum was somewhat limited. For example, I was interested in medicine and applied for and was accepted at Emory. Two college courses required in college pre-med were chemistry and physics. These courses were not offered in high school in Apalachicola and when I entered college, I was at a serious disadvantage in that I had to compete with students who had learned the basics of these subjects in high school. I sincerely hope the curriculum in Franklin County School does not meet the same fate as that that occurred during the Great Depression. School teachers salaries should not have to be cut because someone miscalculated the budgetary requirements. The ultimate responsibility to adequately fund the school should be the school board members. It would seem that they would be responsible to do their homework on budgetary matters before meetings. To quote President Harry Truman, If the heat is too hot, get out of the kitchen! The teachers and the students did not create the problem and should not be punished for someone elses mistakes, and I sincerely hope that the curriculum will not be affected. Sincerely, Photis Nichols, M.D. Chapman High Class of 1941 FLORIDA STATUTES 164.1055 READS THAT: Failure to resolve a con ict after following authorized procedures shall require the scheduling of a joint public meeting between the primary con icting governmental entities. The governmental entity rst initiating the con ict resolution process shall have the responsibility to schedule the joint public meeting and arrange a location. In this meeting, the governing bodies of the primary con icting governmental entities shall: (a) Consider the statement of issues prepared in the con ict assessment phase. (b) Seek an agreement. (c) Schedule additional meetings of the entities in con ict, or of their designees, to continue to seek resolution of the con ict. (2) If no agreement is reached, the primary con icting governmental entities shall participate in mediation, the costs of which shall be equally divided between the primary con icting governmental entities Letters TO THE EDITOR @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Local recollections are precious resource VAN W. JOHNSON SR. Cities want to meet, not to compel REP. STEVE SOUTHERLAND Another resource, more precious than the Internet, as it is more fleeting, are the recollections of our local residents. The library has scant resources to put toward an oral history project, but the Florida Humanities Council did record some in 2003.

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The Times | A5 Thursday, February 14, 2013 TOBACCO C ESSA T ION C LASS S CHEDULE LOCATION: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital A ll classes begin at 5:30 P.M. Free nicotine patches and gum will be provided to participants who complete each class Each class is a 2 hour (one time) session. Please visit the following websites to view a current schedule of tobacco cessation classes that are being held in Franklin County at www.bigbendahec.org/quit-now and www.ahectobacco.com T o register for a class, please call Big Bend A HE C at 850-224-1177. THERE IS NO COS T T O A TT END! March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013 The Bay County Fairgrounds Register now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo special section, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show: Call: 850-248-3976 or E-mail: expostradeshows@aol.com For sponsorship information call: 850-763-6587 For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 SPONSORS THERE IS S T ILL SPACE FOR YOU A T T HE Friday: Noon 5 PM Saturday: 9 AM 5 PM Sunday: 10 AM 3 PM A HOST OF SHABBY CHIC VENDORS ALREADY SIGNED UP! PRESENTING SPONSORS: SHOW SPONSORS: PATRON SPONSORS: The Goulding Agency By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A Carrabelle resident has appealed to the city for help controlling traf c in his neighborhood. When Bill Owen decided to retire, he and wife Tammy knew they wanted a place on the Gulf Coast. They toured from Sarasota to Louisiana hoping to nd the ideal spot. After several trips, they decided Franklin County would be their new home. They bought their house at 915 NE 7th St. and disposed of most of their possessions and their New York home. Looking forward to warm winters and a laidback lifestyle, in June 2012, they moved to Carrabelle. Owen hoped to concentrate on his hobbies, painting and photography. Tammy Owen became the director of rehabilitation at the St. James Rehabilitation Center. That, said Owen, is when the nightmare began. The couple discovered that the dirt track that runs behind their new home is a dump site for trash and worse. That the stretch of road is constantly used as a race track by dirt bikes, four-wheelers and even bog trucks. The noise and dust were so bad, the Owens could not sit on the porch or open their windows. At the end of 7th Street is a thrift shop that buys scrap metal and other goods. The shop last year was granted a special variance to operate in a residential zone. Owen said he believes traf c to the store greatly increases the dust and noise. In September, Bill Owen appealed to the city to place some stop signs along his road to calm traf c. He received no response. On Oct. 23, his yellow lab Buddy was struck by a truck and killed. The driver didnt even stop. The Owens were devastated, and Bill again called city hall begging for help. On Oct. 25, street superintendent William Massey and his crew installed two stop signs and a 20 mph speed limit sign. The signs were ignored. Owen later contacted the Franklin County Road Department, and his county commissioner, Cheryl Sanders. Sanders dispatched Hubert Chipman, superintendent of roads to visit 915 NE 7th Street. Owen said Chipman agreed there was a problem and promised to work on a plan to reduce dust. A third stop sign was installed by the county. On Feb. 7, Owen addressed the Carrabelle city commission and brought them two video recordings of the traf c at his home. Owen said he only approached the city commission after several conversations with the Carrabelle police. The rst video viewed by commissioners during the meeting showed a teenager on a four-wheeler repeatedly blasting up and down the road behind Owens home. The boy ignores the stop signs and creates huge clouds of dust. The noise is unpleasantly loud on a recording Owen said was made inside his home through closed windows. The second video, not viewed during the meeting, shows a series of vehicles running the stop signs adjacent to the Owen home, apparently at high speed. Among the vehicles pictured are the citys knuckle boom truck, a school bus and UPS truck as well as numerous pick ups. At the Feb. 7 meeting, Owen distributed a letter asking for help. We love Carrabelle and are totally invested in this community, he wrote. We shop here, dine here, get our gas, give to local charities and are trying to get more involved all the time. The combination of all these people driving at high speeds is an accident waiting to happen. The wide sweeping corner has limited sight distance. If someone is speeding east on the straightaway, which happens all the time, and someone runs the stop sign from the south, there is little space to avoid an accident. The city commissioners thanked Owen for his presentation but offered no immediate solution to his problem. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider, in a telephone interview, said she plans a eld trip to look at the situation. She said it is possible the police need to be more proactive in dealing with traf c violations in the area. In an interview Monday, Bill Owen said he and his wife almost ful lled his prediction on Sunday night when their car was narrowly missed by a speeding pick up that never even swerved to avoid hitting the couple when Bill slowed to make the turn into his driveway. No one was hurt Saturday evening when a car stopped in the road on the bridge was struck by an FWC truck. According to a report provided by Florida Highway Patrol Trooper P. Azrak, at 7 p.m. Saturday, on the bridge about 2.5 miles west of Apalachicola, a 2009 Chevrolet HHR, driven by Larry Eugene McCourt, 47, of Liberty County, was stopped in the westbound lane, with no lights on. Approaching from Eastpoint was a 2000 GMC truck, owned by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and driven by Donielle McKinley, who had just picked it up from the former Apalachicola National Estuaries Research Reserve in Eastpoint. McKinley, a sheries biological scientist for FWC, samples sh brought in at the sh houses, measuring them, weighing them and removing ear bones to age them. McKinley said approaching traf c were ashing their lights at her. I thought Why are they ashing their lights at me? I already have my lights on, not my brights on, she said. It was then that McKinley saw McCourts vehicle in the road. I slammed on the brakes and swerved into the oncoming lane to try to avoid hitting him, she said. McKinley said she braked and steered her vehicle to the left, but her right front hit McCourts station wagon at an angle, striking the rear drivers side. Unhurt, she immediately got out and went to the vehicle she had hit. He said he was just going to wait there for a little bit. He said he was waiting for deer to cross the road, she said. He didnt seem to realize I hit him. McCourt sustained minor injuries, and was transported by Weems ambulance to Weems Memorial Hospital. It was there that a blood draw was done, with results pending. Both drivers were wearing their seatbelts at the time of the collision. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Apalachicola Police Department (APD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. FEB. 7 Elton J. Garcia, 37, Winters, Texas, violation of a pretrial release (FCSO) Floyd B. Parramore, 52, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Willie G. Dasher, Jr., 34, Eastpoint, Bay County warrant for withholding child support (FCSO) FEB. 8 Charles C. Golden, 43, Eastpoint, Arrest REPORT BILL OWEN | Special to The Times Dust trails behind a pick-up truck Bill Owen said blasted through a stop sign at highway speeds. Carrabelle man seeks traf c relief Injuries spared in Saturday bridge crash burglary of a structure and grand theft (FCSO) Esmeralda Dominguez, 45, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (APD) FEB. 9 Steve A. Johns, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, burglary of a structure, criminal mischief and violation of probation (FCSO) Michael J. Anderson, 41, Tallahassee, no valid drivers license, false report to a law enforcement of cer and Gadsden County warrant for violation of probation (FHP) Gretta A. Prevette, 27, Eastpoint, trespass after warning, resisting of cer without violence, corruption by threat against public servant and violation of a pre-trial release (FCSO) Law Enforcement

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com APALACHICOLA The ailing Apalachicola Bay might get some help if Gov. Rick Scott gets his way, but lawmakers say most of the funding will go toward a study. Scotts recently unveiled budget would give $3 million to water quality improvement projects in the bay. The Northwest Florida Water Management District would receive the money and undertake the projects. State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, who represents the county, said he is pleased the governor recommended the funding. He understands the severe problem that we have with the Apalachicola River basin and the Apalachicola Bay, he said. Montford said the money, at least partly, will go toward a riverow study. Lawmakers and scientists agree the lack of freshwater ow on the river is contributing to the oyster-haul decline, as well as other issues. Montford said the lack of ow has increased the bays salinity, allowing sea predators to feast on oysters. But Florida has no control over freshwater ow on the river. Lake Lanier, north of Atlanta, releases the water that feeds the river, and despite legal wrangling, Florida has not been able to increase that volume. There has been no ofcial decision on how the $3 million would be spent, Montford said. Scott likely will leave that up to the water management districts professionals, but he de nitely wants a waterow study, Montford said. Also Montford said he will ght to put the $3 million is in the Legislatures budget, which has not been written. And he said he has some big guns in the Legislature Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and Sen. Charlie Dean, RInverness, chair of the Environmental Preservation and Conservation Committee who support helping the bay. Montford said like the Everglades, the bay and the basin are problems that should concern everyone in the state. This is not just a North Florida issue; this is a Florida issue, he said. We are witnessing the destruction of an American treasure. So far, the water management district has been reticent to detail how the $3 million would be spent, saying theres no project list for the money. Its a proposed budget; its pretty early, said Lauren Engel, district spokeswoman. Engel said she had no knowledge the money would be spent on a study. Meanwhile, State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, was less energized about the governors interest in the bays problems. I wish that we were doing something more direct to help out those people down in Apalachicola, rather than study(ing) something, he said. Beshears said the problem is one that must be relentlessly pursued. He, the chairman and vice chairman of Agriculture & Natural Resources Subcommittee, and the secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection toured the region Friday. They spent half a day in Apalachicola, going out on the water, even seeing oystermen harvesting. And Beshears was resolute the Legislature needs to nd some remedies. We were there trying to look at all our options, trying to see what in the world we can do to help this problem, he said. BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Vendor Space Is Going Fast... So Call Now! $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. I NSTANTLY MA K E IT YOUR EX PO GAIN THE EXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Calling All Businesses To The 2013 Bay County Health Expo BOARDWAL K BEACH RESORT F EBRUARY 19, 2013 9 AM 2 PM S o n s o r e y T e N e w s H e r a 2084417 2084477 Entry Form www.newsherald.com BENEFITTING To enter go online at the Panama City News Herald website at www.newsherald.com or by mail or enter in-person To enter by mail or in person, complete an Of cial Entry Form printed in The Panama City News Herald, and return or mail to: Beautiful Baby Contest, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.com To Enter Rules $5 entry fee shall accompany each entry. Categories. The contest shall consist of four categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 13-24 months, and 25-36 months Photographs must be submitted by the parents or guardians entrant. No third-party entries will be accepted. Hardcopy photos must be at least 3 inches on one side and no more than 10 inches. Poor quality photos will not be accepted. All photos featured in a special section in the newspaper : _____________________________________ : _____________________________________________ : _______________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ________________________________________ ____________________________________________ __________________ __________ ____ Return hand written forms to the at 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL or go to NORTHWEST FLORIDA W ATER MA N AGE M E N T D ISTRICT G OVER N I N G BOARD MEETI N G S CHEDULE FOR 2013 A ll meetings are scheduled to begin at 1:00 p.m., ET at D istrict H eadquarters, 81 W ater Management D rive, H avana, F L 32333, unless otherwise indicated. January 10, 2013 February 14, 2013 March 14, 2013 A pril 11, 2013 May 9, 2013 June 13, 2013 July 11, 2013 A ugust 8, 2013 S eptember 12, 2013 Governing Board 4:00 P.M. ET Budget Public Hearing 5:05 P.M. ET S eptember 26, 2013 Budget Public Hearing 5:05 P.M. ET O ctober 10, 2013 November 14, 2013 D ecember 12, 2013 BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 Governors budget could aid Apalachicola Bay FILE PHOTO | The News Herald A tributary of the Apalachicola River ows near Apalachicola.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, February 14, 2013 6012790 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net planning to turn over the task of conducting oyster shelling to a private com pany. As a result, the state decided to withdraw about $350,000 it planned to spend to build a new bulkhead for the barge and ll some wetlands in the area to ac commodate the barges presence. Leslie Palmer, who over sees DOACS aquaculture program, said the state has rethought the wisdom of holding on to the barge, especially because its long time skipper, Capt. David Cole, is set to retire at the end of this month. We could never hire a marine captain at the price we pay Capt. Cole, Palmer said. (Agriculture Com missioner) Adam Putnam believes this is something that private industry can do. The shell belongs to the state, but with a private contractor, you can get more bang for your buck. Palmer said the shell, known as cultch, will con tinue to be owned and managed by the state, but will be handled under the terms of a contract speci ed by bid. She said this method is in keeping with how other states do it, with the exception of North Carolina. It only will change who is doing the work, she said. We dont want this program to cost any more administratively than it does. The timing is right. This is money we have been spending thats not going to cultch, Palmer said. Well have less mon ey for salaries and more money towards getting the work done. At a meeting last month between Taylor-Webb and Palmer, DOACS told the city that because it would be withdrawing its $350,000 investment, it would make available funds to meet other outstanding needs in the area. At the Feb. 5 city com mission meeting, Tay lor-Webb said she had re quested about $200,000, with about half of that to go toward the shortfall in com pleting the construction on the haul-out facility. In addition, she has asked for another $25,000 to help in the removal of three derelict vessels, two in the slips and one on the dock, that have been there for several years. Taylor-Webb said she hopes an additional $80,000 will be available from the state to buy the boat lift at the completed haul-out fa cility, which she said could run in the neighborhood of about $120,000. This is money set aside anyway, Palmer said. We think the marine renova tion is a great thing for the city. She stressed that both sides are working on a draft contract and that the money must be spent by September 2013. She (Taylor-Webb) is very aware that is where the grant ends, Palmer said. They (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) have told me anything left on the ta ble, theyll take it back. Taylor-Webb told com missioners the Poloronis project should take it about six months to complete, so that it should be done by June 30, 2013. DOACS to get interior renovationOn Feb. 4, Palmer ap peared at the citys plan ning and zoning board to outline its plans to reno vate the DOACS facility at 260 Seventh St., just a few hundred feet from the Scipio Creek marina. The footprint wont change, the buildings not expanding, but were in creasing the lab footprint in the building, she said. We want to make it a 21st century building. Palmer said the $900,000 project, designed by the JRA Associates architec tural rm and to be com pleted by Tampas Nelco Construction, will include additional ofce space for visiting professors and researchers, as well as a state-of-the-art improve ment to the labs FDA certied water testing capabilities. This thing was envi sioned 18 months ago be fore we knew about the (oyster industry) collapse, she said. We do all the shellsh testing for the state. We could do it in Tal lahassee, but we think its important to keep testing done in Franklin County. Palmer said the state plans to add meeting space for the local seafood indus try to take advantage of and to shore up the aging space. We had a lot of mold and mildew in that build ing, which is a workplace environmental issue, she said. Theres asbestos in there. Well do an interior and exterior makeover; the stuccos been leaking over the years. The state plans to reasphalt the driveway, but Palmer said it would likely not be able to meet P & Zs request for pervious asphalt, which could cost an additional $40,000 to $50,000. P & Z members said they were pleased overall that the state would be add ing a pitched roof and gut ters but wanted to be sure the storm runoff would be addressed appropriately. Pictures from the ar chives, some dating back to the late 1800s and early 1900s, as well as pictures of the previous oyster lab, will be hung throughout the building. In addition, there will be displays of old oys ter implements. Its an homage to the history; I kind of like that juxtaposition, Palmer said. We hope the industry and the county will be very proud of it, as a resource for dealers and harvest ers and for a myriad of researchers. Palmer said the proj ect should take about six months, with demolition set to start as early as next week. Currently, DOACS staff, as well as some from the Fish and Wildlife Con servation Commission, are housed in the former Apalachicola National Es tuarine Research Reserve facility in Eastpoint. hunting, shing and rearm laws that reect the needs and desires of our communitys sportsmen. Grayson Shepard, a spokesman for THRGC, said moving the range would have a number of ad vantages. He said because the range is next to and in clear view of the county in mates exercise yard, some shooters are nervous about displaying automobile tag numbers and equipment they own to potential thieves. There also are safety con cerns for the prisoners and the possibility of clandestine transfer of a weapon to an inmate. In addition, the range is next to the Franklin County Animal Shelter and, in particular, its outdoor ken nels. The sound of gunre is disrup tive to both the animals and staff of the shelter, and Director Karen Mar tin has expressed concern that an animal could be accidentally shot. The shelter also has experienced problems with vehicles going to and from the range driving recklessly and speeding. The shelter is circu lating the petition to move the range north on County 65. THRGC, which now boasts more than 100 members, is not working alone on creating the new range. In March 2012, Bill Cline, section leader, division of hunting and game management for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, brought a proposal before the county commission to create a public shoot ing park on a cleared section of land directly north of the sheriffs ofce. Cline said FWC fund ing was in place for the proj ect. He provided commission ers with a handout and gave some background on the park project. Cline said at the last FWC meeting, former Sheriff Skip Shiver had suggested a location. Former Commissioner Bevin Putnal and commissioners Pinki Jackel and Cheryl Sanders supported his plan. Commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter of support for the shooting range to the FWC. Because the property be longs to the school board and, at the time, the county leased a portion of it, a copy of the letter was sent to the school board. The plan stalled when further in vestigation of the property revealed that portions also were leased to Eastpoint Water and Sewer District for possible use as a spray eld at some future date. In a telephone interview Feb. 6, Cline said the FWC still strongly sup ports the gun park. Our funding sources change every year, he said. This year our funds are spent. Were always willing to work with Franklin County. Other funding sources might be avail able. Were looking at state lands that might be available. The sup port is still there. We need to nd a location. Jackel, a vocal advocate of the project, said at the Feb. 5 county meeting that she and County Planner Alan Pierce are investigating sites. FWC is very interested in spon soring a classroom building that they will pay for construction of, she said. We would have instruc tional courses. It would be something that we could really build on in the county that would be an economic engine. We could attract competition skeet shooting, trap and archery, and theres the educational aspect. ROTC and different folks at the school could use the range. It would just be a really nice facil ity for the public because were hunt ers. We own guns. Wed like the op portunity to have a safe environment and an instructional environment also. Shepard said local Scout troops also support the development of a new shooting range. For more information about the proposed shooting range or to sup port the plan, visit the Tates Hell Rod and Gun Club website, http:// thrgc.com/. MILL POND from page A1 GUN RANGE from page A1 GRA YSON SHEP ARD P H O T OS BY DAVID ADL ER S TE I N | The Times At left, the state barge likely will be sold off as surplus once a new private contractor is approved. At right, the states oyster lab is set to get a renovation this year.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 OF THE WEEK PET Franklin County Humane Society JACK & THOMAS! JACK and THOMAS are 6 week old Siamese kittens. They are both calm, social and very handsome. We have some beautiful cats/kittens at the Adoption Center and we continue to offer the reduced adoption fee of only $50.00 to encourage you to come and adopt. Come meet these blue eyed beauties and all the rest. V O LUN T EER S A RE DE S PER AT ELY NEEDED TO SOC I A LIZE WI TH A LL O F O UR D O G S A ND CATS We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR Society Carrabelles Mayor Curley Messer is turning 90. On Saturday, surrounded by more 100 friends and family members, Curley Messer celebrated his 90th birthday at a surprise party held at the Franklin County Senior Center. Messers family prepared a banquet of barbecue chicken and pork with all the xins and the evening ended when a huge cake, decorated with a hunting scene, was cut and passed around. The tables were beautifully decorated and a gift table sagged under the weight of cards and packages. Two of Messers brothers, Curt and Bill, traveled from Tennessee for the occasion, and his sister Mickey came from Liberty County. The grace before dining was led by Ron Comb. Messer was in high spirits, surrounded by his beloved family and especially the grandchildren and greatgrandchildren who are so dear to his heart. He thanked everyone for joining him to celebrate this momentous occasion. Messer arrived in Carrabelle at age 17 to train at Camp Gordon Johnston during World War II. He met and married Audrey Riley here. He has worked in law enforcement both for Carrabelle and for the county and has served as mayor on ve separate occasions beginning in the 1960s. He is credited with having purchased the citys rst police car and with helping to install the Worlds Smallest Police Station. Payton Wood celebrated her third birthday on Tuesday, Feb. 12, with friends and family. She is the daughter of Buddy and Cheree Wood of Carrabelle. Maternal grandparents are Keith and Lucille Walden of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Leonard and Shirley Brannan of Carrabelle and Buddy Wood of Hosford. Birthdays Chairman Carol Roberts called the meeting of Lanark Village Association to order Feb. 4. After the prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance, offered by our very own Gene Sewell, Carol turned the meeting over to Sheriff Mike Mock. He spoke on several topics and problems in the village and had a questionand-answer session afterward. Oh, by the way, you know that sign in front of Chillas Hall? The leash and clean-up law is printed on it. Well, the county has placed three more in the village. Pay attention to them; its not only a law in Franklin County, but it is a Florida state law! I am saddened by the death of another friend and neighbor. Mary Lou Kathe and her late husband, Barney, were fun to be around. She will be missed by all who knew her. Pray for Mary Lous eternal peace and her family. We have two more big weekends upon us. Valentines Day is Thursday, Feb. 14. Try to join us for lunch at the Senior Center, 201 Avenue F in Carrabelle. Serving begins at noon. A donation of $4 is required. Friday night, you can enjoy a huge hamburger and chips at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 on Oak Street in the village. Donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. Phone ahead for take-out at 6979998. Orders are taken after 5 p.m. Saturday, you can start off with a full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Enjoy pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, sausage, coffee and juice. Yum yum. Still only $5. Then, later on Saturday, you can work off the calories at the birthday bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. The songbird, Evelyn McAnally, will be joined by Ann Merrell and others to sing your favorite songs. Come on down for a fun evening. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you walk in the door. Sunday, we will all gather at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish dinner. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. See you there! Whats for supper? Well, come on down to Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and enjoy the company and pizza. Orders taken after 5 p.m. One dollar by the slice, whole pizzas $8 to enjoy in the bar. Or take out is $10 to go. Place your takeout orders at 697-9998 after 5 p.m. I hope you mark your calendar for Saturday, Feb. 23. Well all gather at Chillas Hall, but this time it will be our 20th annual Community Breakfast. Big full breakfast for your donation of only $6. Good food, great service and great fellowship. We will be watching for you. Public is invited to all above! Next Friday, Feb. 22, the Nina and the Pinta will be arriving up the river and dock at the Moorings. They will be on display until Feb. 22. Sure hope you can come down and see this piece of American history. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better, but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Hundreds of visitors ocked to the second annual St. George Island Tour of Homes Saturday. This years tour was even more successful than last years debut. With 450 tickets sold, the event raised more than $6,500 for the lighthouse association, topping last years tally of 370 tickets sold. Terry Kemp, secretary for the association, said the vast majority of tickets were purchased in advance. Kemp said Monday morning, she had viewed 200 surveys lled out by ticket holders and that fewer than 20 of the participants lived in Franklin County. She said among the visitors from 27 states, about 70 were snowbirds. All but a handful said they would come back for future tours. One naysayer explained, I am 7. As always, all of the homes and the entire island was at its best for the event. The weather was clear and fresh with a light breeze that made it a perfect day to cruise St. George Island with the top down. While many owners displayed their homes with pride, extracted sand burrs from the carpets, shared construction war stories or took the chance to view their neighbors domains, John Hockman spent the day working on an impressive home improvement project. Hockman is constructing a barbecue that puts most to shame. His seven-foot by four-foot wood-burning, agstone edi ce incorporates a grill and smoker. On Saturday, he was putting the nishing touches on a pizza oven. The oven is built of re bricks and wrapped in a brous ceramic blanket for insulation. The blanket will be covered by more agstones. Hockman said the oor of the oven will reach 600 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit. Its exactly like the one (at Jo Mamas) in St. Joe, only smaller, he said. The grill, which has been completed, incorporates two jacks to raise and lower the cooking surface. Hockman said he designed his masterpiece after viewing plans online. The grill was not the Hockmans rst do-ityourself project. Wife Linda did all the interior painting and created the window treatments for their lovely island home and John built the kitchen cabinets. - By LOIS SWOBODA Local artist Leon Wiesener has set himself the task of creating a tourist attraction for Carrabelle. A year ago, he set to work to create a bottle house like ones historically constructed in Western boom towns during the gold rush. Eleven months and 6,000 bottles later, he completed it. Next, he began constructing a lighthouse with dual rotating lights in the base and crown. That project is almost complete. The beacon is up and running and now requires only a pressure wash to reduce excess cement and some ne tuning for the battery. Wiesener already has his eyes and mind turned to the nal monument in his glittering empire, an arch constructed entirely of bottles. The bottle house and lighthouse are at 604 S.E. Avenue F in Carrabelle and can be seen from the road. According to the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce website, they can be viewed seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The artist said he needs several thousand bottles to complete the Arc de Carrabelle and is especially seeking blue ones. To donate bottles, call 653-7201. By LOIS SWOBODA LOIS SWOBODA | The Times At left, John Hockman spent the day of the tour working on his pizza oven. At right, this stunning interior was located at the Hockman house on West Gorrie Drive. Islanders cook up a tasty tour of homes LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Curley Messer with great-great grandson Little Buddy Massey. Valentines Day leads to full weekend of fun Happy Birthday, Papa Curley Payton Wood turns 3 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Artist looking for more bottles

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The Times | A9 Thursday, February 14, 2013 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Joshua A. Phipps, 26, of Eastpoint, passed away Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Gainesville. He was born Feb. 19, 1986 in Panama City. Joshua enjoyed fishing, basketball, music and playing drums. He is preceded in death by his grandfathers, J.M. Farmer, Buddy Adkison, and Floyd Phipps. Joshua is survived by his parents, Rex Alan and Sabrina Farmer Phipps of Eastpoint; a sister, Kimberly Hollenbeck of Sumatra; and grandmothers Margaret Farmer, of Sumatra, Sylvia Adkison of Eastpoint, and Janet Phipps of Galax, Va. Funeral services will be held 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15 at the Trinity Episcopal Church of Apalachicola with Father Joe Knight officiating. The family will receive friends from 3 p.m.. until service time at the church. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting memorial donations be given to Childrens Organ Transplant Association; go to www.cota.org to make contributions online. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Joshua A. Phipps JOSHUA A. PHIPPS Stanley Willie McIntyre was born July 11, 1952, in Port St. Joe to the late Willie and Alice McIntyre, the youngest sibling of four children. He graduated from Miami Northwestern High School, and attended Southern Unievrsity in Baton Rouge, La., where he pursued his football career. Later in his life, he became a Champion for Sobriety, where he counseled and motivated numerous individuals battling addiction. On Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, Stanley departed his old residence, 242 Sixth Street, Apalachicola, to go to his new residence in Heaven with God. Upon his arrival, he was welcomed into Heaven by his parents, Willie and Alice McIntyre, and his older brother, Johnnie Blakes. He leaves to cherish his memories three sons, Stanley McIntye, Jr., of Camden, Conn.; Tedrick McIntyre, of Shreveport, La., and Chandler Poole, of Fort Lauderdale; one brother Freddie McIntyre (Cecilia) of Apalachicola; one sister, Janie Garvin, of Miami; one uncle, Matthew McIntyre, of Chicago, Ill.; and one aunt, Rosalee McIntyre, of Thomasville, Ga. He also leaves his grandchildren, as well as a host of nieces and nephews. Stanley McIntyre Jean Elaine Quaranta, 85, of Port St. Joe, passed away Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013. She was born in Cleveland Ohio. Jean was the beloved matriarch of the Quaranta family. Married for 59 years to Charles Quaranta, they had ve children. Her greatest times in life were when her family, and anyone else who got dragged in, would be gathered around the table, eating, laughing, and taking lots of pictures. She knew no strangers and talked to everyone like shed known them for years. Jean worked for Manatee Pediatrics in Bradenton for 17 years until she retired and moved to Port St. Joe in 1992. Her love of children evident and Grandma was always willing to babysit. She volunteered with the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Dept., enjoyed the beaches, lots of family gatherings, and the beautiful sunsets from her balcony. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles Quaranta; two grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Survivors include her children and their spouses, Gloria Schoelles and husband Richie, Bill Quaranta, Patti Quaranta, Chuck Quaranta, and Jayne Bamburg; 15 grandchildren; 19 greatgrandchildren; one greatgreat grandchild; brother, Jack Warren of Ester, and a sister Jeri Bass of Bradenton. A memorial service will be held in her memory at the Oak Grove Church on Saturday, Feb. 16, at 11 a.m ET. In lieu of owers, donations may be made in her memory to the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, 1007 10th Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Services provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Jean Elaine Quaranta Kristian Javon Tevor Jackson was born Jan. 10, 2012, in Panama City to James Bell and Katoya Jackson. He passed away Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 in Pensacola at the age of 1. Funeral services will be held at noon Friday, Feb. 15, at Family of God Baptist Church in Panama City. Burial will be at 3 p.m. that Friday in Snowhill Cemetery in Apalachicola. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements. Kristian Javon Tevor Jackson A service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola on Friday, Feb. 15 at 1:30 p.m. to honor Lawrence Robert Bobby Siprell, of Apalachicola, who passed away Sunday, Feb. 10. The service will be followed by a short gathering at Benedict Hall. All family and friends are invited to attend. Bobby Siprell Thomas Jefferson Tommy Chumney was born Aug. 22, 1939, in Gulf County, Fla., to George and Susie Chumney Tommy passed away Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013, at his home in Eastpoint surrounded by his family. Tommy was a commercial seafood worker and a longtime resident of Franklin County. He is survived by his longtime companion, Henrietta Cassell; children, Sheila Scott of Panama City, Mikey Chumney of Wewahitchka, Cecil Chumney of Panama City, and Tina Chumney of Wewahitchka; Robert Lashley, Bonnie Whiddon, Ona Jean Russell, Rena Kay En nger, and Karen Page; siblings, Betty Sue Britt, Norma Jean Dunkle, Judy Diane Knowles, Ann Caroline Lucas, John Grice and Charles Grice; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and extended family and friends. He was preceded in death by his sister, Mary E. Pickeron. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, at Kelley Funeral Home with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Tommy Chumney Mary Louise Nichols was born July 6, 1944, in Carrabelle to Dalsie and George Evans. She passed away Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013, at the age of 68 in Eastpoint. Mary was a homemaker and member of the Eastpoint Church of God. She is survived by her husband, Joe Nichols; children, Randy Nichols, JoAnn Falk, Donnie Nichols, Debbie Banks, and Wanda Register; brother, Billy Evans; 17 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today, Feb. 14, at Eastpoint Church of God with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Viewing was held from 5 until 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, at Kelley Funeral Home. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements. Mary Louise Nichols Special to The Times The winner of the raf e drawing for the log cabin for Franklins Promise Toy Project was Gene Goff of Apalachicola. Sheriff Mike Mock is shown at right drawing the winning ticket for the raf e, from a jar held by Beth Brinkley, chairman of the project and one of the owners of Resort Vacation Properties, whose staff helped with packing and distributing the toys. Inmates at the Bay City Work Camp built the cabin, with Taylors Building Supply splitting the cost of the materials with Franklins Promise. The project, which raised close to $1,000, is funded through donations from individuals and businesses in Franklin County and other areas. Nicky Millender, director of county parks and recreation, was helpful getting the log cabin delivered once we retrieved it from Carrabelle, where it was being displayed. Millender family reunion The Millender family reunion will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the old Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle. The Millender extended family includes Mock, McKnight, Walden and Barwick. Please bring a covered dish or two. Eastpoint Baptist recovery Under the leadership of Ms. Rose Grif n, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Family and Friends Day Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, 233 Ninth St., Apalachicola, welcomes the community to its Family and Friends Day at 3 p.m. Feb. 24. Chairperson Eula Rochelle said everybody is welcome. For more information, call 370-0841. Segree family reunion The Segree family reunion will be March 9 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Bring a covered dish, old pictures and have a good time. For more information, call Inez at 670-1115. Obituaries Faith Faith BRIEFS Card of THANKS McIntyre family The McIntyre family would like to express our deepest gratitude to all who showed their support during our loss. You have made this process so much easier for us to get through. God bless each and every one of you. Stanley S. and Tedrick McIntyre Goff wins Toy Project cabin OBITUARIES ONLINE View obituaries and leave your condolences at www.apalachtimes.com.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters COMES STANDARD WITH H OGUE GRIPS, TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER O PTI C SIGHTS AND C ARRY C ASE! WAS $ 399.99 MUST BE 21 YR TO BUY ASE! $ 319 99 WOW! LIMITED STOCK NO RAINCHECKS LIMITED STOCK OF .22LR AMMO LIMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER O PTI C COMES STANDARD WITH COMES STANDARD WITH H OGUE GRIPS, TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER O PTI C CIT A DEL 1911.22 L R WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Feb. 14 63 47 10 % Fri, Feb. 15 67 42 10 % Sat, Feb. 16 59 40 0 % Sun, Feb. 17 59 46 0 % Mon, Feb. 18 65 51 0 % Tues, Feb. 19 71 55 60 % Wed, Feb. 20 69 56 20 % 14 Th 500am 1.6 444pm 2.1 1000am 0.5 1105pm 0.0 15 Fr 601am 1.4 510pm 2.1 1022am 0.8 16 Sa 714am 1.3 543pm 2.1 1203am 0.0 1047am 1.0 17 Su 848am 1.3 622pm 2.1 114am 0.0 1118am 1.1 18 Mo 1051am 1.3 712pm 2.1 233am 0.0 1208pm 1.1 19 Tu 1220pm 1.4 815pm 1.9 346am -0.2 205pm 1.3 20 We 100pm 1.6 928pm 1.9 446am -0.3 350pm 1.4 21 Th 130pm 1.8 1040pm 1.9 536am -0.3 501pm 1.3 22 Fr 155pm 1.8 1144pm 2.1 618am -0.3 553pm 1.1 23 Sa 216pm 1.8 654am -0.3 636pm 1.0 24 Su 1239am 2.1 234pm 1.8 724am -0.3 713pm 0.8 25 Mo 129am 2.1 249pm 1.9 750am -0.2 748pm 0.6 26 Tu 218am 2.1 305pm 1.9 815am 0.0 823pm 0.5 27 We 308am 2.1 322pm 2.1 838am 0.3 900pm 0.2 14 Th 500am 1.6 444pm 2.1 1000am 0.5 1105pm 0.0 15 Fr 601am 1.4 510pm 2.1 1022am 0.8 16 Sa 714am 1.3 543pm 2.1 1203am 0.0 1047am 1.0 17 Su 848am 1.3 622pm 2.1 114am 0.0 1118am 1.1 18 Mo 1051am 1.3 712pm 2.1 233am 0.0 1208pm 1.1 19 Tu 1220pm 1.4 815pm 1.9 346am -0.2 205pm 1.3 20 We 100pm 1.6 928pm 1.9 446am -0.3 350pm 1.4 21 Th 130pm 1.8 1040pm 1.9 536am -0.3 501pm 1.3 22 Fr 155pm 1.8 1144pm 2.1 618am -0.3 553pm 1.1 23 Sa 216pm 1.8 654am -0.3 636pm 1.0 24 Su 1239am 2.1 234pm 1.8 724am -0.3 713pm 0.8 25 Mo 129am 2.1 249pm 1.9 750am -0.2 748pm 0.6 26 Tu 218am 2.1 305pm 1.9 815am 0.0 823pm 0.5 Page 10 Thursday, February 14, 2013 By DAVID DAMON Special to the Times The year was 2004. Stuck in a mud bank on Dog Island was a 45-foot sailboat lying at a 40-degree angle. Filled with water and encrusted with barnacles, her once-shining hull and ne lines were all but hidden. Her former beauty and pedigree could only be imagined at this point. It took vision to think she could be brought back from the brink of total ruin and once again sail with the grace and grandeur of her former yachting days. In her glory days, she enjoyed the world of yacht racing and cruising that be t her earlier days in South Florida. From the drawing board of noted naval architect Charlie Morgan, she was designed in 1966 and built in 1981. This former classic beauty now found herself lying open to the elements, and by all accounts, dying a slow death with every rising tide and passing storm. It was in this condition that Mason Bean from St. George Island rst laid eyes on her. He looked beyond the barnacle-encrusted hull that was lled with mud, an engine that was a mass of rusted iron and a mast whose base had corroded away from salt water saturation. Mason had a vision of this beautiful hull once again sailing as she did in her earlier days. As someone always looking for a project, whether it be a house or a boat, he wasnt discouraged by her condition. Mason tracked down the owners and asked what their plans were for her. They said they would sell her, for $50,000, as is. Mason countered with an offer for $4,000 and threw out the word closure. A week later the call came; he had a boat. As much as he may have wanted this, the reality of owning her now set in. The long road to salvaging and rebuilding her had not even begun. With a full moon tide, she was oated off the mud bank on Dog Island and towed the seven long miles to nearby Timber Island in Carrabelle. After six months dockside at Timber Island, she was nally pulled out of the water so the work could begin in earnest. It soon became apparent to Mason that a project of this magnitude needed to be closer to home in order to get the work done ef ciently. In 2010, she was trucked to St. George Island and unloaded at a nearby bayfront lot Mason owned. Keep in mind that safely loading, trucking and then unloading a 45-foot-long, 11-foot-wide, 15-ton vessel is, in itself, no small feat. Once she was carefully unloaded at her new home, scaffolding was erected around her. The rebuild began to gain momentum. Then, about a year ago, in January 2012, Martin Ben Baruch entered the picture. As a multi-talented boat builder, electrician and rigger, Martin was just the perspiration, inspiration and talent that this project needed. With Martin on board, the pace picked up and a launch date in the not-too-distant future became a reality. By summers end, Lady M was nearing completion. Once again, she was loaded, trucked back to Timber Island and again unloaded. On Oct. 7, 2012, Lady M was launched at Timber Island as a nervous but proud owner, along with family, friends and onlookers stood by. For Mason, it was a relief to nally see her oating again and in such beautiful condition. However, this was just the beginning of a new chapter in Lady Ms story. She remained docked at Timber Island as the many nal preparations and changes were made in order to sail her around to her new home port of Apalachicola. With nal tuning to rigging and sails, Lady M. was ready, ready enough anyway. The day had come, on Dec. 14, after eight long years of blood, sweat and tears, her dock lines were cast off and Lady M was nally headed home, under sail! Masons dogged determination to breathe new life into a sunken 31year-old boat had nally paid off. Standing at the helm on that gray, damp, December afternoon, he was a very proud owner as Lady M ew through Bob Sikes Cut on a rising tide under full sail. It was as if she were once again alive, as the wind drove her powerful hull through the waves. With all the grace and speed seldom seen in boats of more recent design, Lady Ms classic lines and sweeping sheer will truly set her apart wherever she sails. Future plans for Lady M include youth sailing programs in an effort to encourage and motivate young people in our area. David Damon is an avid sailor, boat builder, photographer and writer. He teaches sailing for the Boy Scouts and other organizations, including programs encouraging sailing for those with disabilities. SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Whiting have been the local staple for some time now. Good reports from Mexico Beach and on the Cape are seeing lots of fish in the 2-pound range. Flounder are making their way back to our waters from offshore back to the bays and nearshore wrecks. Good reports came from the Mexico Beach canal this past week, so springtime fishing is close! As the rain moves out this week, the local creeks and rivers will be on the rise, and many reports are showing high water marks for the weekend. This increase should have the catfish biting very well. A few bream and bass are being caught this week before the rain in Lake Wimico and the Jackson River system. Special to The Times The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida Park Service has developed a new, free smartphone app, available for download. This interactive guide gives users on-the-go access to Floridas 171 state parks, trails and historic sites, complete with detailed information about campgrounds, amenities, facility maps, directions and more. In honor of the new app, Floridas state parks will offer free entry to state parks on Monday, Feb. 18, to visitors who show the app downloaded on their mobile device at the ranger station. Visitors are encouraged to download the app this week and plan a visit to their favorite state park or a state park they discovered by using the new app. The app allows visitors to plan that perfect outdoor trip by searching for a park by GPS location or activity to nd nearby locations to enjoy hiking, camping, boating, birding and more. Once there, GPS and GIS mapping technology allows visitors to track and record trails, mark waypoints and locate friends within the park. There is even an option to cache GPS maps in advance to ensure navigation remains possible in the event of lost mobile reception. This is an exciting new feature that will increase public access to DEPs award-winning park system, DEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard said. Being able to plan your trip to one of our parks, trails or historic sites from your phone makes experiencing Floridas natural, cultural and historical resources easier. The apps provide plenty of other features to maximize visitors outdoor adventure, including educational information, amenities, maps and directions, a real-time calendar of events, advisories, weather alerts and built-in compass. New features such as GeoChallenge games and a photo share option will be added in the coming months. Follow FLStateParks on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates. The Florida State Parks Pocket Ranger app is available on iTunes and Android Market by searching Of cial Florida State Parks and is identi ed under ParksByNature Network. It is also available on PocketRanger.com and is formatted as a Mobile Website: http:// .pocketranger.com. The Florida Park Service partnered with ParksByNature Network and PocketRanger.com to create this app free for the public. For a tutorial on how to use the app, please visit www.pocketranger.com. It is recommended to use Wi-Fi or a strong wireless connection when downloading the app. To receive free entry, please show the ranger station or staff at the park entrance booth the app downloaded on your mobile device. Lady M rises from ruin to cruise again LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Mason Bean, above, restored the Lady M. DAVID DAMON | Special to the Times LEGION POST 82 SUPPORTS WARRIOR FOUNDATION SPECIAL TO THE TIMES American Legion Post 82 made a contribution last week to support the families of fallen veterans. When the Special Operations Warrior Foundation trekked through Franklin County last week on a 450-mile march to raise funds, they made a stop on the east end of the county. Representatives from Camp Cordon Johnston Post 82 met the marchers at their last scheduled stop in the county, Alligator Point Road, to present the Warrior Foundation with a check for $100. The foundation raises funds to provide emergency assistance to the families of injured military personnel and to create scholarships for the children of soldiers killed during an operational or training mission under the U.S. Special Operations Command. DEP unveils state parks mobile app

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Learn to improve your lawn The Franklin University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Services is offering Growing Turfgrass 101 The Basics, a new series of educational programs on lawn maintenance. The Franklin UF IFAS is one of the host sites for this distance education program. Classes begin on Tuesday, Feb. 26, with pH, Soil Types, Soil Testing and Turf Types. On March 5, the topic is Fertilization. The March 12 lecture offers advice on Weed Control, and the nal talk on March 19 covers Irrigation. These classes will be offered by interactive video at the Franklin UF IFAS County Extension Of ce at 66 Fourth St., Apalachicola, from 7-9 p.m. Registration fee is $25 per person or $40 per couple and covers the costs of the classes, refreshments and course materials. Registration is due today, Feb. 14. For more information or to register, call the Franklin UF IFAS Extension Program at 653-9337. Recreational grouper season closed Gulf grouper recreational season closed Feb. 1. Several species of grouper, including black, red, yellow n, scamp, yellowmouth, rock hind and red hind will close to recreational harvest from Feb. 1 through March 31 in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, excluding state waters of Monroe County. Gag grouper has a separate season from other Gulf of Mexico grouper and is currently closed to harvest. A proposed 2013 gag grouper season in state waters will be discussed at the February Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting in Orlando. The upcoming twomonth recreational harvest closure that starts Feb. 1 was put in place to help rebuild the gag grouper shery. Gag grouper spawn during the February and March closure, so limiting the harvest of other grouper helps reduce the number of gag grouper that are caught unintentionally and die after being released. More information regarding grouper shing regulations, including the current grouper closure in Atlantic and Monroe County waters, is available online at MyFWC.com/ Fishing. Visit MyFWC. com/Commission to learn more about the February commission meeting. Fishing regulations guide available The newest saltwater shing publication, the January June 2013 Florida Saltwater Recreational Fishing Regulations booklet, is available. The new edition has a photo of the invasive lion sh on the cover and features an article requesting public assistance removing these sh from Floridas waters. It also includes information on upcoming regulation changes for giant anemone, unicorn le sh and Atlantic black sea bass. You also can review the new maps detailing special management zones within the Gulf and Atlantic for red sh and spotted seatrout. Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Wearing #10, Franklin County High School senior Chena Segree had three hits, including a double, and a pair of runs batted in, to help key the Lady Seahawks to a 5-1 win at Wewahitchka Tuesday evening. On Monday at home against Rickards, Segree smacked two hits, and had two RBIs, while striking out 10 over the course of eight innings, to help in the 6-5 win. Congratulations, Chena! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Special to the Times Dr. Roger Dearing, executive director of the Florida High School Athletic Association, has issued the following statement in response to new guidance from the federal government regarding schools obligation to provide equal opportunity to students with disabilities who wish to participate in extracurricular athletics. The guidance, issued by the U.S. Department of Educations Of ce for Civil Rights, urges school districts to work with community organizations to increase athletic opportunities for students with disabilities. Florida has been ahead of the curve for several years, and we fully embrace the steps suggested by the federal government, Dearing said. In the past few years, we have added some adaptive sports to the athletic activities offered at member schools, and we look forward to working with schools, districts and most importantly student-athletes with disabilities and their parents to provide every reasonable opportunity for them to experience the joy and benets of athletic competition. Wherever and whenever possible, we want every student to have the opportunity to be a part of the team, because providing access to athletic programs for students with disabilities certainly adds value to their overall educational experience. If this new guidance helps just one more student become a student-athlete, it will be worth the effort, he said. The new federal guidance letter provides examples of the types of reasonable modi cations schools might be required to make to existing policies, practices or procedures for students with disabilities who otherwise are athletically talented enough to compete. The U.S. Department of Education said examples of such modi cations could include allowing a visual cue alongside a starter pistol so a student with a hearing impairment can compete in track, or waiver of a rule requiring a twohand touch nish in swim events to accommodate a one-armed swimmer. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks softball team is off to an undefeated start, including wins in tight one-run ballgames on Monday and Tuesday evening. Coach Lisa Sweatts softball squad features a wealth of returning players, many of whom played on the summer team that quali ed for the World Series. On Feb. 5 at home, they shelled West Gadsden 20-4 in three innings, as junior shortstop Morgan Mock smacked three hits for ve runs batted in. Senior out elder Christina Collins had three hits, with two hits and two RBIs coming off the bat of sophomore out elder Summer Medley. On Monday at home, the team was outhit by Rickards 119 but the Lady Seahawks came out the winner, with the goahead run in the bottom of the ninth for the 6-5 win. Senior pitcher Chena Segree went eight innings, striking out 10. She added two hits and two RBIs, with two hits from junior catcher Ally Millender and one RBI from senior third baseman Anna Lee. On Tuesday night at Wewahitchka, the Lady Seahawks got a pair of runs in both the rst and fth innings and secured the nal run in the top of the sixth for the 5-1 win. Freshman Krista Martina went the distance on the mound, striking out four over seven innings. She had 16 rst-pitch strikes. Chena Segree led the team with two hits and two RBIs, while eighth grade rst baseman Scout Segree belted two hits and one RBI. Millender added a RBI as well. Also on the varsity roster are senior out elder Codee Crum, juniors out elder Ashley Carroll and third baseman Marlyn Lee, and sophomore second baseman Maddie Newell. Outdoors BRIEFS Thursday, February 14, 2013 FHSAA embraces guidance on disabled athletes Lady Seahawks off to 3-0 start Page 11 LADY SEAHAWK SOFTBALL SCHEDULE Friday, Feb. 15 @ West Gadsden* 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19 @ Munroe 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21 @ Rutherford 4/6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22 @ Bozeman* 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 25 @ Blountstown* 4:30/6:30 p.m. Friday, March 1 Liberty* 5/7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5 @ Port St. Joe* 5/7 p.m. Friday, March 8 @ South Walton* 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 12 Godby 5/7 p.m. Tuesday, March 19 @ Liberty* 5/7 p.m. Friday, March 22 Port St. Joe* 7 p.m. Saturday, March 23 @ Port St. Joe* JV tourney Tuesday, March 26 @ Godby 6 p.m. Thursday, March 28 Wewahitchka 7 p.m. Friday, March 29 Wakulla 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 2 Blountstown* 7 p.m. Thursday, April 4 Bozeman* 5 p.m. Friday, April 5 South Walton* 6 p.m. Thursday, April 11 Rutherford 6 p.m. Friday, April 12 @ Rickards 6:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 4/15-19 Districts at Port St. Joe INDICATES DISTRICT GAME

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly Sta Times of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At: 106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-4121 Renee Parrish, D.M.D ACCEP T ING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICE S FOR CHILDREN: E arly H ead Start / H ead Start All services for our children are free with no cost to the parent. **Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).** Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING A RESOLUTION THAT WILL REQUIRE THE COLLECTION OF ALL OF THE FIRE AND RESCUE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS ON THE AD VALOREM TAX BILL USING THE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTION PROVIDED BY SECTION 197.3632, FLORIDA STATUTES Notice is given that on February 28, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. (ET), at the Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners shall hold a public hearing to consider adopting a resolution of intent to rescue special assessments from the seven municipal service units, as provided by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes (2012) beginning with the ad valorem tax bills mailed November 2013. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed resolution. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hearing is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant book keeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082 HOME OF T H E $50 T AX RETU R N* Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. You may have noticed a new face at Franklin County Public Library. We welcome Maureen Downey as a new library assistant who brings positive energy and a sincere interest in our libraries and communities that we serve. Be sure to stop in and introduce yourself and if you need assistance dont hesitate to ask for help. E-books were recently introduced to our library system and we have received some very positive feedback from patrons. The ability to upload a book into an e-reading device is extremely easy for anyone who logs into the Wilderness Coast Public Library website and is a patron and has a library card at Franklin, Jefferson, or Wakulla County library system. If you are looking for a fun way to spend a Saturday afternoon, the Carrabelle Branch will be hosting another Game Day that is free to participants on Saturday, Feb. 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Children will have access to a variety of board games and interactive games. Refreshments will be served at no cost, and door prizes will be gifted to a few of the lucky children. For more information about programs and services please call 670-8151 or 697-2366. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Anyone who expected the members of the countys RESTORE Council to be nalized at the last county commission meeting is disappointed today. Although each county district now has a spokesman, the cities remain silent. No date has been set for the rst meeting of the RESTORE Council, and Apalachicola and Carrabelle still decline to choose representatives. The RESTORE Council was created by the county commission on Jan. 15, The council will vet requests for funding of possible RESTORE projects, with county commissioners having the ultimate say in who receives nancial support from penalties paid by BP under Clean Water Act for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The city of Apalachicola has not named a representative because it is suing the county seeking to compel it to meet jointly with Apalachicola and Carrabelle boards under the Governmental Con ict Resolution Act, Florida Statutes 164.1055. Carrabelle is not a party to the suit but is a bene ciary of it and, in a surprise move Feb. 7 did not name a RESTORE representative at their regular meeting. We took the lead, City Attorney Pat Floyd told Apalachicola commissioners Feb. 5. Carrabelle is not joining the lawsuit as a as a party but they are a bene ciary. Four new council members were named at the Feb. 5 county commission meeting. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders was tapped as the nonvoting chairman of the RESTORE Council. Commissioner Pinki Jackel appointed Pat OConnell, 66, of St. George Island as representative of District 1. OConnell chairs the S. George Island Plantation landscape committee. After retiring from the Florida Attorney General, and running a lobbying rm in Tallahassee, she and her husband retired to the island in 2004. She is a registered Democrat. I dont have any kind of preconceived notions, she said. I think we should rst create a process where all the good ideas can be heard. She said she believes the foremost goals of the RESTORE Act are to protect the environment and increase tourism. Sanders chose Suzanne Zimmerman, 67, as her District 2 representative. Zimmerman is executive director of the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce and a registered Democrat who has lived in Franklin County for 14 years. Zimmerman said she too has no preconceived agenda and believes the councils duty will be to look at whats presented and choose projects that will qualify for funding. Commissioner Smokey Parrish chose seafood dealer/processor Ottice Amison, 40, to speak for District 4. A registered Democrat, he is a lifelong resident of the county with the exception of a period of military service. Commissioner William Massey had appointed Cal Allen to represent District 5 at the January 15 meeting but after discovering Allen did not live in the district, he amended his decision at the Feb. 5 meeting. He appointed Carrabelle City commissioner Brenda LaPaz, 58, a retired medical transcriptionist who moved to Carrabelle ve years ago. She is a registered Republican. I will weigh proposed projects presented to the council and research will have to be done to determine eligibility, she said. So far, ve members reside in District 1; four in District 2 and one each in districts 3, 4 and 5. There are seven Democrats, ve Republicans and one independent. Seven of the council members are women. Since both cities declined to name representatives, the number of seated council members, 11, remains odd, with one vonvoting chairperson. Dennis and Ralph have a home. The dogs were left homeless after the preChristmas murder of their owner, Cynthia Green of Apalachicola. Karen Martin, Director of the Franklin County Humane Society Animal Shelter vowed to place the traumatized animals out only as a pair. After the plight of the two dogs was publicized, a television station out of Panama City picked up the story from the Apalachicola Times and aired a segment to assist the Humane Society with their efforts to nd a new caregiver for Mrs. Greens dogs. After the story ran, the Humane Society was contacted by several families interested in giving these two deserving dogs a home. The family that adopted them lives in Panama City, and Ralph and Dennis are now living on the beach in a big, fenced in yard with their new pack. The Humane Society would like to thank everyone who helped them get the word out via Facebook, email, newspaper, radio and TV. Ralph and Dennis are loved and well cared for and Mrs. Green can nally rest in peace. By Lois Swoboda Cities spurn RESTORE council YOUR COUNTY LIBRARY Cynthia Greens dogs have a home KAREN MARTIN | Special to The Times Dennis and Ralph meet their new owner.

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, February 14, 2013 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM Carrabelle cooperates with Workforce: Carrabelle is using a state program to primp and polish around town. At the Feb. 7 city meeting, Mayor Curley Messer announced the city has hired six temporary employees under the Work Force Florida training program. Under this plan, unemployed workers can receive up to six months training working 20 hours a week. Work Force pays for the trainees salaries, and they are covered by state workmans compensation. Messer said Joann White helped the city implement the program. Some of the trainees are employed in streets and roads, some in water and sewer and some are doing building maintenance at the municipal center. Were using them for routine maintenance we cant get to like painting and greasing re hydrants, City Clerk Keisha Smith said Messer said he intends to hire several more of the trainees. Smith said everyone hired so far has been a Carrabelle resident, and in order to take advantage of the program, employers must have speci c job descriptions and demonstrate the trainees work so many hours each week in prescribed tasks. Of course you have to take the time to train them, she said. But its worked out well, for Carrabelle. Were getting free maintenance. Id hire them all if I could. Messer said the city will continue to participate in the program for six months to a year. Smith encouraged other employers to investigate the opportunity. Anybody that has a business can apply for workers, she said, and the state pays them. Theres plenty out there that need some jobs, and they cant work unless somebody hires them. Putnal family still needs help: The Putnal family, who lost their home on Feb. 3, is still in need of a place to stay. On Monday, Ann Putnal said she had paid for a hotel room for that night but was completely out of money. She said Franklins Promise has offered to help with rent if the family has been unable to nd a suitable rental. She would appreciate all cash donations and any information about possible rental properties for herself, son, Cody, and husband, Joseph. She said her son Mason is back in his trailer but seeking work. To help, call 524-7424. Library needs used books: Donations of books are needed for a fundraiser to bene t the Franklin County Public Libraries (FCPL). On Saturday, Feb. 16, three good things are coming together: homemade soup, fromscratch bread and cheap books. The Friends of the FCPL will hold a sale at Sea Oats Gallery on the island. Right now, the friends are seeking books for the sale, especially recent ction of all genres, cookbooks and childrens and young adult books. All books are welcome. Take donations to the Eastpoint Library, 29 Island Drive; open Tuesday through Friday or Sea Oats Gallery, 128 E. Pine Drive, St. George Island, during regular business hours. Questions? Want to help? Contact Anna Carmichael at 370-6763. Legislative delegation meeting Feb. 26: State Senator Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) announced the countys legislative delegation meeting will take place at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 26, in the county commission chambers. The delegation is rst meeting in Gulf County on the same day, starting at 5 p.m., and then coming to Franklin. Elder care workshop planned: There will be a meeting to discuss services provided to the elderly in Franklin County at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 5, after the regular county meeting. The purpose of the workshop will investigate duplication of services and costs in preparation for preparing the upcoming county budget. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the Franklin County Senior Center; the Wakulla County Senior Center, which provides Meals on Wheels in the eastern part of the county; the Apalachicola Senior Center; the Gulf County Senior Center, which provides Meals on Wheels for the western part of the county; the Carrabelle food pantry and Franklins Promise will be invited to attend. Other organizations wishing to attend or those wishing to suggest other participants should contact Pierce at 653-9783. Bill may restrict municipal employees: At the Feb. 5 meeting, County Attorney Michael Shuler told the board a bill is proposed for the upcoming legislative session that would restrict and limit the ability of municipal employees to hold of ce as a county commissioner. He said current county commissioners employed by a municipality will be grandfathered but will be prevented from accepting any pay increases or job advancement. Shuler described the details of the bill as fairly draconian. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved that the county write a letter opposing adoption of the bill. He was seconded by Commissioner William Massey and the motion passed unanimously. Lose your keys on Sawyer Lane? A large set of keys was found Saturday on Sawyer Lane in Apalachicola while the Tamara Marsh family was riding their golf cart down the alley? If theyre yours, you can claim them at Coastal Foot & Ankle Clinic, 221 Avenue E, or call 653-3338. News BRIEFS Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs

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A14 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A Christmas gift has inspired island artist Beth Appleton to create a new body of work. On Friday, Feb. 8, Appleton premiered an exhibit of her latest creations at the Apalachicola Museum of Art located at 96 5th St. The exhibit includes both her familiar cutpaper confections and a new medium depicting the microorganisms in Apalachicola Bay. I got a microscope for Christmas three years ago, and thats where it started, Appleton said. I was always fascinated by all the tiny creatures as a kid, but then I got away from it. When I got back into it, it just took me away. This rebirth of interest led to the creation of micro waterscapes featuring the images of plankton from our bay. The waterscapes are photographs. The original image exists only as a le on Appletons computer. The images on display are all prints. I look under the microscope and piece together literally hundreds of photographs of tiny plants and animals magnied 1600 times. I have to say it took about two months to do a single assemblage, Appleton said. About 200 photos go into one. Nothing I do is simple. I was hoping I could simplify in my older age. At the reception, biologist Megan Lamb from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve was on hand with a microscope to let visitors view the original miniscule life forms depicted on Appletons canvases. Visitors were delighted when the tiny organisms danced and wriggled across the screen. At the same gala opening, Appleton also premiered something very new A childrens book she wrote and illustrated titled Gently Down the Stream. The illustrations are her familiar cut-paper assemblages and the words are a poem/song written to the tune of Row, row, row your boat. The subject matter is the complexity and beauty of the web of life. Her poetry conjures up barking dogs, glowing jellysh and shing boats bobbing on the bay. Appleton said she has produced prototypes of several books, but this is the rst she published. I was inspired by Michaelin (Watts) and her work with Bring Me a Book to do it, she said, They bought 300 copies. Appletons friend, island resident Velma Frye, performed another version Row, row, row your boat, at the opening. One she composed to honor the artist. Her lyrics are: First I cut the paper Cut it with a tiny knife, yeah, or a scissor. Move it all a-round. Move it over here. Now I like it. Paste it down, down, Paste it down, down. The crowd of more than 70 art lovers gathered around Frye and sang the song as a round. The reception was just the beginning of this multifaceted exhibit for Appleton. All this week, children from the ABC and Franklin County Schools will be visiting the museum. Appleton lowered the pictures to child eye level for the occasion. She will host the school groups herself. Lamb will again be on hand with her microscope. On Feb. 19 and 20, Appleton will go into the schools with Franklin Bring Me a Book to read Gently Down the Stream. Each child will receive a copy of Appletons book. Bring Me a Book is also donating art supplies to each classroom that participates in the event so each child can make a paper plate sh. Beth Appletons art will remain on display, at adult level, at the Apalachicola Museum of Art through March 15. The exhibit includes both new pieces and older work many will recognize from other exhibits. She said she was delighted with the outpouring of interest at the reception and feels that a great many things have come together to help her hang her newest exhibit and delve into the web of life. A14 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 90086T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012 CC 000112 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN H. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN N. NICHOLS, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: John H. Nichols a/k/a John N. Nichols 600 S. 3rd St. Gadsden, AL 35901 and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Claim of Lien for assessments and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: Lot 42 of Pebble Beach Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 34 and 35, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney, Raymond F. Newman, Jr., Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy, Suite 7, Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548, on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court January 25, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON as Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Becker & Poliakiff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax February 7, 14, 2013 90116T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 09000347CA GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MCMILLIAN, JEAN, et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 09000347CA of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judical Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, is Plaintiff, and, MCMILLAN, JEAN, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 21st day of March, 2013. the following described property: LOT 11, BLOCK 61, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT #5, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGES 16 AND 17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 30th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February 14, 21, 2013 90118T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO. 2012 CC 000130 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF BRENT KARDOES, DECEASED, AND ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY LOCATED AT 2116 SEA FERN WAY IN ST. GEORGE PLANTATION; BEVERLY I. KARDOES and H. FRANK KARDOES, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Claim of Lien for assessments and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: Lot 10 of Pelican Beach Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney, Raymond F. Newman, Jr., Becker & Poliakiff, P.A., 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy, Suite 7, Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548, on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court January 31, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer as Deputy Clerk Bill to: Becker & Poliakiff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax February 14, 21, 2013 92015T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000438 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLOW FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST, Plaintiff vs. JANE B. PALMIER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: JANE B. PALMIER: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 430 BALD POINT RD., ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following described described property to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK B, BALD POINT ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES 43, 44 AND 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 430 BALD POINT ROAD, ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due 30 days from the first day of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this of this Court on the 11th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 7, 14, 2013 92147T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 221 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 16 BLOCK S ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, PHASE II PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1001-000S-01 60 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92117T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: Franklin County School District School Board Policy Manual updates to improve formatting and to address recent legislative changes. Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida, no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of February 7, 2013 through March 7, 2013 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday -Friday. Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92149T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax Web of life inspires AppletonPHOT O S BY LOI S S WOBODA | The Times Susan Gary peers into a microscope at the tiny organisms that inspired Beth Appletons Micro Waterscapes. Above a detail from the cut paper assemblage Biosphere depicts aquatic life forms. Center, Hurricane Mask is a self portrait of artist Beth Appleton. At left is one of Beth Appletons micro waterscapes. Local | Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 14, 2013 The Times | A15 Nestled in more than 200 miles of Award-Winning Pet-Friendly Beaches, World Famous seafood and Maritime History and Culture Lies Apalachicola, Florida. Known as the Forgotten Coast, Franklin County, Florida is a wonderfully Historic community. Apalachicola, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 3500 residents, The Apalachicola housing authority, is a public housing complex with 54 units and is located within the city of Apalachicola, the AHA is currently accepting applications for the following Position:EXECUTIVE DIRECTORJob Requirements include Bachelors Degree; a minimum of 5 years management and/or supervisory experience and excellent communications skills.Anyone interested in this position should submit an application to:PAUL E. MILLS, INTERIM DIRECTOR141 15TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320(850)653-9304 PHONE(850)653-2473 FAXapalha@fairpoint.net(APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYEMENT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AHA OFFICE) EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is seeking applications for a eld position in operations and maintenance. Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District O ce, 40 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 during normal business hours, Monday thru Friday 8:30 am 4:30 pm EST. The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and is a drug free workplace. The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year:TWO FULLTIME TEACHERS ASSISTANTS AND ONE BUS MONITORABC School is an Equal Opportunity EmployerPlease send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fax: 850-653-1857 Fickling Vacation Rentals St. George IslandEXPERIENCED CLEANERS NEEDED Must be thorough and meticulous. Weekends are mandatory! Please apply in person at: 112 Franklin Blvd., St. George Island, FL. RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .......................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ............$600 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ 10X15 STORAGE AND POOL ...................................$950 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ POOL $150/ NIGHTLY OR $700/WEEKLY 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtected H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 The s e tin y a ds s ell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. E m eral d Coa s t Mar k etpla c e 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 190 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 12 BLOCK D ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1000-000D-0 120 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92197T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resource permit for Apalachicola River Snagging, file number 07-0129424-008-EI, to the US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, at P.O. Box 2288, Mobile, Alabama 36628-0001. The purpose of the permit is to authorize maintenance snagging (relocation of tree snags out of the navigation channel) in the Florida portion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project. The project will be located in the Apalachicola River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile 106.4 in Class III, Outstanding Florida Waters (entire Florida portion of river), and Apalachicola Bay Aquatic Preserve (River Miles 0.0 -4.5) in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, s proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interest will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known: (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination’ (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or status that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of the notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must e filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, Florida. February 14, 2013 92249T PUBLIC NOTICE Alligator Point Water Resources District P.O. Box 155 1378 Alligator Drive Panacea, Florida 32346 The Alligator Point Water Resources District is requesting bids from qualified contractors for the following project: Gulf Shore Boulevard Water Main Relocation Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. on March 6, 2013 at the APWRD office located at 1378 Alligator Drive, Alligator Point, Florida 32346. Bids may also be mailed to APWRD, P.O. Box 155, Panacea, Florida 32346 or hand delivered to the board office. All bids must be marked on the outside of a sealed package “BID FOR GULF SHORE BOULEVARD”. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Bond or a certified check in the amount of 5% of the actual bid. Bids will be publically opened at 2:05 p.m. on March 6, 2013. The District reserves the right to reject any and all bids for any reason that it deems appropriate. Bid documents (plans, general conditions, technical specifications) may be purchased from Allen Nobles & Associates, Inc., 2844 Pablo Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850-385-1179). Any questions concerning this project from bidding contractors, or suppliers, will be in written form and addressed to Charles E. Cook, P.E. project manager at the address above. No questions will be answered after 5 days prior to the bid date. Questions may also be sent via e-mail to cook05@ comcast.net. A copy of any questions/answers will be shared with all bidding contractors via letter or e-mail. February 14, 2013 *Adopt*:Active educated couple yearn to share LOVE of outdoors, music, each other w/baby *Dirk & Claudia* Expenses Paid FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Bargain’sNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Food Srvc/HospitalityRestraunt HelpAll shifts. Please apply in person at Apalachicola Seafood Grill 100 Market St, Apalachicola, FL Food Svc/HospitalityHousekeepingSaturday cleaning for Vacation Rental Homes on Cape San Blas. To apply: Call for appointment. 850-270-7736 Web ID# 34241417 Text FL41417 to 56654 Food SvsHalf Shell Oyster Shuckers Needed4 days per week Leavins Seafood, Inc (850) 653-8823 Web ID#: 34241259 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityExperienced WaitressBayside Burgerslocated at 260 Hwy 98 in Eastpoint is taking applications for experienced wait staff. You can call 850-670-1025 or apply in person. Web ID# 34241402 Text FL41402 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 OtherCashier & Meat CutterNow Taking applications for cashier and meat cutter. Must be able to work nights and weekends. Apply in person at Big Top Supermarket in Eastpoint Web ID# 34241408 txt FL41408 to 56654 Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL39318 to 56654 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, Cottage& 3bd 2ba House, CH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 St. George Island-2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1200 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL39317 to 56654 3Br/2Ba Home For Sale By Owner located at 1860 Beacon St, Carabelle, Fla, Call 850-210-3541 For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $165,000; Call 864-356-5949 3Br/2Ba, Large Living Room, Dinning Room, on 1 acre of land, Heat & Air, All Appliances, 595 Wilderness Rd, Eastpoint, $75K; Call 850-370-0939 Total Down Pmt $675‘02 Chevy Monte Carlo T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $12752002 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T otal Price $6,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! The s e tin y a ds s ell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. E m eral d Coa s t Mar k etpla c e 747-5020

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 245232 $89,000 St. George Island HIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOT Located on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248583 $949,000 St. George Island PLANTATION BEACHFRONT All the amenities, 4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Furnished, Flat on deck, under house screened Kitchen near Pool with Nautilus Drive Florida Health Mission: To protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community eorts. Rick Scott Governor John H. Armstrong, MD, FACS Surgeon General & Secretary Florida Department of Health In FRANKLIN COUNTY Apalachicola Clinic: 139-12 Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 PHONE: 850-653-2111 FAX: 850-653-9896 Carrabelle Clinic: 106 NE 5 Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 PHONE:850-697-4121 FAX: 850-697-8288 www.oridashealth.com TWITTER: HealthyFLA FACEBOOK: FLDepartmentofHealth YOUTUBE: doh WHEN IT COMES TO T OBA CC O, S MOKELESS DOES N OT M EAN H ARMLESS Tobacco Free Franklin is Raising Awareness During Through With Chew Week FRANKLIN COUNTY Tobacco products like chew, dip and snu are not harmless. But because theyre smokeless, youth and adults may underestimate the serious health risks associated with these products. In fact, while cigarette use continues to decline, smokeless tobacco use has remained steady among Franklin Countys youth for more than a decade. To help raise awareness about the dangers of smokeless tobacco, Tobacco Free Franklin and the Florida Department of Healths Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida will observe Through With Chew Week from Feb.17-23. Franklin County SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco Use) will have planned activities both on and o campus this week and will be doing a presentation before the public on one of our policy initiatives Tobacco Industry Advertising Retail Outlets and manning the Tobacco Free Franklin booth at our 10th Annual HCOLA (Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola) African American History Festival on Saturday, February 16, 2013. Marsha Player Lindeman, Interim Administrator, Florida Health/Franklin County commented, Smokeless tobacco has a hidden dan ger and is a powerful risk of addiction for youth in Franklin County. HE ALTH R ISKS Constant exposure to tobacco juices from these smokeless products can cause oral cancers, which can form within just ve years of regular use, and can cause cancer of the esophagus, pharynx, larynx, stomach and pancreas. Smokeless tobacco use can increase the risk of oral cancers by 80 percent and the risk of pancreatic and esophageal cancer by 60 percent, according to a 2008 study from the World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer. Aside from the increased risk of cancer, using smokeless tobacco can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. It can lead to other oral problems such as mouth sores, gum recession, tooth decay, and permanent discoloration of teeth. Smokeless tobacco use can also increase the risk of reproductive health problems such as reduced sperm count and abnormal sperm cells for men. Women who use smokeless tobacco may be at an increased risk of preeclampsia (a condition that may include high blood pressure, uid retention, and swelling), premature birth, and low birth weight. A DDICTION Like cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products contain nicotine, a highly addictive and dangerous chemical. Smokeless tobacco users and cigarette smokers have comparable levels of nicotine in the blood, according to the National Cancer Institute. Smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to smoking and the rate at which youth continue to use these products is alarming, said State Surgeon General and Secretary of Health Dr. John Armstrong. Many of these young people may be substituting cigarettes with smokeless tobacco in places where they cant smoke, leading to a stronger nicotine addiction that makes it harder for them to quit. Tobacco Free Florida has three ways to help smokeless tobacco users quit. Those who want to quit can double their chances at suc cess by using one of these free and convenient quit services. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com. For more information on smokeless tobacco, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com/smokelesstobacco. ABOUT TOBACCO FR EE FLORIDA DOHs Tobacco Free Florida campaign is a statewide cessation and prevention campaign funded by Floridas tobacco settlement fund. Tobacco users interested in quitting are encouraged to use one of the states three ways to quit. To learn about Tobacco Free Florida and the states free quit resources, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com or follow the campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TobaccoFreeFlorida or Twitter at www.twitter.com/tobaccofreea. DOH works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community eorts. The S.T.O.P. Guide (The Smokeless Tobacco Outreach and Prevention Guide): A Comprehensive Directory of Smokeless Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Resources. Applied Behavioral Science Press, 1997; Hatsukami, D & Severson, H, Oral Spit Tobacco: Addiction, Prevention and Treatment, Nicotine & Tobacco Research 1:21-44, 1999 National Cancer Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm Centre of Public Health. Smokeless Tobacco Fact Sheets. Third International Conference on Smokeless Tobacco; Stockholm. September 22, 2002 Boetta, P, et al., Smokeless tobacco and cancer, The Lancet 9:667-675, 2008 Boetta, P, et al. Use of smokeless tobacco and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke: systematic review with meta-analysis, BMJ, 2009; 339 (aug18 2): b3060 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.b3060 Tomar, SL. Chewing Tobacco Use and Dental Caries Among U.S. Men, Journal of the American Dental Association, 1999, 130: 160. World Health Organization. Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specic N-Nitrosamines. International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans Vol. 89. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 2007 National Cancer Institute. Smokeless Tobacco or Health: An International Perspective. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute; 1992. Smoking and Tobacco Control Monograph 2. ABOUT THROUGH WITH CH E W W EE K This national annual health observance was established by the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery as an educational campaign designed to prevent and reduce the use of smokeless tobacco. Through With Chew Week is now recognized by public health groups across the country. The week includes the Great American Spit Out on Thursday, Feb. 21, which encourages smokeless tobacco users to plan in advance to quit using smokeless tobacco that day, or to use the day to make a plan to quit. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Was something strange in the sky over Apalachicola on Saturday, Feb. 9? The Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) published a reported UFO sighting submitted by a witness who listed Apalachicola as his or her location. The following report submitted the same evening as the sighting allegedly occurred: (I) was in my backyard with my dog. Looking toward the front of my house, I saw a bright orangish light, moving at a fairly fast clip in a northwesterly direction. Thinking the object seemed strange I went to the front of my house to get a better view. There I saw another orangish light moving in line with the rst. At this point, I called to my partner in the house, and she came out and saw the lights as well. Another two lights followed behind these lights. The lights seemed to be evenly spaced. I watched as the lights quickly went from being very bright to being tiny and then disappearing completely. This all happened within perhaps three to four minutes, perhaps less. A woman named Darlene, who described herself as a resident of Carrabelle Beach, posted a comment about the above report online through MUFON on Monday, stating she and her husband had also seen the lights on Feb. 9. He had just come home from going to town and was yelling for me to come out to see the strange lights, she wrote. Herman Bell, chief of public affairs for the 325 the Fighter Wing, said that Tyndall Air Force Base did not have any aircraft scheduled in this area during the evening of Feb. 9. The same evening, a similar phenomenon was reported at 11:45 p.m. in Tampa. The witness wrote, I was outside smoking a cigarette, I looked to the east then I saw a large orange/reddish star-like object rise straight up above the tree line as if it was taking off into the air (maybe 10 miles away). Once it rose to a certain distance, another one followed behind it. When those two rose to a distance they became just a reddish color, then they began traveling west, another one, a third one, rose from the tree line, rising straight up, then following the two proceeding ones. I was just watching in shock, thinking I wish I had my camera. When the rst one had passed overhead at a far distance, the second one wasnt too far behind. I watched them both head west toward Orion, then they disappeared completely, when they should have been somewhat visible. I saw the fourth rise from behind the tree line (like the three before them) it was also an orange/reddish color, almost glowing with it until getting to a certain distance into the atmosphere, Im not sure? They just became a red color once they started traveling west. While I watched all four of them rise, I didnt notice a sound around me at all. But it was when the fourth one rose that I ran into my house to get my phone to lm them. When I came back out the third one was already disappearing into thin air as it got closer to the Orion constellation as well. The video I took of the fourth one, it is in the middle of the screen for the most part. It is a red dot, but its visible. At some points it disappears but shows back up. There are some street lights in the video as well, but its taken of the fourth one as it starts heading west, above and then as far west as I could see it on the camera screen. The Tampa witness managed to lm something with his or her phone, and the video is posted online at www.mufon.com/mufonreports.html. According to the website, MUFON began May 31, 1969, as the Midwest UFO Network and later become Mutual UFO Network after it outgrew its Midwestern state boundaries. MUFON is currently the largest and oldest UFO organization in the world that publishes a monthly journal, holds an annual symposium, has a structured eld investigator training program and currently has more than 800 trained eld investigators and a membership of 2,800 people. It reports that it has computerized UFO case management system, trained underwater dive team and an active business board of directors. UFOs spotted over Apalachicola



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A local club would like to see the county shooting range moved farther north on County Road 65. There is currently a public shooting range on county land just east of the Franklin County Humane Society on County Road 65. A group of local outdoorsmen, the Tates Hell Rod and Gun Club (THRGC), has taken on the task of facilitating the construction of a new public ri e range in the county. According to the THRGC website, plans include separate pistol, ri e, trap and skeet areas with covered shooting benches. Our rst goals are to facilitate the relocation and improvement of our countys ri e range to a more suitable location to make it safer for shooters and neighbors, the site reads. We hope in the future to arrange rearm training courses as well as competitive matches open to the public. A secondary goal will be to work with FWC on other regulatory agencies to voice our concerns with hunting and shing regulations. We intend to advocate, with elected of cials at all levels, School board will vote on agreement Feb. 21By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County School district employees voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to ratify a contract for the current school year designed to bring the districts fund balance into positive territory. But whether it will prevent the need for future cuts this school year remains a question. Rik McNeill, executive director of the Florida Education Associations Central Panhandle Service unit and a key negotiator on behalf of the county teachers and education support personnel, said the one-year contract, from July 1, 2012 until June 30, 2103, passed easily in secret balloting by both teachers and support personnel. All teachers, regardless of whether they are among the roughly two-thirds who are members of the Franklin County Teachers Association union, were entitled to vote on the contract. Of these, 93 percent voted yes. The same was true of the nonteaching staff, with all of them, not only members of the Franklin Education Support Professionals Association, able to vote. Of these, 78 percent voted yes. The contract remains to be approved by the district, with school board members expected to vote yes when they meet Feb. 21. Key to the contract is a provision that will enable the district to delay the June 2012 paychecks to teachers on 10-month contracts until July 2013, the rst month of the next scal year. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com For the past 17 years, the annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler has showcased the culinary creations of the areas growing number of ne establishments. This year, there were some new twists, including stylish mixed drinks, a celebrity chef and the cuisine of a retirement community all part of the evolving face of the areas food establishments. Once again, the annual fundraiser for the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce was a sell-out, attracting more than 210 people to the Armory on Sunday night. A huge array of volunteers helped to make the event a success, with their efforts State, city begin big Mill Pond investmentBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Both the state and city are moving forward this month with major investments at Scipio Creek, with the state set to spend almost $1 million in renovating and modernizing the aging structure that houses aquaculture regulators. The city last week also awarded an almost $330,000 contract to Poloronis Construction to complete a haul-out facility at the marina, long known by locals as the Mill Pond, dating back to the days when a saw mill was located there. Though the two projects have separate funding sources, they are intertwined because they are two major pieces of what city of cials hope will be a revitalized area for preserving and enhancing the struggling seafood industry. At the Feb. 5 city commission meeting, City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb presented seven bids for constructing the haulout facility, work to be managed by Baskerville Donovans Richard Delp. She said because the industry has said a 60-ton lift is what is needed, the base bids for a 50-ton facility would be suf cient. These bids ranged from a high of $581,000 from H.G. Harders & Son Inc. to Poloronis low bid. The only other bid under a half-million dollars was $349,000 from Cathey Construction and Development. Drawing on millions in federal stimulus money to complete the overall Scipio Creek renovation, Taylor-Webb said $230,000 has been granted for the portion of the project covered by Poloronis bid. The additional $100,000 needed will come from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (DOACS), which has plans to modify its original plans for housing its barge at the marina. Taylor-Webb said DOACS noti ed the city in late 2010 that the state was Teachers OK budget deal INSIDESt. Joe settlement comes through, brings $61,000 to school districtA2 See TEACHERS A2 Thursday, February 14, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 42County aims to relocate gun range PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAt left, The Blue Parrots George Joanos stands behind his red pepper sauce over baked grouper. At right, members of the high schools culinary arts class offer up their selections. From left are David Butler, Daniel Carrino, Brittany Carr, Casey Sapp, Brittany Bryant, Chandler White and Karl Sanford.FORGOTTEN COAST CHEF SAMPLER 17th Chef Sampler displays varied offeringsSee GOURMET A3 See GUN RANGE A7See MILL POND A7Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Classi eds . . . . A15African-American History Festival this weekend HCOLAs 10th annual African-American History Festival will be Feb. 1517 at Franklin Square in Apalachicola. The two-day free festival will highlight African-American history, food, art and culture with a parade, entertainment featuring Un nished Business, exhibits, food, arts and crafts, speakers, music, dance, poetry and drama. The festival is in the North Historic District, The Hill off Sixth Street and Avenue L. For info, call 323-0544 or 653-7515.Dixie to present Vintage HitchcockThe Dixie Theatre presents the rst in its 2013 professional season with Vintage Hitchcock: A Live Radio Play over the next two weekends. Spies, murder, love and other trademarks of Alfred Hitchcock come to life in the style of a 1940s radio broadcast complete with vintage commercials, a train chase, a serial killer and a devastating explosion through live sound effects and music. Shows are 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 15-16, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17. There will be a matinee at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20, and then shows continue Feb. 22-24. All seats are $25. For tickets, call the box of ce at 653-3200.Souper Book and Bread sale SaturdayFriends of the Franklin County Public Library will hold their annual Souper Book and Bread sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Sea Oats Gallery, 128 E. Pine Ave on St. George Island. Delicious homemade soups and breads plus great used books of all kinds! Enjoy a bowl while you browse, or buy a quart for lunch or dinner. All proceeds bene t the county libraries in Eastpoint and Carrabelle. Want to donate books, soups or breads? Questions? Call Anna Carmichael at 370-6763.Appletons estuary, A14

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 Shannon Venable, the districts nance director, said by delaying these last two paychecks until July, the district will save about $396,000, just slightly below the roughly $402,000 in property tax proceeds that disappeared during the July to October 2012 budget process. Venable said the state will allow for a prior period millage adjustment for the upcoming scal year, which will enable the district to assess additional millage in 2013-14 because of the declines between July and October 2012. Were going to see that on our tax revenues that come in next year, she said. In addition, the teachers agreed to two furlough days, June 10 and 11, two planning days after the last day of school on June 7. The furloughs will save the district about $56,000. Though the deal takes a huge step toward balancing the budget by the end of the scal year, it is not expected to bring the district to the minimum 2 percent of overall revenue the state requires a district have in its fund balance. Venable said with these changes, the unrestricted fund balance will be negative $110,976 at years end, and when the more than $200,000 in restricted funds are factored in, it will be a positive $131,000, still short of the 2 percent. The problem is not solved, she said. We will still be in nancial woes after these changes this week. I think both parties are aware this doesnt solve the problem. McNeill said it was the understanding of the two unions that nishing the year with a positive fund balance would satisfy the Florida Department of Education. We should nish the year in the black, not in the red, he said. Thats what we were told, that they (the administration) have been told by the DOE. That we needed to get to zero, or into the positive, but they werent going to be held to the 2 percent threshold this year. We need to get there in the future, McNeill said. I think we need to get to the end of this year and see the number of students we have at the end of the year, and what faculty has retired or moved away, and then make some determination of how were going to move ahead to meet the needs of students and the county and to get to a more positive fund balance. McNeill credited the districts receipt last week of money from a property tax settlement with The St. Joe Company (see sidebar) as being instrumental in making the deal possible. We were very fortunate that settlement of monies from St. Joe came through, he said. It absolutely helped out. Without it, (the deal) might not have happened as easily as it did. The employees were reluctant to bear the burden of the all of these other errors that have occurred.Employees speak outAt last weeks regular school board meeting, the board heard from two employees who urged the district not to cut employee salaries and bene ts. Im not here to brag. Im not here to complain, said Paul Bankston, a 15-year paraprofessional. I just want my income, if it cant go up, to stay the same. I dont want no money taken away from me. He said his paycheck last year totaled a little more than $18,000, and he brought home a little more than $12,000, with about $3,000 spent on out-of-pocket costs for health insurance and other bene ts. I dont drink, I dont smoke, I dont play the lottery, he said. Its not like I spend this on bad habits. (But) Im not the healthy man I was years ago. I know its tough, I know what youre going through, Bankston said. Im not a number on the paper, Im one voice for the voice of hundreds. Cathy Wood, the teachers union representative, commended the work of athletic director Josh Wright, who was the unions chief negotiator. Wright left last week to take a job as football coach at Arnold High School in Panama City. She credited the district with the cuts it had made so far this scal year. Have we cut corners? Weve proven we can live on potatoes and beans, and I think its working, Wood said. I cant say its the morale thats the best. She also alluded to Richard Metcalf, a former middle school math teacher who was dismissed in January after an incident involving an altercation with a student that the district believed constituted professional misconduct. Wood said Metcalf had been cleared by the Florida Department of Educations Of ce of Professional Practices of all wrongdoing, although it is arguable whether a decision not to sanction a teacher constitutes a complete exoneration. If we rehired that person, we would save all expenses of attorney fees, Wood said. In her report, School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders asked the school board to refer Metcalfs appeal of its decision to the Florida Department of Administrative Hearings. She opted against recommending the ve-member school board hear the matter. That administrative law judge makes a decision, Was what the board did right or wrong? Thats the bottom line, and they refer it to back to you. Some options you can adopt or not adopt, she said. Sanders said attorney Bob Harris will represent the district in the appeal, with attorney fees covered by the districts insurance company. She said the district will be liable for several thousand dollars in administrative fees. WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Family Care and Rotating Specialty Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST135 Avenue G, ApalachicolaQuick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-653-8853 ext. 118 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-28-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM St. Joe settlement comes throughAn infusion of almost $62,000 in additional tax proceeds as a result of a settlement with The St. Joe Company helped lead to school employees rati cation this week of a one-year contract deal. The schools received a check last week from Tax Collector Jimmy Harris for $61,891 as a result of the settlement. The county received $53,745 from the settlement, while the Northwest Florida Water Management District got $698, for a total of $116,133. Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper said the settlement with The St. Joe Company dates back to 2007, when the company rst went to court to protest the valuation of 147 lots in the SummerCamp development on the eastern end of the county. The company also sued over the appraisals for 2008 and 2009. Skipper said St. Joe argued that some of their values were in ated because though there were contracts in 2004 for deeds agreed upon during the height of real estate market, these werent recorded until 2006, when values had begun to fall. She said she and Doris Pendleton, the former property appraiser, met with St. Joe representatives in April 2010 to discuss these valuations. Skipper said the county offered St. Joe a $15 million reduction in value on the whole SummerCamp subdivision for three years. We met and made that offer and heard nothing from them up until Doris retired, she said. Skipper said the company contacted the property appraisers of ce in October and December 2012, but the countys offer remained the same. Both sides then entered mediation and agreed on a $20 million property tax reduction over the three years. The biggest reason for the agreement is now the state of Florida says that whenever were qualifying sales, we must recognize the notarized acknowledged date of the document as opposed the actual recorded date, Skipper said. It gives the judge (the ability) to rule on so many ifs in the situation. We just didnt feel it was a good gamble for the county. The judge could have waived the penalty and interest that St. Joe owed, and it was quite a sum. Now that the lawsuit has been resolved, the monies that had been frozen now can be disbursed. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN TEACHERS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe districts chief negotiator, Leonard Dietzen, left, speaks with school board attorney Barbara Sanders while board member George Thompson, center, talks with administrator Al London.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, February 14, 2013 Thursday, February 14, 2013 PHOTOS BY DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIN | The TimesLELEFTT : Kelli Boxberger created this sign, one of many she has at her Funky Fiddler furniture store. CENTERENTER: The areas political muscle was represented, clockwise from left, by Gulf County Superintendent Jim Norton, Jane Montford, Liz Boyette, Cristin Beshears, State Rep. Halsey Beshears, Erika Norton, Aaron Boyette and State Sen. Bill Montford. RIRIGHTHT : Celebrity Chef Joe Rego chats with the Owl Cafes Susan Gary.matched once again by the students in the Franklin County High Schools culinary arts program. Debbie Fletcher, a former restaurateur who directs the program, said seven of her 66 students took part in preparing sweets for the event, including succulent chocolate clair cakes and white chocolate toffee cake. Taking part were Brittany Bryant, Karl Sanford, Casey Sapp, Daniel Carrino, Brittany Carr, Chandler White and David Butler. It was a great inspiration to them and left a lasting impression, Fletcher said. Though the young people did not take part, a new addition to the offerings this year were fancy mixed drinks, courtesy of the two newest beverage spots, The Tap Room and Tamaras Tapas Bar. Traditionally, beverage suppliers such as Southern Wine and Spirits, Lewis Bear Company and Republic National Distributing Company handle all the libations. The Tap Room offered up a selection of craft beers, Bees Knees martinis and Key Lime cocktails, while the Tapas Bar poured blueberry lemon drop martinis. Among the rst to sell out was the Blue Parrot Oceanfront Cafs baked grouper St. George with red pepper sauce. Owner George Joanos plated a hefty chunk of fresh grouper, lightly breaded and baked to seal in the moisture, then topped with a delicate sauce. Right alongside him was the Apalachicola Seafood Grill, which had owners Bev Hewitt and Jerry Hall serving up tropical rice with sweet and sour shrimp and Jerrys famous smoked sh dip. The Owl Caf saw owner Susan Gary presenting an alligator sausage Creole, with grits cake, made from sausage she gets from New Orleans. This was accompanied by brie with bread, and baklava made with local Tupelo honey and pecans. Up the Creek Raw Bar and chef Brett Gormley delighted patrons with Thai noodles with mung bean salad with ginger crisps, as well as crab cake with chipotle aioli. Carolines Dining of the River served up Panhandle grouper with sweet pepper, leeks and a light garlic sauce. The Crooked River Grill offered a seafood blend of grouper, shrimp and crab, served over jasmine rice with a remoulade sauce. This was accompanied by lo stuffed with pured peas with baked salmon and dill. Tamaras Caf offered home baked rosemary foccaccio bread, with mozzarella, heirloom tomatoes, spinach, basil aioli and prosciutto ham, tossed with balsamic vinegar. Iras at the Gibson Inn offered salmon on cucumber rounds, and a sweet potato soup, while Eddy Teachs Raw Bar served up what else? raw oysters, accompanied with a curried potato salad. Caf Con Leche offered a host of delicacies, including chocolate chip lavender cookies, bacon dipped with chocolate, kumquat liqueur, kumquats dipped in chocolate, amaretto cakes, mocha cake and monkey bread. Jonathan Brubaker, a graduate of Johnson and Wales who now works as chef and dietary director at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing home, showed the new face of a growing niche in the culinary industry, that of ne foods at longterm care communities. He offered a salmon mousse and she crab soup to delight the palate. Attracting a lot of attention was chef Joe Rego at the Front Porch restaurant in Tallahassee. A native of Portugal, Rego secured the title of Chopped Champion on the widely popular Food Network television show, gaining national recognition through the competition that challenges skill, speed and ingenuity. Rego served up a house specially, ceviche, with the restaurant featuring on its menu a make-your-own ceviche bar with a choice of fresh snapper, tuna, scallop, shrimp or salmon. For the Chefs Sampler, Rego made a spicy ceviche with watermelon, served on malanga chips. Each of the tables was designed by a volunteer with a different theme in mind. These designers included Andrea Duval, Kathy Andrews, Caty Greene, Judi Stokowski, Amy Price, Denise Butler, Kelli Boxberger, Butch Rowell, Jan Houser, Kayd Selden, Bonnie Fulmer, Katherine Neill, Elizabeth and Rich Wynn, Shelly James, Dixie Partington, Karen Brown, Beverly Coxwell and Anna Carmichael. GOURMET from page A1LELEFTT : Michaelin Watts tries a pastry from the Bridge at Bay St. Joe. RIRIGHTHT : Ira Mittleman, from The Gibson Inn, stands with Nola Tolbert from Crooked River Grille, center, and the Gibson Inns Emily Adams.

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.comThursday, February 14, 2013 APage 4SectionSoutherland named to Coast Guard subcommitteeSpecial to the TimesHouse Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster said last month he has appointed Rep. Steve Southerland II to serve as vice chairman of the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation for the 113th Congress. Southerlands new role will enhance his leadership for Florida on Coast Guard, ports and maritime issues in Congress. As a member of the House Transportation Committee hailing from a state with 20 ports, I understand the importance of bolstering Coast Guard readiness and strengthening our coastal economies, Southerland said. I appreciate Chairman Shusters friendship and look forward to expanding my role on these maritime issues so critical to our nations economic competiveness. Over the past two years, Rep. Southerland has consistently demonstrated a commitment to reforming Americas vital infrastructure systems without losing his focus on making Washington spend smartly, Shuster said. His knowledge and expertise in coastal issues will be a welcome addition to the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee. For more than a year, Sue Cronkite has been working on a database of names of people who are referenced in the indexes of books such as Outposts on the Gulf by William Warren Rogers, published by the University of Florida, The Magic of Cape San Blas and the Surrounding Area, published by Marlene Womack in 2011, and The Lovett Family of Apalachicola Florida and Allied Families self-published by Rose Gibbons Lovett in 1963. These are great resources, in hardcopy form at the library, but if nothing else Library School is teaching me that library holdings are only part of the wealth of information available, especially on the Internet. Yesterday I found, while looking for a particular portal for early Apalachicola Census Records, a Florida State University dissertation by Christopher Horrell on maritime history and archaeology focusing substantially on Apalachicola. In the appendixes are lists of ship captains, vessels and the master carpenters who built them. All of these names could potentially be added to the database, which the Apalachicola Municipal Library is willing to share with any other interested parties. The library is reaching out to the Gulf County Public Library, with their Alfred I. DuPont Florida History and Genealogy Center, which is almost the square footage of this library. Port St. Joe and Apalachicola, while certainly rivals historically, are linked together by history and families, back before the town, known then as St Joseph, was decimated by Yellow Fever and a hurricane in 1843. Some Apalachicola houses were even originally built in Port St. Joe and transported to Apalachicola. Another resource, more precious than the Internet, as it is more eeting, are the recollections of our local residents. The library has scant resources to put toward an oral history project, but the Florida Humanities Council did record some in 2003. The loss of our beloved Bobby Siprell last Sunday highlights the urgency of gathering information from lifelong resident. Bobby was not one we thought we would lose so soon. He was just going to be tapped by the University of Floridas Historic Preservation Program, to provide recollections on the evolution of the Chapman School buildings, at the recommendation of Susan Clementson. The list of Bobbys wonderful works, both personal and physical is long, but we especially appreciate his transformation of a discarded piece of furniture, which is now the librarys circulation desk. He was on our list to call for some other carpentry projects. We will miss him, as will many residents of Apalachicola. Let the call go out come help us compile an historical record of Apalachicola. Any suggestions or temporary offers of materials will be greatly appreciated. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. As you know, Apalachicola has led a lawsuit against the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners to compel them to meet jointly and in public with the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Boards of City Commissioners as required by the Governmental Con ict Resolution Act, Florida Statutes 164.1055. The intent of the lawsuit is very much contrary to the political spin that has most recently emanated the chambers where our esteemed county commission conducts the business affairs of the people of this great county. The complaint is solely about the Franklin County Commissions refusal to meet jointly and in public with the City of Apalachicola and the City of Carrabelle on Dec. 19, 2012, to discuss and attempt to resolve con icts regarding the local plan for allocation of Restore Act Fine Funds under the stated Governmental Dispute Resolution Act. The total focus of which is to require the Franklin County Commission to meet as required by the statute to discuss and attempt to resolve con icts between the county and the two cities. It is not to compel Franklin County to accept the fair distribution plan adopted by both cities in August and early September, which apparently to date has been rejected without cause or comment at a meeting of the county commission on Wednesday morning, Jan. 2, 2013, without being on the agenda and without any notice being given to the cities. The truth is that Franklin County has knowingly and repeatedly refused to meet with the cities to even discuss much less attempt to resolve the con icts and has in large part ignored the many cordial requests by Carrabelle and Apalachicola since August 2012 to meet with the cities to discuss a fair plan of allocation to our respective communities. The Franklin County Commission now comes to the court cloaked in indignation, with a de ant attitude where their actions have made it abundantly clear that they would rather ght than meet with the two cities to discuss the simple and uncomplicated matter of how the cities are to receive a fair share of the Fine Funds. We trust that the court will declare F.S. .1055 applicable and require Franklin County to meet jointly and in public with the cities such as the meeting called and noticed and attended by both Apalachicola and Carrabelle on Dec. 19, 2012. Again, I thank you for your time and attention to this matter.Van W. Johnson Sr. mayor of ApalachicolaThreats to public servants against the lawAfter carefully listening to the county commission meeting proceedings for the Feb. 5 meeting, and hearing District One Commissioner Massey report multiple threats to his person and property over the forthcoming vote for the county attorney position, I was truly saddened and very disappointed that neither the current county attorney, nor the administrator of services, nor the current or past board of commissioners chair took this opportunity to remind the public of the penalties and illegality of threatening a public of cial in the commission of their duties. What an ideal opportunity for public education and civility wasted! Florida Statutes 838.021 Corruption by threat against public servant Florida Statutes > Title XLVI > Chapter 838 > 838.021 Corruption by threat against public servant current as of: 2011 It is unlawful to harm or threaten to harm any public servant, his or her immediate family, or any other person with whose welfare the public servant is interested with the intent to: In uence the performance of any act or omission that the person believes to be, or that the public servant represents as being, within the of cial discretion of the public servant, in violation of a public duty, or in performance of a public duty. When this issue to choose a county attorney is again presented for a vote at the next meeting, I sincerely hope that such an important and cautionary statutory reminder will be made to the public at that time by one of the lead county of cials. It will at least be better late than never! Sincerely,Mel KellyMayor of Carrabelle 2005-2007Dont let cuts affect salaries, curriculumGood Morning! I am writing concerning the dire nancial situation the Franklin County School board nds itself in. I fear the drastic methods under discussion to solve the problems may in the long term affect the curriculum offered and the students as well. As a graduate of the public schools (1941) of Franklin County, I was a student during the great depression of the 1930s and the school year was only eight months long. The elected superintendent during my senior year was Dr. Ham who had a full-time dental practice. Dr Ham had a fulltime secretary to help with his school job. I think school board members received $25 per meeting, but did not meet every month. The point that I would like to make is that because of the severe depression, school expenses were carefully monitored to keep within the schools austere budget. As a result the curriculum was somewhat limited. For example, I was interested in medicine and applied for and was accepted at Emory. Two college courses required in college pre-med were chemistry and physics. These courses were not offered in high school in Apalachicola and when I entered college, I was at a serious disadvantage in that I had to compete with students who had learned the basics of these subjects in high school. I sincerely hope the curriculum in Franklin County School does not meet the same fate as that that occurred during the Great Depression. School teachers salaries should not have to be cut because someone miscalculated the budgetary requirements. The ultimate responsibility to adequately fund the school should be the school board members. It would seem that they would be responsible to do their homework on budgetary matters before meetings. To quote President Harry Truman, If the heat is too hot, get out of the kitchen! The teachers and the students did not create the problem and should not be punished for someone elses mistakes, and I sincerely hope that the curriculum will not be affected. Sincerely,Photis Nichols, M.D.Chapman High Class of 1941 FLORIDA STATUTES 164.1055 READS THAT:Failure to resolve a con ict after following authorized procedures shall require the scheduling of a joint public meeting between the primary con icting governmental entities. The governmental entity rst initiating the con ict resolution process shall have the responsibility to schedule the joint public meeting and arrange a location. In this meeting, the governing bodies of the primary con icting governmental entities shall: (a) Consider the statement of issues prepared in the con ict assessment phase. (b) Seek an agreement. (c) Schedule additional meetings of the entities in con ict, or of their designees, to continue to seek resolution of the con ict. (2) If no agreement is reached, the primary con icting governmental entities shall participate in mediation, the costs of which shall be equally divided between the primary con icting governmental entities Letters TO THE EDITOR@THE LIBRARY Caty GreeneLocal recollections are precious resource VAN W. JOHNSON SR. Cities want to meet, not to compel REP. STEVE SOUTHERLAND Another resource, more precious than the Internet, as it is more fleeting, are the recollections of our local residents. The library has scant resources to put toward an oral history project, but the Florida Humanities Council did record some in 2003.

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The Times | A5Thursday, February 14, 2013 TOBACCO CESSATIONCLASSSCHEDULELOCATION: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital All classes begin at 5:30 P.M. Free nicotine patches and gum will be provided to participants who complete each class Each class is a 2 hour (one time) session. Please visit the following websites to view a current schedule of tobacco cessation classes that are being held in Franklin County at www.bigbendahec.org/quit-now and www.ahectobacco.com To register for a class, please call Big Bend AHEC at 850-224-1177.THERE IS NO COSTTO ATTEND! March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013The Bay County FairgroundsRegister now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo special section, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show:Call: 850-248-3976 orE-mail: expostradeshows@aol.comFor sponsorship information call:850-763-6587For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo, contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 SPONSORSTHERE IS STILL SPACE FOR YOU ATTHE Friday: Noon 5 PM Saturday: 9 AM 5 PM Sunday: 10 AM 3 PM A HOST OF SHABBY CHIC VENDORS ALREADY SIGNED UP! PRESENTING SPONSORS: SHOW SPONSORS: PATRON SPONSORS: The Goulding Agency By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A Carrabelle resident has appealed to the city for help controlling traf c in his neighborhood. When Bill Owen decided to retire, he and wife Tammy knew they wanted a place on the Gulf Coast. They toured from Sarasota to Louisiana hoping to nd the ideal spot. After several trips, they decided Franklin County would be their new home. They bought their house at 915 NE 7th St. and disposed of most of their possessions and their New York home. Looking forward to warm winters and a laidback lifestyle, in June 2012, they moved to Carrabelle. Owen hoped to concentrate on his hobbies, painting and photography. Tammy Owen became the director of rehabilitation at the St. James Rehabilitation Center. That, said Owen, is when the nightmare began. The couple discovered that the dirt track that runs behind their new home is a dump site for trash and worse. That the stretch of road is constantly used as a race track by dirt bikes, four-wheelers and even bog trucks. The noise and dust were so bad, the Owens could not sit on the porch or open their windows. At the end of 7th Street is a thrift shop that buys scrap metal and other goods. The shop last year was granted a special variance to operate in a residential zone. Owen said he believes traf c to the store greatly increases the dust and noise. In September, Bill Owen appealed to the city to place some stop signs along his road to calm traf c. He received no response. On Oct. 23, his yellow lab Buddy was struck by a truck and killed. The driver didnt even stop. The Owens were devastated, and Bill again called city hall begging for help. On Oct. 25, street superintendent William Massey and his crew installed two stop signs and a 20 mph speed limit sign. The signs were ignored. Owen later contacted the Franklin County Road Department, and his county commissioner, Cheryl Sanders. Sanders dispatched Hubert Chipman, superintendent of roads to visit 915 NE 7th Street. Owen said Chipman agreed there was a problem and promised to work on a plan to reduce dust. A third stop sign was installed by the county. On Feb. 7, Owen addressed the Carrabelle city commission and brought them two video recordings of the traf c at his home. Owen said he only approached the city commission after several conversations with the Carrabelle police. The rst video viewed by commissioners during the meeting showed a teenager on a four-wheeler repeatedly blasting up and down the road behind Owens home. The boy ignores the stop signs and creates huge clouds of dust. The noise is unpleasantly loud on a recording Owen said was made inside his home through closed windows. The second video, not viewed during the meeting, shows a series of vehicles running the stop signs adjacent to the Owen home, apparently at high speed. Among the vehicles pictured are the citys knuckle boom truck, a school bus and UPS truck as well as numerous pick ups. At the Feb. 7 meeting, Owen distributed a letter asking for help. We love Carrabelle and are totally invested in this community, he wrote. We shop here, dine here, get our gas, give to local charities and are trying to get more involved all the time. The combination of all these people driving at high speeds is an accident waiting to happen. The wide sweeping corner has limited sight distance. If someone is speeding east on the straightaway, which happens all the time, and someone runs the stop sign from the south, there is little space to avoid an accident. The city commissioners thanked Owen for his presentation but offered no immediate solution to his problem. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider, in a telephone interview, said she plans a eld trip to look at the situation. She said it is possible the police need to be more proactive in dealing with traf c violations in the area. In an interview Monday, Bill Owen said he and his wife almost ful lled his prediction on Sunday night when their car was narrowly missed by a speeding pick up that never even swerved to avoid hitting the couple when Bill slowed to make the turn into his driveway. No one was hurt Saturday evening when a car stopped in the road on the bridge was struck by an FWC truck. According to a report provided by Florida Highway Patrol Trooper P. Azrak, at 7 p.m. Saturday, on the bridge about 2.5 miles west of Apalachicola, a 2009 Chevrolet HHR, driven by Larry Eugene McCourt, 47, of Liberty County, was stopped in the westbound lane, with no lights on. Approaching from Eastpoint was a 2000 GMC truck, owned by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and driven by Donielle McKinley, who had just picked it up from the former Apalachicola National Estuaries Research Reserve in Eastpoint. McKinley, a sheries biological scientist for FWC, samples sh brought in at the sh houses, measuring them, weighing them and removing ear bones to age them. McKinley said approaching traf c were ashing their lights at her. I thought Why are they ashing their lights at me? I already have my lights on, not my brights on, she said. It was then that McKinley saw McCourts vehicle in the road. I slammed on the brakes and swerved into the oncoming lane to try to avoid hitting him, she said. McKinley said she braked and steered her vehicle to the left, but her right front hit McCourts station wagon at an angle, striking the rear drivers side. Unhurt, she immediately got out and went to the vehicle she had hit. He said he was just going to wait there for a little bit. He said he was waiting for deer to cross the road, she said. He didnt seem to realize I hit him. McCourt sustained minor injuries, and was transported by Weems ambulance to Weems Memorial Hospital. It was there that a blood draw was done, with results pending. Both drivers were wearing their seatbelts at the time of the collision. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Apalachicola Police Department (APD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.FEB. 7Elton J. Garcia, 37, Winters, Texas, violation of a pretrial release (FCSO) Floyd B. Parramore, 52, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Willie G. Dasher, Jr., 34, Eastpoint, Bay County warrant for withholding child support (FCSO)FEB. 8Charles C. Golden, 43, Eastpoint, Arrest REPORTBILL OWEN | Special to The TimesDust trails behind a pick-up truck Bill Owen said blasted through a stop sign at highway speeds.Carrabelle man seeks traf c relief Injuries spared in Saturday bridge crash burglary of a structure and grand theft (FCSO) Esmeralda Dominguez, 45, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (APD)FEB. 9Steve A. Johns, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, burglary of a structure, criminal mischief and violation of probation (FCSO) Michael J. Anderson, 41, Tallahassee, no valid drivers license, false report to a law enforcement of cer and Gadsden County warrant for violation of probation (FHP) Gretta A. Prevette, 27, Eastpoint, trespass after warning, resisting of cer without violence, corruption by threat against public servant and violation of a pre-trial release (FCSO) Law Enforcement

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013By MATTHEW BEATON522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com APALACHICOLA The ailing Apalachicola Bay might get some help if Gov. Rick Scott gets his way, but lawmakers say most of the funding will go toward a study. Scotts recently unveiled budget would give $3 million to water quality improvement projects in the bay. The Northwest Florida Water Management District would receive the money and undertake the projects. State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, who represents the county, said he is pleased the governor recommended the funding. He understands the severe problem that we have with the Apalachicola River basin and the Apalachicola Bay, he said. Montford said the money, at least partly, will go toward a riverow study. Lawmakers and scientists agree the lack of freshwater ow on the river is contributing to the oyster-haul decline, as well as other issues. Montford said the lack of ow has increased the bays salinity, allowing sea predators to feast on oysters. But Florida has no control over freshwater ow on the river. Lake Lanier, north of Atlanta, releases the water that feeds the river, and despite legal wrangling, Florida has not been able to increase that volume. There has been no ofcial decision on how the $3 million would be spent, Montford said. Scott likely will leave that up to the water management districts professionals, but he de nitely wants a waterow study, Montford said. Also Montford said he will ght to put the $3 million is in the Legislatures budget, which has not been written. And he said he has some big guns in the Legislature Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and Sen. Charlie Dean, RInverness, chair of the Environmental Preservation and Conservation Committee who support helping the bay. Montford said like the Everglades, the bay and the basin are problems that should concern everyone in the state. This is not just a North Florida issue; this is a Florida issue, he said. We are witnessing the destruction of an American treasure. So far, the water management district has been reticent to detail how the $3 million would be spent, saying theres no project list for the money. Its a proposed budget; its pretty early, said Lauren Engel, district spokeswoman. Engel said she had no knowledge the money would be spent on a study. Meanwhile, State Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, was less energized about the governors interest in the bays problems. I wish that we were doing something more direct to help out those people down in Apalachicola, rather than study(ing) something, he said. Beshears said the problem is one that must be relentlessly pursued. He, the chairman and vice chairman of Agriculture & Natural Resources Subcommittee, and the secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection toured the region Friday. They spent half a day in Apalachicola, going out on the water, even seeing oystermen harvesting. And Beshears was resolute the Legislature needs to nd some remedies. We were there trying to look at all our options, trying to see what in the world we can do to help this problem, he said. BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Vendor Space Is Going Fast... So Call Now! $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. INSTANTLYMAKEIT YOUR EXPO!GAIN THEEXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Calling All Businesses To The 2013 Bay County Health Expo BOARDWALK BEACH RESORT FEBRUARY 19, 2013 9AM 2 PMSonsoreyTeNewsHera 2084417 2084477 Entry Form www.newsherald.com BENEFITTING To enter go online at the Panama City News Herald website at www.newsherald.com or by mail or enter in-person To enter by mail or in person, complete an Of cial Entry Form printed in The Panama City News Herald, and return or mail to: Beautiful Baby Contest, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.comTo Enter Rules $5 entry fee shall accompany each entry. Categories. The contest shall consist of four categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 13-24 months, and 25-36 months. Photographs must be submitted by the parents or guardians entrant. No third-party entries will be accepted. Hardcopy photos must be at least 3 inches on one side and no more than 10 inches. Poor quality photos will not be accepted. All photos featured in a special section in the newspaper :_____________________________________:_____________________________________________:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Return hand written forms to theat 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL or go to NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENTDISTRICT GOVERNING BOARD MEETING SCHEDULE FOR 2013*All meetings are scheduled to begin at 1:00 p.m., ET, at DistrictHeadquarters, 81Water Management Drive,Havana, FL 32333, unless otherwise indicated.January 10, 2013 February 14, 2013 March 14, 2013 April 11, 2013 May 9, 2013 June 13, 2013 July 11, 2013 August 8, 2013 September 12, 2013 Governing Board 4:00 P.M. ET Budget Public Hearing 5:05 P.M. ETSeptember 26, 2013 Budget Public Hearing 5:05 P.M. ETOctober 10, 2013 November 14, 2013 December 12, 2013 BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 Governors budget could aid Apalachicola Bay FILE PHOTO | The News HeraldA tributary of the Apalachicola River ows near Apalachicola.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, February 14, 2013 6012790 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net planning to turn over the task of conducting oyster shelling to a private com pany . As a result, the state decided to withdraw about $350,000 it planned to spend to build a new bulkhead for the barge and ll some wetlands in the area to ac commodate the barges presence. L eslie Palmer, who over sees DOACS aquaculture program, said the state has rethought the wisdom of holding on to the barge, especially because its long time skipper, Capt. David Cole, is set to retire at the end of this month. We could never hire a marine captain at the price we pay Capt. Cole, Palmer said. (Agriculture Com m issioner) Adam Putnam believes this is something that private industry can do. The shell belongs to the state, but with a private contractor, you can get more bang for your buck. Palmer said the shell, known as cultch, will con t inue to be owned and managed by the state, but will be handled under the terms of a contract speci ed by bid. She said this method is in keeping with how other states do it, with the exception of North Carolina. It only will change who is doing the work, she said. We dont want this program to cost any more administratively than it does. The timing is right. This is money we have been spending thats not going to cultch, Palmer said. Well have less mon ey for salaries and more money towards getting the work done. At a meeting last month between Taylor-Webb and Palmer, DOACS told the city that because it would be withdrawing its $350,000 investment, it would make available funds to meet other outstanding needs in the area. At the Feb. 5 city com mission meeting, Tay lor -Webb said she had re quested about $200,000, with about half of that to go toward the shortfall in com pleting the construction on the haul-out facility. In addition, she has asked for another $25,000 to help in the removal of three derelict vessels, two in the slips and one on the dock, that have been there for several years. Taylor-Webb said she hopes an additional $80,000 will be available from the state to buy the boat lift at the completed haul-out fa cility , which she said could run in the neighborhood of about $120,000. This is money set aside anyway, Palmer said. We think the marine renova tion is a great thing for the city. She stressed that both sides are working on a draft contract and that the money must be spent by September 2013. She (Taylor-Webb) is very aware that is where the grant ends, Palmer said. They (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) have told me anything left on the ta ble, theyll take it back. Taylor-Webb told com missioners the Poloronis project should take it about six months to complete, so that it should be done by June 30, 2013.DOACS to get interior renovationOn Feb. 4, Palmer appeared at the citys plan ning and zoning board to outline its plans to reno vate the DOACS facility at 260 Seventh St., just a few hundred feet from the Scipio Creek marina. The footprint wont change, the buildings not expanding, but were in creasing the lab footprint in the building, she said. We want to make it a 21st century building. Palmer said the $900,000 project, designed by the JRA Associates architec tural rm and to be com pleted by Tampas Nelco Construction, will include additional ofce space for visiting professors and researchers, as well as a state-of-the-art improve ment to the labs FDA certied water testing capabilities. This thing was envi sioned 18 months ago be fore we knew about the (oyster industry) collapse, she said. We do all the shellsh testing for the state. We could do it in Tal lahassee, but we think its important to keep testing done in Franklin County. Palmer said the state plans to add meeting space for the local seafood indus tr y to take advantage of and to shore up the aging space. W e had a lot of mold and mildew in that build ing, which is a workplace environmental issue, she said. Theres asbestos in there. Well do an interior and exterior makeover; the stuccos been leaking over the years. The state plans to reasphalt the driveway, but Palmer said it would likely not be able to meet P & Zs request for pervious asphalt, which could cost an additional $40,000 to $50,000. P & Z members said they were pleased overall that the state would be add ing a pitched roof and gut ters but wanted to be sure the storm runoff would be addressed appropriately. Pictures from the ar chives, some dating back to the late 1800s and early 1900s, as well as pictures of the previous oyster lab, will be hung throughout the building. In addition, there will be displays of old oys ter implements. Its an homage to the history; I kind of like that juxtaposition, Palmer said. We hope the industry and the county will be very proud of it, as a resource for dealers and harvest ers and for a myriad of researchers. P almer said the proj ect should take about six months, with demolition set to start as early as next week. Cur rently, DOACS staff, as well as some from the Fish and Wildlife Con ser vation Commission, are housed in the former Apalachicola National Es tuarine Research Reserve facility in Eastpoint. hunting, shing and rearm laws that reect the needs and desires of our communitys sportsmen. Grayson Shepard, a spokesman for THRGC, said moving the range would have a number of ad v antages. He said because the range is next to and in clear view of the county in m ates exercise yard, some shooters are nervous about d isplaying automobile tag numbers and equipment they own to potential thieves. There also are safety con c erns for the prisoners and the possibility of clandestine transfer of a weapon to an inmate. In addition, the range is next to the Franklin County Animal Shelter and, in particular, its outdoor ken n els. The sound of gunre is disrup t ive to both the animals and staff of the shelter, and Director Karen Mar t in has expressed concern that an animal could be accidentally shot. The shelter also has experienced problems with vehicles going to and from the range driving recklessly and speeding. The shelter is circu l ating the p etition to move the range north on County 65. THRGC, which now boasts more than 100 members, is not working alone on creating the new range. In March 2012, Bill Cline, section leader, division of hunting and game management for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, brought a proposal before the county commission to create a public shoot i ng park on a cleared section of land directly north of the sheriffs ofce. Cline said FWC fund i ng was in place for the proj e ct. He provided commission e rs with a handout and gave some background on the park project. Cline said at the last FWC m eeting, former Sheriff Skip Shiver had suggested a location. F ormer Commissioner Bevin Putnal and commissioners Pinki Jackel and Cheryl Sanders supported his plan. Commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter of support for the shooting range to the FWC. Because the property be l ongs to the school board and, at the time, the county leased a portion of it, a copy of the letter was sent to the school board. The plan stalled when further in v estigation of the property revealed that portions also were leased to Eastpoint Water and Sewer District for possible use as a spray eld at some future date. In a telephone interview Feb. 6, Cline said the FWC still strongly sup ports the gun park. Our funding sources change every year, he said. This year our funds are spent. Were always willing to work with Franklin County. Other funding sources might be avail a ble. Were looking at state lands that might be available. The sup p ort is still there. We need to nd a location. Jackel, a vocal advocate of the project, said at the Feb. 5 county meeting that she and County Planner Alan Pierce are investigating sites. FWC is very interested in spon soring a classroom building that they will pay for constr uction of, she said. We would have instruc tional courses. It would be something that we could really build on in the county that would be an economic engine. We could attract competition skeet shooting, trap and archery, and theres the educational aspect. ROTC and different folks at the school could use the range. It would just be a really nice facil ity for the public because were hunt ers. We own guns. Wed like the op portunity to have a safe environment and an instructional environment also. Shepard said local Scout troops also support the development of a new shooting range. For more information about the proposed shooting range or to sup port the plan, visit the Tates Hell Rod and Gun Club website, http:// thrgc.com/. MILL POND from page A1 GUN RANGE from page A1 GRaA YsoSON SHEPa ARdD PP Ho O Tos OS BY DAVID ADLER ER STE TE IN N | The TimesAt left, the state barge likely will be sold off as surplus once a new private contractor is approved. At right, the states oyster lab is set to get a renovation this year.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 OFTHEWEEKPET Franklin County Humane SocietyJACK & THOMAS!JACK and THOMAS are 6 week old Siamese kittens. They are both calm, social and very handsome. We have some beautiful cats/kittens at the Adoption Center and we continue to offer the reduced adoption fee of only $50.00 to encourage you to come and adopt. Come meet these blue eyed beauties and all the rest.VOLUNTEERSARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TOSOCIALIZE WITHALL OFOUR DOGSAND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR SocietyCarrabelles Mayor Curley Messer is turning 90. On Saturday, surrounded by more 100 friends and family members, Curley Messer celebrated his 90th birthday at a surprise party held at the Franklin County Senior Center. Messers family prepared a banquet of barbecue chicken and pork with all the xins and the evening ended when a huge cake, decorated with a hunting scene, was cut and passed around. The tables were beautifully decorated and a gift table sagged under the weight of cards and packages. Two of Messers brothers, Curt and Bill, traveled from Tennessee for the occasion, and his sister Mickey came from Liberty County. The grace before dining was led by Ron Comb. Messer was in high spirits, surrounded by his beloved family and especially the grandchildren and greatgrandchildren who are so dear to his heart. He thanked everyone for joining him to celebrate this momentous occasion. Messer arrived in Carrabelle at age 17 to train at Camp Gordon Johnston during World War II. He met and married Audrey Riley here. He has worked in law enforcement both for Carrabelle and for the county and has served as mayor on ve separate occasions beginning in the 1960s. He is credited with having purchased the citys rst police car and with helping to install the Worlds Smallest Police Station. Payton Wood celebrated her third birthday on Tuesday, Feb. 12, with friends and family. She is the daughter of Buddy and Cheree Wood of Carrabelle. Maternal grandparents are Keith and Lucille Walden of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Leonard and Shirley Brannan of Carrabelle and Buddy Wood of Hosford. BirthdaysChairman Carol Roberts called the meeting of Lanark Village Association to order Feb. 4. After the prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance, offered by our very own Gene Sewell, Carol turned the meeting over to Sheriff Mike Mock. He spoke on several topics and problems in the village and had a questionand-answer session afterward. Oh, by the way, you know that sign in front of Chillas Hall? The leash and clean-up law is printed on it. Well, the county has placed three more in the village. Pay attention to them; its not only a law in Franklin County, but it is a Florida state law! I am saddened by the death of another friend and neighbor. Mary Lou Kathe and her late husband, Barney, were fun to be around. She will be missed by all who knew her. Pray for Mary Lous eternal peace and her family. We have two more big weekends upon us. Valentines Day is Thursday, Feb. 14. Try to join us for lunch at the Senior Center, 201 Avenue F in Carrabelle. Serving begins at noon. A donation of $4 is required. Friday night, you can enjoy a huge hamburger and chips at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 on Oak Street in the village. Donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. Phone ahead for take-out at 6979998. Orders are taken after 5 p.m. Saturday, you can start off with a full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Enjoy pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, sausage, coffee and juice. Yum yum. Still only $5. Then, later on Saturday, you can work off the calories at the birthday bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. The songbird, Evelyn McAnally, will be joined by Ann Merrell and others to sing your favorite songs. Come on down for a fun evening. Party starts at 6 p.m. Fun starts when you walk in the door. Sunday, we will all gather at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish dinner. Chow line forms at 1 p.m. See you there! Whats for supper? Well, come on down to Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and enjoy the company and pizza. Orders taken after 5 p.m. One dollar by the slice, whole pizzas $8 to enjoy in the bar. Or take out is $10 to go. Place your takeout orders at 697-9998 after 5 p.m. I hope you mark your calendar for Saturday, Feb. 23. Well all gather at Chillas Hall, but this time it will be our 20th annual Community Breakfast. Big full breakfast for your donation of only $6. Good food, great service and great fellowship. We will be watching for you. Public is invited to all above! Next Friday, Feb. 22, the Nina and the Pinta will be arriving up the river and dock at the Moorings. They will be on display until Feb. 22. Sure hope you can come down and see this piece of American history. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better, but everyone else will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Hundreds of visitors ocked to the second annual St. George Island Tour of Homes Saturday. This years tour was even more successful than last years debut. With 450 tickets sold, the event raised more than $6,500 for the lighthouse association, topping last years tally of 370 tickets sold. Terry Kemp, secretary for the association, said the vast majority of tickets were purchased in advance. Kemp said Monday morning, she had viewed 200 surveys lled out by ticket holders and that fewer than 20 of the participants lived in Franklin County. She said among the visitors from 27 states, about 70 were snowbirds. All but a handful said they would come back for future tours. One naysayer explained, I am 7. As always, all of the homes and the entire island was at its best for the event. The weather was clear and fresh with a light breeze that made it a perfect day to cruise St. George Island with the top down. While many owners displayed their homes with pride, extracted sand burrs from the carpets, shared construction war stories or took the chance to view their neighbors domains, John Hockman spent the day working on an impressive home improvement project. Hockman is constructing a barbecue that puts most to shame. His seven-foot by four-foot wood-burning, agstone edi ce incorporates a grill and smoker. On Saturday, he was putting the nishing touches on a pizza oven. The oven is built of re bricks and wrapped in a brous ceramic blanket for insulation. The blanket will be covered by more agstones. Hockman said the oor of the oven will reach 600 to 700 degrees Fahrenheit. Its exactly like the one (at Jo Mamas) in St. Joe, only smaller, he said. The grill, which has been completed, incorporates two jacks to raise and lower the cooking surface. Hockman said he designed his masterpiece after viewing plans online. The grill was not the Hockmans rst do-ityourself project. Wife Linda did all the interior painting and created the window treatments for their lovely island home and John built the kitchen cabinets. - By LOIS SWOBODA Local artist Leon Wiesener has set himself the task of creating a tourist attraction for Carrabelle. A year ago, he set to work to create a bottle house like ones historically constructed in Western boom towns during the gold rush. Eleven months and 6,000 bottles later, he completed it. Next, he began constructing a lighthouse with dual rotating lights in the base and crown. That project is almost complete. The beacon is up and running and now requires only a pressure wash to reduce excess cement and some ne tuning for the battery. Wiesener already has his eyes and mind turned to the nal monument in his glittering empire, an arch constructed entirely of bottles. The bottle house and lighthouse are at 604 S.E. Avenue F in Carrabelle and can be seen from the road. According to the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce website, they can be viewed seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The artist said he needs several thousand bottles to complete the Arc de Carrabelle and is especially seeking blue ones. To donate bottles, call 653-7201. By LOIS SWOBODA LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAt left, John Hockman spent the day of the tour working on his pizza oven. At right, this stunning interior was located at the Hockman house on West Gorrie Drive.Islanders cook up a tasty tour of homesLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesCurley Messer with great-great grandson Little Buddy Massey.Valentines Day leads to full weekend of funHappy Birthday, Papa Curley Payton Wood turns 3LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesArtist looking for more bottles

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The Times | A9Thursday, February 14, 2013 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Joshua A. Phipps, 26, of Eastpoint, passed away Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Gainesville. He was born Feb. 19, 1986 in Panama City. Joshua enjoyed fishing, basketball, music and playing drums. He is preceded in death by his grandfathers, J.M. Farmer, Buddy Adkison, and Floyd Phipps. Joshua is survived by his parents, Rex Alan and Sabrina Farmer Phipps of Eastpoint; a sister, Kimberly Hollenbeck of Sumatra; and grandmothers Margaret Farmer, of Sumatra, Sylvia Adkison of Eastpoint, and Janet Phipps of Galax, Va. Funeral services will be held 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15 at the Trinity Episcopal Church of Apalachicola with Father Joe Knight officiating. The family will receive friends from 3 p.m.. until service time at the church. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting memorial donations be given to Childrens Organ Transplant Association; go to www.cota.org to make contributions online. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com.Joshua A. Phipps JOSHUA A. PHIPPSStanley Willie McIntyre was born July 11, 1952, in Port St. Joe to the late Willie and Alice McIntyre, the youngest sibling of four children. He graduated from Miami Northwestern High School, and attended Southern Unievrsity in Baton Rouge, La., where he pursued his football career. Later in his life, he became a Champion for Sobriety, where he counseled and motivated numerous individuals battling addiction. On Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, Stanley departed his old residence, 242 Sixth Street, Apalachicola, to go to his new residence in Heaven with God. Upon his arrival, he was welcomed into Heaven by his parents, Willie and Alice McIntyre, and his older brother, Johnnie Blakes. He leaves to cherish his memories three sons, Stanley McIntye, Jr., of Camden, Conn.; Tedrick McIntyre, of Shreveport, La., and Chandler Poole, of Fort Lauderdale; one brother Freddie McIntyre (Cecilia) of Apalachicola; one sister, Janie Garvin, of Miami; one uncle, Matthew McIntyre, of Chicago, Ill.; and one aunt, Rosalee McIntyre, of Thomasville, Ga. He also leaves his grandchildren, as well as a host of nieces and nephews.Stanley McIntyreJean Elaine Quaranta, 85, of Port St. Joe, passed away Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013. She was born in Cleveland Ohio. Jean was the beloved matriarch of the Quaranta family. Married for 59 years to Charles Quaranta, they had ve children. Her greatest times in life were when her family, and anyone else who got dragged in, would be gathered around the table, eating, laughing, and taking lots of pictures. She knew no strangers and talked to everyone like shed known them for years. Jean worked for Manatee Pediatrics in Bradenton for 17 years until she retired and moved to Port St. Joe in 1992. Her love of children evident and Grandma was always willing to babysit. She volunteered with the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Dept., enjoyed the beaches, lots of family gatherings, and the beautiful sunsets from her balcony. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles Quaranta; two grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Survivors include her children and their spouses, Gloria Schoelles and husband Richie, Bill Quaranta, Patti Quaranta, Chuck Quaranta, and Jayne Bamburg; 15 grandchildren; 19 greatgrandchildren; one greatgreat grandchild; brother, Jack Warren of Ester, and a sister Jeri Bass of Bradenton. A memorial service will be held in her memory at the Oak Grove Church on Saturday, Feb. 16, at 11 a.m ET. In lieu of owers, donations may be made in her memory to the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, 1007 10th Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Services provided by Comforter Funeral Home.Jean Elaine QuarantaKristian Javon Tevor Jackson was born Jan. 10, 2012, in Panama City to James Bell and Katoya Jackson. He passed away Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 in Pensacola at the age of 1. Funeral services will be held at noon Friday, Feb. 15, at Family of God Baptist Church in Panama City. Burial will be at 3 p.m. that Friday in Snowhill Cemetery in Apalachicola. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements.Kristian Javon Tevor JacksonA service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola on Friday, Feb. 15 at 1:30 p.m. to honor Lawrence Robert Bobby Siprell, of Apalachicola, who passed away Sunday, Feb. 10. The service will be followed by a short gathering at Benedict Hall. All family and friends are invited to attend.Bobby SiprellThomas Jefferson Tommy Chumney was born Aug. 22, 1939, in Gulf County, Fla., to George and Susie Chumney Tommy passed away Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013, at his home in Eastpoint surrounded by his family. Tommy was a commercial seafood worker and a longtime resident of Franklin County. He is survived by his longtime companion, Henrietta Cassell; children, Sheila Scott of Panama City, Mikey Chumney of Wewahitchka, Cecil Chumney of Panama City, and Tina Chumney of Wewahitchka; Robert Lashley, Bonnie Whiddon, Ona Jean Russell, Rena Kay En nger, and Karen Page; siblings, Betty Sue Britt, Norma Jean Dunkle, Judy Diane Knowles, Ann Caroline Lucas, John Grice and Charles Grice; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and extended family and friends. He was preceded in death by his sister, Mary E. Pickeron. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, at Kelley Funeral Home with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Tommy Chumney Mary Louise Nichols was born July 6, 1944, in Carrabelle to Dalsie and George Evans. She passed away Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013, at the age of 68 in Eastpoint. Mary was a homemaker and member of the Eastpoint Church of God. She is survived by her husband, Joe Nichols; children, Randy Nichols, JoAnn Falk, Donnie Nichols, Debbie Banks, and Wanda Register; brother, Billy Evans; 17 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today, Feb. 14, at Eastpoint Church of God with burial in Eastpoint Cemetery. Viewing was held from 5 until 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, at Kelley Funeral Home. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements.Mary Louise Nichols Special to The TimesThe winner of the raf e drawing for the log cabin for Franklins Promise Toy Project was Gene Goff of Apalachicola. Sheriff Mike Mock is shown at right drawing the winning ticket for the raf e, from a jar held by Beth Brinkley, chairman of the project and one of the owners of Resort Vacation Properties, whose staff helped with packing and distributing the toys. Inmates at the Bay City Work Camp built the cabin, with Taylors Building Supply splitting the cost of the materials with Franklins Promise. The project, which raised close to $1,000, is funded through donations from individuals and businesses in Franklin County and other areas. Nicky Millender, director of county parks and recreation, was helpful getting the log cabin delivered once we retrieved it from Carrabelle, where it was being displayed. Millender family reunionThe Millender family reunion will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the old Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle. The Millender extended family includes Mock, McKnight, Walden and Barwick. Please bring a covered dish or two.Eastpoint Baptist recoveryUnder the leadership of Ms. Rose Grif n, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint.Family and Friends DayFriendship Missionary Baptist Church, 233 Ninth St., Apalachicola, welcomes the community to its Family and Friends Day at 3 p.m. Feb. 24. Chairperson Eula Rochelle said everybody is welcome. For more information, call 370-0841.Segree family reunionThe Segree family reunion will be March 9 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Bring a covered dish, old pictures and have a good time. For more information, call Inez at 670-1115. Obituaries Faith Faith BRIEFS Card of THANKSMcIntyre familyThe McIntyre family would like to express our deepest gratitude to all who showed their support during our loss. You have made this process so much easier for us to get through. God bless each and every one of you.Stanley S. and Tedrick McIntyreGoff wins Toy Project cabin OBITUARIES ONLINEView obituaries and leave your condolences at www.apalachtimes.com.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters COMES STANDARD WITH HOGUE GRIPS, TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER OPTIC SIGHTS AND CARRY CASE!WAS $399.99 MUST BE 21 YR TO BUY ASE! $31999WOW!LIMITED STOCK NO RAINCHECKS LIMITED STOCK OF .22LR AMMO LIMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER O PTI C COMES STANDARD WITH COMES STANDARD WITH H OGUE GRIPS, TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER TWO 10RD MAGAZINES, FIBER O PTI C CITADEL 1911.22LR WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Feb. 1463 4710% Fri, Feb. 1567 4210% Sat, Feb. 1659 40 0% Sun, Feb. 1759 46 0% Mon, Feb. 1865 51 0% Tues, Feb. 1971 5560% Wed, Feb. 2069 5620% 14 Th 500am 1.6 444pm 2.1 1000am 0.5 1105pm 0.0 15 Fr 601am 1.4 510pm 2.1 1022am 0.8 16 Sa 714am 1.3 543pm 2.1 1203am 0.0 1047am 1.0 17 Su 848am 1.3 622pm 2.1 114am 0.0 1118am 1.1 18 Mo 1051am 1.3 712pm 2.1 233am 0.0 1208pm 1.1 19 Tu 1220pm 1.4 815pm 1.9 346am -0.2 205pm 1.3 20 We 100pm 1.6 928pm 1.9 446am -0.3 350pm 1.4 21 Th 130pm 1.8 1040pm 1.9 536am -0.3 501pm 1.3 22 Fr 155pm 1.8 1144pm 2.1 618am -0.3 553pm 1.1 23 Sa 216pm 1.8 654am -0.3 636pm 1.0 24 Su 1239am 2.1 234pm 1.8 724am -0.3 713pm 0.8 25 Mo 129am 2.1 249pm 1.9 750am -0.2 748pm 0.6 26 Tu 218am 2.1 305pm 1.9 815am 0.0 823pm 0.5 27 We 308am 2.1 322pm 2.1 838am 0.3 900pm 0.2 14 Th 500am 1.6 444pm 2.1 1000am 0.5 1105pm 0.0 15 Fr 601am 1.4 510pm 2.1 1022am 0.8 16 Sa 714am 1.3 543pm 2.1 1203am 0.0 1047am 1.0 17 Su 848am 1.3 622pm 2.1 114am 0.0 1118am 1.1 18 Mo 1051am 1.3 712pm 2.1 233am 0.0 1208pm 1.1 19 Tu 1220pm 1.4 815pm 1.9 346am -0.2 205pm 1.3 20 We 100pm 1.6 928pm 1.9 446am -0.3 350pm 1.4 21 Th 130pm 1.8 1040pm 1.9 536am -0.3 501pm 1.3 22 Fr 155pm 1.8 1144pm 2.1 618am -0.3 553pm 1.1 23 Sa 216pm 1.8 654am -0.3 636pm 1.0 24 Su 1239am 2.1 234pm 1.8 724am -0.3 713pm 0.8 25 Mo 129am 2.1 249pm 1.9 750am -0.2 748pm 0.6 26 Tu 218am 2.1 305pm 1.9 815am 0.0 823pm 0.5 Page 10 Thursday, February 14, 2013By DAVID DAMON Special to the Times The year was 2004. Stuck in a mud bank on Dog Island was a 45-foot sailboat lying at a 40-degree angle. Filled with water and encrusted with barnacles, her once-shining hull and ne lines were all but hidden. Her former beauty and pedigree could only be imagined at this point. It took vision to think she could be brought back from the brink of total ruin and once again sail with the grace and grandeur of her former yachting days. In her glory days, she enjoyed the world of yacht racing and cruising that be t her earlier days in South Florida. From the drawing board of noted naval architect Charlie Morgan, she was designed in 1966 and built in 1981. This former classic beauty now found herself lying open to the elements, and by all accounts, dying a slow death with every rising tide and passing storm. It was in this condition that Mason Bean from St. George Island rst laid eyes on her. He looked beyond the barnacle-encrusted hull that was lled with mud, an engine that was a mass of rusted iron and a mast whose base had corroded away from salt water saturation. Mason had a vision of this beautiful hull once again sailing as she did in her earlier days. As someone always looking for a project, whether it be a house or a boat, he wasnt discouraged by her condition. Mason tracked down the owners and asked what their plans were for her. They said they would sell her, for $50,000, as is. Mason countered with an offer for $4,000 and threw out the word closure. A week later the call came; he had a boat. As much as he may have wanted this, the reality of owning her now set in. The long road to salvaging and rebuilding her had not even begun. With a full moon tide, she was oated off the mud bank on Dog Island and towed the seven long miles to nearby Timber Island in Carrabelle. After six months dockside at Timber Island, she was nally pulled out of the water so the work could begin in earnest. It soon became apparent to Mason that a project of this magnitude needed to be closer to home in order to get the work done ef ciently. In 2010, she was trucked to St. George Island and unloaded at a nearby bayfront lot Mason owned. Keep in mind that safely loading, trucking and then unloading a 45-foot-long, 11-foot-wide, 15-ton vessel is, in itself, no small feat. Once she was carefully unloaded at her new home, scaffolding was erected around her. The rebuild began to gain momentum. Then, about a year ago, in January 2012, Martin Ben Baruch entered the picture. As a multi-talented boat builder, electrician and rigger, Martin was just the perspiration, inspiration and talent that this project needed. With Martin on board, the pace picked up and a launch date in the not-too-distant future became a reality. By summers end, Lady M was nearing completion. Once again, she was loaded, trucked back to Timber Island and again unloaded. On Oct. 7, 2012, Lady M was launched at Timber Island as a nervous but proud owner, along with family, friends and onlookers stood by. For Mason, it was a relief to nally see her oating again and in such beautiful condition. However, this was just the beginning of a new chapter in Lady Ms story. She remained docked at Timber Island as the many nal preparations and changes were made in order to sail her around to her new home port of Apalachicola. With nal tuning to rigging and sails, Lady M. was ready, ready enough anyway. The day had come, on Dec. 14, after eight long years of blood, sweat and tears, her dock lines were cast off and Lady M was nally headed home, under sail! Masons dogged determination to breathe new life into a sunken 31year-old boat had nally paid off. Standing at the helm on that gray, damp, December afternoon, he was a very proud owner as Lady M ew through Bob Sikes Cut on a rising tide under full sail. It was as if she were once again alive, as the wind drove her powerful hull through the waves. With all the grace and speed seldom seen in boats of more recent design, Lady Ms classic lines and sweeping sheer will truly set her apart wherever she sails. Future plans for Lady M include youth sailing programs in an effort to encourage and motivate young people in our area. David Damon is an avid sailor, boat builder, photographer and writer. He teaches sailing for the Boy Scouts and other organizations, including programs encouraging sailing for those with disabilities. SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreWhiting have been the local staple for some time now. Good reports from Mexico Beach and on the Cape are seeing lots of fish in the 2-pound range. Flounder are making their way back to our waters from offshore back to the bays and nearshore wrecks. Good reports came from the Mexico Beach canal this past week, so springtime fishing is close! As the rain moves out this week, the local creeks and rivers will be on the rise, and many reports are showing high water marks for the weekend. This increase should have the catfish biting very well. A few bream and bass are being caught this week before the rain in Lake Wimico and the Jackson River system.Special to The TimesThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida Park Service has developed a new, free smartphone app, available for download. This interactive guide gives users on-the-go access to Floridas 171 state parks, trails and historic sites, complete with detailed information about campgrounds, amenities, facility maps, directions and more. In honor of the new app, Floridas state parks will offer free entry to state parks on Monday, Feb. 18, to visitors who show the app downloaded on their mobile device at the ranger station. Visitors are encouraged to download the app this week and plan a visit to their favorite state park or a state park they discovered by using the new app. The app allows visitors to plan that perfect outdoor trip by searching for a park by GPS location or activity to nd nearby locations to enjoy hiking, camping, boating, birding and more. Once there, GPS and GIS mapping technology allows visitors to track and record trails, mark waypoints and locate friends within the park. There is even an option to cache GPS maps in advance to ensure navigation remains possible in the event of lost mobile reception. This is an exciting new feature that will increase public access to DEPs award-winning park system, DEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard said. Being able to plan your trip to one of our parks, trails or historic sites from your phone makes experiencing Floridas natural, cultural and historical resources easier. The apps provide plenty of other features to maximize visitors outdoor adventure, including educational information, amenities, maps and directions, a real-time calendar of events, advisories, weather alerts and built-in compass. New features such as GeoChallenge games and a photo share option will be added in the coming months. Follow FLStateParks on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates. The Florida State Parks Pocket Ranger app is available on iTunes and Android Market by searching Of cial Florida State Parks and is identi ed under ParksByNature Network. It is also available on PocketRanger.com and is formatted as a Mobile Website: http:// .pocketranger.com. The Florida Park Service partnered with ParksByNature Network and PocketRanger.com to create this app free for the public. For a tutorial on how to use the app, please visit www.pocketranger.com. It is recommended to use Wi-Fi or a strong wireless connection when downloading the app. To receive free entry, please show the ranger station or staff at the park entrance booth the app downloaded on your mobile device. Lady M rises from ruin to cruise againLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesMason Bean, above, restored the Lady M.DAVID DAMON | Special to the Times LEGION POST 82 SUPPORTS WARRIOR FOUNDATIONSPECIAL TO THE TIMESAmerican Legion Post 82 made a contribution last week to support the families of fallen veterans. When the Special Operations Warrior Foundation trekked through Franklin County last week on a 450-mile march to raise funds, they made a stop on the east end of the county. Representatives from Camp Cordon Johnston Post 82 met the marchers at their last scheduled stop in the county, Alligator Point Road, to present the Warrior Foundation with a check for $100. The foundation raises funds to provide emergency assistance to the families of injured military personnel and to create scholarships for the children of soldiers killed during an operational or training mission under the U.S. Special Operations Command. DEP unveils state parks mobile app

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection Learn to improve your lawnThe Franklin University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Services is offering Growing Turfgrass 101 The Basics, a new series of educational programs on lawn maintenance. The Franklin UF IFAS is one of the host sites for this distance education program. Classes begin on Tuesday, Feb. 26, with pH, Soil Types, Soil Testing and Turf Types. On March 5, the topic is Fertilization. The March 12 lecture offers advice on Weed Control, and the nal talk on March 19 covers Irrigation. These classes will be offered by interactive video at the Franklin UF IFAS County Extension Of ce at 66 Fourth St., Apalachicola, from 7-9 p.m. Registration fee is $25 per person or $40 per couple and covers the costs of the classes, refreshments and course materials. Registration is due today, Feb. 14. For more information or to register, call the Franklin UF IFAS Extension Program at 653-9337.Recreational grouper season closedGulf grouper recreational season closed Feb. 1. Several species of grouper, including black, red, yellow n, scamp, yellowmouth, rock hind and red hind will close to recreational harvest from Feb. 1 through March 31 in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, excluding state waters of Monroe County. Gag grouper has a separate season from other Gulf of Mexico grouper and is currently closed to harvest. A proposed 2013 gag grouper season in state waters will be discussed at the February Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting in Orlando. The upcoming twomonth recreational harvest closure that starts Feb. 1 was put in place to help rebuild the gag grouper shery. Gag grouper spawn during the February and March closure, so limiting the harvest of other grouper helps reduce the number of gag grouper that are caught unintentionally and die after being released. More information regarding grouper shing regulations, including the current grouper closure in Atlantic and Monroe County waters, is available online at MyFWC.com/ Fishing. Visit MyFWC. com/Commission to learn more about the February commission meeting.Fishing regulations guide availableThe newest saltwater shing publication, the January June 2013 Florida Saltwater Recreational Fishing Regulations booklet, is available. The new edition has a photo of the invasive lion sh on the cover and features an article requesting public assistance removing these sh from Floridas waters. It also includes information on upcoming regulation changes for giant anemone, unicorn le sh and Atlantic black sea bass. You also can review the new maps detailing special management zones within the Gulf and Atlantic for red sh and spotted seatrout. Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORWearing #10, Franklin County High School senior Chena Segree had three hits, including a double, and a pair of runs batted in, to help key the Lady Seahawks to a 5-1 win at Wewahitchka Tuesday evening. On Monday at home against Rickards, Segree smacked two hits, and had two RBIs, while striking out 10 over the course of eight innings, to help in the 6-5 win.Congratulations, Chena! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Special to the TimesDr. Roger Dearing, executive director of the Florida High School Athletic Association, has issued the following statement in response to new guidance from the federal government regarding schools obligation to provide equal opportunity to students with disabilities who wish to participate in extracurricular athletics. The guidance, issued by the U.S. Department of Educations Of ce for Civil Rights, urges school districts to work with community organizations to increase athletic opportunities for students with disabilities. Florida has been ahead of the curve for several years, and we fully embrace the steps suggested by the federal government, Dearing said. In the past few years, we have added some adaptive sports to the athletic activities offered at member schools, and we look forward to working with schools, districts and most importantly student-athletes with disabilities and their parents to provide every reasonable opportunity for them to experience the joy and benets of athletic competition. Wherever and whenever possible, we want every student to have the opportunity to be a part of the team, because providing access to athletic programs for students with disabilities certainly adds value to their overall educational experience. If this new guidance helps just one more student become a student-athlete, it will be worth the effort, he said. The new federal guidance letter provides examples of the types of reasonable modi cations schools might be required to make to existing policies, practices or procedures for students with disabilities who otherwise are athletically talented enough to compete. The U.S. Department of Education said examples of such modi cations could include allowing a visual cue alongside a starter pistol so a student with a hearing impairment can compete in track, or waiver of a rule requiring a twohand touch nish in swim events to accommodate a one-armed swimmer.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks softball team is off to an undefeated start, including wins in tight one-run ballgames on Monday and Tuesday evening. Coach Lisa Sweatts softball squad features a wealth of returning players, many of whom played on the summer team that quali ed for the World Series. On Feb. 5 at home, they shelled West Gadsden 20-4 in three innings, as junior shortstop Morgan Mock smacked three hits for ve runs batted in. Senior out elder Christina Collins had three hits, with two hits and two RBIs coming off the bat of sophomore out elder Summer Medley. On Monday at home, the team was outhit by Rickards 119 but the Lady Seahawks came out the winner, with the goahead run in the bottom of the ninth for the 6-5 win. Senior pitcher Chena Segree went eight innings, striking out 10. She added two hits and two RBIs, with two hits from junior catcher Ally Millender and one RBI from senior third baseman Anna Lee. On Tuesday night at Wewahitchka, the Lady Seahawks got a pair of runs in both the rst and fth innings and secured the nal run in the top of the sixth for the 5-1 win. Freshman Krista Martina went the distance on the mound, striking out four over seven innings. She had 16 rst-pitch strikes. Chena Segree led the team with two hits and two RBIs, while eighth grade rst baseman Scout Segree belted two hits and one RBI. Millender added a RBI as well. Also on the varsity roster are senior out elder Codee Crum, juniors out elder Ashley Carroll and third baseman Marlyn Lee, and sophomore second baseman Maddie Newell. Outdoors BRIEFSThursday, February 14, 2013 FHSAA embraces guidance on disabled athletesLady Seahawks off to 3-0 startPage 11 LADY SEAHAWK SOFTBALL SCHEDULEFriday, Feb. 15 @ West Gadsden* 4 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19 @ Munroe 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21 @ Rutherford 4/6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22 @ Bozeman* 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 25 @ Blountstown* 4:30/6:30 p.m. Friday, March 1 Liberty* 5/7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5 @ Port St. Joe* 5/7 p.m. Friday, March 8 @ South Walton* 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 12 Godby 5/7 p.m. Tuesday, March 19 @ Liberty* 5/7 p.m. Friday, March 22 Port St. Joe* 7 p.m. Saturday, March 23 @ Port St. Joe* JV tourney Tuesday, March 26 @ Godby 6 p.m. Thursday, March 28 Wewahitchka 7 p.m. Friday, March 29 Wakulla 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 2 Blountstown* 7 p.m. Thursday, April 4 Bozeman* 5 p.m. Friday, April 5 South Walton* 6 p.m. Thursday, April 11 Rutherford 6 p.m. Friday, April 12 @ Rickards 6:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 4/15-19 Districts at Port St. Joe INDICATES DISTRICT GAME

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly StaTimes of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At:106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322850-697-4121Renee Parrish, D.M.DACCEPTING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN: Early Head Start / Head StartAll services for our children are free with no cost to the parent.**Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).**Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGTO CONSIDER ADOPTING A RESOLUTION THAT WILL REQUIRE THE COLLECTION OF ALL OF THE FIRE AND RESCUE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS ON THE AD VALOREM TAX BILL USING THE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTION PROVIDED BY SECTION 197.3632, FLORIDA STATUTESNotice is given that on February 28, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. (ET), at the Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, the FranklinCounty Board of County Commissioners shall hold a public hearing to consider adopting a resolution of intent to rescue special assessments from the seven municipal service units, as provided by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes (2012) beginning with the ad valorem tax bills mailed November 2013. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed resolution. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hearing is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant bookkeeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082HOME OF THE $50 TAX RETURN** Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. You may have noticed a new face at Franklin County Public Library. We welcome Maureen Downey as a new library assistant who brings positive energy and a sincere interest in our libraries and communities that we serve. Be sure to stop in and introduce yourself and if you need assistance dont hesitate to ask for help. E-books were recently introduced to our library system and we have received some very positive feedback from patrons. The ability to upload a book into an e-reading device is extremely easy for anyone who logs into the Wilderness Coast Public Library website and is a patron and has a library card at Franklin, Jefferson, or Wakulla County library system. If you are looking for a fun way to spend a Saturday afternoon, the Carrabelle Branch will be hosting another Game Day that is free to participants on Saturday, Feb. 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Children will have access to a variety of board games and interactive games. Refreshments will be served at no cost, and door prizes will be gifted to a few of the lucky children. For more information about programs and services please call 670-8151 or 697-2366.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Anyone who expected the members of the countys RESTORE Council to be nalized at the last county commission meeting is disappointed today. Although each county district now has a spokesman, the cities remain silent. No date has been set for the rst meeting of the RESTORE Council, and Apalachicola and Carrabelle still decline to choose representatives. The RESTORE Council was created by the county commission on Jan. 15, The council will vet requests for funding of possible RESTORE projects, with county commissioners having the ultimate say in who receives nancial support from penalties paid by BP under Clean Water Act for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The city of Apalachicola has not named a representative because it is suing the county seeking to compel it to meet jointly with Apalachicola and Carrabelle boards under the Governmental Con ict Resolution Act, Florida Statutes 164.1055. Carrabelle is not a party to the suit but is a bene ciary of it and, in a surprise move Feb. 7 did not name a RESTORE representative at their regular meeting. We took the lead, City Attorney Pat Floyd told Apalachicola commissioners Feb. 5. Carrabelle is not joining the lawsuit as a as a party but they are a bene ciary. Four new council members were named at the Feb. 5 county commission meeting. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders was tapped as the nonvoting chairman of the RESTORE Council. Commissioner Pinki Jackel appointed Pat OConnell, 66, of St. George Island as representative of District 1. OConnell chairs the S. George Island Plantation landscape committee. After retiring from the Florida Attorney General, and running a lobbying rm in Tallahassee, she and her husband retired to the island in 2004. She is a registered Democrat. I dont have any kind of preconceived notions, she said. I think we should rst create a process where all the good ideas can be heard. She said she believes the foremost goals of the RESTORE Act are to protect the environment and increase tourism. Sanders chose Suzanne Zimmerman, 67, as her District 2 representative. Zimmerman is executive director of the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce and a registered Democrat who has lived in Franklin County for 14 years. Zimmerman said she too has no preconceived agenda and believes the councils duty will be to look at whats presented and choose projects that will qualify for funding. Commissioner Smokey Parrish chose seafood dealer/processor Ottice Amison, 40, to speak for District 4. A registered Democrat, he is a lifelong resident of the county with the exception of a period of military service. Commissioner William Massey had appointed Cal Allen to represent District 5 at the January 15 meeting but after discovering Allen did not live in the district, he amended his decision at the Feb. 5 meeting. He appointed Carrabelle City commissioner Brenda LaPaz, 58, a retired medical transcriptionist who moved to Carrabelle ve years ago. She is a registered Republican. I will weigh proposed projects presented to the council and research will have to be done to determine eligibility, she said. So far, ve members reside in District 1; four in District 2 and one each in districts 3, 4 and 5. There are seven Democrats, ve Republicans and one independent. Seven of the council members are women. Since both cities declined to name representatives, the number of seated council members, 11, remains odd, with one vonvoting chairperson. Dennis and Ralph have a home. The dogs were left homeless after the preChristmas murder of their owner, Cynthia Green of Apalachicola. Karen Martin, Director of the Franklin County Humane Society Animal Shelter vowed to place the traumatized animals out only as a pair. After the plight of the two dogs was publicized, a television station out of Panama City picked up the story from the Apalachicola Times and aired a segment to assist the Humane Society with their efforts to nd a new caregiver for Mrs. Greens dogs. After the story ran, the Humane Society was contacted by several families interested in giving these two deserving dogs a home. The family that adopted them lives in Panama City, and Ralph and Dennis are now living on the beach in a big, fenced in yard with their new pack. The Humane Society would like to thank everyone who helped them get the word out via Facebook, email, newspaper, radio and TV. Ralph and Dennis are loved and well cared for and Mrs. Green can nally rest in peace. By Lois SwobodaCities spurn RESTORE council YOUR COUNTY LIBRARYCynthia Greens dogs have a homeKAREN MARTIN | Special to The TimesDennis and Ralph meet their new owner.

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, February 14, 2013 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM Carrabelle cooperates with Workforce: Carrabelle is using a state program to primp and polish around town. At the Feb. 7 city meeting, Mayor Curley Messer announced the city has hired six temporary employees under the Work Force Florida training program. Under this plan, unemployed workers can receive up to six months training working 20 hours a week. Work Force pays for the trainees salaries, and they are covered by state workmans compensation. Messer said Joann White helped the city implement the program. Some of the trainees are employed in streets and roads, some in water and sewer and some are doing building maintenance at the municipal center. Were using them for routine maintenance we cant get to like painting and greasing re hydrants, City Clerk Keisha Smith said Messer said he intends to hire several more of the trainees. Smith said everyone hired so far has been a Carrabelle resident, and in order to take advantage of the program, employers must have speci c job descriptions and demonstrate the trainees work so many hours each week in prescribed tasks. Of course you have to take the time to train them, she said. But its worked out well, for Carrabelle. Were getting free maintenance. Id hire them all if I could. Messer said the city will continue to participate in the program for six months to a year. Smith encouraged other employers to investigate the opportunity. Anybody that has a business can apply for workers, she said, and the state pays them. Theres plenty out there that need some jobs, and they cant work unless somebody hires them. Putnal family still needs help: The Putnal family, who lost their home on Feb. 3, is still in need of a place to stay. On Monday, Ann Putnal said she had paid for a hotel room for that night but was completely out of money. She said Franklins Promise has offered to help with rent if the family has been unable to nd a suitable rental. She would appreciate all cash donations and any information about possible rental properties for herself, son, Cody, and husband, Joseph. She said her son Mason is back in his trailer but seeking work. To help, call 524-7424. Library needs used books: Donations of books are needed for a fundraiser to bene t the Franklin County Public Libraries (FCPL). On Saturday, Feb. 16, three good things are coming together: homemade soup, fromscratch bread and cheap books. The Friends of the FCPL will hold a sale at Sea Oats Gallery on the island. Right now, the friends are seeking books for the sale, especially recent ction of all genres, cookbooks and childrens and young adult books. All books are welcome. Take donations to the Eastpoint Library, 29 Island Drive; open Tuesday through Friday or Sea Oats Gallery, 128 E. Pine Drive, St. George Island, during regular business hours. Questions? Want to help? Contact Anna Carmichael at 370-6763. Legislative delegation meeting Feb. 26: State Senator Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee) announced the countys legislative delegation meeting will take place at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 26, in the county commission chambers. The delegation is rst meeting in Gulf County on the same day, starting at 5 p.m., and then coming to Franklin. Elder care workshop planned: There will be a meeting to discuss services provided to the elderly in Franklin County at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 5, after the regular county meeting. The purpose of the workshop will investigate duplication of services and costs in preparation for preparing the upcoming county budget. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the Franklin County Senior Center; the Wakulla County Senior Center, which provides Meals on Wheels in the eastern part of the county; the Apalachicola Senior Center; the Gulf County Senior Center, which provides Meals on Wheels for the western part of the county; the Carrabelle food pantry and Franklins Promise will be invited to attend. Other organizations wishing to attend or those wishing to suggest other participants should contact Pierce at 653-9783. Bill may restrict municipal employees: At the Feb. 5 meeting, County Attorney Michael Shuler told the board a bill is proposed for the upcoming legislative session that would restrict and limit the ability of municipal employees to hold of ce as a county commissioner. He said current county commissioners employed by a municipality will be grandfathered but will be prevented from accepting any pay increases or job advancement. Shuler described the details of the bill as fairly draconian. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved that the county write a letter opposing adoption of the bill. He was seconded by Commissioner William Massey and the motion passed unanimously. Lose your keys on Sawyer Lane? A large set of keys was found Saturday on Sawyer Lane in Apalachicola while the Tamara Marsh family was riding their golf cart down the alley? If theyre yours, you can claim them at Coastal Foot & Ankle Clinic, 221 Avenue E, or call 653-3338. News BRIEFS Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs

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A14 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A Christmas gift has inspired island artist Beth Appleton to create a new body of work. On Friday, Feb. 8, Appleton premiered an exhibit of her latest creations at the Apalachicola Museum of Art located at 96 5th St. The exhibit includes both her familiar cutpaper confections and a new medium depicting the microorganisms in Apalachicola Bay. I got a microscope for Christmas three years ago, and thats where it started, Appleton said. I was always fascinated by all the tiny creatures as a kid, but then I got away from it. When I got back into it, it just took me away. This rebirth of interest led to the creation of micro waterscapes featuring the images of plankton from our bay. The waterscapes are photographs. The original image exists only as a le on Appletons computer. The images on display are all prints. I look under the microscope and piece together literally hundreds of photographs of tiny plants and animals magnied 1600 times. I have to say it took about two months to do a single assemblage, Appleton said. About 200 photos go into one. Nothing I do is simple. I was hoping I could simplify in my older age. At the reception, biologist Megan Lamb from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve was on hand with a microscope to let visitors view the original miniscule life forms depicted on Appletons canvases. Visitors were delighted when the tiny organisms danced and wriggled across the screen. At the same gala opening, Appleton also premiered something very new A childrens book she wrote and illustrated titled Gently Down the Stream. The illustrations are her familiar cut-paper assemblages and the words are a poem/song written to the tune of Row, row, row your boat. The subject matter is the complexity and beauty of the web of life. Her poetry conjures up barking dogs, glowing jellysh and shing boats bobbing on the bay. Appleton said she has produced prototypes of several books, but this is the rst she published. I was inspired by Michaelin (Watts) and her work with Bring Me a Book to do it, she said, They bought 300 copies. Appletons friend, island resident Velma Frye, performed another version Row, row, row your boat, at the opening. One she composed to honor the artist. Her lyrics are: First I cut the paper Cut it with a tiny knife, yeah, or a scissor. Move it all a-round. Move it over here. Now I like it. Paste it down, down, Paste it down, down. The crowd of more than 70 art lovers gathered around Frye and sang the song as a round. The reception was just the beginning of this multifaceted exhibit for Appleton. All this week, children from the ABC and Franklin County Schools will be visiting the museum. Appleton lowered the pictures to child eye level for the occasion. She will host the school groups herself. Lamb will again be on hand with her microscope. On Feb. 19 and 20, Appleton will go into the schools with Franklin Bring Me a Book to read Gently Down the Stream. Each child will receive a copy of Appletons book. Bring Me a Book is also donating art supplies to each classroom that participates in the event so each child can make a paper plate sh. Beth Appletons art will remain on display, at adult level, at the Apalachicola Museum of Art through March 15. The exhibit includes both new pieces and older work many will recognize from other exhibits. She said she was delighted with the outpouring of interest at the reception and feels that a great many things have come together to help her hang her newest exhibit and delve into the web of life. A14| The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 90086T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012 CC 000112 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN H. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN N. NICHOLS, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: John H. Nichols a/k/a John N. Nichols 600 S. 3rd St. Gadsden, AL 35901 and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Claim of Lien for assessments and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: Lot 42 of Pebble Beach Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 34 and 35, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney, Raymond F. Newman, Jr., Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy, Suite 7, Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548, on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court January 25, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON as Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Becker & Poliakiff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax February 7, 14, 2013 90116T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 09000347CA GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MCMILLIAN, JEAN, et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 09000347CA of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judical Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, is Plaintiff, and, MCMILLAN, JEAN, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 21st day of March, 2013. the following described property: LOT 11, BLOCK 61, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT #5, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGES 16 AND 17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 30th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February 14, 21, 2013 90118T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO. 2012 CC 000130 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF BRENT KARDOES, DECEASED, AND ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY LOCATED AT 2116 SEA FERN WAY IN ST. GEORGE PLANTATION; BEVERLY I. KARDOES and H. FRANK KARDOES, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Claim of Lien for assessments and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: Lot 10 of Pelican Beach Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney, Raymond F. Newman, Jr., Becker & Poliakiff, P.A., 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy, Suite 7, Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548, on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court January 31, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer as Deputy Clerk Bill to: Becker & Poliakiff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax February 14, 21, 2013 92015T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000438 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLOW FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST, Plaintiff vs. JANE B. PALMIER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: JANE B. PALMIER: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 430 BALD POINT RD., ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following described described property to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK B, BALD POINT ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES 43, 44 AND 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 430 BALD POINT ROAD, ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due 30 days from the first day of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this of this Court on the 11th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 7, 14, 2013 92147T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 221 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 16 BLOCK S ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, PHASE II PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1001-000S-01 60 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92117T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: Franklin County School District School Board Policy Manual updates to improve formatting and to address recent legislative changes. Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida, no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of February 7, 2013 through March 7, 2013 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday -Friday. Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92149T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax Web of life inspires AppletonPHOTo O S BY LOIS S SS WOBODA | The TimesSusan Gary peers into a microscope at the tiny organisms that inspired Beth Appletons Micro Waterscapes.Above, a detail from the cut paper assemblage Biosphere depicts aquatic life forms. Center, Hurricane Mask is a self portrait of artist Beth Appleton. At left is one of Beth Appletons micro waterscapes. Local | Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 14, 2013 The Times | A15 Nestled in more than 200 miles of Award-Winning Pet-Friendly Beaches, World Famous seafood and Maritime History and Culture Lies Apalachicola, Florida. Known as the Forgotten Coast, Franklin County, Florida is a wonderfully Historic community. Apalachicola, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 3500 residents, The Apalachicola housing authority, is a public housing complex with 54 units and is located within the city of Apalachicola, the AHA is currently accepting applications for the following Position:EXECUTIVE DIRECTORJob Requirements include Bachelors Degree; a minimum of 5 years management and/or supervisory experience and excellent communications skills.Anyone interested in this position should submit an application to:PAUL E. MILLS, INTERIM DIRECTOR141 15TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320(850)653-9304 PHONE(850)653-2473 FAXapalha@fairpoint.net(APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYEMENT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AHA OFFICE) EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLEThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is seeking applications for a eld position in operations and maintenance. Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District O ce, 40 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 during normal business hours, Monday thru Friday 8:30 am 4:30 pm EST. The Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is an equal opportunity employer and is a drug free workplace. The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year:TWO FULLTIME TEACHERS ASSISTANTS AND ONE BUS MONITORABC School is an Equal Opportunity EmployerPlease send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fax: 850-653-1857 Fickling Vacation Rentals St. George IslandEXPERIENCED CLEANERS NEEDED Must be thorough and meticulous. Weekends are mandatory! Please apply in person at: 112 Franklin Blvd., St. George Island, FL. RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .......................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ............$600 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ 10X15 STORAGE AND POOL ...................................$950 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ POOL $150/ NIGHTLY OR $700/WEEKLY 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtectedH&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 These tin y ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 190 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 12 BLOCK D ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1000-000D-0 120 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92197T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resource permit for Apalachicola River Snagging, file number 07-0129424-008-EI, to the US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, at P.O. Box 2288, Mobile, Alabama 36628-0001. The purpose of the permit is to authorize maintenance snagging (relocation of tree snags out of the navigation channel) in the Florida portion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project. The project will be located in the Apalachicola River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile 106.4 in Class III, Outstanding Florida Waters (entire Florida portion of river), and Apalachicola Bay Aquatic Preserve (River Miles 0.0 -4.5) in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, s proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interest will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known: (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or status that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of the notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must e filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, Florida. February 14, 2013 92249T PUBLIC NOTICE Alligator Point Water Resources District P.O. Box 155 1378 Alligator Drive Panacea, Florida 32346 The Alligator Point Water Resources District is requesting bids from qualified contractors for the following project: Gulf Shore Boulevard Water Main Relocation Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. on March 6, 2013 at the APWRD office located at 1378 Alligator Drive, Alligator Point, Florida 32346. Bids may also be mailed to APWRD, P.O. Box 155, Panacea, Florida 32346 or hand delivered to the board office. All bids must be marked on the outside of a sealed package BID FOR GULF SHORE BOULEVARD. Bids must be accompanied by a Bid Bond or a certified check in the amount of 5% of the actual bid. Bids will be publically opened at 2:05 p.m. on March 6, 2013. The District reserves the right to reject any and all bids for any reason that it deems appropriate. Bid documents (plans, general conditions, technical specifications) may be purchased from Allen Nobles & Associates, Inc., 2844 Pablo Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (850-385-1179). Any questions concerning this project from bidding contractors, or suppliers, will be in written form and addressed to Charles E. Cook, P.E. project manager at the address above. No questions will be answered after 5 days prior to the bid date. Questions may also be sent via e-mail to cook05@ comcast.net. A copy of any questions/answers will be shared with all bidding contractors via letter or e-mail. February 14, 2013 *Adopt*:Active educated couple yearn to share LOVE of outdoors, music, each other w/baby *Dirk & Claudia* Expenses Paid FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 BargainsNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Food Srvc/HospitalityRestraunt HelpAll shifts. Please apply in person at Apalachicola Seafood Grill 100 Market St, Apalachicola, FL Food Svc/HospitalityHousekeepingSaturday cleaning for Vacation Rental Homes on Cape San Blas. To apply: Call for appointment. 850-270-7736 Web ID# 34241417 Text FL41417 to 56654 Food SvsHalf Shell Oyster Shuckers Needed4 days per week Leavins Seafood, Inc (850) 653-8823 Web ID#: 34241259 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityExperienced WaitressBayside Burgerslocated at 260 Hwy 98 in Eastpoint is taking applications for experienced wait staff. You can call 850-670-1025 or apply in person. Web ID# 34241402 Text FL41402 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 OtherCashier & Meat CutterNow Taking applications for cashier and meat cutter. Must be able to work nights and weekends. Apply in person at Big Top Supermarket in Eastpoint Web ID# 34241408 txt FL41408 to 56654 Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL39318 to 56654 Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, Cottage& 3bd 2ba House, CH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 St. George Island-2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1200 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-370-6001 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL39317 to 56654 3Br/2Ba, Home For Sale By Owner located at 1860 Beacon St, Carabelle, Fla, Call 850-210-3541 For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $165,000; Call 864-356-5949 3Br/2Ba, Large Living Room, Dinning Room, on 1 acre of land, Heat & Air, All Appliances, 595 Wilderness Rd, Eastpoint, $75K; Call 850-370-0939 Total Down Pmt $675 Chevy Monte Carlo T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $12752002 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T otal Price $6,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Thes e tin y a ds s ell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. E m erald Coas t Mark etplac e 747-5020

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, February 14, 2013 Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 245232$89,000St. George IslandHIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOTLocated on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248583$949,000St. George IslandPLANTATION BEACHFRONT All the amenities, 4 BR, 3 BA, Pool, Furnished, Flat on deck, under house screened Kitchen near Pool with Nautilus Drive Florida Health Mission:To protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community eorts.Rick Scott Governor John H. Armstrong, MD, FACS Surgeon General & Secretary Florida Department of Health In FRANKLIN COUNTY Apalachicola Clinic: 139-12 Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 PHONE: 850-653-2111 FAX: 850-653-9896 Carrabelle Clinic: 106 NE 5 Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 PHONE:850-697-4121 FAX: 850-697-8288 www.oridashealth.com TWITTER: HealthyFLA FACEBOOK: FLDepartmentofHealth YOUTUBE: doh WHEN IT COMES TO TOBACCO, SMOKELESS DOES NOT MEAN HARMLESSTobacco Free Franklin is Raising Awareness During Through With Chew Week -FRANKLIN COUNTY Tobacco products like chew, dip and snu are not harmless. But because theyre smokeless, youth and adults may underestimate the serious health risks associated with these products. In fact, while cigarette use continues to decline, smokeless tobacco use has remained steady among Franklin Countys youth for more than a decade. To help raise awareness about the dangers of smokeless tobacco, Tobacco Free Franklin and the Florida Department of Healths Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida will observe Through With Chew Week from Feb.17-23. Franklin County SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco Use) will have planned activities both on and o campus this week and will be doing a presentation before the public on one of our policy initiatives Tobacco Industry Advertising Retail Outlets and manning the Tobacco Free Franklin booth at our 10th Annual HCOLA (Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola) African AmericanHistory Festival on Saturday, February 16, 2013.Marsha Player Lindeman, Interim Administrator, Florida Health/Franklin County commented, Smokeless tobacco has a hidden dangerand is a powerful risk of addiction for youth in Franklin County.HEALTH RISKSConstant exposure to tobacco juices from these smokeless products can cause oral cancers, which can form within just ve years of regular use, and can cause cancer of the esophagus, pharynx, larynx, stomach and pancreas. Smokeless tobacco use can increase the risk of oral cancers by 80 percent and the risk of pancreatic and esophageal cancer by 60 percent, according to a 2008 study from the World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer. Aside from the increased risk of cancer, using smokeless tobacco can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. It can lead to other oral problems such as mouth sores, gum recession, tooth decay, and permanent discoloration of teeth. Smokeless tobacco use can also increase the risk of reproductive health problems such as reduced sperm count and abnormal sperm cells for men. Women who use smokeless tobacco may be at an increased risk of preeclampsia (a condition that may include high blood pressure, uid retention, and swelling), premature birth, and low birth weight. ADDICTIONLike cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products contain nicotine, a highly addictive and dangerous chemical. Smokeless tobacco users and cigarette smokers have comparable levels of nicotine in the blood, according to the National Cancer Institute. Smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to smoking and the rate at which youth continue to use these products is alarming, said State Surgeon General and Secretary of Health Dr. John Armstrong. Many of these young people may be substituting cigarettes with smokeless tobacco in places where they cant smoke, leading to a stronger nicotine addiction that makes it harder for them to quit. Tobacco Free Florida has three ways to help smokeless tobacco users quit. Those who want to quit can double their chances at successby using one of these free and convenient quit services. For more information, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com. For more information on smokeless tobacco, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com/smokelesstobacco. ABOUT TOBACCO FREE FLORIDADOHs Tobacco Free Florida campaign is a statewide cessation and prevention campaign funded by Floridas tobacco settlement fund. Tobacco users interested in quitting are encouraged to use one of the states three ways to quit. To learn about Tobacco Free Florida and the states free quit resources, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com or follow the campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TobaccoFreeFlorida or Twitter at www.twitter.com/tobaccofreea. DOH works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community eorts. The S.T.O.P. Guide (The Smokeless Tobacco Outreach and Prevention Guide): A Comprehensive Directory of Smokeless Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Resources. Applied Behavioral Science Press, 1997; Hatsukami, D & Severson, H, Oral Spit Tobacco: Addiction, Prevention and Treatment, Nicotine & Tobacco Research 1:21-44, 1999 National Cancer Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm Centre of Public Health. Smokeless Tobacco Fact Sheets. Third International Conference on Smokeless Tobacco; Stockholm. September 22, 2002 Boetta, P, et al., Smokeless tobacco and cancer, The Lancet 9:667-675, 2008 Boetta, P, et al. Use of smokeless tobacco and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke: systematic review with meta-analysis, BMJ, 2009; 339 (aug18 2): b3060 DOI: 10.1136/bmj.b3060 Tomar, SL. Chewing Tobacco Use and Dental Caries Among U.S. Men, Journal of the American Dental Association, 1999, 130: 160. World Health Organization. Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specic N-Nitrosamines. International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans Vol. 89. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 2007 National Cancer Institute. Smokeless Tobacco or Health: An International Perspective. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute; 1992. Smoking and Tobacco Control Monograph 2. ABOUT THROUGH WITH CHEW WEEKThis national annual health observance was established by the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery as an educational campaign designed to prevent and reduce the use of smokeless tobacco. Through With Chew Week is now recognizedby public health groups across the country. The week includes the Great American Spit Out on Thursday, Feb. 21, which encourages smokeless tobacco users to plan in advance to quit using smokeless tobacco that day, or to use the day to make a plan to quit. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Was something strange in the sky over Apalachicola on Saturday, Feb. 9? The Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) published a reported UFO sighting submitted by a witness who listed Apalachicola as his or her location. The following report submitted the same evening as the sighting allegedly occurred: (I) was in my backyard with my dog. Looking toward the front of my house, I saw a bright orangish light, moving at a fairly fast clip in a northwesterly direction. Thinking the object seemed strange I went to the front of my house to get a better view. There I saw another orangish light moving in line with the rst. At this point, I called to my partner in the house, and she came out and saw the lights as well. Another two lights followed behind these lights. The lights seemed to be evenly spaced. I watched as the lights quickly went from being very bright to being tiny and then disappearing completely. This all happened within perhaps three to four minutes, perhaps less. A woman named Darlene, who described herself as a resident of Carrabelle Beach, posted a comment about the above report online through MUFON on Monday, stating she and her husband had also seen the lights on Feb. 9. He had just come home from going to town and was yelling for me to come out to see the strange lights, she wrote. Herman Bell, chief of public affairs for the 325 the Fighter Wing, said that Tyndall Air Force Base did not have any aircraft scheduled in this area during the evening of Feb. 9. The same evening, a similar phenomenon was reported at 11:45 p.m. in Tampa. The witness wrote, I was outside smoking a cigarette, I looked to the east then I saw a large orange/reddish star-like object rise straight up above the tree line as if it was taking off into the air (maybe 10 miles away). Once it rose to a certain distance, another one followed behind it. When those two rose to a distance they became just a reddish color, then they began traveling west, another one, a third one, rose from the tree line, rising straight up, then following the two proceeding ones. I was just watching in shock, thinking I wish I had my camera. When the rst one had passed overhead at a far distance, the second one wasnt too far behind. I watched them both head west toward Orion, then they disappeared completely, when they should have been somewhat visible. I saw the fourth rise from behind the tree line (like the three before them) it was also an orange/reddish color, almost glowing with it until getting to a certain distance into the atmosphere, Im not sure? They just became a red color once they started traveling west. While I watched all four of them rise, I didnt notice a sound around me at all. But it was when the fourth one rose that I ran into my house to get my phone to lm them. When I came back out the third one was already disappearing into thin air as it got closer to the Orion constellation as well. The video I took of the fourth one, it is in the middle of the screen for the most part. It is a red dot, but its visible. At some points it disappears but shows back up. There are some street lights in the video as well, but its taken of the fourth one as it starts heading west, above and then as far west as I could see it on the camera screen. The Tampa witness managed to lm something with his or her phone, and the video is posted online at www.mufon.com/mufonreports.html. According to the website, MUFON began May 31, 1969, as the Midwest UFO Network and later become Mutual UFO Network after it outgrew its Midwestern state boundaries. MUFON is currently the largest and oldest UFO organization in the world that publishes a monthly journal, holds an annual symposium, has a structured eld investigator training program and currently has more than 800 trained eld investigators and a membership of 2,800 people. It reports that it has computerized UFO case management system, trained underwater dive team and an active business board of directors.UFOs spotted over Apalachicola